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Sample records for center feasibility trial

  1. MacMillan Pier Transportation Center Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    The MacMillan Pier Transportation Center Feasibility Study examines two potential sites (landside and waterside) for a transportation center that provides a range of tourist and traveler information. It would serve as a gateway for Provincetown and t...

  2. Pragmatic trial design elements showed a different impact on trial interpretation and feasibility than explanatory elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, Joost B.; Irving, Elaine; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lloyd, Emily; Goetz, Iris; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Pieter; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Zuidgeest, Mira G P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To illustrate how pragmatic trial design elements, or inserting explanatory trial elements in pragmatic trials affect validity, generalizability, precision and operational feasibility. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: From illustrative examples identified through the IMI Get Real Consortium, we

  3. Center-Within-Trial Versus Trial-Level Evaluation of Surrogate Endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, Lindsay A.; Shi, Qian; Xue, Yuan; Li, Junlong; Shang, Hongwei; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of candidate surrogate endpoints using individual patient data from multiple clinical trials is considered the gold standard approach to validate surrogates at both patient and trial levels. However, this approach assumes the availability of patient-level data from a relatively large collection of similar trials, which may not be possible to achieve for a given disease application. One common solution to the problem of too few similar trials involves performing trial-level surrogacy analyses on trial sub-units (e.g., centers within trials), thereby artificially increasing the trial-level sample size for feasibility of the multi-trial analysis. To date, the practical impact of treating trial sub-units (centers) identically to trials in multi-trial surrogacy analyses remains unexplored, and conditions under which this ad hoc solution may in fact be reasonable have not been identified. We perform a simulation study to identify such conditions, and demonstrate practical implications using a multi-trial dataset of patients with early stage colon cancer. PMID:25061255

  4. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  5. Moxibustion for cephalic version: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisits Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Moxibustion (a type of Chinese medicine which involves burning a herb close to the skin has been used to correct a breech presentation. Evidence of effectiveness and safety from systematic reviews is encouraging although significant heterogeneity has been found among trials. We assessed the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial of moxibustion plus usual care compared with usual care to promote cephalic version in women with a breech presentation, and examined the views of women and health care providers towards implementing a trial within an Australian context. Methods The study was undertaken at a public hospital in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Women at 34-36.5 weeks of gestation with a singleton breech presentation (confirmed by ultrasound, were randomised to moxibustion plus usual care or usual care alone. The intervention was administered over 10 days. Clinical outcomes included cephalic presentation at birth, the need for ECV, mode of birth; perinatal morbidity and mortality, and maternal complications. Feasibility outcomes included: recruitment rate, acceptability, compliance and a sample size for a future study. Interviews were conducted with 19 midwives and obstetricians to examine the acceptability of moxibustion, and views on the trial. Results Twenty women were randomised to the trial. Fifty one percent of women approached accepted randomisation to the trial. A trend towards an increase in cephalic version at delivery (RR 5.0; 95% CI 0.7-35.5 was found for women receiving moxibustion compared with usual care. There was also a trend towards greater success with version following ECV. Two babies were admitted to the neonatal unit from the moxibustion group. Compliance with the moxibustion protocol was acceptable with no reported side effects. Clinicians expressed the need for research to establish the safety and efficacy of moxibustion, and support for the intervention was given to

  6. Single-center trials in neonatology: Issues to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ian P; Sinha, Sunil K

    2015-12-01

    Single-center randomized controlled trials confer certain advantages over multi-center trials, in that they are cheaper and easier to design and conduct. However, recent research suggests that single-center trials are likely to overestimate treatment effects. There are notable examples in neonatology where results from multi-center trials have contradicted results of single-center studies. In this paper we discuss issues around external generalizability of single-center studies, and methodological issues that may cause bias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Probiotics: Prevention of Severe Pneumonia and Endotracheal Colonization Trial-PROSPECT: protocol for a feasibility randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Jennie; Meade, Maureen; Marshall, John; Heyland, Daren K; Surette, Michael G; Bowdish, Dawn Me; Lauzier, Francois; Thebane, Lehana; Cook, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that may confer health benefits when ingested. Meta-analysis of probiotic trials suggests a 25 % lower ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and 18 % lower infection rates overall when administered to patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, prior trials are small, largely single center, and at high risk of bias. Before a large rigorous trial is launched, testing whether probiotics confer benefit, harm, or have no impact, a pilot trial is needed. The aim of the PROSPECT Pilot Trial is to determine the feasibility of performing a larger trial in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients investigating Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. A priori, we determined that the feasibility of the larger trial would be based on timely recruitment, high protocol adherence, minimal contamination, and an acceptable VAP rate. Patients ≥18 years old in the ICU who are anticipated to receive mechanical ventilation for ≥72 hours will be included. Patients are excluded if they are at increased risk of probiotic-associated infection, have strict enteral medication contraindications, are pregnant, previously enrolled in a related trial, or are receiving palliative care. Following informed consent, patients are randomized in variable unspecified block sizes in a fixed 1:1 ratio, stratified by ICU, and medical, surgical, or trauma admitting diagnosis. Patients receive 1 × 10 10 colony forming units of L. rhamnosus GG (Culturelle, Locin Industries Ltd) or an identical placebo suspended in tap water administered twice daily via nasogastric tube in the ICU. Clinical and research staff, patients, and families are blinded. The primary outcomes for this pilot trial are the following: (1) recruitment success, (2) ≥90 % protocol adherence, (3) ≤5 % contamination, and (4) ~10 % VAP rate. Additional clinical outcomes are VAP, other infections, diarrhea (total, antibiotic associated, and Clostridium difficile), ICU and

  8. Feasibility of a Trial on Improvisational Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Bieleninik, Łucja; Gold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    To conduct generalizable, rigorously designed, adequately powered trials investigating music therapy and other complex interventions, it is essential that study procedures are feasible and acceptable for participants. To date, only limited evidence on feasibility of trial designs and strategies to facilitate study implementation is available in the music therapy literature. Using data from a subsample of a multi-center RCT on improvisational music therapy (IMT) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study aims to evaluate feasibility of study procedures, evaluate safety, document concomitant treatment, and report consistency of individuals' trends over time in chosen outcome measures. Children with ASD aged between 4 years, 0 months, and 6 years, 11 months, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: one (low intensity) vs. three weekly IMT sessions (high intensity) for five months vs. standard care. Feasibility was evaluated by examining recruitment, implementation of study conditions, assessment procedures, blinding, and retention; we also evaluated safety, concomitant treatment, and consistency of changes in standardized scales completed by blinded assessors and parents before and 5 months after randomization. Within this subsample (n = 15), recruitment rates, session attendance in the high-intensity condition, and consistency between outcome measures were lower than expected. Session attendance in the low-intensity and control conditions, treatment fidelity, measurement completion, blinding, retention, and safety met a priori thresholds for feasibility. By discussing strategies to improve recruitment and to minimize potential burden on study participants, referrers, and researchers, this study helps build knowledge about designing and implementing trials successfully. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Assessing the feasibility of the Effectiveness of Discontinuing Bisphosphonates trial: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, N C; Foster, P J; Mudano, A S; Melnick, J A; Lewiecki, M E; Shergy, W J; Curtis, J R; Cutter, G R; Danila, M I; Kilgore, M L; Lewis, E C; Morgan, S L; Redden, D T; Warriner, A H; Saag, K G

    2017-08-01

    The Effectiveness of Discontinuing Bisphosphonates (EDGE) study is a planned pragmatic clinical trial to guide "drug holiday" clinical decision making. This pilot study assessed work flow and feasibility of such a study. While participant recruitment and treatment adherence were suboptimal, administrative procedures were generally feasible and minimally disrupted clinic flow. The comparative effectiveness of continuing or discontinuing long-term alendronate (ALN) on fractures is unknown. A large pragmatic ALN discontinuation study has potential to answer this question. We conducted a 6-month pilot study of the planned the EDGE study among current long-term ALN users (women aged ≥65 with ≥3 years of ALN use) to determine study work flow and feasibility including evaluating the administrative aspects of trial conduct (e.g., time to contract, institutional review board (IRB) approval), assessing rates of site and participant recruitment, and evaluating post-randomization outcomes, including adherence, bisphosphonate-associated adverse events, and participant and site satisfaction. We assessed outcomes 1 and 6 months after randomization. Nine sites participated, including seven community-based medical practices and two academic medical centers. On average (SD), contract execution took 3.4 (2.3) months and IRB approval took 13.9 (4.1) days. Sites recruited 27 participants (13 to continue ALN and 14 to discontinue ALN). Over follow-up, 22% of participants did not adhere to their randomization assignment: 30.8% in the continuation arm and 14.3% in the discontinuation arm. No fractures or adverse events were reported. Sites reported no issues regarding work flow, and participants were highly satisfied with the study. Administrative procedures of the EDGE study were generally feasible, with minimal disruption to clinic flow. In this convenience sample, participant recruitment was suboptimal across most practice sites. Accounting for low treatment arm adherence, a

  10. Task-Oriented Training with Computer Games for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Hand Osteoarthritis: A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikesavan, Cynthia Swarnalatha; Shay, Barbara; Szturm, Tony

    2016-09-13

    To examine the feasibility of a clinical trial on a novel, home-based task-oriented training with conventional hand exercises in people with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis. To explore the experiences of participants who completed their respective home exercise programmes. Thirty volunteer participants aged between 30 and 60 years and diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis were proposed for a single-center, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial ( ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT01635582). Participants received task-oriented training with interactive computer games and objects of daily life or finger mobility and strengthening exercises. Both programmes were home based and were done four sessions per week with 20 minutes each session for 6 weeks. Major feasibility outcomes were number of volunteers screened, randomized, and retained; completion of blinded assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data management; and clinical outcomes of hand function. Reaching the recruitment target in 18 months and achieving exercise compliance >80% were set as success criteria. Concurrent with the trial, focus group interviews explored experiences of those participants who completed their respective programmes. After trial initiation, revisions in inclusion criteria were required to promote recruitment. A total of 17 participants were randomized and 15 were retained. Completion of assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data collection and management demonstrated excellent feasibility. Both groups improved in hand function outcomes and exercise compliance was above 85%. Participants perceived both programmes as appropriate and acceptable. Participants who completed task-oriented training also agreed that playing different computer games was enjoyable, engaging, and motivating. Findings demonstrate initial evidence on recruitment, feasibility of trial procedures, and acceptability of

  11. Preliminary evaluation of factors associated with premature trial closure and feasibility of accrual benchmarks in phase III oncology trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroen, Anneke T; Petroni, Gina R; Wang, Hongkun; Gray, Robert; Wang, Xiaofei F; Cronin, Walter; Sargent, Daniel J; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Wickerham, Donald L; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Slingluff, Craig L

    2010-08-01

    A major challenge for randomized phase III oncology trials is the frequent low rates of patient enrollment, resulting in high rates of premature closure due to insufficient accrual. We conducted a pilot study to determine the extent of trial closure due to poor accrual, feasibility of identifying trial factors associated with sufficient accrual, impact of redesign strategies on trial accrual, and accrual benchmarks designating high failure risk in the clinical trials cooperative group (CTCG) setting. A subset of phase III trials opened by five CTCGs between August 1991 and March 2004 was evaluated. Design elements, experimental agents, redesign strategies, and pretrial accrual assessment supporting accrual predictions were abstracted from CTCG documents. Percent actual/predicted accrual rate averaged per month was calculated. Trials were categorized as having sufficient or insufficient accrual based on reason for trial termination. Analyses included univariate and bivariate summaries to identify potential trial factors associated with accrual sufficiency. Among 40 trials from one CTCG, 21 (52.5%) trials closed due to insufficient accrual. In 82 trials from five CTCGs, therapeutic trials accrued sufficiently more often than nontherapeutic trials (59% vs 27%, p = 0.05). Trials including pretrial accrual assessment more often achieved sufficient accrual than those without (67% vs 47%, p = 0.08). Fewer exclusion criteria, shorter consent forms, other CTCG participation, and trial design simplicity were not associated with achieving sufficient accrual. Trials accruing at a rate much lower than predicted (accrual rate) were consistently closed due to insufficient accrual. This trial subset under-represents certain experimental modalities. Data sources do not allow accounting for all factors potentially related to accrual success. Trial closure due to insufficient accrual is common. Certain trial design factors appear associated with attaining sufficient accrual. Defining

  12. Acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal specimen collection in clinical trial participants in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Omosa-Manyonyi

    Full Text Available Mucosal specimens are essential to evaluate compartmentalized immune responses to HIV vaccine candidates and other mucosally targeted investigational products. We studied the acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal sampling in East African clinical trial participants at low risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.The Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI enrolled participants into three Phase 1 trials of preventive HIV candidate vaccines in 2011-2012 at two clinical research centers in Nairobi. After informed consent to a mucosal sub-study, participants were asked to undergo collection of mucosal secretions (saliva, oral fluids, semen, cervico-vaginal and rectal, but could opt out of any collection at any visit. Specimens were collected at baseline and two additional time points. A tolerability questionnaire was administered at the final sub-study visit. Of 105 trial participants, 27 of 34 women (79% and 62 of 71 men (87% enrolled in the mucosal sub-study. Nearly all sub-study participants gave saliva and oral fluids at all visits. Semen was collected from about half the participating men (47-48% at all visits. Cervico-vaginal secretions were collected by Softcup from about two thirds of women (63% at baseline, increasing to 78% at the following visits, with similar numbers for cervical secretion collection by Merocel sponge; about half of women (52% gave cervico-vaginal samples at all visits. Rectal secretions were collected with Merocel sponge from about a quarter of both men and women (24% at all 3 visits, with 16% of men and 19% of women giving rectal samples at all visits.Repeated mucosal sampling in clinical trial participants in Kenya is feasible, with a good proportion of participants consenting to most sampling methods with the exception of rectal samples. Experienced staff members of both sexes and trained counselors with standardized messaging may improve acceptance of rectal sampling.

  13. Sham-controlled, randomized, feasibility trial of acupuncture for prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia among patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhiqiang; Garcia, M. Kay; Hu, Chaosu; Chiang, Joseph; Chambers, Mark; Rosenthal, David I.; Peng, Huiting; Wu, Caijun; Zhao, Qi; Zhao, Genming; Liu, Luming; Spelman, Amy; Palmer, J. Lynn; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Background Xerostomia (dry mouth) after head/neck radiation is a common problem among cancer patients. Quality of life (QOL) is impaired, and available treatments are of little benefit. This trial determined the feasibility of conducting a sham-controlled trial of acupuncture and whether acupuncture could prevent xerostomia among head/neck patients undergoing radiotherapy. Methods A sham controlled, feasibility trial was conducted at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China among patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma undergoing radiotherapy. To determine feasibility of a sham procedure, 23 patients were randomized to real acupuncture (N = 11) or to sham acupuncture (N = 12). Patients were treated 3 times/week during their course of radiotherapy. Subjective measures were the Xerostomia Questionnaire (XQ) and MD Anderson Symptom Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer (MDASI-HN). Objective measures were unstimulated whole salivary flow rates (UWSFR) and stimulated salivary flow rates (SSFR). Patients were followed for 1 month after radiotherapy. Results XQ scores for acupuncture were significantly lower than sham controls starting in week 3 and lasted through the 1-month follow-up (all P’s xerostomia symptoms and improved QOL when compared with sham acupuncture. Large-scale, multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are now needed. PMID:22285177

  14. Transient Ischaemic Attack 999 Emergency Referral (TIER: a cluster randomised feasibility trial facilitated by data linkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Seagrove

    2017-04-01

    Will inform full trial development using criteria: intervention acceptability to practitioners and patients; trial design feasibility; outcome data completeness. Conclusions • If indicated, full trial conducted • If not, but positive results - advise intervention development for immediate implementation • If not, but negative results – advise delivery of intervention should cease.

  15. Three-center feasibility of lung clearance index in infants and preschool children with cystic fibrosis and other lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Mirjam; Graeber, Simon Y; Joachim, Cornelia; Barth, Sandra; Ricklefs, Isabell; Diekmann, Gesa; Kopp, Matthias V; Naehrlich, Lutz; Mall, Marcus A

    2018-03-01

    Lung clearance index (LCI) detects early ventilation inhomogeneity and has been suggested as sensitive endpoint in multicenter intervention trials in infants and preschoolers with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the feasibility of multicenter LCI in this age group has not been determined. We, therefore, investigated the feasibility of LCI in infants and preschoolers with and without CF in a three-center setting. Following central training, standardized SF 6 -MBW measurements were performed in 73 sedated children (10 controls, 49 with CF and 14 with other lung diseases), mean age 2.3±1.2years across three centers, and data were analyzed centrally. Overall success rate of LCI measurements was 91.8% ranging from 78.9% to 100% across study sites. LCI was increased in patients with CF (P<0.05) and with other lung diseases (P<0.05) compared to controls. Our results support feasibility of LCI as multicenter endpoint in clinical trials in infants and preschoolers with CF. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Conducting feasibilities in clinical trials: An investment to ensure a good study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Rajadhyaksha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conducting clinical trial feasibility is one of the first steps in clinical trial conduct. This process includes assessing internal and environmental capacity, alignment of the clinical trial in terms of study design, dose of investigational product, comparator, patient type, with the local environment and assessing potential of conducting clinical trial in a specific country. A robust feasibility also ensures a realistic assessment and capability to conduct the clinical trial. For local affiliates of pharmaceutical organizations, and contract research organizations, this is a precursor to study placement and influences the decision of study placement. This article provides details on different types of feasibilities, information which is to be included and relevance of each. The article also aims to provide practical hands-on suggestions to make feasibilities more realistic and informative.

  17. Conducting feasibilities in clinical trials: an investment to ensure a good study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajadhyaksha, Viraj

    2010-07-01

    Conducting clinical trial feasibility is one of the first steps in clinical trial conduct. This process includes assessing internal and environmental capacity, alignment of the clinical trial in terms of study design, dose of investigational product, comparator, patient type, with the local environment and assessing potential of conducting clinical trial in a specific country. A robust feasibility also ensures a realistic assessment and capability to conduct the clinical trial. For local affiliates of pharmaceutical organizations, and contract research organizations, this is a precursor to study placement and influences the decision of study placement. This article provides details on different types of feasibilities, information which is to be included and relevance of each. The article also aims to provide practical hands-on suggestions to make feasibilities more realistic and informative.

  18. The PACT trial: PAtient Centered Telerehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stefan Rothgangel

    2015-01-01

    Discussion: Several questions concerning the study design that emerged during the preparation of this trial will be discussed. This will include how these questions were addressed and arguments for the choices that were made.

  19. Feasibility of a multicentre, randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open colorectal surgery in the acute setting: the LaCeS feasibility trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harji, Deena; Marshall, Helen; Gordon, Katie; Crow, Hannah; Hiley, Victoria; Burke, Dermot; Griffiths, Ben; Moriarty, Catherine; Twiddy, Maureen; O'Dwyer, John L; Verjee, Azmina; Brown, Julia; Sagar, Peter

    2018-02-22

    Acute colorectal surgery forms a significant proportion of emergency admissions within the National Health Service. There is limited evidence to suggest minimally invasive surgery may be associated with improved clinical outcomes in this cohort of patients. Consequently, there is a need to assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic surgery in the acute colorectal setting. However,emergency colorectal surgical trials have previously been difficult to conduct due to issues surrounding recruitment and equipoise. The LaCeS (randomised controlled trial of Laparoscopic versus open Colorectal Surgery in the acute setting) feasibility trial will determine the feasibility of conducting a definitive, phase III trial of laparoscopic versus open acute colorectal resection. The LaCeS feasibility trial is a prospective, multicentre, single-blinded, parallel group, pragmatic randomised controlled feasibility trial. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis to receive eitherlaparoscopic or open surgery. The trial aims to recruit at least 66 patients from five acute general surgical units across the UK. Patients over the age of 18 with a diagnosis of acute colorectal pathology requiring resection on clinical and radiological/endoscopic investigations, with a National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death classification of urgent will be considered eligible for participation. The primary outcome is recruitment. Secondary outcomes include assessing the safety profile of laparoscopic surgery using intraoperative and postoperative complication rates, conversion rates and patient-safety indicators as surrogate markers. Clinical and patient-reported outcomes will also be reported. The trial will contain an embedded qualitative study to assess clinician and patient acceptability of trial processes. The LaCeS feasibility trial is approved by the Yorkshire and The Humber, Bradford Leeds Research Ethics Committee (REC reference: 15/ YH/0542). The

  20. EEG Neurofeedback for ADHD: Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Randomized Pilot Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Lofthouse, Nicholas; Hersch, Sarah; Pan, Xueliang; Hurt, Elizabeth; Bates, Bethany; Kassouf, Kathleen; Moone, Stacey; Grantier, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Preparing for a definitive randomized clinical trial (RCT) of neurofeedback (NF) for ADHD, this pilot trial explored feasibility of a double-blind, sham-controlled design and adherence/palatability/relative effect of two versus three treatments/week. Method: Unmedicated 6- to 12-year-olds with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  1. Maximising the impact of qualitative research in feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials: guidance for researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O’Cathain, A.; Hoddinott, P.; Lewin, S.; Thomas, K.J.; Young, B.; Adamson, J.; Jansen, J.F.M.; Mills, N.; Moore, G.; Donovan, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies are increasingly undertaken in preparation for randomised controlled trials in order to explore uncertainties and enable trialists to optimise the intervention or the conduct of the trial. Qualitative research can be used to examine and address key uncertainties prior to a full

  2. Feasibility study of a clinically-integrated randomized trial of modifications to radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous technical modifications to radical prostatectomy have been proposed. Such modifications are likely to lead to only slight improvements in outcomes. Although small differences would be worthwhile, an appropriately powered randomized trial would need to be very large, and thus of doubtful feasibility given the expense, complexity and regulatory burden of contemporary clinical trials. We have proposed a novel methodology, the clinically-integrated randomized trial, which dramatically streamlines trial procedures in order to reduce the marginal cost of an additional patient towards zero. We aimed to determine the feasibility of implementing such a trial for radical prostatectomy. Methods Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy as initial treatment for prostate cancer were randomized in a factorial design to involvement of the fascia during placement of the anastomotic sutures, urethral irrigation, both or neither. Endpoint data were obtained from routine clinical documentation. Accrual and compliance rates were monitored to determine the feasibility of the trial. Results From a total of 260 eligible patients, 154 (59% consented; 56 patients declined to participate, 20 were not approached on recommendation of the treating surgeon, and 30 were not approached for logistical reasons. Although recording by surgeons of the procedure used was incomplete (~80%, compliance with randomization was excellent when it was recorded, with only 6% of procedures inconsistent with allocation. Outcomes data was received from 71% of patients at one year. This improved to 83% as the trial progressed. Conclusions A clinically-integrated randomized trial was conducted at low cost, with excellent accrual, and acceptable compliance with treatment allocation and outcomes reporting. This demonstrates the feasibility of the methodology. Improved methods to ensure documentation of surgical procedures would be required before wider implementation

  3. A centralised public information resource for randomised trials: a scoping study to explore desirability and feasibility

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    Entwistle Vikki A

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently several concerns about the ways in which people are recruited to participate in randomised controlled trials, the low acceptance rates among people invited to participate, and the experiences of trial participants. An information resource about on-going clinical trials designed for potential and current participants could help overcome some of these problems. Methods We carried out a scoping exercise to explore the desirability and feasibility of establishing such a resource. We sought the views of a range of people including people who were considering taking part in a trial, current trial participants, people who had been asked but refused to participate in a trial, consumer group representatives and researchers who design and conduct trials. Results There was broad-based support for the concept of a centralised information resource for members of the public about on-going and recently completed clinical trials. Such an information resource could be based on a database containing standardised information for each trial relating to the purpose of the trial; the interventions being compared; the implications of participation for participants; and features indicative of scientific quality and ethical probity. The usefulness of the database could be enhanced if its search facility could allow people to enter criteria such as a disease and geographic area and be presented with all the trials relevant to them, and if optional display formats could allow them to view information in varying levels of detail. Access via the Internet was considered desirable, with complementary supported access via health information services. The development of such a resource is technically feasible, but the collation of the required information would take a significant investment of resources. Conclusion A centralised participant oriented information resource about clinical trials could serve several purposes. A more detailed

  4. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Eldridge

    Full Text Available We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  5. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Lancaster, Gillian A; Campbell, Michael J; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L; Bond, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention.

  6. Wordless intervention for people with epilepsy and learning disabilities (WIELD): a randomised controlled feasibility trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, Silvana E; Gates, Bob; Parkes, Georgina; Wellsted, David; Barton, Garry; Ring, Howard; Khoo, Mary Ellen; Monji-Patel, Deela; Friedli, Karin; Zia, Asif; Irvine, Lisa; Durand, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of a full-scale randomised controlled trial of a picture booklet to improve quality of life for people with epilepsy and learning disabilities. Trial design A randomised controlled feasibility trial. Randomisation was not blinded and was conducted using a centralised secure database and a blocked 1:1 allocation ratio. Setting Epilepsy clinics in 1 English National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Participants Patients with learning disabilities and epilepsy who had: a seizure within the past 12 months, meaningful communication and a carer with sufficient proficiency in English. Intervention Participants in the intervention group used a picture booklet with a trained researcher, and a carer present. These participants kept the booklet, and were asked to use it at least twice more over 20 weeks. The control group received treatment as usual, and were provided with a booklet at the end of the study. Outcome measures 7 feasibility criteria were used relating to recruitment, data collection, attrition, potential effect on epilepsy-related quality of life (Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities Quality of Life Scale, ELDQOL) at 4-week, 12-week and 20-week follow-ups, feasibility of methodology, acceptability of the intervention and potential to calculate cost-effectiveness. Outcome The recruitment rate of eligible patients was 34% and the target of 40 participants was reached. There was minimal missing data and attrition. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed; data from the outcome measures suggest a benefit from the intervention on the ELDQOL behaviour and mood subscales at 4 and 20 weeks follow-up. The booklet and study methods were positively received, and no adverse events were reported. There was a positive indication of the potential for a cost-effectiveness analysis. Conclusions All feasibility criteria were fully or partially met, therefore confirming feasibility of a definitive trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  7. Effectiveness of physiotherapy in Parkinson's disease: the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, S.H.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Hilten, J.J. van; Ashburn, A.; Munneke, M.

    2007-01-01

    To study the feasibility of a large randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of physiotherapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), 173 patients were asked to participate in a study with random allocation to best practice physiotherapy, or to no physiotherapy. The primary outcome

  8. Restrictive vs Liberal Blood Transfusion for Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Rationale and Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C.; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J.; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A.; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A.; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M.; James, Martin W.; Stanley, Adrian J.; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E.; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R.; Logan, Richard F.A.; Travis, Simon P.L.; Walsh, Timothy S.; Murphy, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The results of this study will inform the feasibility and design of a phase III randomized trial. PMID:23706959

  9. Feasibility, Safety, and Compliance in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Physical Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. McGinley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both efficacy and clinical feasibility deserve consideration in translation of research outcomes. This study evaluated the feasibility of rehabilitation programs within the context of a large randomized controlled trial of physical therapy. Ambulant participants with Parkinson's disease (PD (n=210 were randomized into three groups: (1 progressive strength training (PST; (2 movement strategy training (MST; or (3 control (“life skills”. PST and MST included fall prevention education. Feasibility was evaluated in terms of safety, retention, adherence, and compliance measures. Time to first fall during the intervention phase did not differ across groups, and adverse effects were minimal. Retention was high; only eight participants withdrew during or after the intervention phase. Strong adherence (attendance >80% did not differ between groups (P=.435. Compliance in the therapy groups was high. All three programs proved feasible, suggesting they may be safely implemented for people with PD in community-based clinical practice.

  10. Key feasibility considerations when conducting vaccine clinical trials in Asia–Pacific countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansang EZ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Elvira Zenaida Lansang,1 Kenneth Tan,2 Saumya Nayak,1 Ken J Lee,1 Karen Wai1 1Feasibility and Site Identification – Asia, Quintiles East Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2National University of Singapore, Singapore Introduction: Conducting clinical trial feasibility is an important first step in initiating a clinical trial. A robust feasibility process ensures that a realistic capability assessment is made before conducting a trial. A retrospective analysis of vaccine clinical trials was performed to understand changes which could affect feasibility recommendations. Methods: Feasibilities conducted by Quintiles between January 2011 and August 2012 were reviewed. Vaccine studies only involving Asia–Pacific countries were selected, and common study parameters were identified. Information from Quintiles’ database was retrieved to examine changes in parameters over time. Results: A total of six vaccine studies were identified within the 1.7-year period. Two studies were excluded because they did not contain feasibility information or had involved sites that were sponsor selected. Four studies were analyzed. Three cases required healthy volunteers, while one case involved a specific patient population. Age requirement and seasonality of disease mainly influenced recommendations for Study 1. Sponsor’s marketing strategy influenced the recommendations for Study 2. Study 3 showed the effect of a country’s immunization program and reimbursement of vaccines on a study’s success. In contrast to the other studies, Study 4 demonstrated the impact of eligibility criteria in recruitment recommendations for a vaccine trial requiring specific patient pools. Conclusion: Feasibility recommendations for vaccine trials are largely based on (1 eligibility criteria; (2 cultural beliefs; (3 country’s past recruitment performance; (4 use of advertising; (5 site’s access to subject populations; (6 cooperation with local health professionals and government; (7

  11. A novel experience-based internet intervention for smoking cessation: feasibility randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Powell

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is frequently used to share experiences of health and illness, but this phenomenon has not been harnessed as an intervention to achieve health behaviour change. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a randomised trial assessing the effects of a novel, experience-based website as a smoking cessation intervention. The secondary aim was to measure the potential impact on smoking behaviour of both the intervention and a comparator website. Methods A feasibility randomised controlled single-blind trial assessed a novel, experience-based website containing personal accounts of quitting smoking as a cessation intervention, and a comparator website providing factual information. Feasibility measures including recruitment, and usage of the interventions were recorded, and the following participant-reported outcomes were also measured: Smoking Abstinence Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, the single-item Motivation to Stop Scale, self-reported abstinence, quit attempts and health status outcomes. Eligible smokers from two English regions were entered into the trial and given access to their allocated website for two weeks. Results Eighty-seven smokers were randomised, 65 completed follow-up (75 %. Median usage was 15 min for the intervention, and 5 min for the comparator (range 0.5–213 min. Median logins for both sites was 2 (range 1–20. All participant-reported outcomes were similar between groups. Conclusions It was technically feasible to deliver a novel intervention harnessing the online sharing of personal experiences as a tool for smoking cessation, but recruitment was slow and actual use was relatively low, with attrition from the trial. Future work needs to maximize engagement and to understand how best to assess the value of such interventions in everyday use, rather than as an isolated ‘dose of information’. Trial registration ISRCTN29549695 DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN29549695 . Registered 17/05/2013.

  12. Accounting for center in the Early External Cephalic Version trials: an empirical comparison of statistical methods to adjust for center in a multicenter trial with binary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Angela; Chu, Rong; Thorpe, Julia; McDonald, Sarah; Thabane, Lehana; Hutton, Eileen

    2014-09-26

    Clustering of outcomes at centers involved in multicenter trials is a type of center effect. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement recommends that multicenter randomized controlled trials (RCTs) should account for center effects in their analysis, however most do not. The Early External Cephalic Version (EECV) trials published in 2003 and 2011 stratified by center at randomization, but did not account for center in the analyses, and due to the nature of the intervention and number of centers, may have been prone to center effects. Using data from the EECV trials, we undertook an empirical study to compare various statistical approaches to account for center effect while estimating the impact of external cephalic version timing (early or delayed) on the outcomes of cesarean section, preterm birth, and non-cephalic presentation at the time of birth. The data from the EECV pilot trial and the EECV2 trial were merged into one dataset. Fisher's exact method was used to test the overall effect of external cephalic version timing unadjusted for center effects. Seven statistical models that accounted for center effects were applied to the data. The models included: i) the Mantel-Haenszel test, ii) logistic regression with fixed center effect and fixed treatment effect, iii) center-size weighted and iv) un-weighted logistic regression with fixed center effect and fixed treatment-by-center interaction, iv) logistic regression with random center effect and fixed treatment effect, v) logistic regression with random center effect and random treatment-by-center interaction, and vi) generalized estimating equations. For each of the three outcomes of interest approaches to account for center effect did not alter the overall findings of the trial. The results were similar for the majority of the methods used to adjust for center, illustrating the robustness of the findings. Despite literature that suggests center effect can change the estimate of effect in

  13. Feasibility of a Trial on Improvisational Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Bieleninik, Łucja

    2016-01-01

    and strategies to facilitate study implementation is available in the music therapy literature. Objective: Using data from a subsample of a multi-center RCT on improvisational music therapy (IMT) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study aims to evaluate feasibility of study procedures, evaluate safety...

  14. Enhancing pediatric clinical trial feasibility through the use of Bayesian statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Robin A; Maca, Jeff D; Puri, Mala; Seltzer, Earl W

    2017-11-01

    BackgroundPediatric clinical trials commonly experience recruitment challenges including limited number of patients and investigators, inclusion/exclusion criteria that further reduce the patient pool, and a competitive research landscape created by pediatric regulatory commitments. To overcome these challenges, innovative approaches are needed.MethodsThis article explores the use of Bayesian statistics to improve pediatric trial feasibility, using pediatric Type-2 diabetes as an example. Data for six therapies approved for adults were used to perform simulations to determine the impact on pediatric trial size.ResultsWhen the number of adult patients contributing to the simulation was assumed to be the same as the number of patients to be enrolled in the pediatric trial, the pediatric trial size was reduced by 75-78% when compared with a frequentist statistical approach, but was associated with a 34-45% false-positive rate. In subsequent simulations, greater control was exerted over the false-positive rate by decreasing the contribution of the adult data. A 30-33% reduction in trial size was achieved when false-positives were held to less than 10%.ConclusionReducing the trial size through the use of Bayesian statistics would facilitate completion of pediatric trials, enabling drugs to be labeled appropriately for children.

  15. Report on the feasibility study for improving electric motor service centers in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.S.; Jallouk, P.A.; Staunton, R.H.

    1999-12-10

    On March 3 and 4, 1998, a visit was made to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by two officials from Ghana: Mr. I.K. Mintah, Acting Executive Director, Technical Wing, Ministry of Mines and Energy (MOME) and Dr. A.K. Ofosu-Ahenkorah, Coordinator, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program, MOME. As a result of this visit, Dr. John S. Hsu of ORNL was invited by MOME to visit the Republic of Ghana in order to study the feasibility of improving electric motor service centers in Ghana.

  16. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state

  17. Is total pancreatectomy as feasible, safe, efficacious, and cost-effective as pancreaticoduodenectomy? A single center, prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, Riccardo; Ricci, Claudio; Taffurelli, Giovanni; Guariniello, Anna; Di Gioia, Anthony; Di Marco, Mariacristina; Pagano, Nico; Serra, Carla; Calculli, Lucia; Santini, Donatella; Minni, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Total pancreatectomy is actually considered a viable option in selected patients even if large comparative studies between partial versus total pancreatectomy are not currently available. Our aim was to evaluate whether total pancreatectomy can be considered as feasible, safe, efficacious, and cost-effective as pancreaticoduodenectomy. A single center, prospective, observational trial, regarding postoperative outcomes, long-term results, and cost-effectiveness, in a tertiary referral center was conducted, comparing consecutive patients who underwent elective total pancreatectomy and/or pancreaticoduodenectomy. Seventy-three consecutive elective total pancreatectomies and 184 pancreaticoduodenectomies were compared. There were no significant differences regarding postoperative outcomes and overall survival. The quality of life, evaluated in 119 patients according to the EQ-5D-5L questionnaire, showed that there were no significant differences regarding the five items considered. The mean EQ-5D-5L score was similar in the two procedures (total pancreatectomy = 0.872, range 0.345-1.000; pancreaticoduodenectomy = 0.832, range 0.393-1.000; P = 0.320). The impact of diabetes according to the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire did not show any significant differences except for question 13 (total pancreatectomy = 0.60; pancreaticoduodenectomy = 0.19; P = 0.022). The cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that the quality-adjusted life year was not significantly different between the two procedures (total pancreatectomy = 0.910, range 0.345-1.000; pancreaticoduodenectomy = 0.910, range -0.393-1.000; P = 0.320). From this study, it seems reasonable to suggest that total pancreatectomy can be considered as safe, feasible, and efficacious as PD and acceptable in terms of cost-effectiveness.

  18. Art participation for psychosocial wellbeing during stroke rehabilitation: a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jacqui H; Kelly, Chris; Joice, Sara; Kroll, Thilo; Mead, Gillian; Donnan, Peter; Toma, Madalina; Williams, Brian

    2017-08-30

    To examine the feasibility of undertaking a pragmatic single-blind randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a visual arts participation programme to evaluate effects on survivor wellbeing within stroke rehabilitation. Stroke survivors receiving in-patient rehabilitation were randomised to receive eight art participation sessions (n = 41) or usual care (n = 40). Recruitment, retention, preference for art participation and change in selected outcomes were evaluated at end of intervention outcome assessment and three-month follow-up. Of 315 potentially eligible participants 81 (29%) were recruited. 88% (n = 71) completed outcome and 77% (n = 62) follow-up assessments. Of eight intervention group non-completers, six had no preference for art participation. Outcome completion varied between 97% and 77%. Running groups was difficult because of randomisation timing. Effectiveness cannot be determined from this feasibility study but effects sizes suggested art participation may benefit emotional wellbeing, measured on the positive and negative affect schedule, and self-efficacy for Art (d = 0.24-0.42). Undertaking a RCT of art participation within stroke rehabilitation was feasible. Art participation may enhance self-efficacy and positively influence emotional wellbeing. These should be outcomes in a future definitive trial. A cluster RCT would ensure art groups could be reliably convened. Fewer measures, and better retention strategies are required. Implications for Rehabilitation This feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) showed that recruiting and retaining stroke survivors in an RCT of a visual arts participation intervention within stroke rehabilitation was feasible. Preference to participate in art activities may influence recruitment and drop-out rates, and should be addressed and evaluated fully. Art participation as part of rehabilitation may improve some aspects of post-stroke wellbeing, including positive affect and self-efficacy for art

  19. A novel experience-based internet intervention for smoking cessation: feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, John; Newhouse, Nikki; Martin, Angela; Jawad, Sena; Yu, Ly-Mee; Davoudianfar, Mina; Locock, Louise; Ziebland, Sue

    2016-11-11

    The internet is frequently used to share experiences of health and illness, but this phenomenon has not been harnessed as an intervention to achieve health behaviour change. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a randomised trial assessing the effects of a novel, experience-based website as a smoking cessation intervention. The secondary aim was to measure the potential impact on smoking behaviour of both the intervention and a comparator website. A feasibility randomised controlled single-blind trial assessed a novel, experience-based website containing personal accounts of quitting smoking as a cessation intervention, and a comparator website providing factual information. Feasibility measures including recruitment, and usage of the interventions were recorded, and the following participant-reported outcomes were also measured: Smoking Abstinence Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, the single-item Motivation to Stop Scale, self-reported abstinence, quit attempts and health status outcomes. Eligible smokers from two English regions were entered into the trial and given access to their allocated website for two weeks. Eighty-seven smokers were randomised, 65 completed follow-up (75 %). Median usage was 15 min for the intervention, and 5 min for the comparator (range 0.5-213 min). Median logins for both sites was 2 (range 1-20). All participant-reported outcomes were similar between groups. It was technically feasible to deliver a novel intervention harnessing the online sharing of personal experiences as a tool for smoking cessation, but recruitment was slow and actual use was relatively low, with attrition from the trial. Future work needs to maximize engagement and to understand how best to assess the value of such interventions in everyday use, rather than as an isolated 'dose of information'. ISRCTN29549695 DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN29549695 . Registered 17/05/2013.

  20. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  1. Stockbridge Munsee Community Health and Wellness Center and the Mohican Family Center Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRocher, Andy [Stockbridge-Munsee Health and Wellness Center, Bowler, WI (United States); Barrnett, Michael [Stockbridge-Munsee Health and Wellness Center, Bowler, WI (United States)

    2014-03-14

    The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Health and Wellness Center (HWC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the HWC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the HWC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the HWC performs in the lowest 8 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with paybacks of less than five years to yield an estimated 25-percent decrease in annual energyconsumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $26,800 per year with an implementation cost of just $4,650 (0.2 year payback). For the Mohican Family Center document: The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Mohican Family Center (MFC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the MFC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the MFC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the MFC performs better than 80 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with short term paybacks to yield an estimated 13-percent decrease in energy consumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated

  2. Feasibility, Process, and Outcomes of Cardiovascular Clinical Trial Data Sharing: A Reproduction Analysis of the SMART-AF Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Hawkins C; Baldridge, Abigail S; Huffman, Mark D

    2017-12-01

    Data sharing is as an expanding initiative for enhancing trust in the clinical research enterprise. To evaluate the feasibility, process, and outcomes of a reproduction analysis of the THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH Catheter for the Treatment of Symptomatic Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (SMART-AF) trial using shared clinical trial data. A reproduction analysis of the SMART-AF trial was performed using the data sets, data dictionary, case report file, and statistical analysis plan from the original trial accessed through the Yale Open Data Access Project using the SAS Clinical Trials Data Transparency platform. SMART-AF was a multicenter, single-arm trial evaluating the effectiveness and safety of an irrigated, contact force-sensing catheter for ablation of drug refractory, symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in 172 participants recruited from 21 sites between June 2011 and December 2011. Analysis of the data was conducted between December 2016 and April 2017. Effectiveness outcomes included freedom from atrial arrhythmias after ablation and proportion of participants without any arrhythmia recurrence over the 12 months of follow-up after a 3-month blanking period. Safety outcomes included major adverse device- or procedure-related events. The SMART AF trial participants' mean age was 58.7 (10.8) years, and 72% were men. The time from initial proposal submission to final analysis was 11 months. Freedom from atrial arrhythmias at 12 months postprocedure was similar compared with the primary study report (74.0%; 95% CI, 66.0-82.0 vs 76.4%; 95% CI, 68.7-84.1). The reproduction analysis success rate was higher than the primary study report (65.8%; 95% CI 56.5-74.2 vs 75.6%; 95% CI, 67.2-82.5). Adverse events were minimal and similar between the 2 analyses, but contact force range or regression models could not be reproduced. The feasibility of a reproduction analysis of the SMART-AF trial was demonstrated through an academic data-sharing platform. Data sharing can be

  3. Final Report Feasibility Study for the California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWavesm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakeslee, Samuel Norman [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Inst. for Advanced Technology and Public Policy; Toman, William I. [Protean Wave Energy Ltd., Los Osos, CA (United States); Williams, Richard B. [Leidos Maritime Solutions, Reston, VA (United States); Davy, Douglas M. [CH2M, Sacramento, CA (United States); West, Anna [Kearns and West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Connet, Randy M. [Omega Power Engineers, LLC, Anaheim, CA (United States); Thompson, Janet [Kearns and West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Dolan, Dale [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Baltimore, Craig [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Jacobson, Paul [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Hagerman, George [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Potter, Chris [California Natural Resources Agency, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, Brendan [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wendt, Dean [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Sheppard, Colin [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States); Harris, Andrew [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States); Lawson, W. Graham [Power Delivery Consultants, Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

    2017-07-31

    The California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWave) Feasibility Study project was funded over multiple phases by the Department of Energy to perform an interdisciplinary feasibility assessment to analyze the engineering, permitting, and stakeholder requirements to establish an open water, fully energetic, grid connected, wave energy test center off the coast of California for the purposes of advancing U.S. wave energy research, development, and testing capabilities. Work under this grant included wave energy resource characterization, grid impact and interconnection requirements, port infrastructure and maritime industry capability/suitability to accommodate the industry at research, demonstration and commercial scale, and macro and micro siting considerations. CalWave Phase I performed a macro-siting and down-selection process focusing on two potential test sites in California: Humboldt Bay and Vandenberg Air Force Base. This work resulted in the Vandenberg Air Force Base site being chosen as the most favorable site based on a peer reviewed criteria matrix. CalWave Phase II focused on four siting location alternatives along the Vandenberg Air Force Base coastline and culminated with a final siting down-selection. Key outcomes from this work include completion of preliminary engineering and systems integration work, a robust turnkey cost estimate, shoreside and subsea hazards assessment, storm wave analysis, lessons learned reports from several maritime disciplines, test center benchmarking as compared to existing international test sites, analysis of existing applicable environmental literature, the completion of a preliminary regulatory, permitting and licensing roadmap, robust interaction and engagement with state and federal regulatory agency personnel and local stakeholders, and the population of a Draft Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Preliminary Application Document (PAD). Analysis of existing offshore oil and gas infrastructure was also performed

  4. Inpatient Massage Therapy Versus Music Therapy Versus Usual Care: A Mixed-methods Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseen, Eric J; Cornelio-Flores, Oscar; Lemaster, Chelsey; Hernandez, Maria; Fong, Calvin; Resnick, Kirsten; Wardle, Jon; Hanser, Suzanne; Saper, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the feasibility of providing massage or music therapy to medical inpatients at urban safety-net hospitals or the impact these treatments may have on patient experience. To determine the feasibility of providing massage and music therapy to medical inpatients and to assess the impact of these interventions on patient experience. Single-center 3-arm feasibility randomized controlled trial. Urban academic safety-net hospital. Adult inpatients on the Family Medicine ward. Massage therapy consisted of a standardized protocol adapted from a previous perioperative study. Music therapy involved a preference assessment, personalized compact disc, music-facilitated coping, singing/playing music, and/or songwriting. Credentialed therapists provided the interventions. Patient experience was measured with the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) within 7 days of discharge. We compared the proportion of patients in each study arm reporting "top box" scores for the following a priori HCAHPS domains: pain management, recommendation of hospital, and overall hospital rating. Responses to additional open-ended postdischarge questions were transcribed, coded independently, and analyzed for common themes. From July to December 2014, 90 medical inpatients were enrolled; postdischarge data were collected on 68 (76%) medical inpatients. Participants were 70% females, 43% non-Hispanic black, and 23% Hispanic. No differences between groups were observed on HCAHPS. The qualitative analysis found that massage and music therapy were associated with improved overall hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist. Providing music and massage therapy in an urban safety-net inpatient setting was feasible. There was no quantitative impact on HCAHPS. Qualitative findings suggest benefits related to an improved hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist.

  5. Inpatient Massage Therapy Versus Music Therapy Versus Usual Care: A Mixed-methods Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelio-Flores, Oscar; Lemaster, Chelsey; Hernandez, Maria; Fong, Calvin; Resnick, Kirsten; Wardle, Jon; Hanser, Suzanne; Saper, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the feasibility of providing massage or music therapy to medical inpatients at urban safety-net hospitals or the impact these treatments may have on patient experience. Objective To determine the feasibility of providing massage and music therapy to medical inpatients and to assess the impact of these interventions on patient experience. Design Single-center 3-arm feasibility randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban academic safety-net hospital. Patients Adult inpatients on the Family Medicine ward. Interventions Massage therapy consisted of a standardized protocol adapted from a previous perioperative study. Music therapy involved a preference assessment, personalized compact disc, music-facilitated coping, singing/playing music, and/or songwriting. Credentialed therapists provided the interventions. Measurements Patient experience was measured with the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) within 7 days of discharge. We compared the proportion of patients in each study arm reporting “top box” scores for the following a priori HCAHPS domains: pain management, recommendation of hospital, and overall hospital rating. Responses to additional open-ended postdischarge questions were transcribed, coded independently, and analyzed for common themes. Results From July to December 2014, 90 medical inpatients were enrolled; postdischarge data were collected on 68 (76%) medical inpatients. Participants were 70% females, 43% non-Hispanic black, and 23% Hispanic. No differences between groups were observed on HCAHPS. The qualitative analysis found that massage and music therapy were associated with improved overall hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist. Conclusions Providing music and massage therapy in an urban safety-net inpatient setting was feasible. There was no quantitative impact on HCAHPS. Qualitative findings suggest benefits related to an

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of TRANSFoRm to improve clinical trial recruitment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Nikolaos; Bliźniuk, Grzegorz; Czopnik, Dorota; McGilchrist, Mark; Misiaszek, Andrzej; Bródka, Piotr; Curcin, Vasa; Car, Josip; Delaney, Brendan C; Andreasson, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Recruitment of study participants is a challenging process for health professionals and patients. The Translational Medicine and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm) clinical trial tools enable automated identification, recruitment and follow-up in clinical trials, potentially saving time, effort and costs for all parties involved. This study evaluates the acceptability and feasibility of TRANSFoRm to improve clinical trial recruitment in primary care. A feasibility study was conducted in three general practices in Poland. Participants were physicians and patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Semi-structured interviews were held to obtain feedback about the usefulness, ease of use and overall experience with the TRANSFoRm tools and to identify potential usability issues. Data were analysed thematically. A total of 5 physicians and 10 patients participated in the study. Physicians were satisfied with the usefulness of the system, as it enabled easier and faster identification, recruitment and follow-up of patients compared with existing methods. Patients found the TRANSFoRm apps easy to use to report patient outcomes. However, they also felt that the apps may not be useful for patients with limited exposure to smartphone and web technologies. Two main usability issues were identified: physicians could not access the result of the randomization at the end of each visit, and participants could not locate the follow-up reminder email. This study provides new evidence on the acceptability and feasibility of TRANSFoRm to enable automated identification, recruitment and follow-up of study participants in primary care trials. It also helps to better understand and address users' requirements in eHealth-supported clinical research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Culturally adaptive storytelling method to improve hypertension control in Vietnam - "We talk about our hypertension": study protocol for a feasibility cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Jeroan J; Nguyen, Hoa L; Ha, Duc A; Chiriboga, Germán; Ly, Ha N; Tran, Hanh T; Phan, Ngoc T; Vu, Nguyen C; Kim, Minjin; Goldberg, Robert J

    2016-01-14

    Vietnam is experiencing an epidemiologic transition with an increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. At present, the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are either on the rise or at alarming levels in Vietnam; inasmuch, the burden of CVD will continue to increase in this country unless effective prevention and control measures are put in place. A national survey in 2008 found that the prevalence of hypertension (HTN) was approximately 25 % among Vietnamese adults and it increased with advancing age. Therefore, novel, large-scale, and sustainable interventions for public health education to promote engagement in the process of detecting and treating HTN in Vietnam are urgently needed. A feasibility randomized trial will be conducted in Hung Yen province, Vietnam to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a novel community-based intervention using the "storytelling" method to enhance the control of HTN in adults residing in four rural communities. The intervention will center on stories about living with HTN, with patients speaking in their own words. The stories will be obtained from particularly eloquent patients, or "video stars," identified during Story Development Groups. The study will involve two phases: (i) developing a HTN intervention using the storytelling method, which is designed to empower patients to facilitate changes in their lifestyle practices, and (ii) conducting a feasibility cluster-randomized trial to investigate the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of the intervention compared with usual care in HTN control among rural residents. The trial will be conducted at four communes, and within each commune, 25 individuals 50 years or older with HTN will be enrolled in the trial resulting in a total sample size of 100 patients. This feasibility trial will provide the necessary groundwork for a subsequent large-scale, fully powered, cluster-randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of our novel

  8. Wordless intervention for people with epilepsy and learning disabilities (WIELD): a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoni, Silvana E; Gates, Bob; Parkes, Georgina; Wellsted, David; Barton, Garry; Ring, Howard; Khoo, Mary Ellen; Monji-Patel, Deela; Friedli, Karin; Zia, Asif; Irvine, Lisa; Durand, Marie-Anne

    2016-11-10

    To investigate the feasibility of a full-scale randomised controlled trial of a picture booklet to improve quality of life for people with epilepsy and learning disabilities. A randomised controlled feasibility trial. Randomisation was not blinded and was conducted using a centralised secure database and a blocked 1:1 allocation ratio. Epilepsy clinics in 1 English National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Patients with learning disabilities and epilepsy who had: a seizure within the past 12 months, meaningful communication and a carer with sufficient proficiency in English. Participants in the intervention group used a picture booklet with a trained researcher, and a carer present. These participants kept the booklet, and were asked to use it at least twice more over 20 weeks. The control group received treatment as usual, and were provided with a booklet at the end of the study. 7 feasibility criteria were used relating to recruitment, data collection, attrition, potential effect on epilepsy-related quality of life (Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities Quality of Life Scale, ELDQOL) at 4-week, 12-week and 20-week follow-ups, feasibility of methodology, acceptability of the intervention and potential to calculate cost-effectiveness. The recruitment rate of eligible patients was 34% and the target of 40 participants was reached. There was minimal missing data and attrition. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed; data from the outcome measures suggest a benefit from the intervention on the ELDQOL behaviour and mood subscales at 4 and 20 weeks follow-up. The booklet and study methods were positively received, and no adverse events were reported. There was a positive indication of the potential for a cost-effectiveness analysis. All feasibility criteria were fully or partially met, therefore confirming feasibility of a definitive trial. ISRCTN80067039. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  9. Automating the Analytical Laboratories Section, Lewis Research Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, W.G.; Barton, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of computerized automation of the Analytical Laboratories Section at NASA's Lewis Research Center. Since that laboratory's duties are not routine, we set our automation goals with that in mind. We selected four instruments as the most likely automation candidates: an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, an emission spectrometer, an x-ray fluorescence spectrometer, and an x-ray diffraction unit. Our study describes two options for computer automation: a time-shared central computer and a system with microcomputers for each instrument connected to a central computer. A third option, presented for future planning, expands the microcomputer version. We determine costs and benefits for each option. We conclude that the microcomputer version best fits the goals and duties of the laboratory and that such an automated system is needed to meet the laboratory's future requirements

  10. Feasibility of mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion for a phase I clinical trial in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, Sarah M; Lingas, Karen T; Reese Koç, Jane; Hooper, Brittney M; Maitra, Basabi; Fox, Robert M; Imrey, Peter B; Drake, Kylie M; Aldred, Micheala A; Lazarus, Hillard M; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system for which therapeutic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is under study. Published experience of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical trials is limited. To determine the feasibility of culture-expanding multiple sclerosis patients' mesenchymal stem cells for clinical use. In a phase I trial, autologous, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from 25 trial participants with multiple sclerosis and eight matched controls, and culture-expanded to a target single dose of 1-2 × 10 6 cells/kg. Viability, cell product identity and sterility were assessed prior to infusion. Cytogenetic stability was assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from 18 multiple sclerosis patients and five controls. One patient failed screening. Mesenchymal stem cell culture expansion was successful for 24 of 25 multiple sclerosis patients and six of eight controls. The target dose was achieved in 16-62 days, requiring two to three cell passages. Growth rate and culture success did not correlate with demographic or multiple sclerosis disease characteristics. Cytogenetic studies identified changes on one chromosome of one control (4.3%) after extended time in culture. Culture expansion of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple sclerosis patients as donors is feasible. However, culture time should be minimized for cell products designated for therapeutic administration.

  11. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF ESTABLISHING AN ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION (AI CENTER FOR CARABAOS IN SAN ILDEFONSO, BULACAN, PHILIPPINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Q. Arrienda II

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The productivity of the carabao subsector is influenced by several constraints such as social,technical, economic and policy factors. The need to enhance the local production of carabaos will helplocal farmers to increase their income. Thus, producing thorough breeds of carabaos and improving itgenetically is the best response to these constraints. This study was conducted to present the feasibilitystudy of establishing an Artificial Insemination (AI Center and its planned area of operation in Brgy.San Juan, Ildefonso, Bulacan. The market, production, organizational and financial viability of operatingthe business would also be evaluated. This particular study will provide insights in establishing an AICenter. Included in this study is the identification of anticipated problems that could affect the businessand recommendation of specific courses of action to counteract these possible problems. Primary datawere obtained through interviews with key informants from the Philippine. Carabao Center (PCC. Togain insights about the present status of an AI Center, interviews with the technicians of PCC and privatefarm were done to get additional information. Secondary data were acquired from various literatures andfrom San Ildefonso Municipal Office. The proposed area would be 1,500 square meters that would beallotted for the laboratory and bullpen. The AI Center will operate six days a week and will be openedfrom 8 AM until 5 PM. However, customers or farmers can call the technicians beyond the office hoursin case of emergency. The total initial investment of Php 3,825,417.39 is needed in establishing the AICenter. The whole amount will be sourced from the owner’s equity. Financial projection showed an IRRof 30% with a computed NPV of Php 2,415,597.00 and a payback period of 3.97 years. Based on all themarket, technical, organizational, financial factors, projections and data analysis, it is said that thisbusiness endeavor is viable and feasible.

  12. Wordless intervention for epilepsy in learning disabilities (WIELD): study protocol for a randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Marie-Anne; Gates, Bob; Parkes, Georgina; Zia, Asif; Friedli, Karin; Barton, Garry; Ring, Howard; Oostendorp, Linda; Wellsted, David

    2014-11-20

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological problem that affects people with learning disabilities. The high seizure frequency, resistance to treatments, associated skills deficit and co-morbidities make the management of epilepsy particularly challenging for people with learning disabilities. The Books Beyond Words booklet for epilepsy uses images to help people with learning disabilities manage their condition and improve quality of life. Our aim is to conduct a randomized controlled feasibility trial exploring key methodological, design and acceptability issues, in order to subsequently undertake a large-scale randomized controlled trial of the Books Beyond Words booklet for epilepsy. We will use a two-arm, single-centre randomized controlled feasibility design, over a 20-month period, across five epilepsy clinics in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom. We will recruit 40 eligible adults with learning disabilities and a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy and will randomize them to use either the Books Beyond Words booklet plus usual care (intervention group) or to receive routine information and services (control group). We will collect quantitative data about the number of eligible participants, number of recruited participants, demographic data, discontinuation rates, variability of the primary outcome measure (quality of life: Epilepsy and Learning Disabilities Quality of Life scale), seizure severity, seizure control, intervention's patterns of use, use of other epilepsy-related information, resource use and the EQ-5D-5L health questionnaire. We will also gather qualitative data about the feasibility and acceptability of the study procedures and the Books Beyond Words booklet. Ethical approval for this study was granted on 28 April 2014, by the Wales Research Ethics Committee 5. Recruitment began on 1 July 2014. The outcomes of this feasibility study will be used to inform the design and methodology of a definitive study, adequately powered to determine the impact of

  13. CONTRACT Study - CONservative TReatment of Appendicitis in Children (feasibility): study protocol for a randomised controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Natalie; Wood, Wendy; Reading, Isabel; Walker, Erin; Blazeby, Jane M; Van't Hoff, William; Young, Bridget; Crawley, Esther M; Eaton, Simon; Chorozoglou, Maria; Sherratt, Frances C; Beasant, Lucy; Corbett, Harriet; Stanton, Michael P; Grist, Simon; Dixon, Elizabeth; Hall, Nigel J

    2018-03-02

    Currently, the routine treatment for acute appendicitis in the United Kingdom is an appendicectomy. However, there is increasing scientific interest and research into non-operative treatment of appendicitis in adults and children. While a number of studies have investigated non-operative treatment of appendicitis in adults, this research cannot be applied to the paediatric population. Ultimately, we aim to perform a UK-based multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the clinical and cost effectiveness of non-operative treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis in children, as compared with appendicectomy. First, we will undertake a feasibility study to assess the feasibility of performing such a trial. The study involves a feasibility RCT with a nested qualitative research to optimise recruitment as well as a health economic substudy. Children (aged 4-15 years inclusive) diagnosed with acute uncomplicated appendicitis that would normally be treated with an appendicectomy are eligible for the RCT. Exclusion criteria include clinical/radiological suspicion of perforated appendicitis, appendix mass or previous non-operative treatment of appendicitis. Participants will be randomised into one of two arms. Participants in the intervention arm are treated with antibiotics and regular clinical assessment to ensure clinical improvement. Participants in the control arm will receive appendicectomy. Randomisation will be minimised by age, sex, duration of symptoms and centre. Children and families who are approached for the RCT will be invited to participate in the embedded qualitative substudy, which includes recording of recruitment consultants and subsequent interviews with participants and non-participants and their families and recruiters. Analyses of these will inform interventions to optimise recruitment. The main study outcomes include recruitment rate (primary outcome), identification of strategies to optimise recruitment, performance of trial treatment

  14. Facilitated Extinction Training to Improve Pharmacotherapy for Smoking Cessation: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H; Unrod, Marina; Drobes, David J; Sutton, Steven K; Hawk, Larry W; Simmons, Vani N; Brandon, Karen O; Roetzheim, Richard G; Meltzer, Lauren R; Miller, Ralph R; Cahill, Shawn P

    2017-09-12

    Varenicline reduces smoking satisfaction during the pre-cessation run-in period, which may contribute to extinction of cravings and smoking behavior. Research indicates that efficacy is enhanced when the run-in period is increased from 1 to 4 weeks, providing a longer extinction opportunity. We hypothesized that efficacy could be further enhanced by harnessing basic and applied research on extinction. We developed a pre-cessation extinction-facilitating intervention and tested its feasibility in a pilot trial. The Facilitated Extinction (FE) intervention comprised brief counseling and a workbook recommending strategies to maximize extinction processes during the run-in, including instructions to smoke at a normal rate across contexts and cues, and use of an extinction cue to enhance generalization. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 varenicline interventions: standard (1-week run-in), extended (4-week run-in), and extended + FE. Interventions were delivered prior to the target quit date (TQD). Assessments were conducted in weeks 1 and 4 pre-TQD and 1 and 3 months post-TQD, with focus on feasibility indices. Recruitment and retention goals were met (N=58). Treatment satisfaction was high across groups. The majority of FE participants adhered to instructions and maintained their usual smoking rate during the run-in period. Greater decreases in craving and smoking satisfaction were observed among participants in both extended groups versus the standard group (p's<.005). Feasibility was demonstrated. Participants adhered to the FE intervention, thereby optimizing the number and variety of extinction trials. Findings support testing the novel FE smoking cessation intervention in a fully-powered trial. This study expands the research on the clinical benefits of extending the pre-cessation run-in period of varenicline. It introduces the hypothesis that further benefit might be achieved by translating basic behavioral research, as well as cue-exposure research

  15. Physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in people with chronic low back pain: results of a feasibility randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eadie, J.; van de Water, A.T.; Lonsdale, C.; Tully, M.A.; van Mechelen, W.; Boreham, C.A.; Daly, L.; McDonough, S.M.; Hurley, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain (CLBP) (≥12wks). Design: Randomized controlled trial with evaluations at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Setting: Outpatient

  16. Preliminary study of environmental parameters associated with the feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of a polygeneration plant at Kennedy Space Center was studied. Liquid hydrogen and gaseous nitrogen are the two principal products in consideration. Environmental parameters (air quality, water quality, biological diversity and hazardous waste disposal) necessary for the feasibility study were investigated. A National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) project flow sheet was to be formulated for the environmental impact statement. Water quality criteria for Florida waters were to be established

  17. Physiotherapy Post Lumbar Discectomy: Prospective Feasibility and Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Alison; Goodwin, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate: acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures; distribution of scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, planned primary outcome); and efficient working of trial components. Design and Setting A feasibility and external pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN33808269, assigned 10/12/2012) was conducted across 2 UK secondary care outpatient physiotherapy departments associated with regional spinal surgery centres. Participants Consecutive consenting patients aged >18 years; post primary, single level, lumbar discectomy. Interventions Participants were randomised to either 1:1 physiotherapy outpatient management including patient leaflet, or patient leaflet alone. Main Outcome Measures Blinded assessments were made at 4 weeks post surgery (baseline) and 12 weeks post baseline (proposed primary end point). Secondary outcomes included: Global Perceived Effect, back/leg pain, straight leg raise, return to work/function, quality of life, fear avoidance, range of movement, medication, re-operation. Results At discharge, 110 (44%) eligible patients gave consent to be contacted. 59 (54%) patients were recruited. Loss to follow up was 39% at 12 weeks, with one site contributing 83% losses. Mean (SD) RMDQ was 10.07 (5.58) leaflet and 10.52 (5.94) physiotherapy/leaflet at baseline; and 5.37 (4.91) leaflet and 5.53 (4.49) physiotherapy/leaflet at 12 weeks. 5.1% zero scores at 12 weeks illustrated no floor effect. Sensitivity to change was assessed at 12 weeks with mean (SD) change -4.53 (6.41), 95%CI -7.61 to -1.44 for leaflet; and -6.18 (5.59), 95%CI -9.01 to -3.30 for physiotherapy/leaflet. RMDQ mean difference (95%CI) between change from baseline to twelve weeks was 1.65(-2.46 to 5.75). Mean difference (95%CI) between groups at 12 weeks was -0.16 (-3.36 to 3.04). Participant adherence with treatment was good. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions Both interventions were acceptable, and it is promising that they both

  18. Developing a placebo-controlled trial in surgery: Issues of design, acceptability and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald AM

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical placebos are controversial. This in-depth study explored the design, acceptability, and feasibility issues relevant to designing a surgical placebo-controlled trial for the evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of arthroscopic lavage for the management of people with osteoarthritis of the knee in the UK. Methods Two surgeon focus groups at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic surgeons and one regional surgeon focus group (41 surgeons; plenary discussion at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic anaesthetists (130 anaesthetists; three focus groups with anaesthetists (one national, two regional; 58 anaesthetists; two focus groups with members of the patient organisation Arthritis Care (7 participants; telephone interviews with people on consultant waiting lists from two UK regional centres (15 participants; interviews with Chairs of UK ethics committees (6 individuals; postal surveys of members of the British Association of Surgeons of the Knee (382 surgeons and members of the British Society of Orthopaedic Anaesthetists (398 anaesthetists; two centre pilot (49 patients assessed. Results There was widespread acceptance that evaluation of arthroscopic lavage had to be conducted with a placebo control if scientific rigour was not to be compromised. The choice of placebo surgical procedure (three small incisions proved easier than the method of anaesthesia (general anaesthesia. General anaesthesia, while an excellent mimic, was more intrusive and raised concerns among some stakeholders and caused extensive discussion with local decision-makers when seeking formal approval for the pilot. Patients were willing to participate in a pilot with a placebo arm; although some patients when allocated to surgery became apprehensive about the possibility of receiving placebo, and withdrew. Placebo surgery was undertaken successfully. Conclusions Our study illustrated the opposing and often strongly held opinions about

  19. Alcohol and disadvantaged men: A feasibility trial of an intervention delivered by mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Iain K; Irvine, Linda; Falconer, Donald W; Williams, Brian; Ricketts, Ian W; Jones, Claire; Humphris, Gerry; Norrie, John; Slane, Peter; Rice, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Disadvantaged men suffer substantial harm from heavy drinking. This feasibility study developed and evaluated the methods for a trial of a brief intervention delivered by text messages to disadvantaged men. It aimed to test the methods for recruitment and retention, to monitor engagement with the intervention and assess the overall acceptability of study methods. Disadvantaged men aged 25-44 years who had ≥2 episodes of binge drinking (≥8 units in one session) in the preceding month were recruited. Two recruitment strategies were assessed: recruitment from general practice registers and by a community outreach strategy. Theoretically and empirically based text messages were tailored to the target group. The study recruited 67 disadvantaged men at high risk of alcohol-related harm, exceeding the target of 60. Evaluation showed that 95% of text messages were delivered, and the men engaged enthusiastically with the intervention. Retention at follow up was 96%. Outcomes were successfully measured on all men followed up. This provided data for the sample size calculation for the full trial. Post-study evaluation showed high levels of satisfaction with the study. This study has shown that disadvantaged men can be recruited and follow-up data obtained in an alcohol intervention study. The study methods were acceptable to the participants. The men recruited were at high risk of alcohol-related harms. It also clarified ways in which the recruitment strategy, the baseline questionnaire and the intervention could be improved. The full trial is currently underway. [Crombie IK, Irvine L, Falconer DW, Williams B, Ricketts IW, Jones C, Humphris G, Norrie J, Slane P, Rice P. Alcohol and disadvantaged men: A feasibility trial of an intervention delivered by mobile phone. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:468-476]. © 2017 The Authors. Drug and Alcohol Review published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  20. Feasibility trial of a psychoeducational intervention for parents with personality difficulties: The Helping Families Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispin Day

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Helping Families Programme is a psychoeducational parenting intervention that aims to improve outcomes and engagement for parents affected by clinically significant personality difficulties. This is achieved by working collaboratively with parents to explore ways in which their emotional and relational difficulties impact on parenting and child functioning, and to identify meaningful and realistic goals for change. The intervention is delivered via one-to-one sessions at weekly intervals over a period of 16 weeks. This protocol describes a two-arm parallel RCT in which consenting parents are randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to either the Helping Families Programme plus the usual services that the parent may be receiving from their mental health and/or social care providers, or to standard care (usual services plus a brief parenting advice session. The primary clinical outcome will be child behaviour. Secondary clinical outcomes will be child and parental mental health, parenting satisfaction, parenting behaviour and therapeutic alliance. Health economic measures will be collected on quality of life and service use. Outcome measures will be collected at the initial assessment stage, after the intervention is completed and at 6-month follow-up by research staff blind to group allocation. Trial feasibility will be assessed using rates of trial participation at the three time points and intervention uptake, attendance and retention. A parallel process evaluation will use qualitative interviews to ascertain key-workers’ and parent participants' experiences of intervention delivery and trial participation. The results of this feasibility study will determine the appropriateness of proceeding to a full-scale trial.

  1. Developing a placebo-controlled trial in surgery: issues of design, acceptability and feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M K; Entwistle, V A; Cuthbertson, B H; Skea, Z C; Sutherland, A G; McDonald, A M; Norrie, J D; Carlson, R V; Bridgman, S

    2011-02-21

    Surgical placebos are controversial. This in-depth study explored the design, acceptability, and feasibility issues relevant to designing a surgical placebo-controlled trial for the evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of arthroscopic lavage for the management of people with osteoarthritis of the knee in the UK. Two surgeon focus groups at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic surgeons and one regional surgeon focus group (41 surgeons); plenary discussion at a UK national meeting for orthopaedic anaesthetists (130 anaesthetists); three focus groups with anaesthetists (one national, two regional; 58 anaesthetists); two focus groups with members of the patient organisation Arthritis Care (7 participants); telephone interviews with people on consultant waiting lists from two UK regional centres (15 participants); interviews with Chairs of UK ethics committees (6 individuals); postal surveys of members of the British Association of Surgeons of the Knee (382 surgeons) and members of the British Society of Orthopaedic Anaesthetists (398 anaesthetists); two centre pilot (49 patients assessed). There was widespread acceptance that evaluation of arthroscopic lavage had to be conducted with a placebo control if scientific rigour was not to be compromised. The choice of placebo surgical procedure (three small incisions) proved easier than the method of anaesthesia (general anaesthesia). General anaesthesia, while an excellent mimic, was more intrusive and raised concerns among some stakeholders and caused extensive discussion with local decision-makers when seeking formal approval for the pilot.Patients were willing to participate in a pilot with a placebo arm; although some patients when allocated to surgery became apprehensive about the possibility of receiving placebo, and withdrew. Placebo surgery was undertaken successfully. Our study illustrated the opposing and often strongly held opinions about surgical placebos, the ethical issues underpinning this

  2. What Value Can Qualitative Research Add to Quantitative Research Design? An Example From an Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Trial Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, Francine; Williamson, Esther; Williams, Mark A; Fairbank, Jeremy; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-08-09

    Using an example of qualitative research embedded in a non-surgical feasibility trial, we explore the benefits of including qualitative research in trial design and reflect on epistemological challenges. We interviewed 18 trial participants and used methods of Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Our findings demonstrate that qualitative research can make a valuable contribution by allowing trial stakeholders to see things from alternative perspectives. Specifically, it can help to make specific recommendations for improved trial design, generate questions which contextualize findings, and also explore disease experience beyond the trial. To make the most out of qualitative research embedded in quantitative design it would be useful to (a) agree specific qualitative study aims that underpin research design, (b) understand the impact of differences in epistemological truth claims, (c) provide clear thematic interpretations for trial researchers to utilize, and (d) include qualitative findings that explore experience beyond the trial setting within the impact plan. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Randomized multicentre feasibility trial of intermediate care versus standard ward care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, M; Waldau, T; Wetterslev, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a considerable risk of death and postoperative complications. Early detection and timely management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of intermediate care compared with standard ward care...... ward within 24 h of emergency abdominal surgery. Participants were randomized to either intermediate care or standard surgical ward care after surgery. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: In total, 286 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. The trial...... was terminated after the interim analysis owing to slow recruitment and a lower than expected mortality rate. Eleven (7·6 per cent) of 144 patients assigned to intermediate care and 12 (8·5 per cent) of 142 patients assigned to ward care died within 30 days of surgery (odds ratio 0·91, 95 per cent c.i. 0·38 to 2...

  4. Development and feasibility of an objective measure of patient-centered communication fidelity in a pediatric obesity intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to develop a measure of person-centered communication (PCC) and demonstrate feasibility for use in primary care child obesity interventions. Helping Healthy Activity and Nutrition Directions was a primary care intervention for families of overweight or obese 5- to 8-year-old childr...

  5. Randomized controlled trial of Family Nurture Intervention in the NICU: assessments of length of stay, feasibility and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Martha G; Hofer, Myron A; Stark, Raymond I; Andrews, Howard F; Austin, Judy; Glickstein, Sara B; Ludwig, Robert J; Myers, Michael M

    2013-09-24

    While survival rates for preterm infants have increased, the risk for adverse long-term neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes remains very high. In response to the need for novel, evidence-based interventions that prevent such outcomes, we have assessed Family Nurture Intervention (FNI), a novel dual mother-infant intervention implemented while the infant is in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Here, we report the first trial results, including the primary outcome measure, length of stay in the NICU and, the feasibility and safety of its implementation in a high acuity level IV NICU. The FNI trial is a single center, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital for mothers and their singleton or twin infants of 26-34 weeks gestation. Families were randomized to standard care (SC) or (FNI). FNI was implemented by nurture specialists trained to facilitate affective communication between mother and infant during specified calming interactions. These interactions included scent cloth exchange, sustained touch, vocal soothing and eye contact, wrapped or skin-to-skin holding, plus family-based support interactions. A total of 826 infants born between 26 and 34 weeks during the 3.5 year study period were admitted to the NICU. After infant and mother screening plus exclusion due to circumstances that prevented the family from participating, 373 infants were eligible for the study. Of these, we were unable to schedule a consent meeting with 56, and consent was withheld by 165. Consent was obtained for 150 infants from 115 families. The infants were block randomized to groups of N = 78, FNI and N = 72, SC. Sixteen (9.6%) of the randomized infants did not complete the study to home discharge, 7% of those randomized to SC and 12% of FNI infants. Mothers in the intervention group engaged in 3 to 4 facilitated one- to two-hour sessions/week. Intent to treat analyses revealed no significant difference between groups in

  6. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy after percutaneous coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Clinical pilot trial; feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popowski, Youri; Verin, Vitali; Urban, Philippe; Nouet, Philippe; Rouzaud, Michel; Schwager, Michaeel; Rutishauser, Wilhelm; Kurtz, John

    1996-01-01

    Introduction. With the aim of reducing the incidence of restenosis, we developed a technique of intracoronary beta irradiation using an enylenediamine centered pure metallic 90-yttrium source fixed to a thrust wire. The outer diameter of both the active and thrust wires is 0.34 mm. A centering balloon with a monorail design and a blind lumen for source advancement has been developed. The source can be advanced manually in 10-13'' from the protection container to the target site. Its flexibility allows easy insertion despite tortuous anatomy. Dosimetric tests have been performed with 2.5, 3, 3.5 and 4 mm centering balloons. The standard deviation values varied between 8 and 12 % of the mean surface doses, which confirms the efficacy of the source centering. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its technical feasibility and short-term safety in the clinical setting. Methods and results. Between June 21 and November 15, 1995 fifteen patients (6 women and 9 men, aged 72 ± 5 years) underwent intracoronary beta irradiation immediately after a conventional percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (P TCA) procedure. Both the PTCA and the irradiation procedure were done in an ordinary catheterization laboratory. They were technically feasible in all cases, and the delivery of the 18 Gy dose was accomplished within a local exposure time 391 ± 206 sec (range 153 - 768 sec) without any complication. In four patients, the intervention was completed by intraarterial stent implantation because of dissection induced by the initial PTCA. No in-hospital complications occurred, and serial creatine kinase measurements remained within the normal range in all cases. During a follow-up period of 54±46 days (range 20 days - 5 months) all patients remained well and free of cardiac events. Conclusions. Our early experience thus suggests that this approach is both feasible and safe on a short-term basis. Whether beta-irradiation will favorably influence post PTCA restenosis in

  7. Physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain: a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Deirdre A

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is becoming increasingly recognised as a clinically important symptom in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP, low back pain >12 weeks), associated with physical inactivity and depression. Current research and international clinical guidelines recommend people with CLBP assume a physically active role in their recovery to prevent chronicity, but the high prevalence of sleep disturbance in this population may be unknowingly limiting their ability to participate in exercise-based rehabilitation programmes and contributing to poor outcomes. There is currently no knowledge concerning the effectiveness of physiotherapy on sleep disturbance in people with chronic low back pain and no evidence of the feasibility of conducting randomized controlled trials that comprehensively evaluate sleep as an outcome measure in this population.

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Auricular Point Acupressure for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT was designed to investigate the feasibility and effects of a 4-week auricular point acupressure (APA for chronic low back pain (CLBP. Methods. Participants were randomized to either true APA (true acupoints with taped seeds on the designated ear points for CLBP or sham APA (sham acupoints with taped seeds but on different locations than those designated for CLBP. The duration of treatment was four weeks. Participants were assessed before treatment, weekly during treatment, and 1 month following treatment. Results. Participants in the true APA group who completed the 4-week APA treatment had a 70% reduction in worst pain intensity, a 75% reduction in overall pain intensity, and a 42% improvement in disability due to back pain from baseline assessment. The reductions of worst pain and overall pain intensity in the true APA group were statistically greater than participants in the sham group (P<0.01 at the completion of a 4-week APA and 1 month followup. Discussion. The preliminary findings of this feasibility study showed a reduction in pain intensity and improvement in physical function suggesting that APA may be a promising treatment for patients with CLBP.

  9. Inorganic nitrate as a treatment for acute heart failure: a protocol for a single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Roman; Seman, Michael; Braat, Sabine; Sortino, Joshua; Allen, Jason D; Neil, Christopher J

    2017-08-08

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a frequent reason for hospitalization worldwide and effective treatment options are limited. It is known that AHF is a condition characterized by impaired vasorelaxation, together with reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, an endogenous vasodilatory compound. Supplementation of inorganic sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) is an indirect dietary source of NO, through bioconversion. It is proposed that oral sodium nitrate will favorably affect levels of circulating NO precursors (nitrate and nitrite) in AHF patients, resulting in reduced systemic vascular resistance, without significant hypotension. We propose a single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial, evaluating the feasibility of sodium nitrate as a treatment for AHF. The primary hypothesis that sodium nitrate treatment will result in increased systemic levels of nitric oxide pre-cursors (nitrate and nitrite) in plasma, in parallel with improved vasorelaxation, as assessed by non-invasively derived systemic vascular resistance index. Additional surrogate measures relevant to the known pathophysiology of AHF will be obtained in order to assess clinical effect on dyspnea and renal function. The results of this study will provide evidence of the feasibility of this novel approach and will be of interest to the heart failure community. This trial may inform a larger study.

  10. Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial of Intranasal Ketamine Compared to Intranasal Fentanyl for Analgesia in Children with Suspected Extremity Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacy L; Bryant, Kathleen K; Studnek, Jonathan R; Hogg, Melanie; Dunn, Connell; Templin, Megan A; Moore, Charity G; Young, James R; Walker, Katherine Rivera; Runyon, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    We compared the tolerability and efficacy of intranasal subdissociative ketamine to intranasal fentanyl for analgesia of children with acute traumatic pain and investigated the feasibility of a larger noninferiority trial that could investigate the potential opioid-sparing effects of intranasal ketamine. This randomized controlled trial compared 1 mg/kg intranasal ketamine to 1.5 μg/kg intranasal fentanyl in children 4 to 17 years old with acute pain from suspected isolated extremity fractures presenting to an urban Level II pediatric trauma center from December 2015 to November 2016. Patients, parents, treating physicians, and outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome, a tolerability measure, was the frequency of cumulative side effects and adverse events within 60 minutes of drug administration. The secondary outcomes included the difference in mean pain score reduction at 20 minutes, the proportion of patients achieving a clinically significant reduction in pain in 20 minutes, total dose of opioid pain medication in morphine equivalents/kg/hour (excluding study drug) required during the emergency department (ED) stay, and the feasibility of enrolling children presenting to the ED in acute pain into a randomized trial conducted under U.S. regulations. All patients were monitored until 6 hours after their last dose of study drug or until admission to the hospital ward or operating room. Of 629 patients screened, 87 received the study drug and 82 had complete data for the primary outcome (41 patients in each group). The median (interquartile range) age was 8 (6-11) years and 62% were male. Baseline pain scores were similar among patients randomized to receive ketamine (73 ± 26) and fentanyl (69 ± 26; mean difference [95% CI] = 4 [-7 to 15]). The cumulative number of side effects was 2.2 times higher in the ketamine group, but there were no serious adverse events and no patients in either group required intervention. The most

  11. Financial management of large, multi-center trials in a challenging funding milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegreen, Olivia; Riggs, Danielle; Staten, Myrlene A; Sheehan, Patricia; Pittas, Anastassios G

    2018-05-03

    Randomized clinical trials that have public health implications but no or low potential for commercial gain are predominantly funded by governmental (e.g., National Institutes of Health (NIH)) and not-for-profit organizations. Our objective was to develop an alternative clinical trial site funding model for judicious allocation of declining public research funds. In the Vitamin D and Type 2 Diabetes (D2d) study, an NIH-supported, large clinical trial testing the effect of vitamin D supplementation on incident diabetes in 2423 participants at high risk for diabetes, a hybrid financial management model for supporting collaborating clinical sites was developed and applied. The funding model employed two reimbursement components: Core (for study start-up and partial efforts throughout the study, ~40% of the total site budget), invoiced by sites, and Performance-Based Payments (for successful enrollment of participants and completion of follow-up visits, ~60% of the total site budget), automatically issued to the sites by the Coordinating Center based on actual recruitment and visits conducted. Underperforming sites transitioned to Performance-Based Payments only. Recruitment occurred from October 2013 through December 2016, requiring one additional year than the 2-year projection. Median enrollment at each site was 88 participants (range 29-318; 20 to 205% of the site target). At the end of year 1, study-wide recruitment was at 12% of the target (vs. 50% projected) and 12% of the total grant award was invested. The model constantly evaluated sites' needs and re-allocated resources to meet the study enrollment goal. If D2d had issued cost reimbursement subaward agreements and sites invoiced for their entire budget, 83% of the award would have been spent for all study activities over the first 4 years of the trial compared to 65% of the award spent (US$26M) under the hybrid model used by D2d. It is feasible to foster a hybrid financial management approach to steward

  12. The use of feasibility studies for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials: protocol for a review of impact and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristunas, Caroline A; Hemming, Karla; Eborall, Helen C; Gray, Laura J

    2017-08-01

    The stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial (SW-CRT) is a complex design, for which many decisions about key design parameters must be made during the planning. These include the number of steps and the duration of time needed to embed the intervention. Feasibility studies are likely to be useful for informing these decisions and increasing the likelihood of the main trial's success. However, the number of feasibility studies being conducted for SW-CRTs is currently unknown. This review aims to establish the number of feasibility studies being conducted for SW-CRTs and determine which feasibility issues are commonly investigated. Fully published feasibility studies for SW-CRTs will be identified, according to predefined inclusion criteria, from searches conducted in Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase and PsycINFO. To also identify and gain information on unpublished feasibility studies the following will be contacted: authors of published SW-CRTs (identified from the most recent systematic reviews); contacts for registered SW-CRTs (identified from clinical trials registries); lead statisticians of UK registered clinical trials units and researchers known to work in the area of SW-CRTs.Data extraction will be conducted independently by two reviewers. For the fully published feasibility studies, data will be extracted on the study characteristics, the rationale for the study, the process for determining progression to a main trial, how the study informed the main trial and whether the main trial went ahead. The researchers involved in the unpublished feasibility studies will be contacted to elicit the same information.A narrative synthesis will be conducted and provided alongside a descriptive analysis of the study characteristics. This review does not require ethical approval, as no individual patient data will be used. The results of this review will be published in an open-access peer-reviewed journal. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in

  13. Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain Tumor Trials Collaborative In Pursuit of a Cure The mission of the BTTC is to develop and perform state-of-the-art clinical trials in a collaborative and collegial environment, advancing treatments for patients with brain tumors, merging good scientific method with concern for patient well-being and outcome.

  14. The HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programmme for early Years feasibility randomised control trial: acceptability and feasibility of an intervention to reduce infant obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary R. C. McEachan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of infant obesity is increasing, but there is a lack of evidence-based approaches to prevent obesity at this age. This study tested the acceptability and feasibility of evaluating a theory-based intervention aimed at reducing risk of obesity in infants of overweight/obese women during and after pregnancy: the Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years (HAPPY. Methods A feasibility randomised controlled trial was conducted in Bradford, England. One hundred twenty overweight/obese pregnant women (Body Mass Index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2 were recruited between 10–26 weeks gestation. Consenting women were randomly allocated to HAPPY (6 antenatal, 6 postnatal sessions: N = 59 or usual care (N = 61. Appropriate outcome measures for a full trial were explored, including: infant’s length and weight, woman’s BMI, physical activity and dietary intake of the women and infants. Health economic data were collected. Measurement occurred before randomisation and when the infant was aged 6 months and 12 months. Feasibility outcomes were: recruitment/attrition rates, and acceptability of: randomisation, measurement, and intervention. Intra-class correlations for infant weight were calculated. Fidelity was assessed through observations and facilitator feedback. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews explored acceptability of methods, implementation, and intervention content. Results Recruitment targets were met (~20 women/month with a recruitment rate of 30 % of eligible women (120/396. There was 30 % attrition at 12 months; 66 % of recruited women failed to attend intervention sessions, but those who attended the first session were likely to continue to attend (mean 9.4/12 sessions, range 1–12. Reaction to intervention content was positive, and fidelity was high. Group clustering was minimal; an adjusted effect size of −0.25 standard deviation scores for infant weight at 12 months (95 % CI:

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy as group psychotherapy for chronically depressed inpatients: a naturalistic multicenter feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaß, Lena; Padberg, Frank; Normann, Claus; Engel, Vera; Konrad, Carsten; Helmle, Kristina; Jobst, Andrea; Worlitz, Andrew; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta

    2017-09-27

    The Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) is a relatively new approach in the treatment of chronic depression (CD). Adapted as group psychotherapy for inpatients, CBASP is attracting increasing attention. In this naturalistic multicenter trial, we investigated its feasibility after 10 sessions of CBASP group therapy over a treatment time of at least 5 to a maximum of 10 weeks. Treatment outcome was additionally assessed. Across four centers, 116 inpatients with CD (DSM-IV-TR) attended CBASP group psychotherapy. Feasibility was focused on acceptance, and evaluated for patients and therapists after five (t1) and ten sessions (t2) of group psychotherapy. Observer- and self-rating scales (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-24 items, HDRS 24 ; Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II; World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment, WHOQOL-BREF) were applied before group psychotherapy (t0) and at t2. Dropouts were low (10.3%). Patients' evaluation improved significantly from t1 to t2 with a medium effect size (d = 0.60). Most of the patients stated that the group had enriched their treatment (75.3%), that the size (74.3%) and duration (72.5%) were 'optimal' and 37.3% wished for a higher frequency. Patients gave CBASP group psychotherapy an overall grade of 2 ('good'). Therapists' evaluation was positive throughout, except for size of the group. Outcome scores of HDRS 24 , BDI-II, and WHOQOL-BREF were significantly reduced from t0 to t2 with medium to large effect sizes (d = 1.48; d = 1.11; d = 0.67). In this naturalistic open-label trial, CBASP, when applied as inpatient group psychotherapy, was well accepted by patients and therapists. The results point towards a clinically meaningful effect of inpatient treatment with CBASP group psychotherapy on depression and quality of life. Other potential factors that could have promoted symptom change were discussed. A future controlled study could investigate the safety and efficacy of CBASP

  16. Feasibility of Conducting a Randomized Trial to Promote Healthy Eating, Active Play and Sustainability Awareness in Early Childhood Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Heather; Skouteris, Helen; Edwards, Susan; Rutherford, Leonie Margaret; Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy; O'Connor, Amanda; Mantilla, Ana; Huang, Terry TK; Lording, Kate Marion; Williams-Smith, Janet

    2016-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of a preschool/kindergarten curriculum intervention designed to increase 4-year-old children's knowledge of healthy eating, active play and the sustainability consequences of their food and toy choices. Ninety intervention and 65 control parent/child…

  17. Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) in the Netherlands : A naturalistic pilot study to explore the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosenschoon, B.J.; Van Weeghel, J.; Bogaards, M.; Deen, M.L.; Mulder, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) is a curriculum-based program for people with severe and persistent mental illness. To date, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been published on it. As these produced mixed results, we conducted a pilot study to test the feasibility of

  18. Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Alexander J; Magee, Wendy L; Bateman, Andrew; Parker, Michael; Odell-Miller, Helen; Fachner, Jorg

    2018-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate music therapy as a home-based intervention for arm hemiparesis in stroke. A pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial, with cross-over design. Randomization by statistician using computer-generated, random numbers concealed in opaque envelopes. Participants' homes across Cambridgeshire, UK. Eleven people with stroke and arm hemiparesis, 3-60 months post stroke, following discharge from community rehabilitation. Each participant engaged in therapeutic instrumental music performance in 12 individual clinical contacts, twice weekly for six weeks. Feasibility was estimated by recruitment from three community stroke teams over a 12-month period, attrition rates, completion of treatment and successful data collection. Structured interviews were conducted pre and post intervention to establish participant tolerance and preference. Action Research Arm Test and Nine-hole Peg Test data were collected at weeks 1, 6, 9, 15 and 18, pre and post intervention by a blinded assessor. A total of 11 of 14 invited participants were recruited (intervention n = 6, waitlist n = 5). In total, 10 completed treatment and data collection. It cannot be concluded whether a larger trial would be feasible due to unavailable data regarding a number of eligible patients screened. Adherence to treatment, retention and interview responses might suggest that the intervention was motivating for participants. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT 02310438.

  19. Practices, patients and (imperfect data - feasibility of a randomised controlled clinical drug trial in German general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical (drug trials supply high quality evidence for therapeutic strategies in primary care. Until now, experience with drug trials in German general practice has been sparse. In 2007/2008, the authors conducted an investigator-initiated, non-commercial, double-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial (HWI-01 to assess the clinical equivalence of ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI. Here, we report the feasibility of this trial in German general practices and the implementation of Good Clinical Practice (GCP standards as defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH in mainly inexperienced general practices. Methods This report is based on the experience of the HWI-01 study conducted in 29 German general practices. Feasibility was defined by 1 successful practice recruitment, 2 sufficient patient recruitment, 3 complete and accurate data collection and 4 appropriate protection of patient safety. Results The final practice recruitment rate was 18%. In these practices, 79 of 195 screened UTI patients were enrolled. Recruitment differed strongly between practices (range 0-12, mean 2.8 patients per practice and was below the recruitment goal of approximately 100 patients. As anticipated, practice nurses became the key figures in the screening und recruitment of patients. Clinical trial demands, in particular for completing symptom questionnaires, documentation of source data and reporting of adverse events, did not agree well with GPs' documentation habits and required support from study nurses. In many cases, GPs and practice staff seemed to be overwhelmed by the amount of information and regulations. No sudden unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs were observed during the trial. Conclusions To enable drug trials in general practice, it is necessary to adapt the setup of clinical research infrastructure to the needs of GPs and

  20. Couple-Based Psychosexual Support Following Prostate Cancer Surgery: Results of a Feasibility Pilot Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jane; McNamee, Phillip; Molloy, Gerry; Hubbard, Gill; McNeill, Alan; Bollina, Prasad; Kelly, Daniel; Forbat, Liz

    2016-08-01

    Surgery for prostate cancer can result in distressing side effects such as sexual difficulties, which are associated with lower levels of dyadic functioning. The study developed and tested an intervention to address sexual, relational, and emotional aspects of the relationship after prostate cancer by incorporating elements of family systems theory and sex therapy. To develop and test the feasibility and acceptability of relational psychosexual treatment for couples with prostate cancer, determine whether a relational-psychosexual intervention is feasible and acceptable for couples affected by prostate cancer, and determine the parameters for a full-scale trial. Forty-three couples were recruited for this pilot randomized controlled trial and received a six-session manual-based psychosexual intervention or usual care. Outcomes were measured before, after, and 6 months after the intervention. Acceptability and feasibility were established from recruitment and retention rates and adherence to the manual. The primary outcome measurement was the sexual bother subdomain of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the 15-item Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15) were used to measure emotional and relational functioning, respectively. The intervention was feasible and acceptable. The trial achieved adequate recruitment (38%) and retention (74%) rates. The intervention had a clinically and statistically significant effect on sexual bother immediately after the intervention. Small decreases in anxiety and depression were observed for the intervention couples, although these were not statistically significant. Practitioners reported high levels of adherence to the manual. The clinically significant impact on sexual bother and positive feedback on the study's feasibility and acceptability indicate that the intervention should be tested in a multicenter trial. The SCORE-15 lacked specificity for this

  1. Feasibility trial of letrozole in combination with bevacizumab in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina, Tiffany A; Rugo, Hope S; Caravelli, James F; Patil, Sujata; Yeh, Benjamin; Melisko, Michele E; Park, John W; Geneus, Stephanie; Paulson, Matthew; Grothusen, Jill; Seidman, Andrew D; Fornier, Monica; Lake, Diana; Dang, Chau; Robson, Mark; Theodoulou, Maria; Flombaum, Carlos D; Norton, Larry; Hudis, Clifford A; Dickler, Maura N

    2010-02-01

    Preclinical models suggest that the use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy with antiestrogens may prevent or delay the development of endocrine therapy resistance. We therefore performed a feasibility study to evaluate the safety of letrozole plus bevacizumab in patients with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients with locally advanced breast cancer or MBC were treated with the aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (2.5 mg orally daily) and the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab (15 mg/kg intravenously every 3 weeks). The primary end point was safety, defined by grade 4 toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Secondary end points included response rate, clinical benefit rate, and progression-free survival (PFS). Prior nonsteroidal AIs (NSAIs) were permitted in the absence of progressive disease. Forty-three patients were treated. After a median of 13 cycles (range, 1 to 71 cycles), select treatment-related toxicities included hypertension (58%; grades 2 and 3 in 19% and 26%), proteinuria (67%; grades 2 and 3 in 14% and 19%), headache (51%; grades 2 and 3 in 16% and 7%), fatigue (74%; grades 2 and 3 in 19% and 2%), and joint pain (63%; grades 2 and 3 in 19% and 0%). Eighty-four percent of patients had at least stable disease on an NSAI, confounding efficacy results. Partial responses were seen in 9% of patients and stable disease >or= 24 weeks was noted in 67%. Median PFS was 17.1 months. Combination letrozole and bevacizumab was feasible with expected bevacizumab-related events of hypertension, headache, and proteinuria. Phase III proof-of-efficacy trials of endocrine therapy plus bevacizumab are in progress (Cancer and Leukemia Group B 40503).

  2. Magnetic force nanotherapy: feasibility and tolerance in a trial with residual tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gneveckow, U.; Scholz, R.; Jordan, A.; Cho, C.H.; Feussner, A.; Eckelt, L.; Wust, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In February 2004 a clinical trial on the feasibility and tolerability of the magnetic force nanotherapy was started. Magnetic force nanotherapy is a new treatment concept for local tumors. The energy deposited by a homogeneous AC magnetic field is transformed into heat by a transducer. This transducer, nanosized superparamagnetic particles dispersed in water (magnetic fluid), is infiltrated into a selected target by minimal invasive intervention. Due to their subdomain size, these particles show no hysteresis behavior. Therefore, the behavior is independent on any previous exposures to magnetic fields. In contrast to hysteresis heating with multidomain-particles, the energy of the magnetic field is transformed to heat by both Brownian rotation and Neel relaxation. In addition, a special 'tumorphil' coating of the ironoxide cores increases the cellular uptake of the particles into tumor cells, which binds the particles in the tumor region. Thus a particular high power density can be achieved in the tumor and directly regulated by the magnetic field amplitude, whereas the normal tissue lacking magnetic fluid is only slightly affected. Both, deep seated and superficial tumors are accessible with a minimum of invasion and a selectable target temperature. To heat the magnetic fluid under clinical conditions, an applicator system has been built to generate a magnetic field in any desired body region. The first results of the feasibility of the magnetic force nanotherapy on different tumor entities are shown here. Until now 18 of 25 patients of the trial were recruited. 4 in the group of CT-guided instillation, 8 with intraoperative instillation of the magnetic nanoparticles and 6 patients with prostate carcinoma under TRUS control. Except of two cases the instillation was successful and at least one thermotherapy could be performed. Temperatures between 40 and 46 o C could be measured whereas calculated temperatures ranged between 42 and 52 o C. Field

  3. A randomised controlled feasibility trial for an educational school-based mental health intervention: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Katharine Elizabeth; Patterson, Paul; Torgerson, Carole; Turner, Erin; Birchwood, Max

    2012-03-22

    With the burden of mental illness estimated to be costing the English economy alone around £22.5 billion a year 1, coupled with growing evidence that many mental disorders have their origins in adolescence, there is increasing pressure for schools to address the emotional well-being of their students, alongside the stigma and discrimination of mental illness. A number of prior educational interventions have been developed and evaluated for this purpose, but inconsistency of findings, reporting standards, and methodologies have led the majority of reviewers to conclude that the evidence for the efficacy of these programmes remains inconclusive. A cluster randomised controlled trial design has been employed to enable a feasibility study of 'SchoolSpace', an intervention in 7 UK secondary schools addressing stigma of mental illness, mental health literacy, and promotion of mental health. A central aspect of the intervention involves students in the experimental condition interacting with a young person with lived experience of mental illness, a stigma reducing technique designed to facilitate students' engagement in the project. The primary outcome is the level of stigma related to mental illness. Secondary outcomes include mental health literacy, resilience to mental illness, and emotional well-being. Outcomes will be measured pre and post intervention, as well as at 6 month follow-up. The proposed intervention presents the potential for increased engagement due to its combination of education and contact with a young person with lived experience of mental illness. Contact as a technique to reduce discrimination has been evaluated previously in research with adults, but has been employed in only a minority of research trials investigating the impact on youth. Prior to this study, the effect of contact on mental health literacy, resilience, and emotional well-being has not been evaluated to the authors' knowledge. If efficacious the intervention could provide a

  4. Engineering practice variation through provider agreement: a cluster-randomized feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarren, Madeline; Twedt, Elaine L; Mansuri, Faizmohamed M; Nelson, Philip R; Peek, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    Minimal-risk randomized trials that can be embedded in practice could facilitate learning health-care systems. A cluster-randomized design was proposed to compare treatment strategies by assigning clusters (eg, providers) to "favor" a particular drug, with providers retaining autonomy for specific patients. Patient informed consent might be waived, broadening inclusion. However, it is not known if providers will adhere to the assignment or whether institutional review boards will waive consent. We evaluated the feasibility of this trial design. Agreeable providers were randomized to "favor" either hydrochlorothiazide or chlorthalidone when starting patients on thiazide-type therapy for hypertension. The assignment applied when the provider had already decided to start a thiazide, and providers could deviate from the strategy as needed. Prescriptions were aggregated to produce a provider strategy-adherence rate. All four institutional review boards waived documentation of patient consent. Providers (n=18) followed their assigned strategy for most of their new thiazide prescriptions (n=138 patients). In the "favor hydrochlorothiazide" group, there was 99% adherence to that strategy. In the "favor chlorthalidone" group, chlorthalidone comprised 77% of new thiazide starts, up from 1% in the pre-study period. When the assigned strategy was followed, dosing in the recommended range was 48% for hydrochlorothiazide (25-50 mg/day) and 100% for chlorthalidone (12.5-25.0 mg/day). Providers were motivated to participate by a desire to contribute to a comparative effectiveness study. A study promotional mug, provider information letter, and interactions with the site investigator were identified as most helpful in reminding providers of their study drug strategy. Providers prescribed according to an assigned drug-choice strategy most of the time for the purpose of a comparative effectiveness study. This simple design could facilitate research participation and behavior change

  5. Guided imagery targeting exercise, food cravings, and stress: a multi-modal randomized feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Peter; Long, Dustin; Nolan, Richard; Shawley, Samantha; Johnson, Kelsey; Misra, Ranjita

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this randomized wait-list controlled trial was to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a guided imagery based multi-behavior intervention intended to address psychological stress, food cravings, and physical activity. Personalized guided imagery scripts were created and participants were instructed to practice guided imagery every day for 35 consecutive days. Of 48 women who enrolled, we report comparisons between 16 randomized to treatment with 19 who were wait-listed (overall M age  = 45.50; M bodymassindex  = 31.43). Study completers reported 89% compliance with practicing guided imagery during the intervention. A significant time-by-group interaction was observed with reductions in food cravings and increases in physical activity compared with wait-list controls. Telephone-based multi-behavior interventions that utilize guided imagery to address food cravings and exercise behavior appear to be acceptable for overweight and obese women. Future phone-based guided imagery research testing this skill to address multiple health behaviors is justified.

  6. A Feasibility Trial of Mental Health First Aid First Nations: Acceptability, Cultural Adaptation, and Preliminary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Claire V; Lapp, Andrea; Auger, Monique; van der Woerd, Kim; Snowshoe, Angela; Rogers, Billie Jo; Tsuruda, Samantha; Caron, Cassidy

    2018-03-25

    The Mental Health First Aid First Nations course was adapted from Mental Health First Aid Basic to create a community-based, culturally safe and relevant approach to promoting mental health literacy in First Nations contexts. Over 2.5 days, the course aims to build community capacity by teaching individuals to recognize and respond to mental health crises. This feasibility trial utilized mixed methods to evaluate the acceptability, cultural adaptation, and preliminary effectiveness of MHFAFN. Our approach was grounded in community-based participatory research principles, emphasizing relationship-driven procedures to collecting data and choice for how participants shared their voices. Data included participant interviews (n = 89), and surveys (n = 91) from 10 groups in four provinces. Surveys contained open-ended questions, retrospective pre-post ratings, and a scenario. We utilized data from nine facilitator interviews and 24 facilitator implementation surveys. The different lines of evidence converged to highlight strong acceptability, mixed reactions to the cultural adaptation, and gains in participants' knowledge, mental health first aid skill application, awareness, and self-efficacy, and reductions in stigma beliefs. Beyond promoting individual gains, the course served as a community-wide prevention approach by situating mental health in a colonial context and highlighting local resources and cultural strengths for promoting mental well-being. © 2018 The Authors American Journal of Community Psychology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Community Research and Action.

  7. Haptic-based neurorehabilitation in poststroke patients: a feasibility prospective multicentre trial for robotics hand rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turolla, Andrea; Daud Albasini, Omar A; Oboe, Roberto; Agostini, Michela; Tonin, Paolo; Paolucci, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Venneri, Annalena; Piron, Lamberto

    2013-01-01

    Background. Haptic robots allow the exploitation of known motor learning mechanisms, representing a valuable option for motor treatment after stroke. The aim of this feasibility multicentre study was to test the clinical efficacy of a haptic prototype, for the recovery of hand function after stroke. Methods. A prospective pilot clinical trial was planned on 15 consecutive patients enrolled in 3 rehabilitation centre in Italy. All the framework features of the haptic robot (e.g., control loop, external communication, and graphic rendering for virtual reality) were implemented into a real-time MATLAB/Simulink environment, controlling a five-bar linkage able to provide forces up to 20 [N] at the end effector, used for finger and hand rehabilitation therapies. Clinical (i.e., Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale; nine hold pegboard test) and kinematics (i.e., time; velocity; jerk metric; normalized jerk of standard movements) outcomes were assessed before and after treatment to detect changes in patients' motor performance. Reorganization of cortical activation was detected in one patient by fMRI. Results and Conclusions. All patients showed significant improvements in both clinical and kinematic outcomes. Additionally, fMRI results suggest that the proposed approach may promote a better cortical activation in the brain.

  8. Haptic-Based Neurorehabilitation in Poststroke Patients: A Feasibility Prospective Multicentre Trial for Robotics Hand Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Turolla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Haptic robots allow the exploitation of known motorlearning mechanisms, representing a valuable option for motor treatment after stroke. The aim of this feasibility multicentre study was to test the clinical efficacy of a haptic prototype, for the recovery of hand function after stroke. Methods. A prospective pilot clinical trial was planned on 15 consecutive patients enrolled in 3 rehabilitation centre in Italy. All the framework features of the haptic robot (e.g., control loop, external communication, and graphic rendering for virtual reality were implemented into a real-time MATLAB/Simulink environment, controlling a five-bar linkage able to provide forces up to 20 [N] at the end effector, used for finger and hand rehabilitation therapies. Clinical (i.e., Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale; nine hold pegboard test and kinematics (i.e., time; velocity; jerk metric; normalized jerk of standard movements outcomes were assessed before and after treatment to detect changes in patients' motor performance. Reorganization of cortical activation was detected in one patient by fMRI. Results and Conclusions. All patients showed significant improvements in both clinical and kinematic outcomes. Additionally, fMRI results suggest that the proposed approach may promote a better cortical activation in the brain.

  9. A randomised controlled feasibility trial for an educational school-based mental health intervention: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisholm Katharine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the burden of mental illness estimated to be costing the English economy alone around £22.5 billion a year 1, coupled with growing evidence that many mental disorders have their origins in adolescence, there is increasing pressure for schools to address the emotional well-being of their students, alongside the stigma and discrimination of mental illness. A number of prior educational interventions have been developed and evaluated for this purpose, but inconsistency of findings, reporting standards, and methodologies have led the majority of reviewers to conclude that the evidence for the efficacy of these programmes remains inconclusive. Methods/Design A cluster randomised controlled trial design has been employed to enable a feasibility study of 'SchoolSpace', an intervention in 7 UK secondary schools addressing stigma of mental illness, mental health literacy, and promotion of mental health. A central aspect of the intervention involves students in the experimental condition interacting with a young person with lived experience of mental illness, a stigma reducing technique designed to facilitate students' engagement in the project. The primary outcome is the level of stigma related to mental illness. Secondary outcomes include mental health literacy, resilience to mental illness, and emotional well-being. Outcomes will be measured pre and post intervention, as well as at 6 month follow-up. Discussion The proposed intervention presents the potential for increased engagement due to its combination of education and contact with a young person with lived experience of mental illness. Contact as a technique to reduce discrimination has been evaluated previously in research with adults, but has been employed in only a minority of research trials investigating the impact on youth. Prior to this study, the effect of contact on mental health literacy, resilience, and emotional well-being has not been evaluated to the authors

  10. A randomised controlled trial of a smoking cessation intervention delivered by dental hygienists: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins William

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco use continues to be a global public health problem. Helping patients to quit is part of the preventive role of all health professionals. There is now increasing interest in the role that the dental team can play in helping their patients to quit smoking. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of undertaking a randomised controlled smoking cessation intervention, utilising dental hygienists to deliver tobacco cessation advice to a cohort of periodontal patients. Methods One hundred and eighteen patients who attended consultant clinics in an outpatient dental hospital department (Periodontology were recruited into a trial. Data were available for 116 participants, 59 intervention and 57 control, and were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The intervention group received smoking cessation advice based on the 5As (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange follow-up and were offered nicotine replacement therapy (NRT, whereas the control group received 'usual care'. Outcome measures included self-reported smoking cessation, verified by salivary cotinine measurement and CO measurements. Self-reported measures in those trial participants who did not quit included number and length of quit attempts and reduction in smoking. Results At 3 months, 9/59 (15% of the intervention group had quit compared to 5/57 (9% of the controls. At 6 months, 6/59 (10% of the intervention group quit compared to 3/57 (5% of the controls. At one year, there were 4/59 (7% intervention quitters, compared to 2/59 (4% control quitters. In participants who described themselves as smokers, at 3 and 6 months, a statistically higher percentage of intervention participants reported that they had had a quit attempt of at least one week in the preceding 3 months (37% and 47%, for the intervention group respectively, compared with 18% and 16% for the control group. Conclusion This study has shown the potential that trained dental hygienists

  11. Facilitating return to work through early specialist health-based interventions (FRESH): protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Kathryn A; Phillips, Julie; Jones, Trevor; Gibson, Ali; Sutton, Chris; Watkins, Caroline; Sach, Tracey; Duley, Lelia; Walker, Marion; Drummond, Avril; Hoffman, Karen; O'Connor, Rory; Forshaw, Denise; Shakespeare, David

    2015-01-01

    Over one million people sustain traumatic brain injury each year in the UK and more than 10 % of these are moderate or severe injuries, resulting in cognitive and psychological problems that affect the ability to work. Returning to work is a primary rehabilitation goal but fewer than half of traumatic brain injury survivors achieve this. Work is a recognised health service outcome, yet UK service provision varies widely and there is little robust evidence to inform rehabilitation practice. A single-centre cohort comparison suggested better work outcomes may be achieved through early occupational therapy targeted at job retention. This study aims to determine whether this intervention can be delivered in three new trauma centres and to conduct a feasibility, randomised controlled trial to determine whether its effects and cost effectiveness can be measured to inform a definitive trial. Mixed methods study, including feasibility randomised controlled trial, embedded qualitative studies and feasibility economic evaluation will recruit 102 people with traumatic brain injury and their nominated carers from three English UK National Health Service (NHS) trauma centres. Participants will be randomised to receive either usual NHS rehabilitation or usual rehabilitation plus early specialist traumatic brain injury vocational rehabilitation delivered by an occupational therapist. The primary objective is to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial; secondary objectives include measurement of protocol integrity (inclusion/exclusion criteria, intervention adherence, reasons for non-adherence) recruitment rate, the proportion of eligible patients recruited, reasons for non-recruitment, spectrum of TBI severity, proportion of and reasons for loss to follow-up, completeness of data collection, gains in face-to-face V s postal data collection and the most appropriate methods of measuring primary outcomes (return to work, retention) to determine the sample size for a

  12. Feasibility, safety, acceptability, and functional outcomes of playing Nintendo Wii Fit Plus™ for frail elderly: study protocol for a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Gisele Cristine Vieira; Bacha, Jéssica Maria Ribeiro; do Socorro Simões, Maria; Lin, Sumika Mori; Viveiro, Larissa Alamino Pereira; Varise, Eliana Maria; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Pompeu, José Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Frailty can be defined as a medical syndrome with multiple causes and contributors, characterized by diminished strength and endurance and reduced physiological function that increases the vulnerability to develop functional dependency and/or death. Studies have shown that the most commonly studied exercise protocol for frail older adults is the multimodal training. Interactive video games (IVGs) involve tasks in virtual environments that combine physical and cognitive demands in an attractive and challenging way. The aim of this study will be to evaluate the feasibility, safety, acceptability, and functional outcomes of playing Nintendo Wii Fit Plus TM (NWFP) for frail older adults. The study is a randomized controlled, parallel group, feasibility trial. Participants will be randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG) and control group (CG). The EG will participate in 14 training sessions, each lasting 50 min, twice a week. In each training session, the participants will play five games, with three attempts at each game. The first attempt will be performed with the assistance of a physical therapist to correct the movements and posture of the patients and subsequent attempts will be performed independently. Scores achieved in the games will be recorded. The participants will be evaluated by a blinded physical therapist at three moments: before and after intervention and 30 days after the end of the intervention (follow-up). We will assess the feasibility, acceptability, safety, and clinical outcomes (postural control, gait, cognition, quality of life, mood, and fear of falling). Due to the deficiencies in multiple systems, studies have shown that multimodal interventions including motor-cognitive stimulation can improve the mobility of frail elderly adults. IVGs, among them the NWFP, are considered as a multimodal motor-cognitive intervention that can potentially improve motor and cognitive functions in the frail elderly. However, there is still no evidence

  13. Ethics Review of Pediatric Multi-Center Drug Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Needham, Allison C.; Kapadia, Mufiza Z.; Offringa, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of safety and efficacy of therapeutics for children and adolescents requires the use of multi-centered designs. However, the need to obtain ethical approval from multiple independent research ethics boards (REBs) presents as a challenge to investigators and sponsors who must consider

  14. Novel, Family-Centered Intervention to Improve Nutrition in Patients Recovering From Critical Illness: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrea P; Lemieux, Margot; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Seyler, Hilda; MacEachern, Kristen N; Heyland, Daren K

    2017-06-01

    Critically ill patients are at increased risk of developing malnutrition-related complications because of physiological changes, suboptimal delivery, and reduced intake. Strategies to improve nutrition during critical illness recovery are required to prevent iatrogenic underfeeding and risk of malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a novel family-centered intervention to improve nutrition in critically ill patients. A 3-phase, prospective cohort feasibility study was conducted in 4 intensive care units (ICUs) across 2 countries. Intervention feasibility was determined by patient eligibility, recruitment, and retention rates. The acceptability of the intervention was assessed by participant perspectives collected through surveys. Participants included family members of the critically ill patients and ICU and ward healthcare professionals (HCPs). A total of 75 patients and family members, as well as 56 HCPs, were enrolled. The consent rate was 66.4%, and 63 of 75 (84%) of family participants completed the study. Most family members (53/55; 98.1%) would recommend the nutrition education program to others and reported improved ability to ask questions about nutrition (16/20; 80.0%). Family members viewed nutrition care more positively in the ICU. HCPs agreed that families should partner with HCPs to achieve optimal nutrition in the ICU and the wards. Health literacy was identified as a potential barrier to family participation. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to families of critically ill patients and HCPs. Further research to evaluate intervention impact on nutrition intake and patient-centered outcomes is required.

  15. [Acceptability and feasibility among primary care doctors of the opportunistic search for HIV in Health Care centers in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes Torres, Rafael Carlos; Aguado Taberné, Cristina; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Espejo Espejo, José; Castro Fernández, Cristina; Fransi Galiana, Luis

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of the opportunistic search of HIV according to primary care doctors' experience. To set up the profile of the physician involved in this study. Observational, transversal study. Primary Care Centers of the National Health System. General practitioners and residents who participated in VIH-AP study to measure the acceptability of HIV opportunistic search by patients. Self-filling survey to collect data on age, sex, teaching skills, amount of years dedicated to research, time working with the same quota of patients, acceptability and feasibility of opportunistic HIV search. A total of 197 physicians with a mean age of 45.2±9.7 (SD) years. 18.8% were under 36years old, 70.1% were women and 62.4% had teaching skills. 55.8% worked in towns with a population over 100,000 inhabitants and the mean of years working with the same quota of patients was 6.4±6.6. 91.9% (95%CI: 88.1-98.7) of them considered the opportunistic search of HIV acceptable and 89.3% (95%CI: 85.0-93.6), feasible to perform. The multivariate analysis showed positive relation between the acceptability/feasibility and teaching skills (OR: 2.74; 95%CI: 1.16-6.49). The acceptance of the screening by patients was 93.1% and this was positively related to how long the doctor had worked with the same quota, teaching skills and the amount of years dedicated to research. HIV opportunistic search is an acceptable and feasible method for primary care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial: study protocol, rationale and feasibility of a randomised multicentre trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vester-Andersen Morten

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim of the present trial is to evaluate the effect of postoperative intermediate care following emergency major abdominal surgery in high-risk patients. Methods and design The InCare trial is a randomised, parallel-group, non-blinded clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Patients undergoing emergency laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery with a perioperative Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 10 or above, who are ready to be transferred to the surgical ward within 24 h of surgery are allocated to either intermediate care for 48 h, or surgical ward care. The primary outcome measure is all-cause 30-day mortality. We aim to enrol 400 patients in seven Danish hospitals. The sample size allows us to detect or refute a 34% relative risk reduction of mortality with 80% power. Discussion This trial evaluates the benefits and possible harm of intermediate care. The results may potentially influence the survival of many high-risk surgical patients. As a pioneer trial in the area, it will provide important data on the feasibility of future large-scale randomised clinical trials evaluating different levels of postoperative care. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01209663

  17. Feasibility study for automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch, National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, W.F.; Fisher, E.R.; Barton, G.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch of the National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, Colorado, is explored. The goals of the chemistry laboratory are defined, and instrumental methods and other tasks to be automated are described. Five optional automation systems are proposed to meet these goals and the options are evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and other specified criteria. The instruments to be automated include (1) a Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 403, (2) Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 306, (3) Technicon AutoAnalyzer II, (4) Mettler electronic balance, and a (5) Jarrell-Ash ICP emission spectrometer

  18. Many multicenter trials had few events per center, requiring analysis via random-effects models or GEEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Brennan C; Harhay, Michael O

    2015-12-01

    Adjustment for center in multicenter trials is recommended when there are between-center differences or when randomization has been stratified by center. However, common methods of analysis (such as fixed-effects, Mantel-Haenszel, or stratified Cox models) often require a large number of patients or events per center to perform well. We reviewed 206 multicenter randomized trials published in four general medical journals to assess the average number of patients and events per center and determine whether appropriate methods of analysis were used in trials with few patients or events per center. The median number of events per center/treatment arm combination for trials using a binary or survival outcome was 3 (interquartile range, 1-10). Sixteen percent of trials had less than 1 event per center/treatment combination, 50% fewer than 3, and 63% fewer than 5. Of the trials which adjusted for center using a method of analysis which requires a large number of events per center, 6% had less than 1 event per center-treatment combination, 25% fewer than 3, and 50% fewer than 5. Methods of analysis that allow for few events per center, such as random-effects models or generalized estimating equations (GEEs), were rarely used. Many multicenter trials contain few events per center. Adjustment for center using random-effects models or GEE with model-based (non-robust) standard errors may be beneficial in these scenarios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamic feasibility of harvesting data center waste heat to drive an absorption chiller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, Anna; Sherbeck, Jon; Phelan, Patrick; Varsamopoulos, Georgios; Gupta, Sandeep K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose an alternative data center cooling architecture that is heat driven. ► Our primary source of thermal energy is the heat dissipated by the CPUs. ► Supplementary external heat sources such as solar thermal are included as well. ► We develop a comprehensive model that leads to a potentially realizable value of less than one. - Abstract: More than half the energy to run a data center can be consumed by vapor-compression equipment that cools the center. To reduce consumption and recycle otherwise wasted thermal energy, this paper proposes an alternative cooling architecture that is heat driven and leads to a more efficient data center in terms of power usage effectiveness (PUE). The primary thermal source is waste heat produced by CPUs on each server blade. The main challenge is capturing enough of this high-temperature heat to energize an absorption unit. The goal is to capture a high fraction of dissipated thermal power by using a heat capture scheme with water as the heat transfer fluid. To determine if the CPU temperature range and amount of heat are sufficient for chiller operation, we use server software, validation thermocouples, and chip specifications. We compare these results to required values from a simulator tool specific to our chiller model. One challenge is to simultaneously cool the data center and generate enough exergy to drive the cooling process, regardless of the thermal output of the data center equipment. We can address this by adding phase change latent heat storage to consistently deliver the required heat flow and, if necessary, a solar heat source. Even with zero solar contribution, the results show that the number of CPUs we have is sufficient and our PUE indicates a very efficient data center. Adding solar contribution, the steady-state model proposed leads to a potentially realizable PUE value of less than one.

  20. A Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial of the New Orleans Intervention for Infant Mental Health: A Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Pritchett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Child maltreatment is associated with life-long social, physical, and mental health problems. Intervening early to provide maltreated children with safe, nurturing care can improve outcomes. The need for prompt decisions about permanent placement (i.e., regarding adoption or return home is internationally recognised. However, a recent Glasgow audit showed that many maltreated children “revolve” between birth families and foster carers. This paper describes the protocol of the first exploratory randomised controlled trial of a mental health intervention aimed at improving placement permanency decisions for maltreated children. This trial compares an infant's mental health intervention with the new enhanced service as usual for maltreated children entering care in Glasgow. As both are new services, the trial is being conducted from a position of equipoise. The outcome assessment covers various fields of a child’s neurodevelopment to identify problems in any ESSENCE domain. The feasibility, reliability, and developmental appropriateness of all outcome measures are examined. Additionally, the potential for linkage with routinely collected data on health and social care and, in the future, education is explored. The results will inform a definitive randomised controlled trial that could potentially lead to long lasting benefits for the Scottish population and which may be applicable to other areas of the world. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NC01485510.

  1. Building trust and diversity in patient-centered oncology clinical trials: An integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Thelma C; Kaplan, Charles D; Cook, Elise D; Chilton, Janice A; Lytton, Jay S; Hawk, Ernest T; Jones, Lovell A

    2017-04-01

    contract. Contract renegotiation occurs in response to cyclical changes within the trust relationship throughout trial participation. The Integrated Model of Trust offers a novel framework to interrogate the process by which diverse populations and clinical trial teams build trust. To our knowledge, this is the first model of trust-building in clinical trials that frames trust development through integrated clinical and business perspectives. By focusing on the process, rather than outcomes of trust-building diverse trial participants, clinical trials teams, participants, and cancer centers may be able to better understand, measure, and manage their trust relationships in real time. Ultimately, this may foster increased recruitment and retention of diverse populations to clinical trials.

  2. Video-game based exercises for older people with chronic low back pain: a protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial (the GAMEBACK trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadro, Joshua Robert; Shirley, Debra; Simic, Milena; Mousavi, Seyed Javad; Ceprnja, Dragana; Maka, Katherine; Ferreira, Paulo

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility of implementing a video-game exercise programme for older people with chronic low back pain (LBP). Single-centred single-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT). Physiotherapy outpatient department in a public hospital in Western Sydney, Australia. We will recruit 60 participants over 55 years old with chronic LBP from the waiting list. Participants will be randomised to receive video-game exercise (n=30) or to remain on the waiting list (n=30) for 8 weeks, with follow up at 3 and 6 months. Participants engaging in video-game exercises will be unsupervised and will complete video-game exercise for 60minutes, 3 times per week. Participants allocated to remain on the waiting list will be encouraged to maintain their usual levels of physical activity. The primary outcomes for this feasibility study will be study processes (recruitment and response rates, adherence to and experience with the intervention, and incidence of adverse events) relevant to the future design of a large RCT. Estimates of treatment efficacy (point estimates and 95% confidence intervals) on pain self-efficacy, care seeking, physical activity, fear of movement/re-injury, pain, physical function, disability, falls-efficacy, strength, and walking speed, will be our secondary outcome measures. Recruitment for this trial began in November 2015. This study describes the rationale and processes of a feasibility study investigating a video-game exercise programme for older people with chronic LBP. Results from the feasibility study will inform on the design and sample required for a large multicentre RCT. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12615000703505. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhaled PGE1 in neonates with hypoxemic respiratory failure: two pilot feasibility randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Beena G; Keszler, Martin; Garg, Meena; Klein, Jonathan M; Ohls, Robin; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Cotten, C Michael; Malian, Monica; Sanchez, Pablo J; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Nelin, Leif D; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Bara, Rebecca; Saha, Shampa; Das, Abhik; Wallace, Dennis; Higgins, Rosemary D; Shankaran, Seetha

    2014-12-12

    Inhaled nitric oxide (INO), a selective pulmonary vasodilator, has revolutionized the treatment of neonatal hypoxemic respiratory failure (NHRF). However, there is lack of sustained improvement in 30 to 46% of infants. Aerosolized prostaglandins I2 (PGI2) and E1 (PGE1) have been reported to be effective selective pulmonary vasodilators. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of inhaled PGE1 (IPGE1) in NHRF. Two pilot multicenter phase II RCTs are included in this report. In the first pilot, late preterm and term neonates with NHRF, who had an oxygenation index (OI) of ≥15 and <25 on two arterial blood gases and had not previously received INO, were randomly assigned to receive two doses of IPGE1 (300 and 150 ng/kg/min) or placebo. The primary outcome was the enrollment of 50 infants in six to nine months at 10 sites. The first pilot was halted after four months for failure to enroll a single infant. The most common cause for non-enrollment was prior initiation of INO. In a re-designed second pilot, co-administration of IPGE1 and INO was permitted. Infants with suboptimal response to INO received either aerosolized saline or IPGE1 at a low (150 ng/kg/min) or high dose (300 ng/kg/min) for a maximum duration of 72 hours. The primary outcome was the recruitment of an adequate number of patients (n = 50) in a nine-month-period, with fewer than 20% protocol violations. No infants were enrolled in the first pilot. Seven patients were enrolled in the second pilot; three in the control, two in the low-dose IPGE1, and two in the high-dose IPGE1 groups. The study was halted for recruitment futility after approximately six months as enrollment targets were not met. No serious adverse events, one minor protocol deviation and one pharmacy protocol violation were reported. These two pilot RCTs failed to recruit adequate eligible newborns with NHRF. Complex management RCTs of novel therapies for persistent pulmonary

  4. Final Report Feasibility Study for the California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWavesm) - Volume #2 - Appendices #16-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooher, Brendan [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Ramon, CA (United States). Applied Technical Services; Toman, William I. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Inst. of Advanced Technology and Public Policy; Davy, Doug M. [CH2M Hill Engineers, Inc., Sacramento, CA (United States); Blakslee, Samuel N. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    The California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWave) Feasibility Study project was funded over multiple phases by the Department of Energy to perform an interdisciplinary feasibility assessment to analyze the engineering, permitting, and stakeholder requirements to establish an open water, fully energetic, grid connected, wave energy test center off the coast of California for the purposes of advancing U.S. wave energy research, development, and testing capabilities. Work under this grant included wave energy resource characterization, grid impact and interconnection requirements, port infrastructure and maritime industry capability/suitability to accommodate the industry at research, demonstration and commercial scale, and macro and micro siting considerations. CalWave Phase I performed a macro-siting and down-selection process focusing on two potential test sites in California: Humboldt Bay and Vandenberg Air Force Base. This work resulted in the Vandenberg Air Force Base site being chosen as the most favorable site based on a peer reviewed criteria matrix. CalWave Phase II focused on four siting location alternatives along the Vandenberg Air Force Base coastline and culminated with a final siting down-selection. Key outcomes from this work include completion of preliminary engineering and systems integration work, a robust turnkey cost estimate, shoreside and subsea hazards assessment, storm wave analysis, lessons learned reports from several maritime disciplines, test center benchmarking as compared to existing international test sites, analysis of existing applicable environmental literature, the completion of a preliminary regulatory, permitting and licensing roadmap, robust interaction and engagement with state and federal regulatory agency personnel and local stakeholders, and the population of a Draft Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Preliminary Application Document (PAD). Analysis of existing offshore oil and gas infrastructure was also performed

  5. Feasibility of a controlled trial aiming to prevent excessive pregnancy-related weight gain in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiderpass Elisabete

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention may predispose women to long-term overweight and other health problems. Intervention studies aiming at preventing excessive pregnancy-related weight gain are needed. The feasibility of implementing such a study protocol in primary health care setting was evaluated in this pilot study. Methods A non-randomized controlled trial was conducted in three intervention and three control maternity and child health clinics in primary health care in Finland. Altogether, 132 pregnant and 92 postpartum women and 23 public health nurses (PHN participated in the study. The intervention consisted of individual counselling on physical activity and diet at five routine visits to a PHN and of an option for supervised group exercise until 37 weeks' gestation or ten months postpartum. The control clinics continued their usual care. The components of the feasibility evaluation were 1 recruitment and participation, 2 completion of data collection, 3 realization of the intervention and 4 the public health nurses' experiences. Results 1 The recruitment rate was slower than expected and the recruitment period had to be prolonged from the initially planned three months to six months. The average participation rate of eligible women at study enrolment was 77% and the drop-out rate 15%. 2 In total, 99% of the data on weight, physical activity and diet and 96% of the blood samples were obtained. 3 In the intervention clinics, 98% of the counselling sessions were realized, their contents and average durations were as intended, 87% of participants regularly completed the weekly records for physical activity and diet, and the average participation percentage in the group exercise sessions was 45%. 4 The PHNs regarded the extra training as a major advantage and the high additional workload as a disadvantage of the study. Conclusion The study protocol was mostly feasible to implement, which

  6. Feasibility of Pilates exercise to decrease falls risk: a pilot randomized controlled trial in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Talevski, Jason; Bohensky, Megan A; Brand, Caroline A; Cameron, Peter A; Morello, Renata T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of Pilates exercise in older people to decrease falls risk and inform a larger trial. Pilot Randomized controlled trial. Community physiotherapy clinic. A total of 53 community-dwelling people aged ⩾60 years (mean age, 69.3 years; age range, 61-84). A 60-minute Pilates class incorporating best practice guidelines for exercise to prevent falls, performed twice weekly for 12 weeks. All participants received a letter to their general practitioner with falls risk information, fall and fracture prevention education and home exercises. Indicators of feasibility included: acceptability (recruitment, retention, intervention adherence and participant experience survey); safety (adverse events); and potential effectiveness (fall, fall injury and injurious fall rates; standing balance; lower limb strength; and flexibility) measured at 12 and 24 weeks. Recruitment was achievable but control group drop-outs were high (23%). Of the 20 participants who completed the intervention, 19 (95%) attended ⩾75% of the classes and reported classes were enjoyable and would recommend them to others. The rate of fall injuries at 24 weeks was 42% lower and injurious fall rates 64% lower in the Pilates group, however, was not statistically significant (P = 0.347 and P = 0.136). Standing balance, lower-limb strength and flexibility improved in the Pilates group relative to the control group (P fall injury rates. A definitive randomized controlled trial analysing the effect of Pilates in older people would be feasible and is warranted given the acceptability and potential positive effects of Pilates on fall injuries and fall risk factors. The protocol for this study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN1262000224820). © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Economic feasibility study of regional centers for nuclear fuel reprocessing in the developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakeshloo, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel cycle costs for the following three different economic alternatives were studied: (1) Reprocessing in an industrialized country (such as the U.S.); (2) Reprocessing in the individual developing country; (3) Reprocessing in a regional center. The nuclear fuel cycle cost for the ''Throw-away'' fuel cycle was evaluated. Among the six regions which were considered in this study, region one (South America including Mexico) was selected for the economic analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle for the above three alternatives. For evaluation of the cases where the fuel is reprocessed in a regional center or in an individual developing country, a unit reprocessing cost equation was developed. An economic evaluation was developed to estimate the least expensive method for transporting radioactive nuclear material by either leased or purchased shipping casks. The necessary equations were also developed for estimating plutonium transportation and the safeguard costs. On the basis of nuclear material and services requirements and unit costs for each component, the levelized nuclear fuel cycle costs for each alternative were estimated. Finally, by a comparison of cost, among these three alternatives plus the ''Throw-away'' case,it was found that it is not at all economical to build individual reprocessing plants inside the developing countries in region one. However, it also was found that the economic advantage of a regional center with respect to the first alternative is less than a 4% difference between their total fuel cycle costs. It is concluded that there is no great economic advantage in any developing countries to seek to process their fuel in one of the advanced countries. Construction of regional reprocessing centers is an economically viable concept

  8. Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for renal fatigue (BReF):a feasibility randomised-controlled trial of CBT for the management of fatigue in haemodialysis (HD) patients

    OpenAIRE

    Picariello, Federica; Moss-Morris, Rona; Macdougall, Iain C.; Norton, Sam; Da Silva-Gane, Maria; Farrington, Ken; Clayton, Hope; Chilcot, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Fatigue is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in end-stage kidney disease, particularly among in-centre haemodialysis patients. This two-arm parallel group feasibility randomised controlled trial will determine whether a fully powered efficacy trial is achievable by examining the feasibility of recruitment, acceptability and potential benefits of a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based intervention for fatigue among in-centre haemodialysis patients.Methods We aim t...

  9. Randomised controlled feasibility trial of an evidence-informed behavioural intervention for obese adults with additional risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko F Sniehotta

    Full Text Available Interventions for dietary and physical activity changes in obese adults may be less effective for participants with additional obesity-related risk factors and co-morbidities than for otherwise healthy individuals. This study aimed to test the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment, allocation, measurement, retention and intervention procedures of a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve physical activity and dietary practices amongst obese adults with additional obesity related risk factors.Pilot single centre open-labelled outcome assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial of obese (Body Mass Index (BMI≥30 kg/m2 adults (age≥18 y with obesity related co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension. Participants were randomly allocated to a manual-based group intervention or a leaflet control condition in accordance to a 2∶1 allocation ratio. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures, secondary outcomes included measures of body composition, physical activity, food intake and psychological process measures.Out of 806 potentially eligible individuals identified through list searches in two primary care general medical practices N = 81 participants (63% female; mean-age = 56.56(11.44; mean-BMI = 36.73(6.06 with 2.35(1.47 co-morbidities were randomised. Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD was the only significant predictor of providing consent to take part in the study (higher chances of consent for invitees with lower levels of deprivation. Participant flowcharts, qualitative and quantitative feedback suggested good acceptance and feasibility of intervention procedures but 34.6% of randomised participants were lost to follow-up due to overly high measurement burden and sub-optimal retention procedures. Participants in the intervention group showed positive trends for most psychological, behavioural and body composition outcomes

  10. Texas Manufacturing Technology Center feasibility study for the Inland Regional Industrial Technology Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This document presents the Texas Manufacturing Technology Center (TMTC) Business Plan to convert the Central Facility of the Superconducting Super Collider project to alternate uses. The plan is divided into six sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Market and Benefit Analysis, (3) Marketing Strategy, (4) Services, (5) Organization and Operations Overview, and (6) Financial Plan. Each area is supported by separate documents that address individual opportunities and challenges associated with transitioning the facility, and its asset base to new uses for benefit of the locality, state, region and nation

  11. The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH): intervention, implementation, and feasibility for elementary schools in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C L; Sellers, D E; Johnson, C; Pedersen, S; Bachman, K J; Parcel, G S; Stone, E J; Luepker, R V; Wu, M; Nader, P R; Cook, K

    1997-12-01

    The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) was the largest school-based field trial ever sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The trial demonstrated positive changes in the school food service and physical education program, as well as in students' cardiovascular health behaviors. Because the CATCH intervention programs were implemented in 56 schools (in four states) that were typical of schools throughout the United States, their reception by schools and degree of implementation provide evidence about their feasibility for schools nationally. Extensive process evaluation data were collected from students, teachers, school food service personnel, and physical education specialists throughout the three school years of the CATCH intervention. Four of the CATCH programs--school food service, physical education, classroom curricula, and home programs--were assessed over the three school years. The process data provide information on participation, dose, fidelity, and compatibility of the CATCH programs in the intervention schools for these programs. High levels of participation, dose, fidelity, and compatibility were observed for the four programs during the 3 school years. CATCH emerges as a model of a feasible multilevel health promotion program to improve eating and exercise behaviors for elementary schools in the United States.

  12. A qualitative feasibility study to inform a randomised controlled trial of fluid bolus therapy in septic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hara, Caitlin B; Canter, Ruth R; Mouncey, Paul R; Carter, Anjali; Jones, Nicola; Nadel, Simon; Peters, Mark J; Lyttle, Mark D; Harrison, David A; Rowan, Kathryn M; Inwald, David; Woolfall, Kerry

    2018-01-01

    Objective The Fluids in Shock (FiSh) Trial proposes to evaluate whether restrictive fluid bolus therapy (10 mL/kg) is more beneficial than current recommended practice (20 mL/kg) in the resuscitation of children with septic shock in the UK. This qualitative feasibility study aimed to explore acceptability of the FiSh Trial, including research without prior consent (RWPC), potential barriers to recruitment and participant information for a pilot trial. Design Qualitative interview study involving parents of children who had presented to a UK emergency department or been admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit with severe infection in the previous 3 years. Participants Twenty-one parents (seven bereaved) were interviewed 16 (median) months since their child’s hospital admission (range: 1–41). Results All parents said they would have provided consent for the use of their child’s data in the FiSh Trial. The majority were unfamiliar with RWPC, yet supported its use. Parents were initially concerned about the change from currently recommended treatment, yet were reassured by explanations of the current evidence base, fluid bolus therapy and monitoring procedures. Parents made recommendations about the timing of the research discussion and content of participant information. Bereaved parents stated that recruiters should not discuss research immediately after a child’s death, but supported a personalised postal ‘opt-out’ approach to consent. Conclusions Findings show that parents whose child has experienced severe infection supported the proposed FiSh Trial, including the use of RWPC. Parents’ views informed the development of the pilot trial protocol and site staff training. Trial registration number ISRCTN15244462—results. PMID:28847877

  13. Is high-intensity interval cycling feasible and more beneficial than continuous cycling for knee osteoarthritic patients? Results of a randomised control feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W; Grigg, Josephine; Vertullo, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients often suffer joint pain and stiffness, which contributes to negative changes in body composition, strength, physical performance (function), physical activity and health-related quality of life. To reduce these symptoms and side effects of knee OA, moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) cycling is often recommended. While resistance training is considered the optimal form of training to improve sarcopenic outcomes, it imposes higher joint loads and requires supervision, either initially or continuously by trained exercise professionals. Therefore, this pilot study sought to gain some insight into the feasibility and potential benefits of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) cycling as an alternative exercise option to MICT cycling for individuals with knee OA. Twenty-seven middle-aged and older adults with knee OA were randomly allocated to either MICT or HIIT, with both programs involving four unsupervised home-based cycling sessions (∼25 min per session) each week for eight weeks. Feasibility was assessed by enrolment rate, withdrawal rate, exercise adherence and number of adverse effects. Efficacy was assessed by health-related quality of life (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Lequesne index), physical function (Timed Up and Go (TUG), Sit to Stand (STS) and preferred gait speed) and body composition (body mass, BMI, body fat percentage and muscle mass). Twenty-seven of the interested 50 potential participants (54%) enrolled in the study, with 17 of the 27 participants completing the trial (withdrawal rate of 37%); with the primary withdrawal reasons being unrelated injuries or illness or family related issues. Of the 17 participants who completed the trial, exercise adherence was very high (HIIT 94%; MICT 88%). While only three individuals (one in the MICT and two in the HIIT group) reported adverse events, a total of 28 adverse events were reported, with 24 of these

  14. Is high-intensity interval cycling feasible and more beneficial than continuous cycling for knee osteoarthritic patients? Results of a randomised control feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Keogh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA patients often suffer joint pain and stiffness, which contributes to negative changes in body composition, strength, physical performance (function, physical activity and health-related quality of life. To reduce these symptoms and side effects of knee OA, moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT cycling is often recommended. While resistance training is considered the optimal form of training to improve sarcopenic outcomes, it imposes higher joint loads and requires supervision, either initially or continuously by trained exercise professionals. Therefore, this pilot study sought to gain some insight into the feasibility and potential benefits of high-intensity interval training (HIIT cycling as an alternative exercise option to MICT cycling for individuals with knee OA. Methods Twenty-seven middle-aged and older adults with knee OA were randomly allocated to either MICT or HIIT, with both programs involving four unsupervised home-based cycling sessions (∼25 min per session each week for eight weeks. Feasibility was assessed by enrolment rate, withdrawal rate, exercise adherence and number of adverse effects. Efficacy was assessed by health-related quality of life (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC and Lequesne index, physical function (Timed Up and Go (TUG, Sit to Stand (STS and preferred gait speed and body composition (body mass, BMI, body fat percentage and muscle mass. Results Twenty-seven of the interested 50 potential participants (54% enrolled in the study, with 17 of the 27 participants completing the trial (withdrawal rate of 37%; with the primary withdrawal reasons being unrelated injuries or illness or family related issues. Of the 17 participants who completed the trial, exercise adherence was very high (HIIT 94%; MICT 88%. While only three individuals (one in the MICT and two in the HIIT group reported adverse events, a total of 28 adverse events were

  15. Technical and financial feasibility of an inferior vena cava filter retrieval program at a level one trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Leake, Samuel S; Sola, Cristina N; Sandhu, Harleen K; Albarado, Rondel; Holcomb, John B; Miller, Charles C; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Considering new guidelines for retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs), we examine our initial experience after establishing a comprehensive filter removal program in our level 1 trauma center. We evaluated the technical and financial feasibility of this program and barriers to IVCF retrieval, including insurance status and costs, in trauma patients. Trauma patients receiving IVCFs from May 2011 to 2013 were consented and prospectively enrolled in the study program. Retrieval rates were assessed for the years before study initiation. Primary outcome was IVCF retrieval. Hospital financial data for retrieval were examined and univariate analysis performed. Hospital cost-to-charge and payment-to-charge ratios were assessed. Before study initiation from April 2009 to 2011, 66 IVCFs were placed in trauma patients with only 2 retrievals in 2 years. During the study period, 247 trauma patients had IVCF placement of which 111 (45%) were enrolled. The main reason for nonenrollment was lack of referral by the implanting team. Retrieval was attempted in 100 outpatients with success in 85 (85%). Patients enrolled in the program were more likely to have their filters removed (73% vs. 18%; odds ratio, 12.6; 95% confidence interval, 6.6-24.3; P financially feasible without loss to the health care system even in regions with high rates of uninsured. A major barrier to successful filter retrieval was lack of patient referral into the program by implanting physicians. Hospital administration and physician outreach are important determinants of successful IVCF retrieval in trauma patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The feasibility of progressive resistance training in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizza, Lisa; Smith, Caroline A; Swaraj, Soji; Agho, Kingsley; Cheema, Birinder S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of executing a randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training (PRT) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS were randomized to an experimental (PRT) group or a no-exercise (usual care) control group. The PRT group was prescribed two supervised and two unsupervised (home-based) training sessions per week for 12 weeks. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment and attrition, adherence, adverse events, and completion of assessments. Secondary outcomes, collected pre and post intervention, included a range of pertinent physiological, functional and psychological measures. Fifteen participants were randomised into the PRT group (n = 8) or control group (n = 7); five women (n = 2 in PRT group and n = 3 in control group) withdrew from the study. The most successful recruitment sources were Facebook (40 %) and online advertisement (27 %), while least successful methods were referrals by clinicians, colleagues and flyers. In the PRT group, attendance to supervised sessions was higher (95 %; standard deviation ±6 %) compared to unsupervised sessions (51 %; standard deviation ±28 %). No adverse events were attributed to PRT. Change in menstrual cycle status was not significantly different between groups over time (p = 0.503). However, the PRT group significantly increased body weight (p = 0.01), BMI (p = 0.04), lean mass (p = 0.01), fat-free mass (p = 0.005) and lower body strength (p = 0.03), while reducing waist circumference (p = 0.03) and HbA1c (p = 0.033) versus the control group. The PRT group also significantly improved across several domains of disease-specific and general health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety and exercise self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial of PRT in PCOS would be feasible, and this mode of exercise may elicit a therapeutic effect on clinically important outcomes in this cohort. The success of a large

  17. Feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of ice therapy in patients with an acute tear in the gastrocnemius muscle: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.C.M.; Stubbe, J.H.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Scheffers, F.A.; Dongen, M.C.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial and the preliminary effectiveness of ice therapy in the acute phase of a gastrocnemius tear for the quality of functional recovery. Design: A pilot version of an intended prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was

  18. Feasibility of ISO 14000 certification for the RA-6 reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gho, Carlos J.

    2003-01-01

    The strengths and weaknesses of a proposal to set up a System for the Environmental Management of RA-6 reactor are reviewed. With this aim: The facility, its surroundings, its institutional frame, and the links of both the National Atomic Energy Commission and the Bariloche Atomic Center with the environmental issues are described. The RA-6 past and present regarding the environment is analyzed. The existence of an abundant documentation on procedures and manuals for administrative and technical management, as well as records of environmental behavior is determined. A summary is made of the work done with the staff in order to assess their motivation to develop this type of initiative, and their degree of knowledge and awareness of environmental issues. It is worthy to point out the high professional training of the RA-6 staff. This information is analyzed under the point of view of ISO 14001 both text and philosophy. It is shown that there exist important strengths that enable to face a concrete project, and that the weaknesses are few, most of them can be overcome somehow easily. The opportunity is remarkable. Conclusion is made that RA-6 is not only in optimal conditions to face successfully the implementation of an Environmental Management System, but it has already a rudimentary one

  19. Culturally adaptive storytelling intervention versus didactic intervention to improve hypertension control in Vietnam: a cluster-randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa L; Allison, Jeroan J; Ha, Duc A; Chiriboga, Germán; Ly, Ha N; Tran, Hanh T; Nguyen, Cuong K; Dang, Diem M; Phan, Ngoc T; Vu, Nguyen C; Nguyen, Quang P; Goldberg, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Vietnam is experiencing an epidemiologic transition with an increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Novel, large-scale, effective, and sustainable interventions to control hypertension in Vietnam are needed. We report the results of a cluster-randomized feasibility trial at 3 months follow-up conducted in Hung Yen province, Vietnam, designed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of two community-based interventions to improve hypertension control: a "storytelling" intervention, "We Talk about Our Hypertension," and a didactic intervention. The storytelling intervention included stories about strategies for coping with hypertension, with patients speaking in their own words, and didactic content about the importance of healthy lifestyle behaviors including salt reduction and exercise. The didactic intervention included only didactic content. The storytelling intervention was delivered by two DVDs at 3-month intervals; the didactic intervention included only one installment. The trial was conducted in four communes, equally randomized to the two interventions. The mean age of the 160 study patients was 66 years, and 54% were men. Most participants described both interventions as understandable, informative, and motivational. Between baseline and 3 months, mean systolic blood pressure declined by 8.2 mmHg (95% CI 4.1-12.2) in the storytelling group and by 5.5 mmHg (95% CI 1.4-9.5) in the didactic group. The storytelling group also reported a significant increase in hypertension medication adherence. Both interventions were well accepted in several rural communities and were shown to be potentially effective in lowering blood pressure. A large-scale randomized trial is needed to compare the effectiveness of the two interventions in controlling hypertension. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02483780.

  20. Feasibility and acceptability of the DSM-5 Field Trial procedures in the Johns Hopkins Community Psychiatry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E; Wilcox, Holly C; Miller, Leslie; Cullen, Bernadette; Gerring, Joan; Greiner, Lisa H; Newcomer, Alison; McKitty, Mellisha V; Regier, Darrel A; Narrow, William E

    2014-06-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) contains criteria for psychiatric diagnoses that reflect advances in the science and conceptualization of mental disorders and address the needs of clinicians. DSM-5 also recommends research on dimensional measures of cross-cutting symptoms and diagnostic severity, which are expected to better capture patients' experiences with mental disorders. Prior to its May 2013 release, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) conducted field trials to examine the feasibility, clinical utility, reliability, and where possible, the validity of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and dimensional measures. The methods and measures proposed for the DSM-5 field trials were pilot tested in adult and child/adolescent clinical samples, with the goal to identify and correct design and procedural problems with the proposed methods before resources were expended for the larger DSM-5 Field Trials. Results allowed for the refinement of the protocols, procedures, and measures, which facilitated recruitment, implementation, and completion of the DSM-5 Field Trials. These results highlight the benefits of pilot studies in planning large multisite studies. Copyright © 2013, American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Feasibility and acceptability of the DSM-5 Field Trial procedures in the Johns Hopkins Community Psychiatry Programs†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E.; Wilcox, Holly C.; Miller, Leslie; Cullen, Bernadette; Gerring, Joan; Greiner, Lisa H.; Newcomer, Alison; Mckitty, Mellisha V.; Regier, Darrel A.; Narrow, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) contains criteria for psychiatric diagnoses that reflect advances in the science and conceptualization of mental disorders and address the needs of clinicians. DSM-5 also recommends research on dimensional measures of cross-cutting symptoms and diagnostic severity, which are expected to better capture patients’ experiences with mental disorders. Prior to its May 2013 release, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) conducted field trials to examine the feasibility, clinical utility, reliability, and where possible, the validity of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and dimensional measures. The methods and measures proposed for the DSM-5 field trials were pilot tested in adult and child/adolescent clinical samples, with the goal to identify and correct design and procedural problems with the proposed methods before resources were expended for the larger DSM-5 Field Trials. Results allowed for the refinement of the protocols, procedures, and measures, which facilitated recruitment, implementation, and completion of the DSM-5 Field Trials. These results highlight the benefits of pilot studies in planning large multisite studies. PMID:24615761

  2. A qualitative feasibility study to inform a randomised controlled trial of fluid bolus therapy in septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Caitlin B; Canter, Ruth R; Mouncey, Paul R; Carter, Anjali; Jones, Nicola; Nadel, Simon; Peters, Mark J; Lyttle, Mark D; Harrison, David A; Rowan, Kathryn M; Inwald, David; Woolfall, Kerry

    2018-01-01

    The Fluids in Shock (FiSh) Trial proposes to evaluate whether restrictive fluid bolus therapy (10 mL/kg) is more beneficial than current recommended practice (20 mL/kg) in the resuscitation of children with septic shock in the UK. This qualitative feasibility study aimed to explore acceptability of the FiSh Trial, including research without prior consent (RWPC), potential barriers to recruitment and participant information for a pilot trial. Qualitative interview study involving parents of children who had presented to a UK emergency department or been admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit with severe infection in the previous 3 years. Twenty-one parents (seven bereaved) were interviewed 16 (median) months since their child's hospital admission (range: 1-41). All parents said they would have provided consent for the use of their child's data in the FiSh Trial. The majority were unfamiliar with RWPC, yet supported its use. Parents were initially concerned about the change from currently recommended treatment, yet were reassured by explanations of the current evidence base, fluid bolus therapy and monitoring procedures. Parents made recommendations about the timing of the research discussion and content of participant information. Bereaved parents stated that recruiters should not discuss research immediately after a child's death, but supported a personalised postal 'opt-out' approach to consent. Findings show that parents whose child has experienced severe infection supported the proposed FiSh Trial, including the use of RWPC. Parents' views informed the development of the pilot trial protocol and site staff training. ISRCTN15244462-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. The feasibility of a home-based sedentary behaviour intervention for hospitalised chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients: Sitting and ExacerbAtions Trial (COPD-SEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Orme

    2015-10-01

    COPD-SEAT will be one of the first trials aimed at reducing sedentary behaviour at home in patients hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of COPD. This trial will provide valuable insight into the feasibility of implementing an at-home technology-based feedback intervention for reducing sedentary behaviour into patients existing care. Findings will inform a future large-scale trial acting as an adjuvant to pulmonary rehabilitation.

  4. Making co-enrolment feasible for randomised controlled trials in paediatric intensive care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Harron

    Full Text Available Enrolling children into several trials could increase recruitment and lead to quicker delivery of optimal care in paediatric intensive care units (PICU. We evaluated decisions taken by clinicians and parents in PICU on co-enrolment for two large pragmatic trials: the CATCH trial (CATheters in CHildren comparing impregnated with standard central venous catheters (CVCs for reducing bloodstream infection in PICU and the CHIP trial comparing tight versus standard control of hyperglycaemia.We recorded the period of trial overlap for all PICUs taking part in both CATCH and CHiP and reasons why clinicians decided to co-enrol children or not into both studies. We examined parental decisions on co-enrolment by measuring recruitment rates and reasons for declining consent.Five PICUs recruited for CATCH and CHiP during the same period (an additional four opened CATCH after having closed CHiP. Of these five, three declined co-enrolment (one of which delayed recruiting elective patients for CATCH whilst CHiP was running, due to concerns about jeopardising CHiP recruitment, asking too much of parents, overwhelming amounts of information to explain to parents for two trials and a policy against co-enrolment. Two units co-enrolled in order to maximise recruitment to both trials. At the first unit, 35 parents were approached for both trials. 17/35 consented to both; 13/35 consented to one trial only; 5/35 declined both. Consent rates during co-enrolment were 29/35 (82% and 18/35 (51% for CATCH and CHiP respectively compared with 78% and 51% respectively for those approached for a single trial within this PICU. The second unit did not record data on approaches or refusals, but successfully co-enrolled one child.Co-enrolment did not appear to jeopardise recruitment or overwhelm parents. Strategies for seeking consent for multiple trials need to be developed and should include how to combine information for parents and patients.

  5. Restrictive versus liberal blood transfusion for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (TRIGGER): a pragmatic, open-label, cluster randomised feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J; Mora, Ana; James, Martin W; Stanley, Adrian J; Everett, Simon M; Bailey, Adam A; Dallal, Helen; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Darwent, Melanie; Church, Nicholas; Reckless, Ian; Hodge, Renate; Dyer, Claire; Meredith, Sarah; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Palmer, Kelvin R; Logan, Richard F; Travis, Simon P; Walsh, Timothy S; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-07-11

    Transfusion thresholds for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding are controversial. So far, only three small, underpowered studies and one single-centre trial have been done. Findings from the single-centre trial showed reduced mortality with restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. We aimed to assess whether a multicentre, cluster randomised trial is a feasible method to substantiate or refute this finding. In this pragmatic, open-label, cluster randomised feasibility trial, done in six university hospitals in the UK, we enrolled all patients aged 18 years or older with new presentations of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, irrespective of comorbidity, except for exsanguinating haemorrhage. We randomly assigned hospitals (1:1) with a computer-generated randomisation sequence (random permuted block size of 6, without stratification or matching) to either a restrictive (transfusion when haemoglobin concentration fell below 80 g/L) or liberal (transfusion when haemoglobin concentration fell below 100 g/L) RBC transfusion policy. Neither patients nor investigators were masked to treatment allocation. Feasibility outcomes were recruitment rate, protocol adherence, haemoglobin concentration, RBC exposure, selection bias, and information to guide design and economic evaluation of the phase 3 trial. Main exploratory clinical outcomes were further bleeding and mortality at day 28. We did analyses on all enrolled patients for whom an outcome was available. This trial is registered, ISRCTN85757829 and NCT02105532. Between Sept 3, 2012, and March 1, 2013, we enrolled 936 patients across six hospitals (403 patients in three hospitals with a restrictive policy and 533 patients in three hospitals with a liberal policy). Recruitment rate was significantly higher for the liberal than for the restrictive policy (62% vs 55%; p=0·04). Despite some baseline imbalances, Rockall and Blatchford risk scores were identical between policies. Protocol adherence was 96% (SD 10) in

  6. Feasible model for prevention of functional decline in older people: municipality-randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, Mikkel; Avlund, Kirsten; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    no differences in mortality (relative risk (RR)=1.06, 95% CI=0.87-1.28, P=.59) or rates of nursing home admissions after 3 years (RR=0.74, 95% CI=0.50-1.09, P=.13). Subjects aged 80 benefited from accepting and receiving in-home assessment with regular follow-ups. CONCLUSION: A brief, feasible educational...

  7. Open Trial of Vinyasa Yoga for Persistently Depressed Individuals: Evidence of Feasibility and Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Tremont, Geoffrey; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Gillette, Tom; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability and feasibility of Vinyasa yoga as an adjunctive treatment for depressed patients who were not responding adequately to antidepressant medication. The authors also planned to ask participants for qualitative feedback on their experience of the class and to assess change over time in depression…

  8. Study of Optimal Replacement of Thyroxine in the Elderly (SORTED) - results from the feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvi, Salman; Ingoe, Lorna; Ryan, Vicky; Pearce, Simon H S; Wilkes, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common condition, particularly in the older population. Thyroid hormone requirements change with age and serum TSH levels also alter, especially in older patients. However, in practice laboratory reference ranges for thyroid function are not age-specific and treatment in older patients aims to achieve a similar target thyroid function level as younger age groups. A dual centre, single blind, randomised controlled trial was conducted to determine the feasibility of a future definitive RCT in hypothyroid individuals aged 80 years or older who were treated with levothyroxine. Potential participants were identified from 17 research-active GP practices ( n  = 377), by opportunistic invitations ( n  = 9) or in response to publicity ( n  = 4). Participants were randomly allocated to either usual (0.4-4.0 mU/L) or a higher (4.1-8.0 mU/L) target serum TSH range. Information on participants' willingness to enter the trial, acceptability of study design, length of time to complete recruitment and dose titration strategy was collected. Fifteen percent (57/390) of potentially eligible hypothyroid individuals consented to participate in this trial and 48 were randomised to trial medication for 24 weeks, giving a recruitment rate of 12 %. Recruitment averaged 5.5 participants per month over approximately 9 months. Eight participants withdrew (3/24 and 5/24 in the usual and higher TSH arms, respectively) with the commonest reason cited (5 patients) being tiredness. Interestingly, 3/5 participants withdrew from the site that required a visit to a Research Facility whereas only 5/43 participants withdrew from the site that offered home visits. In the higher TSH arm, of those participants who completed the study, approximately half of participants (10/19) reached target TSH. It is feasible to perform a randomised controlled trial of thyroid hormones in hypothyroid patients aged 80 or older. A definitive trial would require collaboration with a

  9. A pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial of an adjunct brief social network intervention in opiate substitution treatment services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ed; Copello, Alex; Seddon, Jennifer L; Christie, Marilyn; Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Bennett, Carmel; Akhtar, Shabana; George, Sanju; Ball, Andrew; Frew, Emma; Goranitis, Ilias; Freemantle, Nick

    2018-01-15

    Approximately 3% of people receiving opioid substitution therapy (OST) in the UK manage to achieve abstinence from prescribed and illicit drugs within three years of commencing treatment. Involvement of families and wider social networks in supporting psychological treatment may be an effective strategy in facilitating recovery, and this pilot study aimed to evaluate the impact of a social network-focused intervention for patients receiving OST. A two-site, open feasibility trial randomised patients receiving OST for at least 12 months but still reporting illicit opiate use in the past 28 days to one of three treatments: 1) treatment as usual (TAU), 2) Brief Social Behaviour and Network Therapy (B-SBNT) + TAU, or 3) Personal Goal Setting (PGS) + TAU. The two active interventions consisted of 4 sessions. There were 3 aims: 1) test the feasibility of recruiting OST patients to a trial of B-SBNT, and following them up over 12 months; 2) test the feasibility of training clinicians to deliver B-SBNT; 3) test whether B-SBNT reduces heroin use 3 and 12 months after treatment, and to explore potential mediating factors. The primary outcome for aim 3 was number of days of heroin use in the past month, and a range of secondary outcome measures were specified in advance (level of drug dependence, mental health, social satisfaction, therapist rapport, treatment satisfaction, social network size and support). A total of 83 participants were randomised, and 70 (84%) were followed-up at 12 months. Fidelity analysis of showed that B-SBNT sessions were clearly distinguishable from PGS and TAU sessions, suggesting it was possible to train clinical staff to an adequate level of competence. No significant differences were found between the 3 intervention arms in the primary or secondary outcome measures. Attendance at psychosocial treatment intervention sessions was low across all three arms (44% overall). Patients receiving OST can be recruited into a trial of a social

  10. The feasibility of an exercise intervention in males at risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke M Winzer

    Full Text Available To investigate the feasibility and safety of a 24-week exercise intervention, compared to control, in males with Barrett's oesophagus, and to estimate the effect of the intervention, compared to control, on risk factors associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma development.A randomized controlled trial of an exercise intervention (60 minutes moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance exercise five days/week over 24 weeks; one supervised and four unsupervised sessions versus attention control (45 minutes stretching five days/week over 24 weeks; one supervised and four unsupervised sessions in inactive, overweight/obese (25.0-34.9 kg/m2 males with Barrett's oesophagus, aged 18-70 years. Primary outcomes were obesity-associated hormones relevant to oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk (circulating concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance [HOMA]. Secondary outcomes included waist circumference, body composition, fitness, strength and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 24-weeks. Intervention effects were analysed using generalised linear models, adjusting for baseline value.Recruitment was difficult in this population with a total of 33 participants recruited (target sample size: n = 80; 97% retention at 24-weeks. Adherence to the exercise protocol was moderate. No serious adverse events were reported. A statistically significant intervention effect (exercise minus control was observed for waist circumference (-4.5 [95% CI -7.5, -1.4] cm; p < 0.01. Effects on primary outcomes were not statistically significant.This small, exploratory trial provides important information to inform future trial development including recruitment rates and estimates of effect sizes on outcomes related to oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk. Future trials should investigate a combined dietary and exercise intervention to achieve greater weight loss in this

  11. Feasibility and Efficacy of an mHealth Game for Managing Anxiety: "Flowy" Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial and Design Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Quynh; Khatib, Yasmin; Stansfeld, Stephen; Fox, Simon; Green, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Meeting the complex needs of patients with chronic common mental health disorders (CMHDs) may be the greatest challenge facing organized medical practice. On the basis of a well-established and proven theoretical foundation for controlled respiration as a behavioral intervention for CMHDs, as well as preliminary evidence that gamification can improve health outcomes through increasing patient engagement, this randomized controlled pilot study evaluated the feasibility and clinical efficacy of a mobile health game called "Flowy" ( www.flowygame.com ) that digitally delivered breathing retraining exercises for anxiety, panic, and hyperventilation symptom management. We designed an unblinded, Web-based, parallel-group randomized controlled trial focusing on feasibility, clinical efficacy, and design proof of concept. In the intervention condition (n = 31), participants received free access to "Flowy" for 4 weeks. In the control condition (n = 32), participants were placed on a waitlist for 4 weeks before being offered free access to "Flowy." Online measurements using psychological self-report questionnaires were made at 2 and 4 weeks post-baseline. At trial conclusion, participants found "Flowy" acceptable as an anxiety management intervention. "Flowy" engaged participants sufficiently to endorse proactive gameplay. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed a reduction in anxiety, panic, and self-report hyperventilation scores in both trial arms, with the intervention arm experiencing greater quality of life. Participants perceived "Flowy" as a fun and useful intervention, proactively used "Flowy" as part of their care, and would recommend "Flowy" to family and friends. Our results suggest that a digital delivery of breathing retraining exercises through a mobile health game can manage anxiety, panic, and hyperventilation symptoms associated with CMHDs.

  12. Study of Optimal Replacement of Thyroxine in the ElDerly (SORTED): protocol for a mixed methods feasibility study to assess the clinical utility of lower dose thyroxine in elderly hypothyroid patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Scott; Pearce, Simon; Ryan, Vicky; Rapley, Tim; Ingoe, Lorna; Razvi, Salman

    2013-03-22

    The population of the UK is ageing. There is compelling evidence that thyroid stimulating hormone distribution levels increase with age. Currently, in UK clinical practice elderly hypothyroid patients are treated with levothyroxine to lower their thyroid stimulating hormone levels to a standard non-age-related range. Evidence suggests that mortality is negatively associated with thyroid stimulating hormone levels. We report the protocol of a feasibility study working towards a full-scale randomized controlled trial to test whether lower dose levothyroxine has beneficial cardiovascular outcomes in the oldest old. SORTED is a mixed methods study with three components: SORTED A: A feasibility study of a dual-center single-blinded randomized controlled trial of elderly hypothyroid patients currently treated with levothyroxine. Patients will be recruited from 20 general practices and two hospital trust endocrine units in Northumberland, Tyne and Wear. Target recruitment of 50 elderly hypothyroid patients currently treated with levothyroxine, identified in both primary and secondary care settings. Reduced dose of levothyroxine to achieve an elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (target range 4.1 to 8.0 mU/L) versus standard levothyroxine replacement (target range 0.4 to 4.0 mU/L). Using random permuted blocks, in a ratio of 1:1, randomization will be carried out by Newcastle Clinical Trials Unit. Study feasibility (recruitment and retention rates and medication compliance), acceptability of the trial design, assessment of mobility and falls risk, and change in cardiovascular risk factors. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews to understand patients' willingness to take part in a randomized controlled trial and participants' experience of the intervention. Retrospective cohort study of 400 treated hypothyroid patients aged 80 years or over registered in 2008 in primary care practices, studying their 4-year cardiovascular outcomes to inform the power of SORTED

  13. Person-centered care planning and service engagement: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Tondora, Janis; Davidson, Larry; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-04-22

    Service disengagement is a pervasive challenge the mental health care system faces. Mental health services are of little value should persons with mental illnesses continue to opt out of receiving them. Consumers attribute disengagement from care to an absence of choice in their treatment. In response, the mental health system is adopting a person-centered model, based upon recovery principles, to engage consumers more actively in their care. Person-centered care planning is a promising practice involving collaboration to develop and implement an actionable plan to assist the person in achieving personal recovery goals. This study design combines a parallel-group randomized controlled trial of community mental health organizations with qualitative methods to assess the effectiveness of person-centered care planning. Participants at 14 sites in Delaware and Connecticut will be randomized to treatment as usual or the person-centered care planning intervention. Participants will be in leadership (n = 70) or supervisory or direct care (n = 210) roles. The person-centered care planning intervention involves intensive staff training and 12 months of ongoing technical assistance. Quantitative survey data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months measuring person-centered care planning competency and organizational factors. Consumer outcomes (engagement, medication adherence, functioning and consumer satisfaction) will be assessed by Medicaid and state-level data. Qualitative data focused on process factors will include staff and consumer interviews and focus groups. In this intent-to-treat analysis, we will use mixed-effects multivariate regression models to evaluate the differential impact of the person-centered care planning intervention on each consumer and implementation outcome as well as the extent to which clinician assessments of organizational factors are associated with the implementation outcome. Mixed methods will triangulate and strengthen the

  14. Exploring the feasibility and acceptability of a recovery-focused group therapy intervention for adults with bipolar disorder: trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alison K; Baker, Amanda; Jones, Steven; Lobban, Fiona; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Attia, John; Banfield, Michelle

    2018-01-31

    Improving accessible, acceptable recovery-oriented service provision for people with bipolar disorder (BD) is an important priority. Mindfulness and acceptance-based cognitive and behavioural therapies (or 'third -wave' CBT) may prove fruitful due to the considerable overlap between these approaches and key features of personal recovery. Groups also confer therapeutic benefits consistent with personal recovery and may improve recovery-oriented service provision by adding another modality for accessing support. The primary objective of this trial is to explore the feasibility and acceptability of a new recovery-focused group therapy (RfGT) intervention for adults with BD. This is the first published feasibility assessment of a time-limited RfGTrecovery-focused group therapy intervention for BD. This protocol describes an open feasibility study, utilising a pre-treatment design versus post- treatment design and nested qualitative evaluation. Participants will be recruited from the Central Coast region of New South Wales, Australia, from primary care providers, specialist mental health services, non-government organisations and via self-referral. The primary outcomes are feasibility and acceptability as indexed by recruitment, retention, intervention adherence, adverse events (if any) and detailed consumer feedback. Clinical outcomes and process measures will be assessed to inform future research. Primary outcome data will utiliseuse descriptive statistics (eg, summarizingsummarising recruitment, demographics, attendance, attrition and intervention adherence). Secondary outcomes will be assessed using repeated-measures analysis of covariance across all time points (including change, effect size and variability). Ethical approval has been granted by the Northern Sydney Local Health District HREChuman research ethics committee (HREC) (HREC/16/HAWKE/69) and The University of Newcastle HREC (H-2016-0107). The Ffindings will be used to improve the intervention per user

  15. Changing physical activity behaviour for people with multiple sclerosis: protocol of a randomised controlled feasibility trial (iStep-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jennifer M; Fortune, Jennifer; Stennett, Andrea; Kilbride, Cherry; Anokye, Nana; Victor, Christina; Hendrie, Wendy; Abdul, Mohamed; DeSouza, Lorraine; Lavelle, Grace; Brewin, Debbie; David, Lee; Norris, Meriel

    2017-11-15

    Although physical activity may reduce disease burden, fatigue and disability, and improve quality of life among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), many people with MS are physically inactive and spend significant time in sedentary behaviour. Behaviour change interventions may assist people with MS to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour. However, few studies have investigated their effectiveness using objective measures of physical activity, particularly in the long term. Further, interventions that have proven effective in the short term may not be feasible in clinical practice because of the large amount of support provided. The iStep-MS trial aims to determine the safety, feasibility and acceptability of a behaviour change intervention to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour among people with MS. Sixty people with MS will be randomised (1:1 ratio) to receive a 12-week intervention or usual care only. The intervention consists of four physical activity consultations with a physiotherapist supported by a handbook and pedometer. Outcomes assessed at baseline, 12 weeks and 9 months are physical activity (ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometer), sedentary behaviour (activPAL3µ), self-reported activity and sitting time, walking capability, fatigue, self-efficacy, participation, quality of life and health service use. The safety of the intervention will be determined by assessing change in pain and fatigue and the incidence of adverse events during the follow-up period. A parallel process evaluation will assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention through assessment of fidelity to the programme and semistructured interviews exploring participants' and therapists' experiences of the intervention. The feasibility of conducting an economic evaluation will be determined by collecting data on quality of life and resource use. Research ethics committee approval has been granted from Brunel University London. Results of

  16. Wildcat wellness coaching feasibility trial: protocol for home-based health behavior mentoring in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, Brooke J; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Dzewaltowski, David A; Teeman, Colby S; Knutson, Cassandra K; Rosenkranz, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health problem, with one third of America's children classified as either overweight or obese. Obesity prevention and health promotion programs using components such as wellness coaching and home-based interventions have shown promise, but there is a lack of published research evaluating the impact of a combined home-based and wellness coaching intervention for obesity prevention and health promotion in young girls. The main objective of this study is to test the feasibility of such an intervention on metrics related to recruitment, intervention delivery, and health-related outcome assessments. The secondary outcome is to evaluate the possibility of change in health-related psychosocial, behavioral, and biomedical outcomes in our sample of participants. Forty girls who are overweight or obese (aged 8-13 years) will be recruited from a Midwestern college town. Participants will be recruited through posted flyers, newspaper advertisements, email, and social media. The volunteer convenience sample of girls will be randomized to one of two home-based wellness coaching interventions: a general health education condition or a healthy eating physical activity skills condition. Trained female wellness coaches will conduct weekly hour-long home visits for 12 consecutive weeks. Assessments will occur at baseline, post-intervention (3 months after baseline), and follow-up (6 months after baseline) and will include height, weight, waist circumference, body composition, pulmonary function, blood pressure, systemic inflammation, physical activity (Actical accelerometer), and self-reported survey measures (relevant to fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and quality of life). This study will evaluate the feasibility of home-based wellness coaching interventions for overweight and obese girls and secondarily assess the preliminary impact on health-related psychosocial, behavioral, and biomedical outcomes. Results will provide

  17. Feasibility trial of a film-based educational intervention for increasing boys' and girls' intentions to avoid teenage pregnancy: Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Maria; Aventin, Aine; Maguire, Lisa; Clarke, Mike; Linden, Mark; McDaid, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organisation, amongst others, recognises that adolescent men have a vital yet neglected role in reducing teenage pregnancies and that there is a pressing need for educational interventions designed especially for them. This study seeks to fill this gap by determining the feasibility of conducting an effectiveness trial of the If I Were Jack intervention in post-primary schools. This 4-week intervention aims to increase teenagers' intentions to avoid unintended pregnancy and addresses gender inequalities in sex education by explicitly focusing on young men. A cluster randomised feasibility trial with embedded process evaluation will determine: recruitment, participation and retention rates; quality of implementation; acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and trial procedures; and costs.

  18. Technical and economic feasibility study for the reactivation of the integral test facility of IPEN/CNEN Nuclear Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biaty, Flávia P.; Rocha, Marcelo da S.; Oliveira, Otávio L. de, E-mail: flavia.biaty@usp.br, E-mail: msrocha@ipen.br, E-mail: otavioluis@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Integral Test Facility of Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP), known as 'Loop 70', is a semi-industrial thermal-hydraulic test facility and can operate as a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) or a PWR (Pressurizing Water Reactor) mode. Designed and built in the 1980's, it is currently disabled. The experimental circuits ('test loop') are facilities that reproduce the thermohydraulic and fluid dynamic conditions that occur inside a reactor and are used to simulate the practical reality which it is not possible to be obtained through mathematical models. In this context, this research project aims the development of a Business Plan to analyze the technical and economic feasibility related to the reactivation of the facility. This methodology (adapted to the government sector) is a decision-making tool that will offer a wide perspective of the project, set the guidelines and actions that will define the future of the facility and provide a general rule to make investments on it. This paper presents the historic aspects to better understand the Loop 70's current situation. It also presents information about similar facilities around the world, services that can be offered (thermal-hydraulics parameters measurements, equipment qualification and transient analysis due accident situations), results of the strategic analysis (SWOT) performed, specific goals for each critical success or failure factor of the facility, financial aspects related to the reactivation and an overview of the facility's perspectives. (author)

  19. Technical and economic feasibility study for the reactivation of the integral test facility of IPEN/CNEN Nuclear Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaty, Flávia P.; Rocha, Marcelo da S.; Oliveira, Otávio L. de

    2017-01-01

    The Integral Test Facility of Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP), known as 'Loop 70', is a semi-industrial thermal-hydraulic test facility and can operate as a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) or a PWR (Pressurizing Water Reactor) mode. Designed and built in the 1980's, it is currently disabled. The experimental circuits ('test loop') are facilities that reproduce the thermohydraulic and fluid dynamic conditions that occur inside a reactor and are used to simulate the practical reality which it is not possible to be obtained through mathematical models. In this context, this research project aims the development of a Business Plan to analyze the technical and economic feasibility related to the reactivation of the facility. This methodology (adapted to the government sector) is a decision-making tool that will offer a wide perspective of the project, set the guidelines and actions that will define the future of the facility and provide a general rule to make investments on it. This paper presents the historic aspects to better understand the Loop 70's current situation. It also presents information about similar facilities around the world, services that can be offered (thermal-hydraulics parameters measurements, equipment qualification and transient analysis due accident situations), results of the strategic analysis (SWOT) performed, specific goals for each critical success or failure factor of the facility, financial aspects related to the reactivation and an overview of the facility's perspectives. (author)

  20. Clinical and biomarker changes in premanifest Huntington disease show trial feasibility: a decade of the PREDICT-HD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane S Paulsen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is growing consensus that intervention and treatment of Huntington disease (HD should occur at the earliest stage possible. Various early-intervention methods for this fatal neurodegenerative disease have been identified, but preventive clinical trials for HD are limited by a lack of knowledge of the natural history of the disease and a dearth of appropriate outcome measures. Objectives of the current study are to document the natural history of premanifest HD progression in the largest cohort ever studied and to develop a battery of imaging and clinical markers of premanifest HD progression that can be used as outcome measures in preventive clinical trials. PREDICT-HD is a 32-site, international, observational study of premanifest HD, with annual examination of 1013 participants with premanifest HD and 301 gene-expansion negative controls between 2001 and 2012. Findings document 39 variables representing imaging, motor, cognitive, functional, and psychiatric domains, showing different rates of decline between premanifest Huntington disease and controls. Required sample size and models of premanifest HD are presented to inform future design of clinical and preclinical research. Preventive clinical trials in premanifest HD with participants who have a medium or high probability of motor onset are calculated to be as resource-effective as those conducted in diagnosed HD and could interrupt disease seven to twelve years earlier. Methods and measures for preventive clinical trials in premanifest HD more than a dozen years from motor onset are also feasible. These findings represent the most thorough documentation of a clinical battery for experimental therapeutics in stages of premanifest HD, the time period for which effective intervention may provide the most positive possible outcome for patients and their families affected by this devastating disease.

  1. Job retention vocational rehabilitation for employed people with inflammatory arthritis (WORK-IA): a feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Alison; O'Brien, Rachel; Woodbridge, Sarah; Bradshaw, Lucy; Prior, Yeliz; Radford, Kate; Culley, June; Whitham, Diane; Ruth Pulikottil-Jacob

    2017-07-21

    Inflammatory arthritis leads to work disability, absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e. at-work productivity loss) at high cost to individuals, employers and society. A trial of job retention vocational rehabilitation (VR) in the United States identified this helped people keep working. The effectiveness of this VR in countries with different socioeconomic policies and conditions, and its impact on absenteeism, presenteeism and health, are unknown. This feasibility study tested the acceptability of this VR, modified for the United Kingdom, compared to written advice about managing work problems. To help plan a randomized controlled trial, we tested screening, recruitment, intervention delivery, response rates, applicability of the control intervention and identified the relevant primary outcome. A feasibility randomized controlled trial with rheumatoid, psoriatic or inflammatory arthritis patients randomized to receive either job retention VR or written information only (the WORK-IA trial). Following three days VR training, rheumatology occupational therapists provided individualised VR on a one to one basis. VR included work assessment, activity diaries and action planning, and (as applicable) arthritis self-management in the workplace, ergonomics, fatigue and stress management, orthoses, employment rights and support services, assistive technology, work modifications, psychological and disclosure support, workplace visits and employer liaison. Fifty five (10%) people were recruited from 539 screened. Follow-up response rates were acceptable at 80%. VR was delivered with fidelity. VR was more acceptable than written advice only (7.8 versus 6.7). VR took on average 4 h at a cost of £135 per person. Outcome assessment indicated VR was better than written advice in reducing presenteeism (Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) change score mean: VR = -12.4 (SD 13.2); control = -2.5 (SD 15.9), absenteeism, perceived risk of job loss and improving pain and health status

  2. Enhancing mHealth Technology in the Patient-Centered Medical Home Environment to Activate Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Multisite Feasibility Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, Ronald; Shi, Lu; Williams, Joel E; Dye, Cheryl J; Chen, Liwei; Crawford, Paul; Shry, Eric A; Griffin, Sarah F; Jones, Karyn O; Sherrill, Windsor W; Truong, Khoa; Little, Jeanette R; Edwards, Karen W; Hing, Marie; Moss, Jennie B

    2017-03-06

    The potential of mHealth technologies in the care of patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions has captured the attention of clinicians and researchers. Efforts to date have incorporated a variety of tools and techniques, including Web-based portals, short message service (SMS) text messaging, remote collection of biometric data, electronic coaching, electronic-based health education, secure email communication between visits, and electronic collection of lifestyle and quality-of-life surveys. Each of these tools, used alone or in combination, have demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness. Some of the more promising results have been demonstrated using regular collection of biometric devices, SMS text messaging, secure email communication with clinical teams, and regular reporting of quality-of-life variables. In this study, we seek to incorporate several of the most promising mHealth capabilities in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) workflow. We aim to address underlying technology needs and gaps related to the use of mHealth technology and the activation of patients living with type 2 diabetes. Stated differently, we enable supporting technologies while seeking to influence patient activation and self-care activities. This is a multisite phased study, conducted within the US Military Health System, that includes a user-centered design phase and a PCMH-based feasibility trial. In phase 1, we will assess both patient and provider preferences regarding the enhancement of the enabling technology capabilities for type 2 diabetes chronic care management. Phase 2 research will be a single-blinded 12-month feasibility study that incorporates randomization principles. Phase 2 research will seek to improve patient activation and self-care activities through the use of the Mobile Health Care Environment with tailored behavioral messaging. The primary outcome measure is the Patient Activation Measure scores. Secondary outcome measures are Summary of

  3. Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of Visual Cue Training to Improve Adaptability of Walking after Stroke: Multi-Centre, Single-Blind Randomised Control Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Kristen L.; Pelton, Trudy A.; Wimperis, Andrew; Whitham, Diane; Tan, Wei; Jowett, Sue; Sackley, Catherine M.; Wing, Alan M.; Tyson, Sarah F.; Mathias, Jonathan; Hensman, Marianne; van Vliet, Paulette M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Given the importance of vision in the control of walking and evidence indicating varied practice of walking improves mobility outcomes, this study sought to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of varied walking practice in response to visual cues, for the rehabilitation of walking following stroke. Design This 3 arm parallel, multi-centre, assessor blind, randomised control trial was conducted within outpatient neurorehabilitation services Participants Community dwelling stroke survivors with walking speed adaptability practice using visual cues are feasible and may improve mobility and balance. Future studies should continue a carefully phased approach using identified methods to improve retention. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01600391 PMID:26445137

  4. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Web-Based Treatment with Telephone Support for Postpartum Women With Anxiety: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Miriam T; Olander, Ellinor K; Rowe, Heather; Fisher, Jane Rw; Ayers, Susan

    2018-04-20

    Postpartum anxiety can have adverse effects on the mother and child if left untreated. Time constraints and stigma are common barriers to postpartum treatment. Web-based treatments offer potential flexibility and anonymity. What Am I Worried About (WaWa) is a self-guided treatment based on cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness principles for women experiencing postpartum anxiety. WaWa was developed in Australia and consists of 9 modules with optional weekly telephone support. WaWa was adapted to a Web-based version for use in England (Internet-based What Am I Worried About, iWaWa). This study aimed to investigate the feasibility (engagement and usability) and acceptability (usefulness, satisfaction, and helpfulness) of iWaWa among English postpartum women with anxiety. Postpartum (parenting styles. Despite interest in iWaWa, the results suggest that both the study and iWaWa were not feasible in the current format. However, this first trial provides useful evidence about treatment format and content preferences that can inform iWaWa's future development, as well as research and development of Web-based postpartum anxiety treatments, in general, to optimize adherence. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02434406; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02434406 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6xTq7Bwmd). ©Miriam T Ashford, Ellinor K Olander, Heather Rowe, Jane RW Fisher, Susan Ayers. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 20.04.2018.

  5. Promoting Physical Activity in Low-Active Adolescents via Facebook: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial to Test Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicki, Thomas R; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana; Hillman, Charles H; Huhman, Marian; McAuley, Edward

    2014-10-30

    The World Wide Web is an effective method for delivering health behavior programs, yet major limitations remain (eg, cost of development, time and resource requirements, limited interactivity). Social media, however, has the potential to deliver highly customizable and socially interactive behavioral interventions with fewer constraints. Thus, the evaluation of social media as a means to influence health behaviors is warranted. The objective of this trial was to examine and demonstrate the feasibility of using an established social networking platform (ie, Facebook) to deliver an 8 week physical activity intervention to a sample of low-active adolescents (N=21; estimated marginal mean age 13.48 years). Participants were randomized to either an experimental (ie, Behavioral) or attentional control (ie, Informational) condition. Both conditions received access to a restricted-access, study-specific Facebook group where the group's administrator made two daily wall posts containing youth-based physical activity information and resources. Primary outcomes included physical activity as assessed by accelerometry and self-report. Interactions and main effects were examined, as well as mean differences in effect sizes. Analyses revealed significant improvements over time on subjectively reported weekly leisure-time physical activity (F1,18=8.426, P=.009, η2 = .319). However, there was no interaction between time and condition (F1,18=0.002, P=.968, η2 = .000). There were no significant time or interaction effects among the objectively measured physical activity variables. Examination of effect sizes revealed moderate-to-large changes in physical activity outcomes. Results provide initial support for the feasibility of delivery of a physical activity intervention to low-active adolescents via social media. Whether by employing behavioral interventions via social media can result in statistically meaningful changes in health-related behaviors and outcomes remains to be

  6. Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive impairment: a protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouw, Maaike A; Calf, Agneta H; van Munster, Barbara C; Ter Maaten, Jan C; Smidt, Nynke; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2018-03-27

    An acute hospital admission is a stressful life event for older people, particularly for those with cognitive impairment. The hospitalisation is often complicated by hospital-associated geriatric syndromes, including delirium and functional loss, leading to functional decline and nursing home admission. Hospital at Home care aims to avoid hospitalisation-associated adverse outcomes in older patients with cognitive impairment by providing hospital care in the patient's own environment. This randomised, non-blinded feasibility trial aims to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial in terms of the recruitment, use and acceptability of Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive impairment. The quality of care will be evaluated and the advantages and disadvantages of the Hospital at Home care programme compared with usual hospital care. Eligible patients will be randomised either to Hospital at Home care in their own environment or usual hospital care. The intervention consists of hospital level care provided at patients' homes, including visits from healthcare professionals, diagnostics (laboratory tests, blood cultures) and treatment. The control group will receive usual hospital care. Measurements will be conducted at baseline, during admission, at discharge and at 3 and 6 months after the baseline assessment. Institutional ethics approval has been granted. The findings will be disseminated through public lectures, professional and scientific conferences, as well as peer-reviewed journal articles. The study findings will contribute to knowledge on the implementation of Hospital at Home care for older patients with cognitive disorders. The results will be used to inform and support strategies to deliver eligible care to older patients with cognitive impairment. e020313; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  7. General or Spinal Anaesthetic for Vaginal Surgery in Pelvic Floor Disorders (GOSSIP): a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, B; Ismail, K M; Turner, N; Farrell, A; Verzune, M; Annappa, M; Smith, I; El-Gizawy, Zeiad; Cooper, J C

    2015-08-01

    Spinal anaesthesia (SA) and general anaesthesia (GA) are widely used techniques for vaginal surgery for pelvic floor disorders with inconclusive evidence of the superiority of either. We conducted a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to assess the feasibility of a full scale RCT aiming to examine the effect of anaesthetic mode for vaginal surgery on operative, patient reported and length of hospital stay (LOHS) outcomes. Patients undergoing vaginal surgery, recruited through a urogynaecology service in a University teaching hospital, were randomised to receive either GA or SA. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks postoperatively. Pain was measured on a visual analogue scale; nausea was assessed with a four-point verbal rating scale. Patient's subjective perception of treatment outcome, quality of life (QoL) and functional outcomes were assessed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) on vaginal symptoms and the SF-36 questionnaire. Sixty women were randomised, 29 to GA and 31 to SA. The groups were similar in terms of age and type of vaginal surgery performed. No statistically significant differences were noted between the groups with regard to pain, nausea, quality of life (QoL), functional outcomes as well as length of stay in the postoperative recovery room, use of analgesia postoperatively and LOHS. This study has demonstrated that a full RCT is feasible and should focus on the length of hospital stay in a subgroup of patients undergoing vaginal surgery where SA may help to facilitate enhanced recovery or day surgery.

  8. Feasibility of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of decision boxes on shared decision-making processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Anik Mc; Labrecque, Michel; Légaré, France; Grad, Roland; Cauchon, Michel; Greenway, Matthew; Haynes, R Brian; Pluye, Pierre; Syed, Iqra; Banerjee, Debi; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Martin, Mélanie

    2015-02-25

    Decision boxes (DBoxes) are two-page evidence summaries to prepare clinicians for shared decision making (SDM). We sought to assess the feasibility of a clustered Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) to evaluate their impact. A convenience sample of clinicians (nurses, physicians and residents) from six primary healthcare clinics who received eight DBoxes and rated their interest in the topic and satisfaction. After consultations, their patients rated their involvement in decision-making processes (SDM-Q-9 instrument). We measured clinic and clinician recruitment rates, questionnaire completion rates, patient eligibility rates, and estimated the RCT needed sample size. Among the 20 family medicine clinics invited to participate in this study, four agreed to participate, giving an overall recruitment rate of 20%. Of 148 clinicians invited to the study, 93 participated (63%). Clinicians rated an interest in the topics ranging 6.4-8.2 out of 10 (with 10 highest) and a satisfaction with DBoxes of 4 or 5 out of 5 (with 5 highest) for 81% DBoxes. For the future RCT, we estimated that a sample size of 320 patients would allow detecting a 9% mean difference in the SDM-Q-9 ratings between our two arms (0.02 ICC; 0.05 significance level; 80% power). Clinicians' recruitment and questionnaire completion rates support the feasibility of the planned RCT. The level of interest of participants for the DBox topics, and their level of satisfaction with the Dboxes demonstrate the acceptability of the intervention. Processes to recruit clinics and patients should be optimized.

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultra-high-field liver MRI: A feasibility trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: Lale.Umutlu@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Bitz, Andreas K.; Maderwald, Stefan; Orzada, Stephan; Kinner, Sonja; Kraff, Oliver; Brote, Irina; Ladd, Susanne C.; Schroeder, Tobias; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Ladd, Mark E. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, University Nuernberg-Erlangen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 7 T MRI of the liver using an eight-channel radiofrequency (RF) transmit/receive body-coil. 16 healthy subjects were examined on a 7 T MR system utilizing a custom-built eight-channel RF body-coil suitable for RF-shimming. The following data were acquired: (1) steady state free precession imaging, (2) T2w turbo spin echo imaging, (3) T1w in and opposed-phase imaging, (4) T1w 3D FLASH images pre-contrast and in arterial, portal-venous and venous phase and (5) a fat-saturated pre- and post-contrast 2D FLASH sequence. Visual evaluation of (1) the delineation of liver vasculature, (2) the overall image quality, and (3) artifact presence and consequent image impairment was performed. SNR of the liver parenchyma was measured for the contrast-enhanced 2D and 3D FLASH sequences. For statistical analysis, a Wilcoxon-Rank Test was used. Best delineation of non-enhanced liver vasculature and overall image quality was found for 2D FLASH MRI, with only slight improvement in vessel conspicuity after the application of contrast media. T2-weighted TSE imaging remained strongly impaired, falling short of diagnostic relevance and precluding a clinical application. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and diagnostic potential of dedicated contrast-enhanced 7 T liver MRI as well as the potential for non-contrast-enhanced angiographic application.

  10. Feasibility of Protective Ventilation During Elective Supratentorial Neurosurgery: A Randomized, Crossover, Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, Francesco; Beretta, Luigi; Corno, Laura; Testa, Valentina; Martino, Enrico A; Gemma, Marco

    2017-06-30

    Traditional ventilation approaches, providing high tidal volumes (Vt), produce excessive alveolar distention and lung injury. Protective ventilation, employing lower Vt and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), is an attractive alternative also for neuroanesthesia, when prolonged mechanical ventilation is needed. Nevertheless, protective ventilation during intracranial surgery may exert dangerous effects on intracranial pressure (ICP). We tested the feasibility of a protective ventilation strategy in neurosurgery. Our monocentric, double-blind, 1:1 randomized, 2×2 crossover study aimed at studying the effect size and variability of ICP in patients undergoing elective supratentorial brain tumor removal and alternatively ventilated with Vt 9 mL/kg-PEEP 0 mm Hg and Vt 7 mL/kg-PEEP 5 mm Hg. Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain comparable end-tidal carbon dioxide between ventilation modes. ICP was measured through a subdural catheter inserted before dural opening. Forty patients were enrolled; 8 (15%) were excluded after enrollment. ICP did not differ between traditional and protective ventilation (11.28±5.37, 11 [7 to 14.5] vs. 11.90±5.86, 11 [8 to 15] mm Hg; P=0.541). End-tidal carbon dioxide (28.91±2.28, 29 [28 to 30] vs. 28.00±2.17, 28 [27 to 29] mm Hg; Pprotective ventilation. Blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature did not differ between ventilation modes. Dural tension was "acceptable for surgery" in all cases. ICP differences between ventilation modes were not affected by ICP values under traditional ventilation (coefficient=0.067; 95% confidence interval, -0.278 to 0.144; P=0.523). Protective ventilation is a feasible alternative to traditional ventilation during elective neurosurgery.

  11. Early cryoprecipitate for major haemorrhage in trauma: a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, N; Rourke, C; Davenport, R; Beer, S; Pankhurst, L; Deary, A; Thomas, H; Llewelyn, C; Green, L; Doughty, H; Nordmann, G; Brohi, K; Stanworth, S

    2015-07-01

    Low fibrinogen (Fg) concentrations in trauma haemorrhage are associated with poorer outcomes. Cryoprecipitate is the standard source for Fg administration in the UK and USA and is often given in the later stages of transfusion therapy. It is not known whether early cryoprecipitate therapy improves clinical outcomes. The primary aim of this feasibility study was to determine whether it was possible to administer cryoprecipitate, within 90 min of admission to hospital. Secondary aims were to evaluate laboratory measures of Fg and clinical outcomes including thrombotic events, organ failure, length of hospital stay and mortality. This was an unblinded RCT, conducted at two civilian UK major trauma centres of adult trauma patients (age ≥16 yrs), with active bleeding and requiring activation of the major haemorrhage protocol. Participants were randomised to standard major haemorrhage therapy (STANDARD) (n=22), or to standard haemorrhage therapy plus two early pools of cryoprecipitate (CRYO) (n=21). 85% (95% CI: 69-100%) CRYO participants received cryoprecipitate within 90 min, median time 60 min (IQR: 57-76) compared with 108 min (67-147), CRYO and STANDARD arms respectively (P=0.002). Fg concentrations were higher in the CRYO arm and were maintained above 1.8 g litre(-1) at all time-points during active haemorrhage. All-cause mortality at 28 days was not significantly different (P=0.14). Early Fg supplementation using cryoprecipitate is feasible in trauma patients. This study supports the need for a definitive RCT to determine the effect of early Fg supplementation on mortality and other clinical outcomes. ISRCTN55509212. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS-62): Acceptance, feasibility, and initial psychometric properties in a UK student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglia, Emma; Millings, Abigail; Barkham, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The burden and severity of student mental health continue to increase in parallel with increasing financial pressures on students and services alike. There is a need for a student-specific measure of distress that acknowledges their unique context. This study examined the feasibility, acceptance, and initial psychometric properties of a US measure, the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS), in a UK student sample. A sample of 294 UK help-seeking students from two universities completed the CCAPS-62 and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10) as a comparator. The factor solution and reliability of the CCAPS-62 were examined. Correlations and clinical boundaries were determined between the CCAPS-62 subscales and CORE-10, and comparisons were made with US published norms. The CCAPS-62 demonstrated a strong factor solution that matched the intended subscales. All subscales had good reliability and correlated significantly with the CORE-10. The agreement on caseness between the two measures was 92.8% with 86.3% reaching clinical threshold on both the CCAPS-62 and CORE-10. Severity was most noticeable for academic distress, depression, anxiety, and social anxiety. Compared to US data, UK students showed higher clinical severity for all psychological symptoms. The CCAPS-62 is a reliable and psychometrically valid assessment measure to use with UK students without revision. The overall distress indicated is similar to that of the CORE-10, but the individual subscales are more informative of specific student concerns including academic distress, social anxiety, and substance abuse. Potential benefits of administering a student-focused assessment measure in student counselling services are discussed. University students attending counselling in the UK demonstrate clinical severity for academic distress, depression, anxiety, and social anxiety. Compared to university students in the US, UK students present with higher clinical severity on

  13. Patient-centered disease management (PCDM) for heart failure: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, David B; Plomondon, Mary E; Sullivan, Mark D; Nelson, Karin; Hattler, Brack; McBryde, Connor; Lehmann, Kenneth G; Potfay, Jonathan; Heidenreich, Paul; Rumsfeld, John S

    2013-07-09

    Chronic heart failure (HF) disease management programs have reported inconsistent results and have not included comorbid depression management or specifically focused on improving patient-reported outcomes. The Patient Centered Disease Management (PCDM) trial was designed to test the effectiveness of collaborative care disease management in improving health status (symptoms, functioning, and quality of life) in patients with HF who reported poor HF-specific health status. Patients with a HF diagnosis at four VA Medical Centers were identified through population-based sampling. Patients with a Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ, a measure of HF-specific health status) score of patients were randomized to receive usual care or the PCDM intervention, which included: (1) collaborative care management by VA clinicians including a nurse, cardiologist, internist, and psychiatrist, who worked with patients and their primary care providers to provide guideline-concordant care management, (2) home telemonitoring and guided patient self-management support, and (3) screening and treatment for comorbid depression. The primary study outcome is change in overall KCCQ score. Secondary outcomes include depression, medication adherence, guideline-based care, hospitalizations, and mortality. The PCDM trial builds on previous studies of HF disease management by prioritizing patient health status, implementing a collaborative care model of health care delivery, and addressing depression, a key barrier to optimal disease management. The study has been designed as an 'effectiveness trial' to support broader implementation in the healthcare system if it is successful. Unique identifier: NCT00461513.

  14. Feasibility and acceptability of a beverage intervention for Hispanic adults: a protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Kristin E; Aceves, Benjamin; Valdez, Luis A; Thomson, Cynthia A; Hakim, Iman A; Bell, Melanie L; Martinez, Jessica A; Garcia, David O

    2018-02-09

    -reactive protein (hs-CRP). This pilot study will provide important feasibility, safety, and early efficacy data necessary to design a larger, adequately-powered randomized controlled trial. NCT02911753 ( ClinicalTrials.gov ). Registered September 19, 2016. Last updated November 1, 2017.

  15. Feasibility and acceptability of training community health workers in ear and hearing care in Malawi: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulwafu, Wakisa; Kuper, Hannah; Viste, Asgaut; Goplen, Frederik K

    2017-10-11

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of training community health workers (CHWs) in ear and hearing care, and their ability to identify patients with ear and hearing disorders. Cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT). Health centres in Thyolo district, Malawi. Ten health centres participated, 5 intervention (29 CHWs) and 5 control (28 CHWs). Intervention CHWs received 3 days of training in primary ear and hearing care, while among control CHWs, training was delayed for 6 months. Both groups were given a pretest that assessed knowledge about ear and hearing care, only the intervention group was given the posttest on the third day of training. The intervention group was given 1 month to identify patients with ear and hearing disorders in their communities, and these people were screened for hearing disorders by ear, nose and throat clinical specialists. Primary outcome measure was improvement in knowledge of ear and hearing care among CHWs after the training. Secondary outcome measures were number of patients with ear or hearing disorders identified by CHWs and number recorded at health centres during routine activities, and the perceived feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. The average overall correct answers increased from 55% to 68% (95% CI 65 to 71) in the intervention group (phearing disorders were identified by CHWs and 860 patients attended the screening camps, of whom 400 had hearing loss (73 patients determined through bilateral fail on otoacoustic emissions, 327 patients through audiometry). Where cause could be determined, the most common cause of ear and hearing disorders was chronic suppurative otitis media followed by impacted wax. The intervention was perceived as feasible and acceptable to implement. Training was effective in improving the knowledge of CHW in ear and hearing care in Malawi and allowing them to identify patients with ear and hearing disorders. This intervention could be scaled up to other CHWs in low-income and

  16. Awareness Enhancing and Monitoring Device plus Habit Reversal in the Treatment of Trichotillomania: An Open Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himle, Joseph A; Bybee, Deborah; O'Donnell, Lisa A; Weaver, Addie; Vlnka, Sarah; DeSena, Daniel T; Rimer, Jessica M

    2018-01-01

    Habit Reversal Therapy (HRT) is helpful for many persons suffering from trichotillomania. However successful habit reversal therapy requires awareness of hair pulling behaviors. Available methods to monitor hair pulling behaviors are less than ideal, particularly when sufferers are unaware of their pulling-related behaviors. This open feasibility trial included 20 persons with trichotillomania who were treated with nine weeks of HRT with experienced clinicians following a well-established HRT protocol. HRT was augmented with an electronic Awareness Enhancing and Monitoring Device (AEMD) designed to alert users of hand to head contact and to monitor the frequency of pulling-related behaviors. The AEMD included a neck unit and two wrist units, each equipped with vibrating alert functions. The results of the open trial revealed significant improvements in trichotillomania symptoms as measured by clinician and self-report rating scales. Most participants met study criteria for HRT completion and treatment effects were large. Participants reported that the AEMD, when operational, was effective in alerting participants to TTM-related behaviors. The monitoring function of the AEMD did not operate as designed. Subjective feedback focused on the AEMD concept was positive but AEMD reliability problems and complaints about the wearability the units were common. Recommendations for AEMD design modifications were included.

  17. A Self-Directed Mobile Intervention (WaznApp) to Promote Weight Control Among Employees at a Lebanese University: Protocol for a Feasibility Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardus, Marco; Hamadeh, Ghassan; Hayek, Bouchra; Al Kherfan, Rawan

    2018-05-16

    Overweight and obesity have become major health problems globally with more than 1.9 billion overweight adults. In Lebanon, the prevalence of obesity and overweight is 65.4% combined. Risk factors of obesity and overweight are preventable and can be addressed by modifications in the environment and in an individual's lifestyle. Mobile technologies are increasingly used in behavioral, self-directed weight management interventions, providing users with additional opportunities to attain weight control (weight loss, weight gain prevention, etc). Mobile apps may allow for the delivery of Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions (JITAIs), which provide support through skill building, emotional support, and instrumental support, following the participants' progress. A few commercially available apps offer JITAI features, but no studies have tested their efficacy. The primary objective of this study is to examine the feasibility of a self-directed weight loss intervention, targeting employees of an academic institution, using a virtual coaching app with JITAI features (Lark) and a self-help calorie-counting app (MyFitnessPal). The secondary objective is to estimate the effects of the intervention on main study outcomes. This study is a single-center, parallel, randomized controlled trial with 2 study arms (intervention and control). Participants will be randomly allocated in equal proportions to the intervention (Lark) and control groups (MyFitnessPal). To be eligible for this study, participants must be employed full- or part-time at the university or its medical center, able to read English, have a smartphone, and be interested in controlling their weight. Recruitment strategies entail email invitations, printed posters, and social media postings. We will assess quantitative rates of recruitment, adherence, and retention, self-reported app quality using the user version of the Mobile App Rating Scale. We will also assess changes in weight-related outcomes (absolute weight

  18. Balancing treatment allocations by clinician or center in randomized trials allows unacceptable levels of treatment prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Robert K; Gray, Richard; Wheatley, Keith

    2009-08-01

    Randomized controlled trials are the standard method for comparing treatments because they avoid the selection bias that might arise if clinicians were free to choose which treatment a patient would receive. In practice, allocation of treatments in randomized controlled trials is often not wholly random with various 'pseudo-randomization' methods, such as minimization or balanced blocks, used to ensure good balance between treatments within potentially important prognostic or predictive subgroups. These methods avoid selection bias so long as full concealment of the next treatment allocation is maintained. There is concern, however, that pseudo-random methods may allow clinicians to predict future treatment allocations from previous allocation history, particularly if allocations are balanced by clinician or center. We investigate here to what extent treatment prediction is possible. Using computer simulations of minimization and balanced block randomizations, the success rates of various prediction strategies were investigated for varying numbers of stratification variables, including the patient's clinician. Prediction rates for minimization and balanced block randomization typically exceed 60% when clinician is included as a stratification variable and, under certain circumstances, can exceed 80%. Increasing the number of clinicians and other stratification variables did not greatly reduce the prediction rates. Without clinician as a stratification variable, prediction rates are poor unless few clinicians participate. Prediction rates are unacceptably high when allocations are balanced by clinician or by center. This could easily lead to selection bias that might suggest spurious, or mask real, treatment effects. Unless treatment is blinded, randomization should not be balanced by clinician (or by center), and clinician-center effects should be allowed for instead by retrospectively stratified analyses. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese

  19. Healthy Beyond Pregnancy, a Web-Based Intervention to Improve Adherence to Postpartum Care: Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Katherine Park; Donovan, Heidi; Wang, Stephanie; Weaver, Carrie; Grove, Jillian Rae; Facco, Francesca Lucia

    2017-10-10

    During the postpartum visit, health care providers address issues with short- and long-term implications for maternal and child health. Women with Medicaid insurance are less likely to return for a postpartum visit compared with women with private insurance. Behavioral economics acknowledges that people do not make exclusively rational choices, rather immediate gratification, cognitive and psychological biases, and social norms influence decision making. Drawing on insights from decision science, behavioral economists have examined how these biases can be modulated through carefully designed interventions. We have developed a Web-based tool, Healthy Beyond Pregnancy, that incorporates empirically derived concepts of behavioral economics to improve adherence rates to the postpartum visit. The primary objectives of this pilot study were to (1) refine and assess the usability of Healthy Beyond Pregnancy and (2) assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the intervention. We used a multistep process and multidisciplinary team of maternal-fetal medicine physicians, a behavioral economist, and researchers with expertise in behavioral interventions to design Healthy Beyond Pregnancy. We assessed the usability of the program with the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ), a validated 7-point scale, and semistructured interviews with postpartum women. We then conducted a feasibility trial to determine the proportion of eligible women who were willing to participate in an RCT of Healthy Beyond Pregnancy and the proportion of women willing to complete the Web-based program. Exploratory outcomes of the pilot trial included attendance at the postpartum visit, uptake of long-acting reversible contraception, and uptake of any contraception. The median PSSUQ score for Healthy Beyond Pregnancy was 6.5 (interquartile range: 6.1-7) demonstrating high usability. Semistructured interviews (n=10) provided in-depth comments about users' experience and

  20. Feasibility of an online mindfulness-based program for patients with melanoma: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Lahiru; Ugalde, Anna; Milne, Donna; Krishnasamy, Meinir; O Seung Chul, Eric; Austin, David W; Chambers, Richard; Orellana, Liliana; Livingston, Patricia M

    2018-04-13

    People with a melanoma diagnosis are at risk of recurrence, developing a new primary or experiencing disease progression. Previous studies have suggested that fear of a cancer recurrence is clinically relevant in this group of patients and, if not addressed, can lead to distress. Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to alleviate symptoms of anxiety and depression among various groups of cancer patients. Online mindfulness-based interventions have the potential to reach people unable to attend face-to-face interventions due to limitations such as cancer-related illness, transportation or time constraints. This study aims to (1) examine whether individuals with a melanoma diagnosis are willing to participate and adhere to a 6-week online mindfulness-based intervention and (2) explore potential benefits of the program on fear of cancer recurrence, worries, rumination, perceived stress and trait mindfulness to inform the design of a clinical trial. This is a single-site randomised controlled trial of a feasibility study. Seventy-five participants with stage 2c or 3 melanoma will be recruited from a melanoma outpatient clinic and randomised (2:1) either to an online mindfulness-based program (intervention) or to usual care (control). The intervention is a 6-week program specifically developed for this study. It consists of videos describing the concept of mindfulness, short daily guided meditation practices (5-10 min), automated meditation reminders and instructions for applying mindfulness in daily life to enhance wellbeing. All participants will complete questionnaires at baseline and at 6-week post-randomisation. Participants in the control group will be given access to the online program at the end of the study. Primary outcomes are overall recruitment; retention; extent of questionnaire completion; and usability and acceptability of, and adherence to, the program. The secondary outcomes are fear of cancer recurrence, worries, rumination, perceived

  1. Patient education and rehabilitation after hip arthroplasty in an Italian spa center: a pilot study on its feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Alfredo; Pranovi, Giulia; Masiero, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    Nowadays, some spa centers are suitable for providing rehabilitative and preventive treatment in association with traditional spa therapy. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of an intensive rehabilitation program after hip arthroplasty in an Italian spa center. Early after total hip arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis (≤ 10 days after the intervention), 12 consecutive patients (5 males and 7 females) aged between 50 and 85 years were enrolled for this study. All the patients performed a 2-week thermal multimodal rehabilitation program, which consisted of education and physical rehabilitative measures. Patients had 2-h and half/day session of land-based and hydrokinesitherapy (aquatic therapy) consisted in active and passive joint mobilization, respiratory and functional re-education exercises, gait and balance training, resistance exercise, and power training mainly for the upper limb associated to physical therapy modalities (electrotherapy and low-level laser therapy). An educational program was performed to both patients and families. Both before and after the rehabilitation treatment, patients underwent clinical evaluation, hip flexion/abduction range of motion, and Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Harris Hip Score (HHS) and SF-12 questionnaires (physical—PCS-12—and mental health component—MCS-12) were also administered. After the 2-week thermal spa treatment, hip flexion/abduction improved significantly (p < 0.05), but there was no statistically significant reduction in pain (p = 0.350). The HHS score improved significantly from 62.6 ± 12.8 to 82.15 ± 12.7 (p < 0.05), and the PCS-12 score from 36.37 ± 8.4 to 43.61 ± 8.95 (p < 0.05). There was no adverse event during spa treatment. After total hip arthroplasty, patients who underwent an intensive post-acute multimodal rehabilitation program showed an improvement in motor and functional recovery and a positive impact on quality of life. Therefore, we believe that the

  2. Bridges self-management program for people with stroke in the community: A feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Suzanne; Jones, Fiona; Glenfield, Pauline; Lennon, Sheila

    2015-07-01

    Enabling self-management behaviors is considered important in order to develop coping strategies and confidence for managing life with a long-term condition. However, there is limited research into stroke-specific self-management interventions. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering the Bridges stroke self-management program in addition to usual stroke rehabilitation compared with usual rehabilitation only. Participants recruited from the referrals to a community stroke team were randomly allocated to the Bridges stroke self-management program, receiving either one session of up to one-hour per week over a six-week period in addition to usual stroke rehabilitation, or usual rehabilitation only. Feasibility was measured using a range of methods to determine recruitment and retention; adherence to the program; suitability and variability of outcome measures used; application and fidelity of the program; and acceptability of the program to patients, carers and professionals. Twenty-five people were recruited to the study over a 13-month period. Eight out of the 12 participants in the Bridges stroke self-management program received all six sessions; there was one withdrawal from the study. There were changes in outcomes between the two groups. Participants who received the Bridges stroke self-management program appeared to have a greater change in self-efficacy, functional activity, social integration and quality of life over the six-week intervention period and showed less decline in mood and quality of life at the three-month follow-up. Professionals found the program acceptable to use in practice, and feedback from participants was broadly positive. The findings from this study appear promising, but questions remain regarding the feasibility of delivering the Bridges stroke self-management program in addition to usual rehabilitation. The dose response of receiving the program cannot be ruled out, and the next stage

  3. Neurofeedback-Based Enhancement of Single Trial Auditory Evoked Potentials: Feasibility in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Kathryn; Rarra, Marie-Helene; Moor, Nicolas; Diaz Hernandez, Laura; Baenninger, Anja; Razavi, Nadja; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela; Koenig, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies showed a global reduction of the event-related potential component N100 in patients with schizophrenia, a phenomenon that is even more pronounced during auditory verbal hallucinations. This reduction assumingly results from dysfunctional activation of the primary auditory cortex by inner speech, which reduces its responsiveness to external stimuli. With this study, we tested the feasibility of enhancing the responsiveness of the primary auditory cortex to external stimuli with an upregulation of the event-related potential component N100 in healthy control subjects. A total of 15 healthy subjects performed 8 double-sessions of EEG-neurofeedback training over 2 weeks. The results of the used linear mixed effect model showed a significant active learning effect within sessions ( t = 5.99, P < .001) against an unspecific habituation effect that lowered the N100 amplitude over time. Across sessions, a significant increase in the passive condition ( t = 2.42, P = .03), named as carry-over effect, was observed. Given that the carry-over effect is one of the ultimate aims of neurofeedback, it seems reasonable to apply this neurofeedback training protocol to influence the N100 amplitude in patients with schizophrenia. This intervention could provide an alternative treatment option for auditory verbal hallucinations in these patients.

  4. Improved quality monitoring of multi-center acupuncture clinical trials in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hui

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2007, the Chinese Science Division of the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine(TCM convened a special conference to discuss quality control for TCM clinical research. Control and assurance standards were established to guarantee the quality of clinical research. This paper provides practical guidelines for implementing strict and reproducible quality control for acupuncture randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Methods A standard quality control program (QCP was established to monitor the quality of acupuncture trials. Case report forms were designed; qualified investigators, study personnel and data management personnel were trained. Monitors, who were directly appointed by the project leader, completed the quality control programs. They guaranteed data accuracy and prevented or detected protocol violations. Clinical centers and clinicians were audited, the randomization system of the centers was inspected, and the treatment processes were audited as well. In addition, the case report forms were reviewed for completeness and internal consistency, the eligibility and validity of the patients in the study was verified, and data was monitored for compliance and accuracy. Results and discussion The monitors complete their reports and submit it to quality assurance and the sponsors. Recommendations and suggestions are made for improving performance. By holding regular meetings to discuss improvements in monitoring standards, the monitors can improve quality and efficiency. Conclusions Supplementing and improving the existed guidelines for quality monitoring will ensure that large multi-centre acupuncture clinical trials will be considered as valid and scientifically stringent as pharmaceutical clinical trials. It will also develop academic excellence and further promote the international recognition of acupuncture.

  5. Back to the future – feasibility of recruitment and retention to patient education and telephone follow-up after hip fracture: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langford DP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dolores P Langford,1,2 Lena Fleig,3–5 Kristin C Brown,3,4 Nancy J Cho,1,2 Maeve Frost,1 Monique Ledoyen,1 Jayne Lehn,1 Kostas Panagiotopoulos,1,6 Nina Sharpe,1 Maureen C Ashe3,4 1Vancouver Coastal Health, 2Department of Physical Therapy, The University of British Columbia (UBC, 3Department of Family Practice, The University of British Columbia (UBC, 4Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 5Freie Universität Berlin, Health Psychology, Berlin, Germany; 6Department of Orthopaedics, The University of British Columbia (UBC, Vancouver, BC, Canada Objectives: Our primary aim of this pilot study was to test feasibility of the planned design, the interventions (education plus telephone coaching, and the outcome measures, and to facilitate a power calculation for a future randomized controlled trial to improve adherence to recovery goals following hip fracture.Design: This is a parallel 1:1 randomized controlled feasibility study.Setting: The study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Vancouver, BC, Canada.Participants: Participants were community-dwelling adults over 60 years of age with a recent hip fracture. They were recruited and assessed in hospital, and then randomized after hospital discharge to the intervention or control group by a web-based randomization service. Treatment allocation was concealed to the investigators, measurement team, and data entry assistants and analysts. Participants and the research physiotherapist were aware of treatment allocation.Intervention: Intervention included usual care for hip fracture plus a 1-hour in-hospital educational session using a patient-centered educational manual and four videos, and up to five postdischarge telephone calls from a physiotherapist to provide recovery coaching. The control group received usual care plus a 1-hour in-hospital educational session using the educational manual and videos.Measurement: Our primary outcome was feasibility, specifically recruitment

  6. OS7.7 Feasibility and toxicity of concomitant radiochemotherapy with vincristine in adult patients with medulloblastoma - results from the NOA-07 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, C.; Reimers, C.; Beier, D.; Pietsch, T.; Warmuth-Metz, M.; Bogdahn, U.; Kortmann, R.; Hau, P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Medulloblastoma is a tumor of the cerebellum that is rare in adults with an incidence of about 0.6 cases per million per year. In children the introduction of chemotherapy with cisplatin, lomustine and vincristine in combination with craniospinal radiotherapy led to a significant improvement of overall survival. In adults, this regimen was never prospectively investigated in a clinical trial. Methods. The NOA-07 trial is a prospective single arm Phase II study to evaluate toxicity of craniospinal irradiation (1.6 Gy/35.2 Gy, posterior fossa boost 1.8 Gy/55.0 Gy) in combination with vincristine (1.5 mg/m2 weekly, ceiling dose 2.0 mg) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with a maximum 8 of 6-weekly cycles of cisplatin (70 mg/m2, day 1), lomustine (75 mg/m2, day 1) and vincristine (1.5 g/m2, ceiling dose 2.0 mg, day 1, 8, 15) in adults with medulloblastoma. Here, we report on feasibility and toxicity of the concomitant radiochemotherapy. Results. 30 patients with medulloblastoma were recruited in 15 German centers. Radiotherapy was completed in all patients. Treatment interruptions occurred in 3/30 patients (toxicity related: 2, compliance: 1). Leukopenia was the major toxicity with grade 3 and 4 (CTC Version 3.0) occurring in 11 of 30 patients and 1 of 30 patients, respectively. Grade 3 to 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in 1 patient. Grade 3 to 4 infections occurred in 3 patients. Polyneuropathy due to vincristine was the most prevalent adverse event (Grade 1: 5, Grade 2: 4, Grade 3: 5 of 30 patients). Frequent but less severe toxicities involved sickness, dermatitis and alopecia. Conclusion. Concomitant radiochemotherapy with vincristine was feasible in adults with medulloblastoma. Leukopenia and polyneuropathy are major complications, pointing out that polyneuropathy occurs already early in treatment after application of only 1 to 6 doses in a substantial number of patients. Toxicity of the complete treatment protocol including

  7. Design of the muscles in motion study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of an individually tailored home-based exercise training program for children and adolescents with juvenile dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habers Esther A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is a rare, often chronic, systemic autoimmune disease of childhood, characterized by inflammation of the microvasculature of the skeletal muscle and skin. Prominent clinical features include significant exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Despite pharmacological improvements, these clinical features continue to affect patients with JDM, even when the disease is in remission. Exercise training is increasingly utilized as a non-pharmacological intervention in the clinical management of (adult patients with chronic inflammatory conditions; however no randomized controlled trials (RCT have been performed in JDM. In the current study, the efficacy and feasibility of an exercise training program in patients with JDM will be examined. Methods/design Subjects (n = 30 will include 8–18 year olds diagnosed with JDM. The intervention consists of an individually tailored 12-weeks home-based exercise training program in which interval training on a treadmill is alternated with strength training during each session. The program is based on previous literature and designed with a defined frequency, intensity, time, and type of exercise (FITT principles. Primary outcome measures include aerobic exercise capacity, isometric muscle strength, and perception of fatigue. The study methodology has been conceived according to the standards of the CONSORT guidelines. The current study will be a multi-center (4 Dutch University Medical Centers RCT, with the control group also entering the training arm directly after completion of the initial protocol. Randomization is stratified according to age and gender. Discussion The current study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of an individually tailored 12-week home-based exercise training program in youth with JDM. Trial registration Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands: 11–336

  8. Modifying Alcohol Consumption to Reduce Obesity (MACRO): development and feasibility trial of a complex community-based intervention for men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Iain K; Cunningham, Kathryn B; Irvine, Linda; Williams, Brian; Sniehotta, Falko F; Norrie, John; Melson, Ambrose; Jones, Claire; Briggs, Andrew; Rice, Peter M; Achison, Marcus; McKenzie, Andrew; Dimova, Elena; Slane, Peter W

    2017-04-01

    Obese men who consume alcohol are at a greatly increased risk of liver disease; those who drink > 14 units of alcohol per week have a 19-fold increased risk of dying from liver disease. To develop an intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in obese men and to assess the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to investigate its effectiveness. The intervention was developed using formative research, public involvement and behaviour change theory. It was organised in two phases, comprising a face-to-face session with trained laypeople (study co-ordinators) followed by a series of text messages. Participants explored how alcohol consumption contributed to weight gain, both through direct calorie consumption and through its effect on increasing food consumption, particularly of high-calorie foodstuffs. Men were encouraged to set goals to reduce their alcohol consumption and to make specific plans to do so. The comparator group received an active control in the form of a conventional alcohol brief intervention. Randomisation was carried out using the secure remote web-based system provided by the Tayside Clinical Trials Unit. Randomisation was stratified by the recruitment method and restricted using block sizes of randomly varying lengths. Members of the public were involved in the development of all study methods. Men were recruited from the community, from primary care registers and by time-space sampling (TSS). The intervention was delivered in community settings such as the participant's home, community centres and libraries. Men aged 35-64 years who had a body mass index (BMI) of > 30 kg/m 2 and who drank > 21 units of alcohol per week. The screening methods successfully identified participants meeting the entry criteria. Trial recruitment was successful, with 69 men (36 from 419 approached in primary care, and 33 from 470 approached via TSS) recruited and randomised in 3 months. Of the 69 men randomised, 35 were allocated to the intervention

  9. Pilot trial of a tele-rehab intervention to improve outcomes after stroke in Ghana: A feasibility and user satisfaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Fred S; Adusei, Nathaniel; Ampofo, Michael; Kpeme, Frank K; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2018-04-15

    Tele-rehabilitation after stroke holds promise for under-resourced settings, especially sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), with its immense stroke burden and severely limited physical therapy services. To preliminarily assess the feasibility and outcomes of mobile technology-assisted physical therapy exercises for stroke survivors in Ghana. We conducted a prospective, single arm, pre-post study involving 20 stroke survivors recruited from a tertiary medical center, who received a Smartphone with the 9zest Stroke App® to deliver individualized, goal-targeted 5-days-a-week exercise program that was remotely supervised by a tele-therapist for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included changes in stroke levity scale scores (SLS), Modified Rankin score (MRS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA), and feasibility indicators. Among study participants, mean ± SD age was 54.6 ± 10.2 years, 11 (55%) were men, average time from stroke onset was 6 months. No participants dropped out. Compared with baseline status, mean ± SD scores on SLS improved from 7.5 ± 3.1 to 11.8 ± 2.2 at month 1 (p < 0.0001) and 12.2 ± 2.4 at month 3 (p < 0.0001), MOCA scores improved from 18.2 ± 4.3 to 20.4 ± 4.7 at month 1 (p = 0.14), and 22.2 ± 7.6 at month 3 (p = 0.047). Mean ± SD weekly sessions performed by participants per month was 5.7 ± 5.8 and duration of sessions was 25.5 ± 16.2 min. Erratic internet connectivity negatively affected full compliance with the intervention, although satisfaction ratings by study participants were excellent. It is feasible to administer an m-health delivered physical therapy intervention in SSA, with high user satisfaction. Randomized trials to assess the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of this intervention are warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A cluster randomised feasibility trial evaluating six-month nutritional interventions in the treatment of malnutrition in care home-dwelling adults: recruitment, data collection and protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stow, Ruth; Rushton, Alison; Ives, Natalie; Smith, Christina; Rick, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition predisposes individuals to disease, delays recovery from illness and reduces quality of life. Care home residents are especially vulnerable, with an estimated 30%-42% at risk. There is no internationally agreed protocol for the nutritional treatment of malnutrition in the care home setting. Widely used techniques include food-based intervention and/or the use of prescribed oral nutritional supplements, but a trial comparing the efficacy of interventions is necessary. In order to define outcomes and optimise the design for an adequately powered, low risk of bias cluster randomised controlled trial, a feasibility trial with 6-month intervention is being run, to assess protocol procedures, recruitment and retention rates, consent processes and resident and staff acceptability. Trial recruitment began in September 2013 and concluded in December 2013. Six privately run care homes in Solihull, England, were selected to establish feasibility within different care home types. Residents with or at risk of malnutrition with no existing dietetic intervention in place were considered for receipt of the allocated intervention. Randomisation took place at the care home level, using a computer-generated random number list to allocate each home to either a dietetic intervention arm (food-based or prescribed supplements) or the standard care arm, continued for 6 months. Dietetic intervention aimed to increase daily calorie intake by 600 kcal and protein by 20-25 g. The primary outcomes will be trial feasibility and acceptability of trial design and allocated interventions. A range of outcome assessments and data collection tools will be evaluated for feasibility, including change in nutrient intake, anthropometric parameters and patient-centric measures, such as quality of life and self-perceived appetite. The complexities inherent in care home research has resulted in the under representation of this population in research trials. The results of this

  11. Management of irritable bowel syndrome in primary care: feasibility randomised controlled trial of mebeverine, methylcellulose, placebo and a patient self-management cognitive behavioural therapy website. (MIBS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardley Lucy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IBS affects 10-22% of the UK population. Abdominal pain, bloating and altered bowel habit affect quality of life, social functioning and time off work. Current GP treatment relies on a positive diagnosis, reassurance, lifestyle advice and drug therapies, but many suffer ongoing symptoms. A recent Cochrane review highlighted the lack of research evidence for IBS drugs. Neither GPs, nor patients have good evidence to inform prescribing decisions. However, IBS drugs are widely used: In 2005 the NHS costs were nearly £10 million for mebeverine and over £8 million for fibre-based bulking agents. CBT and self-management can be helpful, but poor availability in the NHS restricts their use. We have developed a web-based CBT self-management programme, Regul8, based on an existing evidence based self-management manual and in partnership with patients. This could increase access with minimal increased costs. Methods/Design The aim is to undertake a feasibility factorial RCT to assess the effectiveness of the commonly prescribed medications in UK general practice for IBS: mebeverine (anti-spasmodic and methylcellulose (bulking-agent and Regul8, the CBT based self-management website. 135 patients aged 16 to 60 years with IBS symptoms fulfilling Rome III criteria, recruited via GP practices, will be randomised to 1 of 3 levels of the drug condition: mebeverine, methylcellulose or placebo for 6 weeks and to 1 of 3 levels of the website condition, Regul8 with a nurse telephone session and email support, Regul8 with minimal email support, or no website, thus creating 9 groups. Outcomes: Irritable bowel symptom severity scale and IBS-QOL will be measured at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks as the primary outcomes. An intention to treat analysis will be undertaken by ANCOVA for a factorial trial. Discussion This pilot will provide valuable information for a larger trial. Determining the effectiveness of commonly used drug treatments will help

  12. Quality assurance of 3-D conformal radiation therapy for a cooperative group trial - RTOG 3D QA center initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Purdy, James A.; Harms, William B.; Bosch, Walter R.; Oehmke, Frederick; Cox, James D.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: 3-D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) holds promise in allowing safe escalation of radiation dose to increase the local control of prostate cancer. Prospective evaluation of this new modality requires strict quality assurance (QA). We report the results of QA review on patients receiving 3DCRT for prostate cancer on a cooperative group trial. MATERIALS and METHODS: In 1993 the NCI awarded the ACR/RTOG and nine institutions an RFA grant to study the use of 3DCRT in the treatment of prostate cancer. A phase I/II trial was developed to: a) test the feasibility of conducting 3DCRT radiation dose escalation in a cooperative group setting; b) establish the maximum tolerated radiation dose that can be delivered to the prostate; and c) quantify the normal tissue toxicity rate when using 3DCRT. In order to assure protocol compliance each participating institution was required to implement data exchange capabilities with the RTOG 3D QA center. The QA center reviews at a minimum the first five case from each participating center and spot checks subsequent submissions. For each case review the following parameters are evaluated: 1) target volume delineation, 2) normal structure delineation, 3) CT data quality, 4) field placement, 5) field shaping, and 6) dose distribution. RESULTS: Since the first patient was registered on August 23, 1994, an additional 170 patients have been accrued. Each of the nine original approved institutions has participated and three other centers have recently passed quality assurance bench marks for study participation. Eighty patients have been treated at the first dose level (68.4 Gy minimum PTV dose) and accrual is currently ongoing at the second dose level (73.8 Gy minimum PTV dose). Of the 124 cases that have undergone complete or partial QA review, 30 cases (24%) have had some problems with data exchange. Five of 67 CT scans were not acquired by protocol standards. Target volume delineation required the submitting institution

  13. Feasibility of bispectral index-guided propofol infusion for flexible bronchoscopy sedation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lun Lo

    Full Text Available There are safety issues associated with propofol use for flexible bronchoscopy (FB. The bispectral index (BIS correlates well with the level of consciousness. The aim of this study was to show that BIS-guided propofol infusion is safe and may provide better sedation, benefiting the patients and bronchoscopists.After administering alfentanil bolus, 500 patients were randomized to either propofol infusion titrated to a BIS level of 65-75 (study group or incremental midazolam bolus based on clinical judgment to achieve moderate sedation. The primary endpoint was safety, while the secondary endpoints were recovery time, patient tolerance, and cooperation.The proportion of patients with hypoxemia or hypotensive events were not different in the 2 groups (study vs. control groups: 39.9% vs. 35.7%, p = 0.340; 7.4% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.159, respectively. The mean lowest blood pressure was lower in the study group. Logistic regression revealed male gender, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and electrocautery were associated with hypoxemia, whereas lower propofol dose for induction was associated with hypotension in the study group. The study group had better global tolerance (p<0.001, less procedural interference by movement or cough (13.6% vs. 36.1%, p<0.001; 30.0% vs. 44.2%, p = 0.001, respectively, and shorter time to orientation and ambulation (11.7±10.2 min vs. 29.7±26.8 min, p<0.001; 30.0±18.2 min vs. 55.7±40.6 min, p<0.001, respectively compared to the control group.BIS-guided propofol infusion combined with alfentanil for FB sedation provides excellent patient tolerance, with fast recovery and less procedure interference.ClinicalTrials. gov NCT00789815.

  14. Transdiagnostic internet-delivered cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID): A feasibility open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, B F; Fogliati, V J; Fogliati, R; Gandy, M; McDonald, S; Talley, N; Holtmann, G; Titov, N; Jones, M

    2018-05-01

    Many people with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) face significant barriers in accessing psychological treatments that are known to reduce symptoms and their psychological sequelae. This study examined the feasibility and initial outcomes of a transdiagnostic and internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) intervention, the Chronic Conditions Course, for adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). A single-group feasibility open trial design was employed and administered to twenty seven participants. The course ran for 8 weeks and was provided with weekly contact from a Clinical Psychologist. Seventy percent of participants completed the course within the 8 weeks and 81.5% provided data at post-treatment. High levels of satisfaction were observed and relatively little clinician time (M = 42.70 min per participant; SD = 46.25 min) was required. Evidence of clinical improvements in FGID symptoms (ds ≥ 0.46; avg. improvement ≥21%), anxiety symptoms (ds ≥ 0.99; avg. improvement ≥42%), and depression symptoms (ds ≥ 0.75; avg. improvement ≥35%) were observed, which either maintained or continued to improve to 3-month follow-up. Evidence of improvement was also observed in pain catastrophising and mental-health related quality of life, but not physical-health related quality of life. These findings highlight the potential value of transdiagnostic internet-delivered programs for adults with FGIDs and support for the conduct of larger-scale controlled studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediabetes in pregnancy, can early intervention improve outcomes? A feasibility study for a parallel randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ruth C E; Rowan, Janet; Williman, Jonathan

    2018-03-03

    Measurement of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in early pregnancy is routine in New Zealand to identify women with diabetes and prediabetes. However, the benefit of early intervention in women with prediabetes is inconclusive. Our aim was to test the feasibility of a two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial of standard care versus early intervention in pregnancies complicated by prediabetes. Two tertiary referral centres in New Zealand. Women measured at booking, without pre-existing diabetes. Randomisation was done by remote web-based allocation into one of two groups. Women in the early intervention group attended an antenatal diabetes clinic, commenced daily home blood glucose monitoring, and medication was prescribed if lifestyle measures failed to maintain target blood glucose levels. Controls received lifestyle education, continued standard care with their midwife and/or obstetrician, and were asked to perform a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24 weeks' gestation with a referral to clinic if this test was positive. Both groups received lifestyle questionnaires at recruitment and in late pregnancy. Recruitment rate, adherence to protocol and validation of potential primary outcomes. Recruitment rates were lower than expected, especially in Māori and Pacific women. Non-adherence to allocated treatment protocol was significant, 42% (95% CI 24% to 61%) in the early intervention group and 30% (95% CI 16% to 51%) in controls. Caesarean section and pre-eclampsia were signalled as potential primary outcomes, due to both the high observed incidence in the control group and ease of measurement. For a future definitive trial, extending the gestation of eligibility and stepped-wedge cluster randomisation may overcome the identified feasibility issues. Consistent with published observational data, pre-eclampsia and emergency caesarean section could be included as primary outcome measures, both of which have a significant impact on maternal and neonatal morbidity and

  16. [Qilin Pills for idiopathic oligoasthenospermia: A multi-centered randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jia-Ming; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Chuan-Hang; Ning, Ke-Qin; Liu, Ji-Hong; Yang, Shu-Wen; Li, Hai-Song; Zhou, Shao-Hu; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Ji-Xiu; Huang, Yong-Han

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of Qilin Pills in the treatment of oligoasthenospermia in infertile men. This multi-centered randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial included 216 infertile males with oligoasthenospermia, 108 in the trial group and the other 108 in the control, the former treated with Qilin Pills at the dose of 6 g tid while the latter with Wuziyanzong Pills at 6 g bid, both for 12 weeks. We examined the total sperm count, sperm motility and the count of progressively motile sperm of the patients before and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after medication and evaluated the safety of the drug based on the adverse events and the laboratory results of blood and urine routine examinations and liver and kidney function tests. Compared with the baseline, the patients in the trial group showed a significant time-dependent improvement after 4, 8 and 12 weeks of medication in sperm motility (21.75% vs 27.54%, 29.04% and 32.95%, P Pills can evidently improve the semen quality of oligoasthenospermia patients with no obvious adverse events.

  17. Feasibility and effectiveness of the baby friendly community initiative in rural Kenya: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth W; Kimiywe, Judith; Kabue, Mark; Wekesah, Frederick; Matiri, Evelyn; Muhia, Nelson; Wanjohi, Milka; Muriuki, Peterrock; Samburu, Betty; Kanyuira, James N; Young, Sera L; Griffiths, Paula L; Madise, Nyovani J; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2015-09-28

    Interventions promoting optimal infant and young child nutrition could prevent a fifth of under-5 deaths in countries with high mortality. Poor infant and young child feeding practices are widely documented in Kenya, with potential detrimental effects on child growth, health and survival. Effective strategies to improve these practices are needed. This study aims to pilot implementation of the Baby Friendly Community Initiative (BFCI), a global initiative aimed at promoting optimal infant and young child feeding practices, to determine its feasibility and effectiveness with regards to infant feeding practices, nutrition and health outcomes in a rural setting in Kenya. The study, employing a cluster-randomized trial design, will be conducted in rural Kenya. A total of 12 clusters, constituting community units within the government's Community Health Strategy, will be randomized, with half allocated to the intervention and the other half to the control arm. A total of 812 pregnant women and their respective children will be recruited into the study. The mother-child pairs will be followed up until the child is 6 months old. Recruitment will last approximately 1 year from January 2015, and the study will run for 3 years, from 2014 to 2016. The intervention will involve regular counseling and support of mothers by trained community health workers and health professionals on maternal, infant and young child nutrition. Regular assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practices on maternal, infant and young child nutrition will be done, coupled with assessment of nutritional status of the mother-child pairs and morbidity for the children. Statistical methods will include analysis of covariance, multinomial logistic regression and multilevel modeling. The study is funded by the NIH and USAID through the Program for Enhanced Research (PEER) Health. Findings from the study outlined in this protocol will inform potential feasibility and effectiveness of a community

  18. Readability of informed consent forms in clinical trials conducted in a skin research center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Aniseh; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining informed consents is one of the most fundamental principles in conducting a clinical trial. In order for the consent to be informed, the patient must receive and comprehend the information appropriately. Complexity of the consent form is a common problem that has been shown to be a major barrier to comprehension for many patients. The objective of this study was to assess the readability of different templates of informed consent forms (ICFs) used in clinical trials in the Center for Research and Training in Skin Diseases and Leprosy (CRTSDL), Tehran, Iran. This study was conducted on ICFs of 45 clinical trials of the CRTSDL affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. ICFs were tested for reading difficulty, using the readability assessments formula adjusted for the Persian language including the Flesch–Kincaid reading ease score, Flesch–Kincaid grade level, and Gunning fog index. Mean readability score of the whole text of ICFs as well as their 7 main information parts were calculated. The mean ± SD Flesch Reading Ease score for all ICFs was 31.96 ± 5.62 that is in the difficult range. The mean ± SD grade level was calculated as 10.71 ± 1.8 (8.23–14.09) using the Flesch–Kincaid formula and 14.64 ± 1.22 (12.67–18.27) using the Gunning fog index. These results indicate that the text is expected to be understandable for an average student in the 11th grade, while the ethics committee recommend grade level 8 as the standard readability level for ICFs. The results showed that the readability scores of ICFs assessed in our study were not in the acceptable range. This means they were too complex to be understood by the general population. Ethics committees must examine the simplicity and readability of ICFs used in clinical trials. PMID:27471590

  19. Feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of ice therapy in patients with an acute tear in the gastrocnemius muscle: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Jan C M; Stubbe, Janine H; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Scheffers, Frans A; van Dongen, Martien C J M

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial and the preliminary effectiveness of ice therapy in the acute phase of a gastrocnemius tear for the quality of functional recovery. A pilot version of an intended prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 19 patients with an acute tear in the gastrocnemius muscle were randomly allocated to either active or control treatment. The intervention consisted of the repeated application of crushed ice. Primary outcome measures were functional capacity and reconvalescence time. Secondary outcome measures were pain and work absenteeism. The number of patients we could include within the 6-hour time window and dropping out from the pilot study were regarded as indicators of the feasibility of ice therapy. A total of 16 patients were excluded from the study because diagnosis was not made within 6 hours after onset of the complaint. The 19 patients included completed the treatment. For functional capacity, reconvalescence time, work absenteeism and pain relief, no significant differences between the intervention and control group were found. The execution of a randomized controlled trial on ice therapy for acute gastrocnemius tear is feasible though quite an enterprise. First, it is recommended to improve the recruitment processes. Second, power analysis demands inclusion of 396 participants. Preliminary effectiveness in our limited-sized trial indicates that the use of ice is not beneficial for people who receive ice therapy.

  20. Feasibility of personalised remote long-term follow-up of people with cochlear implants: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullington, Helen; Kitterick, Padraig; Weal, Mark; Margol-Gromada, Magdalena

    2018-04-20

    Substantial resources are required to provide lifelong postoperative care to people with cochlear implants. Most patients visit the clinic annually. We introduced a person-centred remote follow-up pathway, giving patients telemedicine tools to use at home so they would only visit the centre when intervention was required. To assess the feasibility of comparing a remote care pathway with the standard pathway in adults using cochlear implants. Two-arm randomised controlled trial. Randomisation used a minimisation approach, controlling for potential confounding factors. Participant blinding was not possible, but baseline measures occurred before allocation. University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service: provider of National Health Service care. 60 adults who had used cochlear implants for at least 6 months. Control group (n=30) followed usual care pathway.Remote care group (n=30) received care remotely for 6 months incorporating: home hearing in noise test, online support tool and self-adjustment of device (only 10 had compatible equipment). Primary: change in patient activation; measured using the Patient Activation Measure.Secondary: change in hearing and quality of life; qualitative feedback from patients and clinicians. One participant in the remote care group dropped out. The remote care group showed a greater increase in patient activation than the control group. Changes in hearing differed between the groups. The remote care group improved on the Triple Digit Test hearing test; the control group perceived their hearing was worse on the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale questionnaire. Quality of life remained unchanged in both groups. Patients and clinicians were generally positive about remote care tools and wanted to continue. Adults with cochlear implants were willing to be randomised and complied with the protocol. Personalised remote care for long-term follow-up is feasible and acceptable, leading to more empowered patients. ISRCTN14644286

  1. A six-month crossover chemoprevention clinical trial of tea in smokers and non-smokers: methodological issues in a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemoprevention crossover trials of tea can be more efficient than parallel designs but the attrition and compliance rates with such trials are unknown. Methods Attrition (dropouts) and compliance with treatment were assessed in a 25-week randomized, placebo controlled, crossover, feasibility clinical trial of four tea treatments to investigate the effect of tea on oral cancer biomarkers. Each treatment lasted 4 weeks with 2 weeks of washout in between. Participants were 32 smokers and 33 non-smokers without any evidence of premalignant oral lesions. The interventions consisted of packets of green tea, black tea, caffeinated water, or placebo. Participants were assigned to each treatment for four weeks, and were instructed to drink five packets per day while on the treatment. Dropout from the trial and compliance (consumption of ≥ 85% of the prescribed treatment packets) are the main outcome measures reported. Results There was a high rate of dropout (51%) from the study, and the rates were significantly higher among smokers (64%) than non-smokers (36%). Among participants who completed the study the rate of compliance was 72%. The highest rates of dropouts occurred between the first and second treatment visits in both smokers (38% dropout) and non-smokers (18% dropout). Throughout the study smokers were more likely to dropout than non-smokers. Black tea treatment was associated with the highest rates of dropout among smokers (37%), but was associated with the lowest rate of dropout among non-smokers (4%). Conclusions In a study conducted to test the feasibility of a four-treatment crossover tea trial, a high rate of dropout among smokers and non-smokers was observed. Multi-arm crossover tea trials might pose a higher burden on participants and research is needed to improve adherence and treatment compliance in such trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN70410203 PMID:22800470

  2. Recruiting young people with a visible difference to the YP Face IT feasibility trial: a qualitative exploration of primary care staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, Claire; Williamson, Heidi; Harcourt, Diana

    2017-11-01

    Qualitative research methods embedded within feasibility trials are of significant value as they can provide important information for a definitive trial, often unable to be fulfilled by quantitative methods alone. In addition, such information can aid researchers running other trials or evaluating interventions on a similar topic. Aim This study aimed to explore GP and nurses' experiences of recruiting to a trial exploring the feasibility of evaluating YP Face IT, a novel online psychosocial intervention to support young people with appearance-altering conditions. During the recruitment period, a focus group with participating GPs and nurses explored recruitment challenges. In addition, at the end of the recruitment period, telephone interviews were conducted with eight GPs and nurses involved in recruiting to the study, in order to inform a definitive trial of YP Face IT. Transcripts were subjected to thematic analysis. Findings Despite reporting that the study was valuable and interesting, interviewees struggled to recruit in-consultation. They appeared to lack confidence in raising the sensitive issue of a visible difference and adopted strategies to avoid mentioning the topic. Participants felt the nature of the target population, as well as pressures of the primary care environment presented challenges to recruitment, but welcomed YP Face IT as an intervention that could address unmet support needs. Primary care staff may benefit from training to help them raise the subject of a visible difference with young people in order to identify those that require additional support.

  3. 12 A multi-centre randomised feasibility study evaluating the impact of a prognostic model for management of blunt chest wall trauma patients: stumbl trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri; Hutchings, Hayley; Abbott, Zoe; O'neill, Claire; Groves, Sam; Watkins, Alan; Lecky, Fiona; Jones, Sally; Gagg, James; Body, Rick; Evans, Phillip

    2017-12-01

    A new prognostic model has been developed and externally validated, the aim of which is to assist in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department (ED). A definitive randomised controlled trial (impact trial), is required to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the new model, before it can be accepted in clinical practice. The purpose of this trial is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of such a definitive trial and inform its design. This feasibility trial is designed to test the methods of a multi-centre, cluster-randomised (stepped wedge) trial, with a substantial qualitative component. Four EDs in England and Wales will collect data for all blunt chest wall trauma patients over a five month period; in the initial period acting as the controls (normal care) and the second period, acting as the interventions (in which the new model will be used). Baseline measurements including completion of the SF-12v2 will be obtained on initial assessment in the ED. Patient outcome data will then be collected for any subsequent hospitalisations. Data collection will conclude with a six week follow-up completion of two surveys (SF-12v2 and Client Services Receipt Inventory).Analysis of outcomes will focus on feasibility, acceptability and trial processes and will include recruitment and retention rates, attendance at clinician training rates and use of model in the ED. Qualitative feedback will be obtained through clinician interviews and a research nurse focus group. An evaluation of the feasibility of health economics outcomes data will be completed. Wales Research Ethics Committee 6 granted approval for the trial in September 2016. Health Care Research Wales Research Permissions and the HRA have granted approval for the study. Patient recruitment commenced in February 2017. Planned dissemination is through publication in a peer-reviewed Emergency Medicine Journal, presentation at appropriate conferences and to

  4. Protocol for a multicentre randomised feasibility STUdy evaluating the impact of a prognostic model for Management of BLunt chest wall trauma patients: STUMBL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri; Abbott, Zoe; Hutchings, Hayley A; O'Neill, Claire; Groves, Sam; Watkins, Alan; Lecky, Fiona E; Jones, Sally; Gagg, James; Body, Richard; Evans, Philip A

    2017-07-10

    A new prognostic model has been developed and externally validated, the aim of which is to assist in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the emergency department (ED). A definitive randomised controlled trial (impact trial) is required to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the new model before it can be accepted in clinical practice. The purpose of this trial is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of such a definitive trial and inform its design. This feasibility trial is designed to test the methods of a multicentre, cluster-randomised (stepped- wedge) trial, with a substantial qualitative component. Four EDs in England and Wales will collect data for all blunt chest wall trauma patients over a 5-month period; in the initial period acting as the controls (normal care), and in the second period acting as the interventions (in which the new model will be used). Baseline measurements including completion of the SF-12v2 will be obtained on initial assessment in the ED. Patient outcome data will then be collected for any subsequent hospitalisations. Data collection will conclude with a 6-week follow-up completion of two surveys (SF-12v2 and Client Services Receipt Inventory). Analysis of outcomes will focus on feasibility, acceptability and trial processes and will include recruitment and retention rates, attendance at clinician training rates and use of model in the ED. Qualitative feedback will be obtained through clinician interviews and a research nurse focus group. An evaluation of the feasibility of health economics outcomes data will be completed. Wales Research Ethics Committee 6 granted approval for the trial in September 2016. Patient recruitment will commence in February 2017. Planned dissemination is through publication in a peer-reviewed Emergency Medicine Journal , presentation at appropriate conferences and to stakeholders at professional meetings. ISRCTN95571506; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their

  5. Protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of a peer-led school-based intervention to increase the physical activity of adolescent girls (PLAN-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J; Edwards, Mark J; Campbell, Rona; Jago, Russell; Kipping, Ruth; Banfield, Kathryn; Tomkinson, Keeley; Garfield, Kirsty; Lyons, Ronan A; Simon, Joanne; Blair, Peter S; Hollingworth, William

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low amongst adolescent girls, and this population faces specific barriers to being active. Peer influences on health behaviours are important in adolescence and peer-led interventions might hold promise to change behaviour. This paper describes the protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of Peer-Led physical Activity iNtervention for Adolescent girls (PLAN-A), a peer-led intervention aimed at increasing adolescent girls' physical activity levels. A two-arm cluster randomised feasibility trial will be conducted in six secondary schools (intervention n  = 4; control n  = 2) with year 8 (12-13 years old) girls. The intervention will operate at a year group level and consist of year 8 girls nominating influential peers within their year group to become peer-supporters. Approximately 15 % of the cohort will receive 3 days of training about physical activity and interpersonal communication skills. Peer-supporters will then informally diffuse messages about physical activity amongst their friends for 10 weeks. Data will be collected at baseline (time 0 (T0)), immediately after the intervention (time 1 (T1)) and 12 months after baseline measures (time 2 (T2)). In this feasibility trial, the primary interest is in the recruitment of schools and participants (both year 8 girls and peer-supporters), delivery and receipt of the intervention, data provision rates and identifying the cost categories for future economic analysis. Physical activity will be assessed using 7-day accelerometry, with the likely primary outcome in a fully-powered trial being daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Participants will also complete psychosocial questionnaires at each time point: assessing motivation, self-esteem and peer physical activity norms. Data analysis will be largely descriptive and focus on recruitment, attendance and data provision rates. The findings will inform the sample size required for a

  6. Vocational rehabilitation services for patients with cancer: design of a feasibility study incorporating a pilot randomised controlled trial among women with breast cancer following surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayansina Dolapo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to improvements in cancer survival the number of people of working age living with cancer across Europe is likely to increase. UK governments have made commitments to reduce the number of working days lost to ill-health and to improve access to vocational rehabilitation (VR services. Return to work for people with cancer has been identified as a priority. However, there are few services to support people to remain in or return to work after cancer and no associated trials to assess their impact. A pilot randomised controlled trial among women with breast cancer has been designed to assess the feasibility of a larger definitive trial of VR services for people with cancer. Methods Patients are being recruited from three clinical sites in two Scottish National Health Service (NHS Boards for 6 months. Eligible patients are all women who are: (1 aged between 18 and 65 years; (2 in paid employment or self-employed; (3 living or working in Lothian or Tayside, Scotland, UK; (4 diagnosed with an invasive breast cancer tumour; (5 treated first with surgery. Patients are randomly allocated to receive referral to a VR service or usual care, which involves no formal employment support. The primary outcome measure is self-reported sickness absence in the first 6 months following surgery. Secondary outcome measures include changes in quality of life (FACT-B, fatigue (FACIT-Fatigue and employment status between baseline and 6- and 12-months post-surgery. A post-trial evaluation will be conducted to assess the acceptability of the intervention among participants and the feasibility of a larger, more definitive, trial with patients with lung and prostate cancer. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first study to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of VR services to enable people with cancer to remain in or return to employment. The study will provide evidence to assess the relevance and

  7. A Phase 2 Trial of Once-Weekly Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation: First Report of Acute Toxicity, Feasibility, and Patient Satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Quillo, Amy R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Riley, Elizabeth C. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Roberts, Teresa L.; Hunter, Allison M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Rai, Shesh N. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Callender, Glenda G. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Jain, Dharamvir [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); McMasters, Kelly M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Spanos, William J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report on early results of a single-institution phase 2 trial of a 5-fraction, once-weekly radiation therapy regimen for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent BCS for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0, I, or II breast cancer with negative surgical margins were eligible to receive whole breast radiation therapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 5 weekly fractions of 6 Gy with or without an additional boost. Elective nodal irradiation was not permitted. There were no restrictions on breast size or the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy for otherwise eligible patients. Patients were assessed at baseline, treatment completion, and at first posttreatment follow-up to assess acute toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-BR23). Results: Between January and September 2011, 42 eligible patients underwent weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation immediately following BCS (69.0%) or at the conclusion of cytotoxic chemotherapy (31.0%). The rates of grade ≥2 radiation-induced dermatitis, pain, fatigue, and breast edema were 19.0%, 11.9%, 9.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Only 1 grade 3 toxicity—pain requiring a course of narcotic analgesics—was observed. One patient developed a superficial cellulitis (grade 2), which resolved with the use of oral antibiotics. Patient-reported moderate-to-major breast symptoms (pain, swelling, and skin problems), all decreased from baseline through 1 month, whereas breast sensitivity remained stable over the study period. Conclusions: The tolerance of weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation compares well with recent reports of daily hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation schedules. The regimen appears feasible and cost-effective. Additional follow-up with continued accrual is needed to assess late toxicity, cosmesis, and disease-specific outcomes.

  8. A Phase 2 Trial of Once-Weekly Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation: First Report of Acute Toxicity, Feasibility, and Patient Satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragun, Anthony E.; Quillo, Amy R.; Riley, Elizabeth C.; Roberts, Teresa L.; Hunter, Allison M.; Rai, Shesh N.; Callender, Glenda G.; Jain, Dharamvir; McMasters, Kelly M.; Spanos, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report on early results of a single-institution phase 2 trial of a 5-fraction, once-weekly radiation therapy regimen for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent BCS for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0, I, or II breast cancer with negative surgical margins were eligible to receive whole breast radiation therapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 5 weekly fractions of 6 Gy with or without an additional boost. Elective nodal irradiation was not permitted. There were no restrictions on breast size or the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy for otherwise eligible patients. Patients were assessed at baseline, treatment completion, and at first posttreatment follow-up to assess acute toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-BR23). Results: Between January and September 2011, 42 eligible patients underwent weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation immediately following BCS (69.0%) or at the conclusion of cytotoxic chemotherapy (31.0%). The rates of grade ≥2 radiation-induced dermatitis, pain, fatigue, and breast edema were 19.0%, 11.9%, 9.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Only 1 grade 3 toxicity—pain requiring a course of narcotic analgesics—was observed. One patient developed a superficial cellulitis (grade 2), which resolved with the use of oral antibiotics. Patient-reported moderate-to-major breast symptoms (pain, swelling, and skin problems), all decreased from baseline through 1 month, whereas breast sensitivity remained stable over the study period. Conclusions: The tolerance of weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation compares well with recent reports of daily hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation schedules. The regimen appears feasible and cost-effective. Additional follow-up with continued accrual is needed to assess late toxicity, cosmesis, and disease-specific outcomes

  9. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Costigan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6 years were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP (n = 21, resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP (n = 22 and control (n = 22. The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8–10 min/session, delivered during physical education (PE lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run, muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests, body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI, BMI-z scores, waist circumference and physical activity motivation (questionnaire, by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024, BMI-z (p = 0.037 and BMI (not significant in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

  10. Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, S A; Eather, N; Plotnikoff, R C; Taaffe, D R; Pollock, E; Kennedy, S G; Lubans, D R

    2015-01-01

    Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8-10 min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.

  11. A screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community center involved in a radiation oncology disparities program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Julian W; Martz, Elaine; Schenken, Larry L; Rainville, Rebecca; Marlowe, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community radiation oncology center involved in a National Cancer Institute-funded disparities program but lacking on-site clinical trials personnel. The screening form was pasted to the front of the charts and filled out for all new patients over the 9-month period of the study, during which time five external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) trials and a patient perception study were open for accrual. Patient consent was obtained by assorted personnel at several different sites. Patients potentially eligible for a trial were identified and approached by one of the clinic staff. Patients who were under- or uninsured, age > 80 years, members of an racial/ethnic minority, or recipients of medical assistance were identified as at risk for health care disparities and were offered patient navigator services. Of 196 patients consulted during the study, 144 were treated with EBRT. Of the 24 patients eligible for EBRT trials, 23 were approached (one had an incomplete screening form), and 15 accepted. Of 77 patients eligible for a patient perception trial, 72 were approached (five had incomplete forms), and 45 accepted. The eligibility and acceptance rates for EBRT trials were similar for disparities and nondisparities patients. Screening was completed for 96 patients (67%). When completed, the screening tool ensured clinical trial accrual. The major factor limiting overall accrual was a shortage of available trials.

  12. Feasibility randomized-controlled trial of online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for patients with complex chronic pain in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W; Chilcot, J; Guildford, B; Daly-Eichenhardt, A; McCracken, L M

    2018-04-28

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has growing support for chronic pain. However, more accessible treatment delivery is needed. This study evaluated the feasibility of online ACT for patients with complex chronic pain in the United Kingdom to determine whether a larger trial is justified. Participants with chronic pain and clinically meaningful disability and distress were randomly assigned to ACT online plus specialty medical pain management, or specialty medical management alone. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline, and 3- and 9-month post-randomization. Primary feasibility outcomes included recruitment, retention and treatment completion rates. Secondary outcomes were between-groups effects on treatment outcomes and psychological flexibility. Of 139 potential participants, 63 were eligible and randomized (45% recruitment rate). Retention rates were 76-78% for follow-up assessments. Sixty-one per cent of ACT online participants completed treatment. ACT online was less often completed by employed (44%) compared to unemployed (80%) participants. Fifty-six per cent of ACT online participants rated themselves as 'much improved' or better on a global impression of change rating, compared to only 20 per cent of control participants. Three-month effects favouring ACT online were small for functioning, medication and healthcare use, committed action and decentring, medium for mood, and large for acceptance. Small-to-medium effects were maintained for functioning, healthcare use and committed action at 9 months. Online ACT for patients with chronic pain in the United Kingdom appears feasible to study in a larger efficacy trial. Some adjustments to treatment and trial procedures are warranted, particularly to enhance engagement among employed participants. This study supports the feasibility of online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for chronic pain in the United Kingdom and a larger efficacy trial. Refinements to treatment delivery, particularly to

  13. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility of the Wii Fit for improving walking in older adults with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Bita; Miller, William C; Finlayson, Heather; Eng, Janice J; Jarus, Tal

    2017-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of Wii.n.Walk for improving walking capacity in older adults with lower limb amputation. A parallel, evaluator-blind randomized controlled feasibility trial. Community-living. Individuals who were ⩾50 years old with a unilateral lower limb amputation. Wii.n.Walk consisted of Wii Fit training, 3x/week (40 minute sessions), for 4 weeks. Training started in the clinic in groups of 3 and graduated to unsupervised home training. Control group were trained using cognitive games. Feasibility indicators: trial process (recruitment, retention, participants' perceived benefit from the Wii.n.Walk intervention measured by exit questionnaire), resources (adherence), management (participant processing, blinding), and treatment (adverse event, and Cohen's d effect size and variance). Primary clinical outcome: walking capacity measured using the 2 Minute Walk Test at baseline, end of treatment, and 3-week retention. Of 28 randomized participants, 24 completed the trial (12/arm). Median (range) age was 62.0 (50-78) years. Mean (SD) score for perceived benefit from the Wii.n.Walk intervention was 38.9/45 (6.8). Adherence was 83.4%. The effect sizes for the 2 Minute Walk Test were 0.5 (end of treatment) and 0.6 (3-week retention) based on intention to treat with imputed data; and 0.9 (end of treatment) and 1.2 (3-week retention) based on per protocol analysis. The required sample size for a future larger RCT was deemed to be 72 (36 per arm). The results suggested the feasibility of the Wii.n.Walk with a medium effect size for improving walking capacity. Future larger randomized controlled trials investigating efficacy are warranted.

  14. Feasibility trial of a film-based educational intervention for increasing boys’ and girls’ intentions to avoid teenage pregnancy: Study protocol ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Lohan, Maria; Aventin, Áine; Maguire, Lisa; Clarke, Mike; Linden, Mark; McDaid, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organisation, amongst others, recognises that adolescent men have a vital yet neglected role in reducing teenage pregnancies and that there is a pressing need for educational interventions designed especially for them. This study seeks to fill this gap by determining the feasibility of conducting an effectiveness trial of the If I Were Jack intervention in post-primary schools. This 4-week intervention aims to increase teenagers' intentions to avoid unintended pregnancy and a...

  15. Job retention vocational rehabilitation for\\ud employed people with inflammatory\\ud arthritis (WORK-IA) : a feasibility randomized\\ud controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, A; O'Brien, R; Woodbridge, S; Bradshaw, L; Prior, Y; Radford, K; Culley, J; Whitham, D; Pulikottil-Jacob, R

    2017-01-01

    Background Inflammatory arthritis leads to work disability, absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e. at-work productivity loss) at high cost to individuals, employers and society. A trial of job retention vocational rehabilitation (VR) in the United States identified this helped people keep working. The effectiveness of this VR in countries with different socioeconomic policies and conditions, and its impact on absenteeism, presenteeism and health, are unknown. This feasibility study tested the acc...

  16. The Community Navigator Study: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase community connections and reduce loneliness for people with complex anxiety or depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Bone, Jessica K; Pinfold, Vanessa; Lewis, Glyn; Billings, Jo; Frerichs, Johanna; Fullarton, Kate; Jones, Rebecca; Johnson, Sonia

    2017-10-23

    Loneliness is associated with poor health outcomes at all ages, including shorter life expectancy and greater risk of developing depression. People with mental health problems are particularly vulnerable to loneliness and, for those with anxiety or depression, loneliness is associated with poorer outcomes. Interventions which support people to utilise existing networks and access new social contact are advocated in policy but there is little evidence regarding their effectiveness. People with mental health problems have potential to benefit from interventions to reduce loneliness, but evidence is needed regarding their feasibility, acceptability and outcomes. An intervention to reduce loneliness for people with anxiety or depression treated in secondary mental health services was developed for this study, which will test the feasibility and acceptability of delivering and evaluating it through a randomised controlled trial. In this feasibility trial, 40 participants with anxiety or depression will be recruited through two secondary mental health services in London and randomised to an intervention (n = 30) or control group (n = 10). The control group will receive standard care and written information about local community resources. The coproduced intervention, developed in this study, includes up to ten sessions with a 'Community Navigator' over a 6-month period. Community Navigators will work with people individually to increase involvement in social activities, with the aim of reducing feelings of loneliness. Data will be collected at baseline and at 6-month follow-up - the end of the intervention period. The acceptability of the intervention and feasibility of participant recruitment and retention will be assessed. Potential primary and secondary outcomes for a future definitive trial will be completed to assess response and completeness, including measures of loneliness, depression and anxiety. Qualitative interviews with participants, staff and other

  17. Fermented Milk Consumption and Common Infections in Children Attending Day-Care Centers: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodeus, Andrey; Niborski, Violeta; Schrezenmeir, Juergen; Gorelov, Alexander; Shcherbina, Anna; Rumyantsev, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    This multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial investigated the effect of a fermented milk product containing the Lactobacillus casei National Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (CNCM) I-1518 strain on respiratory and gastrointestinal common infectious diseases (CIDs) in children attending day-care centers in Russia. Children ages 3 to 6 years received 100 g of a fermented milk product (n = 300) or a control product (n = 299) twice daily for 3 months, followed by a 1-month observation period. The primary outcome was the incidence of CIDs during the product consumption period. There was no significant difference in the incidence of CIDs between the groups (N = 98 with fermented milk product vs N = 93 with control product). The overall number of CIDs (and no severe cases at all) in both study groups and in all 12 centers, however, was unexpectedly low resulting in underpowering of the study. No differences were found between the groups in the duration or severity of disease, duration of sick leave from day-care centers, parental missed working days, or in quality-of-life dimensions on the PedsQL questionnaire (P > 0.05).There was, however, a significantly lower incidence of the most frequently observed CID, rhinopharyngitis, in children consuming the fermented milk product compared with those consuming the control product (N = 81 vs N = 100, relative risk 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.69-0.96, P = 0.017) when considering the entire study period. Although no other significant differences were shown between the fermented milk and control product groups in this study, lower incidence of rhinopharyngitis may indicate a beneficial effect of this fermented milk product.

  18. Acute Whiplash Injury Study (AWIS): a protocol for a cluster randomised pilot and feasibility trial of an Active Behavioural Physiotherapy Intervention in an insurance private setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiangkham, Taweewat; Duda, Joan; Haque, M Sayeed; Price, Jonathan; Rushton, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) causes substantial social and economic burden internationally. Up to 60% of patients with WAD progress to chronicity. Research therefore needs to focus on effective management in the acute stage to prevent the development of chronicity. Approximately 93% of patients are classified as WADII (neck complaint and musculoskeletal sign(s)), and in the UK, most are managed in the private sector. In our recent systematic review, a combination of active and behavioural physiotherapy was identified as potentially effective in the acute stage. An Active Behavioural Physiotherapy Intervention (ABPI) was developed through combining empirical (modified Delphi study) and theoretical (social cognitive theory focusing on self-efficacy) evidence. This pilot and feasibility trial has been designed to inform the design of an adequately powered definitive randomised controlled trial. Methods and analysis Two parallel phases. (1) An external pilot and feasibility cluster randomised double-blind (assessor and participants), parallel two-arm (ABPI vs standard physiotherapy) clinical trial to evaluate procedures and feasibility. Six UK private physiotherapy clinics will be recruited and cluster randomised by a computer-generated randomisation sequence. Sixty participants (30 each arm) will be assessed at recruitment (baseline) and at 3 months postbaseline. The planned primary outcome measure is the neck disability index. (2) An embedded exploratory qualitative study using semistructured indepth interviews (n=3–4 physiotherapists) and a focus group (n=6–8 patients) and entailing the recruitment of purposive samples will explore perceptions of the ABPI. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively. Qualitative data will be coded and analysed deductively (identify themes) and inductively (identify additional themes). Ethics and dissemination This trial is approved by the University of Birmingham Ethics Committee (ERN_15-0542). Trial

  19. Recruiting faith- and non-faith-based schools, adolescents and parents to a cluster randomised sexual-health trial: experiences, challenges and lessons from the mixed-methods Jack Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aventin, Áine; Lohan, Maria; Maguire, Lisa; Clarke, Mike

    2016-07-29

    The move toward evidence-based education has led to increasing numbers of randomised trials in schools. However, the literature on recruitment to non-clinical trials is relatively underdeveloped, when compared to that of clinical trials. Recruitment to school-based randomised trials is, however, challenging, even more so when the focus of the study is a sensitive issue such as sexual health. This article reflects on the challenges of recruiting post-primary schools, adolescent pupils and parents to a cluster randomised feasibility trial of a sexual-health intervention, and the strategies employed to address them. The Jack Trial was funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research. It comprised a feasibility study of an interactive film-based sexual-health intervention entitled If I Were Jack, recruiting over 800 adolescents from eight socio-demographically diverse post-primary schools in Northern Ireland. It aimed to determine the facilitators and barriers to recruitment and retention to a school-based sexual-health trial and identify optimal multi-level strategies for an effectiveness study. As part of an embedded process evaluation, we conducted semi-structured interviews and focus groups with principals, vice-principals, teachers, pupils and parents recruited to the study as well as classroom observations and a parents' survey. With reference to social learning theory, we identified a number of individual-, behavioural- and environmental-level factors that influenced recruitment. Commonly identified facilitators included perceptions of the relevance and potential benefit of the intervention to adolescents, the credibility of the organisation and individuals running the study, support offered by trial staff, and financial incentives. Key barriers were prior commitment to other research, lack of time and resources, and perceptions that the intervention was incompatible with pupil or parent needs or the school ethos. Reflecting on the methodological

  20. Managing with Learning Disability and Diabetes: OK-Diabetes - a case-finding study and feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Allan; Bryant, Louise; Russell, Amy M; Wright-Hughes, Alexandra; Graham, Liz; Walwyn, Rebecca; Wright, Judy M; Hulme, Claire; O'Dwyer, John L; Latchford, Gary; Meer, Shaista; Birtwistle, Jacqueline C; Stansfield, Alison; Ajjan, Ramzi; Farrin, Amanda

    2018-05-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are common in adults with a learning disability. It is not known if the principles of self-management can be applied in this population. To develop and evaluate a case-finding method and undertake an observational study of adults with a learning disability and type 2 diabetes, to develop a standardised supported self-management (SSM) intervention and measure of adherence and to undertake a feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) of SSM versus treatment as usual (TAU). Observational study and an individually randomised feasibility RCT. Three cities in West Yorkshire, UK. In the observational study: adults aged > 18 years with a mild or moderate learning disability, who have type 2 diabetes that is not being treated with insulin and who are living in the community. Participants had mental capacity to consent to research and to the intervention. In the RCT participants had glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) levels of > 6.5% (48 mmol/mol), a body mass index (BMI) of > 25 kg/m 2 or self-reported physical activity below national guideline levels. Standardised SSM. TAU supported by an easy-read booklet. (1) The number of eligible participants identified and sources of referral; (2) current living and support arrangements; (3) current health state, including level of HbA 1c , BMI and waist circumference, blood pressure and lipids; (4) mood, preferences for change; (5) recruitment and retention in RCT; (6) implementation and adherence to the intervention; (7) completeness of data collection and values for candidate primary outcomes; and (8) qualitative data on participant experience of the research process and intervention. In the observational study we identified 147 eligible consenting participants. The mean age was 54.4 years. In total, 130 out of 147 (88%) named a key supporter, with 113 supporters (77%) being involved in diabetes management. The mean HbA 1c level was 54.5 mmol/mol [standard deviation (SD) 14.8 mmol/mol; 7

  1. New developments in the conduct and management of multi-center trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Sørensen, T I

    1995-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the performance of more, better designed, and better managed randomized clinical trials. After visits to 43 leading organizations and units involved in clinical trials in Europe and North America during 1993, the way of conducting randomized clinical trials was analyzed...... and data management systems). By employing such developments, randomized clinical trials can run much more efficiently. This facilitates faster and better answers to the questions addressed by randomized clinical trials, thereby also making them more ethical....

  2. Music therapy in Huntington's disease: a protocol for a multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen-Rufi, Monique; Vink, Annemieke; Achterberg, Wilco; Roos, Raymund

    2016-07-26

    Huntington's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with autosomal dominant inheritance, characterized by motor disturbances, cognitive decline and behavioral and psychological symptoms. Since there is no cure, all treatment is aimed at improving quality of life. Music therapy is a non-pharmacological intervention, aiming to improve the quality of life, but its use and efficacy in patients with Huntington's disease has hardly been studied. In this article, a protocol is described to study the effects of music therapy in comparison with a control intervention to improve quality of life through stimulating expressive and communicative skills. By targeting these skills we assume that the social-cognitive functioning will improve, leading to a reduction in behavioral problems, resulting in an overall improvement of the quality of life in patients with Huntington's disease. The study is designed as a multi-center single-blind randomised controlled intervention trial. Sixty patients will be randomised using centre-stratified block-permuted randomisation. Patients will be recruited from four long-term care facilities specialized in Huntington's disease-care in The Netherlands. The outcome measure to assess changes in expressive and communication skills is the Behaviour Observation Scale Huntington and changes in behavior will be assessed by the Problem Behaviour Assesment-short version and by the BOSH. Measurements take place at baseline, then 8, 16 (end of intervention) and 12 weeks after the last intervention (follow-up). This randomized controlled study will provide greater insight into the effectiveness of music therapy on activities of daily living, social-cognitive functioning and behavior problems by improving expressive and communication skills, thus leading to a better quality of life for patients with Huntington's disease. Netherlands Trial Register: NTR4904 , registration date Nov. 15, 2014.

  3. Comparing open and minimally invasive surgical procedures for oesophagectomy in the treatment of cancer: the ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) feasibility study and pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Chris; Avery, Kerry; Berrisford, Richard; Barham, Paul; Noble, Sian M; Fernandez, Aida Moure; Hanna, George; Goldin, Robert; Elliott, Jackie; Wheatley, Timothy; Sanders, Grant; Hollowood, Andrew; Falk, Stephen; Titcomb, Dan; Streets, Christopher; Donovan, Jenny L; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-06-01

    Localised oesophageal cancer can be curatively treated with surgery (oesophagectomy) but the procedure is complex with a risk of complications, negative effects on quality of life and a recovery period of 6-9 months. Minimal-access surgery may accelerate recovery. The ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study aimed to establish the feasibility of, and methodology for, a definitive trial comparing minimally invasive and open surgery for oesophagectomy. Objectives were to quantify the number of eligible patients in a pilot trial; develop surgical manuals as the basis for quality assurance; standardise pathological processing; establish a method to blind patients to their allocation in the first week post surgery; identify measures of postsurgical outcome of importance to patients and clinicians; and establish the main cost differences between the surgical approaches. Pilot parallel three-arm randomised controlled trial nested within feasibility work. Two UK NHS departments of upper gastrointestinal surgery. Patients aged ≥ 18 years with histopathological evidence of oesophageal or oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma, squamous cell cancer or high-grade dysplasia, referred for oesophagectomy or oesophagectomy following neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. Oesophagectomy, with patients randomised to open surgery, a hybrid open chest and minimally invasive abdomen or totally minimally invasive access. The primary outcome measure for the pilot trial was the number of patients recruited per month, with the main trial considered feasible if at least 2.5 patients per month were recruited. During 21 months of recruitment, 263 patients were assessed for eligibility; of these, 135 (51%) were found to be eligible and 104 (77%) agreed to participate, an average of five patients per month. In total, 41 patients were allocated to open surgery, 43 to the hybrid procedure and 20 to totally minimally invasive surgery. Recruitment is continuing

  4. Feasibility and efficacy of balloon-based neuroprotection during carotid artery stenting in a single-center setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Michael; Tübler, Thilo; Mathey, Detlef G; Schofer, Joachim

    2002-09-04

    We sought to prospectively assess the feasibility and in-hospital efficacy of the PercuSurge GuardWire temporary balloon-occlusive system for neuroprotection during carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS).Carotid angioplasty and stenting harbors a risk of distal embolization. Cerebral protection devices are currently under clinical investigation.Ninety-six consecutive patients with carotid bifurcation disease underwent a total of 102 CAS procedures with the intention to use the GuardWire for neuroprotection. GuardWire deployment was achieved in 99 procedures performed in 93 patients (97%). Device failure (n = 3) and severe neurologic responses to balloon occlusion of the targeted carotid artery (n = 2) accounted for five additional procedures that were essentially concluded without neuroprotection, for a total of 94 procedures completed as intended in 88 patients (92% procedural feasibility rate). Carotid angioplasty and stenting was performed successfully in 94 patients (100 procedures). There were no in-hospital deaths; but three patients (3.1%) sustained strokes, and two patients experienced transient ischemic attacks, for a total periprocedural complication rate of 5.2%. One major stroke occurred with the GuardWire in place, whereas two minor strokes were observed in patients in whom the device could not be deployed. Thus, successful neuroprotected CAS without major neurologic events was achieved in 87 patients (91%). The GuardWire temporary balloon-occlusive system is feasible as an adjunct to CAS in the majority of patients. It is associated with a 3.1% rate of major periprocedural neurologic complications. Adverse neurologic reactions to balloon occlusion may prohibit effective use of the system in about 2% of patients.

  5. Protocol for a feasibility trial for improving breast feeding initiation and continuation: assets-based infant feeding help before and after birth (ABA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Kate; Ingram, Jenny; Clarke, Joanne; Johnson, Debbie; Trickey, Heather; Thomson, Gill; Dombrowski, Stephan U; Sitch, Alice; Dykes, Fiona; Feltham, Max G; Darwent, Kirsty; MacArthur, Christine; Roberts, Tracy

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Breast feeding improves the health of mothers and infants; the UK has low rates, with marked socioeconomic inequalities. While trials of peer support services have been effective in some settings, UK trials have not improved breast feeding rates. Qualitative research suggests that many women are alienated by the focus on breast feeding. We propose a change from breast feeding-focused interactions to respecting a woman’s feeding choices, inclusion of behaviour change theory and an increased intensity of contacts in the 2 weeks after birth when many women cease to breast feed. This will take place alongside an assets-based approach that focuses on the positive capability of individuals, their social networks and communities. We propose a feasibility study for a multicentre randomised controlled trial of the Assets feeding help Before and After birth (ABA) infant feeding service versus usual care. Methods and analysis A two-arm, non-blinded randomised feasibility study will be conducted in two UK localities. Women expecting their first baby will be eligible, regardless of feeding intention. The ABA infant feeding intervention will apply a proactive, assets-based, woman-centred, non-judgemental approach, delivered antenatally and postnatally tailored through face-to-face contacts, telephone and SMS texts. Outcomes will test the feasibility of delivering the intervention with recommended intensity and duration to disadvantaged women; acceptability to women, feeding helpers and professionals; and feasibility of a future randomised controlled trial (RCT), detailing recruitment rates, willingness to be randomised, follow-up rates at 3 days, 8 weeks and 6 months, and level of outcome completion. Outcomes of the proposed full trial will also be collected. Mixed methods will include qualitative interviews with women/partners, feeding helpers and health service staff; feeding helper logs; and review of audio-recorded helper–women interactions to assess

  6. Mixed methods feasibility study for a trial of blood pressure telemonitoring for people who have had stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Janet; Fairbrother, Peter; Krishan, Ashma; McCloughan, Lucy; Padfield, Paul; Paterson, Mary; Pinnock, Hilary; Sheikh, Aziz; Sudlow, Cathie; Todd, Allison; McKinstry, Brian

    2015-03-25

    Good blood pressure (BP) control reduces the risk of recurrence of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Although there is strong evidence that BP telemonitoring helps achieve good control, none of the major trials have considered the effectiveness in stroke/TIA survivors. We therefore conducted a feasibility study for a trial of BP telemonitoring for stroke/TIA survivors with uncontrolled BP in primary care. Phase 1 was a pilot trial involving 55 patients stratified by stroke/TIA randomised 3:1 to BP telemonitoring for 6 months or usual care. Phase 2 was a qualitative evaluation and comprised semi-structured interviews with 16 trial participants who received telemonitoring and 3 focus groups with 23 members of stroke support groups and 7 carers. Overall, 125 patients (60 stroke patients, 65 TIA patients) were approached and 55 (44%) patients were randomised including 27 stroke patients and 28 TIA patients. Fifty-two participants (95%) attended the 6-month follow-up appointment, but one declined the second daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) measurement resulting in a 93% completion rate for ABPM - the proposed primary outcome measure for a full trial. Adherence to telemonitoring was good; of the 40 participants who were telemonitoring, 38 continued to provide readings throughout the 6 months. There was a mean reduction of 10.1 mmHg in systolic ABPM in the telemonitoring group compared with 3.8 mmHg in the control group, which suggested the potential for a substantial effect from telemonitoring. Our qualitative analysis found that many stroke patients were concerned about their BP and telemonitoring increased their engagement, was easy, convenient and reassuring. A full-scale trial is feasible, likely to recruit well and have good rates of compliance and follow-up. ISRCTN61528726 15/12/2011.

  7. Efficacy of brief motivational interviewing to improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids among adult asthmatics: results from a randomized controlled pilot feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavoie KL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kim L Lavoie,1–3 Gregory Moullec,1,2,4 Catherine Lemiere,2 Lucie Blais,2 Manon Labrecque,2 Marie-France Beauchesne,2 Veronique Pepin,2,4 André Cartier,2 Simon L Bacon1,2,41Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, 2Research Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal – A University of Montreal Affiliated Hospital, Montréal, 3Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM, Succursale Center-Ville, Montreal, 4Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaPurpose: Daily adherence to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS regimens is one of the most important factors linked to achieving optimal asthma control. Motivational interviewing (MI is a client-centered communication style that focuses on enhancing intrinsic motivation to engage in appropriate self-management behaviors. MI has been shown to improve a variety of health behaviors including medication adherence in other disorders, but its efficacy for the improvement of ICS adherence in asthmatics has yet to be examined. This pilot “proof of concept” trial assessed the feasibility of MI to improve daily ICS adherence and asthma control levels in adult asthmatics.Methods: Fifty-four poorly controlled (Asthma Control Questionnaire [ACQ] score ≥1.5, highly nonadherent (filled <50% of ICS medication in the last year adult asthmatics were recruited from the outpatient asthma clinic of a university-affiliated hospital. Participants underwent baseline assessments and were randomly assigned to MI (3×30 minutes sessions within a 6-week period, n=26 or a usual care (UC control group (n=28. ICS adherence (% pharmacy refills and asthma control (ACQ, Asthma Control Test [ACT] were measured at 6 and 12 months postintervention. Mixed model repeated measure analyses for both intent-to-treat and per-protocol were used. Results were adjusted for a priori-defined covariates including baseline adherence. Patients in the MI group also reported their impressions of

  8. A feasibility randomised controlled trial of pre-operative occupational therapy to optimise recovery for patients undergoing primary total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (PROOF-THR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Paul; Sands, Gina; Beswick, Andrew D; Davis, Edward T; Blom, Ashley W; Sackley, Catherine M

    2016-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of a pre-operative occupational therapy intervention for patients undergoing primary total hip replacement. Single blinded feasibility randomised controlled trial, with data collection prior to the intervention, and at 4, 12, and 26 weeks following surgery. Recruitment from two NHS orthopaedic outpatient centres in the West Midlands, UK. Patients awaiting primary total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis were recruited. Following pre-operative assessment, patients were individually randomised to intervention or control by a computer-generated block randomisation algorithm stratified by age and centre. The intervention group received a pre-surgery home visit by an occupational therapist who discussed expectations, assessed home safety, and provided appropriate adaptive equipment. The control group received treatment as usual. The study assessed the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Health related quality of life and resource use were recorded at 4, 12 and 26 weeks. Forty-four participants were recruited, 21 were randomised to the occupational therapy intervention and 23 to usual care. Analysis of 26 week data included 18 participants in the intervention group and 21 in the control. The intervention was delivered successfully with no withdrawals or crossovers; 5/44 were lost to follow-up with further missing data for participation and resource use. The feasibility study provided the information required to conduct a definitive trial. Burden of assessment would need to be addressed. A total of 219 patients would be required in an efficacy trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Comparison of group-based outpatient physiotherapy with usual care after total knee replacement: a feasibility study for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Neil; Dixon, Samantha; Wylde, Vikki; Marques, Elsa; Beswick, Andrew D; Lenguerrand, Erik; Blom, Ashley W; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial comparing group-based outpatient physiotherapy with usual care in patients following total knee replacement. A feasibility study for a randomized controlled trial. One secondary-care hospital orthopaedic centre, Bristol, UK. A total of 46 participants undergoing primary total knee replacement. The intervention group were offered six group-based exercise sessions after surgery. The usual care group received standard postoperative care. Participants were not blinded to group allocation. Feasibility was assessed by recruitment, reasons for non-participation, attendance, and completion rates of study questionnaires that included the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Recruitment rate was 37%. Five patients withdrew or were no longer eligible to participate. Intervention attendance was high (73%) and 84% of group participants reported they were 'very satisfied' with the exercises. Return of study questionnaires at six months was lower in the usual care (75%) than in the intervention group (100%). Mean (standard deviation) Lower Extremity Functional Scale scores at six months were 45.0 (20.8) in the usual care and 57.8 (15.2) in the intervention groups. Recruitment and retention of participants in this feasibility study was good. Group-based physiotherapy was acceptable to participants. Questionnaire return rates were lower in the usual care group, but might be enhanced by telephone follow-up. The Lower Extremity Functional Scale had high responsiveness and completion rates. Using this outcome measure, 256 participants would be required in a full-scale randomized controlled trial.

  10. Efficacy and feasibility of frontozygomatic angle approach for extra oral maxillary nerve block in oral surgery: a descriptive clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radder, Kiran; Shah, Ashwin; Fatima, Shereen; Kothari, Chaitanya; Zakaullah, Syed; Siddiqua, Aaisha

    2014-09-01

    Pain control is an integral part of minor oral surgery and maxillary/mandibular nerve blocks have proved promising in achieving the same. Although intra oral techniques of maxillary nerve block are common and are widely used, there are certain inherent disadvantages and potential complications. Less commonly described in the literature, the extra oral techniques have a wide spectrum of indications as well as can be more advantageous than the intra oral approach. This prospective clinical trial is an attempt to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of the extra oral frontozygomatic approach to the foramen rotundum to block the maxillary nerve. Sample size was 100 patients and the inclusion criteria were patients of ASA I or II category who needed extraction of a minimum of 4 maxillary teeth in the same quadrant in a single sitting while exclusion criteria were patients with a history of allergy to local anesthesia, medically compromised patients in whom dental extraction was contraindicated. Mean age was 71.9 years and 56 patients were males while 44 were females. Only a single quadrant (first or second) was chosen as the operative site in each patient and local anaesthesia was secured using a 21 gauge 89 mm long spinal needle with frontozygomatic angle approach and the parameters used were pain experienced during the injection, onset of subjective symptoms, time required for the peak effect (objective symptoms), pain during extraction and the duration of anesthesia. All the parameters were expressed as mean values with standard deviations. A successful anesthesia was secured in first attempt in 98 patients while in 2 patients, the procedure had to be repeated owing to the difficulty in reaching the target site. A majority of the patients i.e., 71 % scored 0-2 (no pain) on visual analogue scale (VAS) while only 2 patients experienced a moderate degree of pain. Subjective symptoms were reported in 27.24 s (mean value) and 12.93 s (mean value) in the palate

  11. Effects of home-based exercise on pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: a randomized pilot and feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Koji; Shibagaki, Yugo; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Hotta, Chiharu; Wakamiya, Akiko; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2017-06-17

    Only a few research is available on the effects of home-based exercise training on pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the effect of home-based exercise therapy on kidney function and arm and leg muscle strength in pre-dialysis CKD patients. Thirty-six male stage 3-4 pre-dialysis CKD patients (age, 68.7 ± 6.8 years; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 39.0 ± 11.6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ) who were being treated as outpatients were included. The subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise intervention group (Ex group: 18) and a control group (C group: 18). The Ex group wore accelerometer pedometers and were instructed to perform home-based aerobic and resistance exercises, such as brisk walking for 30 min per day, for 12 months. The C group subjects wore accelerometer pedometers but received no exercise therapy guidance; the number of steps covered during normal daily activities was recorded for the C group. The outcome measures were changes in kidney function and handgrip and knee extension muscle strength. Values at the baseline (T1) and 12 months later (T2) were compared. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups; however, the C group was more physically active than the Ex group. Eight subjects dropped out, and 28 subjects (14 in each group) were included in the final analysis. Physical activity increased significantly only in the Ex group. Grip strength (F = 7.0, p = 0.01) and knee extension muscle strength (F = 14.3, p < 0.01) were found to improve only in the Ex group. Further, the changes in eGFR were not significantly different between the two groups (F = 0.01, p = 0.93). Home-based exercise therapy for pre-dialysis CKD patients was feasible and improved arm and leg muscle strength without affecting kidney function. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry ( UMIN000005091 ). Registered 2/15/2011.

  12. Tailored online cognitive behavioural therapy with or without therapist support calls to target psychological distress in adults receiving haemodialysis: A feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Joanna L; Moss-Morris, Rona; Norton, Sam; Picariello, Federica; Game, David; Carroll, Amy; Spencer, Jonathan; McCrone, Paul; Hotopf, Matthew; Yardley, Lucy; Chilcot, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Psychological distress is prevalent in haemodialysis (HD) patients yet access to psychotherapy remains limited. This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of online cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) tailored for HD patients, with or without therapist support, for managing psychological distress. This feasibility randomised controlled trial recruited patients from a UK HD centre. Following psychological distress screens, patients with mild-moderate psychological distress (Patient Health Questionnaire PHQ-9; score: 5-19 and/or Generalised Anxiety Disorder; GAD-7 score: 5-14) who met remaining inclusion criteria were approached for consent. Consenters were individually randomised (1:1) to online-CBT or online-CBT plus three therapist support calls. Outcomes included recruitment, retention, and adherence rates. Exploratory change analyses were performed for: psychological distress, quality of life (QoL), illness perceptions, and costs. The statistician was blinded to allocation. 182 (44%) out of 410 patients approached completed psychological distress screens. 26% found screening unacceptable; a further 30% found it unfeasible. Psychological distress was detected in 101 (55%) patients, 60 of these met remaining inclusion criteria. The primary reason for ineligibility was poor computer literacy (N=17, 53%). Twenty-five patients were randomised to the supported (N=18) or unsupported arm (N=7); 92% were retained at follow-up. No differences in psychological distress or cost-effectiveness were observed. No trial adverse events occurred. Online CBT appears feasible but only for computer literate patients who identify with the label psychological distress. A definitive trial using the current methods for psychological distress screening and online care delivery is unfeasible. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02352870. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. "FIND Technology": investigating the feasibility, efficacy and safety of controller-free interactive digital rehabilitation technology in an inpatient stroke population: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, M L; Cannell, J; Callisaya, M L; Moles, E; Rathjen, A; Lane, K; Tyson, A; Smith, S

    2016-04-16

    Stroke results in significant disability, which can be reduced by physical rehabilitation. High levels of repetition and activity are required in rehabilitation, but patients are typically sedentary. Using clinically relevant and fun computer games may be one way to achieve increased activity in rehabilitation. A single-blind randomized controlled trial will be conducted to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of novel stroke-specific rehabilitation software. This software uses controller-free client interaction and inertial motion sensors. Elements of feasibility include recruitment into the trial, ongoing participation (adherence and dropout), perceived benefit, enjoyment and ease of use of the games. Efficacy will be determined by measuring activity and using upper-limb tasks as well as measures of balance and mobility. The hypothesis that the intervention group will have increased levels of physical activity within rehabilitation and improved physical outcomes compared with the control group will be tested. Results from this study will provide a basis for discussion of feasibility of this interactive video technological solution in an inpatient situation. Differences in activity levels between groups will be the primary measure of efficacy. It will also provide data on measures of upper-limb function, balance and mobility. ACTRN12614000427673 . Prospectively registered 17 April 2014.

  14. Feasibility of a patient-centred nutrition intervention to improve oral intakes of patients at risk of pressure ulcer: a pilot randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; Desbrow, Ben; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition is important for pressure ulcer prevention. This randomised control pilot study assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to test the effectiveness of a patient-centred intervention for improving the dietary intakes of patients at risk of pressure ulcer in hospital. A 3-day intervention targeting patients at risk of pressure ulcer was developed, based on three main foundations: patient education, patient participation and guided goal setting. The intervention was piloted in three wards in a metropolitan hospital in Queensland, Australia. Participants were randomised into control or intervention groups and had their oral intakes monitored. A subset of intervention patients was interviewed on their perceptions of the intervention. Feasibility was tested against three criteria: ≥75% recruitment; ≥80% retention; and ≥80% intervention fidelity. Secondary outcomes related to effects on energy and protein intakes. Eighty patients participated in the study and 66 were included in final analysis. The recruitment rate was 82%, retention rate was 88%, and 100% of intervention patients received the intervention. Patients viewed the intervention as motivating and met significantly more of their estimated energy and protein requirements over time. This pilot study indicates that the intervention is feasible and acceptable by patients at risk of pressure ulcer. A larger trial is needed to confirm the effectiveness of the intervention in the clinical setting. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Evaluating feasibility and acceptability of a local psycho-educational intervention for pregnant women with common mental problems affected by armed conflict in Swat, Pakistan: A parallel randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Dherani, Mukesh; Chiumento, Anna; Atif, Najia; Bristow, Katie; Sikander, Siham; Rahman, Atif

    2017-12-01

    The current research was conducted in the Swat valley, where widespread conflict and militancy had been experienced prior to the field activities. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a locally developed psycho-educational intervention. This mixed-methods study incorporated a quantitative and qualitative component. For the quantitative component, trial participants were identified from a cross-sectional study conducted in the earlier phase of the research, with Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ) score of ≥9. Participants with suicidal ideation, severe mental or medical illness, recently given birth or living with another woman with an SRQ score of 9 or above were excluded. Participants fulfilling eligibility were randomized on a 1:1 allocation ratio using simple randomization to the psycho-educational intervention or routine care arm. The intervention arm received two psycho-educational sessions at their homes delivered by local community health worker from the study area. The primary outcome was help-seeking for psychological distress, measured by a semi-structured interview by a researcher blind to the allocation status at 2 months post-intervention. Secondary outcomes include psychological distress and social support measured by SRQ and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), respectively, at 2 months post-intervention. Intervention acceptability was explored through in-depth interviews. Local community health workers with no mental health experience successfully delivered the psycho-educational sessions in the community. The uptake of intervention was good and the intervention was taken well by the families and the community health workers. The outcome evaluation was not powered; however, more women sought assistance for their distress from their community health workers in the intervention arm, compared to women in the control arm. This trial showed good acceptance and feasible delivery of a

  16. ATTIRE: Albumin To prevenT Infection in chronic liveR failurE: study protocol for a single-arm feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, Louise; Muirhead, Nicola; Skene, Simon S; Shabir, Zainib; De Maeyer, Roel P H; Maini, Alexander A N; Gilroy, Derek W; O'Brien, Alastair J

    2016-01-25

    Circulating prostaglandin E2 levels are elevated in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and have been shown to contribute to immune suppression. Albumin binds and inactivates this hormone. Human albumin solution could thus be repurposed as an immune restorative drug in these patients.This feasibility study aims to determine whether it is possible and safe to restore serum albumin to >30 g/L and maintain it at this level in patients admitted with acute decompensated cirrhosis using repeated 20% human albumin infusions according to daily serum albumin levels. Albumin To prevenT Infection in chronic liveR failurE (ATTIRE) stage 1 is a multicentre, open label dose feasibility trial. Patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis admitted to hospital with a serum albumin of albumin solution will be infused, according to serum albumin levels, for up to 14 days or discharge in all patients. The primary end point is daily serum albumin levels for the duration of the treatment period and the secondary end point is plasma-induced macrophage dysfunction. The trial will recruit 80 patients. Outcomes will be used to assist with study design for an 866 patient randomised controlled trial at more than 30 sites across the UK. Research ethics approval was given by the London-Brent research ethics committee (ref: 15/LO/0104). The clinical trials authorisation was issued by the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency (ref: 20363/0350/001-0001). Will be disseminated through peer reviewed journals and international conferences. Recruitment of the first participant occurred on 26/05/2015. The trial is registered with the European Medicines Agency (EudraCT 2014-002300-24) and has been adopted by the NIHR (ISRCTN 14174793). This manuscript refers to V.4.0 of the protocol; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Solar powered oxygen systems in remote health centers in Papua New Guinea: a large scale implementation effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Trevor; Hwaihwanje, Ilomo; Kaupa, Magdalynn; Karubi, Jonah; Panauwe, Doreen; Sa'avu, Martin; Pulsan, Francis; Prasad, Peter; Maru, Freddy; Tenambo, Henry; Kwaramb, Ambrose; Neal, Eleanor; Graham, Hamish; Izadnegahdar, Rasa

    2017-06-01

    Pneumonia is the largest cause of child deaths in Papua New Guinea (PNG), and hypoxaemia is the major complication causing death in childhood pneumonia, and hypoxaemia is a major factor in deaths from many other common conditions, including bronchiolitis, asthma, sepsis, malaria, trauma, perinatal problems, and obstetric emergencies. A reliable source of oxygen therapy can reduce mortality from pneumonia by up to 35%. However, in low and middle income countries throughout the world, improved oxygen systems have not been implemented at large scale in remote, difficult to access health care settings, and oxygen is often unavailable at smaller rural hospitals or district health centers which serve as the first point of referral for childhood illnesses. These hospitals are hampered by lack of reliable power, staff training and other basic services. We report the methodology of a large implementation effectiveness trial involving sustainable and renewable oxygen and power systems in 36 health facilities in remote rural areas of PNG. The methodology is a before-and after evaluation involving continuous quality improvement, and a health systems approach. We describe this model of implementation as the considerations and steps involved have wider implications in health systems in other countries. The implementation steps include: defining the criteria for where such an intervention is appropriate, assessment of power supplies and power requirements, the optimal design of a solar power system, specifications for oxygen concentrators and other oxygen equipment that will function in remote environments, installation logistics in remote settings, the role of oxygen analyzers in monitoring oxygen concentrator performance, the engineering capacity required to sustain a program at scale, clinical guidelines and training on oxygen equipment and the treatment of children with severe respiratory infection and other critical illnesses, program costs, and measurement of processes and

  18. Impact of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information System (PROMIS) upon the Design and Operation of Multi-center Clinical Trials: a Qualitative Research Study

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenstein, Eric L.; Diener, Lawrence W.; Nahm, Meredith; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    New technologies may be required to integrate the National Institutes of Health’s Patient Reported Outcome Management Information System (PROMIS) into multi-center clinical trials. To better understand this need, we identified likely PROMIS reporting formats, developed a multi-center clinical trial process model, and identified gaps between current capabilities and those necessary for PROMIS. These results were evaluated by key trial constituencies. Issues reported by principal investigators ...

  19. Pivot/Remote: a distributed database for remote data entry in multi-center clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, S B; Jiang, K; Plummer, W D; Edens, T R; Stroud, M J; Swindell, B B; Wheeler, A P; Bernard, G R

    1995-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTION. Data collection is a critical component of multi-center clinical trials. Clinical trials conducted in intensive care units (ICU) are even more difficult because the acute nature of illnesses in ICU settings requires that masses of data be collected in a short time. More than a thousand data points are routinely collected for each study patient. The majority of clinical trials are still "paper-based," even if a remote data entry (RDE) system is utilized. The typical RDE system consists of a computer housed in the CC office and connected by modem to a centralized data coordinating center (DCC). Study data must first be recorded on a paper case report form (CRF), transcribed into the RDE system, and transmitted to the DCC. This approach requires additional monitoring since both the paper CRF and study database must be verified. The paper-based RDE system cannot take full advantage of automatic data checking routines. Much of the effort (and expense) of a clinical trial is ensuring that study data matches the original patient data. 2. METHODS. We have developed an RDE system, Pivot/Remote, that eliminates the need for paper-based CRFs. It creates an innovative, distributed database. The database resides partially at the study clinical centers (CC) and at the DCC. Pivot/Remote is descended from technology introduced with Pivot [1]. Study data is collected at the bedside with laptop computers. A graphical user interface (GUI) allows the display of electronic CRFs that closely mimic the normal paper-based forms. Data entry time is the same as for paper CRFs. Pull-down menus, displaying the possible responses, simplify the process of entering data. Edit checks are performed on most data items. For example, entered dates must conform to some temporal logic imposed by the study. Data must conform to some acceptable range of values. Calculations, such as computing the subject's age or the APACHE II score, are automatically made as the data is entered. Data

  20. Unsupervised progressive elastic band exercises for frail geriatric inpatients objectively monitored by new exercise-integrated technology-a feasibility trial with an embedded qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, C R; Bandholm, T; Spaich, E G

    2017-01-01

    feasibility and acceptability of an unsupervised progressive strength training intervention monitored by BandCizer for frail geriatric inpatients. Methods: This feasibility trial included 15 frail inpatients at a geriatric ward. At hospitalization, the patients were prescribed two elastic band exercises......Background: Frailty is a serious condition frequently present in geriatric inpatients that potentially causes serious adverse events. Strength training is acknowledged as a means of preventing or delaying frailty and loss of function in these patients. However, limited hospital resources challenge...... the amount of supervised training, and unsupervised training could possibly supplement supervised training thereby increasing the total exercise dose during admission. A new valid and reliable technology, the BandCizer, objectively measures the exact training dosage performed. The purpose was to investigate...

  1. Perfusion-CT guided intravenous thrombolysis in patients with unknown-onset stroke: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrik; Ntaios, George; Reichhart, Marc; Schindler, Christian; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Maeder, Philip; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max

    2012-06-01

    Patients with unknown stroke onset are generally excluded from acute recanalisation treatments. We designed a pilot study to assess feasibility of a trial of perfusion computed tomography (PCT)-guided thrombolysis in patients with ischemic tissue at risk of infarction and unknown stroke onset. Patients with a supratentorial stroke of unknown onset in the middle cerebral artery territory and significant volume of at-risk tissue on PCT were randomized to intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (0.9 mg/kg) or placebo. Feasibility endpoints were randomization and blinded treatment of patients within 2 h after hospital arrival, and the correct application (estimation) of the perfusion imaging criteria. At baseline, there was a trend towards older age [69.5 (57-78) vs. 49 (44-78) years] in the thrombolysis group (n = 6) compared to placebo (n = 6). Regarding feasibility, hospital arrival to treatment delay was above the allowed 2 h in three patients (25%). There were two protocol violations (17%) regarding PCT, both underestimating the predicted infarct in patients randomized in the placebo group. No symptomatic hemorrhage or death occurred during the first 7 days. Three of the four (75%) and one of the five (20%) patients were recanalized in the thrombolysis and placebo group respectively. The volume of non-infarcted at-risk tissue was 84 (44-206) cm(3) in the treatment arm and 29 (8-105) cm(3) in the placebo arm. This pilot study shows that a randomized PCT-guided thrombolysis trial in patients with stroke of unknown onset may be feasible if issues such as treatment delays and reliable identification of tissue at risk of infarction tissue are resolved. Safety and efficiency of such an approach need to be established.

  2. Perfusion-CT guided intravenous thrombolysis in patients with unknown-onset stroke: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot feasibility trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Patrik; Ntaios, George; Reichhart, Marc; Schindler, Christian; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Maeder, Philip; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max

    2012-01-01

    Patients with unknown stroke onset are generally excluded from acute recanalisation treatments. We designed a pilot study to assess feasibility of a trial of perfusion computed tomography (PCT)-guided thrombolysis in patients with ischemic tissue at risk of infarction and unknown stroke onset. Patients with a supratentorial stroke of unknown onset in the middle cerebral artery territory and significant volume of at-risk tissue on PCT were randomized to intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase (0.9 mg/kg) or placebo. Feasibility endpoints were randomization and blinded treatment of patients within 2 h after hospital arrival, and the correct application (estimation) of the perfusion imaging criteria. At baseline, there was a trend towards older age [69.5 (57-78) vs. 49 (44-78) years] in the thrombolysis group (n = 6) compared to placebo (n = 6). Regarding feasibility, hospital arrival to treatment delay was above the allowed 2 h in three patients (25%). There were two protocol violations (17%) regarding PCT, both underestimating the predicted infarct in patients randomized in the placebo group. No symptomatic hemorrhage or death occurred during the first 7 days. Three of the four (75%) and one of the five (20%) patients were recanalized in the thrombolysis and placebo group respectively. The volume of non-infarcted at-risk tissue was 84 (44-206) cm 3 in the treatment arm and 29 (8-105) cm 3 in the placebo arm. This pilot study shows that a randomized PCT-guided thrombolysis trial in patients with stroke of unknown onset may be feasible if issues such as treatment delays and reliable identification of tissue at risk of infarction tissue are resolved. Safety and efficiency of such an approach need to be established. (orig.)

  3. Safety and feasibility of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined with sensorimotor retraining in chronic low back pain: a protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Adam Louis; Liston, Matthew B; Chang, Wei-Ju; Walton, David M; Wand, Benedict Martin; Schabrun, Siobhan M

    2017-08-21

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a common and costly health problem yet current treatments demonstrate at best, small effects. The concurrent application of treatments with synergistic clinical and mechanistic effects may improve outcomes in chronic LBP. This pilot trial aims to (1) determine the feasibility, safety and perceived patient response to a combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and sensorimotor retraining intervention in chronic LBP and (2) provide data to support a sample size calculation for a fully powered trial should trends of effectiveness be present. A pilot randomised, assessor and participant-blind, sham-controlled trial will be conducted. Eighty participants with chronic LBP will be randomly allocated to receive either (1) active tDCS + sensorimotor retraining or (2) sham tDCS + sensorimotor retraining. tDCS (active or sham) will be applied to the primary motor cortex for 20 min immediately prior to 60 min of supervised sensorimotor retraining twice per week for 10 weeks. Participants in both groups will complete home exercises three times per week. Feasibility, safety, pain, disability and pain system function will be assessed immediately before and after the 10-week intervention. Analysis of feasibility and safety will be performed using descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses will be conducted based on intention-to-treat and per protocol and will be used to determine trends for effectiveness. Ethical approval has been gained from the institutional human research ethics committee (H10184). Written informed consent will be provided by all participants. Results from this pilot study will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals. ACTRN12616000624482. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Feasibility and effectiveness of the implementation of a primary prevention programme for type 2 diabetes in routine primary care practice: a phase IV cluster randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Alvaro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to perform an independent evaluation of the feasibility and effectiveness of an educational programme for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (DM2 in high risk populations in primary care settings, implanted within the Basque Health Service - Osakidetza. Methods/design This is a prospective phase IV cluster clinical trial conducted under routine conditions in 14 primary health care centres of Osakidetza, randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. We will recruit a total sample of 1089 individuals, aged between 45 and 70 years old, without diabetes but at high risk of developing the condition (Finnish Diabetes Risk Score, FINDRISC ≥ 14 and follow them up for 2 years. Primary health care nursing teams of the intervention centres will implement DE-PLAN, a structured educational intervention program focused on changing healthy lifestyles (diet and physical activity; while the patients in the control centres will receive the usual care for the prevention and treatment of DM2 currently provided in Osakidetza. The effectiveness attributable to the programme will be assessed by comparing the changes observed in patients exposed to the intervention and those in the control group, with respect to the risk of developing DM2 and lifestyle habits. In terms of feasibility, we will assess indicators of population coverage and programme implementation. Discussion The aim of this study is to provide the scientific basis for disseminate the programme to the remaining primary health centres in Osakidetza, as a novel way of addressing prevention of DM2. The study design will enable us to gather information on the effectiveness of the intervention as well as the feasibility of implementing it in routine practice. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365013

  5. Palliative use of non-invasive ventilation in end-of-life patients with solid tumours: a randomised feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Stefano; Ferrer, Miguel; Esquinas, Antonio; Scala, Raffaele; Groff, Paolo; Cosentini, Roberto; Guido, Davide; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Cuomo, Anna Maria; Grassi, Mario

    2013-03-01

    Despite best-possible medical management, many patients with end-stage cancer experience breathlessness, especially towards the end of their lives. We assessed the acceptability and effectiveness of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) versus oxygen therapy in decreasing dyspnoea and the amount of opiates needed. In this randomised feasibility study, we recruited patients from seven centres in Italy, Spain, and Taiwan, who had solid tumours and acute respiratory failure and had a life expectancy of less than 6 months. We randomly allocated patients to receive either NIV (using the Pressure Support mode and scheduled on patients' request and mask comfort) or oxygen therapy (using a Venturi or a reservoir mask). We used a computer-generated sequence for randomisation, stratified on the basis of patients' hypercapnic status (PaCO2 >45 mm Hg or PaCO2 ≤45 mm Hg), and assigned treatment allocation using opaque, sealed envelopes. Patients in both groups were given sufficient subcutaneous morphine to reduce their dyspnoea score by at least one point on the Borg scale. Our primary endpoints were to assess the acceptability of NIV used solely as a palliative measure and to assess its effectiveness in reducing dyspnoea and the amount of opiates needed compared with oxygen therapy. Analysis was done by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00533143. We recruited patients between Jan 15, 2008, and March 9, 2011. Of 234 patients eligible for recruitment, we randomly allocated 200 (85%) to treatment: 99 to NIV and 101 to oxygen. 11 (11%) patients in the NIV group discontinued treatment; no patients in the oxygen group discontinued treatment. Dyspnoea decreased more rapidly in the NIV group compared with the oxygen group (average change in Borg scale -0·58, 95% CI -0·92 to -0·23, p=0·0012), with most benefit seen after the first hour of treatment and in hypercapnic patients. The total dose of morphine during the first 48 h was

  6. Unsupervised progressive elastic band exercises for frail geriatric inpatients objectively monitored by new exercise-integrated technology-a feasibility trial with an embedded qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathleff, C R; Bandholm, T; Spaich, E G; Jorgensen, M; Andreasen, J

    2017-01-01

    Frailty is a serious condition frequently present in geriatric inpatients that potentially causes serious adverse events. Strength training is acknowledged as a means of preventing or delaying frailty and loss of function in these patients. However, limited hospital resources challenge the amount of supervised training, and unsupervised training could possibly supplement supervised training thereby increasing the total exercise dose during admission. A new valid and reliable technology, the BandCizer, objectively measures the exact training dosage performed. The purpose was to investigate feasibility and acceptability of an unsupervised progressive strength training intervention monitored by BandCizer for frail geriatric inpatients. This feasibility trial included 15 frail inpatients at a geriatric ward. At hospitalization, the patients were prescribed two elastic band exercises to be performed unsupervised once daily. A BandCizer Datalogger enabling measurement of the number of sets, repetitions, and time-under-tension was attached to the elastic band. The patients were instructed in performing strength training: 3 sets of 10 repetitions (10-12 repetition maximum (RM)) with a separation of 2-min pauses and a time-under-tension of 8 s. The feasibility criterion for the unsupervised progressive exercises was that 33% of the recommended number of sets would be performed by at least 30% of patients. In addition, patients and staff were interviewed about their experiences with the intervention. Four (27%) out of 15 patients completed 33% of the recommended number of sets. For the total sample, the average percent of performed sets was 23% and for those who actually trained ( n  = 12) 26%. Patients and staff expressed a general positive attitude towards the unsupervised training as an addition to the supervised training sessions. However, barriers were also described-especially constant interruptions. Based on the predefined criterion for feasibility, the

  7. Parents Working Together: development and feasibility trial of a workplace-based program for parents that incorporates general parenting and health behaviour messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parenting programs integrating general parenting and health behaviour messaging may be an effective childhood obesity prevention strategy. The current study explored workplaces as an alternate setting to deliver parenting programs. Methods This study involved two phases. The objective of the first phase was to explore interest in and preferred delivery mode of a workplace program that addresses general parenting and health behaviours. The objective of the second phase was to adapt and test the feasibility and acceptability of a pre-existing program that has been successfully run in community settings for parents in their workplace. To achieve the first objective, we conducted 9 individual or small group qualitative interviews with 11 workplace representatives involved in employee wellness/wellness programming from 8 different organizations across Southwestern Ontario. To achieve the second objective, we adapted a pre-existing program incorporating workplace representatives’ suggestions to create Parents Working Together (PWT. We then tested the program using a pre/post uncontrolled feasibility trial with 9 employees of a large manufacturing company located in Guelph, Ontario. Results Results from the qualitative phase showed that a workplace parenting program that addresses general parenting and health behaviour messages is of interest to workplaces. Results from the feasibility trial suggest that PWT is feasible and well received by participants; attendance rates were high with 89 % of the participants attending 5 or more sessions and 44 % attending all 7 sessions offered. All participants stated they would recommend the program to co-workers. Just over half of our parent participants were male (55.6 %, which is a unique finding as the majority of existing parenting programs engage primarily mothers. Impact evaluation results suggest that changes in children’s and parents’ weight-related behaviours, as well as

  8. Parents Working Together: development and feasibility trial of a workplace-based program for parents that incorporates general parenting and health behaviour messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L; Lero, Donna; Smofsky, Allan; Gross, Deborah; Haines, Jess

    2016-11-10

    Parenting programs integrating general parenting and health behaviour messaging may be an effective childhood obesity prevention strategy. The current study explored workplaces as an alternate setting to deliver parenting programs. This study involved two phases. The objective of the first phase was to explore interest in and preferred delivery mode of a workplace program that addresses general parenting and health behaviours. The objective of the second phase was to adapt and test the feasibility and acceptability of a pre-existing program that has been successfully run in community settings for parents in their workplace. To achieve the first objective, we conducted 9 individual or small group qualitative interviews with 11 workplace representatives involved in employee wellness/wellness programming from 8 different organizations across Southwestern Ontario. To achieve the second objective, we adapted a pre-existing program incorporating workplace representatives' suggestions to create Parents Working Together (PWT). We then tested the program using a pre/post uncontrolled feasibility trial with 9 employees of a large manufacturing company located in Guelph, Ontario. Results from the qualitative phase showed that a workplace parenting program that addresses general parenting and health behaviour messages is of interest to workplaces. Results from the feasibility trial suggest that PWT is feasible and well received by participants; attendance rates were high with 89 % of the participants attending 5 or more sessions and 44 % attending all 7 sessions offered. All participants stated they would recommend the program to co-workers. Just over half of our parent participants were male (55.6 %), which is a unique finding as the majority of existing parenting programs engage primarily mothers. Impact evaluation results suggest that changes in children's and parents' weight-related behaviours, as well as parents' reports of family interfering with work were in the

  9. The GETUG 70 Gy vs. 80 Gy randomized trial for localized prostate cancer: Feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean Marc; Lefloch, Olivier; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdin, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Lagrange, Jean-L.eon; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal M.D.; Hay, Men H.; Dubray, Bernard; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe treatments and acute tolerance in a randomized trial comparing 70 Gy and 80 Gy to the prostate in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Between September 1999 and February 2002, 306 patients were randomized to receive 70 Gy (153 patients) or 80 Gy (153 patients) in 17 institutions. Patients exhibited intermediate-prognosis tumors. If the risk of node involvement was greater than 10%, surgical staging was required. Previous prostatectomy was excluded, and androgen deprivation was not admitted. The treatment was delivered in two steps. PTV1-including seminal vesicles, prostate, and a 1-0.5-cm margin-received 46 Gy given with a 4-field conformal technique. PTV2, reduced to prostate with the same margins, irradiated with at least 5 fields. Dose was prescribed according to ICRU recommendations in the 70 Gy group, but adapted at the 80 Gy level. Results: All patients but one in the 80 Gy arm completed the treatment. In the 70 Gy arm, the mean dose to the PTV2 was 69.5 Gy. In the 80 Gy arm, the mean dose in the PTV2 was 78.5 Gy. Acute toxicity according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale during treatment was reported in 306 patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the two arms: 12% had no toxicity, 80% complained of bladder toxicity, and 70% complained of rectal symptoms. Two months after the end of treatment, 43% of the 70 Gy level and 48% of the 80 Gy level complained of side effects, including 24% and 20% of sexual disorders. There was 6% and 2% of Grade 3 urinary and rectal toxicity. Five patients required a 10-29-day suspension of the treatment. Acute Grade 2 and 3 side effects were related to PTV and CTV1 size, which was the only independent predictive factor in multivariate analysis. Toxicity was not related to the center, age, arm of treatment, or selected data from dose-volume histogram of organ at risk. Conclusion: Treatments were completed in respect to constraints. Acute toxicity

  10. [YANG's pricking-cupping therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a multi-center randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Xiru; Hu, Zhihai; Sun, Aijun; Ma, Yanwen; Chen Yingying; Zhang, Xuzhi; Liu, Meiling; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shuoshuo; Zhang, Yunjia; Li, Yijing; Shen, Weidong

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of YANG's pricking-cupping therapy for knee osteoar thritis (KOA). Methods This was a multi-center randomized parallel controlled trial. One hundred and seventy one patients with KOA were randomly allocated to a pricking-cupping group (89 cases) and a conventional acu puncture group (82 cases). Neixiyan (EX-LE 4), Dubi (ST 35) and ashi points were selected in the two groups. Patients in the pricking-cupping group were treated with YANG's pricking-cupping therapy; the seven-star needles were used to perform pricking at acupoints, then cupping was used until slight bleeding was observed. Patients in the conventional acupuncture group were treated with semi-standardized filiform needle therapy. The treatment was given for 4 weeks (from a minimum of 5 times to a maximum of 10 times). The follow-up visit was 4 weeks. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were adopted for the efficacy assessments. The pain score, stiffness score, physical function score and total score of WOMAC were all reduced after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit in the two groups (all P0. 05), each score and total score of WOMAC in the pricking-cupping group were lower than those in the conventional acupuncture group after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit (Pcupping group were lower than those in the conventional acupuncture group after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit (P cupping and conventional acupuncture therapy can both significantly improve knee joint pain and function in patients with KOA, which are relatively safe. The pricking cupping therapy is superior to conventional acupuncture with the identical selection of acupoints.

  11. A randomised controlled trial of six weeks of home enteral nutrition versus standard care after oesophagectomy or total gastrectomy for cancer: report on a pilot and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowrey, David J; Baker, Melanie; Halliday, Vanessa; Thomas, Anne L; Pulikottil-Jacob, Ruth; Smith, Karen; Morris, Tom; Ring, Arne

    2015-11-21

    Poor nutrition in the first months after oesophago-gastric resection is a contributing factor to the reduced quality of life seen in these patients. The aim of this pilot and feasibility study was to ascertain the feasibility of conducting a multi-centre randomised controlled trial to evaluate routine home enteral nutrition in these patients. Patients undergoing oesophagectomy or total gastrectomy were randomised to either six weeks of home feeding through a jejunostomy (intervention), or treatment as usual (control). Intervention comprised overnight feeding, providing 50 % of energy and protein requirements, in addition to usual oral intake. Primary outcome measures were recruitment and retention rates at six weeks and six months. Nutritional intake, nutritional parameters, quality of life and healthcare costs were also collected. Interviews were conducted with a sample of participants, to ascertain patient and carer experiences. Fifty-four of 112 (48 %) eligible patients participated in the study over the 20 months. Study retention at six weeks was 41/54 patients (76 %) and at six months was 36/54 (67 %). At six weeks, participants in the control group had lost on average 3.9 kg more than participants in the intervention group (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.6 to 6.2). These differences remained evident at three months (mean difference 2.5 kg, 95 % CI -0.5 to 5.6) and at six months (mean difference 2.5 kg, 95 % CI -1.2 to 6.1). The mean values observed in the intervention group for mid arm circumference, mid arm muscle circumference, triceps skin fold thickness and right hand grip strength were greater than for the control group at all post hospital discharge time points. The economic evaluation suggested that it was feasible to collect resource use and EQ-5D data for a full cost-effectiveness analysis. Thematic analysis of 15 interviews identified three main themes related to the intervention and the trial: 1) a positive experience, 2) the reasons for taking

  12. A randomised, feasibility trial of a tele-health intervention for Acute Coronary Syndrome patients with depression ('MoodCare': Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hare David L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease (CHD and depression are leading causes of disease burden globally and the two often co-exist. Depression is common after Myocardial Infarction (MI and it has been estimated that 15-35% of patients experience depressive symptoms. Co-morbid depression can impair health related quality of life (HRQOL, decrease medication adherence and appropriate utilisation of health services, lead to increased morbidity and suicide risk, and is associated with poorer CHD risk factor profiles and reduced survival. We aim to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomised, multi-centre trial designed to compare a tele-health program (MoodCare for depression and CHD secondary prevention, with Usual Care (UC. Methods Over 1600 patients admitted after index admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS are being screened for depression at six metropolitan hospitals in the Australian states of Victoria and Queensland. Consenting participants are then contacted at two weeks post-discharge for baseline assessment. One hundred eligible participants are to be randomised to an intervention or a usual medical care control group (50 per group. The intervention consists of up to 10 × 30-40 minute structured telephone sessions, delivered by registered psychologists, commencing within two weeks of baseline screening. The intervention focuses on depression management, lifestyle factors (physical activity, healthy eating, smoking cessation, alcohol intake, medication adherence and managing co-morbidities. Data collection occurs at baseline (Time 1, 6 months (post-intervention (Time 2, 12 months (Time 3 and 24 months follow-up for longer term effects (Time 4. We are comparing depression (Cardiac Depression Scale [CDS] and HRQOL (Short Form-12 [SF-12] scores between treatment and UC groups, assessing the feasibility of the program through patient acceptability and exploring long term maintenance effects. A cost-effectiveness analysis of

  13. Web-Based Decision Aid to Assist Help-Seeking Choices for Young People Who Self-Harm: Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krisna; French, Rebecca S; Henderson, Claire; Ougrin, Dennis; Slade, Mike; Moran, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Background Adolescents who self-harm are often unsure how or where to get help. We developed a Web-based personalized decision aid (DA) designed to support young people in decision making about seeking help for their self-harm. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the DA intervention and the randomized controlled trial (RCT) in a school setting. Methods We conducted a two-group, single blind, randomized controlled feasibility trial in a school setting. Participants aged 12 to 18 years who reported self-harm in the past 12 months were randomized to either a Web-based DA or to general information about mood and feelings. Feasibility of recruitment, randomization, and follow-up rates were assessed, as was acceptability of the intervention and study procedures. Descriptive data were collected on outcome measures examining decision making and help-seeking behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with young people, parents or carers, and staff and subjected to thematic analysis to explore their views of the DA and study processes. Results Parental consent was a significant barrier to young people participating in the trial, with only 17.87% (208/1164) of parents or guardians who were contacted for consent responding to study invitations. Where parental consent was obtained, we were able to recruit 81.7% (170/208) of young people into the study. Of those young people screened, 13.5% (23/170) had self-harmed in the past year. Ten participants were randomized to receiving the DA, and 13 were randomized to the control group. Four-week follow-up assessments were completed with all participants. The DA had good acceptability, but qualitative interviews suggested that a DA that addressed broader mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, and self-harm may be more beneficial. Conclusions A broad-based mental health DA addressing a wide range of psychosocial problems may be useful for young people. The requirement

  14. Sugarsquare, a Web-Based Patient Portal for Parents of a Child With Type 1 Diabetes: Multicenter Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogerd, Emiel; Maas-Van Schaaijk, Nienke M; Sas, Theo C; Clement-de Boers, Agnes; Smallenbroek, Mischa; Nuboer, Roos; Noordam, Cees; Verhaak, Chris M

    2017-08-22

    Raising a child with type 1 diabetes (T1D) means combining the demands of the disease management with everyday parenting, which is associated with increased levels of distress. A Web-based patient portal, Sugarsquare, was developed to support parents, by providing online parent-professional communication, online peer support and online disease information. The first aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting a multicenter, randomized controlled trial in Dutch parents of a child with T1D. The second aim was to assess the feasibility of implementing Sugarsquare in clinical practice. The parents of 105 children (N=105) with T1D below the age of 13 participated in a 6-month multicenter randomized controlled feasibility trial. They were randomly assigned to an experimental (n=54, usual care and Sugarsquare) or a control group (n=51, usual care). Attrition rates and user statistics were gathered to evaluate feasibility of the trial and implementation. To determine potential efficacy, the parenting stress index (PSI-SF) was assessed at baseline (T0) and after 6 months (T1). Of a potential population of parents of 445 children, 189 were willing to participate (enrollment refusal=57.5%, n=256), 142 filled in the baseline questionnaire (baseline attrition rate=25%, n=47), and 105 also filled in the questionnaire at T1 (post randomization attrition rate during follow-up=26%, n=32). As such, 24% of the potential population participated. Analysis in the experimental group (n=54) revealed a total of 32 (59%) unique users, divided into 12 (38%) frequent users, 9 (28%) incidental users, and 11 (34%) low-frequent users. Of the total of 44 professionals, 34 (77%) logged in, and 32 (73%) logged in repeatedly. Analysis of the user statistics in the experimental group further showed high practicability and integration in all users, moderate acceptability and demand in parents, and high acceptability and demand in health care professionals. Baseline parenting stress

  15. An intervention for pulmonary rehabilitators to develop a social identity for patients attending exercise rehabilitation: a feasibility and pilot randomised control trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Andrew R; Matata, Bashir; Pilsworth, Sam; Mcgonigle, Adrian; Wigelsworth, Lyndsey; Jones, Linda; Pott, Nicola; Bettany, Max; Midgley, Adrian W

    2018-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a degenerative condition that can impair health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A number of self-management interventions, employing a variety of behavioural change techniques (BCTs), have been adopted to improve HRQoL for COPD patients. However, a lack of attention has been given to group management interventions with an emphasis on incorporating BCTs into rehabilitators' practice. This study aims to pilot and feasibly explore a social identity group management intervention, delivered by COPD rehabilitation staff to patients attending exercise pulmonary rehabilitation. Doing so will help inform the plausibility of the intervention before conducting a full trial to evaluate its effectiveness to improve HRQoL. This is a two-centre, randomised cross-over controlled trial. Two pulmonary rehabilitation centres based in the UK will be randomly allocated to two treatment arms (standard care and intervention). Outcome measurements relating to HRQoL and social identity will be completed pre- and post-exercise rehabilitation. Focus group interviews will be conducted at the end of exercise rehabilitation to capture participants' contextualised experiences of the intervention. COPD rehabilitators will undertake semi-structured interviews at the end of the trial to garner their holistic perspectives of intervention fidelity and implementation. This is the first study to adopt a social identity approach to develop a rehabilitator-led, group management intervention for COPD patients attending exercise pulmonary rehabilitation. The results of this study will provide evidence for the feasibility and sample size requirements to inform a larger study, which can ascertain the intervention's effectiveness for improving HRQoL for COPD patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02288039. Date 31 October 2014.

  16. Impact of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information System (PROMIS) upon the design and operation of multi-center clinical trials: a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Eric L; Diener, Lawrence W; Nahm, Meredith; Weinfurt, Kevin P

    2011-12-01

    New technologies may be required to integrate the National Institutes of Health's Patient Reported Outcome Management Information System (PROMIS) into multi-center clinical trials. To better understand this need, we identified likely PROMIS reporting formats, developed a multi-center clinical trial process model, and identified gaps between current capabilities and those necessary for PROMIS. These results were evaluated by key trial constituencies. Issues reported by principal investigators fell into two categories: acceptance by key regulators and the scientific community, and usability for researchers and clinicians. Issues reported by the coordinating center, participating sites, and study subjects were those faced when integrating new technologies into existing clinical trial systems. We then defined elements of a PROMIS Tool Kit required for integrating PROMIS into a multi-center clinical trial environment. The requirements identified in this study serve as a framework for future investigators in the design, development, implementation, and operation of PROMIS Tool Kit technologies.

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a ... will be done during the clinical trial and why. Each medical center that does the study uses ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ...

  19. Examining self-guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for older adults with symptoms of anxiety and depression: Two feasibility open trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake F. Dear

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT has considerable public health potential for treating anxiety and depression. However, no research has examined the use of self-guided iCBT, that is, treatment without contact with a clinician, specifically for older adults. The aim of the present study was to undertake a preliminary examination of the acceptability, efficacy and health economic impact of two entirely self-guided iCBT programs for adults over 60 years of age with anxiety and depression. Two separate single-group feasibility open trials of self-guided iCBT were conducted, the Anxiety Trial (n = 27 and the Depression Trial (n = 20, using the control groups of two randomized controlled trials. The online treatment packages consisted of five online educational lessons, which were delivered over 8 weeks without clinical contact. Participants rated the interventions as acceptable with more than 90% reporting the course was worth their time and more than 70% of participants completing at least 3 of the 5 lessons within the eight weeks. Significant reductions on measures of anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item; GAD-7 and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item; PHQ-9 were observed from pre-treatment to post-treatment in both the Anxiety Trial (GAD-7 Cohen's d = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.55 to 1.75 and the Depression Trial (PHQ-9 Cohen's d = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.33 to 1.73. The economic analyses indicated that there was statistically significant improvement in health-related quality of life compared to baseline and marginally higher costs associated with treatment for both the Anxiety Trial ($69.84; 95% CI: $4.24 to $135.45 and the Depression Trial ($54.98; 95% CI: $3.84 to $106.12. The results provide preliminary support for the potential of entirely self-guided iCBT for older adults with anxiety and depression and indicate larger scale and controlled research trials are warranted.

  20. A participatory workplace intervention for employees with distress and lost time: a feasibility evaluation within a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mechelen, van W.; Oostrom, van S.H.; Terluin, B.; Vet, de H.C.W.; Anema, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Little is known about feasibility and acceptability of return to work (RTW) interventions for mental health problems. RTW for mental health problems is more complicated than for musculoskeletal problems due to stigmatization at the workplace. A participatory workplace intervention was

  1. Feasibility of a Preventive Parenting Intervention for Very Preterm Children at 18 Months Corrected Age: A Randomized Pilot Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flierman, Monique; Koldewijn, Karen; Meijssen, Dominique; van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, Aleid; Aarnoudse-Moens, Cornelieke; van Schie, Petra; Jeukens-Visser, Martine

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and potential efficacy of an age-appropriate additional parenting intervention for very preterm born toddlers. In a randomized controlled pilot study, 60 of 94 eligible very preterm born children who had received a responsive parenting intervention in their first year

  2. Targeting “hardly reached” people with chronic illness: a feasibility study of a person-centered self-management education approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varming AR

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie Reinhardt Varming,1 Rikke Torenholt,1 Tue Helms Andersen,2 Birgitte Lund Møller,3 Ingrid Willaing1 1Diabetes Management Research, Health Promotion, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, The Capital Region of Denmark, 2Danish Diabetes Association, 3Department of Intersectoral Collaboration, Region of Southern Denmark, Denmark Background: Self-management education is critical to the development of successful health behavior changes related to chronic illness. However, people in high-risk groups attend less frequently or benefit less from patient education programs than do people with more socioeconomic advantages.Aim: The aim was to test the feasibility of a participatory person-centered education approach and tool-kit targeting self-management of chronic illness in hardly reached people.Methods: After participating in a training program, educators (n=77 tested the approach in practice. Data collection included online questionnaires for educators (n=65, observations of education sessions (n=7, and interviews with educators (n=11 and participants (n=22. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Transcripts of interviews and observations were analyzed using systematic text condensation. Feasibility was examined in terms of practicality, integration, suitability, and efficacy.Results: Educators had a positive response to the approach and found that the tools supported involving participants in education and support. Participant satisfaction varied, depending on the ability of educators to integrate the tools into programs in a meaningful way. The tools provided time for reflection in the education process that benefited participants and educators alike. Educators found it challenging to allow participants to help set the agenda and to exchange experiences without educator control. Barriers to use reported by educators included lack of time for both training and preparation.Limitations: The testing included varied groups of participants, some

  3. Measuring skin necrosis in a randomised controlled feasibility trial of heat preconditioning on wound healing after reconstructive breast surgery: study protocol and statistical analysis plan for the PREHEAT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cro, Suzie; Mehta, Saahil; Farhadi, Jian; Coomber, Billie; Cornelius, Victoria

    2018-01-01

    Essential strategies are needed to help reduce the number of post-operative complications and associated costs for breast cancer patients undergoing reconstructive breast surgery. Evidence suggests that local heat preconditioning could help improve the provision of this procedure by reducing skin necrosis. Before testing the effectiveness of heat preconditioning in a definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT), we must first establish the best way to measure skin necrosis and estimate the event rate using this definition. PREHEAT is a single-blind randomised controlled feasibility trial comparing local heat preconditioning, using a hot water bottle, against standard care on skin necrosis among breast cancer patients undergoing reconstructive breast surgery. The primary objective of this study is to determine the best way to measure skin necrosis and to estimate the event rate using this definition in each trial arm. Secondary feasibility objectives include estimating recruitment and 30 day follow-up retention rates, levels of compliance with the heating protocol, length of stay in hospital and the rates of surgical versus conservative management of skin necrosis. The information from these objectives will inform the design of a larger definitive effectiveness and cost-effectiveness RCT. This article describes the PREHEAT trial protocol and detailed statistical analysis plan, which includes the pre-specified criteria and process for establishing the best way to measure necrosis. This study will provide the evidence needed to establish the best way to measure skin necrosis, to use as the primary outcome in a future RCT to definitively test the effectiveness of local heat preconditioning. The pre-specified statistical analysis plan, developed prior to unblinded data extraction, sets out the analysis strategy and a comparative framework to support a committee evaluation of skin necrosis measurements. It will increase the transparency of the data analysis for the

  4. A Mixed-Methods, Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Trial to Inform the Design of a Phase III Trial to Test the Effect of the Handheld Fan on Physical Activity and Carer Anxiety in Patients With Refractory Breathlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Miriam J; Booth, Sara; Currow, David C; Lam, Lawrence T; Phillips, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    The handheld fan is an inexpensive and safe way to provide facial airflow, which may reduce the sensation of chronic refractory breathlessness, a frequently encountered symptom. To test the feasibility of developing an adequately powered, multicenter, multinational randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of a handheld fan and exercise advice with advice alone in increasing activity in people with chronic refractory breathlessness from a variety of medical conditions, measuring recruitment rates; data quality; and potential primary outcome measures. This was a Phase II, multisite, international, parallel, nonblinded, mixed-methods randomized controlled trial. Participants were centrally randomized to fan or control. All received breathlessness self-management/exercise advice and were followed up weekly for four weeks. Participants/carers were invited to participate in a semistructured interview at the study's conclusion. Ninety-seven people were screened, 49 randomized (mean age 68 years; 49% men), and 43 completed the study. Site recruitment varied from 0.25 to 3.3/month and screening:randomization from 1.1:1 to 8.5:1. There were few missing data except for the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Self-Efficacy Scale (two-thirds of data missing). No harms were observed. Three interview themes included 1) a fan is a helpful self-management strategy, 2) a fan aids recovery, and 3) a symptom control trial was welcome. A definitive, multisite trial to study the use of the handheld fan as part of self-management of chronic refractory breathlessness is feasible. Participants found the fan useful. However, the value of information for changing practice or policy is unlikely to justify the expense of such a trial, given perceived benefits, the minimal costs, and an absence of harms demonstrated in this study. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Should academic medical centers conduct clinical trials of the efficacy of intercessory prayer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, E C

    2001-08-01

    Intercessory prayers for health or healing are requests to an object of worship for the preservation or restoration of health. There has been a recent proliferation of clinical trials that compare the health outcome of a group of prayed-for patients with that of controls, to test the efficacy of intercessory prayer. In this essay, the author defines the concept of intercessory prayer, contrasts it with other forms of prayer, and reviews the literature concerning clinical trials of its efficacy. The arguments put forward in favor of conducting such trials and those against are described and the reader is invited to consider their relative merits. The author concludes by discussing the potential power of faith in healing, reviewing the philosophical basis and pitfalls of clinical trials of intercessory prayer, and urging readers to weigh the arguments for and against such trials in academic medicine.

  6. Protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial of the use of Physical ACtivity monitors in an Exercise Referral Setting: the PACERS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Jemma; Edwards, Michelle; Charles, Joanna; Jago, Russell; Kelson, Mark; Morgan, Kelly; Murphy, Simon; Oliver, Emily; Simpson, Sharon; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Moore, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Exercise referral schemes are recommended by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) for physical activity promotion among inactive patients with health conditions or risk factors. Whilst there is evidence for the initial effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such schemes for increasing physical activity, evidence of long-term effects is limited. Techniques such as goal setting, self-monitoring and personalised feedback may support motivation for physical activity. Technologies such as activity monitoring devices provide an opportunity to enhance delivery of motivational techniques. This paper describes the PACERS study protocol, which aims to assess the feasibility and acceptability of implementing an activity monitor within the existing Welsh National Exercise Referral Scheme (NERS) and proposed evaluation methodology for a full-scale randomised controlled trial. The PACERS study consists of a pilot randomised controlled trial, process evaluation and exploratory economic analyses. Participants will be recruited from the generic pathway of the Welsh NERS and will be randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual practice. Usual practice is a 16-week structured exercise programme; the intervention consists of an accelerometry-based activity monitor (MyWellnessKey) and an associated web platform (MyWellnessCloud). The primary outcomes are predefined progression criteria assessing the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and feasibility of the proposed evaluation methodology. Postal questionnaires will be completed at baseline (time 0: T0), 16 weeks after T0 (T1) and 12 months after T0 (T2). Routinely collected data will also be accessed at the same time points. A sub-sample of intervention participants and exercise referral staff will be interviewed following initiation of intervention delivery and at the end of the study. The PACERS study seeks to assess the feasibility of adding a novel motivational component to an existing

  7. Nurse-led immunotreatment DEcision Coaching In people with Multiple Sclerosis (DECIMS) - Feasibility testing, pilot randomised controlled trial and mixed methods process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, A C; Köpke, S; Backhus, I; Kasper, J; Anger, K; Untiedt, B; Alegiani, A; Kleiter, I; Mühlhauser, I; Heesen, C

    2018-02-01

    Treatment decision-making is complex for people with multiple sclerosis. Profound information on available options is virtually not possible in regular neurologist encounters. The "nurse decision coach model" was developed to redistribute health professionals' tasks in supporting immunotreatment decision-making following the principles of informed shared decision-making. To test the feasibility of a decision coaching programme and recruitment strategies to inform the main trial. Feasibility testing and parallel pilot randomised controlled trial, accompanied by a mixed methods process evaluation. Two German multiple sclerosis university centres. People with suspected or relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis facing immunotreatment decisions on first line drugs were recruited. Randomisation to the intervention (n = 38) or control group (n = 35) was performed on a daily basis. Quantitative and qualitative process data were collected from people with multiple sclerosis, nurses and physicians. We report on the development and piloting of the decision coaching programme. It comprises a training course for multiple sclerosis nurses and the coaching intervention. The intervention consists of up to three structured nurse-led decision coaching sessions, access to an evidence-based online information platform (DECIMS-Wiki) and a final physician consultation. After feasibility testing, a pilot randomised controlled trial was performed. People with multiple sclerosis were randomised to the intervention or control group. The latter had also access to the DECIMS-Wiki, but received otherwise care as usual. Nurses were not blinded to group assignment, while people with multiple sclerosis and physicians were. The primary outcome was 'informed choice' after six months including the sub-dimensions' risk knowledge (after 14 days), attitude concerning immunotreatment (after physician consultation), and treatment uptake (after six months). Quantitative process evaluation data

  8. Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project's maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes

  9. Reach Out Churches: A Community-Based Participatory Research Pilot Trial to Assess the Feasibility of a Mobile Health Technology Intervention to Reduce Blood Pressure Among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Cowdery, Joan; Dome, Mackenzie; Bailey, Sarah; Baek, Jonggyu; Byrd, James Brian; Hartley, Sarah E; Valley, Staci C; Saberi, Sima; Wheeler, Natalie C; McDermott, Mollie; Hughes, Rebecca; Shanmugasundaram, Krithika; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Brown, Devin L

    2017-06-01

    Innovative strategies are needed to reduce the hypertension epidemic among African Americans. Reach Out was a faith-collaborative, mobile health, randomized, pilot intervention trial of four mobile health components to reduce high blood pressure (BP) compared to usual care. It was designed and tested within a community-based participatory research framework among African Americans recruited and randomized from churches in Flint, Michigan. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of the Reach Out processes. Feasibility was assessed by willingness to consent (acceptance of randomization), proportion of weeks participants texted their BP readings (intervention use), number lost to follow-up (retention), and responses to postintervention surveys and focus groups (acceptance of intervention). Of the 425 church members who underwent BP screening, 94 enrolled in the study and 73 (78%) completed the 6-month outcome assessment. Median age was 58 years, and 79% were women. Participants responded with their BPs on an average of 13.7 (SD = 10.7) weeks out of 26 weeks that the BP prompts were sent. All participants reported satisfaction with the intervention. Reach Out, a faith-collaborative, mobile health intervention was feasible. Further study of the efficacy of the intervention and additional mobile health strategies should be considered.

  10. A feasibility dosimetric study on prostate cancer. Are we ready for a multicenter clinical trial on SBRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, Carmelo; Bonanno, Elisa [Humanitas C.C.O., Catania (Italy); Villaggi, Elena [AUSL, Piacenza (Italy); Maggi, Giulia; Mancosu, Pietro [IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Research Center, Milan (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria Firenze (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy). Lab. of Medical Physics and Expert Systems; Borzi, Giusi R. [REM Radioterapia, Catania (Italy); Carbonini, Claudia [A.O. Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Consorti, Rita [ACO S. Filippo Neri, Rome (Italy); Fedele, David [Casa di Cura Privata San Rossore s.r.l., Pisa (Italy); Fiandra, Christian [Torino Univ. (Italy). Radiation Oncology Unit; Ielo, Isidora [A.O.U. Policlinico G. Martino, Messina (Italy); Malatesta, Tiziana [' ' S. Giovanni Calibita' ' Fatebenefratelli, Rome (Italy); Malisan, Maria Rosa [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Udine (Italy); Martinotti, Anna [Centro Diagnostico Italiano, Milan (Italy); Moretti, Renzo [Az. Ospedaliera Spedali Civili di Brescia (Italy); Nardiello, Barbara [UPMC San Pietro FBF, Rome (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina; Clemente, Stefania [IRCCS CROB Rieonero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    The Italian Association of Medical Physics (AIFM) started a working group dedicated to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment. In this work, we performed a multicenter planning study on patients who were candidates for SBRT in the treatment of prostate cancer with the aim of evaluating the dosimetric consistency among the different hospitals. Fourteen centers were provided the contours of 5 patients. Plans were performed following the dose prescription and constraints for organs at risk (OARs) of a reference paper. The dose prescription was 35 Gy in five fractions for the planning target volume (PTV). Different techniques were used (3D-CRT, fixed-Field IMRT, VMAT, CyberKnife). Plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Furthermore, the median DVH was calculated and one patient was re-planned. A total of 70 plans were compared. The maximum dose to the body was 107.9 ± 4.5 % (range 101.5-116.3 %). Dose at 98 % (D{sub 98} {sub %}) and mean dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) were 102.0 ± 0.9 % (global range 101.1-102.9 %) and 105.1 ± 0.6 % (range 98.6-124.6 %). Similar trends were found for D{sub 95} {sub %} and mean dose to the PTV. Important differences were found in terms of the homogeneity index. Doses to OARs were heterogeneous. The subgroups with the same treatment planning system showed differences comparable to the differences of the whole group. In the re-optimized plans, DVH differences among institutes were reduced and OAR sparing improved. Important dosimetric differences with possible clinical implications, in particular related to OARs, were found. Replanning allowed a reduction in the OAR dose and decreased standard deviations. Multicenter clinical trials on SBRT should require a preplanning study to standardize the optimization procedure. (orig.) [German] Der italienische Verband der Medizinphysiker (AIFM) hat eine Arbeitsgruppe gegruendet, die sich mit der Koerperstammstereotaxie (SBRT) befasst. Im Rahmen

  11. Study protocol for the 'HelpMeDoIt!' randomised controlled feasibility trial: an app, web and social support-based weight loss intervention for adults with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynsay; Pugmire, Juliana; Moore, Laurence; Kelson, Mark; McConnachie, Alex; McIntosh, Emma; Morgan-Trimmer, Sarah; Murphy, Simon; Hughes, Kathryn; Coulman, Elinor; Utkina-Macaskill, Olga; Simpson, Sharon Anne

    2017-10-25

    HelpMeDoIt! will test the feasibility of an innovative weight loss intervention using a smartphone app and website. Goal setting, self-monitoring and social support are three key facilitators of behaviour change. HelpMeDoIt! incorporates these features and encourages participants to invite 'helpers' from their social circle to help them achieve their goal(s). To test the feasibility of the intervention in supporting adults with obesity to achieve weight loss goals. 12-month feasibility randomised controlled trial and accompanying process evaluation. Participants (n=120) will be adults interested in losing weight, body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m 2 and smartphone users. The intervention group will use the app/website for 12 months. Participants will nominate one or more helpers to support them. Helpers have access to the app/website. The control group will receive a leaflet on healthy lifestyle and will have access to HelpMeDoIt! after follow-up. The key outcome of the study is whether prespecified progression criteria have been met in order to progress to a larger randomised controlled effectiveness trial. Data will be collected at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Outcomes focus on exploring the feasibility of delivering the intervention and include: (i) assessing three primary outcomes (BMI, physical activity and diet); (ii) secondary outcomes of waist/hip circumference, health-related quality of life, social support, self-efficacy, motivation and mental health; (iii) recruitment and retention; (iv) National Health Service (NHS) resource use and participant borne costs; (v) usability and acceptability of the app/website; and (vi) qualitative interviews with up to 50 participants and 20 helpers on their experiences of the intervention. Statistical analyses will focus on feasibility outcomes and provide initial estimates of intervention effects. Thematic analysis of qualitative interviews will assess implementation, acceptability, mechanisms of effect and contextual

  12. Computer modeling with randomized-controlled trial data informs the development of person-centered aged care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Lynn; Vickland, Victor; Stein-Parbury, Jane; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Kenny, Patricia; Brodaty, Henry

    2015-10-01

    To answer questions on the essential components (services, operations and resources) of a person-centered aged care home (iHome) using computer simulation. iHome was developed with AnyLogic software using extant study data obtained from 60 Australian aged care homes, 900+ clients and 700+ aged care staff. Bayesian analysis of simulated trial data will determine the influence of different iHome characteristics on care service quality and client outcomes. Interim results: A person-centered aged care home (socio-cultural context) and care/lifestyle services (interactional environment) can produce positive outcomes for aged care clients (subjective experiences) in the simulated environment. Further testing will define essential characteristics of a person-centered care home.

  13. Feasibility randomised controlled trial of Recovery-focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Elizabeth; Lobban, Fiona; Sutton, Chris; Depp, Colin; Johnson, Sheri; Laidlaw, Ken; Jones, Steven H

    2016-03-03

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and chronic mental health problem that persists into older adulthood. The number of people living with this condition is set to rise as the UK experiences a rapid ageing of its population. To date, there has been very little research or service development with respect to psychological therapies for this group of people. A parallel two-arm randomised controlled trial comparing a 14-session, 6-month Recovery-focused Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA) plus treatment as usual (TAU) versus TAU alone. Participants will be recruited in the North-West of England via primary and secondary mental health services and through self-referral. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of RfCBT-OA; therefore, a formal power calculation is not appropriate. It has been estimated that randomising 25 participants per group will be sufficient to be able to reliably determine the primary feasibility outcomes (eg, recruitment and retention rates), in line with recommendations for sample sizes for feasibility/pilot trials. Participants in both arms will complete assessments at baseline and then every 3 months, over the 12-month follow-up period. We will gain an estimate of the likely effect size of RfCBT-OA on a range of clinical outcomes and estimate parameters needed to determine the appropriate sample size for a definitive, larger trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of RfCBT-OA. Data analysis is discussed further in the Analysis section in the main paper. This protocol was approved by the UK National Health Service (NHS) Ethics Committee process (REC ref: 15/NW/0330). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and local, participating NHS trusts. ISRCTN13875321; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  14. Feasibility of the Enhancing Participation In the Community by improving Wheelchair Skills (EPIC Wheels) program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, Edward M; Miller, William C; Eng, Janice J; Mitchell, Ian M; Woodgate, Roberta L; Goldsmith, Charles H

    2013-10-24

    Many older adults rely on a manual wheelchair for mobility but typically receive little, if any, training on how to use their wheelchair effectively and independently. Standardized skill training is an effective intervention, but limited access to clinician trainers is a substantive barrier. Enhancing Participation in the Community by Improving Wheelchair Skills (EPIC Wheels) is a 1-month monitored home training program for improving mobility skills in older novice manual wheelchair users, integrating principles from andragogy and social cognitive theory. The purpose of this study is to determine whether feasibility indicators and primary clinical outcome measures of the EPIC Wheels program are sufficiently robust to justify conducting a subsequent multi-site randomized controlled trial. A 2 × 2 factorial randomized controlled trial at two sites will compare improvement in wheelchair mobility skills between an EPIC Wheels treatment group and a computer-game control group, with additional wheelchair use introduced as a second factor. A total of 40 community-dwelling manual wheelchair users at least 55 years old and living in two Canadian metropolitan cities (n = 20 × 2) will be recruited. Feasibility indicators related to study process, resources, management, and treatment issues will be collected during data collection and at the end of the study period, and evaluated against proposed criteria. Clinical outcome measures will be collected at baseline (pre-randomization) and post-intervention. The primary clinical outcome measure is wheelchair skill capacity, as determined by the Wheelchair Skills Test, version 4.1. Secondary clinical outcome measures include wheelchair skill safety, satisfaction with performance, wheelchair confidence, life-space mobility, divided-attention, and health-related quality of life. The EPIC Wheels training program offers several innovative features. The convenient, portable, economical, and adaptable tablet-based, home program model

  15. Integrated psychological therapy for people with bipolar disorder and co-morbid alcohol use: A feasibility and acceptability randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Jones

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Co-morbid substance misuse, particularly alcohol, is common in bipolar disorder (BD and associated with worse treatment outcomes. Research into psychological interventions for substance misuse in BD is at an early stage and no studies have specifically targeted problematic alcohol use. This paper describes the context and protocol for a feasibility and acceptability randomised controlled trial (RCT evaluating a novel intervention combining motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural therapy (MI-CBT for participants with BD and problematic alcohol use, developed in collaboration with people with lived experience of both issues. Methods and design: An RCT will assess the feasibility and acceptability of MI-CBT in addition to treatment as usual (TAU compared with TAU alone. Participants will be recruited from across the North West of England through NHS services and self-referral. The primary outcomes will be the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention assessed by recruitment to target, adherence to intervention, retention rate at follow-up, absence of adverse events and qualitative analysis of participants' reported experiences of intervention. The effect size of the impact of the intervention on alcohol use and mood outcomes will also be estimated. In addition, we will explore a number of potential process variables in therapy. Discussion: This is the first RCT evaluating MI-CBT for BD and problematic alcohol use. Given the prevalence and impact of alcohol problems in BD this novel integrated intervention may have potential to offer important improvements in clinical and functional outcomes. Keywords: Bipolar, Alcohol, Substance, Motivational interviewing, Trial registration number: ISRCTN14774583

  16. Randomized feasibility trial to improve hydroxyurea adherence in youth ages 10-18 years through community health workers: The HABIT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nancy S; Manwani, Deepa; Matos, Sergio; Hicks, April; Soto, Luisa; Castillo, Yina; Ireland, Karen; Stennett, Yvonne; Findley, Sally; Jia, Haomiao; Smaldone, Arlene

    2017-12-01

    The main therapeutic intervention for sickle cell disease (SCD) is hydroxyurea (HU). The effect of HU is largely through dose-dependent induction of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). Poor HU adherence is common among adolescents. Our 6-month, two-site pilot intervention trial, "HABIT," was led by culturally aligned community health workers (CHWs). CHWs performed support primarily through home visits, augmented by tailored text message reminders. Dyads of youth with SCD ages 10-18 years and a parent were enrolled. A customized HbF biomarker, the percentage decrease from each patients' highest historical HU-induced HbF, "Personal best," was used to qualify for enrollment and assess HU adherence. Two primary outcomes were as follows: (1) intervention feasibility and acceptability and (2) HU adherence measured in three ways: monthly percentage improvement toward HbF Personal best, proportion of days covered (PDC) by HU, and self-report. Twenty-eight dyads were enrolled, of which 89% were retained. Feasibility and acceptability were excellent. Controlling for group assignment and month of intervention, the intervention group improved percentage decrease from Personal best by 2.3% per month during months 0-4 (P = 0.30), with similar improvement in adherence demonstrated using pharmacy records. Self-reported adherence did not correlate. Dyads viewed CHWs as supportive for learning about SCD and HU, living with SCD and making progress in coordinated self-management responsibility to support a daily HU habit. Most parents and youth appreciated text message HU reminders. The HABIT pilot intervention demonstrated feasibility and acceptability with promising effect toward improved medication adherence. Testing in a larger multisite intervention trial is warranted. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Storytelling in the Early Bereavement Period to Reduce Emotional Distress Among Surrogates Involved in a Decision to Limit Life Support in the ICU: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Amber E; Schenker, Yael; Tiver, Greer; Dew, Mary Amanda; Arnold, Robert M; Nunez, Eduardo R; Reynolds, Charles F

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate decision makers involved in decisions to limit life support for an incapacitated patient in the ICU have high rates of adverse emotional health outcomes distinct from normal processes of grief and bereavement. Narrative self-disclosure (storytelling) reduces emotional distress after other traumatic experiences. We sought to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of storytelling among bereaved surrogates involved in a decision to limit life support in the ICU. Pilot single-blind trial. Five ICUs across three hospitals within a single health system between June 2013 and November 2014. Bereaved surrogates of ICU patients. Storytelling and control conditions involved printed bereavement materials and follow-up assessments. Storytelling involved a single 1- to 2-hour home or telephone visit by a trained interventionist who elicited the surrogate's story. The primary outcomes were feasibility (rates of enrollment, intervention receipt, 3- and 6-mo follow-up), acceptability (closed and open-ended end-of-study feedback at 6 mo), and tolerability (acute mental health services referral). Of 53 eligible surrogates, 32 (60%) consented to treatment allocation. Surrogates' mean age was 55.5 (SD, 11.8), and they were making decisions for their parent (47%), spouse (28%), sibling (13%), child (3%), or other relation (8%). We allocated 14 to control and 18 to storytelling, 17 of 18 (94%) received storytelling, 14 of 14 (100%) and 13 of 14 (94%) control subjects and 16 of 18 (89%) and 17 of 18 (94%) storytelling subjects completed their 3- and 6-month telephone assessments. At 6 months, nine of 13 control participants (69%) and 16 of 17 storytelling subjects (94%) reported feeling "better" or "much better," and none felt "much worse." One control subject (8%) and one storytelling subject (6%) said that the study was burdensome, and one control subject (8%) wished they had not participated. No subjects required acute mental health services referral. A

  18. Clinical feasibility of the Nintendo Wii™ for balance training post-stroke: a phase II randomized controlled trial in an inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kelly J; Clark, Ross A; McGinley, Jennifer L; Martin, Clarissa L; Miller, Kimberly J

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility and potential efficacy of the Nintendo Wii™ for balance rehabilitation after stroke. Phase II, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation facility. Thirty adults (mean age 63.6 (14.7) years) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation who were less than three months post-stroke and able to stand unsupported. Participants were allocated to a Balance Group, using the 'Wii Fit Plus' in standing, or Upper Limb Group, using the 'Wii Sports/Sports Resort' in sitting. Both groups undertook three 45 minute sessions per week over two to four weeks in addition to standard care. The primary focus was feasibility, addressed by recruitment, retention, adherence, acceptability and safety. Efficacy was evaluated by balance, mobility and upper limb outcomes. Twenty-one percent of individuals screened were recruited and 86% (n = 30) of eligible people agreed to participate. Study retention and session adherence was 90% and > 99%, respectively, at two weeks; dropping to 70% and 87% at four weeks due to early discharge. All participants reported enjoying the sessions and most felt they were beneficial. No major adverse events occurred. Wii use by the Balance Group was associated with trends for improved balance, with significantly greater improvement in outcomes including the Step Test and Wii Balance Board-derived centre of pressure scores. The Upper Limb Group had larger, non-significant changes in arm function. A Wii-based approach appears feasible and promising for post-stroke balance rehabilitation. A larger randomized controlled trial is recommended to further investigate efficacy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Feasibility and potential efficacy of the family-centered Prevent-Teach-Reinforce model with families of children with developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathleen M; Blair, Kwang-Sun Cho

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility and potential efficacy of the family-centered Prevent-Teach-Reinforce (PTR) model with three families of young children with an autism spectrum disorder or language delay with sensory processing problems. Particularly, the study assessed the family adherence to the PTR intervention, changes in child behavior, family use of the Individualized Behavior Rating Scale Tool (IBRST), procedural integrity, and social validity. A multiple-baseline design across families was used to examine the functional relation between parent-implemented PTR intervention and changes in child behavior. Results indicated that the family-centered PTR process was successful in promoting parents to design and implement the PTR intervention plans with fidelity, and the parents' implemented intervention plans were effective in increasing replacement behavior and decreasing problem behavior across children. The results also indicated that the parents successfully used the IBRST to monitor their child's progress and were highly satisfied with the PTR intervention process and outcomes for their children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility and acceptability of conducting HIV vaccine trials in adolescents in South Africa: Going beyond willingness to participate towards implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Wallace

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. HIV/AIDS remains a leading cause of death in adolescents (aged 15 - 25 years, and in sub-Saharan Africa HIV-related deaths continue to rise in this age group despite a decline in both adult and paediatric populations. This is attributable in part to high adolescent infection rates and supports the urgent need for more efficacious prevention strategies. In particular, an even partially effective HIV vaccine, given prior to sexual debut, is predicted to significantly curb adolescent infection rates. While adolescents have indicated willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials, there are concerns around safety, uptake, adherence, and ethical and logistic issues.Objectives. To initiate a national, multisite project with the aim of identifying obstacles to conducting adolescent HIV vaccine trials in South Africa (SA.Method. A simulated HIV vaccine trial was conducted in adolescents aged 12 - 17 years across five SA research sites, using the already licensed Merck human papillomavirus vaccine Gardasil as a proxy for an HIV vaccine. Adolescents were recruited at community venues and, following a vaccine discussion group, invited to participate in the trial. Consent for trial enrolment was obtained from a parent or legal guardian, and participants aged 16 - 17 years were eligible only if sexually active. Typical vaccine trial procedures were applied during the five study visits, including the administration of vaccination injections at study visits 2, 3 and 4.Results. The median age of participants was 14 years (interquartile range 13 - 15, with 81% between the ages of 12 and 15 years at enrolment. Overall, 98% of screened participants opted to receive the vaccine, 588 participants enrolled, and 524 (89% attended the final visit.Conclusions. This trial showed that adolescents can be recruited, enrolled and retained in clinical prevention trials with parental support. While promising, these results were tempered by the coupling of sexual

  1. The Falls In Care Home study: a feasibility randomized controlled trial of the use of a risk assessment and decision support tool to prevent falls in care homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gemma M; Armstrong, Sarah; Gordon, Adam L; Gladman, John; Robertson, Kate; Ward, Marie; Conroy, Simon; Arnold, Gail; Darby, Janet; Frowd, Nadia; Williams, Wynne; Knowles, Sue; Logan, Pip A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of implementing and evaluating the Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention. Design: Two-centre, cluster feasibility randomized controlled trial and process evaluation. Setting: Purposive sample of six diverse old age/learning disability, long stay care homes in Nottinghamshire, UK. Subjects: Residents aged over 50 years, who had fallen at least once in the past year, not bed-bound, hoist-dependent or terminally ill. Interventions: Intervention homes (n = 3) received Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention training and support. Control homes (n = 3) received usual care. Outcomes: Recruitment, attrition, baseline and six-month outcome completion, contamination and intervention fidelity, compliance, tolerability, acceptance and impact. Results: A total of 81 of 145 (56%) care homes expressed participatory interest. Six of 22 letter respondent homes (27%) participated. The expected resident recruitment target was achieved by 76% (52/68). Ten (19%) residents did not complete follow-up (seven died, three moved). In intervention homes 36/114 (32%) staff attended training. Two of three (75%) care homes received protocol compliant training. Staff valued the training, but advised greater management involvement to improve intervention implementation. Fall risks were assessed, actioned and recorded in care records. Of 115 recorded falls, 533/570 (93%) of details were complete. Six-month resident fall rates were 1.9 and 4.0 per year for intervention and control homes, respectively. Conclusions: The Guide to Action Care Home is implementable under trial conditions. Recruitment and follow-up rates indicate that a definitive trial can be completed. Falls (primary outcome) can be ascertained reliably from care records. PMID:26385358

  2. The feasibility of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to compare usual care with usual care plus individualised homeopathy, in children requiring secondary care for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E A; Shaw, A; Nichol, J; Hollinghurst, S; Henderson, A J; Thompson, T; Sharp, D

    2011-07-01

    To test the feasibility of a pragmatic trial design with economic evaluation and nested qualitative study, comparing usual care (UC) with UC plus individualised homeopathy, in children requiring secondary care for asthma. This included recruitment and retention, acceptability of outcome measures patients' and health professionals' views and experiences and a power calculation for a definitive trial. In a pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial (RCT) design, children on step 2 or above of the British Thoracic Society Asthma Guidelines (BTG) were randomly allocated to UC or UC plus a five visit package of homeopathic care (HC). Outcome measures included the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire, Quality of Life Questionnaire and a resource use questionnaire. Qualitative interviews were used to gain families' and health professionals' views and experiences. 226 children were identified from hospital clinics and related patient databases. 67 showed an interest in participating, 39 children were randomised, 18 to HC and 21 to UC. Evidence in favour of adjunctive homeopathic treatment was lacking. Economic evaluation suggests that the cost of additional consultations was not offset by the reduced cost of homeopathic remedies and the lower use of primary care by children in the homeopathic group. Qualitative data gave insights into the differing perspectives of families and health care professionals within the research process. A future study using this design is not feasible, further investigation of a potential role for homeopathy in asthma management might be better conducted in primary care with children with less severe asthma. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Feasibility, safety, and efficacy of aerobic training in pretreated patients with metastatic breast cancer: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica M; Iyengar, Neil M; Nilsen, Tormod S; Michalski, Meghan; Thomas, Samantha M; Herndon, James; Sasso, John; Yu, Anthony; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Dang, Chau T; Comen, Elizabeth A; Dickler, Maura N; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Jones, Lee W

    2018-04-06

    The investigation of exercise training in metastatic breast cancer has received minimal attention. This study determined the feasibility and safety of aerobic training in metastatic breast cancer. Sixty-five women (age, 21-80 years) with metastatic (stage IV) breast cancer (57% were receiving chemotherapy, and >40% had ≥ 2 lines of prior therapy) were allocated to an aerobic training group (n = 33) or a stretching group (n = 32). Aerobic training consisted of 36 supervised treadmill walking sessions delivered thrice weekly between 55% and 80% of peak oxygen consumption (VO 2peak ) for 12 consecutive weeks. Stretching was matched to aerobic training with respect to location, frequency, duration, and intervention length. The primary endpoint was aerobic training feasibility, which was a priori defined as the lost to follow-up (LTF) rate (aerobic training was LTF, whereas the mean attendance rate was 63% ± 30%. The rates of permanent discontinuation and dose modification were 27% and 49%, respectively. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated improvements in PROs, which favored the attention control group (P values > .05). Per protocol analyses indicated that 14 of 33 patients (42%) receiving aerobic training had acceptable tolerability (relative dose intensity ≥ 70%), and this led to improvements in VO 2peak and functional capacity (P values Aerobic training at the dose and schedule tested is safe but not feasible for a significant proportion of patients with metastatic breast cancer. The acceptable feasibility and promising benefit for select patients warrant further evaluation in a dose-finding phase 1/2 study. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  4. The "Interval Walking in Colorectal Cancer" (I-WALK-CRC) study: Design, methods and recruitment results of a randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banck-Petersen, Anna; Olsen, Cecilie K; Djurhuus, Sissal S; Herrstedt, Anita; Thorsen-Streit, Sarah; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Østerlind, Kell; Osterkamp, Jens; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Vistisen, Kirsten; Mosgaard, Camilla S; Pedersen, Bente K; Højman, Pernille; Christensen, Jesper F

    2018-03-01

    Low physical activity level is associated with poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). To increase physical activity, technology-based platforms are emerging and provide intriguing opportunities to prescribe and monitor active lifestyle interventions. The "Interval Walking in Colorectal Cancer"(I-WALK-CRC) study explores the feasibility and efficacy a home-based interval-walking intervention delivered by a smart-phone application in order to improve cardio-metabolic health profile among CRC survivors. The aim of the present report is to describe the design, methods and recruitment results of the I-WALK-CRC study.Methods/Results: The I-WALK-CRC study is a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a home-based interval walking intervention compared to a waiting-list control group for physiological and patient-reported outcomes. Patients who had completed surgery for local stage disease and patients who had completed surgery and any adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced stage disease were eligible for inclusion. Between October 1st , 2015, and February 1st , 2017, 136 inquiries were recorded; 83 patients were eligible for enrollment, and 42 patients accepted participation. Age and employment status were associated with participation, as participants were significantly younger (60.5 vs 70.8 years, P CRC survivors was feasible but we aim to better the recruitment rate in future studies. Further, the study clearly favored younger participants. The I-WALK-CRC study will provide important information regarding feasibility and efficacy of a home-based walking exercise program in CRC survivors.

  5. Chiropractic treatment including instrument-assisted manipulation for non-specific dizziness and neck pain in community-dwelling older people: a feasibility randomised sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Julie C; French, Simon D; Hartvigsen, Jan; Azari, Michael F

    2018-01-01

    Dizziness in older people is a risk factor for falls. Neck pain is associated with dizziness and responds favourably to neck manipulation. However, it is unknown if chiropractic intervention including instrument-assisted manipulation of the neck in older people with neck pain can also improve dizziness. This parallel two-arm pilot trial was conducted in Melbourne, Australia over nine months (October 2015 to June 2016). Participants aged 65-85 years, with self-reported chronic neck pain and dizziness, were recruited from the general public through advertisements in local community newspapers and via Facebook. Participants were randomised using a permuted block method to one of two groups: 1) Activator II™-instrument-assisted cervical and thoracic spine manipulation plus a combination of: light massage; mobilisation; range of motion exercises; and home advice about the application of heat, or 2) Sham-Activator II™-instrument-assisted manipulation (set to zero impulse) plus gentle touch of cervical and thoracic spinal regions. Participants were blinded to group allocation. The interventions were delivered weekly for four weeks. Assessments were conducted one week pre- and post-intervention. Clinical outcomes were assessed blindly and included: dizziness (dizziness handicap inventory [DHI]); neck pain (neck disability index [NDI]); self-reported concerns of falling; mood; physical function; and treatment satisfaction. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment rates, compliance with intervention and outcome assessment, study location, success of blinding, costs and harms. Out of 162 enquiries, 24 participants were screened as eligible and randomised to either the chiropractic ( n  = 13) or sham ( n  = 11) intervention group. Compliance was satisfactory with only two participants lost to follow up; thus, post-intervention data for 12 chiropractic intervention and 10 sham intervention participants were analysed. Blinding was similar between groups. Mild harms

  6. Effects and feasibility of a standardised orientation and mobility training in using an identification cane for older adults with low vision: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Velde J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orientation and mobility training (O&M-training in using an identification cane, also called symbol cane, is provided to people with low vision to facilitate independent participation in the community. In The Netherlands this training is mainly practice-based because a standardised and validly evaluated O&M-training in using the identification cane is lacking. Recently a standardised O&M-training in using the identification cane was developed. This training consists of two face-to-face sessions and one telephone session during which, in addition to usual care, the client's needs regarding mobility are prioritised, and cognitive restructuring techniques, action planning and contracting are applied to facilitate the use of the cane. This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate this standardised O&M-training in using the identification cane in older adults with low vision. Methods/design A parallel group randomised controlled trial was designed to compare the standardised O&M-training with usual care, i.e. the O&M-training commonly provided by the mobility trainer. Community-dwelling older people who ask for support at a rehabilitation centre for people with visual impairment and who are likely to receive an O&M-training in using the identification cane are included in the trial (N = 190. The primary outcomes of the effect evaluation are ADL self care and visual functioning with respect to distance activities and mobility. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, feelings of anxiety, symptoms of depression, fear of falling, and falls history. Data for the effect evaluation are collected by means of telephone interviews at baseline, and at 5 and 17 weeks after the start of the O&M-training. In addition to an effect evaluation, a process evaluation to study the feasibility of the O&M-training is carried out. Discussion The screening procedure for eligible participants started in November

  7. Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) in the Netherlands; a naturalistic pilot study to explore the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Roosenschoon (Bert); J. van Weeghel (Jaap); Bogaards, M. (Moniek); M. Deen (Mathijs); C.L. Mulder (Niels)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) is a curriculum-based program for people with severe and persistent mental illness. To date, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been published on it. As these produced mixed results, we conducted a pilot study to test the

  8. Do soft skills predict surgical performance?: a single-center randomized controlled trial evaluating predictors of skill acquisition in virtual reality laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschuw, K; Schlosser, K; Kupietz, E; Slater, E P; Weyers, P; Hassan, I

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) training in minimal invasive surgery (MIS) is feasible in surgical residency and beneficial for the performance of MIS by surgical trainees. Research on stress-coping of surgical trainees indicates the additional impact of soft skills on VR performance in the surgical curriculum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of structured VR training and soft skills on VR performance of trainees. The study was designed as a single-center randomized controlled trial. Fifty first-year surgical residents with limited experience in MIS ("camera navigation" in laparoscopic cholecystectomy only) were randomized for either 3 months of VR training or no training. Basic VR performance and defined soft skills (self-efficacy, stress-coping, and motivation) were assessed prior to randomization using basic modules of the VR simulator LapSim(®) and standardized psychological questionnaires. Three months after randomization VR performance was reassessed. Outcome measurement was based on the results derived from the most complex of the basic VR modules ("diathermy cutting") as the primary end point. A correlation analysis of the VR end-point performance and the psychological scores was done in both groups. Structured VR training enhanced VR performance of surgical trainees. An additional correlation to high motivational states (P 0.05). Low self-efficacy and negative stress-coping strategies seem to predict poor VR performance. However, structured training along with high motivational states is likely to balance out this impairment.

  9. Incidence, feasibility and outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with a self-expanding prosthesis. Results from a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allali, Abdelhakim; El-Mawardy, Mohamed; Schwarz, Bettina; Sato, Takao; Geist, Volker; Toelg, Ralph; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can become technically challenging after implantation of the self-expanding Medtronic CoreValve (MCV) device, which completely covers the aortic root. The aim of this study was to report on the incidence, feasibility and outcome of PCI after TAVI with the MCV device. Between 2007 and 2014, all patients subjected to PCI after MCV implantation in a single-center institutional TAVI database were retrospectively identified. Clinical, angiographic and procedural characteristics were reviewed and analyzed. We identified a total of 17 patients (5.7%) treated with 24 PCI procedures for 29 lesions at a median of 17.7months (range 1-72) after MCV implantation. The mean age was 79.7±6.8years and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 30.3%±18.9%. Nine procedures were performed for patients with acute coronary syndrome. 89.6% of the treated lesions were of type B2/C and 79.3% were de novo ones. A median of one guiding catheter was necessary to intubate the target coronary ostium (range 1-10) and 95% of the lesions on the left coronary artery were treated through a Judkins catheter. In one primary PCI for STEMI the intubation of the right coronary ostium was not successful. Final procedural success was obtained in 95.8%, and peri-procedural death occurred in one patient. The need for PCI after MCV is not uncommon and is mostly related to coronary artery disease progression. PCI after MCV is usually feasible and safe, but coronary intubation in an emergency setting can be challenging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A study protocol of a three-group randomized feasibility trial of an online yoga intervention for mothers after stillbirth (The Mindful Health Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Jennifer; Matthews, Jeni; Leiferman, Jenn; Cacciatore, Joanne; Gold, Katherine J

    2018-01-01

    In the USA, stillbirth (in utero fetal death ≥20 weeks gestation) is a major public health issue. Women who experience stillbirth, compared to women with live birth, have a nearly sevenfold increased risk of a positive screen for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a fourfold increased risk of depressive symptoms. Because the majority of women who have experienced the death of their baby become pregnant within 12-18 months and the lack of intervention studies conducted within this population, novel approaches targeting physical and mental health, specific to the needs of this population, are critical. Evidence suggests that yoga is efficacious, safe, acceptable, and cost-effective for improving mental health in a variety of populations, including pregnant and postpartum women. To date, there are no known studies examining online-streaming yoga as a strategy to help mothers cope with PTSD symptoms after stillbirth. The present study is a two-phase randomized controlled trial. Phase 1 will involve (1) an iterative design process to develop the online yoga prescription for phase 2 and (2) qualitative interviews to identify cultural barriers to recruitment in non-Caucasian women (i.e., predominately Hispanic and/or African American) who have experienced stillbirth ( N  = 5). Phase 2 is a three-group randomized feasibility trial with assessments at baseline, and at 12 and 20 weeks post-intervention. Ninety women who have experienced a stillbirth within 6 weeks to 24 months will be randomized into one of the following three arms for 12 weeks: (1) intervention low dose (LD) = 60 min/week online-streaming yoga ( n  = 30), (2) intervention moderate dose (MD) = 150 min/week online-streaming yoga ( n  = 30), or (3) stretch and tone control (STC) group = 60 min/week of stretching/toning exercises ( n  = 30). This study will explore the feasibility and acceptability of a 12-week, home-based, online-streamed yoga intervention, with varying doses

  11. A pilot randomized controlled trial of the feasibility of a self-directed coping skills intervention for couples facing prostate cancer: Rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Sylvie D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it is known both patients’ and partners’ reactions to a prostate cancer diagnosis include fear, uncertainty, anxiety and depression with patients’ partners’ reactions mutually determining how they cope with and adjust to the illness, few psychosocial interventions target couples. Those that are available tend to be led by highly trained professionals, limiting their accessibility and long-term sustainability. In addition, it is recognised that patients who might benefit from conventional face-to-face psychosocial interventions do not access these, either by preference or because of geographical or mobility barriers. Self-directed interventions can overcome some of these limitations and have been shown to contribute to patient well-being. This study will examine the feasibility of a self-directed, coping skills intervention for couples affected by cancer, called Coping-Together, and begin to explore its potential impact on couples’ illness adjustment. The pilot version of Coping-Together includes a series of four booklets, a DVD, and a relaxation audio CD. Methods/design In this double-blind, two-group, parallel, randomized controlled trial, 70 couples will be recruited within 4 months of a prostate cancer diagnosis through urology private practices and randomized to: 1 Coping-Together or 2 a minimal ethical care condition. Minimal ethical care condition couples will be mailed information booklets available at the Cancer Council New South Wales and a brochure for the Cancer Council Helpline. The primary outcome (anxiety and additional secondary outcomes (distress, depression, dyadic adjustment, quality of life, illness or caregiving appraisal, self-efficacy, and dyadic and individual coping will be assessed at baseline (before receiving study material and 2 months post-baseline. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis will be conducted. Discussion As partners’ distress rates exceed not only population

  12. Para-aortic lymphadenectomy in advanced stage cervical cancer, a protocol for comparing safety, feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of surgical staging versus PET-CT; PALDISC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, Casper; Abbink, Karin; Rovers, Maroeska M; Bekkers, Ruud L M; Zusterzeel, Petra L M

    2018-01-01

    Currently, a PET-CT is used to assess the need for extended field radiotherapy of para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) in International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2, IIA2-IVA (locally advanced stage) cervical cancer. A small study established a sensitivity and specificity estimate for PALN metastases of 50% (95% CI; 7-93%) and 83% (95% CI; 52-98%), respectively. Surgical staging of PALN may lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy. However, surgical staging of para-aortic lymph nodes in locally advanced stage cervical cancer is not common practice. Therefore, a phase 2 randomised controlled trial is needed to assess its safety and feasibility. In addition to standard imaging (MRI or CT scan) with PET-CT, 30 adult women with FIGO stage IB2, IIA2-IVA cervical cancer will be randomised to receive either surgical staging or usual PET-CT staging. Administering extended field radiotherapy will be based on lymphadenectomy results for the intervention group and on the PET-CT results for the control group. Follow-up visits at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will assess health-related quality of life and progression-free survival.Primary safety and feasibility outcomes of surgical staging will be assessed by calculating means with 95% confidence intervals for duration of surgery, number of complications, blood loss, nodal yield after para-aortic lymphadenectomy and treatment delay due to surgical staging. Secondary patient-centred outcomes on quality of life and first year survival will be documented and compared between the two groups. Estimates of sensitivity, specificity and negative and positive predictive values of MRI, PET-CT and surgical staging will be presented with 95% CI.. All analysis will be performed according to the intention to treat principle. This study will assess safety and feasibility, expressed as the number and severity of complications, effect on quality of life and the treatment delay due to surgically staging para-aortic lymph nodes in

  13. A randomized phase II feasibility trial of a multimodal intervention for the management of cachexia in lung and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Tora S; Laird, Barry J A; Balstad, Trude Rakel; Stene, Guro B; Bye, Asta; Johns, Neil; Pettersen, Caroline H; Fallon, Marie; Fayers, Peter; Fearon, Kenneth; Kaasa, Stein

    2017-10-01

    Cancer cachexia is a syndrome of weight loss (including muscle and fat), anorexia, and decreased physical function. It has been suggested that the optimal treatment for cachexia should be a multimodal intervention. The primary aim of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of a multimodal intervention (n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid nutritional supplements, exercise, and anti-inflammatory medication: celecoxib) for cancer cachexia in patients with incurable lung or pancreatic cancer, undergoing chemotherapy. Patients receiving two cycles of standard chemotherapy were randomized to either the multimodal cachexia intervention or standard care. Primary outcome measures were feasibility assessed by recruitment, attrition, and compliance with intervention (>50% of components in >50% of patients). Key secondary outcomes were change in weight, muscle mass, physical activity, safety, and survival. Three hundred and ninety-nine were screened resulting in 46 patients recruited (11.5%). Twenty five patients were randomized to the treatment and 21 as controls. Forty-one completed the study (attrition rate 11%). Compliance to the individual components of the intervention was 76% for celecoxib, 60% for exercise, and 48% for nutritional supplements. As expected from the sample size, there was no statistically significant effect on physical activity or muscle mass. There were no intervention-related Serious Adverse Events and survival was similar between the groups. A multimodal cachexia intervention is feasible and safe in patients with incurable lung or pancreatic cancer; however, compliance to nutritional supplements was suboptimal. A phase III study is now underway to assess fully the effect of the intervention. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  14. Digital health promotion in sexual health clinics: results of a feasibility trial of the Men’s Safer Sex website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V Bailey

    2015-10-01

    The best way to assess the impact of the MenSS website was by recording STI diagnoses from clinical records. Response rates for the online questionnaire were poor despite offers of incentives. There were many challenges to conducting an online trial of a sexual health website including ethical committee concerns about email content, poor reliability of trial-related software, balancing data protection and security protocols against ease of access for participants, barriers to patient access to IT in NHS clinics, and trying to ensure that participants engage with a digital intervention for long enough. Whilst digital interventions have great potential for health promotion, we encountered significant obstacles to online research, and to implementation of an IDI in an NHS clinical setting.

  15. Findings of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-Sitting and Exacerbations Trial (COPD-SEAT) in Reducing Sedentary Time Using Wearable and Mobile Technologies With Educational Support: Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Mark W; Weedon, Amie E; Saukko, Paula M; Esliger, Dale W; Morgan, Mike D; Steiner, Michael C; Downey, John W; Sherar, Lauren B; Singh, Sally J

    2018-04-11

    Targeting sedentary time post exacerbation may be more relevant than targeting structured exercise for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Focusing interventions on sitting less and moving more after an exacerbation may act as a stepping stone to increase uptake to pulmonary rehabilitation. The aim of this paper was to conduct a randomized trial examining trial feasibility and the acceptability of an education and self-monitoring intervention using wearable technology to reduce sedentary behavior for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation. Participants were recruited and randomized in hospital into 3 groups, with the intervention lasting 2 weeks post discharge. The Education group received verbal and written information about reducing their time in sedentary behavior, sitting face-to-face with a study researcher. The Education+Feedback group received the same education component along with real-time feedback on their sitting time, stand-ups, and steps at home through a waist-worn inclinometer linked to an app. Patients were shown how to use the technology by the same study researcher. The inclinometer also provided vibration prompts to encourage movement at patient-defined intervals of time. Patients and health care professionals involved in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation care were interviewed to investigate trial feasibility and acceptability of trial design and methods. Main quantitative outcomes of trial feasibility were eligibility, uptake, and retention, and for acceptability, were behavioral responses to the vibration prompts. In total, 111 patients were approached with 33 patients recruited (11 Control, 10 Education, and 12 Education+Feedback). Retention at 2-week follow-up was 52% (17/33; n=6 for Control, n=3 for Education, and n=8 for Education+Feedback). No study-related adverse events occurred. Collectively, patients responded to 106 out of 325

  16. A single center analysis of factors influencing study start-up timeline in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafcik, Brianna M; Doros, Gheorghe; Malikova, Marina A

    2017-11-01

    Efficient start-up phase in clinical trials is crucial to execution. The goal was to determine factors contributing to delays. The start-up milestones were assessed for 38 studies and analyzed. Total start-up time was shorter for following studies: device trials, no outsourcing, fewer ancillary services used and in interventional versus observational designs. The use of a centralized Institutional Review Board (IRB) versus a local IRB reduced time to approval. Studies that never enrolled took longer on average to finalize their budget/contract, and obtain IRB than ones that did enroll. Different features of clinical trials can affect timeline of start-up process. An understanding of the impact of each feature allows for optimization.

  17. Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment for clinical trials among cancer center leaders, investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians: enhancing minority participation in clinical trials (EMPaCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Raegan W; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Scarinci, Isabel C; Paterniti, Debora A; Fouad, Mona N; Hurd, Thelma C; Martin, Michelle Y

    2014-04-01

    The study of disparities in minority recruitment to cancer clinical trials has focused primarily on inquiries among minority populations. Yet very little is known about the perceptions of individuals actively involved in minority recruitment to clinical trials within cancer centers. Therefore, the authors assessed the perspectives of cancer center clinical and research personnel on barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. In total, 91 qualitative interviews were conducted at 5 US cancer centers among 4 stakeholder groups: cancer center leaders, principal investigators, research staff, and referring clinicians. All interviews were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative analyses of response data was focused on identifying prominent themes related to barriers and facilitators to minority recruitment. The perspectives of the 4 stakeholder groups were largely overlapping with some variations based on their unique roles in minority recruitment. Four prominent themes were identified: 1) racial and ethnic minorities are influenced by varying degrees of skepticism related to trial participation, 2) potential minority participants often face multilevel barriers that preclude them from being offered an opportunity to participate in a clinical trial, 3) facilitators at both the institutional and participant level potentially encourage minority recruitment, and 4) variation between internal and external trial referral procedures may limit clinical trial opportunities for racial and ethnic minorities. Multilevel approaches are needed to address barriers and optimize facilitators within cancer centers to enhance minority recruitment for cancer clinical trials. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  18. Implementation-effectiveness trial of an ecological intervention for physical activity in ethnically diverse low income senior centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porchia Rich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the US population ages, there is an increasing need for evidence based, peer-led physical activity programs, particularly in ethnically diverse, low income senior centers where access is limited. Methods/design The Peer Empowerment Program 4 Physical Activity’ (PEP4PA is a hybrid Type II implementation-effectiveness trial that is a peer-led physical activity (PA intervention based on the ecological model of behavior change. The initial phase is a cluster randomized control trial randomized to either a peer-led PA intervention or usual center programming. After 18 months, the intervention sites are further randomized to continued support or no support for another 6 months. This study will be conducted at twelve senior centers in San Diego County in low income, diverse communities. In the intervention sites, 24 peer health coaches and 408 adults, aged 50 years and older, are invited to participate. Peer health coaches receive training and support and utilize a tablet computer for delivery and tracking. There are several levels of intervention. Individual components include pedometers, step goals, counseling, and feedback charts. Interpersonal components include group walks, group sharing and health tips, and monthly celebrations. Community components include review of PA resources, walkability audit, sustainability plan, and streetscape improvements. The primary outcome of interest is intensity and location of PA minutes per day, measured every 6 months by wrist and hip accelerometers and GPS devices. Secondary outcomes include blood pressure, physical, cognitive, and emotional functioning. Implementation measures include appropriateness & acceptability (perceived and actual fit, adoption & penetration (reach, fidelity (quantity & quality of intervention delivered, acceptability (satisfaction, costs, and sustainability. Discussion Using a peer led implementation strategy to deliver a multi-level community based PA

  19. Feasibility and efficacy of a multi-factorial intervention to prevent falls in older adults with cognitive impairment living in residential care (ProF-Cog). A feasibility and pilot cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Julie; Jackson, Stephen H D; Martin, Finbarr C

    2017-05-30

    Falls are common in people with dementia living in residential care. The ProF-Cog intervention was developed to address fall risk factors specific to this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, acceptability, and feasibility of the intervention and provide an estimate of its efficacy. This was a cluster randomised controlled pilot study undertaken in care homes in London, UK. All permanent residents living in participating homes who were not terminally ill were invited to participate. The intervention included an assessment of falls risk factors followed by a tailored intervention which could include dementia care mapping, comprehensive geriatric assessment, occupational therapy input and twice-weekly exercise for 6 months as required to target identified risk factors. The control group received usual care without a falls risk assessment. Standing balance was the primary outcome. This and other outcome measures were collected at baseline and after 6 months. Falls were recorded for this period using incident reports. Changes were analysed using multi-level modelling. Adherence to the interventions, adverse events and trial feasibility were recorded. Nine care homes enrolled in the study with a total 191 participants (51% of those eligible); five homes allocated to the intervention with 103 participants, and four homes to the usual care control group with 88 participants. The intervention was safe with only one reported fall whilst undertaking exercise. Adherence to agreed recommendations on activity and the environment was modest (21 and 45% respectively) and to exercise was poor (41%). Balance scores (score range 0-49) analysed on 100 participants decreased by a mean of 3.9 in the control and 5.1 in the intervention groups, a non-significant difference (p = 0.9). In other measures, both groups declined equally and there was no difference in falls rates (IRR = 1.59 95%, CI 0.67-3.76). The intervention was safe but not clinically

  20. Effects and feasibility of a standardised orientation and mobility training in using an identification cane for older adults with low vision: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, G A R; van Rens, G H M B; Scherder, E J A; Brouwer, D M; van der Velde, J; Verstraten, P F J; Kempen, G I J M

    2009-08-27

    Orientation and mobility training (O&M-training) in using an identification cane, also called symbol cane, is provided to people with low vision to facilitate independent participation in the community. In The Netherlands this training is mainly practice-based because a standardised and validly evaluated O&M-training in using the identification cane is lacking. Recently a standardised O&M-training in using the identification cane was developed. This training consists of two face-to-face sessions and one telephone session during which, in addition to usual care, the client's needs regarding mobility are prioritised, and cognitive restructuring techniques, action planning and contracting are applied to facilitate the use of the cane. This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate this standardised O&M-training in using the identification cane in older adults with low vision. A parallel group randomised controlled trial was designed to compare the standardised O&M-training with usual care, i.e. the O&M-training commonly provided by the mobility trainer. Community-dwelling older people who ask for support at a rehabilitation centre for people with visual impairment and who are likely to receive an O&M-training in using the identification cane are included in the trial (N = 190). The primary outcomes of the effect evaluation are ADL self care and visual functioning with respect to distance activities and mobility. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, feelings of anxiety, symptoms of depression, fear of falling, and falls history. Data for the effect evaluation are collected by means of telephone interviews at baseline, and at 5 and 17 weeks after the start of the O&M-training. In addition to an effect evaluation, a process evaluation to study the feasibility of the O&M-training is carried out. The screening procedure for eligible participants started in November 2007 and will continue until October 2009. Preliminary findings

  1. Feasibility and acceptability of a nursing intervention with family caregiver on self-care among heart failure patients: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Sylvie; Belaid, Hayet; Heppell, Sonia; Mailhot, Tanya; Guertin, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    . Caregiver involvement was found to be both a feasible and acceptable means of supporting self-care practice in HF patients. This approach presents a potential avenue for enhancing patients' efforts in this regard. However, this pilot study offers preliminary findings only, which need to be replicated in a phase 3 clinical trial.

  2. Feasibility of a Psychosocial Rehabilitation Intervention to Enhance the Involvement of Relatives in Cancer Rehabilitation: Pilot Study for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L, Ledderer; KI, Cour; O, Mogensen

    2013-01-01

    . We developed an innovative rehabilitation program to be offered to the patient and a relative as a pair. Objective The aim of the present pilot study was to examine the feasibility of the intervention in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and to evaluate the impact on quality of life. Methods...... significant difference was observed between the intervention and the control group. Pairs reported that the time of inclusion was inconvenient and that rehabilitation ought to meet their changing needs. Conclusions The pilot study showed that it may be difficult to conduct an RCT of a psychosocial...... rehabilitation intervention for pairs, and difficulties with inclusion and drop out have to be addressed. Interventions need to be carefully developed and tested before evaluating an effect in a large-scale study....

  3. Does Interpersonal Psychotherapy improve clinical care for adolescents with depression attending a rural child and adolescent mental health service? Study protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanueva Elmer V

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression amongst adolescents is a costly societal problem. Little research documents the effectiveness of public mental health services in mapping this problem. Further, it is not clear whether usual care in such services can be improved via clinician training in a relevant evidence based intervention. One such intervention, found to be effective and easily learned amongst novice clinicians, is Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT. The study described in the current paper has two main objectives. First, it aims to investigate the impact on clinical care of implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents for the treatment of adolescent depression within a rural mental health service compared with Treatment as Usual (TAU. The second objective is to record the process and challenges (i.e. feasibility, acceptability, sustainability associated with implementing and evaluating an evidence-based intervention within a community service. This paper outlines the study rationale and design for this community based research trial. Methods/design The study involves a cluster randomisation trial to be conducted within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in rural Australia. All clinicians in the service will be invited to participate. Participating clinicians will be randomised via block design at each of four sites to (a training and delivery of IPT, or (b TAU. The primary measure of impact on care will be a clinically significant change in depressive symptomatology, with secondary outcomes involving treatment satisfaction and changes in other symptomatology. Participating adolescents with significant depressive symptomatology, aged 12 to 18 years, will complete assessment measures at Weeks 0, 12 and 24 of treatment. They will also complete a depression inventory once a month during that period. This study aims to recruit 60 adolescent participants and their parent/guardian/s. A power analysis is not indicated as an intra

  4. Nevasic audio program for the prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting: A feasibility study using a randomized controlled trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Saeed; Walshe, Catherine; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Ghavam Nasiri, Mohammad Reza; Pilling, Mark; Molassiotis, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Pharmacological therapy is only partially effective in preventing or treating chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Therefore, exploring the complementary role of non-pharmacological approaches used in addition to pharmacological agents is important. Nevasic uses specially constructed audio signals hypothesized to generate an antiemetic reaction. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of Nevasic to control CINV. A mixed methods design incorporating an RCT and focus group interviews. For the RCT, female breast cancer patients were randomized to receive either Nevasic plus usual care, music plus usual care, or usual care only. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and linear mixed-effects models. Five focus group interviews were conducted to obtain participants' views regarding the acceptability of the interventions in the trial. 99 participants were recruited to the RCT and 15 participated in focus group interviews. Recruitment targets were achieved. Issues of Nevasic acceptability were highlighted as weaknesses of the program. This study did not detect any evidence for the effectiveness of Nevasic; however, the results showed statistically significant less use of anti-emetics (p = 0.003) and borderline non-significant improvement in quality of life (p = 0.06). Conducting a non-pharmacological intervention using such an audio program is feasible, although difficulties and limitations exist with its use. Further studies are required to investigate the effectiveness of Nevasic from perspectives such as anti-emetic use, as well as its overall effect on the levels of nausea and vomiting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Testing the feasibility of a mobile technology intervention promoting healthy gestational weight gain in pregnant women (txt4two) - study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Jane Catherine; Campbell, Karen Jane; McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Wilkinson, Shelley Ann; Lappas, Martha; Ball, Kylie; Fjeldsoe, Brianna; Griffiths, Anne; Whittaker, Robyn; Maddison, Ralph; Shub, Alexis; Pidd, Deborah; Fraser, Elise; Moshonas, Nelly; Crawford, David Andrew

    2015-05-07

    Overweight, obesity and excess gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with negative health outcomes for mother and child in pregnancy and across the life course. Interventions promoting GWG within guidelines report mixed results. Most are time and cost intensive, which limits scalability. Mobile technologies (mHealth) offer low cost, ready access and individually-tailored support. We aim to test the feasibility of an mHealth intervention promoting healthy nutrition, physical activity and GWG in women who begin pregnancy overweight or obese. txt4two is a parallel randomised control trial pilot recruiting women with a singleton, live gestation between 10(+0) and 17(+6) weeks at the first hospital antenatal clinic visit. Inclusion criteria are pre-pregnancy BMI > 25 kg/m(2) and mobile phone ownership. One hundred consenting women will be randomised to intervention or control groups at a 1:1 ratio. All participants will receive standard antenatal care. In addition, the txt4two intervention will be delivered from baseline to 36 weeks gestation and consists of a tailored suite of theoretically-grounded, evidence-based intervention strategies focusing on healthy nutrition, physical activity and GWG. This includes: mobile phone interactive text messages promoting positive health behaviours, goal setting and self-monitoring; video messages; an information website; and a private moderated Facebook® chat forum. The primary outcome is the feasibility of the intervention. Secondary outcomes include GWG and participants' knowledge and behaviour regarding diet and physical activity during pregnancy. Findings will inform the development of larger-scale mHealth programmes to improve the delivery of healthy pregnancy nutrition, physical activity and GWG, that could be widely translated and disseminated. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRNU111111544397 . Date of registration: 19 March 2014.

  6. Clinical trial aims to study immunotherapy for central nervous system tumors | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new clinical trial aims to determine whether nivolumab, an immune checkpoint inhibitor, can improve control of cancer for patients with several types of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS is composed of the brain and spinal cord and the cause of most CNS tumors in adults is unknown. Learn more...

  7. New trial evaluates investigational drug for endometrial and breast cancers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new clinical trial is testing ONC201, an investigational drug that in laboratory studies has been shown to kill breast and endometrial cancer cells most likely by destroying mitochondria within the tumor cells. Mitochondria are the “powerhouse” of the cell, and blocking its activity may kill tumor cells and shrink tumors in human patients.

  8. So you want to conduct a randomised trial? Learnings from a 'failed' feasibility study of a Crisis Resource Management prompt during simulated paediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teis, Rachel; Allen, Jyai; Lee, Nigel; Kildea, Sue

    2017-02-01

    No study has tested a Crisis Resource Management prompt on resuscitation performance. We conducted a feasibility, unblinded, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial at one Australian paediatric hospital (June-September 2014). Eligible participants were any doctor, nurse, or nurse manager who would normally be involved in a Medical Emergency Team simulation. The unit of block randomisation was one of six scenarios (3 control:3 intervention) with or without a verbal prompt. The primary outcomes tested the feasibility and utility of the intervention and data collection tools. The secondary outcomes measured resuscitation quality and team performance. Data were analysed from six resuscitation scenarios (n=49 participants); three control groups (n=25) and three intervention groups (n=24). The ability to measure all data items on the data collection tools was hindered by problems with the recording devices both in the mannequins and the video camera. For a pilot study, greater training for the prompt role and pre-briefing participants about assessment of their cardio-pulmonary resuscitation quality should be undertaken. Data could be analysed in real time with independent video analysis to validate findings. Two cameras would strengthen reliability of the methods. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical timing after chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, analysis of technique (STARRCAT): results of a feasibility multi-centre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J D; Ewings, P; Falk, S; Cooper, E J; Roach, H; West, N P; Williams-Yesson, B A; Hanna, G B; Francis, N K

    2016-10-01

    The optimal time of rectal resection after long-course chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains unclear. A feasibility study was undertaken for a multi-centre randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of the interval after chemoradiotherapy on the technical complexity of surgery. Patients with rectal cancer were randomized to either a 6- or 12-week interval between CRT and surgery between June 2012 and May 2014 (ISRCTN registration number: 88843062). For blinded technical complexity assessment, the Observational Clinical Human Reliability Analysis technique was used to quantify technical errors enacted within video recordings of operations. Other measured outcomes included resection completeness, specimen quality, radiological down-staging, tumour cell density down-staging and surgeon-reported technical complexity. Thirty-one patients were enrolled: 15 were randomized to 6 and 16-12 weeks across 7 centres. Fewer eligible patients were identified than had been predicted. Of 23 patients who underwent resection, mean 12.3 errors were observed per case at 6 weeks vs. 10.7 at 12 weeks (p = 0.401). Other measured outcomes were similar between groups. The feasibility of measurement of operative performance of rectal cancer surgery as an endpoint was confirmed in this exploratory study. Recruitment of sufficient numbers of patients represented a challenge, and a proportion of patients did not proceed to resection surgery. These results suggest that interval after CRT may not substantially impact upon surgical technical performance.

  10. A randomized controlled trial of two simple mind-body programs, Kirtan Kriya meditation and music listening, for adults with subjective cognitive decline: Feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Khalsa, Dharma Singh; Kandati, Sahiti

    2016-06-01

    In this randomized controlled trial (RCT), we assessed the feasibility and acceptability of two simple home-based relaxation programs in adults experiencing subjective cognitive decline, a strong predictor of Alzheimer's disease. Sixty participants were randomized to a beginner Kirtan Kriya meditation (KK) program or a music listening (ML) program. Participants were asked to practice 12min daily for the first 12 weeks, then as often as they liked for the following 3 months. Participants underwent assessments at baseline, 12 weeks, and 6 months to evaluate changes in key outcomes. Feasibility and acceptability were evaluated by measuring recruitment and retention rates, assessment visit attendance, practice adherence, and treatment expectancy; exit questionnaires completed at 12 weeks and 6 months provided additional data regarding participant experience with the study, perceived barriers to and facilitators of practice, reasons for drop-out, and views regarding the assigned intervention. Fifty-three participants (88%) completed the 6 month study. Adherence in both groups was excellent, with participants completing 93% (91% KK, 94% ML) of sessions on average in the first 12 weeks, and 71% (68% KK, 74% ML) during the 3 month, practice-optional, follow-up period. At week 12, over 80% of participants indicated they were likely to continue practicing following study completion. Responses to both structured and open-ended exit questionnaire items also suggested high satisfaction with both programs. Findings of this RCT of a beginner meditation practice and a simple ML program suggest that both programs were well accepted and the practices are feasible in adults with early memory loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transdiagnostic treatment of bipolar disorder and comorbid anxiety using the Unified Protocol for Emotional Disorders: A pilot feasibility and acceptability trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellard, Kristen K; Bernstein, Emily E; Hearing, Casey; Baek, Ji Hyun; Sylvia, Louisa G; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Barlow, David H; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2017-09-01

    Comorbid anxiety in bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with greater illness severity, reduced treatment response, and greater impairment. Treating anxiety in the context of BD is crucial for improving illness course and outcomes. The current study examined the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of the Unified Protocol (UP), a transdiagnostic cognitive behavioral therapy, as an adjunctive treatment to pharmacotherapy for BD and comorbid anxiety disorders. Twenty-nine patients with BD and at least one comorbid anxiety disorder were randomized to pharmacotherapy treatment-as-usual (TAU) or TAU with 18 sessions of the UP (UP+TAU). All patients completed assessments every four weeks to track symptoms, functioning, emotion regulation and temperament. Linear mixed-model regressions were conducted to track symptom changes over time and to examine the relationship between emotion-related variables and treatment response. Satisfaction ratings were equivalent for both treatment groups. Patients in the UP+TAU group evidenced significantly greater reductions over time in anxiety and depression symptoms (Cohen's d's>0.80). Baseline levels of neuroticism, perceived affective control, and emotion regulation ability predicted magnitude of symptom change for the UP+TAU group only. Greater change in perceived control of emotions and emotion regulation skills predicted greater change in anxiety related symptoms. This was a pilot feasibility and acceptability trial; results should be interpreted with caution. Treatment with the UP+TAU was rated high in patient satisfaction, and resulted in significantly greater improvement on indices of anxiety and depression relative to TAU. This suggests that the UP may be a feasible treatment approach for BD with comorbid anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Video-games used in a group setting is feasible and effective to improve indicators of physical activity in individuals with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givon, Noa; Zeilig, Gabi; Weingarden, Harold; Rand, Debbie

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using video-games in a group setting and to compare the effectiveness of video-games as a group intervention to a traditional group intervention for improving physical activity in individuals with chronic stroke. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with evaluations pre and post a 3-month intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compliance (session attendance), satisfaction and adverse effects were feasibility measures. Grip strength and gait speed were measures of physical activity. Hip accelerometers quantified steps/day and the Action Research Arm Test assessed the functional ability of the upper extremity. Forty-seven community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke (29-78 years) were randomly allocated to receive video-game (N=24) or traditional therapy (N=23) in a group setting. There was high treatment compliance for both interventions (video-games-78%, traditional therapy-66%), but satisfaction was rated higher for the video-game (93%) than the traditional therapy (71%) (χ(2)=4.98, P=0.026). Adverse effects were not reported in either group. Significant improvements were demonstrated in both groups for gait speed (F=3.9, P=0.02), grip strength of the weaker (F=6.67, P=0.002) and stronger hands (F=7.5, P=0.001). Daily steps and functional ability of the weaker hand did not increase in either group. Using video-games in a small group setting is feasible, safe and satisfying. Video-games improve indicators of physical activity of individuals with chronic stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Feasibility of a randomised trial of a continuing medical education program in shared decision-making on the use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections in primary care: the DECISION+ pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurier Claudine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The misuse and limited effectiveness of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs are well documented, and current approaches targeting physicians or patients to improve appropriate use have had limited effect. Shared decision-making could be a promising strategy to improve appropriate antibiotic use for ARIs, but very little is known about its implementation processes and outcomes in clinical settings. In this matter, pilot studies have played a key role in health science research over the past years in providing information for the planning, justification, and/or refinement of larger studies. The objective of our study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the study design, procedures, and intervention of the DECISION+ program, a continuing medical education program in shared decision-making among family physicians and their patients on the optimal use of antibiotics for treating ARIs in primary care. Methods A pilot clustered randomised trial was conducted. Family medicine groups (FMGs were randomly assigned, to either the DECISION+ program, which included three 3-hour workshops over a four- to six-month period, or a control group that had a delayed exposure to the program. Results Among 21 FMGs contacted, 5 (24% agreed to participate in the pilot study. A total of 39 family physicians (18 in the two experimental and 21 in the three control FMGs and their 544 patients consulting for an ARI were recruited. The proportion of recruited family physicians who participated in all three workshops was 46% (50% for the experimental group and 43% for the control group, and the overall mean level of satisfaction regarding the workshops was 94%. Conclusions This trial, while aiming to demonstrate the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a larger study, has identified important opportunities for improving the design of a definitive trial. This pilot trial is informative for researchers and clinicians

  14. A Feasibility Study of Moxibustion for Treating Anorexia and Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Metastatic Cancer: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ju-Hyun; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Park, So-Jung; Kang, Hwi-Joong; Kim, Kyungmin; Jung, In-Chul; Kim, Young-Il; Lee, Suk-Hoon; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and safety of using moxibustion for treating anorexia and improving quality of life in patients with metastatic cancer. We conducted a randomized sham-controlled trial of moxibustion. Sixteen patients with metastatic cancer were recruited from Daejeon, South Korea. The patients were randomly placed into a true or a sham moxibustion group and received 10 true or sham moxibustion treatments administered to the abdomen (CV12, CV8, CV4) and legs (ST36) over a 2-week period. Outcome measures included interest in participating in the trial, identification of successful recruitment strategies, the appropriateness of eligibility criteria, and compliance with the treatment plan (ie, attendance at treatment sessions). Clinical outcomes included results of the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy (FAACT), answers on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer 30-item core quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) questionnaires, scores on the visual analogue scale (VAS), and the results from blood tests and a safety evaluation. Moxibustion was an acceptable intervention in patients with metastatic cancer. Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 11 patients completing all 10 treatments. No serious adverse events related to moxibustion occurred, but 4 patients in the true moxibustion group reported mild rubefaction, which disappeared in a few hours. This study suggests that moxibustion may be safely used to treat anorexia and improve quality of life in patients with metastatic cancer. However, further research is needed to confirm this result.

  15. Tuning the light in senior care: Evaluating a trial LED lighting system at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G.; Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Samla, Connie; Bisbee, Dave

    2016-08-31

    This report summarizes the results from a trial installation of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting systems in several spaces within the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) coordinated the project and invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to document the performance of the LED lighting systems as part of a GATEWAY evaluation. DOE tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct the investigation. SMUD and ACC staff coordinated and completed the design and installation of the LED systems, while PNNL and SMUD staff evaluated the photometric performance of the systems. ACC staff also track behavioral and health measures of the residents; some of those results are reported here, although PNNL staff were not directly involved in collecting or interpreting those data. The trial installation took place in a double resident room and a single resident room, and the corridor that connects those (and other) rooms to the central nurse station. Other spaces in the trial included the nurse station, a common room called the family room located near the nurse station, and the ACC administrator’s private office.

  16. A Phase II randomised controlled trial assessing the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of Dignity Therapy for older people in care homes: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Alison

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most older people living in nursing homes die there, there is a dearth of robust evaluations of interventions to improve their end-of-life care. Residents usually have multiple health problems making them heavily reliant on staff for their care, which can erode their sense of dignity. Dignity Therapy has been developed to help promote dignity and reduce distress. It comprises a recorded interview, which is transcribed, edited then returned to the patient, who can bequeath it to people of their choosing. Piloting has suggested that Dignity Therapy is beneficial to people dying of cancer and their families. The aims of this study are to assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of Dignity Therapy to reduce psychological and spiritual distress in older people reaching the end of life in care homes, and to pilot the methods for a Phase III RCT. Methods/design A randomised controlled open-label trial. Sixty-four residents of care homes for older people are randomly allocated to one of two groups: (i Intervention (Dignity Therapy offered in addition to any standard care, and (ii Control group (standard care. Recipients of the "generativity" documents are asked their views on taking part in the study and the therapy. Both quantitative and qualitative outcomes are assessed in face-to-face interviews at baseline and at approximately one and eight weeks after the intervention (equivalent in the control group. The primary outcome is residents' sense of dignity (potential effectiveness assessed by the Patient Dignity Inventory. Secondary outcomes for residents include depression, hopefulness and quality of life. In view of the relatively small sample size, quantitative analysis is mainly descriptive. The qualitative analysis uses the Framework method. Discussion Dignity Therapy is brief, can be done at the bedside and could help both patients and their families. This detailed exploratory research shows if

  17. Reducing electronic media use in 2-3 year-old children: feasibility and efficacy of the Family@play pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Trina; Cliff, Dylan P; Okely, Anthony D

    2015-08-14

    Participation in electronic media use among 2-3 year olds is high and associated with adverse health and developmental outcomes. This study sought to test the feasibility and potential efficacy of a family-based program to decrease electronic media (EM) use in 2-3-year-old children. Family@play was a six-session pilot randomised controlled trial delivered to parents of 2-3 year-old children from August to September 2012 in a community environment in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. Development of program content was guided by Social Cognitive and Family Systems Theories. The primary outcome was children's electronic media use. Secondary outcomes included children's time in sitting, standing and stepping. Data collectors were blinded to group allocation. Parents completed comprehensive process evaluation measures and participated in focus group discussions following completion of the program. Regression analyses were undertaken and effect sizes calculated using principles of intention to treat. Twenty-two participants (n = 12 intervention; n = 10 control) provided complete baseline data; complete data from 16 participants (n = 6 intervention; n = 10 control) were available post-intervention. Process evaluation results were high, showing the acceptability of the program. Compared with children in the control group, there were greater decreases in total EM use among children in the intervention group (adjusted difference [95 % CI] = -31.2 mins/day [-71.0-8.6] Cohen's d = 0.70). Differences for other outcomes were in the hypothesised direction and ranged from small for postural (sitting, standing, stepping) outcomes to moderate to large for individual electronic media (e.g. TV viewing, DVD/video viewing). This is the first family-based study to engage families of 2-3 year old children outside the United States and target multiple EM behaviours. Family@play was shown to be a feasible and acceptable intervention to deliver to

  18. Feasibility of a multi-modal exercise program on cognition in older adults with Type 2 diabetes - a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callisaya, M L; Daly, R M; Sharman, J E; Bruce, D; Davis, T M E; Greenaway, T; Nolan, M; Beare, R; Schultz, M G; Phan, T; Blizzard, L C; Srikanth, V K

    2017-10-16

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is associated with increased risk of dementia. We aimed to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the efficacy of exercise on cognition and brain structure in people with T2D. A 6-month pilot parallel RCT of a progressive aerobic- and resistance-training program versus a gentle movement control group in people with T2D aged 50-75 years (n = 50) at the University of Tasmania, Australia. Assessors were blinded to group allocation. Brain volume (total, white matter, hippocampus), cortical thickness and white matter microstructure (fractional anisotrophy and mean diffusivity) were measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and cognition using a battery of neuropsychological tests. Study design was assessed by any changes (during the pilot or recommended) to the protocol, recruitment by numbers screened and time to enrol 50 participants; randomisation by similarity of characteristics in groups at baseline, adherence by exercise class attendance; safety by number and description of adverse events and retention by numbers withdrawn. The mean age of participants was 66.2 (SD 4.9) years and 48% were women. There were no changes to the design during the study. A total of 114 people were screened for eligibility, with 50 participants with T2D enrolled over 8 months. Forty-seven participants (94%) completed the study (23 of 24 controls; 24 of 26 in the intervention group). Baseline characteristics were reasonably balanced between groups. Exercise class attendance was 79% for the intervention and 75% for the control group. There were 6 serious adverse events assessed as not or unlikely to be due to the intervention. Effect sizes for each outcome variable are provided. This study supports the feasibility of a large scale RCT to test the benefits of multi-modal exercise to prevent cognitive decline in people with T2D. Design changes to the future trial are provided. ANZCTR 12614000222640 ; Registered 3/3/2014; First

  19. The feasibility of clinical endpoint trials in HIV infection in the highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Neaton, J; Bebchuk, J

    2006-01-01

    the assumptions used in designing ESPRIT, a large randomized clinical trial assessing the clinical benefit of interleukin-2 treatment in patients with HIV infection, to use EuroSIDA to mimic the inclusion criterion of ESPRIT in order to compare the observed event rate in ESPRIT with the projected rate in EuroSIDA......, and to project the required length of ESPRIT. METHODS: Patients in EuroSIDA who satisfied the ESPRIT recruitment criteria were selected. Patients were followed from baseline to new AIDS or death. RESULTS: The incidence of clinical progression in the selected EuroSIDA patients (N = 4482) was 1.5 per 100 PYFU (95...... follow-up required to complete ESPRIT and accrue the 320 events required by protocol would be seven years, 10 months using the projected rates from the EuroSIDA study, and seven years, 11 months if the observed event rate in ESPRIT continued unchanged. LIMITATIONS: Differences between patients recruited...

  20. Camino Verde (The Green Way: evidence-based community mobilisation for dengue control in Nicaragua and Mexico: feasibility study and study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Andersson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit dengue virus can breed in clean water, WHO-endorsed vector control strategies place sachets of organophosphate pesticide, temephos (Abate, in household water storage containers. These and other pesticide-dependent approaches have failed to curb the spread of dengue and multiple dengue virus serotypes continue to spread throughout tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. A feasibility study in Managua, Nicaragua, generated instruments, intervention protocols, training schedules and impact assessment tools for a cluster randomised controlled trial of community-based approaches to vector control comprising an alternative strategy for dengue prevention and control in Nicaragua and Mexico. Methods/Design The Camino Verde (Green Way is a pragmatic parallel group trial of pesticide-free dengue vector control, adding effectiveness to the standard government dengue control. A random sample from the most recent census in three coastal regions of Guerrero state in Mexico will generate 90 study clusters and the equivalent sampling frame in Managua, Nicaragua will generate 60 clusters, making a total of 150 clusters each of 137–140 households. After a baseline study, computer-driven randomisation will allocate to intervention one half of the sites, stratified by country, evidence of recent dengue virus infection in children aged 3–9 years and, in Nicaragua, level of community organisation. Following a common evidence-based education protocol, each cluster will develop and implement its own collective interventions including house-to-house visits, school-based programmes and inter-community visits. After 18 months, a follow-up study will compare dengue history, serological evidence of recent dengue virus infection (via measurement of anti-dengue virus antibodies in saliva samples and entomological indices between intervention and control sites. Discussion Our hypothesis is that

  1. A feasibility trial to examine the social norms approach for the prevention and reduction of licit and illicit drug use in European University and college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pischke Claudia R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incorrect perceptions of high rates of peer alcohol and tobacco use are predictive of increased personal use in student populations. Correcting misperceptions by providing feedback has been shown to be an effective intervention for reducing licit drug use. It is currently unknown if social norms interventions are effective in preventing and reducing illicit drug use in European students. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of a multi-site cluster controlled trial of a web-based social norms intervention aimed at reducing licit and preventing illicit drug use in European university students. Methods/Design An online questionnaire to assess rates of drug use will be developed and translated based on existing social norms surveys. Students from sixteen universities in seven participating European countries will be invited to complete the questionnaire. Both intervention and control sites will be chosen by convenience. In each country, the intervention site will be the university that the local principal investigator is affiliated with. We aim to recruit 1000 students per site (baseline assessment. All participants will complete the online questionnaire at baseline. Baseline data will be used to develop social norms messages that will be included in a web-based intervention. The intervention group will receive individualized social norms feedback. The website will remain online during the following 5 months. After five months, a second survey will be conducted and effects of the intervention on social norms and drug use will be measured in comparison to the control site. Discussion This project is the first cross-national European collaboration to investigate the feasibility of a social norms intervention to reduce licit and prevent illicit drug use among European university students. Final trial registration number DRKS00004375 on the ‘German Clinical Trials Register’.

  2. Systematic review of clinical trials assessing the therapeutic efficacy of visceral leishmaniasis treatments: A first step to assess the feasibility of establishing an individual patient data sharing platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T Bush

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There are an estimated 200,000 to 400,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis (VL annually. A variety of factors are taken into account when considering the best therapeutic options to cure a patient and reduce the risk of resistance, including geographical area, malnourishment and HIV coinfection. Pooled analyses combine data from many studies to answer specific scientific questions that cannot be answered with individual studies alone. However, the heterogeneity of study design, data collection, and analysis often makes direct comparison difficult. Individual Participant Data (IPD files can be standardised and analysed, allowing detailed analysis of this merged larger pool, but only a small fraction of systematic reviews and meta-analyses currently employ pooled analysis of IPD. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify published studies and studies reported in clinical trial registries to assess the feasibility of developing a VL data sharing platform to facilitate an IPD-based analysis of clinical trial data. Studies conducted between 1983 to 2015 that reported treatment outcome were eligible.From the 2,271 documents screened, 145 published VL clinical trials were identified, with data from 26,986 patients. Methodologies varied for diagnosis and treatment outcomes, but overall the volume of data potentially available on different drugs and dose regimens identified hundreds or possibly thousands of patients per arm suitable for IPD pooled meta-analyses.A VL data sharing platform would provide an opportunity to maximise scientific use of available data to enable assessment of treatment efficacy, contribute to evidence-based clinical management and guide optimal prospective data collection.

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including ... our campus or trials NIH has sponsored at universities, medical centers, and hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov View a ...

  4. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers ( ...

  5. A community health worker-led lifestyle behavior intervention for Latina (Hispanic) women: feasibility and outcomes of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Villegas, Juan; Melendrez, Marylee; Balcázar, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Low-income Latinas (Hispanics) face risk for cardiovascular disease due to high rates of overweight/obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and other factors. Limited access to health care and language barriers may prevent delivery of health promotion messages. Targeted approaches, including the integration of community health workers, may be required to promote healthy lifestyle and prevent chronic disease in underserved ethnic minority groups. The term commonly used to refer to female community health workers in Latino communities is "promotora(s)." This study evaluates the outcomes and feasibility of a promotora-led lifestyle behavior intervention for overweight, immigrant Latinas. A community prevention model was employed in planning and implementing this study. A randomized controlled trial design was used. A Community Advisory Board provided expertise in evaluating feasibility of study implementation in the community and other important guidance. The sample was comprised of 223 women aged 35-64 years, predominantly with low income and ≤8th grade education. The culturally tailored Lifestyle Behavior Intervention included group education (8 classes based upon Su Corazon, Su Vida), followed by 4 months of individual teaching and coaching (home visits and telephone calls). The control group received a comparable length educational program and follow-up contacts. Evaluations were conducted at baseline and at 6 and 9 months using a dietary habits questionnaire, accelerometer readings of physical activity, and clinical measures (body mass index, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, lipids, blood glucose). Data were collected between January 2010 and August 2012. Women in the intervention group improved significantly in dietary habits, waist circumference, and physical activity in comparison to those in the control group. A treatment dosage effect was observed for weight and waist circumference. Knowledge about heart disease increased. High attendance at classes and

  6. The Feasibility of Real-Time Intraoperative Performance Assessment With SIMPL (System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning): Early Experience From a Multi-institutional Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnen, Jordan D; George, Brian C; Williams, Reed G; Schuller, Mary C; DaRosa, Debra A; Torbeck, Laura; Mullen, John T; Meyerson, Shari L; Auyang, Edward D; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Choi, Jennifer N; Choti, Michael A; Endean, Eric D; Foley, Eugene F; Mandell, Samuel P; Meier, Andreas H; Smink, Douglas S; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul E; Soper, Nathaniel J; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Lillemoe, Keith D; Dunnington, Gary L; Fryer, Jonathan P

    Intraoperative performance assessment of residents is of growing interest to trainees, faculty, and accreditors. Current approaches to collect such assessments are limited by low participation rates and long delays between procedure and evaluation. We deployed an innovative, smartphone-based tool, SIMPL (System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning), to make real-time intraoperative performance assessment feasible for every case in which surgical trainees participate, and hypothesized that SIMPL could be feasibly integrated into surgical training programs. Between September 1, 2015 and February 29, 2016, 15 U.S. general surgery residency programs were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved trial. SIMPL was made available after 70% of faculty and residents completed a 1-hour training session. Descriptive and univariate statistics analyzed multiple dimensions of feasibility, including training rates, volume of assessments, response rates/times, and dictation rates. The 20 most active residents and attendings were evaluated in greater detail. A total of 90% of eligible users (1267/1412) completed training. Further, 13/15 programs began using SIMPL. Totally, 6024 assessments were completed by 254 categorical general surgery residents (n = 3555 assessments) and 259 attendings (n = 2469 assessments), and 3762 unique operations were assessed. There was significant heterogeneity in participation within and between programs. Mean percentage (range) of users who completed ≥1, 5, and 20 assessments were 62% (21%-96%), 34% (5%-75%), and 10% (0%-32%) across all programs, and 96%, 75%, and 32% in the most active program. Overall, response rate was 70%, dictation rate was 24%, and mean response time was 12 hours. Assessments increased from 357 (September 2015) to 1146 (February 2016). The 20 most active residents each received mean 46 assessments by 10 attendings for 20 different procedures. SIMPL can be feasibly integrated into surgical training programs

  7. An interactive health communication application for supporting parents managing childhood long-term conditions: outcomes of a randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Veronica M; Knafl, Kathleen; Santacroce, Sheila; Campbell, Malcolm; Hall, Andrew G; Smith, Trish; Carolan, Ian

    2014-12-03

    Families living with chronic or long-term conditions such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), stages 3-5, face multiple challenges and respond to these challenges in various ways. Some families adapt well while others struggle, and family response to a condition is closely related to outcome. With families and professionals, we developed a novel condition-specific interactive health communication app to improve parents' management ability-the online parent information and support (OPIS) program. OPIS consists of a comprehensive mix of clinical caregiving and psychosocial information and support. The purpose of this study was to (1) assess feasibility of a future full-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) of OPIS in terms of recruitment and retention, data collection procedures, and psychometric performance of the study measures in the target population, and (2) investigate trends in change in outcome measures in a small-scale RCT in parents of children with CKD stages 3-5. Parents were recruited from a pediatric nephrology clinic and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: usual support for home-based clinical caregiving (control) or usual support plus password-protected access to OPIS for 20 weeks (intervention). Both groups completed study measures at study entry and exit. We assessed feasibility descriptively in terms of recruitment and retention rates overall; assessed recruitment, retention, and uptake of the intervention between groups; and compared family condition management, empowerment to deliver care, and fathers' involvement between groups. We recruited 55 parents of 39 children (42% of eligible families). Of those, about three-quarters of intervention group parents (19/26, 73%) and control group parents (22/29, 76%) were retained through completion of 20-week data collection. The overall retention rate was 41/55 (75%). The 41 parents completing the trial were asked to respond to the same 10 questionnaire scales at both baseline and 20 weeks

  8. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training of family members before hospital discharge using video self-instruction: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Audrey L; Leary, Marion; Decker, Christopher S; Andersen, James C; Fredericks, Amanda C; Bobrow, Bentley J; Abella, Benjamin S

    2011-09-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are low. This is especially the case for SCA occurring in the home setting, as family members of at-risk patients are often not CPR trained. To evaluate the feasibility of a novel hospital-based CPR education program targeted to family members of patients at increased risk for SCA. Prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Inpatient wards at 3 hospitals. Family members of inpatients admitted with cardiac-related diagnoses. Family members were offered CPR training via a proctored video-self instruction (VSI) program. After training, CPR skills and participant perspectives regarding their training experience were assessed. Surveys were conducted one month postdischarge to measure the rate of "secondary training" of other individuals by enrolled family members. At the 3 study sites, 756 subjects were offered CPR instruction; 280 agreed to training and 136 underwent instruction using the VSI program. Of these, 78 of 136 (57%) had no previous CPR training. After training, chest compression performance was generally adequate (mean compression rate 90 ± 26/minute, mean depth 37 ± 12 mm). At 1 month, 57 of 122 (47%) of subjects performed secondary training for friends or family members, with a calculated mean of 2.1 persons trained per kit distributed. The hospital setting offers a unique "point of capture" to provide CPR instruction to an important, undertrained population in contact with at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. Phase II trial evaluating the feasibility of interdigitating folfox with chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, M; Chander, S; McKendrick, J; MacKay, J R; Steel, M; Hicks, R; Heriot, A; Leong, T; Cooray, P; Jefford, M; Zalcberg, J; Bressel, M; McClure, B; Ngan, S Y

    2014-11-11

    Patients (pts) with metastatic rectal cancer and symptomatic primary, require local and systemic control. Chemotherapy used during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is adequate for radiosensitisation, but suboptimal for systemic control. The aim of this phase II study was to assess tolerability, local/systemic benefits, of a novel regimen delivering interdigitating intensive chemotherapy with radical CRT. Eligible pts had untreated synchronous symptomatic primary/metastatic rectal cancer. A total of 12 weeks of treatment with split-course pelvic CRT (total 50.4 Gy with concurrent oxaliplatin and 5-FU infusion) alternating with FOLFOX chemotherapy. All pts staged with CT, MRI and FDG-PET pre and post treatment. Twenty-six pts were treated. Rectal primary MRI stage: T3 81% and T4 15%. Liver metastases in 81%. Twenty-four pts (92%) completed the 12-week regimen. All patients received planned RT dose, and for both agents over 88% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity of >75%. Grade 3 toxicities: neutropenia 23%, diarrhoea 15%, and radiation skin reaction 12%. Grade 4 toxicity: neutropenia 15%. FDG-PET metabolic response rate for rectal primary 96%, and for metastatic disease 60%. Delivery of interdigitating chemotherapy with radical CRT was feasible to treat both primary and metastatic rectal cancer. High completion and response rates were encouraging.

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI at 7 Tesla utilizing a single-loop coil: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umutlu, Lale; Maderwald, Stefan; Kraff, Oliver; Theysohn, Jens M; Kuemmel, Sherko; Hauth, Elke A; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultra-high-field breast imaging at 7 Tesla. A total of 15 subjects, including 5 patients with histologically proven breast cancer, were examined on a 7 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging system using a unilateral linearly polarized single-loop coil. Subjects were placed in prone position on a biopsy support system, with the coil placed directly below the region of interest. The examination protocol included the following sequences: 1) T2-weighted turbo spin echo sequence; 2) six dynamic T1-weighted spoiled gradient-echo sequences; and 3) subtraction imaging. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging at 7 Tesla could be obtained at high spatial resolution with short acquisition times, providing good image accuracy and a conclusively good delineation of small anatomical and pathological structures. T2-weighted imaging could be obtained with high spatial resolution at adequate acquisition times. Because of coil limitations, four high-field magnetic resonance examinations showed decreased diagnostic value. This first scientific approach of dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla demonstrates the complexity of ultra-high-field breast magnetic resonance imaging and countenances the implementation of further advanced bilateral coil concepts to circumvent current limitations from the coil and ultra-high-field magnetic strength. 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Feasibility of scenario-based simulation training versus traditional workshops in continuing medical education: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Brendan; Hawkins, Trisha Lee-Ann; Herman, Robert; Barnes, Sue; Kaufmann, Stephanie; Fraser, Kristin; Ma, Irene W. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although simulation-based training is increasingly used for medical education, its benefits in continuing medical education (CME) are less established. This study seeks to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating simulation-based training into a CME conference and compare its effectiveness with the traditional workshop in improving knowledge and self-reported confidence. Methods Participants (N=27) were group randomized to either a simulation-based workshop or a traditional case-based workshop. Results Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= − 0.44; p=0.19). Self-reported comfort in patient assessment parameters increased in both groups (psimulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment. It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived. Further studies are required to better define the conditions under which simulation-based training is beneficial. PMID:23870304

  12. Feasibility and acceptability of group music therapy vs wait-list control for treatment of patients with long-term depression (the SYNCHRONY trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Catherine Elizabeth; O'Kelly, Julian; Sandford, Stephen; Priebe, Stefan

    2017-03-29

    Depression is of significant global concern. Despite a range of effective treatment options it is estimated that around one in five diagnosed with an acute depressive episode continue to experience enduring symptoms for more than 2 years. There is evidence for effectiveness of individual music therapy for depression. However, no studies have as yet looked at a group intervention within an NHS context. This study aims to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial of group music therapy for patients with long-term depression (symptom durations of 1 year or longer) within the community. This is a single-centre randomised controlled feasibility trial of group music therapy versus wait-list control with a nested process evaluation. Thirty participants will be randomised with unbalanced allocation (20 to receive the intervention immediately, 10 as wait-list controls). Group music therapy will be offered three times per week in a community centre with a focus on songwriting. Data will be collected post-intervention, 3 and 6 months after the intervention finishes. We will examine the feasibility of recruitment processes including identifying the number of eligible participants, participation and retention rates and the intervention in terms of testing components, measuring adherence and estimation of the likely intervention effect. A nested process evaluation will consist of treatment fidelity analysis, exploratory analysis of process measures and end-of-participation interviews with participants and referring staff. Whilst group music therapy is an option in some community mental health settings, this will be the first study to examine group music therapy for this particular patient group. We will assess symptoms of depression, acceptability of the intervention and quality of life. We anticipate potential challenges in the recruitment and retention of participants. It is unclear whether offering the intervention three times per week will be

  13. Assessing the impact of user-centered research on a clinical trial eHealth tool via counterbalanced research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nancy L; Massett, Holly A; Mylks, Christy; McCormack, Lauren A; Kish-Doto, Julia; Hesse, Bradford W; Wang, Min Qi

    2011-01-01

    Informatics applications have the potential to improve participation in clinical trials, but their design must be based on user-centered research. This research used a fully counterbalanced experimental design to investigate the effect of changes made to the original version of a website, http://BreastCancerTrials.org/, and confirm that the revised version addressed and reinforced patients' needs and expectations. Participants included women who had received a breast cancer diagnosis within the last 5 years (N=77). They were randomized into two groups: one group used and reviewed the original version first followed by the redesigned version, and the other group used and reviewed them in reverse order. The study used both quantitative and qualitative measures. During use, participants' click paths and general reactions were observed. After use, participants were asked to answer survey items and open-ended questions to indicate their reactions and which version they preferred and met their needs and expectations better. Overall, the revised version of the site was preferred and perceived to be clearer, easier to navigate, more trustworthy and credible, and more private and safe overall. However, users who viewed the original version last had similar attitudes toward both versions. By applying research findings to the redesign of a website for clinical trial searching, it was possible to re-engineer the interface to better support patients' decisions to participate in clinical trials. The mechanisms of action in this case appeared to revolve around creating an environment that supported a sense of personal control and decisional autonomy.

  14. Feasibility of scenario-based simulation training versus traditional workshops in continuing medical education: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Kerr

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although simulation-based training is increasingly used for medical education, its benefits in continuing medical education (CME are less established. This study seeks to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating simulation-based training into a CME conference and compare its effectiveness with the traditional workshop in improving knowledge and self-reported confidence. Methods: Participants (N=27 were group randomized to either a simulation-based workshop or a traditional case-based workshop. Results: Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76 nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= − 0.44; p=0.19. Self-reported comfort in patient assessment parameters increased in both groups (p<0.05 in all. However, only the simulation group reported an increase in comfort in patient management (d=1.1, p=0.051 for the traditional group and d=1.3; p= 0.0003 for the simulation group. At 1 month, comfort measures in the traditional group increased consistently over time while these measures in the simulation group increased post-workshop but decreased by 1 month, suggesting that some of the effects of training with simulation may be short lived. Discussion: The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment. It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived. Further studies are required to better define the conditions under which simulation-based training is beneficial.

  15. Electronic data capture and DICOM data management in multi-center clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Daniel; Page, Charles-E.; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2016-03-01

    Providing eligibility, efficacy and security evaluation by quantitative and qualitative disease findings, medical imaging has become increasingly important in clinical trials. Here, subject's data is today captured in electronic case reports forms (eCRFs), which are offered by electronic data capture (EDC) systems. However, integration of subject's medical image data into eCRFs is insufficiently supported. Neither integration of subject's digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data, nor communication with picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), is possible. This aggravates the workflow of the study personnel, in special regarding studies with distributed data capture in multiple sites. Hence, in this work, a system architecture is presented, which connects an EDC system, a PACS and a DICOM viewer via the web access to DICOM objects (WADO) protocol. The architecture is implemented using the open source tools OpenClinica, DCM4CHEE and Weasis. The eCRF forms the primary endpoint for the study personnel, where subject's image data is stored and retrieved. Background communication with the PACS is completely hidden for the users. Data privacy and consistency is ensured by automatic de-identification and re-labelling of DICOM data with context information (e.g. study and subject identifiers), respectively. The system is exemplarily demonstrated in a clinical trial, where computer tomography (CT) data is de-centrally captured from the subjects and centrally read by a chief radiologists to decide on inclusion of the subjects in the trial. Errors, latency and costs in the EDC workflow are reduced, while, a research database is implicitly built up in the background.

  16. Clinical pharmacists on medical care of pediatric inpatients: a single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore the best interventions and working patterns of clinical pharmacists in pediatrics and to determine the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in pediatrics. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 160 pediatric patients with nerve system disease, respiratory system disease or digestive system disease, who were randomly allocated into two groups, with 80 in each group. Interventions by clinical pharmacists in the experimental group included answering questions of physicians and nurses, giving advice on treating patients, checking prescriptions and patient counseling at discharge. In the control group, patients were treated without clinical pharmacist interventions. RESULTS: Of the 109 interventions provided by clinical pharmacists during 4 months, 47 were consultations for physicians and nurses, 31 were suggestions of treatment, with 30 accepted by physicians (96.77% and 31 were medical errors found in 641 prescriptions. Five adverse drug reactions were submitted to the adverse drug reaction monitoring network, with three in the experimental group and two in the control group. The average length of stay (LOS for patients with respiratory system diseases in the experimental group was 6.45 days, in comparison with 10.83 days in the control group, which was statistically different (p value<0.05; Average drug compliance rate in the experimental group was 81.41%, in comparison with 70.17% of the control group, which was statistically different (p value<0.05. Cost of drugs and hospitalization and rate of readmission in two weeks after discharge in the two groups were not statistically different. CONCLUSION: Participation by clinical pharmacists in the pharmacotherapy of pediatric patients can reduce LOS of patients with respiratory system disease and improve compliance rate through discharge education, showing no significant effects on prevention of ADR, reduction of cost of drugs and hospitalization and readmission

  17. 'Pragmatic randomized controlled trial of individually prescribed exercise versus usual care in a heterogeneous cancer survivor population': a feasibility study PEACH trial: prescribed exercise after chemotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Julie M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many cancer survivors suffer a range of physical and psychological symptoms which may persist for months or years after cessation of treatment. Despite the known benefits of exercise and its potential to address many of the adverse effects of treatment, the role of exercise as well as optimum duration, frequency, and intensity in this population has yet to be fully elucidated. Many cancer rehabilitation programmes presented in the literature are very long and have tight eligibility criteria which make them non-applicable to the majority of cancer survivors. This paper presents the protocol of a novel 8-week intervention which aims to increase fitness, and address other physical symptoms in a heterogeneous cancer survivor population. METHODS\\/DESIGN: The aim is to recruit 64 cancer survivors 2-6 months after completion of chemotherapy, usually adjuvant, with curative intent. Subjects will be recruited through oncology clinics in a single institution and randomised to usual care or an exercise intervention. The exercise intervention consists of two specifically tailored supervised moderate intensity aerobic exercise sessions weekly over 8-weeks. All participants will be assessed at baseline (0 weeks), at the end of the intervention (8 weeks), and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure is fitness, and secondary patient-related outcome measures include fatigue, quality of life, and morphological outcomes. A further secondary outcome is process evaluation including adherence to and compliance with the exercise program. DISCUSSION: This study will provide valuable information about the physical outcomes of this 8-week supervised aerobic programme. Additionally, process information and economic evaluation will inform the feasibility of implementing this program in a heterogeneous population post cessation of chemotherapy.

  18. Feasibility and Efficacy of the Nintendo Wii Gaming System to Improve Balance Performance Post-Stroke: Protocol of a Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial in an Inpatient Rehabilitation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kelly J; Clark, Ross A; McGinley, Jennifer L; Martin, Clarissa L; Miller, Kimberly J

    2013-04-01

    Balance deficits following stroke are common and debilitating. Commercially available gaming systems, such as the Nintendo(®) (Kyoto, Japan) Wii™, have been widely adopted clinically; however, there is limited evidence supporting their feasibility and efficacy for improving balance performance following stroke. The aim of this trial is to investigate the clinical feasibility and efficacy of using the Nintendo Wii gaming system as an adjunct to standard care to improve balance performance following stroke in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. Thirty participants undergoing inpatient stroke rehabilitation will be recruited into this Phase II, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Participants will be allocated into a Balance or Upper Limb Group, and both groups will perform activities using the Nintendo Wii in addition to their standard care. Participants will attend three 45-minute sessions per week, for a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 4 weeks. The main focus of the study is to investigate the feasibility of the intervention protocol. This will be evaluated through recruitment, retention, adherence, acceptability, and safety. The Step Test and Functional Reach Test will be the primary efficacy outcomes. Secondary outcomes will include force platform, mobility, and upper limb measures. Assessments will occur at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after study entry. To the authors' knowledge, this will be the largest randomized clinical trial to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of the Nintendo Wii gaming system for improving balance performance in a stroke population. The results will inform the design of a Phase III multicenter trial.

  19. Feasibility of Urgent-Start Peritoneal Dialysis in Older Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haijiao; Ni, Zhaohui; Mou, Shan; Lu, Renhua; Fang, Wei; Huang, Jiaying; Hu, Chunhua; Zhang, Haifen; Yan, Hao; Li, Zhenyuan; Yu, Zanzhe

    2018-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) frequently require urgent-start dialysis. Recent evidence suggests that peritoneal dialysis (PD) might be a feasible alternative to hemodialysis (HD) in these patients, including in older patients. This retrospective study enrolled patients aged > 65 years with ESRD who underwent urgent dialysis without functional vascular access or PD catheter at a single center, from January 2011 to December 2014. Patients were grouped based on their dialysis modality (PD or HD). Patients unable to tolerate PD catheter insertion or wait for PD were excluded. Each patient was followed for at least 30 days after catheter insertion. Short-term (30-day) dialysis-related complications and patient survival were compared between the 2 groups. A total of 94 patients were enrolled, including 53 (56.4%) who underwent PD. The incidence of dialysis-related complications during the first 30 days was significantly lower in PD compared with HD patients (3 [5.7%] vs 10 [24.4%], p = 0.009). Logistic regression identified urgent-start HD as an independent risk factor for dialysis-related complications compared with urgent-start PD (odds ratio 4.760 [1.183 - 19.147], p = 0.028). The 6-, 12-, 24-, and 36-month survival rates in the PD and HD groups were 92.3% vs 94.6%, 82.4% vs 81.3%, 75.7% vs 74.2%, and 69.5% vs 60.6%, respectively, with no significant differences between the groups (log-rank = 0.011, p = 0.915). Urgent-start PD was associated with fewer short-term dialysis-related complications and similar survival to urgent-start HD in older patients with ESRD. Peritoneal dialysis may thus be a safe and effective dialysis modality for older ESRD patients requiring urgent dialysis. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in ... Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place in medical centers and ... trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new treatments before ...

  1. A feasibility open trial of guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression amongst Arab Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Kayrouz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the preliminary efficacy and acceptability of a culturally modified therapist-guided cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT treatment for Arab Australians, aged 18 years and over with symptoms of depression and anxiety. To facilitate ease of use, the treatment was delivered via the Internet (Internet CBT; iCBT. Eleven participants with at least mild symptoms of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item (PHQ-9 total scores  > 4  or anxiety (Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7 total scores > 4  accessed the online Arab Wellbeing Course, which consisted of five online lessons delivered over 8 weeks. Measures of depression, anxiety, distress and disability were gathered at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. Data were analysed using mixed-linear model analyses. Ninety-one percent (10/11 of participants completed the five lessons over 8 weeks, with 10/11 providing post-treatment and 3-month follow-up data. Participants improved significantly across all outcome measures, with large within-group effect sizes based on estimated marginal means (Cohen's d at post-treatment (d = 1.08 to 1.74 and 3-month follow-up (d = 1.53 to 2.00. The therapist spent an average of 90.72 min (SD = 28.98 in contact, in total, with participants during the trial. Participants rated the Arab Wellbeing Course as acceptable. Caution is needed in interpreting the results of the current study given the small sample size employed, raising questions about the impact of levels of acculturation and the absence of a control group. However, the results are encouraging and indicate that, with minor modifications, western psychological interventions have the potential to be of benefit to English speaking Arab immigrants.

  2. A pilot randomised controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the Baby Triple P Positive Parenting Programme in mothers with postnatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivos, Zoe-Lydia; Calam, Rachel; Sanders, Matthew R; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-10-01

    Few interventions for Postnatal Depression (PND) have focused on parenting difficulties; the aim of this research was to investigate the feasibility and evaluate a parenting intervention (Baby Triple P) in women with PND. This was a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate and determine the feasibility of the newly developed Baby Triple P compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in women with PND. In all, 27 female participants aged from 18 to 45 years (mean age = 28.4 years, standard deviation (SD) = 6.1), with a primary diagnosis of major depression and an infant under 12 months (mean age = 6.2 months, SD = 3.2 months), were recruited from primary care trusts in Greater Manchester, United Kingdom. Participants were randomly allocated to receive either eight Baby Triple P sessions in addition to TAU or TAU only. Outcomes were assessed at post-treatment (Time 2) and 3 months post-treatment (Time 3). Self-report outcomes were as follows: Beck Depression Inventory, Oxford Happiness Inventory, What Being the Parent of a New Baby is Like, Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire and the Brief Parenting Beliefs Scale-baby version. An assessor-rated observational measure of mother-infant interaction, the CARE Index and measure of intervention acceptability were also completed. Significant improvements from Time 1 to Time 2 and Time 1 to Time 3 were observed across both groups. Although women allocated to Baby Triple P showed more favourable improvements, the between-group differences were not significant. However, the intervention was highly acceptable to women with PND. A large-scale RCT is indicated. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Effects of a Tailored Positive Psychology Intervention on Well-Being and Pain in Individuals With Chronic Pain and a Physical Disability: A Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Rachel; Gertz, Kevin J; Molton, Ivan R; Terrill, Alexandra L; Bombardier, Charles H; Ehde, Dawn M; Jensen, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    To determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a computer-based positive psychology intervention in individuals with a physical disability and chronic pain. Individuals with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, neuromuscular disease, or postpolio syndrome and chronic pain were randomly assigned to a positive psychology or a control condition. Participants in the intervention group were instructed to practice 4 personalized positive psychology exercises. Participants in the control group were instructed to write about life details for 8 weeks. Participants completed online well-being and pain-related questionnaires at baseline, posttreatment, and at the 2.5-month follow-up, and rated treatment satisfaction at posttreatment. Ninety-six participants were randomized and 68 (70%) completed follow-up assessments. Participants in the positive psychology intervention group reported significant pretreatment to posttreatment improvements in pain intensity, pain control, pain catastrophizing, pain interference, life satisfaction, positive affect, and depression. Improvements in life satisfaction, depression, pain intensity, pain interference, and pain control were maintained to the 2.5-month follow-up. Participants in the control group reported significant pretreatment to posttreatment improvements in life satisfaction, and pretreatment to follow-up improvements in pain intensity and pain control. Significant between-group differences, favoring the treatment group, emerged for pretreatment to posttreatment improvements in pain intensity and pain control. Participants were similarly satisfied with both treatments. The results support the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of a computer-based positive psychology intervention for improving well-being and pain-related outcomes in individuals with physical disabilities and chronic pain, and indicate that a full trial of the intervention is warranted.

  4. HELPing older people with very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HELP-COPD): mixed-method feasibility pilot randomised controlled trial of a novel intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Susan; Kendall, Marilyn; Ferguson, Susie; MacNee, William; Sheikh, Aziz; White, Patrick; Worth, Allison; Boyd, Kirsty; Murray, Scott A; Pinnock, Hilary

    2015-04-16

    Extending palliative care to those with advanced non-malignant disease is advocated, but the implications in specific conditions are poorly understood. We piloted a novel nurse-led intervention, HELPing older people with very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HELP-COPD), undertaken 4 weeks after discharge from hospital, which sought to identify and address the holistic care needs of people with severe COPD. This 6-month mixed-method feasibility pilot trial randomised (ratio 3:1) patients to HELP-COPD or usual care. We assessed the feasibility of using validated questionnaires as outcome measures and analysed the needs/actions recorded in the HELP-COPD records. Semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of patients, carers and professionals explored the perceptions of HELP-COPD. Verbatim transcriptions and field notes were analysed using Normalisation Process Theory as a framework. We randomised 32 patients (24 to HELP-COPD); 19 completed the study (death=3, ill-health=4, declined=6). The HELP-COPD record noted a mean of 1.6 actions/assessment, mostly provision of information or self-help actions: only five referrals were made. Most patients were positive about HELP-COPD, discussing their concerns and coping strategies in all domains, but the questionnaires were burdensome for some patients. Adaptation to their slowly progressive disability and a strong preference to rely on family support was reflected in limited acceptance of formal services. Professionals perceived HELP-COPD as addressing an important aspect of care, although timing overlapped with discharge planning. The HELP-COPD intervention was well received by patients and the concept resonated with professionals, although delivery post discharge overlapped with existing services. Integration of brief holistic care assessments in the routine primary care management of COPD may be more appropriate.

  5. A Phase II randomised controlled trial assessing the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of dignity therapy for older people in care homes: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sue; Chochinov, Harvey; Harding, Richard; Murray, Scott; Richardson, Alison; Higginson, Irene J

    2009-03-24

    Although most older people living in nursing homes die there, there is a dearth of robust evaluations of interventions to improve their end-of-life care. Residents usually have multiple health problems making them heavily reliant on staff for their care, which can erode their sense of dignity. Dignity Therapy has been developed to help promote dignity and reduce distress. It comprises a recorded interview, which is transcribed, edited then returned to the patient, who can bequeath it to people of their choosing. Piloting has suggested that Dignity Therapy is beneficial to people dying of cancer and their families. The aims of this study are to assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of Dignity Therapy to reduce psychological and spiritual distress in older people reaching the end of life in care homes, and to pilot the methods for a Phase III RCT. A randomised controlled open-label trial. Sixty-four residents of care homes for older people are randomly allocated to one of two groups: (i) Intervention (Dignity Therapy offered in addition to any standard care), and (ii) Control group (standard care). Recipients of the "generativity" documents are asked their views on taking part in the study and the therapy. Both quantitative and qualitative outcomes are assessed in face-to-face interviews at baseline and at approximately one and eight weeks after the intervention (equivalent in the control group). The primary outcome is residents' sense of dignity (potential effectiveness) assessed by the Patient Dignity Inventory. Secondary outcomes for residents include depression, hopefulness and quality of life. In view of the relatively small sample size, quantitative analysis is mainly descriptive. The qualitative analysis uses the Framework method. Dignity Therapy is brief, can be done at the bedside and could help both patients and their families. This detailed exploratory research shows if it is feasible to offer Dignity Therapy to residents of

  6. An mHealth App for Decision-Making Support in Wound Dressing Selection (WounDS): Protocol for a User-Centered Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Scott; McSwiggan, Jane; Parker, Joanne; Halas, Gayle A; Friesen, Marcia

    2018-04-24

    Primary care health professionals, especially family physicians, see a variety of wounds, and yet-despite the frequency of providing wound care-many family physicians do not feel confident in wound care management. This is partly due to a lack of formal wound education in Family Medicine programs. While there are numerous electronic wound care resources available in the UK and North America, none were identified that address the specific need in supporting clinical decision-making in wound dressing selection. At the same time, healthcare providers are increasingly using technology in personal and professional contexts, and a logical extension is to use technology for knowledge translation strategies. This work developed a prototype mobile health software application named WounDS, designed to support clinical decision-making in selecting wound dressings. This article presents the development and evaluation plan for the WounDS app. WounDS has been developed on the iOS platform. The primary specification included ease of use, in that one of the primary influences in user adoption would be the ability to receive a wound dressing recommendation in under 30 seconds and under 5 taps on the screen. The WounDS app guides users through a series of binary decisions for assessing the wound and provides a wound dressing recommendation. The selection algorithm is based in best practices using the Wound Bed Preparation Paradigm. Current work is underway to examine the implementation needs for WounDS to be most effectively utilized and to pilot test its feasibility and use in clinical care. Data will be collected through user trials, focus groups, and user metadata will be collected within the app. Optimizing these preconditions will enable a subsequent phase of study to determine effects on clinical decision-making and clinical outcomes. WounDS is designed for knowledge translation, use of technology in clinical decision-making, and continuity of care. The benefits of Woun

  7. Radiotherapy for calcaneodynia. Results of a single center prospective randomized dose optimization trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Jeremias, C.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work was to compare the efficacy of two different dose fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of patients with calcaneodynia. Between February 2006 and April 2010, 457 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients received radiotherapy using the orthovoltage technique. One radiotherapy series consisted of 6 single fractions/3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after radiotherapy using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). The overall response rate for all patients was 87 % directly after and 88 % 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The mean VAS values before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 65.5 {+-} 22.1 and 64.0 {+-} 20.5 (p = 0.188), 34.8 {+-} 24.7 and 39.0 {+-} 26.3 (p = 0.122), and 25.1 {+-} 26.8 and 28.9 {+-} 26.8 (p = 0.156), respectively. The mean CPS before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 10.1 {+-} 2.7 and 10.0 {+-} 3.0 (p = 0.783), 5.6 {+-} 3.7 and 6.0 {+-} 3.9 (p = 0.336), 4.0 {+-} 4.1 and 4.3 {+-} 3.6 (p = 0.257), respectively. No statistically significant differences between the two single dose trial arms for early (p = 0.216) and delayed response (p = 0.080) were found. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for the management of calcaneodynia. For radiation protection reasons, the dose for a radiotherapy series is recommended not to exceed 3-6 Gy. (orig.)

  8. Update to a protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of a peer-led school-based intervention to increase the physical activity of adolescent girls (PLAN-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J; Edwards, Mark J; Campbell, Rona; Jago, Russell; Kipping, Ruth; Banfield, Kathryn; Kadir, Bryar; Garfield, Kirsty; Lyons, Ronan A; Blair, Peter S; Hollingworth, William

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low amongst adolescent girls, and this population faces specific barriers to being active. Peer influences on health behaviours are important in adolescence, and peer-led interventions might hold promise to change behaviour. This paper describes the protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of Peer-Led physical Activity iNtervention for Adolescent girls (PLAN-A), a peer-led intervention aimed at increasing adolescent girls' physical activity levels. In addition, this paper describes an update that has been made to the protocol for the PLAN-A feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial. A two-arm cluster randomised feasibility trial will be conducted in six secondary schools (intervention n  = 4; control n  = 2) with year 8 (12-13 years old) girls. The intervention will operate at a year group level and consist of year 8 girls nominating influential peers within their year group to become peer supporters. Approximately 15% of the cohort will receive 3 days of training about physical activity and interpersonal communication skills. Peer supporters will then informally diffuse messages about physical activity amongst their friends for 10 weeks. Data will be collected at baseline (time 0 (T0)), immediately after the intervention (time 1 (T1)) and 12 months after baseline measures (time 2 (T2)). In this feasibility trial, the primary interest is in the recruitment of schools and participants (both year 8 girls and peer supporters), delivery and receipt of the intervention, data provision rates and identifying the cost categories for future economic analysis. Physical activity will be assessed using 7-day accelerometry, with the likely primary outcome in a fully powered trial being daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Participants will also complete psychosocial questionnaires at each time point: assessing motivation, self-esteem and peer physical activity norms. Data analysis will be

  9. A randomised controlled trial testing the feasibility and efficacy of a physical activity behavioural change intervention in managing fatigue with gynaecological cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, C M; Blaney, J M; Lowe-Strong, A; Rankin, J P; Campbell, A; McCrum-Gardner, E; Gracey, J H

    2011-09-01

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a physical activity behavioural change intervention in managing cancer-related fatigue among gynaecological cancer survivors during and post anti-cancer treatments. A two arm, single blind, randomised controlled trial was conducted within the Northern Ireland regional Cancer Centre. Thirty three sedentary gynaecological cancer survivors (stage I-III; ≤3 years post diagnosis), experiencing cancer-related fatigue (mild-severe) took part. Participants were randomly assigned to a behavioural change, moderate intensity physical activity intervention (n=16) or a Contact Control group (n=17). The primary outcome was fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form and Functional Assessment in Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue subscale). Secondary outcomes included quality of life, physical functioning, positive and negative affect, depression, body composition, sleep dysfunction and self-reported physical activity. Feasibility was assessed based on the recruitment rate, programme and physical activity adherence and participants' programme evaluation, including optional focus groups (n=16). Twenty five percent of eligible women took part (33/134). Participants were 8.7 (SD=9.1) months post diagnosis, with a mean age of 53 (SD=10.3) years. The majority of the sample had a diagnosis of ovarian (n=12) or endometrial cancer (n=11). Significant differences favouring the intervention group were observed for fatigue at 12 weeks and 6 months follow-up (12 week: mean difference=-11.06; 95% confidence interval (CI)=-21.89 to -0.23; effect size (d)=0.13; p=0.046; 6 month: mean difference=-19.48; 95% CI=-19.67 to -19.15; effect size (d)=0.20; p=0.01). A mean of 10 calls (SD=1.2 calls) were delivered to the Physical Activity Group, and 10 (SD=1.6 calls) to the CC group. The intervention was positively perceived based on exit questionnaire and focus group findings. A physical activity behavioural change intervention for

  10. Thiazide diuretic-caused hyponatremia in the elderly hypertensive: will a bottle of Nepro a day keep hyponatremia and the doctor away? Study protocol for a proof-of-concept feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Marcel; McCormick, Brendan; Magner, Peter; Ramsay, Tim; Edwards, Cedric; Bugeja, Ann; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2018-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, with an increasing prevalence with age, but with easily available medications to control it. Adverse effects of these medications do limit their use, in particular hyponatremia due to thiazide and thiazide-like diuretics. This is more common in the elderly patients due to a combination of inadequate protein intake and impaired urinary dilution capability, made worse by additional thiazide use. Limiting free water intake and increasing protein intake are often not successful resulting in thiazide avoidance. Daily protein supplement is a potential option in this clinical scenario. We describe the protocol for a feasibility study to explore this option. This is a single-arm, prospective, open-label proof-of-concept trial, including elderly patients with thiazide diuretic-induced hyponatremia. Forty patients will be enrolled and receive a bottle of a protein supplement daily, providing 120 mmol of solutes and permitting an extra 163 mL free water loss, for 4 weeks. The main outcome measures will be (1) feasibility for enrollment, (2) safety of the intervention, and (3) potential efficacy of the intervention in improving hyponatremia. Secondary outcome measures will include changes in urine osmolality, body weight, and urea measurements. Thiazide diuretic-induced hyponatremia is an important adverse effect, with significant clinical impact, such as delirium and falls, and limits the use of these potent antihypertensive agents. There are little data on the effect or safety of protein supplementation and also on whether a trial of this is feasible. The results of this proof-of-concept feasibility trial will help plan and execute a larger definitive trial to test protein supplementation as an effective strategy in this condition. The trial is registered with Clinical trials, registration identifier: NCT02614807.

  11. Total integrated performance excellence system (TIPES): A true north direction for a clinical trial support center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Mike R; Parsons, Sherry; Boardman, Kathy D; Warren, Stuart R; Davis-Karim, Anne; Griffin, Kevin; Betterton, Jane A; Jones, Mark S; Johnson, Stanley H; Vertrees, Julia E; Hickey, Jan H; Salazar, Thelma P; Huang, Grant D

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the quality journey taken by a Federal organization over more than 20 years. These efforts have resulted in the implementation of a Total Integrated Performance Excellence System (TIPES) that combines key principles and practices of established quality systems. The Center has progressively integrated quality system frameworks including the Malcom Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) Framework and Criteria for Performance Excellence, ISO 9001, and the Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3), as well as supplemental quality systems of ISO 15378 (packaging for medicinal products) and ISO 21500 (guide to project management) to systematically improve all areas of operations. These frameworks were selected for applicability to Center processes and systems, consistency and reinforcement of complimentary approaches, and international acceptance. External validations include the MBNQA, the highest quality award in the US, continued registration and conformance to ISO standards and guidelines, and multiple VA and state awards. With a focus on a holistic approach to quality involving processes, systems and personnel, this paper presents activities and lessons that were critical to building TIPES and establishing the quality environment for conducting clinical research in support of Veterans and national health care.

  12. Total integrated performance excellence system (TIPES: A true north direction for a clinical trial support center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike R. Sather

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the quality journey taken by a Federal organization over more than 20 years. These efforts have resulted in the implementation of a Total Integrated Performance Excellence System (TIPES that combines key principles and practices of established quality systems. The Center has progressively integrated quality system frameworks including the Malcom Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA Framework and Criteria for Performance Excellence, ISO 9001, and the Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3, as well as supplemental quality systems of ISO 15378 (packaging for medicinal products and ISO 21500 (guide to project management to systematically improve all areas of operations. These frameworks were selected for applicability to Center processes and systems, consistency and reinforcement of complimentary approaches, and international acceptance. External validations include the MBNQA, the highest quality award in the US, continued registration and conformance to ISO standards and guidelines, and multiple VA and state awards. With a focus on a holistic approach to quality involving processes, systems and personnel, this paper presents activities and lessons that were critical to building TIPES and establishing the quality environment for conducting clinical research in support of Veterans and national health care.

  13. Biomarker-driven trial in metastatic pancreas cancer: feasibility in a multicenter study of saracatinib, an oral Src inhibitor, in previously treated pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcaroli, John; Quackenbush, Kevin; Dasari, Arvind; Powell, Rebecca; McManus, Martine; Tan, Aik-Choon; Foster, Nathan R; Picus, Joel; Wright, John; Nallapareddy, Sujatha; Erlichman, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A

    2012-01-01

    Src tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, and the oral Src inhibitor saracatinib has shown antitumor activity in preclinical models of pancreas cancer. We performed a CTEP-sponsored Phase II clinical trial of saracatinib in previously treated pancreas cancer patients, with a primary endpoint of 6-month survival. A Simon MinMax two-stage phase II design was used. Saracatinib (175 mg/day) was administered orally continuously in 28-day cycles. In the unselected portion of the study, 18 patients were evaluable. Only two (11%) patients survived for at least 6 months, and three 6-month survivors were required to move to second stage of study as originally designed. The study was amended as a biomarker-driven trial (leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 [LRRC19] > insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 [IGFBP2] “top scoring pairs” polymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay, and PIK3CA mutant) based on preclinical data in a human pancreas tumor explant model. In the biomarker study, archival tumor tissue or fresh tumor biopsies were tested. Biomarker-positive patients were eligible for the study. Only one patient was PIK3CA mutant in a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) portion of the gene. This patient was enrolled in the study and failed to meet the 6-month survival endpoint. As the frequency of biomarker-positive patients was very low (<3%), the study was closed. Although we were unable to conclude whether enriching for a subset of second/third line pancreatic cancer patients treated with a Src inhibitor based on a biomarker would improve 6-month survival, we demonstrate that testing pancreatic tumor samples for a biomarker-driven, multicenter study in metastatic pancreas cancer is feasible

  14. Design of a randomised controlled trial of adapted physical activity during adjuvant treatment for localised breast cancer: the PASAPAS feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touillaud, M; Foucaut, A-M; Berthouze, S E; Reynes, E; Kempf-Lépine, A-S; Carretier, J; Pérol, D; Guillemaut, S; Chabaud, S; Bourne-Branchu, V; Perrier, L; Trédan, O; Fervers, B; Bachmann, P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction After a diagnosis of localised breast cancer, overweight, obesity and weight gain are negatively associated with prognosis. In contrast, maintaining an optimal weight through a balanced diet combined with regular physical activity appears to be effective protective behaviour against comorbidity or mortality after a breast cancer diagnosis. The primary aim of the Programme pour une Alimentation Saine et une Activité Physique Adaptée pour les patientes atteintes d'un cancer du Sein (PASAPAS) randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the feasibility of implementing an intervention of adapted physical activity (APA) for 6 months concomitant with the prescription of a first line of adjuvant chemotherapy. Secondary aims include assessing the acceptability of the intervention, compliance to the programme, process implementation, patients’ satisfaction, evolution of biological parameters and the medicoeconomic impact of the intervention. Methods and analysis The study population consists of 60 women eligible for adjuvant chemotherapy after a diagnosis of localised invasive breast cancer. They will be recruited during a 2-year inclusion period and randomly allocated between an APA intervention arm and a control arm following a 2:1 ratio. All participants should benefit from personalised dietetic counselling and patients allocated to the intervention arm will be offered an APA programme of two to three weekly sessions of Nordic walking and aerobic fitness. During the 6-month intervention and 6-month follow-up, four assessments will be performed including blood draw, anthropometrics and body composition measurements, and questionnaires about physical activity level, diet, lifestyle factors, psychological criteria, satisfaction with the intervention and medical data. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the French Ethics Committee (Comité de Protection des Personnes Sud-Est IV) and the national agencies for biomedical studies and for privacy

  15. Camino Verde (The Green Way): evidence-based community mobilisation for dengue control in Nicaragua and Mexico: feasibility study and study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Neil; Arostegui, Jorge; Nava-Aguilera, Elizabeth; Harris, Eva; Ledogar, Robert J

    2017-05-30

    Since the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit dengue virus can breed in clean water, WHO-endorsed vector control strategies place sachets of organophosphate pesticide, temephos (Abate), in household water storage containers. These and other pesticide-dependent approaches have failed to curb the spread of dengue and multiple dengue virus serotypes continue to spread throughout tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. A feasibility study in Managua, Nicaragua, generated instruments, intervention protocols, training schedules and impact assessment tools for a cluster randomised controlled trial of community-based approaches to vector control comprising an alternative strategy for dengue prevention and control in Nicaragua and Mexico. The Camino Verde (Green Way) is a pragmatic parallel group trial of pesticide-free dengue vector control, adding effectiveness to the standard government dengue control. A random sample from the most recent census in three coastal regions of Guerrero state in Mexico will generate 90 study clusters and the equivalent sampling frame in Managua, Nicaragua will generate 60 clusters, making a total of 150 clusters each of 137-140 households. After a baseline study, computer-driven randomisation will allocate to intervention one half of the sites, stratified by country, evidence of recent dengue virus infection in children aged 3-9 years and, in Nicaragua, level of community organisation. Following a common evidence-based education protocol, each cluster will develop and implement its own collective interventions including house-to-house visits, school-based programmes and inter-community visits. After 18 months, a follow-up study will compare dengue history, serological evidence of recent dengue virus infection (via measurement of anti-dengue virus antibodies in saliva samples) and entomological indices between intervention and control sites. Our hypothesis is that informed community mobilisation adds effectiveness in controlling

  16. Using data from the Microsoft Kinect 2 to determine postural stability in healthy subjects: A feasibility trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behdad Dehbandi

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether kinematic data collected by the Microsoft Kinect 2 (MK2 could be used to quantify postural stability in healthy subjects. Twelve subjects were recruited for the project, and were instructed to perform a sequence of simple postural stability tasks. The movement sequence was performed as subjects were seated on top of a force platform, and the MK2 was positioned in front of them. This sequence of tasks was performed by each subject under three different postural conditions: "both feet on the ground" (1, "One foot off the ground" (2, and "both feet off the ground" (3. We compared force platform and MK2 data to quantify the degree to which the MK2 was returning reliable data across subjects. We then applied a novel machine-learning paradigm to the MK2 data in order to determine the extent to which data from the MK2 could be used to reliably classify different postural conditions. Our initial comparison of force plate and MK2 data showed a strong agreement between the two devices, with strong Pearson correlations between the trunk centroids "Spine_Mid" (0.85 ± 0.06, "Neck" (0.86 ± 0.07 and "Head" (0.87 ± 0.07, and the center of pressure centroid inferred by the force platform. Mean accuracy for the machine learning classifier from MK2 was 97.0%, with a specific classification accuracy breakdown of 90.9%, 100%, and 100% for conditions 1 through 3, respectively. Mean accuracy for the machine learning classifier derived from the force platform data was lower at 84.4%. We conclude that data from the MK2 has sufficient information content to allow us to classify sequences of tasks being performed under different levels of postural stability. Future studies will focus on validating this protocol on large populations of individuals with actual balance impairments in order to create a toolkit that is clinically validated and available to the medical community.

  17. A hand hygiene intervention to decrease infections among children attending day care centers: design of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomer, Tizza P; Erasmus, Vicki; Vlaar, Nico; van Beeck, Ed F; Tjon-A-Tsien, Aimée; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Voeten, Hélène A C M

    2013-06-03

    Day care center attendance has been recognized as a risk factor for acquiring gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, which can be prevented with adequate hand hygiene (HH). Based on previous studies on environmental and sociocognitive determinants of caregivers' compliance with HH guidelines in day care centers (DCCs), an intervention has been developed aiming to improve caregivers' and children's HH compliance and decrease infections among children attending DCCs. The aim of this paper is to describe the design of a cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention. The intervention will be evaluated in a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial among 71 DCCs in the Netherlands. In total, 36 DCCs will receive the intervention consisting of four components: 1) HH products (dispensers and refills for paper towels, soap, alcohol-based hand sanitizer, and hand cream); 2) training to educate about the Dutch national HH guidelines; 3) two team training sessions aimed at goal setting and formulating specific HH improvement activities; and 4) reminders and cues to action (posters/stickers). Intervention DCCs will be compared to 35 control DCCs continuing usual practice. The primary outcome measure will be observed HH compliance of caregivers and children, measured at baseline and one, three, and six months after start of the intervention. The secondary outcome measure will be the incidence of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections in 600 children attending DCCs, monitored over six months by parents using a calendar to mark the days their child has diarrhea and/or a cold. Multilevel logistic regression will be performed to assess the effect of the intervention on HH compliance. Multilevel poisson regression will be performed to assess the incidence of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections in children attending DCCs. This is one of the first DCC intervention studies to assess HH compliance of both caregivers and

  18. Effectiveness and feasibility of long-lasting insecticide-treated curtains and water container covers for dengue vector control in Colombia: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Juliana; García-Betancourt, Tatiana; Cortés, Sebastian; García, Diana; Alcalá, Lucas; González-Uribe, Catalina; Brochero, Helena; Carrasquilla, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    Long-lasting insecticide-treated net (LLIN) window and door curtains alone or in combination with LLIN water container covers were analysed regarding effectiveness in reducing dengue vector density, and feasibility of the intervention. A cluster randomised trial was conducted in an urban area of Colombia comparing 10 randomly selected control and 10 intervention clusters. In control clusters, routine vector control activities were performed. The intervention delivered first, LLIN curtains (from July to August 2013) and secondly, water container covers (from October to March 2014). Cross-sectional entomological surveys were carried out at baseline (February 2013 to June 2013), 9 weeks after the first intervention (August to October 2013), and 4-6 weeks after the second intervention (March to April 2014). Curtains were installed in 922 households and water container covers in 303 households. The Breteau index (BI) fell from 14 to 6 in the intervention group and from 8 to 5 in the control group. The additional intervention with LLIN covers for water containers showed a significant reduction in pupae per person index (PPI) (p=0.01). In the intervention group, the PPI index showed a clear decline of 71% compared with 25% in the control group. Costs were high but options for cost savings were identified. Short term impact evaluation indicates that the intervention package can reduce dengue vector density but sustained effect will depend on multiple factors. © The author 2015. The World Health Organization has granted Oxford University Press permission for the reproduction of this article.

  19. Effects of a psycho-educational programme on health-related quality of life in patients treated for colorectal and anal cancer: A feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson-Nevo, Emma; Karlsson, Jan; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) may have a negative impact on a person's quality of life. Psycho-educational interventions for patients with CRC are rarely studied. The purpose of this feasibility trial was to evaluate the effect of a psycho-educational programme (PEP) on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients treated for CRC and anal cancer. Patients with CRC and anal cancer were randomly assigned to a PEP (n = 47) or standard treatment (n = 39). The PEP included informative lectures, discussion, and reflection. HRQL was evaluated using the SF-36 at baseline and 1, 6, and 12 months after the end of the PEP. Patients in the PEP group had significantly better Mental Health scores after 1 month and significantly better Bodily Pain scores after 6 months compared with patients who received standard care. The results of this study indicate that a PEP can have a short-term effect on the mental health and bodily pain of patients treated for CRC and anal cancer when comparing with a control group. The article discusses the methodological difficulties of evaluating an intervention such as this PEP in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Increasing children's physical activity through a teaching-assistant led extracurricular intervention: process evaluation of the action 3:30 randomised feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Sebire, Simon J; Davies, Ben; Wood, Lesley; Banfield, Kathryn; Edwards, Mark J; Powell, Jane E; Montgomery, Alan A; Thompson, Janice L; Fox, Kenneth R

    2015-02-18

    Many children do not engage in recommended levels of physical activity (PA), highlighting the need to find ways to increase children's PA. Process evaluations play an important role in improving the science of randomised controlled trials. We recently reported the results of the Action 3:30 cluster randomised feasibility trial illustrating higher levels of moderate to vigorous intensity PA among boys but not girls. The aim of this paper is to report the process evaluation results including intervention fidelity, implementation, context and how intervention components and trial design could be improved before proceeding to a definitive RCT. Children's session enjoyment was assessed every two weeks. Reasons for non-attendance were provided by questionnaire at the end of the intervention. Post intervention interviews were held with participating teaching assistants (TAs) and school key contacts (KCs), and focus groups were conducted with children in all 10 intervention schools. Interviews and focus groups examined how recruitment and session attendance might be improved and established which elements of the programme that were and were not well received. Data indicated good intervention fidelity with TA's adopting enjoyment-focussed teaching styles and the sessions improving children's skills and self-esteem. Several positive aspects of implementation were identified, including high session variety, the opportunity to work in teams, the child-led sessions and the engaging leader style. In terms of context there was evidence that TA's faced difficulties managing challenging behaviour and that further training in this area was needed. TAs and KCs felt that recruitment could be improved by providing taster sessions during PE lessons and clarifying the days that the clubs would run at the point of recruitment. The programme could be improved to enhance interest for girls, by including training for managing disruptive behaviour and making some activities more age

  1. Change in clinical indices following laser or scalpel treatment for periodontitis: A split-mouth, randomized, multi-center trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.; Nicholson, Dawn M.; McCarthy, Delwin; Yukna, Raymond A.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Greenwell, Henry; Finley, James; McCawley, Thomas K.; Xenoudi, Pinelopi; Gregg, Robert H.

    2014-02-01

    Data are presented from a multi-center, prospective, longitudinal, clinical trial comparing four different treatments for periodontitis, (1) the LANAPTM protocol utilizing a FR pulsed-Nd:YAG laser; (2) flap surgery using the Modified Widman technique (MWF); (3) traditional scaling and root planing (SRP); and (4) coronal debridement (CD). Each treatment was randomized to a different quadrant. Fifty-one (54) subjects were recruited at five centers that included both private practice and university-based investigators. At 6-months and 12 months post-treatment the LANAPTM protocol and MWF yielded equivalent results based on changes in probing depths. The major difference observed between the two procedures was that patients reported significantly greater comfort following the LANAP™ procedure than following the MWF (P<0.001). There was greater reduction in bleeding in the LANAPTM quadrant than in the other three at both 6 and 12 months. Improvements following SRP were better than expected at 6 months and continued to improve, providing outcomes that were equivalent to both LANAPTM and MWF at 12 months. The improvement in the SRP quadrants suggests the hypothesis that an aspect of the LANAPTM protocol generated a significant, positive and unanticipated systemic (or trans-oral) effect on sub-gingival wound healing.

  2. TIGA-CUB - manualised psychoanalytic child psychotherapy versus treatment as usual for children aged 5-11 years with treatment-resistant conduct disorders and their primary carers: study protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Elizabeth; Walwyn, Rebecca; Burton, Kayleigh; Cicero, Robert; Graham, Liz; Reed, Sadie; Tubeuf, Sandy; Twiddy, Maureen; Wright-Hughes, Alex; Ellis, Lynda; Evans, Dot; Hughes, Tom; Midgley, Nick; Wallis, Paul; Cottrell, David

    2017-09-15

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends evidence-based parenting programmes as a first-line intervention for conduct disorders (CD) in children aged 5-11 years. As these are not effective in 25-33% of cases, NICE has requested research into second-line interventions. Child and Adolescent Psychotherapists (CAPTs) address highly complex problems where first-line treatments have failed and there have been small-scale studies of Psychoanalytic Child Psychotherapy (PCP) for CD. A feasibility trial is needed to determine whether a confirmatory trial of manualised PCP (mPCP) versus Treatment as Usual (TaU) for CD is practicable or needs refinement. The aim of this paper is to publish the abridged protocol of this feasibility trial. TIGA-CUB (Trial on improving Inter-Generational Attachment for Children Undergoing Behaviour problems) is a two-arm, pragmatic, parallel-group, multicentre, individually randomised (1:1) controlled feasibility trial (target n = 60) with blinded outcome assessment (at 4 and 8 months), which aims to develop an optimum practicable protocol for a confirmatory, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial (RCT) (primary outcome: child's behaviour; secondary outcomes: parental reflective functioning and mental health, child and parent quality of life), comparing mPCP and TaU as second-line treatments for children aged 5-11 years with treatment-resistant CD and inter-generational attachment difficulties, and for their primary carers. Child-primary carer dyads will be recruited following a referral to, or re-referral within, National Health Service (NHS) Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) after an unsuccessful first-line parenting intervention. PCP will be delivered by qualified CAPTs working in routine NHS clinical practice, using a trial-specific PCP manual (a brief version of established PCP clinical practice). Outcomes are: (1) feasibility of recruitment methods, (2) uptake and follow-up rates, (3

  3. Safety and feasibility of laparoscopic colo-rectal surgery for cancer at a tertiary center in a developing country: Egypt as an

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Tawfik Amin

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery for cancer in developing countries could be safe and feasible. Safe reuse of disposable expensive parts of some laparoscopic instruments could help in propagation of this technique in developing countries.

  4. Family Access to a Dentist Study (FADS): A Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Suchitra; Riedy, Christine; Albert, Jeffrey M; Lee, Wonik; Slusar, Mary Beth; Curtan, Shelley; Ferretti, Gerald; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many low-income parent/caregivers do not understand the importance of cavity-free primary (baby) teeth and the chronic nature of dental caries (tooth decay). As a consequence, dental preventive and treatment utilization is low even when children are screened in schools and referred for care. This study aims to test a referral letter and Dental Information Guide (DIG) designed using the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM) framework to improve caregivers’ illness perception of dental caries and increase utilization of care by children with restorative dental needs. Methods A multi-site randomized controlled trial with caregivers of Kindergarten to 4th grade children in urban Ohio and rural Washington State will compare five arms: (1) CSM referral letter alone; (2) CSM referral letter + DIG; (3) reduced CSM referral letter alone; (4) reduced CSM referral letter + DIG; (5) standard (control) referral. At baseline, children will be screened at school to determine restorative dental needs. If in need of treatment, caregivers will be randomized to study arms and an intervention packet will be sent home. The primary outcome will be dental care based on a change in oral health status by clinical examination 7 months post-screening (ICDAS sealant codes 1 and 2; restoration codes 3–8; extraction). Enrollment commenced summer 2015 with results in summer 2016. Conclusion This study uses the CSM framework to develop and test behavioral interventions to increase dental utilization among low-income caregivers. If effective this simple intervention has broad applicability in clinical and community-based settings. PMID:26500170

  5. Pain management in cancer center inpatients: a cluster randomized trial to evaluate a systematic integrated approach—The Edinburgh Pain Assessment and Management Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, M; Walker, J; Colvin, L; Rodriguez, A; Murray, G; Sharpe, M

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Pain is suboptimally managed in patients with cancer. We aimed to compare the effect of a policy of adding a clinician-delivered bedside pain assessment and management tool (Edinburgh Pain Assessment and management Tool [EPAT]) to usual care (UC) versus UC alone on pain outcomes. Patients and Methods In a two-arm, parallel group, cluster randomized (1:1) trial, we observed pain outcomes in 19 cancer centers in the United Kingdom and then randomly assigned the centers to eithe...

  6. Which Obstacles Prevent Us from Recruiting into Clinical Trials: A Survey about the Environment for Clinical Studies at a German University Hospital in a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straube

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProspective clinical studies are the most important tool in modern medicine. The standard in good clinical practice in clinical trials has constantly improved leading to more sophisticated protocols. Moreover, translational questions are increasingly addressed in clinical trials. Such trials must follow elaborate rules and regulations. This is accompanied by a significant increase in documentation issues which require substantial manpower. Furthermore, university-based clinical centers are interested in increasing the amount of patients treated within clinical trials, and this number has evolved to be a key quality criterion. The present study was initiated to elucidate the obstacles that limit clinical scientists in screening and recruiting for clinical trials.MethodsA specific questionnaire with 28 questions was developed focusing on all aspects of clinical trial design as well as trial management. This included questions on organizational issues, medical topics as well as potential patients’ preferences and physician’s goals. The questionnaire was established to collect data anonymously on a web-based platform. The survey was conducted within the Klinikum rechts der Isar, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University of Munich; physicians of all levels (Department Chairs, attending physicians, residents, as well as study nurses, and other study-related staff were addressed. The answers were analyzed using the Survio analyzing tool (http://www.survio.com/de/.ResultsWe collected 42 complete sets of answers; in total 28 physicians, 11 study nurses, and 3 persons with positions in administration answered our survey. The study centers reported to participate in a range of 3–160 clinical trials with a recruitment rate of 1–80%. Main obstacles were determined: 31/42 (74% complained about limited human resources and 22/42 (52% reported to have a lack on technical resources, too. 30/42 (71% consented to the answer, that the documentation

  7. A feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial of the Positive Reappraisal Coping Intervention, a novel supportive technique for recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah; Bailey, Chris; Boivin, Jacky; Cheong, Ying; Reading, Isabel; Macklon, Nick

    2015-04-15

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is diagnosed when a woman has had three or more miscarriages. Increased levels of distress and anxiety are common during the waiting period of any subsequent pregnancies, posing a significant threat to psychological well-being. However, only limited support and therapy are available for these women, and many are left to cope alone. The Positive Reappraisal Coping Intervention (PRCI) is a novel self-administered supportive technique which has been shown to be effective in patients awaiting the outcome of in vitro fertilisation treatment. The primary objective of this study is to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the PRCI in improving quality of life in the difficult waiting period which women with previous RM endure before an ongoing pregnancy can be confirmed. A randomised controlled trial (RCT) feasibility study will establish the viability of conducting a multicentre RCT to definitively test the effects of the PRCI on the psychological well-being of women who have experienced RM during the initial waiting period of a subsequent pregnancy. A second component consists of a qualitative process evaluation exploring the initial experience of pregnancy following repeated miscarriages. Participants (n=50) will be randomised into one of two groups. The PRCI intervention group will receive the PRCI card and weekly questionnaires to assess their psychological well-being during the waiting period of their new pregnancy. The non-intervention group will be asked to complete the same weekly questionnaires. The qualitative process analysis will employ semistructured interviews (n=20) to address relevant aspects of the study objectives. Ethics approval has been obtained from the National Research Ethics Service Committee South Central-Hampshire A. Participating centres have given National Health Service R&D approval. Study findings will be disseminated through peer reviewed journals, national and international conferences and lay user groups

  8. A randomized control trial feasibility evaluation of an mHealth intervention for wheelchair skill training among middle-aged and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Giesbrecht

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Providing mobility skills training to manual wheelchair (MWC users can have a positive impact on community participation, confidence and quality of life. Often such training is restricted or not provided at all because of the expense of, and limited access to, occupational and physical therapists before and after discharge. This is particularly true among middle-aged and older adults, who often have limited access to rehabilitation services and require more time to learn motor skills. A monitored MWC skills training home program, delivered using a computer tablet (mHealth, was developed as an alternative approach to service delivery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing this mHealth MWC skills training program among middle-aged and older adults. Methods A 2 × 2 factorial design randomized controlled trial (RCT was used to compare the mHealth intervention and control groups, with additional wheeling time as a second factor. Community-dwelling MWC users aged 55 and older, who had used their MWC for less than two years and propelled with two hands, were recruited. Feasibility outcomes related to process, resources, management and treatment criteria were collected. Results Eighteen participants were recruited, with a retention rate of 94%. Mean (±SD duration for the first and second in-person training sessions were 90.1 ± 20.5 and 62.1 ± 5.5 min, respectively. In the treatment group, 78% achieved the minimum amount of home training (i.e., 300 min over four weeks and 56% achieved the preferred training threshold (i.e., 600 min. Trainers reported only seven minor protocol deviations. No tablets were lost or damaged and there was one incident of tablet malfunction. No injuries or adverse incidents were reported during data collection or training activities. Participants indicated 98% agreement on the post-treatment benefit questionnaire. Discussion Overall, the study protocol enabled implementation of

  9. A Protocol for a Feasibility and Acceptability Study of a Participatory, Multi-Level, Dynamic Intervention in Urban Outreach Centers to Improve the Oral Health of Low-Income Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E; Metcalf, Sara S; Yi, Stella; Zhang, Qiuyi; Gu, Xiaoxi; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2018-01-01

    While the US health care system has the capability to provide amazing treatment of a wide array of conditions, this care is not uniformly available to all population groups. Oral health care is one of the dimensions of the US health care delivery system in which striking disparities exist. More than half of the population does not visit a dentist each year. Improving access to oral health care is a critical and necessary first step to improving oral health outcomes and reducing disparities. Fluoride has contributed profoundly to the improved dental health of populations worldwide and is needed regularly throughout the life course to protect teeth against dental caries. To ensure additional gains in oral health, fluoride toothpaste should be used routinely at all ages. Evidence-based guidelines for annual dental visits and brushing teeth with fluoride toothpaste form the basis of this implementation science project that is intended to bridge the care gap for underserved Asian American populations by improving access to quality oral health care and enhancing effective oral health promotion strategies. The ultimate goal of this study is to provide information for the design and implementation of a randomized controlled trial of a participatory, multi-level, partnered (i.e., with community stakeholders) intervention to improve the oral and general health of low-income Chinese American adults. This study will evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a partnered intervention using remote data entry into an electronic health record (EHR) to improve access to oral health care and promote oral health. The research staff will survey a sample of Chinese American patients (planned n  = 90) screened at three outreach centers about their satisfaction with the partnered intervention. Providers (dentists and community health workers), research staff, administrators, site directors, and community advisory board members will participate in structured interviews

  10. A Protocol for a Feasibility and Acceptability Study of a Participatory, Multi-Level, Dynamic Intervention in Urban Outreach Centers to Improve the Oral Health of Low-Income Chinese Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Northridge

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionWhile the US health care system has the capability to provide amazing treatment of a wide array of conditions, this care is not uniformly available to all population groups. Oral health care is one of the dimensions of the US health care delivery system in which striking disparities exist. More than half of the population does not visit a dentist each year. Improving access to oral health care is a critical and necessary first step to improving oral health outcomes and reducing disparities. Fluoride has contributed profoundly to the improved dental health of populations worldwide and is needed regularly throughout the life course to protect teeth against dental caries. To ensure additional gains in oral health, fluoride toothpaste should be used routinely at all ages. Evidence-based guidelines for annual dental visits and brushing teeth with fluoride toothpaste form the basis of this implementation science project that is intended to bridge the care gap for underserved Asian American populations by improving access to quality oral health care and enhancing effective oral health promotion strategies. The ultimate goal of this study is to provide information for the design and implementation of a randomized controlled trial of a participatory, multi-level, partnered (i.e., with community stakeholders intervention to improve the oral and general health of low-income Chinese American adults.MethodsThis study will evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a partnered intervention using remote data entry into an electronic health record (EHR to improve access to oral health care and promote oral health. The research staff will survey a sample of Chinese American patients (planned n = 90 screened at three outreach centers about their satisfaction with the partnered intervention. Providers (dentists and community health workers, research staff, administrators, site directors, and community advisory board members will

  11. Detection of domestic violence by community mental health teams: a multi-center, cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijne, Roos E; Howard, Louise M; Trevillion, Kylee; Jongejan, Femke E; Garofalo, Carlo; Bogaerts, Stefan; Mulder, Cornelis L; Kamperman, Astrid M

    2017-08-07

    Domestic Violence and Abuse (DVA) is associated with a range of psychosocial and mental health problems. Having a psychiatric illness increases likelihood of being a victim of DVA. Despite the evidence of a high risk for DVA and the serious effects of violent victimization in psychiatric patients, detection rates are low and responses are inadequate. The aim of the BRAVE (Better Reduction trough Assessment of Violence and Evaluation) study is to improve detection of and response to DVA in psychiatric patients. In this article, we present the protocol of the BRAVE study which follows the SPIRIT guidelines. The BRAVE study is a cluster randomized controlled trial. We will include 24 community mental health teams from Rotterdam and The Hague. Twelve teams will provide care as usual and 12 teams will receive the intervention. The intervention consists of 1) a knowledge and skills training for mental health professionals about DVA, 2) a knowledge and skills training of DVA professionals about mental illness, 3) provision and implementation of a referral pathway between community mental health and DVA services. The follow up period is 12 months. Our primary outcome is the rate of detected cases of recent or any history of DVA in patients per team in 12 months. Detection rates are obtained through a systematic search in electronic patient files. Our secondary aims are to obtain information about the gain and sustainability of knowledge on DVA in mental health professionals, and to obtain insight into the feasibility, sustainability and acceptability of the intervention. Data on our secondary aims will be obtained through structured in depth interviews and a questionnaire on knowledge and attitudes on DVA. This study is the first cluster randomized controlled trial to target both male and female psychiatric patients that experience DVA, using an intervention that involves training of professionals. We expect the rate of detected cases of DVA to increase in the

  12. Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team (PREDICT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter; Shirtcliff, R Michael; Bailit, Howard L; Huebner, Colleen E; Conrad, Douglas; Ludwig, Sharity; Mitchell, Melissa; Dysert, Jeanne; Allen, Gary; Scott, JoAnna; Mancl, Lloyd

    2015-06-20

    To improve the oral health of low-income children, innovations in dental delivery systems are needed, including community-based care, the use of expanded duty auxiliary dental personnel, capitation payments, and global budgets. This paper describes the protocol for PREDICT (Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team), an evaluation project to test the effectiveness of new delivery and payment systems for improving dental care and oral health. This is a parallel-group cluster randomized controlled trial. Fourteen rural Oregon counties with a publicly insured (Medicaid) population of 82,000 children (0 to 21 years old) and pregnant women served by a managed dental care organization are randomized into test and control counties. In the test intervention (PREDICT), allied dental personnel provide screening and preventive services in community settings and case managers serve as patient navigators to arrange referrals of children who need dentist services. The delivery system intervention is paired with a compensation system for high performance (pay-for-performance) with efficient performance monitoring. PREDICT focuses on the following: 1) identifying eligible children and gaining caregiver consent for services in community settings (for example, schools); 2) providing risk-based preventive and caries stabilization services efficiently at these settings; 3) providing curative care in dental clinics; and 4) incentivizing local delivery teams to meet performance benchmarks. In the control intervention, care is delivered in dental offices without performance incentives. The primary outcome is the prevalence of untreated dental caries. Other outcomes are related to process, structure and cost. Data are collected through patient and staff surveys, clinical examinations, and the review of health and administrative records. If effective, PREDICT is expected to substantially reduce disparities in dental care and oral health. PREDICT can be

  13. Assessing the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths through mass drug administration: The DeWorm3 cluster randomized trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ásbjörnsdóttir, Kristjana Hrönn; Ajjampur, Sitara S Rao; Anderson, Roy M; Bailey, Robin; Gardiner, Iain; Halliday, Katherine E; Ibikounle, Moudachirou; Kalua, Khumbo; Kang, Gagandeep; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Luty, Adrian J F; Means, Arianna Rubin; Oswald, William; Pullan, Rachel L; Sarkar, Rajiv; Schär, Fabian; Szpiro, Adam; Truscott, James E; Werkman, Marleen; Yard, Elodie; Walson, Judd L

    2018-01-01

    Current control strategies for soil-transmitted helminths (STH) emphasize morbidity control through mass drug administration (MDA) targeting preschool- and school-age children, women of childbearing age and adults in certain high-risk occupations such as agricultural laborers or miners. This strategy is effective at reducing morbidity in those treated but, without massive economic development, it is unlikely it will interrupt transmission. MDA will therefore need to continue indefinitely to maintain benefit. Mathematical models suggest that transmission interruption may be achievable through MDA alone, provided that all age groups are targeted with high coverage. The DeWorm3 Project will test the feasibility of interrupting STH transmission using biannual MDA targeting all age groups. Study sites (population ≥80,000) have been identified in Benin, Malawi and India. Each site will be divided into 40 clusters, to be randomized 1:1 to three years of twice-annual community-wide MDA or standard-of-care MDA, typically annual school-based deworming. Community-wide MDA will be delivered door-to-door, while standard-of-care MDA will be delivered according to national guidelines. The primary outcome is transmission interruption of the STH species present at each site, defined as weighted cluster-level prevalence ≤2% by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), 24 months after the final round of MDA. Secondary outcomes include the endline prevalence of STH, overall and by species, and the endline prevalence of STH among children under five as an indicator of incident infections. Secondary analyses will identify cluster-level factors associated with transmission interruption. Prevalence will be assessed using qPCR of stool samples collected from a random sample of cluster residents at baseline, six months after the final round of MDA and 24 months post-MDA. A smaller number of individuals in each cluster will be followed with annual sampling to monitor trends in

  14. Study protocol for the optimisation, feasibility testing and pilot cluster randomised trial of Positive Choices: a school-based social marketing intervention to promote sexual health, prevent unintended teenage pregnancies and address health inequalities in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Ruth; Allen, Elizabeth; Campbell, Rona; Elbourne, Diana; Hadley, Alison; Lohan, Maria; Melendez-Torres, G J; Mercer, Catherine H; Morris, Steve; Young, Honor; Bonell, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS), England's under-18 conception rate has fallen by 55%, but a continued focus on prevention is needed to maintain and accelerate progress. The teenage birth rate remains higher in the UK than comparable Western European countries. Previous trials indicate that school-based social marketing interventions are a promising approach to addressing teenage pregnancy and improving sexual health. Such interventions are yet to be trialled in the UK. This study aims to optimise and establish the feasibility and acceptability of one such intervention: Positive Choices. Design: Optimisation, feasibility testing and pilot cluster randomised trial.Interventions: The Positive Choices intervention comprises a student needs survey, a student/staff led School Health Promotion Council (SHPC), a classroom curriculum for year nine students covering social and emotional skills and sex education, student-led social marketing activities, parent information and a review of school sexual health services.Systematic optimisation of Positive Choices will be carried out with the National Children's Bureau Sex Education Forum (NCB SEF), one state secondary school in England and other youth and policy stakeholders.Feasibility testing will involve the same state secondary school and will assess progression criteria to advance to the pilot cluster RCT.Pilot cluster RCT with integral process evaluation will involve six different state secondary schools (four interventions and two controls) and will assess the feasibility and utility of progressing to a full effectiveness trial.The following outcome measures will be trialled as part of the pilot:Self-reported pregnancy and unintended pregnancy (initiation of pregnancy for boys) and sexually transmitted infections,Age of sexual debut, number of sexual partners, use of contraception at first and last sex and non-volitional sexEducational attainmentThe feasibility of linking administrative

  15. Study protocol for Log2Lose: A feasibility randomized controlled trial to evaluate financial incentives for dietary self-monitoring and interim weight loss in adults with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voils, Corrine I; Levine, Erica; Gierisch, Jennifer M; Pendergast, Jane; Hale, Sarah L; McVay, Megan A; Reed, Shelby D; Yancy, William S; Bennett, Gary; Strawbridge, Elizabeth M; White, Allison C; Shaw, Ryan J

    2018-02-01

    The obesity epidemic has negative physical, psychological, and financial consequences. Despite the existence of effective behavioral weight loss interventions, many individuals do not achieve adequate weight loss, and most regain lost weight in the year following intervention. We report the rationale and design for a 2×2 factorial study that involves financial incentives for dietary self-monitoring (yes vs. no) and/or interim weight loss (yes vs. no). Outpatients with obesity participate in a 24-week, group-based weight loss intervention. All participants are asked to record their daily dietary and liquid intake on a smartphone application (app) and to weigh themselves daily at home on a study-provided cellular scale. An innovative information technology (IT) solution collates dietary data from the app and weight from the scale. Using these data, an algorithm classifies participants weekly according to whether they met their group's criteria to receive a cash reward ranging from $0 to $30 for dietary self-monitoring and/or interim weight loss. Notice of the reward is provided via text message, and credit is uploaded to a gift card. This pilot study will provide information on the feasibility of using this novel IT solution to provide variable-ratio financial incentives in real time via its effects on recruitment, intervention adherence, retention, and cost. This study will provide the foundation for a comprehensive, adequately-powered, randomized controlled trial to promote short-term weight loss and long-term weight maintenance. If efficacious, this approach could reduce the prevalence, adverse outcomes, and costs of obesity for millions of Americans. Clinicaltrials.gov registration: NCT02691260. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Adopting a Patient-Centered Approach to Primary Outcome Analysis of Acute Stroke Trials by Use of a Utility-Weighted Modified Rankin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisinanunkul, Napasri; Adeoye, Opeolu; Lewis, Roger J.; Grotta, James C.; Broderick, Joseph; Jovin, Tudor G.; Nogueira, Raul G.; Elm, Jordan; Graves, Todd; Berry, Scott; Lees, Kennedy R.; Barreto, Andrew D.; Saver, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) is the most commonly employed primary endpoint in acute stroke trials, its power is limited when analyzed in dichotomized fashion and its indication of effect size challenging to interpret when analyzed ordinally. Weighting the seven Rankin levels by utilities may improve scale interpretability while preserving statistical power. Methods A utility weighted mRS (UW-mRS) was derived by averaging values from time-tradeoff (patient centered) and person-tradeoff (clinician centered) studies. The UW-mRS, standard ordinal mRS, and dichotomized mRS were applied to 11 trials or meta-analyses of acute stroke treatments, including lytic, endovascular reperfusion, blood pressure moderation, and hemicraniectomy interventions. Results Utility values were: mRS 0–1.0; mRS 1 - 0.91; mRS 2 - 0.76; mRS 3 - 0.65; mRS 4 - 0.33; mRS 5 & 6 - 0. For trials with unidirectional treatment effects, the UW-mRS paralleled the ordinal mRS and outperformed dichotomous mRS analyses. Both the UW-mRS and the ordinal mRS were statistically significant in six of eight unidirectional effect trials, while dichotomous analyses were statistically significant in two to four of eight. In bidirectional effect trials, both the UW-mRS and ordinal tests captured the divergent treatment effects by showing neutral results whereas some dichotomized analyses showed positive results. Mean utility differences in trials with statistically significant positive results ranged from 0.026 to 0.249. Conclusion A utility-weighted mRS performs similarly to the standard ordinal mRS in detecting treatment effects in actual stroke trials and ensures the quantitative outcome is a valid reflection of patient-centered benefits. PMID:26138130

  17. A quasi-randomised, controlled, feasibility trial of GLITtER (Green Light Imaging Interpretation to Enhance Recovery—a psychoeducational intervention for adults with low back pain attending secondary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Karran

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Although it is broadly accepted that clinicians should endeavour to reassure patients with low back pain, to do so can present a significant clinical challenge. Guidance for how to provide effective reassurance is scarce and there may be a need to counter patient concerns arising from misinterpretation of spinal imaging findings. ‘GLITtER’ (Green Light Imaging Intervention to Enhance Recovery was developed as a standardised method of communicating imaging findings in a manner that is reassuring and promotes engagement in an active recovery. This feasibility study is an important step towards definitive testing of its effect. Methods This feasibility study was a prospective, quasi-randomised, parallel trial with longitudinal follow-up, involving sampling of patients attending a spinal outpatient clinic at a metropolitan hospital. English speaking adults (18–75 years presenting to the clinic with low back pain and prior spinal imaging were considered for inclusion. Eligible patients were allocated to receive a GLITtER consultation or a standard consultation (as determined by appointment scheduling and clinician availability, and were blinded to their allocation. Full details of the GLITtER intervention are described in accordance with the Tidier template.Follow-up data were collected after 1 and 3 months. The primary outcome of this study was the fulfillment of specific feasibility criteria which were established a priori. Determination of a sample size for a definitive randomised controlled trial was a secondary objective. Results Two hundred seventy-six patients underwent preliminary screening and 31 patients met the final eligibility criteria for study inclusion. Seventeen participants were allocated to the intervention group and 14 were allocated to the control group. Three month follow-up data were available from 42% of the 31 enrolled participants (N = 13, six intervention, seven control. Feasibility indicators for consent

  18. Pregabalin versus placebo in targeting pro-nociceptive mechanisms to prevent chronic pain after whiplash injury in at-risk individuals - a feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikles, J; Keijzers, G; Mitchell, G; Schug, S; Ware, R; McLean, S A; Connelly, L; Gibson, S; Farrell, S F; Sterling, M

    2018-01-17

    Whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) are an enormous and costly burden to Australian society. Up to 50% of people who experience a whiplash injury will never fully recover. Whiplash is resistant to treatment and no early management approach has yet been shown to prevent chronic pain. The early presence of central sensitization is associated with poor recovery. Pregabalin's effects on central sensitization indicate the potential to prevent or modulate these processes after whiplash injury and to improve health outcomes, but this has not been investigated. This paper describes the protocol for a feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial of pregabalin plus evidence-based advice compared to placebo plus evidence-based advice for individuals with acute whiplash injury who are at risk of poor recovery. This double blind, placebo-controlled randomised feasibility study will examine the feasibility and potential effectiveness of pregabalin and evidence-based advice (intervention) compared to placebo and evidence-based advice (control) for individuals with acute whiplash injury at risk of poor recovery. Thirty participants (15 per group) aged 18-65 years with Grade II WAD, within 48 hours of injury and currently experiencing at least moderate pain (NRS: ≥ 5/10) will be recruited from Emergency Departments of public hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Pregabalin will be commenced at 75 mg bd and titrated up to 300 mg bd as tolerated for 4 weeks followed by 1 week of weaning. The feasibility of trial procedures will be tested, as well as the potential effect of the intervention on the outcomes. The primary outcome of neck pain intensity at 3 months from randomisation will be compared between the treatment groups using standard analysis of variance techniques. Feasibility and potential effectiveness data will inform an appropriately powered full trial, which if successful, will provide an effective and cost-effective intervention for a costly and treatment

  19. Efficacy of chlorophyll c2 for seasonal allergic rhinitis: single-center double-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Nishida, Naoya; Nota, Jumpei; Kitani, Takashi; Aoishi, Kunihide; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sugahara, Takuya; Hato, Naohito

    2016-12-01

    Chlorophyll c2 extracted from Sargassum horneri improved allergic symptoms in an animal model of allergic rhinitis. In the present study, we explored the efficacy of chlorophyll c2 in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. This was a single-center, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-six patients aged 20-43 years, each with a 2-year history of seasonal allergic rhinitis, were randomly assigned to receive either a single daily dose (0.7 mg) of chlorophyll c2 or placebo for 12 weeks. The use of medications including H1-antihistamines and topical nasal steroids was recorded by rescue medication scores (RMSs) noted after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. Disease-specific quality of life was measured using the Japan Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JRQLQ) both before and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. The RMS at 8 weeks was significantly better in the chlorophyll c2 than the placebo group (mean RMS difference = -3.09; 95 % confidence interval = -5.96 to -0.22); the mean RMS at 4 weeks was only slightly better in the chlorophyll c2 group. The JRQLQ scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. Chlorophyll c2 would have a potential to be an alternative treatment for allergic rhinitis.

  20. Short, frequent, 5-days-per-week, in-center hemodialysis versus 3-days-per week treatment: a randomized crossover pilot trial through the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Benjamin L; Huang, Guixia; King, Eileen; Geary, Denis F; Licht, Christoph; Metlay, Joshua P; Furth, Susan L; Kimball, Tom; Mitsnefes, Mark

    2017-08-01

    No controlled trials in children with end-stage kidney disease have assessed the benefits of more frequently administered hemodialysis (HD). We conducted a multicenter, crossover pilot trial to determine if short, more frequent (5 days per week) in-center HD was feasible and associated with improvements in blood pressure compared with three conventional HD treatments per week. Because adult studies have not controlled for the weekly duration of dialysis, we fixed the total treatment time at 12 h a week of dialysis during two 3-month study periods; only frequency varied from 5 to 3 days per week between study periods. Eight children (median age 16.7 years) consented at three children's hospitals. The prespecified primary composite outcome was a sustained 10% decrease in systolic blood pressure and/or a decrease in antihypertensive medications relative to each study period's baseline. Among the six patients completing both study periods, five (83.3%) experienced the primary outcome during HD performed 5 days per week but not 3 days per week; one of the six (16.7%) achieved that outcome during 3-day but not 5-day (p = 0.22) per week HD. During 5-day HD, all patients had significantly more treatments during which their pre-HD systolic (p = 0.01) or diastolic (p = 0.01) blood pressure was 10% lower than baseline. We observed that more frequent HD sessions per week was feasible and associated with improved blood pressure control, but barriers to changing thrice-weekly standard of care include financial reimbursement and the time demands associated with more frequent treatments.

  1. A quasi-randomised, controlled, feasibility trial of GLITtER (Green Light Imaging Interpretation to Enhance Recovery)-a psychoeducational intervention for adults with low back pain attending secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karran, Emma L; Hillier, Susan L; Yau, Yun-Hom; McAuley, James H; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2018-01-01

    Although it is broadly accepted that clinicians should endeavour to reassure patients with low back pain, to do so can present a significant clinical challenge. Guidance for how to provide effective reassurance is scarce and there may be a need to counter patient concerns arising from misinterpretation of spinal imaging findings. 'GLITtER' (Green Light Imaging Intervention to Enhance Recovery) was developed as a standardised method of communicating imaging findings in a manner that is reassuring and promotes engagement in an active recovery. This feasibility study is an important step towards definitive testing of its effect. This feasibility study was a prospective, quasi-randomised, parallel trial with longitudinal follow-up, involving sampling of patients attending a spinal outpatient clinic at a metropolitan hospital. English speaking adults (18-75 years) presenting to the clinic with low back pain and prior spinal imaging were considered for inclusion. Eligible patients were allocated to receive a GLITtER consultation or a standard consultation (as determined by appointment scheduling and clinician availability), and were blinded to their allocation. Full details of the GLITtER intervention are described in accordance with the Tidier template.Follow-up data were collected after 1 and 3 months. The primary outcome of this study was the fulfillment of specific feasibility criteria which were established a priori . Determination of a sample size for a definitive randomised controlled trial was a secondary objective. Two hundred seventy-six patients underwent preliminary screening and 31 patients met the final eligibility criteria for study inclusion. Seventeen participants were allocated to the intervention group and 14 were allocated to the control group. Three month follow-up data were available from 42% of the 31 enrolled participants ( N  = 13, six intervention, seven control). Feasibility indicators for consent, resource burden and acceptability of the

  2. Outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma referred for percutaneous radiofrequency ablation at a tertiary center: Analysis focused on the feasibility with the use of ultrasonography guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Young-sun; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo K.; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Dongil; Shin, Sung Wook; Cho, Sung Ki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to assess the feasibility of performing ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation on patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identify causes of procedure infeasibility and its predisposing conditions. Materials and methods: A total of 109 consecutive patients (male:female = 86:23; mean 59.9 years) with 136 HCCs (mean 1.8 cm) who had been referred for planning US were analyzed. We evaluated overall procedure feasibility as well as specific factors relating to feasibility, including inability to visualize the tumor with US and factors relating to safety of the procedure. Results: The use of percutaneous RF ablation was concluded as infeasible for 45 tumors (33.1%). Reasons for infeasibility included tumor invisibility (n = 32), a high risk of collateral thermal injury (n = 5), absence of a safe electrode path (n = 5) and a combination of factors (n = 3). Among 136 tumors, 36(26.5%) were invisible due to isoechogenicity (n = 16), indiscrimination from surrounding cirrhotic nodules (n = 10) or an unfavorable location (n = 10). Tumor invisibility was significantly attributed to a small tumor size (P < 0.001, risk ratio = 0.823) and the presence of macronodular cirrhosis (P = 0.006, risk ratio = 4.117). Seven patients with invisible tumors were treated with RF ablation after follow-up (n = 4) or with use of adjacent structures as landmarks (n = 3). Ultimately, 65 of 109 patients were treated with percutaneous RF ablation. Conclusions: US-guided percutaneous RF ablation for HCC was feasible in about two-thirds of candidates. Infeasibility was mostly due to inability to visualize the tumor with US, especially for patients with smaller tumor and macronodular cirrhosis.

  3. Variation of Community Consultation and Public Disclosure for a Pediatric Multi-centered “Exception from Informed Consent” Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsti, Maija; Zemek, Roger; Baren, Jill; Stanley, Rachel M.; Prashant, Mahajan; Vance, Cheryl; Brown, Kathleen M.; Gonzalez, Victor; King, Denise; Jacobsen, Kammy; Shreve, Kate; van de Bruinhorst, Katrina; Jones, Anne Marie; Chamberlain, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The U.S. federal regulation “Exception from Informed Consent (EFIC) for Emergency Research,” 21 Code of Federal Regulations 50.24, permits emergency research without informed consent under limited conditions. Additional safeguards to protect human subjects include requirements for community consultation and public disclosure prior to starting the research. Because the regulations are vague about these requirements, Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) determine the adequacy of these activities at a local level. Thus there is potential for broad interpretation and practice variation. Aim To describe the variation of community consultation and public disclosure activities approved by IRBs, and the effectiveness of this process for a multi-center, EFIC, pediatric status epilepticus clinical research trial. Methods: Community consultation and public disclosure activities were analyzed for each of 15 participating sites. Surveys were conducted with participants enrolled in the status epilepticus trial to assess the effectiveness of public disclosure dissemination prior to study enrollment. Results Every IRB, among the 15 participating sites, had a varied interpretation of EFIC regulations for community consultation and public disclosure activities. IRBs required various combinations of focus groups, interviews, surveys, and meetings for community consultation; news releases, mailings, and public service announcements for public disclosure. At least 4,335 patients received information about the study from these efforts. 158 chose to be included in the “Opt Out” list. Of the 304 participants who were enrolled under EFIC, 12 (5%) had heard about the study through community consultation or public disclosure activities. The activities reaching the highest number of participants were surveys and focus groups associated with existing meetings. Public disclosure activities were more efficient and cost-effective if they were part of an in-hospital resource for

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, ... and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including the NHLBI) usually ...

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    Full Text Available ... whether a new approach causes any harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about ... other National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and ...

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  10. Screening for type 2 diabetes in a high-risk population: study design and feasibility of a population-based randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klijs Bart

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the design and present the results of the first year of a population-based study of screening for type 2 diabetes in individuals at high risk of developing the disease. High risk is defined as having abdominal obesity. Methods Between 2006 and 2007, 79,142 inhabitants of two Dutch municipalities aged 40–74 years were approached to participate in screening. Eligible participants had a self-reported waist circumference of ≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men, and no known pre-existing diabetes. Of the respondents (n = 20,578; response rate 26%, 16,135 were abdominally obese. In total, 10,609 individuals gave written informed consent for participation and were randomized into either the screening (n = 5305 or the control arm (n = 5304. Participants in the screening arm were invited to have their fasting plasma glucose (FPG measured and were referred to their general practitioner (GP if it was ≥6.1 mmol/L. In addition, blood lipids were determined in the screening arm, because abdominal obesity is often associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Participants in both arms received written healthy lifestyle information. Between-group differences were analyzed with Chi-square tests and logistic regression (categorical variables and unpaired t-tests (continuous variables. Results The screening attendance rate was 84.1%. Attending screening was associated with age at randomization (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.04, being married (OR = 1.57, 95% CI 1.33-1.83 and not-smoking currently (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.44-0.62. Of the individuals screened, 5.6% had hyperglycemia, and a further 11.6% had an estimated absolute cardiovascular disease risk of 5% or higher, according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation risk model. These participants were referred to their GP. Conclusions Self-reported home-assessed waist circumference could feasibly detect persons at high risk of hyperglycemia or

  11. HABIT, a Randomized Feasibility Trial to Increase Hydroxyurea Adherence, Suggests Improved Health-Related Quality of Life in Youths with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Arlene; Findley, Sally; Manwani, Deepa; Jia, Haomiao; Green, Nancy S

    2018-06-01

    To examine the effect of a community health worker (CHW) intervention, augmented by tailored text messages, on adherence to hydroxyurea therapy in youths with sickle cell disease, as well as on generic and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HrQL) and youth-parent self-management responsibility concordance. We conducted a 2-site randomized controlled feasibility study (Hydroxyurea Adherence for Personal Best in Sickle Cell Treatment [HABIT]) with 2:1 intervention allocation. Youths and parents participated as dyads. Intervention dyads received CHW visits and text message reminders. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and growth models adjusting for group assignment, time, and multiple comparisons. Changes in outcomes from 0 to 6 months were compared with their respective minimal clinically important differences. A total of 28 dyads (mean age of youths, 14.3 ± 2.6 years; 50% Hispanic) participated (18 in the intervention group, 10 in the control group), with 10.7% attrition. Accounting for group assignment, time, and multiple comparisons, at 6 months intervention youths reported improved generic HrQL total score (9.8 points; 95% CI, 0.4-19.2) and Emotions subscale score (15.0 points; 95% CI, 1.6-28.4); improved disease-specific subscale scores for Worry I (30.0 points; 95% CI, 8.5-51.5), Emotions (37.0 points, 95% CI, 9.4-64.5), and Communication I (17.8 points; 95% CI, 0.5-35.1); and 3-month dyad self-management responsibility concordance (3.5 points; 95% CI, -0.2 to 7.1). There were no differences in parent proxy-reported HrQL measures at 6 months. These findings add to research examining effects of behavioral interventions on HrQL outcomes in youths with sickle cell disease. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02029742. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to compare the cost-effectiveness of palliative cardiology or usual care in people with advanced heart failure: Two exploratory prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Miriam J; McSkimming, Paula; McConnachie, Alex; Geue, Claudia; Millerick, Yvonne; Briggs, Andrew; Hogg, Karen

    2018-06-01

    The effectiveness of cardiology-led palliative care is unknown; we have insufficient information to conduct a full trial. To assess the feasibility (recruitment/retention, data quality, variability/sample size estimation, safety) of a clinical trial of palliative cardiology effectiveness. Non-randomised feasibility. Unmatched symptomatic heart failure patients on optimal cardiac treatment from (1) cardiology-led palliative service (caring together group) and (2) heart failure liaison service (usual care group). Outcomes/safety: Symptoms (Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale), Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, performance, understanding of disease, anticipatory care planning, cost-effectiveness, survival and carer burden. A total of 77 participants (caring together group = 43; usual care group = 34) were enrolled (53% men; mean age 77 years (33-100)). The caring together group scored worse in Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (43.5 vs 35.2) and Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (35.4 vs 39.9). The caring together group had a lower consent/screen ratio (1:1.7 vs 1: 2.8) and few died before approach (0.08% vs 16%) or declined invitation (17% vs 37%). Data quality: At 4 months, 74% in the caring together group and 71% in the usual care group provided data. Most attrition was due to death or deterioration. Data quality in self-report measures was otherwise good. There was no difference in survival. Symptoms and quality of life improved in both groups. A future trial requires 141 (202 allowing 30% attrition) to detect a minimal clinical difference (1 point) in Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale score for breathlessness (80% power). More participants (176; 252 allowing 30% attrition) are needed to detect a 10.5 change in Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire score (80% power; minimum clinical difference = 5). A trial to test the clinical effectiveness (improvement in breathlessness) of cardiology-led palliative care is feasible.

  13. Feasibility and safety of augmented-reality glass for computed tomography-assisted percutaneous revascularization of coronary chronic total occlusion: A single center prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolski, Maksymilian P; Debski, Artur; Borucki, Bartosz A; Staruch, Adam D; Kepka, Cezary; Rokicki, Jakub K; Sieradzki, Bartosz; Witkowski, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of chronic total occlusion (CTO) may be facilitated by projection of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) datasets in the catheterization laboratory. There is no data on the feasibility and safety outcomes of CTA-assisted CTO PCI using a wearable augmented-reality glass. A total of 15 patients scheduled for elective antegrade CTO intervention were prospectively enrolled and underwent preprocedural coronary CTA. Three-dimensional and curved multiplanar CT reconstructions were transmitted to a head-mounted hands-free computer worn by interventional cardiologists during CTO PCI to provide additional information on CTO tortuosity and calcification. The results of CTO PCI using a wearable computer were compared with a time-matched prospective angiographic registry of 59 patients undergoing antegrade CTO PCI without a wearable computer. Operators' satisfaction was assessed by a 5-point Likert scale. Mean age was 64 ± 8 years and the mean J-CTO score was 2.1 ± 0.9 in the CTA-assisted group. The voice-activated co-registration and review of CTA images in a wearable computer during CTO PCI were feasible and highly rated by PCI operators (4.7/5 points). There were no major adverse cardiovascular events. Compared with standard CTO PCI, CTA-assisted recanalization of CTO using a wearable computer showed more frequent selection of the first-choice stiff wire (0% vs 40%, p augmented-reality glass is feasible and safe, and might reduce the resources required for the interventional treatment of CTO. Copyright © 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring the feasibility of multi-site flow cytometric processing of gut associated lymphoid tissue with centralized data analysis for multi-site clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian McGowan

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the development of a standardized approach to the collection of intestinal tissue from healthy volunteers, isolation of gut associated lymphoid tissue mucosal mononuclear cells (MMC, and characterization of mucosal T cell phenotypes by flow cytometry was sufficient to minimize differences in the normative ranges of flow parameters generated at two trial sites. Forty healthy male study participants were enrolled in Pittsburgh and Los Angeles. MMC were isolated from rectal biopsies using the same biopsy acquisition and enzymatic digestion protocols. As an additional comparator, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were collected from the study participants. For quality control, cryopreserved PBMC from a single donor were supplied to both sites from a central repository (qPBMC. Using a jointly optimized standard operating procedure, cells were isolated from tissue and blood and stained with monoclonal antibodies targeted to T cell phenotypic markers. Site-specific flow data were analyzed by an independent center which analyzed all data from both sites. Ranges for frequencies for overall CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, derived from the qPBMC samples, were equivalent at both UCLA and MWRI. However, there were significant differences across sites for the majority of T cell activation and memory subsets in qPBMC as well as PBMC and MMC. Standardized protocols to collect, stain, and analyze MMC and PBMC, including centralized analysis, can reduce but not exclude variability in reporting flow data within multi-site studies. Based on these data, centralized processing, flow cytometry, and analysis of samples may provide more robust data across multi-site studies. Centralized processing requires either shipping of fresh samples or cryopreservation and the decision to perform centralized versus site processing needs to take into account the drawbacks and restrictions associated with each method.

  15. Exploring the feasibility of multi-site flow cytometric processing of gut associated lymphoid tissue with centralized data analysis for multi-site clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Ian; Anton, Peter A; Elliott, Julie; Cranston, Ross D; Duffill, Kathryn; Althouse, Andrew D; Hawkins, Kevin L; De Rosa, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the development of a standardized approach to the collection of intestinal tissue from healthy volunteers, isolation of gut associated lymphoid tissue mucosal mononuclear cells (MMC), and characterization of mucosal T cell phenotypes by flow cytometry was sufficient to minimize differences in the normative ranges of flow parameters generated at two trial sites. Forty healthy male study participants were enrolled in Pittsburgh and Los Angeles. MMC were isolated from rectal biopsies using the same biopsy acquisition and enzymatic digestion protocols. As an additional comparator, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected from the study participants. For quality control, cryopreserved PBMC from a single donor were supplied to both sites from a central repository (qPBMC). Using a jointly optimized standard operating procedure, cells were isolated from tissue and blood and stained with monoclonal antibodies targeted to T cell phenotypic markers. Site-specific flow data were analyzed by an independent center which analyzed all data from both sites. Ranges for frequencies for overall CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, derived from the qPBMC samples, were equivalent at both UCLA and MWRI. However, there were significant differences across sites for the majority of T cell activation and memory subsets in qPBMC as well as PBMC and MMC. Standardized protocols to collect, stain, and analyze MMC and PBMC, including centralized analysis, can reduce but not exclude variability in reporting flow data within multi-site studies. Based on these data, centralized processing, flow cytometry, and analysis of samples may provide more robust data across multi-site studies. Centralized processing requires either shipping of fresh samples or cryopreservation and the decision to perform centralized versus site processing needs to take into account the drawbacks and restrictions associated with each method.

  16. Preventing recurrence of endometriosis by means of long-acting progestogen therapy (PRE-EMPT): report of an internal pilot, multi-arm, randomised controlled trial incorporating flexible entry design and adaption of design based on feasibility of recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Lee J; Daniels, Jane P; Weckesser, Annalise; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2017-03-11

    Endometriosis is associated with the growth of endometrium in ectopic sites mainly within the pelvis. This results in inflammation and scarring, causing pain and impaired quality of life. Endometriotic lesions can be excised or ablated surgically, but the risk of recurrence is high. A Heath Technology Assessment commissioning call in 2011 sought applications for trials aimed at evaluating long-term effectiveness of postoperative, long-acting, reversible contraceptives (LARCs) in preventing recurrence of endometriosis. A survey of gynaecologists indicated that there was no consensus about which LARC (Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System (LNG-IUS) or depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection (DMPA)) or comparator (combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) or no treatment) should be evaluated. Hence, we designed a 'flexible-entry' internal pilot to assess whether a four-arm trial was feasible including a possible design adaption based on pilot findings. In this pilot, women could be randomised to two, three or four treatment options provided that one was a LARC and one was a non-LARC. An assessment of feasibility based on recruitment to these options and a revised substantive trial design was considered by an independent oversight committee. The study ran for 1 year from April 2014 and 77 women were randomised. Only 5 (6%) women accepted randomisation to all groups, with 63 (82%) having a LARC preference and 55 (71%) a non-LARC preference. Four-way and three-way designs were ruled out with a two-way LARC versus COCP design, stratified by prerandomisation choice of LARC and optional subrandomisation to LNG-IUS versus DMPA considered a feasible substantive study. Multi-arm studies are potentially efficient as they can answer multiple questions simultaneously but are difficult to recruit to if there are strong patient or clinician preferences. A flexible approach to randomisation in a pilot phase can be used to assess feasibility of such studies and modify a trial design

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  20. Early sheath removal after percutaneous coronary intervention using Assiut Femoral Compression Device is feasible and safe. Results of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman K.M. Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that AFCD2 is a simple and effective alternative to MC for hemostasis following PCI. Early sheath removal 2 h post PCI is feasible, safe, and improves the patient’s comfort.

  1. PERFECTED enhanced recovery (PERFECT-ER) care versus standard acute care for patients admitted to acute settings with hip fracture identified as experiencing confusion: study protocol for a feasibility cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Simon P; Cross, Jane L; Shepstone, Lee; Backhouse, Tamara; Henderson, Catherine; Poland, Fiona; Sims, Erika; MacLullich, Alasdair; Penhale, Bridget; Howard, Robert; Lambert, Nigel; Varley, Anna; Smith, Toby O; Sahota, Opinder; Donell, Simon; Patel, Martyn; Ballard, Clive; Young, John; Knapp, Martin; Jackson, Stephen; Waring, Justin; Leavey, Nick; Howard, Gregory; Fox, Chris

    2017-12-04

    Health and social care provision for an ageing population is a global priority. Provision for those with dementia and hip fracture has specific and growing importance. Older people who break their hip are recognised as exceptionally vulnerable to experiencing confusion (including but not exclusively, dementia and/or delirium and/or cognitive impairment(s)) before, during or after acute admissions. Older people experiencing hip fracture and confusion risk serious complications, linked to delayed recovery and higher mortality post-operatively. Specific care pathways acknowledging the differences in patient presentation and care needs are proposed to improve clinical and process outcomes. This protocol describes a multi-centre, feasibility, cluster-randomised, controlled trial (CRCT) to be undertaken across ten National Health Service hospital trusts in the UK. The trial will explore the feasibility of undertaking a CRCT comparing the multicomponent PERFECTED enhanced recovery intervention (PERFECT-ER), which acknowledges the differences in care needs of confused older patients experiencing hip fracture, with standard care. The trial will also have an integrated process evaluation to explore how PERFECT-ER is implemented and interacts with the local context. The study will recruit 400 hip fracture patients identified as experiencing confusion and will also recruit "suitable informants" (individuals in regular contact with participants who will complete proxy measures). We will also recruit NHS professionals for the process evaluation. This mixed methods design will produce data to inform a definitive evaluation of the intervention via a large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT). The trial will provide a preliminary estimate of potential efficacy of PERFECT-ER versus standard care; assess service delivery variation, inform primary and secondary outcome selection, generate estimates of recruitment and retention rates, data collection difficulties, and

  2. A study protocol for a non-randomised comparison trial evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of a mobile cognitive-behavioural programme with integrated coaching for anxious adults in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Eva; Solano, Francis; Wallace, Meredith; Perry, Dina L; Morrell, Lauren; Scott, Kathryn; Bell, Megan Jones; Oser, Megan

    2018-01-13

    Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and subclinical GAD are highly prevalent in primary care. Unmanaged anxiety worsens quality of life in patients seen in primary care practices and leads to increased medical utilisation and costs. Programmes that teach patients cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) techniques have been shown to improve anxiety and to prevent the evolution of anxiety symptoms to disorders, but access and engagement have hampered integration of CBT into medical settings. This pragmatic study takes place in University of Pittsburgh Medical Center primary care practices to evaluate a coach-supported mobile cognitive- behavioural programme (Lantern) on anxiety symptoms and quality of life. Clinics were non-randomly assigned to either enhanced treatment as usual or Lantern. All clinics provide electronic screening for anxiety and, within clinics assigned to Lantern, patients meeting a threshold level of mild anxiety (ie, >5 on Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Questionnaire (GAD-7)) are referred to Lantern. The first study phase is aimed at establishing feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness. The second phase focuses on long-term impact on psychosocial outcomes, healthcare utilisation and clinic/provider adoption/sustainable implementation using a propensity score matched parallel group study design. Primary outcomes are changes in anxiety symptoms (GAD-7) and quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey) between baseline and 6-month follow-ups, comparing control and intervention. Secondary outcomes include provider and patient satisfaction, patient engagement, durability of changes in anxiety symptoms and quality of life over 12 months and the impact of Lantern on healthcare utilisation over 12 months. Patients from control sites will be matched to the patients who use the mobile app. Ethics and human subject research approval were obtained. A data safety monitoring board is overseeing trial data and ethics. Results will be communicated to

  3. Effects of a Psychological Intervention in a Primary Health Care Center for Caregivers of Dependent Relatives: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Mora-Simon, Sara; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Perez-Penaranda, Anibal; Losada-Baltar, Andres; Garcia-Ortiz, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess, in the context of Primary Health Care (PHC), the effect of a psychological intervention in mental health among caregivers (CGs) of dependent relatives. Design and Methods: Randomized multicenter, controlled clinical trial. The 125 CGs included in the trial were receiving health care in PHC. Inclusion criteria: Identifying…

  4. Envisioning a social-health information exchange as a platform to support a patient-centered medical neighborhood: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Chan, Connie V; Makam, Anil; Stieglitz, Heather; Amarasingham, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Social determinants directly contribute to poorer health, and coordination between healthcare and community-based resources is pivotal to addressing these needs. However, our healthcare system remains poorly equipped to address social determinants of health. The potential of health information technology to bridge this gap across the delivery of healthcare and social services remains unrealized. We conducted in-depth, in-person interviews with 50 healthcare and social service providers to determine the feasibility of a social-health information exchange (S-HIE) in an urban safety-net setting in Dallas County, Texas. After completion of interviews, we conducted a town hall meeting to identify desired functionalities for a S-HIE. We conducted thematic analysis of interview responses using the constant comparative method to explore perceptions about current communication and coordination across sectors, and barriers and enablers to S-HIE implementation. We sought participant confirmation of findings and conducted a forced-rank vote during the town hall to prioritize potential S-HIE functionalities. We found that healthcare and social service providers perceived a need for improved information sharing, communication, and care coordination across sectors and were enthusiastic about the potential of a S-HIE, but shared many technical, legal, and ethical concerns around cross-sector information sharing. Desired technical S-HIE functionalities encompassed fairly simple transactional operations such as the ability to view basic demographic information, visit and referral data, and medical history from both healthcare and social service settings. A S-HIE is an innovative and feasible approach to enabling better linkages between healthcare and social service providers. However, to develop S-HIEs in communities across the country, policy interventions are needed to standardize regulatory requirements, to foster increased IT capability and uptake among social service agencies

  5. Rehabilitation for the management of knee osteoarthritis using comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine in community health centers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background It is becoming increasingly necessary for community health centers to make rehabilitation services available to patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. However, for a number of reasons, including a lack of expertise, the small size of community health centers and the availability of only simple medical equipment, conventional rehabilitation therapy has not been widely used in China. Consequently, most patients with knee osteoarthritis seek treatment in high-grade hospitals. However, many patients cannot manage the techniques that they were taught in the hospital. Methods such as acupuncture, tuina, Chinese medical herb fumigation-washing and t’ai chi are easy to do and have been reported to have curative effects in those with knee osteoarthritis. To date, there have been no randomized controlled trials validating comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine for the rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Furthermore, there is no standard rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for knee osteoarthritis. The aim of the current study is to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for the management of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Method/design This will be a randomized controlled clinical trial with blinded assessment. There will be a 4-week intervention utilizing rehabilitation protocols from traditional Chinese medicine and conventional therapy. Follow-up will be conducted for a period of 12 weeks. A total of 722 participants with knee osteoarthritis will be recruited. Participants will be randomly divided into two groups: experimental and control. Primary outcomes will include range of motion, girth measurement, the visual analogue scale, and results from the manual muscle, six-minute walking and stair-climbing tests. Secondary outcomes will include average daily consumption of pain medication, ability to perform daily tasks and health

  6. An Innovative Mobile Health System to Improve and Standardize Antenatal Care Among Underserved Communities: A Feasibility Study in an Italian Hosting Center for Asylum Seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Lucia; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Guarenti, Laura; Grandi, Teresa; Leotta, Serena; Barcellini, Lucia; Borella, Paola; Benski, Anne Caroline

    2017-11-16

    Innovative migrant-friendly tools are needed to assist health personnel manage the high number of pregnancies within reception centers. This study tests functionality and acceptability of a new mHealth system in providing antenatal care amongst migrants. The study, carried out between 2014 and 2016, involved 150 pregnant women residing in the largest European migrant reception center in Sicily. A ticket tracking system assessed the system's functionality and a questionnaire assessed women's acceptability. The system facilitated the collection of clinical data, enabling the creation of electronic patient records and identifying 10% of pregnancies as high-risk. The application's digital format increased health providers' adherence to antenatal-care recommendations, while the graphic interface facilitated women's engagement and retention of the health education modules. The study recorded a 91.9% patient satisfaction rate. The system was efficient in providing comprehensive and high-quality antenatal care amongst migrants, facilitating the continuity of care for a population undergoing frequent relocations.

  7. Trauma-Focused Smoking Cessation for Smokers Exposed to the World Trade Center Disaster: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam; Friedberg, Fred; Li, Xiaotong; Zvolensky, Michael J; Bromet, Evelyn J; Mahaffey, Brittain L; Vujanovic, Anka A; Luft, Benjamin J; Kotov, Roman

    2017-08-01

    The main objective was to evaluate the efficacy of an 8-session, group-based comprehensive smoking cessation and trauma management (CSC-T) treatment among daily smokers (≥5 cigarettes/day) exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster with elevated WTC-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Participants (N = 90) were randomly assigned to CSC-T (N = 44; 63.6% white; 27.3% female; mean age = 51.32 ± 7.87) or comprehensive smoking cessation (CSC) alone (N = 46; 71.7% white; 28.3% female; mean age = 48.74 ± 10.66), which was comparable in length and time. Assessments included a diagnostic clinical interview and self-report measures of PTSD and respiratory symptoms, and smoking behavior, and biologically confirmed smoking abstinence. Evaluations occurred at a baseline visit, each treatment session, and at 1-, 2-, 4-, 12-, and 26-weeks post-treatment. The two treatments did not differ in regard to PTSD symptom improvement. After quit day (week 6), the two groups had similar 7-day (~15%) and 6-month (~20%) abstinence rates as well as average number of cigarettes smoked, and PTSD and respiratory symptoms. It is possible that the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy skills specific to quitting smoking, group-based support, and degree of therapist contact, that were available in both treatments may have played a role in equalizing the abstinence rates between the two conditions. Although the current study found no evidence that the CSC-T was superior to the CSC alone treatment, the abstinence rates observed were high relative to previous trials of smokers with diagnosed PTSD. Further development of smoking cessation programs tailored to the needs of smokers with PTSD symptoms continues to be needed. This study suggests that a CSC program aids in smoking abstinence for smokers with PTSD symptoms and that incorporating trauma management skills, may not add additional benefits for abstinence and PTSD and respiratory symptom relief. Further work is needed to

  8. Feasibility and resolution limits of opto-magnetic imaging of neural network activity in brain slices using color centers in diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadas, Mürsel; Wojciechowski, Adam M.; Huck, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We suggest a novel approach for wide-field imaging of the neural network dynamics of brain slices that uses highly sensitivity magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Invitro recordings in brain slices is a proven method for the characterization of electrical neural activi...... cell. Our results suggest that imaging of slice activity will be possible with the upcoming generation of NV magnetic field sensors, while single-shot imaging of planar cell activity remains challenging....

  9. Feasibility Study for Implementing Magnetic Suspension in the Glenn Research Center 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel for Testing the Dynamic Stability of Blunt Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Abigail; Davis, David O.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Barnhart, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of a magnetic suspension system in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel would be a powerful test technique that could accurately determine the dynamic stability of blunt body entry vehicles with no sting interference. This paper explores initial design challenges to be evaluated before implementation, including defining the lowest possible operating dynamic pressure and corresponding model size, developing a compatible video analysis technique, and incorporating a retractable initial support sting.

  10. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  11. Ethical issues in a stage 1 cognitive-behavioral therapy feasibility study and trial to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Gakinya, Benson N; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Martino, Steve; Bryant, Kendall J; Meslin, Eric M; Sidle, John E

    2012-07-01

    Epidemics of both HIV/AIDS and alcohol abuse in sub-Saharan Africa have spurred the conduct of local behavioral therapy trials for these problems, but the ethical issues involved in these trials have not been fully examined. In this paper, we discuss ethical issues that emerged during the conduct of a behavioral intervention adaptation and trial using cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. The study was performed within our multinational collaboration, the USAID-Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare Partnership. We discuss relevant ethical considerations and how we addressed them.

  12. Effects of Daikenchuto on Abdominal Bloating Accompanied by Chronic Constipation: A Prospective, Single-Center Randomized Open Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Yuki

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: DKT treatment improved quality of life for patients with chronic constipation regardless of the presence of SIBO and showed no effects on small intestine bacteria. UMIN Clinical Trial Registry identifier: UMIN000008070.

  13. New phase II trial of avelumab, a PD-L1 inhibitor, in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Christian Hinrichs, Investigator and Lasker Clinical Research Scholar in the Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (ETIB), is leading a trial of avelumab in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Learn more...

  14. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, P.; Kalas, P.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility study itself examines the technical, economic and financial implications of a nuclear power station in depth so as to make sure that nuclear power is the right course to take. This means that it is quite an expensive operation and it is to avoid wasting this money that a pre-feasibility study is carried out. This preliminary study should eliminate cases where the electrical system cannot absorb the capacity of a nuclear station of commercial size, where other sources of power such as hydro-electricity, gas or cheap coal would make nuclear obviously uneconomic or where no suitable sites exist. If this first rather simple survey shows that nuclear power is a credible solution to a utilities need for electricity or heat production plant, then the next stage is a full feasibility study. (orig./TK) [de

  15. Feasibility, design and conduct of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to reduce overweight and obesity in children: The electronic games to aid motivation to exercise (eGAME study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodgers Anthony

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in developed countries. Sedentary screen-based activities such as video gaming are thought to displace active behaviors and are independently associated with obesity. Active video games, where players physically interact with images onscreen, may have utility as a novel intervention to increase physical activity and improve body composition in children. The aim of the Electronic Games to Aid Motivation to Exercise (eGAME study is to determine the effects of an active video game intervention over 6 months on: body mass index (BMI, percent body fat, waist circumference, cardio-respiratory fitness, and physical activity levels in overweight children. Methods/Design Three hundred and thirty participants aged 10–14 years will be randomized to receive either an active video game upgrade package or to a control group (no intervention. Discussion An overview of the eGAME study is presented, providing an example of a large, pragmatic randomized controlled trial in a community setting. Reflection is offered on key issues encountered during the course of the study. In particular, investigation into the feasibility of the proposed intervention, as well as robust testing of proposed study procedures is a critical step prior to implementation of a large-scale trial. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12607000632493

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about your health or fill out forms about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place ...

  17. Multi-center feasibility study evaluating recruitment, variability in risk factors and biomarkers for a diet and cancer cohort in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAdams Mary J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background India's population exhibits diverse dietary habits and chronic disease patterns. Nutritional epidemiologic studies in India are primarily of cross-sectional or case-control design and subject to biases, including differential recall of past diet. The aim of this feasibility study was to evaluate whether a diet-focused cohort study of cancer could be established in India, providing insight into potentially unique diet and lifestyle exposures. Methods Field staff contacted 7,064 households within three regions of India (New Delhi, Mumbai, and Trivandrum and found 4,671 eligible adults aged 35-69 years. Participants completed interviewer-administered questionnaires (demographic, diet history, physical activity, medical/reproductive history, tobacco/alcohol use, and occupational history, and staff collected biological samples (blood, urine, and toenail clippings, anthropometric measurements (weight, standing and sitting height; waist, hip, and thigh circumference; triceps, sub-scapula and supra-patella skin fold, and blood pressure measurements. Results Eighty-eight percent of eligible subjects completed all questionnaires and 67% provided biological samples. Unique protein sources by region were fish in Trivandrum, dairy in New Delhi, and pulses (legumes in Mumbai. Consumption of meat, alcohol, fast food, and soft drinks was scarce in all three regions. A large percentage of the participants were centrally obese and had elevated blood glucose levels. New Delhi participants were also the least physically active and had elevated lipids levels, suggesting a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions A high percentage of participants complied with study procedures including biological sample collection. Epidemiologic expertise and sufficient infrastructure exists at these three sites in India to successfully carry out a modest sized population-based study; however, we identified some potential problems in conducting a cohort

  18. Evaluation of an intervention programme addressing ability to perform activities of daily living among persons with chronic conditions: study protocol for a feasibility trial (ABLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidetti, Susanne; Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; von Bülow, Cecilie

    2018-01-01

    version of the ABLE intervention programme was developed. Methods and analysis This feasibility study examine the perceived value and acceptability of the ABLE programme by evaluating the fidelity, reach, dose and potential outcomes using a pretest and post-test design involving 30 persons living...

  19. Once a week not enough, twice a week not feasible? A randomised controlled exercise trial in long-term care facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; M.N. Poppel, van; Twisk, J.W.; van Mechelen, W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of three different training protocols on physical function of older adults living in long-term care facilities. Emphasis was placed on feasibility in real-life situations. Methods: Subjects (N = 224) were randomised to 6 months of twice weekly (1) resistance

  20. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  1. Feasibility and safety of treating non-unions in tibia, femur and humerus with autologous, expanded, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells associated with biphasic calcium phosphate biomaterials in a multicentric, non-comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Rosset, Philippe; Gebhard, Florian; Hernigou, Philippe; Baldini, Nicola; Rouard, Helène; Sensebé, Luc; Gonzalo-Daganzo, Rosa M; Giordano, Rosaria; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma; García-Rey, Eduardo; Cordero-Ampuero, José; Rubio-Suárez, Juan Carlos; Stanovici, Julien; Ehrnthaller, Christian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Chevallier, Nathalie; Donati, Davide Maria; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Fleury, Sandrine; Fernandez, Manuel-Nicolás; Cabrera, José-Rafael; Avendaño-Solá, Cristina; Montemurro, Tiziana; Panaitescu, Carmen; Veronesi, Elena; Rojewski, Markus Thomas; Lotfi, Ramin; Dominici, Massimo; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Layrolle, Pierre

    2018-03-19

    ORTHO-1 is a European, multicentric, first in human clinical trial to prove safety and feasibility after surgical implantation of commercially available biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramic granules associated during surgery with autologous mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from bone marrow (BM-hMSC) under good manufacturing practices, in patients with long bone pseudarthrosis. Twenty-eight patients with femur, tibia or humerus diaphyseal or metaphyso-diaphyseal non-unions were recruited and surgically treated in France, Germany, Italy and Spain with 100 or 200 million BM-hMSC/mL associated with 5-10 cc of bioceramic granules. Patients were followed up during one year. The investigational advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) was expanded under the same protocol in all four countries, and approved by each National Competent Authority. With safety as primary end-point, no severe adverse event was reported as related to the BM-hMSC. With feasibility as secondary end-point, the participating production centres manufactured the BM-hMSC as planned. The ATMP combined to the bioceramic was surgically delivered to the non-unions, and 26/28 treated patients were found radiologically healed at one year (3 out of 4 cortices with bone bridging). Safety and feasibility were clinically proven for surgical implantation of expanded autologous BM-hMSC with bioceramic. EU-FP7-HEALTH-2009, REBORNE Project (GA: 241876). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Conducting a randomized trial in rural and urban safety-net health centers: Added value of community-based participatory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Muthukrishnan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most common cancer in the US. Despite evidence that screening reduces CRC incidence and mortality, screening rates are sub-optimal with disparities by race/ethnicity, income, and geography. Rural-urban differences in CRC screening are understudied even though approximately one-fifth of the US population lives in rural areas. This focus on urban populations limits the generalizability and dissemination potential of screening interventions. Methods: Using community-based participatory research (CBPR principles, we designed a cluster-randomized trial, adaptable to a range of settings, including rural and urban health centers. We enrolled 483 participants across 11 health centers representing 2 separate networks. Both networks serve medically-underserved communities; however one is primarily rural and one primarily urban. Results: Our goal in this analysis is to describe baseline characteristics of participants and examine setting-level differe