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Sample records for center dot cl

  1. Cold white light generation through the simultaneous emission from Ce{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} in 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, W. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Alvarez, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Martinez-Martinez, R.; Yescas-Mendoza, E. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Carretera a Acatlima Km. 2.5, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico); Camarillo, I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Caldino, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2012-08-15

    The photoluminescence of a CeCl{sub 3}, DyCl{sub 3} and MnCl{sub 2} doped aluminum oxide film deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis was characterized by excitation, emission and decay time spectroscopy. A nonradiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} is observed upon UV excitation at 278 nm (peak emission wavelength of AlGaN-based LEDs). Such energy transfer leads to a simultaneous emission of these ions in the blue, green, yellow and red regions, resulting in white light emission with CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, x=0.34 and y=0.23, which correspond to cold white light with a color temperature of 4900 K. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film (AOCDM) could be prepared by spray pyrolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} takes place in AOCDM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AOCDM (pumped with 278 nm-UV light) can generate 4900 K cold white light.

  2. Crystal structure and infrared spectra of a lanthanum coordination compound with glycine, [La(Gly)s{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]{center_dot}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}{sub n}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Aizeng; Li Laiming; Lin Yonghua; Xi Shiquan [Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Jilin (China)

    1994-12-31

    A lanthanum coordination compound with glycine [La(Gly){sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]{center_dot}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}{sub n} (Gly = NH{sup +}{sub 3}-CH{sub 2}-COO{sup -}) was synthesized and obtained in the form of single crystals. Its X-ray crystal structure has been determined and the IR spectrum has been studied. Crystallographic data for the compound are Mr = 698.6, triclinic, space group Pi, with a = 10.730(4), b = 12.958(4), c = 8.806(3) {angstrom}, a = 97, 10(2), {beta} = 113.05(3), {gamma} = 71.52(3), V = 1068.55 (0.67) {angstrom}{sup s}, Z = 2; D{sub calc} = 2.17 cm{sup -3}, {mu} = 25.1 cm{sup -1}; T = 298K; {lambda}(MoKa) = 0.71069 {angstrom}, 2 {theta}{sub max} = 60.0{degrees}. Final R = 0.055 for 5554 observed reflections with I>3{sigma} (I). Glycine molecules coordinate with lanthanum atoms through alternate {open_quotes}two-four glycine molecules coordinate to lanthanum atoms as bridging bidentates ligands and the others as bridging-chelating terdenate ligands. The IR spectrum of the compound is compared with that of ([Sm{sub 2}(Gly){sub 6}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O]{center_dot}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 6}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O){sub n}. Differences in their IR spectra indicate differences of structures. 18 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Magnetic Bloch oscillations in the near-Ising antiferromagnet CoCl2#center dot#2D2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N.B.; Lefmann, K.; Johannsen, I.;

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the possible occurrence of magnetic Bloch oscillations in CoCl2 . 2D(2)O. We were unable to observe these oscillations at 20.0 K, just above T-N. In an attempt to explain this result, we studied spin waves in the a*-c* plane in order to estimate the effect of the interchain...

  4. The isotropic and anisotropic interactions of the alternating ferromagnetic quasi-one-dimensional magnet [Cu{sub 4}(ndpa){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudam, Yasid [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, Gerda [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany); Hagel, Jochen [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany); Herrling, Erik [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany); Pilawa, Bernd [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany); Anson, Christopher E [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie der Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany); Murugesu, Muralee [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie der Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany); Powell, Annie K [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie der Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), 76128-Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-07-02

    The magnetic properties of [Cu{sub 4}(ndpa){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O are studied by static and dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The static susceptibility measurements between 2 and 300 K reveal ferromagnetically coupled Cu(II) dimers (J/k{sub B} = +24.0 {+-} 0.5 K). Two further exchange constants J{sup '}/k{sub B} = -0.40 {+-} 0.02 K and J{sup ''}/k{sub B} = 2.2 {+-} 0.2 K are determined by zero-field ac-susceptibility measurements in the temperature range between 12 and 0.4 K. The exchange couplings are assigned by means of electron spin resonance measurements which show that Cu{sub 4}: Cl realizes a ferromagnetic alternating spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with an antiferromagnetic interchain coupling.

  5. NEGATIVE DONOR CENTER QUANTUM DOTS IN MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Wen-fang

    2000-01-01

    The method of few-body physics is applied to treat a D- center quantumdot system in a magnetic field. The magnetic field is applied in the zdirection. Using this method, we investigate the energy spectra of low-lyingstates of D- center quantum dots as a function of magnetic field. Thedependence of the binding energies of the ground-state of the D- centerare calculated as a function of the dot radius with a few values of themagnetic field strength and compared with other results.

  6. Combined MTX{center_dot}5-FU{center_dot}CDGP for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoda, Takema; Kitano, Hiroya [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Saitoh, Yuko; Ikeda, Hiroki; Dake, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Tadao [Japanese Red Cross Society Wakayama Medical Center (Japan); Seno, Satoshi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan); Kawano, Atsushi [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Combination chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and nedaplatin (CDGP) with methotrexate (MTX) and leucovorin (LV) was administered for modulation in patients with head and neck cancer. We treated 19 patients with MTX{center_dot}5-FU{center_dot}CDGP consisting of 150 mg/body of MTX on day 1 followed by a 3-day continuous infusion of 5-FU at 3,500 mg/m{sup 2} and 17 injections of LV at 15 mg and infusion of CDGP at 100 mg/m{sup 2}. Six patients had recurrent head and neck cancer, and 13 had newly diagnosed disease. Eleven of the new patients were concurrently treated with radiation therapy. Treatment-associated toxicity was significant, including mucositis and myelosuppression, but acceptable. Sixteen patients were eligible for evaluation of response. The overall complete response rate was 75.0% (12/16). Patients treated with radiotherapy had a 90.0% (9/10) overall complete response rate. (author)

  7. Fabrication of CuCl quantum dots and the size dependence of the biexciton binding energy

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S T; Kim, H Y; Kim, I G

    2000-01-01

    We fabricated CuCl quantum dots (QDs) in an aluminoborosilicate glass matrix. The photoluminescence of the CuCl QDs was surveyed by using the band-to-band excitation and the site selective luminescence methods. The excitation density dependence of the exciton and the biexciton luminescence was measured, and the saturation effects of the luminescence intensities were observed. The biexciton binding energies measured using the site selective luminescence method increased with decreasing QD size. The data were well fitted by a function resulting from the numerical matrix-diagonalization method.

  8. Observation of the B (s) (0) -> aEuro parts per thousand J/psi I center dot I center dot decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.

    2016-01-01

    The B (s) (0) -> aEuro parts per thousand J/psi I center dot I center dot decay is observed in pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) recorded by the LHCb detector at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. This is the first observation of this decay channel, wit

  9. Dynamic [Cl-]i measurement with chloride sensing quantum dots nanosensor in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchi; Mao, Hua; Wong, Lid B.

    2010-02-01

    We have synthesized a chloride sensing quantum dots (QD) nanosensor, Cl-QD, for the dynamic measurements of chloride ion concentration in the millimolar range, a sensitivity that is applicable to most physiological intracellular chloride ion concentration ([Cl-]i) measurements in epithelial cells. The Cl-QD is synthesized by conjugating an anion receptor, 1-(2-mercapto-ethyl)-3-phenyl-thiourea (MEPTU) to a water soluble CdSe/ZnS QD at an emission wavelength of 620 nm. Upon binding of chloride ions to the Cl-QD, a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism caused the fluorescence of the QD to quench. This resulted in an inversely proportional relationship between the chloride ion concentration and the fluorescence intensity of the Cl-QD. We have utilized this Cl-QD to measure [Cl-]i in T84 and CF-PAC cultured cells, with either the C1C-2 or CFTR chloride channels being manipulated by pharmacological chloride channel activators and inhibitors. Activations of C1C-2 and CFTR chloride channels in T84 by the respective lubiprostone and genistein caused predictive increases in the fluorescence of the Cl-QD, i.e., a decrease of [Cl-]i. Conversely, glibenclamide, a chloride channel inhibitor, applied to the CF-PAC cells caused a predictable decrease in the fluorescence of Cl-QD due to the increase of [Cl-]i. These are the first data in using QD-based chloride ion sensors for dynamic measurements of intracellular chloride ion concentrations in epithelial cells.

  10. Dynamic [Cl{sup -}]{sub i} measurement with chloride sensing quantum dots nanosensor in epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuchi; Mao Hua; Wong, Lid B, E-mail: ywang@biotechplex.com [BioTechPlex Corporation, 1205 Linda Vista Drive Suite A, San Marcos, CA 92078 (United States); Cytoptics Corporation, 1205 Linda Vista Drive Suite B, San Marcos, CA 92078 (United States)

    2010-02-05

    We have synthesized a chloride sensing quantum dots (QD) nanosensor, Cl-QD, for the dynamic measurements of chloride ion concentration in the millimolar range, a sensitivity that is applicable to most physiological intracellular chloride ion concentration ([Cl{sup -}]{sub i}) measurements in epithelial cells. The Cl-QD is synthesized by conjugating an anion receptor, 1-(2-mercapto-ethyl)-3-phenyl-thiourea (MEPTU) to a water soluble CdSe/ZnS QD at an emission wavelength of 620 nm. Upon binding of chloride ions to the Cl-QD, a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism caused the fluorescence of the QD to quench. This resulted in an inversely proportional relationship between the chloride ion concentration and the fluorescence intensity of the Cl-QD. We have utilized this Cl-QD to measure [Cl{sup -}]{sub i} in T84 and CF-PAC cultured cells, with either the C1C-2 or CFTR chloride channels being manipulated by pharmacological chloride channel activators and inhibitors. Activations of C1C-2 and CFTR chloride channels in T84 by the respective lubiprostone and genistein caused predictive increases in the fluorescence of the Cl-QD, i.e., a decrease of [Cl{sup -}]{sub i}. Conversely, glibenclamide, a chloride channel inhibitor, applied to the CF-PAC cells caused a predictable decrease in the fluorescence of Cl-QD due to the increase of [Cl{sup -}]{sub i}. These are the first data in using QD-based chloride ion sensors for dynamic measurements of intracellular chloride ion concentrations in epithelial cells.

  11. Off-Center D- Centers in a Quantum Dot in the Presence of a Perpendicular Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the position of the donor in quantum dots on the energy spectrum in the presence ofa perpendicular magnetic field by using the method of few-body physics. As a function of the magnetic field, we find, when D- centers are placed sufficiently off-center, discontinuous ground-state transitions which are similar to those found in many-electron parabolic quantum dots. Series of magic numbers of angular momentum which minimize the ground-state electron-electron interaction energy have been discovered. The dependence of the binding energy of the ground-state of the 1D- center on the dot radius for a few values of the magnetic field strength is obtained and compared with other results.

  12. Design of columnar quantum dots for polarization-independent emission using 8-band k{center_dot}p method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrzejewski, J; Sek, G; Misiewicz, J [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrze z-dot e Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); O' Reilly, E [Department of Physics, University College Cork and Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Fiore, A, E-mail: janusz.andrzejewski@pwr.wroc.p [CORBA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-09-01

    Control of the polarization of the emitted light can be highly beneficial for certain optoelectronic applications such as optical amplifiers. It has been recently demonstrated experimentally that semiconductor quantum dots with large height to base length aspect ratio are able to emit polarization-independent light from the edge of the wafer. However, analysis of the physics responsible for the observed polarization properties of such nano-objects (like columnar quantum dots or quantum rods) is still rather limited. In particular, the role of the material surrounding the columnar QD on the strain and thus on the polarization properties has not been considered previously. We report here, based on original software, the results of eight-band k{center_dot}p calculations of the electronic and polarization properties of columnar In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}As quantum dots (CQD) with high aspect ratio (up to 6) embedded in an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As/GaAs quantum well. We calculate the relative intensities of transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) linear polarized light emitted from the edge of the semiconductor wafer as a function of the two main factors affecting the heavy hole - light hole valence band mixing and hence the polarization dependent selection rules for the optical transitions, namely i) the composition contrast y/x between the dot material and the surrounding well, and ii) the dot aspect ratio. Our numerical results show, in contrast to the previously reported expectations, that the former is the main driving parameter for tuning the polarization properties. This is explained analyzing the biaxial strain in the CQD, based on which it is possible to predict on the TM to TE intensity ratio.

  13. Binding Energy of D- and D0 Centers Confined by Spherical Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Yuan-Peng; XIE Wen-Fang

    2008-01-01

    We study a negative donor center, a neutral donor in a spherical Gaussian potential quantum dot by using the matrix diagonalization of Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. We calculate the energy E(D-) as functions of Gaussian potential size and depth, the same calculations as performed with the parabolic approximation. The dependence of the ground state of the neutral shallow donor and the negatively charged donor on the dot size and the potential depth is investigated.

  14. Measurement of HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate due to radon decay in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce ({center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2} {center_dot}) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate was found to be (4.31{plus_minus}0.07) {times} 10{sup 5} HO{sub x}{center_dot} per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G{sub (HO{sub x}{center_dot})}-value, 7.86{plus_minus}0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HO{sub x}{center_dot}] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HO{sub x}{center_dot} produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for {center_dot}OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial {center_dot}OH produced from the photolysis of O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O.

  15. "Dot COM", a nuclear transit center for the primary piRNA pathway in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cynthia; Zanni, Vanessa; Brasset, Emilie; Eymery, Angeline; Zhang, Liang; Mteirek, Rana; Jensen, Silke; Rong, Yikang S; Vaury, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The piRNA pathway protects genomes by silencing mobile elements. Despite advances in understanding the processing events that generate piRNAs for silencing, little is known about how primary transcripts are transported from their genomic clusters to their processing centers. Using a model of the Drosophila COM/flamenco locus in ovarian somatic cells, we identified a prominent nuclear structure called Dot COM, which is enriched in long transcripts from piRNA clusters but located far from their transcription sites. Remarkably, transcripts from multiple clusters accumulate at Dot COM, which is often juxtaposed with Yb-bodies, the cytoplasmic processing centers for cluster transcripts. Genetic evidence suggests that the accumulation of precursor transcripts at Dot COM represents one of the most upstream events in the piRNA pathway. Our results provide new insights into the initial steps of the piRNA pathway, and open up a new research area important for a complete understanding of this conserved pathway.

  16. Thermoluminescence and F centers of manganese doped NaCl and NaCl-CKl crystals exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somera, L.; Cruz Z, E.; Roman L, J. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Hernandez A, J. M.; Murrieta S, H., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Alkali halides crystals doped with rare earths or transition metals have been widely studied due to the luminescence properties. In particular, NaCl and KCl single crystals present thermally stimulated luminescence (Tl) after gamma irradiation. The NaCl and the NaCl KCl mixed crystal doped with manganese (MnCl{sub 2}) impurity were grown by using the Czochralski method. The emission characteristic of Mn{sup 2+} was observed at 543 nm. The crystals were exposed between 0.02 and 10 kGy gamma dose from {sup 60}Co irradiator. Optical absorption at room temperature shows the peaked band at 452 nm corresponding to the manganese impurity. The F bands, was ascribed to the electron trapped in the anion vacancy in the lattice, were obtained at 452 nm and 455 nm belonging to NaCl:Mn and NaCl KCl:Mn, respectively. The F band increases as the doses increase and it was bleaching by the UV light at 470 nm. The glow curves of the samples show the first glow peak between 92-103 degrees C, while the second main peak was observed at 183 degrees C for the undoped NaCl and at 148 and 165 degrees C for the NaCl:Mn and NaCl-KCl:Mn, respectively. The main peak was slowly bleaching when the irradiated sample was illuminated with F (470 nm) light. Optical bleaching confirms that the F center has an important participation in the thermoluminescent response. The glow curves structure from the thermal bleaching suggests the participation of different kind of traps. Also, the kinetics parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and the kinetic order (b) were investigated. (Author)

  17. Application of non-extensive entropy to study of decoherence of RbCl quantum dot qubit: Tsallis entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.; Rastegar Sedehi, H. R.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, an electron which is strongly coupled to the LO-phonon in triangular quantum dots with Coulomb impurity is considered. The eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of the ground and the first-excited states of the electron are obtained using the Pekar variational method. We have studied decoherence of RbCl quantum dot qubit using the non-extensive entropy (Tsallis entropy) for different values of Coulomb impurity parameter, polaronic radius and electron-LO phonon coupling strength. Numerical analysis shows that the entropy has the oscillatory periodic evolution as function of the time due to the triangular form of the confinement. It is found that entropy oscillates under a standing wave envelope with increasing the Coulomb impurity parameter, electron-LO phonon coupling strength and polaronic radius. With reducing the non-extensive parameter q, the entropy increases and thereby we can miss information about the system.

  18. Measurement of the B (s) (0) -> aEuro parts per thousand I center dot I center dot branching fraction and search for the decay B (0) -> phi phi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.

    2015-01-01

    Using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) collected in pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the B (s) (0) -> aEuro parts per thousand I center dot I center dot branching fraction is measured to be B(B-0 -> phi phi) = (1.84 +/- 0.05(stat) +/- 0.07 (sy

  19. Diamagnetic susceptibility of an off-center hydrogenic donor in pyramid-like and cone-like quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avazzadeh, Z.; Bahramiyan, H.; Khordad, R.; Mohammadi, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the diamagnetic susceptibility of an off-center hydrogenic donor impurity confined by pyramid and cone-like quantum dots has been investigated. To this end, the finite-element method and the Arnoldi algorithm are used to find energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the systems. Then, the effect of impurity position and dot size has been investigated on the diamagnetic susceptibility. We have found that the diamagnetic susceptibility has a maximum around the impurity position 4nm for two quantum dots. The diamagnetic susceptibility in the cone-like quantum dot is smaller than that in the pyramid quantum dot. Numerical studies reveal that the diamagnetic susceptibility depends strongly on the geometry of the dot.

  20. Completion of Green Building by Korea Institute of Energy Research - Energy{center_dot}Conservation{center_dot}Environmental Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Dong [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), which was fully aware that the effective utilization of energy could not only save energy but also reduce the environmental pollution due to a combustion exhaust gas, has built and operated 'the Ultra Energy Saving Building' whose energy consumption was only a fifth of general buildings as a example. KIER has started to research the project for the technology development and spread of Green Building in 'Enertech 21' - the most important research program of 1994 year - and has constructed the central building of the Institute with only the current available technology since the early of 1997 year, via researches by a step. Finally, KIER held the ceremony for the completion of Green Building in March sixth. This building is not just the first green building in Korea but also the representative building of energy environment research center, which will be marked out for a model for the domestic construction and construction industry in future. Therefore, this building has functions of exhibition, publicity, education, and experimentation for the building researchers as well as the office and researching place that is original function of this building. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Binding Energy of an Off-Center D- in a Spherical Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dong-Ming; XIE Wen-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Using the method of matrix diagonalization, we investigate an off-center D- in a spherical quantum dot (QD) subjected to a parabolic potential confinement. We discuss the effect of the position of an impurity in the QD on the binding energy of the D- system. Furthermore, we compare a negatively charged donor D- with a neutral donor D0 confined by a spherical QD with a parabolic potential. The results have dearly demonstrate the so-called quantum size effect. The binding energy/s dependent on the confining potential hω0 and the impurity ion distance D.

  2. Optical properties of the Bi+ center in KAlCl4

    CERN Document Server

    Veber, A A; Usovich, O V; Fattakhova, Z T; Haula, E V; Korchak, V N; Trusov, L A; Kazin, P E; Sulimov, V B; Tsvetkov, V B

    2013-01-01

    Temperature behavior of the Bi+ center emission, excitation bands and luminescence decay law in KAlCl4 crystal are investigated. Abrupt changes of the monocation optical properties are observed at phase transitions of the host. The observed optical transitions are assigned to the specific energy states of Bi+ ion. It is shown that two thermalized levels are responsible for the luminescence. The experimental temperature behavior of the emission and excitation bands are in agreement with theory of electron-phonon interaction of impurity centers in solids; the effective-phonon frequencies and Huang-Rhys parameters are estimated. The configuration coordinate diagram is determined for the Bi+ center in KAlCl4 crystal.

  3. Assessing the occurrence of the dibromide radical (Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}) in natural waters: Measures of triplet-sensitised formation, reactivity, and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Mailhot, Gilles; Sarakha, Mohamed [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Brigante, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.brigante@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Vione, Davide, E-mail: davide.vione@unito.it [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Torino, Centro Interdipartimentale NatRisk, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    The triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate (AQ2S) is able to oxidise bromide to Br{sup {center_dot}}/Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}, with rate constant (2-4) Dot-Operator 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} that depends on the pH. Similar processes are expected to take place between bromide and the triplet states of naturally occurring chromophoric dissolved organic matter ({sup 3}CDOM*). The brominating agent Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} could thus be formed in natural waters upon oxidation of bromide by both {sup {center_dot}}OH and {sup 3}CDOM*. Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} would be consumed by disproportionation into bromide and bromine, as well as upon reaction with nitrite and most notably with dissolved organic matter (DOM). By using the laser flash photolysis technique, and phenol as model organic molecule, a second-order reaction rate constant of {approx} 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup 2} L (mg C){sup -1} s{sup -1} was measured between Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} and DOM. It was thus possible to model the formation and reactivity of Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} in natural waters, assessing the steady-state [Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}] Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -13}-10{sup -12} M. It is concluded that bromide oxidation by {sup 3}CDOM* would be significant compared to oxidation by {sup {center_dot}}OH. The {sup 3}CDOM*-mediated process would prevail in DOM-rich and bromide-rich environments, the latter because elevated bromide would completely scavenge {sup {center_dot}}OH. Under such conditions, {sup {center_dot}}OH-assisted formation of Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} would be limited by the formation rate of the hydroxyl radical. In contrast, the formation rate of {sup 3}CDOM* is much higher compared to that of {sup {center_dot}}OH in most surface waters and would provide a large {sup 3}CDOM* reservoir for bromide to react with. A further issue is that nitrite oxidation by Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} could be an important source of the nitrating agent {sup {center_dot

  4. The effect of electric field on an on-center hydrogenic impurity spherical quantum dot GaAs/AlAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abdollahi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  In this research, the effect of the uniform electric field on the ground-state of a centered hydrogenic donor impurity in a GaAs/AlAs spherical quantum dot was studied using infinite potential model. In presence of strong electric field, due to the stark effect (perturbing electric field, the ground state energy would increase linearly. In presence of weak electric fields, the normalized binding energy was calculated by using perturbation method with effective mass approximation. This energy was investigated with respect to electric field strength. Studies show the proper choice of radius of quantum dot and electric field will clearly influence the normalized binding energy. The resulting influence may be used to calculate the small changes in quantum dot radius and thus detect different electric field strengths .

  5. Study of C{sub 60} {center_dot} 2S{sub 8} by the methods of induced electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shul`ga, Yu.M.; Rubtsov, V.I.; Lobach, A.S. [Institute of Chemical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    It was shown by the methods of induced electron emission that a transfer of the electron density from C{sub 60} molecules to the eight-membered ring of sulfur is characteristic of C{sub 60} {center_dot} 2S{sub 8}. The value of the ({sigma}+{pi})-plasmon energy for C{sub 60} {center_dot} 2S{sub 8} is approximately 1 eV less than that for pure C{sub 60}. In a high vacuum, the C{sub 60} {center_dot} 2S{sub 8} surface is depleted in sulfur.

  6. Low-mass lepton pair production in Pb-Au collisions at 40 A center dot GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamova, D; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fomenko, K; Fraenkel, Zeev; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Lenkeit, B C; Maas, A; Marin, A; Milosevic, J; Milov, A; Miskowiec, D; Panebratsev, Yu A; Petchenova, O Yu; Petrácek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Richter, M; Sako, H; Schmitz, W; Schükraft, Jürgen; Sedykh, S; Seipp, W; Shimansky, S S; Slívova, J; Specht, H J; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, Itzhak; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V

    2003-01-01

    The CERES/NA45 experiment at the CERN SPS has previously measured e **+e**- pair production in 160 A center dot GeV Pb-Au collisions. In the mass region m greater than 0.2 GeV/c**2, an enhancement of 2.7 plus or minus 0.4(stat.) plus or minus 0.5(syst.) compared to the expectation from known hadronic decay sources was observed. In the 40 A center dot GeV data taken in 1999, an enhancement is again found; a preliminary analysis gives an even larger value of 5.0 plus or minus 1.3(stat.). The results are compared to theoretical model calculations based on pi**+ pi**- annihilation with a modified rho- propagator; they may be related to chiral symmetry restoration. 17 Refs.

  7. Thermodynamics of formation of double salts M{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} M{sup '}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O and M{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} {center_dot} M{sup '}SeO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O where M denotes Rb, or Cs and M{sup '} denote Co, Ni, or Zn[Pitzer model; Solubility diagram; Rubidium, and cesium sulfate and selenate; Cobalt, nickel, and zinc sulfate and selenate; M2SO4{center_dot}M'SO4{center_dot}6H2O- and M2SeO4{center_dot}M'SeO4{center_dot}nH2O-double salts; Gibbs free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, Christomir. E-mail: hhristov@chem.ucsd.edu

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes a chemical model that calculates (solid + liquid) equilibria in the (m{sub 1}Rb{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}CoSO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Rb{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}CoSeO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Rb{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}NiSO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Rb{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}ZnSO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Rb{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}ZnSeO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Cs{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}CoSO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Cs{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}CoSeO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Cs{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}NiSO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Cs{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}NiSeO{sub 4})(aq), (m{sub 1}Cs{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}ZnSO{sub 4})(aq), and (m{sub 1}Cs{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}ZnSeO{sub 4})(aq) systems, where m denotes molality at the temperature T=298.15 K. The Pitzer ion-interaction model has been used for thermodynamic analysis of the experimental osmotic and solubility data presented in the literature. The thermodynamic functions needed (binary and ternary parameters of ionic interaction, thermodynamic solubility products) have been calculated and the theoretical solubility isotherm has been plotted. The mixing parameters {l_brace}{theta}(MN) and {psi}(MNX){r_brace} have been chosen on the basis of the compositions of saturated ternary solutions and data on the binary solubility of the sulfate M{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. M{sup '}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O double salts in water. To validate the mixing solutions model two different approaches have been used in evaluation of the ternary parameters: (I) preserving the same value of the binary mixing {theta}(MN) for the corresponding chloride, bromide, sulfate, and selenate systems with the same cations, and (II) with constant {theta}(MN) value (set equal to -0.05) for the all 11 sulfate and selenate systems. Very good agreement between experimentally determined and model predicted solubilities has been found. Important thermodynamic characteristics (thermodynamic solubility products, standard molar

  8. Ternary Isothermal Diffusion Coefficients of NaCl-MgCl2-H2O at 25 C. 7. Seawater Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D G; Lee, C M; Rard, J A

    2007-02-12

    The four diffusion coefficients D{sub ij} of the ternary system NaCl-MgCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at the simplified seawater composition 0.48877 mol {center_dot} dm{sup -3} NaCl and 0.05110 mol {center_dot} dm{sup -3} MgCl{sub 2} have been remeasured at 25 C. The diffusion coefficients were obtained using both Gouy and Rayleigh interferometry with the highly precise Gosting diffusiometer. The results, which should be identical in principle, are essentially the same within or very close to their combined 'realistic' errors. This system has a cross-term D{sub 12} that is larger than the D{sub 22} main-term, where subscript 1 denotes NaCl and 2 denotes MgCl{sub 2}. The results are compared with earlier, less-precise measurements. Recommended values for this system are (D{sub 11}){sub V} = 1.432 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2} {center_dot} sec{sup -1}, (D{sub 12}){sub V} = 0.750 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2} {center_dot} sec{sup -1}, (D{sub 21}){sub V} = 0.0185 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2} {center_dot} sec{sup -1}, and (D{sub 22}){sub V} = 0.728 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2} {center_dot} sec{sup -1}.

  9. Nonlinear optical response in a zincblende GaN cylindrical quantum dot with donor impurity center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyos, Jaime H. [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad de Medellín, Cra. 87 No. 30-65, Medellín (Colombia); Correa, J.D., E-mail: jcorrea@udem.edu.co [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad de Medellín, Cra. 87 No. 30-65, Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias, Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Básicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the nonlinear optical absorption coefficient of a cylindrical zincblende GaN-based quantum dot. For this purpose, we consider Coulomb interactions between electrons and an impurity ionized donor atom. The electron-donor-impurity spectrum and the associated quantum states are calculated using the effective mass approximation with a parabolic potential energy model describing both the radial and axial electron confinement. We also include the effects of the hydrostatic pressure and external electrostatic fields. The energy spectrum is obtained through an expansion of the eigenstates as a linear combination of Gaussian-type functions which reduces the computational effort since all the matrix elements are obtained analytically. Therefore, the numerical problem is reduced to the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The obtained energies are used in the evaluation of the dielectric susceptibility and the nonlinear optical absorption coefficient within a modified two-level approach in a rotating wave approximation. This quantity is investigated as a function of the quantum dot dimensions, the impurity position, the external electric field intensity and the hydrostatic pressure. The results of this research could be important in the design and fabrication of zincblende GaN-quantum-dot-based electro-optical devices.

  10. Time-resolved photoluminescence of type-II quantum dots and isoelectronic centers in Zn-Se-Te superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C.-K.; Cartwright, A. N.; Sellers, I. R.; McCombe, B. D.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally and time-resolved photoluminescence of a ZnTe /ZnSe superlattice reveals a smooth transition of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime from ˜100ns at 2.35eV to less than a few nanoseconds at 2.8eV. The significant increase of the lifetime in the low energy region is strong evidence to support the formation of type-II quantum dots (QDs), since in these nanostructures the spatial separation of carriers is increased. The shorter lived emission above 2.5eV is attributed to excitons bound to Te isoelectronic centers in the ZnSe matrix. The smooth transition of the PL lifetime confirms that clusters of these Te atoms evolve into type-II ZnTe /ZnSe QDs.

  11. Decoherence time, hydrogenic-like impurity effect and Shannon entropy on polaron in RbCl triangular quantum dot qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiotsop, M.; Fotue, A. J.; Fautso, G. K.; Kenfack, C. S.; Fotsin, H. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2017-03-01

    Using Pekar variational method, Eigen energies of the ground and first excited states of the polaron in triangular bound and Coulomb potential quantum dot are derived in view of investigating the density of probability, the decoherence time and the Shannon entropy. Numerical analysis show that the decoherence time is decreasing function of polaron radius and the strength of the Coulombic impurity and the increase function of dispersion coefficient. These results suggest that the decrease of polaron radius and Coulombic impurity lead to the increase of coherence time. Also the entropy shows the oscillatory periodic evolution as function of the time due to the triangular form of the confinement. It's also seen that entropy is periodic for the lower value of Coulomb impurity parameter and for the higher value of the polaronic radius.

  12. A administração clássica: um estudo aplicado a centrais de atendimento (call center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Moran Carvalho Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As organizações modernas, a exemplo de operações de centrais de atendimento, ou call centers, tem atuado em diversas áreas de negócios, que pode ser do simples atendimento, como os serviços de atendimento a clientes - SAC, a grandes empresas com foco em cobrança, televendas ou operações diversas. Assim, a pesquisa buscou apresentar evidências do emprego das teorias clássicas da administração, através de estudo de casos, em dois Call Centers de empresas do Rio Grande do Sul vinculados à rede varejista de eletroeletrônicos e a distribuidora de energia elétrica. Embora, a natureza de atuação diversa entre as duas centrais analisadas, os princípios clássicos da administração se mostraram evidenciados em ambas as operações, a exemplo da racionalização do trabalho, controle das atividades, supervisão atuante, jornadas definidas, prêmios por produção, dentre outros elementos característicos dos princípios defendidos por Taylor, Fayol, Ford entre outros clássicos da administração.

  13. Completion of CS insert fabrication; CS insato {center_dot} koiru no kansei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, M.; Isono, T.; Koizumi, N. [and others

    1999-11-10

    In CS model coil plan which was development programs which make center of the ITER engineering design activity, the production of the CS insert coil by the production finished about this. It is a coil made of Nb3Sn-CICC for installing the CS insert coil at the most internal layer of the CS model coil, and for in magnetic flux density, current, temperature and under the strain environment equal to ITER real machine, it tests the superconductive conductor in performance. We report the progress of the CS insert coil production. (NEDO)

  14. Preoperative radiological diagnosis by {sup 99m}Tc{center_dot}MIBI-{sup 99m}Tc subtraction scintigraphy for primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Takahiro; Tomita, Toshiki; Shinden, Seiichi; Takagi, Hitoshi [Tochigi Prefecture Saiseikai Utsunomiya Hospital (Japan); Kano, Shigeru

    1996-04-01

    Preoperative radiological diagnosis constitutes the most important factor for the surgical treatment of hyperparathyroidism. In this regard, MRI is useful for detecting the abnormal parathyroid, but it is often difficult to localize it using MRI only. It is thus necessary to combine this procedure with excellent subtraction scintigraphy. We performed both {sup 201}Tl-{sup 99m}Tc and {sup 99m}Tc{center_dot}MIBI-{sup 99m}Tc subtraction scintigraphy in seven patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and compared them the radiological results. Five patients presented parathyroid adenomas and the rest hypertrophy of the parathyroid. We could detect the abnormal parathyroid in four patients (57.1%) by {sup 201}Tl-{sup 99m}Tc subtraction scintigraphy and in six patients (85.7%) by {sup 99m}Tc{center_dot}MIBI-{sup 99m}Tc subtraction scintigraphy. We therefore believe that {sup 99m}Tc{center_dot}MIBI-{sup 99m}Tc subtraction scintigraphy will become an essential examination for primary hyperparathyroidism rather than the presently employed {sup 201}Tl-{sup 99m}Tc subtraction scintigraphy. (author).

  15. Reaction of sulphate radical anion (SO{sub 4}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) with cyanuric acid. A potential reaction for its degradation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj, P.; Varghese, R.; Manoj, V.M.; Aravindakumar, C.T. [Mahatma Gandhi University, School of Chemical Sciences, Kottayam (India)

    2002-01-01

    A novel reaction between sulfate radical anion (SO{sub 4}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) and cyanuric acid (CA), a non-degradable end product of the oxidative degradation of the triazine based herbicide, atrazine, is presented using laser flash photolysis and steady state radiolysis techniques at pH 5. A second order rate constant of 1.9x10{sup 7} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} has been determined and the transient intermediate ({lambda}{sub max}=330 nm) is assigned to a radical cation of CA (CA{sup {center_dot}}{sup +}). The degradation profile indicated that about 76% of CA have been decomposed after an absorbed {gamma}-radiation dose of 18 kGy. It is therefore proposed that the reaction of SO{sub 4}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} could be utilised for the degradation of CA in aqueous medium which is normally stable to any Advanced Oxidation Processes. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic properties of bis-({eta}{sup 6}-cumene)chromium fulleride [({eta}{sup 6}-PhCH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}Cr]{sup {center_dot}+}[C{sub 60}]{sup {center_dot}-} over the range from T {yields} (0 to 310) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, A.V., E-mail: markin@calorimetry-center.ru [Chemistry Institute, Nizhny Novgorod State University, Prospekt Gagarina 23/5, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ruchenin, V.A.; Smirnova, N.N. [Chemistry Institute, Nizhny Novgorod State University, Prospekt Gagarina 23/5, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Abakumov, G.A.; Markin, G.V.; Shevelev, Yu.A.; Kuropatov, V.A.; Lopatin, M.A.; Cherkasov, V.K.; Domrachev, G.A. [Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tropinin Str. 49, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Heat capacity and thermodynamic properties of crystalline bis-({eta}{sup 6}-cumene)chromium fulleride between T = (6 and 310) K. > Temperature dependence of EPR signal parameters of bis-({eta}{sup 6}-cumene)chromium fulleride over the range from T = (120 to 290) K. > The reversible dimerization of fullerene fragments and thermodynamic characteristics of the transformation.. > The stability of dimeric dianions (C{sub 60}{sup -}){sub 2} depends significantly on the nature of substituent. - Abstract: In the present research, the temperature dependence of heat capacity C{sub p,m}{sup 0}=f(T) of crystalline bis-({eta}{sup 6}-cumene)chromium fulleride [({eta}{sup 6}-PhCH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}Cr]{sup {center_dot}+}[C{sub 60}]{sup {center_dot}-} has been measured between T = (6 and 310) K in the precision adiabatic vacuum calorimeter and reported for the first time. Also, for the first time, the temperature dependence of EPR signal parameters of bis-({eta}{sup 6}-cumene)chromium fulleride over the range from T = (120 to 290) K was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance. In the interval from T = (196 to 240) K the reversible endothermic transformation was detected and its thermodynamic characteristics were estimated. This transformation was caused by dissociation of dimer (C{sub 60}{sup -}){sub 2} and formation of fulleride [({eta}{sup 6}-PhCH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}Cr]{sup {center_dot}+}[C{sub 60}]{sup {center_dot}-} during heating. The experimental results have been used to calculate the standard (p{sup {center_dot}} = 0.1 MPa) thermodynamic functions C{sub p,m}{sup 0}/R, {Delta}{sub T{sub 1}}{sup T{sub 2}}H{sub m}{sup 0}/RT, {Delta}{sub T{sub 1}}{sup T{sub 2}}S{sub m}{sup 0}/R, and {Phi}{sub m}{sup 0}/R={Delta}{sub T{sub 1}}{sup T{sub 2}}S{sub m}{sup 0}/R-{Delta}{sub T{sub 1}}{sup T{sub 2}}H{sub m}{sup 0}/RT (where R is the universal gas constant) for dimeric fulleride over the range from T {yields} (0 to 196) K and for monomeric complex

  17. Hydrogen-atom transfer in reactions of organic radicals with [Co-II(por)](center dot) (por = porphyrinato) and in subsequent addition of [Co(H)(por)] to olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, B.; Dzik, W.I.; Li, S.; Wayland, B.B.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms for hydrogen-atom transfer from the cyanoisopropyl radical C-center dot(CH3)(2)CN to [Co-II(por)](center dot) (yielding [Co-III(H)(por)] and CH2=C(CH3)(CN); por = porphyrinato) and the insertion of vinyl acetate (CH2=CHOAc) into the Co-H bond of [Co(H)(por)] (giving [Co-III{CH-(OAc)CH

  18. Effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} nucleating agents on crystallization behavior and magnetic properties of ferromagnetic glass-ceramic in the system Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaO{center_dot}ZnO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Hameed, Salwa A.M., E-mail: Salwa_NRC@hotmail.com [Glass Research Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Elwan, Rawhia L. [Glass Research Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallization of magnetic glass ceramic with different nucleating agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} as nucleating agents was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD for as prepared samples revealed crystallization of pure magnetite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment revealed minor calcium silicate, hematite and cristobalite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM revealed crystallization of crystallite size in the range 50-100 nm. -- Abstract: Preparation and characterization of ferromagnetic glass ceramic in the system Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaO{center_dot}ZnO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2} with different nucleating agents was studied. The effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} as nucleating agents was investigated. Differential thermal analysis; X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope were used to investigate thermal behavior, sequence of crystallization and microstructure of the samples. XRD analysis for as prepared samples revealed the crystallization of single magnetite phase. Heat treatment at 900 Degree-Sign C/2 h revealed the appearance of minor amounts of calcium silicate, hematite and cristobalite beside magnetite. TEM revealed crystallization of crystallite size in the range 50-100 nm. Lattice parameters, cell volume and crystallite size were stimulated from XRD data. Magnetic properties of quenched samples were measured under 20 kG.

  19. Targeting the environmental assessment of veterinary drugs with the multi-species-soil system (MS{center_dot}3) agricultural soil microcosms: the ivermectin case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell-Martin, G.; Pro-Gonzalez, J.; Aragones-Grunert, P.; Babib-Vich, M. M.; Fernandez-Rorija, C.; Tarazona-Lafarga, J. V.

    2011-07-01

    The environmental risk assessment of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin is receiving significant attention. This paper assesses the capacity of the MS{center_dot}3 soil microcosm as a tool for targeting the environmental impact assessment of veterinary drugs, using ivermectin as model. Two screening MS{center_dot}3 were performed using different European soils; one with a soil collected in an agricultural station near to Madrid, Spain and a second with a soil collected in a farm area close to York, UK. Soils were fortified with ivermectin at the following ranges: 0.01-10 mg kg{sup -}1 and 0.1-100 mg kg{sup -}1 in the Madrid and York studies, respectively. The effects on earthworms, plants and soil microorganisms were assessed in the Madrid soil. Toxicity tests on aquatic organisms (algae, cladocerans and in vitro fish cell line RTLW1) were also conducted with the leachates. No effects were observed in earthworms and plants at any tested concentration; reduction in the respiration rate (< 5%) of soil microorganisms was detected. Earthworm/soil bioconcentration factors decreased with the increase in soil concentrations and were higher for the York soil. Effects on daphnids were observed in tested leachates; based on measured levels of ivermectin in the leachates an EC50 of about 0.5{mu}gL{sup -}1 can be estimated. Comparisons based on toxicity data and equilibrium partitioning confirmed that the main risk is expected to be related to the high sensitivity of cladocerans. The results confirm that MS{center_dot}3 systems are cost-effective tools for assessing the impact of veterinary pharmaceuticals when applied to agricultural land, as previously demonstrated for antimicrobials. (Author) 39 refs.

  20. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN, Center for Emergent Matter Science, 3-1 Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  1. Study on the distribution of active centers in novel low Ti-loading MgCl2-supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王剑峰; 王立; 赵振荣; 王文钦; 陈涛

    2004-01-01

    Novel MgCl2-supported Ziegler-Natta (Z-N) catalysts prepared using a new one-pot ball milling method can effectively control the amounts of Ti-loading in the catalysts. Complex GPC data on polypropylene synthesized by these novel catalysts were analyzed using the method of fitting the molecular weight distribution (MWD) curves with a multiple Flory-Schulz function. It was found that multiple active centers exist in these novel catalysts. Detailed study of the effects of the Ti-loadings in the catalysts on the distribution of the active centers showed that the Ti-loadings in the novel MgCl2-supported Z-N catalysts might affect the proportion of each type of active centers; and might be the main factor responsible for the effect of the Ti-loadings on the microstructure, the molecular weight and molecular weight distribution width of the resultant polymer, the catalytic activity and polymerization kinetics.

  2. Growth kinetics and micromorphology of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyankova, L. A., E-mail: lyuba_pyan@mail.ru; Punin, Yu. O.; Bocharov, S. N.; Shtukenberg, A. G. [Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    The growth kinetics and elementary growth processes on the surface of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} heterogeneous crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system are experimentally studied. It is found that a change in the composition of complexes in an NH{sub 4}Cl crystal from Mn(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O to MnCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 2CONH{sub 3} leads to the occurrence of a local maximum in the kinetic curve and a change in the shape of dislocation growth centers from flat to conical. The growth kinetics of {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of heterogeneous NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals is described within the Bliznakov model using the Fowler-Guggenheim adsorption isotherm, which takes into account the lateral interaction of adsorbed particles.

  3. Silica-supported (nBuCp)2ZrCl2: Effect of catalyst active center distribution on ethylene-1-hexene copolymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2013-08-12

    Metallocenes are a modern innovation in polyolefin catalysis research. Therefore, two supported metallocene catalysts-silica/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 (Catalyst 1) and silica/nBuSnCl3/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 (Catalyst 2), where MAO is methylaluminoxane-were synthesized, and subsequently used to prepare, without separate feeding of MAO, ethylene-1-hexene Copolymer 1 and Copolymer 2, respectively. Fouling-free copolymerization, catalyst kinetic stability and production of free-flowing polymer particles (replicating the catalyst particle size distribution) confirmed the occurrence of heterogeneous catalysis. The catalyst active center distribution was modeled by deconvoluting the measured molecular weight distribution and copolymer composition distribution. Five different active center types were predicted for each catalyst, which was corroborated by successive self-nucleation and annealing experiments, as well as by an extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy report published in the literature. Hence, metallocenes impregnated particularly on an MAO-pretreated support may be rightly envisioned to comprise an ensemble of isolated single sites that have varying coordination environments. This study shows how the active center distribution and the design of supported MAO anions affect copolymerization activity, polymerization mechanism and the resulting polymer microstructures. Catalyst 2 showed less copolymerization activity than Catalyst 1. Strong chain transfer and positive co-monomer effect-both by 1-hexene-were common. Each copolymer demonstrated vinyl, vinylidene and trans-vinylene end groups, and compositional heterogeneity. All these findings were explained, as appropriate, considering the modeled active center distribution, MAO cage structure repeat units, proposed catalyst surface chemistry, segregation effects and the literature that concerns and supports this study. While doing so, new insights were obtained. Additionally, future research, along the direction

  4. Mixed-valence, layered, cation radical salts of the ethane-bridged dimeric tetrathiafulvalene [(EDT-TTF-CH2-)2#centre dot#+] [X-][THF]0.5, X-=FeCl4-, GaCl4-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mézière, C.; Fourmigué, M.; Canadell, E.

    2000-01-01

    The synthesis and X-ray crystal structure of the ethane-linked dimeric tetrathiafulvalene [(EDT-TTF-CH2)(2)], 1,2-bis(ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalenyl)ethane (1), is reported. It oxidizes reversibly at 0.45 and 0.90 V vs SCE. Electrocrystallization in the presence of [n-Bu4N][FeCl4] or [n-Bu4N...

  5. Effects of Supported ( n BuCp) 2 ZrCl 2 Catalyst Active-Center Distribution on Ethylene–1-Hexene Copolymer Backbone Heterogeneity and Thermal Behaviors

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2013-07-10

    Two catalysts, denoted as catalyst 1 [silica/MAO/(nBuCp) 2ZrCl2] and catalyst 2 [silica/nBuSnCl 3/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2] were synthesized and subsequently used to prepare, without separate feeding of methylaluminoxane (MAO), ethylene homopolymer 1 and homopolymer 2, respectively, and ethylene-1-hexene copolymer 1 and copolymer 2, respectively. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Crystaf, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) [conventional and successive self-nucleation and annealing (SSA)], and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) polymer characterization results were used, as appropriate, to model the catalyst active-center distribution, ethylene sequence (equilibrium crystal) distribution, and lamellar thickness distribution (both continuous and discrete). Five different types of active centers were predicted in each catalyst, as corroborated by the SSA experiments and complemented by an extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) report published in the literature. 13C NMR spectroscopy also supported this active-center multiplicity. Models combined with experiments effectively illustrated how and why the active-center distribution and the variance in the design of the supported MAO anion, having different electronic and steric effects and coordination environments, influence the concerned copolymerization mechanism and polymer properties, including inter- and intrachain compositional heterogeneity and thermal behaviors. Copolymerization occurred according to the first-order Markovian terminal model, producing fairly random copolymers with minor skewedness toward blocky character. For each copolymer, the theoretical most probable ethylene sequences, nE MPDSC-GT and n E MPNMR-Flory, as well as the weight-average lamellar thicknesses, Lwav DSC-GT and Lwav SSA DSC, were found to be comparable. To the best of our knowledge, such a match has not previously been reported. The percentage crystallinities of the homo- and copolymers increased linearly as a function of

  6. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of a novel Strandberg-type polyoxoselenomolybdate Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagazi, Ichraf, E-mail: ichrafpcmc@yahoo.fr [Departement de Chimie, Institut Superieur des Mathematiques Appliquees et d' Informatique, Avenue Assad Iben Fourat, 3100 Kairouan (Tunisia); Haddad, Amor [Laboratoire des Materiaux et Cristallochimie (LMC), Institut Superieur des Sciences Appliquees et Technologie, Avenue El Mourouj, 5111 Mahdia (Tunisia)

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H2O. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of the first Strandberg-type polyoxoselenomolybdate Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the novel compound. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chirality of the space group C2 of compound implies that it is expected to have nonlinear optical (NLO) properties -- Abstract: An inorganic compound formulated as Rb{sub 4}[Se{sub 2}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 21}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (1) has been isolated by conventional solution method and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder XRD, IR, UV-vis spectra, and cyclic voltammetry measurements. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2 with unit a = 19.701 (3) Angstrom-Sign , b = 10.296 (2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 12.134 (4) Angstrom-Sign , {beta} = 106.96 (2) Degree-Sign and Z = 4. The crystal structure of (1) is built up from a Strandberg clusters connected through hydrogen-bonding interactions into a three-dimensional supramolecular network.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility of Co sup 2 sup + pairs in [Co sub 2 (ox)tpmc](ClO sub 4) sub 2 centre dot 3H sub 2 O cluster complex

    CERN Document Server

    Spasojevic, V; Sovilj, S P; Mrozinski, J

    2000-01-01

    Calculation of the magnetic susceptibility of Co sup 2 sup + pairs in the recently synthesized cobaltous cluster complex [Co sub 2 (ox)tpmc](ClO sub 4) sub 2 centre dot 3H sub 2 O has been conducted by the use of two different theoretical models. The calculated results were compared to the experimental data collected in a wide temperature region. Conclusions on both the magnetic properties of Co sup 2 sup + dimers and the validity of the proposed models have been drawn. In the temperature region above chi(T) maximum, the best results are obtained with the Heisenberg model that includes spin-orbit coupling and excited single-ion levels. In the low-temperature region anisotropy of the magnetic properties dominates and Ising dimer ground-state model gives a more appropriate description. Obtained g-values (g sub p sub a sub r sub a sub l sub l sub e sub l a=5.67, g sub p sub a sub r sub a sub l sub l sub e sub l b=5.73, and g sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r =1.54) con...

  8. Effects of supported (nBuCp)2ZrCl2 catalyst active center multiplicity on crystallization kinetics of ethylene homo- and copolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    Two different supported zirconocene, that is, bis(n-butylcyclopentadienyl) zirconium dichloride (nBuCp)2ZrCl2, catalysts were synthesized. Each catalyst was used to prepare one ethylene homopolymer and one ethylene-1-hexene copolymer. Catalyst active center multiplicity and polymer crystallization kinetics were modeled. Five separate active center types were predicted, which matched the successive self-nucleation and annealing (SSA) peak temperatures. The predicted crystallinity well matched the differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) values for a single Avrami-Erofeev index, which ranged between 2 and 3 for the polymers experimented. The estimated apparent crystallization activation energy Ea did not vary with cooling rates, relative crystallinity α, and crystallization time or temperature. Therefore, the concept of variable/instantaneous activation energy was not found to hold. Ea linearly increased with the weight average lamellar thickness Lwav DSC-GT; and for each homopolymer, it exceeded that of the corresponding copolymer. Higher Ea, hence slower crystallization, was identified as a pre-requisite to attain higher crystallinity. Crystallization parameters were correlated to polymer backbone parameters, which are influenced by catalyst active center multiplicity. © 2013 Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH) are associated with titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage in fish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, James F.; Davies, Simon J.; Dodd, Nicholas J.F. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2008-04-02

    TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (<100 nm diameter) have been reported to cause oxidative stress related effects, including inflammation, cytotoxicity and genomic instability, either alone or in the presence of UVA irradiation in mammalian studies. Despite the fact that the aquatic environment is often the ultimate recipient of all contaminants there is a paucity of data pertaining to the potential detrimental effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms. Therefore, these investigations aimed to evaluate the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on goldfish skin cells (GFSk-S1), either alone or in combination with UVA. Whilst neutral red retention (NRR) assay (a measure of lysosomal membrane integrity) was used to evaluate cell viability, a modified Comet assay using bacterial lesion-specific repair endonucleases (Endo-III, Fpg) was employed to specifically target oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies with different spin traps were carried out for qualitative analysis of free radical generation. For cell viability, TiO{sub 2} alone (0.1-1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) had little effect whereas co-exposure with UVA (0.5-2.0 kJ m{sup -2}) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease which was dependent on both the concentration of TiO{sub 2} and the dose of UVA administered. For the Comet assay, doses of 1, 10 and 100 {mu}g ml{sup -1} in the absence of UVA caused elevated levels of Fpg-sensitive sites, indicating the oxidation of purine DNA bases (i.e. guanine) by TiO{sub 2}. UVA irradiation of TiO{sub 2}-treated cells caused further increases in DNA damage. ESR studies revealed that the observed toxic effects of nanoparticulate TiO{sub 2} were most likely due to hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) formation.

  10. Training effects on peak (VO2)-O-center dot, specific of the mode of movement, in rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwland, W; Berkhuysen, MA; Landsman, MLJ; Lie, KI; Rispens, P

    1998-01-01

    Training effects on peak oxygen consumption ((V) over dot O-2), specific to the mode of movement, are well-known in exercise training of young, healthy adults. However, these specific training effects were never studied in patients with coronary artery disease, but may be important in the evaluation

  11. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the quinary {l_brace}Na + K + Mg + Cl + SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O{r_brace} system at T=298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, Christomir E-mail: hhristov@chem.ucsd.edu

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes a chemical model that calculates (solid + liquid) equilibria in the {l_brace}m{sub 1}FeCl{sub 2} + m{sub 2}FeCl{sub 3}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}FeSO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}NaCl + m{sub 2}FeCl{sub 3}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}FeSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}NaCl + m{sub 2}FeCl{sub 2}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}KCl + m{sub 2}FeCl{sub 3}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}KCl + m{sub 2}FeCl{sub 2}{r_brace}(aq), {l_brace}m{sub 1}K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + m{sub 2}FeSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq), and {l_brace}m{sub 1}MgCl{sub 2} + m{sub 2}FeCl{sub 2}{r_brace}(aq) systems, where m denotes molality at T=298.15 K. The Pitzer ion-interaction model has been used for thermodynamic analysis of the experimental activity data in binary FeCl{sub 2}(aq) and FeCl{sub 3}(aq) solutions, and ternary solubility data, presented in the literature. The thermodynamic functions needed (binary and ternary parameters of ionic interaction, thermodynamic solubility products) have been calculated and the theoretical solubility isotherms have been plotted. The mixed solution model parameters {l_brace}{theta}(MN) and {psi}(MNX){r_brace} have been chosen on the basis of the compositions of saturated ternary solutions and data on the pure water solubility of the K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O double salt. The standard chemical potentials of four ferrous {l_brace}FeCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O, and MgCl{sub 2} {center_dot} FeCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O{r_brace} and three ferric {l_brace}FeCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O, 2KCl {center_dot} FeCl{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, and 2K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} Fe{sub 2}(SO

  12. Activation of silicon quantum dots for emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wei-Qi; Miao Xin-Jian; Huang Zhong-Mei; Liu Shi-Rong; Qin Chao-Jian

    2012-01-01

    The emission of silicon quantum dots is weak when their surface is passivated well. Oxygen or nitrogen on the surface of silicon quantum dots can break the passivation to form localized electronic states in the band gap to generate active centers where stronger emission occurs.From this point of view,we can build up radiative matter for emission.Emissions of various wavelengths can be obtained by controlling the surface bonds of silicon quantum dots.Our experimental results demonstrate that annealing is important in the treatment of the activation,and stimulated emissions at about 600 and 700 nm take place on active silicon quantum dots.

  13. Small non-polar complexes exhibiting significant piezoelectric properties: Solvothermal synthesis and crystal structures of MO{sub 5}V(tren){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Mo and W; tren=tris(2-aminoethyl)amine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, M.; Naether, C. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 2, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Bismayer, U. [Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Institut, Universitaet Hamburg, Grindelallee 48 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Bensch, W., E-mail: wbensch@ac.uni-kiel.de [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, Max-Eyth-Str. 2, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    The two isostructural complexes MO{sub 5}V(tren){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Mo (1) and W (2)) were synthesized under solvothermal conditions at pH Almost-Equal-To 12 crystallizing in the non-centrosymmetric space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. The structures are constructed by a distorted tetrahedral [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anion bound via one shared oxygen atom to a severely distorted [V{sup IV}N{sub 4}O]{sup 2+} complex completing the octahedral coordination around the V centre. The two O atoms in the VN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedron are in cis position. The two compounds represent rare examples where the [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anion is acting as a ligand. Both compounds exhibit a piezoelectric effect which is more pronounced for M=Mo. The samples are further characterized with IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and thermal analysis. - Graphical abstract: The complexes [(V(tren)O)(MO4)]{center_dot}H2O (M = Mo, W; tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine)) composed of vertex-linked [MO4]{sup 2-} tetrahedron and [VN4O6]{sup 2+}octahedron. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} tetrahedron (M=Mo, W) acting as ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jahn-Teller and steric distortion of the [VN{sub 4}O{sub 2}]{sup 2+} octahedron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-centrosymmetric complexes exhibiting pronounced piezoelectric effect.

  14. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra. Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dot states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  15. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra.Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dots states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  16. The first 3D malonate bridged copper [Cu(O{sub 2}C-CH{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}H){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]: Structure, properties and electronic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguatni, A., E-mail: seguatni@gmail.com [LBPC-INSERM U 698, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris XIII, 99, avenue J. B. Clement 93430, Villetaneuse (France); Fakhfakh, M. [Unite de recherche UR 12-30, Synthese et Structure de Materiaux Inorganiques, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Departement de Chimie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, C.P. 8888, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Que., H3C 3P8 (Canada); Smiri, L.S. [Unite de recherche UR 12-30, Synthese et Structure de Materiaux Inorganiques, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Gressier, P.; Boucher, F. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Jouini, N. [Departement de Chimie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, C.P. 8888, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Que., H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    A new inorganic-organic compound [Cu(O{sub 2}C-CH{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}H){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O] ([Cumal]) was hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. [Cumal] is the first three-dimensional compound existing in the system Cu(II)-malonic acid-H{sub 2}O. Its framework is built up through carboxyl bridged copper where CuO{sub 6} octahedra are elongated with an almost D{sub 4h} symmetry (4+2) due to the Jahn-Teller effect. The magnetic properties were studied by measuring its magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range of 2-300 K indicating the existence of weak ferromagnetic interactions. The electronic structure of [Cumal] was calculated within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. Structural features are well reproduced using DFT structural optimizations and the optical spectra, calculated within the dielectric formalism, explain very well the light blue colour of the compound. It is shown that a GGA+U approach with a U{sub eff} value of about 6 eV is necessary for a better correlation with the experiment. - Graphical abstract: [Cu(O{sub 2}C-CH{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}H){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]: the first 3D hybrid organic-inorganic compound built up carboxyl groups. The network presents a diamond-like structure achieved via carboxyl. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new organic-inorganic material with an unprecedented topology is synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallographic structure is determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure is obtained from DFT, GGA+U calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Framework can be described as formed from CuC{sub 4} tetrahedron sharing four corners. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This structure can be classified as an extended diamond structure.

  17. Connecting dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Kyoko; Jacobs, Rachel L.

    2017-01-01

    of connecting the dots of recalled moments of individual family members lives and is geared towards building a family’s shared future for posterity. Lastly, we consider a wider implication of family reminiscence in terms of human development. http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Memory-Practices-and-Learning...... and Middleton, 1995). A reminiscence conversation is a dynamic talk-in-interaction, which can produce valuable learning experience for the participants involved. Reminiscence talk contains rich, personal, historic data that can reveal and inform family members of an unknown past. In this seminar/chapter, we...... shall present a discursive approach, a methodology that captures the dynamics of reminiscence. We analyse collected conversational data of British family members reminiscing on their past as a joint family activity. Through such talk-in-interaction, the family members develop continuity within...

  18. Direct chemiluminescence of carbon dots induced by potassium ferricyanide and its analytical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, Mohammad; Manzoori, Jamshid L; Hallaj, Tooba; Sorouraddin, Mohammad H

    2014-03-25

    The chemiluminescence (CL) of water-soluble fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) induced by direct chemical oxidation was investigated. C-dots were prepared by solvothermal method and characterized by fluorescence spectra and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that K3Fe(CN)6 could directly oxidize C-dots to produce a relatively intense CL emission. The mechanism of CL generation was investigated based on the fluorescence and CL emission spectra and the effect of radical scavengers on the CL intensity. The inhibitive effect of some metal ions and biologically important molecules on the CL intensity of the system was examined and the potential of the system for the determination of these species at trace levels was studied. In order to evaluate the capability of method to real sample analysis, it was applied to the determination of Cr(VI) and adrenaline in water and injection samples, respectively.

  19. Analytical investigation of AlCl[3]/SO[2]Cl[2] catholyte materials for secondary fuze reserve batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Paul Charles; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Segall, Judith M.; Malizia, Louis A., Jr.; Cherry, Brian Ray; Andrews, Nicholas L.; Clark, Nancy H.; Alam, Todd Michael; Ingersoll, David T.; Tallant, David Robert; Simpson, Regina Lynn; Boyle, Timothy J.; Garcia, Manuel Joseph

    2004-05-01

    Exploration of the fundamental chemical behavior of the AlCl{sub 3}/SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} catholyte system for the ARDEC Self-Destruct Fuze Reserve Battery Project under accelerated aging conditions was completed using a variety of analytical tools. Four different molecular species were identified in this solution, three of which are major. The relative concentrations of the molecular species formed were found to depend on aging time, initial concentrations, and storage temperature, with each variable affecting the kinetics and thermodynamics of this complex reaction system. We also evaluated the effect of water on the system, and determined that it does not play a role in dictating the observed molecular species present in solution. The first Al-containing species formed was identified as the dimer [Al({mu}-Cl)Cl{sub 2}]{sub 2}, and was found to be in equilibrium with the monomer, AlCl{sub 3}. The second species formed in the reaction scheme was identified by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies as [Cl{sub 2}Al({mu}-O{sub 2}SCl)]{sub 2} (I), a scrambled AlCl{sub 3}{center_dot}SO{sub 2} adduct. The SO{sub 2}(g) present, as well as CL{sub 2}(g), was formed through decomposition of SO{sub 2}CL{sub 2}. The SO{sub 2}(g) generated was readily consumed by AlCl{sub 3} to form the adduct 1 which was experimentally verified when 1 was also isolated from the reaction of SO{sub 2}(g) and AlCl {sub 3}. The third species found was tentatively identified as a compound having the general formula {l_brace}[Al(O)Cl{sub 2}][OSCl{sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}. This was based on {sup 27}Al NMR data that revealed a species with tetrahedrally coordinated Al metal centers with increased oxygen coordination and the fact that the precipitate, or gel, that forms over time was shown by Raman spectroscopic studies to possess a component that is consistent with SOCl{sub 2}. The precursor to the precipitate should have similar constituents, thus the assignment of {l_brace}[Al(O)Cl{sub 2}][OSCl{sub 2

  20. Laser-induced positive ion and neutral atom/molecule emissions from single-crystal CaHPO4 center dot 2H20: The role of electron-beam-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawes, Mary L.(Washington State University); Hess, Wayne P.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kawaguchi, Yuji (VISITORS); Langford, S C.(Washington State University); Dickinson, J. Tom (Washington State University)

    1998-11-01

    We examine laser-induced ion and neutral emissions from single-crystal CaHPO4 center dot 2H2O (brushite), a wide-band-gap, hydrated inorganic single crystal, with 248-nm excimer laser radiation. Both laser-induced ion and neutral emissions are several orders magnitude higher following exposure to 2keV electrons at current densities of 200 uA/cm2 and doses of 1 C/cm2. In addition to intense Ca+ signals, electron-irradiated surfaces yield substantial CaO+, PO+, and P+ signals. As-grown and as-cleaved brushite show only weak neutral O2 and Ca emissions, whereas electron-irradiated surfaces yield enhanced O2, Ca, PO, PO2, and P emissions. Electron irradiation (i) significantly heats the sample, leading to thermal dehydration (CaHPO4 formation) and pyrolysis (Ca2P2O7 formation)and (ii) chemically reduces the surface via electron stimulated desorption. The thermal effects are accompanied by morphological changes, including recrystallization. Although complex, these changes lead to high defect densities, which are responsible for the dramatic enhancements in the observed laser desorption.

  1. The Characteristics of YAG:Ce Phosphor Powder Prepared Using a NO{sub 3}{sup -}-Malonic Acid-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin An [NJS Cablecar Co., Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Hwan [Jeonju University High School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Hoon [Tech4M Co., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Gun; Kim, Yoo Young [Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Ce-doped Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG:Ce) phosphor powder was prepared using a NO{sub 3}{sup -}-malonic acid-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O system. The YAG:Ce precursor was ignited at 240 .deg. C and the resulting powder contained YAG:Ce crystallites (42%) - active in the visible region at 460 nm - amorphous particles (53%) - inactive at visible wavelengths - and less than 3% oxide (3%) crystallite impurities. The impurities transformed to active YAG:Ce crystallites at above 800 .deg. C. At above 1000 .deg. C, the amorphous phase became YAG phase and isolated Ce{sub 2}O crystallites emerged. The powder particles comprised < 4 {mu}m secondary aggregates of 20 nm primary particles. The thermal dusting of the secondary particles coincided with the aggregation of the secondary particles at above 900 .deg. C

  2. Effect of texture alteration by thin film fabrication on the spin crossover of [Fe(3-Br-phen){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}]{center_dot}0.5CH{sub 3}OH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Anil D; DIrtu, Marinela M; Garcia, Yann, E-mail: yann.garcia@uclouvain.b [Institut de la Matiere Condensee et des Nanosciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2010-03-01

    A mononuclear complex of composition [Fe(3-Br-phen){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}]{center_dot}0.5CH{sub 3}OH which exhibits a gradual, incomplete spin crossover (SCO) in bulk sample (1) was selected to study the effect of alteration of particle size and shape on SCO properties. Thin films (2) were fabricated using spin coating technique on quartz substrates and silicon wafers. Morphology analysis by scanning electron micrographs shows a drastic reduction in particles size and deformation in shape compared to the bulk sample. Nearly spherical particles of 200-500 nm diameter were obtained and further reduction in size down to 50-120 nm were obtained with increase in spin coating speed. A thin film on a quartz substrate was studied by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy in transmission mode which shows only a low-spin signal as opposed to a dominant high-spin signal in bulk sample thus hinting out the effect of texture modification on increasing the ligand field strength.

  3. Isopiestic Investigation of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of {yMgCl2 + (1 - y)MgSO4}(aq) and the Osmotic Coefficients of Na2SO4.MgSO4(aq) at 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miladinovic, J; Ninkovic, R; Todorovic, M; Rard, J A

    2007-06-06

    Isopiestic vapor pressure measurements were made for {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) solutions with MgCl{sub 2} ionic strength fractions of y = 0, 0.1997, 0.3989, 0.5992, 0.8008, and (1) at the temperature 298.15 K, using KCl(aq) as the reference standard. These measurements for the mixtures cover the ionic strength range I = 0.9794 to 9.4318 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. In addition, isopiestic measurements were made with NaCl(aq) as reference standard for mixtures of {l_brace}xNa{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + (1-x)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) with the molality fraction x = 0.50000 that correspond to solutions of the evaporite mineral bloedite (astrakanite), Na{sub 2}Mg(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O(cr). The total molalities, m{sub T} = m(Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) + m(MgSO{sub 4}), range from m{sub T} = 1.4479 to 4.4312 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} (I = 5.0677 to 15.509 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}), where the uppermost concentration is the highest oversaturation molality that could be achieved by isothermal evaporation of the solvent at 298.15 K. The parameters of an extended ion-interaction (Pitzer) model for MgCl2(aq) at 298.15 K, which were required for an analysis of the {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) mixture results, were evaluated up to I = 12.025 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} from published isopiestic data together with the six new osmotic coefficients obtained in this study. Osmotic coefficients of {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) solutions from the present study, along with critically-assessed values from previous studies, were used to evaluate the mixing parameters of the extended ion-interaction model.

  4. La Clínica del Pueblo: a model of collaboration between a private media broadcasting corporation and an academic medical center for health education for North Carolina Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calles-Escandón, Jorge; Hunter, Jaimie C; Langdon, Sarah E; Gómez, Eva M; Duren-Winfield, Vanessa T; Woods, Kristy F

    2009-12-01

    La Clínica del Pueblo, a health education collaboration between the Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and Qué Pasa Media, Inc., disseminates culturally appropriate health information to the North Carolina (NC) Latino community. The program includes a weekly radio show and corresponding newspaper column addressing four areas: childhood health, adult health, safety, and utilization. The radio show format includes a didactic presentation followed by a call-in question and answer period. Over 200 consecutive weeks of programming have been completed, averaging 11 calls per show. A Latino healthcare resource guide and hotline also provide resource information. Participant demographic information indicates that 50% of the target population comes from Mexico, 60% are women, and 70% of the community is younger than 38 years. There was an increase in the use of the media as a source of health information over the course of the project, from an initial 33% of respondents to 58% in the last survey. Listenership to La Clínica del Pueblo displayed a pronounced increase (18% initial survey to 55% in last survey, P < 0.05). We also observed a statistically significant increase in medical knowledge from initial survey to the last survey (P < 0.001). By multiple regression analysis, we identified 4 predictors of medical knowledge: order of surveys (1 < 3, P < 0.001), education level (P < 0.0001), female gender (P < 0.01) and radio listenership (P < 0.05). The first three variables predicted higher scores; however, radio listening recognition of our radio program was more common among individuals who had lower scores. In conclusion, La Clínica del Pueblo is a model for a novel approach that can reach the Latino community to improve medical knowledge and possibly affect health behaviors in a positive manner.

  5. Photocatalytic production of {sup 1}O{sub 2} and {center_dot}OH mediated by silver oxidation during the photoinactivation of Escherichia coli with TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Camilo A. [Centro de Investigaciones en Catalisis, Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS), A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, GGEC, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Station 6, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Osorio, Paula [Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, GGEC, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Station 6, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sienkiewicz, Andrzej [Laboratory of Complex Matter Physics, Institute of Physics of Condensed Matter, EPFL, Station 3, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Pulgarin, Cesar, E-mail: cesar.pulgarin@epfl.ch [Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, GGEC, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Station 6, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Centeno, Aristobulo [Centro de Investigaciones en Catalisis, Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS), A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Giraldo, Sonia A., E-mail: sgiraldo@uis.edu.co [Centro de Investigaciones en Catalisis, Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS), A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metallic silver enhances the Ag-TiO{sub 2} photoinactivation of Escherichia coli under Vis irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 1}O{sub 2} and {center_dot}OH were identified in Vis irradiated Ag-TiO{sub 2} suspensions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV oxidized the Ag metallic species in the material decreasing photoactivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dark contact of the UV oxidized material with E. coli regenerates the photocatalyst. - Abstract: Ag loaded TiO{sub 2} was applied in the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli under ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) light irradiations. Ag enhanced the TiO{sub 2} photodisinfecting effect under Vis irradiation promoting the formation of singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals as identified by EPR analyses. Ag nanoparticles, determined on TEM analyses, undergo an oxidation process on the TiO{sub 2}'s surface under UV or Vis irradiation as observed by XPS. In particular, UV pre-irradiation of the material totally diminished its photodisinfection activity under a subsequent Vis irradiation test. Under UV, photodegradation of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), attributed to photoproduced holes in TiO{sub 2}, was inhibited by the presence of Ag suggesting that oxidation of Ag{sup 0} to Ag{sup +} and Ag{sup 2+} is faster than the oxidative path of the TiO{sub 2}'s holes on DCA molecules. Furthermore, photoassisted increased of Ag{sup +} concentration on TiO{sub 2}'s surface enhances the bacteriostatic activity of the material in dark periods. Indeed, this latter dark contact of Ag{sup +}-TiO{sub 2} and E. coli seems to induce recovering of the Vis light photoactivity promoted by the surface Ag photoactive species.

  6. Local and Nanoscale Structure and Speciation in the PuO{sub 2+x-y}(OH){sub 2y} {center_dot}zH{sub 2}O System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conradson, Steven D.; Begg, Bruce D.; Clark, David L.; Den Auwer, Christophe J.; Ding, Mei; Dorhout, Peter K.; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J.; Gordon, Pamela L.; Haire, Richard G.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hess, Ryan F.; Keogh, D. Webster; Morales, Luis A.; Neu, Mary P.; Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Runde, Wolfgang; Tait, C DREW.; Veirs, D. Kirk; Villella, Phillip M.

    2004-09-26

    Pu L3 X-ray absorption fine structure spectra from 24 samples of PuO{sub 2+x} (and two related Pu substituted oxides), prepared by a variety of methods, demonstrate that (1) although the Pu sublattice remains the ordered part of the Pu distribution, the nearest-neighbor O atoms even at x = 0 are found in a multisite distribution with Pu-O distances consistent with the stable incorporation of OH{sup -} (and possibly H{sub 2}O and H{sup +}) into the PuO{sub 2} lattice; (2) the excess O from oxidation is found at Pu-O distances <1.9 {angstrom}, consistent with the multiply bound ''oxo''-type ligands found in molecular complexes of Pu(V) and Pu(VI); (3) the Pu associated with these oxo groups is most likely Pu(V), so that the excess O probably occurs as PuO{sub 2}{sup +} moieties that are aperiodically distributed through the lattice; and (4) the collective interactions between these defect sites most likely cause them to cluster so as give nanoscale heterogeneity in the form of domains that may have unusual reactivity, observed as sequential oxidation by H{sub 2}O at ambient conditions. The most accurate description of PuO{sub 2} is therefore actually PuO{sub 2+x-y}(OH){sub 2y} {center_dot} zH{sub 2}O, with pure, ordered, homogeneous PuO{sub 2} attained only when H{sub 2}O is rigorously excluded and the O activity is relatively low.

  7. Quantum Dots Investigated for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe and CuInS2 for use in intermediate-bandgap solar cells. Using quantum dots in a solar cell to create an intermediate band will allow the harvesting of a much larger portion of the available solar spectrum. Theoretical studies predict a potential efficiency of 63.2 percent, which is approximately a factor of 2 better than any state-of-the-art devices available today. This technology is also applicable to thin-film devices--where it offers a potential four-fold increase in power-to-weight ratio over the state of the art. Intermediate-bandgap solar cells require that quantum dots be sandwiched in an intrinsic region between the photovoltaic solar cell's ordinary p- and n-type regions (see the preceding figure). The quantum dots form the intermediate band of discrete states that allow sub-bandgap energies to be absorbed. However, when the current is extracted, it is limited by the bandgap, not the individual photon energies. The energy states of the quantum dot can be controlled by controlling the size of the dot. Ironically, the ground-state energy levels are inversely proportional to the size of the quantum dots. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Ba Wendi et al., in the early 1990's. The most studied quantum dots prepared by this method have been of CdSe. To produce these dots, researchers inject a syringe of the desired organometallic precursors into heated triocytlphosphine oxide (TOPO) that has been vigorously stirred under an inert atmosphere (see the following figure). The solution immediately begins to change from colorless to yellow, then orange and red/brown, as the quantum dots increase in size. When the desired size is reached, the heat is removed from the flask. Quantum dots of different sizes can be identified by placing them under a "black light" and observing the various color differences in

  8. From DOT to Dotty

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    - Module types are interfaces, which can be abstracted. In this talk Martin will present DOT, a particularly simple calculus that can express systems following these principles. DOT has been developed as the foundation of the next version of Scala. He will also report on dotty, a new Scala compiler that implements the constructs of DOT in its core data structures and that uses the lessons learned to drive Scala’s evolution.

  9. The Effectiveness of Family-Based DOTS versus Professional-Family Mix DOTS in Treating Smears Positive Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Yekrang Sis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study compared the effectiveness of Family-Based DOTS (FB-DOTS versus Professional-Family Mix DOTS (PFM-DOTS in smear positive tuberculosis (TB patients. Methods: This semi-experimental study was performed in Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases Research Center of Tabriz in 2011-2012, among 57 TB patients recruited into either FB-DOTS or PFM-DOTS groups. At the baseline of the study, knowledge of both patients and their supervisors were assessed while at the end point, smear and culture of sputum, quality of life, knowledge and satisfaction of the patients along with the knowledge and satisfaction of their super-visors were assessed. Results: The difference for sputum smear negative (culture was 16.2 (4.8% and 7.7(6.9% for the PFM-DOTS in comparison with FB DOTS by the end of the second and forth months of treatment, respectively. A significant difference was observed between the two groups in relation to knowledge, satisfaction (patients and supervisors and all four domains of quality of life: physical health (P=0.036, psychological health (P<0.001, social relations (P=0.026 and environmental health (P<0.001. Conclusion: The PFM-DOTS treatment strategy in which health experts follow the patients in their homes seems to be among most appropriate strategies in treating TB.

  10. Nuclear magnetic relaxation in the ferrimagnetic chain compound NiCu(C{sub 7}H{sub 6}N{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O : three-magnon scattering?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Hiromitsu; Yamamoto, Shoji [Division of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2004-12-15

    Recent proton spin-lattice relaxation-time (T{sub 1}) measurements on the ferrimagnetic chain compound NiCu(C{sub 7}H{sub 6}N{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O are explained by an elaborately modified spin-wave theory. We give strong evidence of the major contribution to 1/T{sub 1} being made by the three-magnon scattering rather than the Raman scattering.

  11. Detection and control of charge states in a quintuple quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takumi; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Nakajima, Takashi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Noiri, Akito; Kawasaki, Kento; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-12-01

    A semiconductor quintuple quantum dot with two charge sensors and an additional contact to the center dot from an electron reservoir is fabricated to demonstrate the concept of scalable architecture. This design enables formation of the five dots as confirmed by measurements of the charge states of the three nearest dots to the respective charge sensor. The gate performance of the measured stability diagram is well reproduced by a capacitance model. These results provide an important step towards realizing controllable large scale multiple quantum dot systems.

  12. Barrier Li Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYi-Min; LIXiao-Zhu; YANWen-Hong; BAOCheng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The methods for the few-body system are introduced to investigate the states of the barrier Li quantum dots (QDs) in an arbitrary strength of magnetic field. The configuration, which consists of a positive ion located on the z-axis at a distaneed from the two-dimensional QD plane (the x-y plane) and three electrons in the dot plane bound by the positive ion, is called a barrier Li center. The system, which consists of three electrons in the dot plane bound by the ion,is called a barrier Li QD. The dependence of energy of the state of the barrier Li QD on an external magnetic field B and the distance d is obtained. The angular momentum L of the ground states is found to jump not only with the variation orB but also with d.

  13. Quantum Dots: Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  14. Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Hepp, Aloysius; Bailey, Sheila G.

    2002-01-01

    We have been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe, CuInS2, and CuInSe2 for use in an intermediate bandgap solar cell. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Bawendi, et. al., in the early 1990's. However, unlike previous work in this area we have also utilized single-source precursor molecules in the synthesis process. We will present XRD, TEM, SEM and EDS characterization of our initial attempts at fabricating these quantum dots. Investigation of the size distributions of these nanoparticles via laser light scattering and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. Theoretical estimates on appropriate quantum dot composition, size, and inter-dot spacing along with potential scenarios for solar cell fabrication will be discussed.

  15. Screened spin-1 and -1/2 Kondo effect in a triangular quantum dot system with interdot Coulomb repulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yong-Chen; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Luo, Shi-Jun; Yang, Jun-Tao; Huang, Hai-Ming

    2017-03-01

    By means of the numerical renormalization group (NRG) technique, we study the low temperature transport property and the phase transition for a triangular triple quantum dot system, including two centered dots (dot 1 and 2) and one side dot (dot 3). We focus on the effect of interdot repulsion V between two centered dots in a wide range of the interdot hopping tij (i,j = 1,2,3). When the hoppings between the centered dot and the side dot are symmetric, i.e., t13 = t23, and that between two centered dots t12 is small, two centered dots form a spin triplet when V is absent, and a totally screened spin-1 Kondo effect is observed. In this case, one has a spin 1 that is partially screened by the leads as in the usual spin-1 Kondo model, and the remaining spin 1/2 degree of freedom forms a singlet with the side dot. As V is large enough, one of the centered dots is singly occupied, while the other one is empty. The spin-1/2 Kondo effect is found when t13 is small. For large t12, two centered dots form a spin singlet when V = 0, leading to zero conductance. As V is large enough, the spin-1/2 Kondo effect is recovered in the case of small t13. For asymmetric t13≠t23 and small t12, a crossover is found as V increases in comparison with a first order quantum phase transition for the symmetric case. In the regime of large V, the spin-1/2 Kondo effect could also be found when both t13 and t23 are small. We demonstrate the present model is similar to the side-coupled double dot system in some appropriate regimes, and it appears as a possible realization of side-controllable molecular electronics and spintronics devices.

  16. Environmental conditions influence for real-time hologram formation on dichromated polyvinyl alcohol NiCl{sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O doped films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanilla-Urdaneta, R C; Olivares-Perez, A; Fuentes-Tapia, I; Rios-Velasco, M A, E-mail: rfontanilla@inaoep.mx, E-mail: olivares@inaoep.mx, E-mail: ifuentes@inaoep.mx, E-mail: moni_arv@hotmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro No. 1 Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    The real-time holographic gratings recording are studied by the presence of a metallic salt. The experimental process refers to analysis of diffraction efficiency by the influence of humidity in the coating solution on holograms formation in presence of electrical potential. The diffraction efficiency is measured as a function of the exposure energy until reach the saturation. The influence of the hologram parameters to get the diffraction efficiency is studied at room conditions.

  17. Crystal structure of a new variety of lead dodecaborate Pb{sub 6}(Li{sub 0.65}Na{sub 0.19})[B{sub 12}O{sub 24}]I{sub 0.84} {center_dot} 0.168H{sub 2}O and its comparison with beryl and cordierite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belokoneva, E. L., E-mail: elbel@geol.msu.ru; Derkach, I. K.; Dimitrova, O. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Geology (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Crystals of a new representative of ring-radical dodecaborates Pb{sub 6}(Li{sub 0.65}Na{sub 0.19})[B{sub 12}O{sub 24}]I{sub 0.84} {center_dot} 0.168H{sub 2}O, space group R3bar m , are obtained under hydrothermal conditions. The structure is determined with-out preliminary knowledge of the chemical formula. It is close to that of the Pb{sub 6}[B{sub 12}O{sub 24}] {center_dot} H{sub 2}O dodecaborate studied earlier, but unlike the latter structure it contains admixtures of iodide anion, lithium cation, and water molecule, which incompletely populate positions in channels. The formation of the second variety, which brings to light ion-exchange properties of the crystals, is due to mineralizing ions available in the concen-trated solution in the course of crystallization. The new compound is compared with beryl and cordierite, which have close structures with channels capable of capturing various groups. Structures of synthetic Na and Ag dodecaborates with analogous but distorted ring dodecaborate radicals are discussed.

  18. Tunable Room Temperature Second Harmonic Generation in Glasses Doped with CuCI Nanocrystalline Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thantu, Napoleon; Schley, Robert Scott; B. L. Justus

    2003-05-01

    Two-photon excited emission centered at 379-426 nm in photodarkening borosilicate glass doped with CuCl nanocrystalline quantum dots at room temperature has been observed. The emission is detected in the direction of the fundamental near-infrared beam. Time- and frequency-resolved measurements at room temperature and 77 K indicate that the emission is largely coherent light characteristic of second harmonic generation (SHG). An average conversion efficiency of ~10-10 is obtained for a 2 mm thick sample. The observed SHG can originate in the individual noncentrosymmetric nanocrystals, leading to a bulk-like contribution, and at the nanocrystal-glass interface, leading to a surface contribution. The bulk-like conversion efficiency is estimated using previously reported values of coherence length (5m) and bulk nonlinear susceptibility. This bulk-like conversion efficiency estimate is found to be smaller than the measured value, suggesting a more prominent surface contribution.

  19. Temperature Studies of Single InP Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-18

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012858 TITLE: Temperature Studies of Single InP Quantum Dots DISTRIBUTION...34 QWR/QD.07 St Petersburg, Russia, June 14-18, 1999 © 1999 loffe Institute Temperature studies of single InP quantum dots Valdry Zwiller, Mats-Erik...Information on the size and geometry of our self-assembled InP Quantum Dots grown on GamnP lattice matched to GaAs has been published elsewhere -I

  20. Dielectrophoretic Manipulation and Separation of Microparticles Using Microarray Dot Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Yafouz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a dielectrophoretic system for the manipulation and separation of microparticles. The system is composed of five layers and utilizes microarray dot electrodes. We validated our system by conducting size-dependent manipulation and separation experiments on 1, 5 and 15 μm polystyrene particles. Our findings confirm the capability of the proposed device to rapidly and efficiently manipulate and separate microparticles of various dimensions, utilizing positive and negative dielectrophoresis (DEP effects. Larger size particles were repelled and concentrated in the center of the dot by negative DEP, while the smaller sizes were attracted and collected by the edge of the dot by positive DEP.

  1. Chiral Graphene Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nozomu; Wang, Yichun; Elvati, Paolo; Qu, Zhi-Bei; Kim, Kyoungwon; Jiang, Shuang; Baumeister, Elizabeth; Lee, Jaewook; Yeom, Bongjun; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Lee, Jaebeom; Violi, Angela; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-02-23

    Chiral nanostructures from metals and semiconductors attract wide interest as components for polarization-enabled optoelectronic devices. Similarly to other fields of nanotechnology, graphene-based materials can greatly enrich physical and chemical phenomena associated with optical and electronic properties of chiral nanostructures and facilitate their applications in biology as well as other areas. Here, we report that covalent attachment of l/d-cysteine moieties to the edges of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) leads to their helical buckling due to chiral interactions at the "crowded" edges. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the GQDs revealed bands at ca. 210-220 and 250-265 nm that changed their signs for different chirality of the cysteine edge ligands. The high-energy chiroptical peaks at 210-220 nm correspond to the hybridized molecular orbitals involving the chiral center of amino acids and atoms of graphene edges. Diverse experimental and modeling data, including density functional theory calculations of CD spectra with probabilistic distribution of GQD isomers, indicate that the band at 250-265 nm originates from the three-dimensional twisting of the graphene sheet and can be attributed to the chiral excitonic transitions. The positive and negative low-energy CD bands correspond to the left and right helicity of GQDs, respectively. Exposure of liver HepG2 cells to L/D-GQDs reveals their general biocompatibility and a noticeable difference in the toxicity of the stereoisomers. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that d-GQDs have a stronger tendency to accumulate within the cellular membrane than L-GQDs. Emergence of nanoscale chirality in GQDs decorated with biomolecules is expected to be a general stereochemical phenomenon for flexible sheets of nanomaterials.

  2. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  3. Hexagonal graphene quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, S.

    2016-12-05

    We study hexagonal graphene quantum dots, using density functional theory, to obtain a quantitative description of the electronic properties and their size dependence, considering disk and ring geometries with both armchair and zigzag edges. We show that the electronic properties of quantum dots with armchair edges are more sensitive to structural details than those with zigzag edges. As functions of the inner and outer radii, we find in the case of armchair edges that the size of the band gap follows distinct branches, while in the case of zigzag edges it changes monotonically. This behaviour is further analyzed by studying the ground state wave function and explained in terms of its localisation.

  4. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  5. Highly Efficient Perovskite-Quantum-Dot Light-Emitting Diodes by Surface Engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2016-08-16

    A two-step ligand-exchange strategy is developed, in which the long-carbon-chain ligands on all-inorganic perovskite (CsPbX3, X = Br, Cl) quantum dots (QDs) are replaced with halide-ion-pair ligands. Green and blue light-emitting diodes made from the halide-ion-paircapped quantum dots exhibit high external quantum efficiencies compared with the untreated QDs.

  6. Fuzzy Dot Structure of BG-algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Senapati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the notions of fuzzy dot subalgebras is introduced together with fuzzy normal dot subalgebras and fuzzy dot ideals of BG-algebras. The homomorphic image and inverse image are investigated in fuzzy dot subalgebras and fuzzy dot ideals of BG-algebras. Also, the notion of fuzzy relations on the family of fuzzy dot subalgebras and fuzzy dot ideals of BG-algebras are introduced with some related properties.

  7. New center for IT research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R Dalton

    2002-09-01

    The motivation for creating such a center is quite obvious. Despite the ‘dot com’ crash, IT continues to be the fastest growing and dominant component of world economy. Computing power and the ability to rapidly move information around the world are, of course, important drivers of that IT economy.

  8. Inmunodeficiencias humorales: Un estudio en tres Centros de Inmunología Clínica de adultos en la Ciudad de Buenos Aires Antibody deficiencies: A survey from three Clinical Immunology Centers for adults in Buenos Aires City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego S. Fernández Romero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Las inmunodeficiencias humorales (IDH comprenden a un grupo de enfermedades caracterizadas por la imposibilidad de desarrollar una respuesta inmune efectiva mediada por anticuerpos. Estos pacientes presentan infecciones, principalmente por bacterias extracelulares capsuladas, del tracto respiratorio. El objetivo de nuestro estudio fue describir las características clínicas de una población de 128 pacientes derivados con sospecha o diagnóstico de IDH a tres centros para inmunodeficiencias de adultos, asistidos entre junio de 2004 y diciembre de 2009. Tres (2.3% consultaron por infecciones recurrentes en una sola oportunidad sin datos suficientes para su adecuada clasificación y fueron excluidos del estudio. De los 125 pacientes restantes, en 21 (16.8% se descartó IDH, en 8 (6.4% se diagnosticó inmunodeficiencia humoral secundaria (IDHS y en 96 (76.8% inmunodeficiencia humoral primaria (IDHP. Las causas de IDHS fueron: en un caso enfermedad renal, en uno uso de fenitoína, dos casos: gammapatía monoclonal y en 4 linfoma B. Las causas de las 96 IDHP fueron: 57 inmunodeficiencia común variable, 12 agammaglobulinemia ligada al cromosoma X, 10 deficiencia selectiva de IgA, 7 deficiencia de IgG1, 3 síndrome hiper-IgM, 3 deficiencia de IgM, 2 síndrome linfoproliferativo ligado al cromosoma X, un síndrome de Good y una deficiencia funcional de anticuerpos. Sesenta y siete pacientes estaban en seguimiento en el momento de la finalización del estudio, 25 de ellos estaban en seguimiento al iniciarse el estudio. De los 58 pacientes en seguimiento con indicación de tratamiento sustitutivo con gammaglobulina, 54 se encontraban en tratamiento al finalizar el estudio. En cuatro pacientes no se pudo confirmar el diagnóstico de IDHP.Antibody deficiency (AD comprises a group of diseases characterized by the inability to develop an effective antibody mediated immune response. These patients suffer mainly of encapsulated extracellular bacterial

  9. Electron correlations in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Tipton, D L J

    2001-01-01

    Quantum dot structures confine electrons in a small region of space. Some properties of semiconductor quantum dots, such as the discrete energy levels and shell filling effects visible in addition spectra, have analogies to those of atoms and indeed dots are sometimes referred to as 'artificial atoms'. However, atoms and dots show some fundamental differences due to electron correlations. For real atoms, the kinetic energy of electrons dominates over their mutual Coulomb repulsion energy and for this reason the independent electron approximation works well. For quantum dots the confining potential may be shallower than that of real atoms leading to lower electron densities and a dominance of mutual Coulomb repulsion over kinetic energy. In this strongly correlated regime the independent electron picture leads to qualitatively incorrect results. This thesis concentrates on few-electron quantum dots in the strongly correlated regime both for quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional dots in a square confining p...

  10. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  11. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  12. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  13. Quantum dot nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Henini

    2002-06-01

    These sophisticated technologies for the growth of high quality epitaxial layers of compound semiconductor materials on single crystal semiconductor substrates are becoming increasingly important for the development of the semiconductor electronics industry. This article is intended to convey the flavor of the subject by focusing on the technology and applications of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs and to give an introduction to some of the essential characteristics.

  14. Inter-dot coupling effects on transport through correlated parallel coupled quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shyam Chand; G Rajput; K C Sharma; P K Ahluwalia

    2009-05-01

    Transport through symmetric parallel coupled quantum dot system has been studied, using non-equilibrium Green function formalism. The inter-dot tunnelling with on-dot and inter-dot Coulomb repulsion is included. The transmission coefficient and Landaur–Buttiker like current formula are shown in terms of internal states of quantum dots. The effect of inter-dot tunnelling on transport properties has been explored. Results, in intermediate inter-dot coupling regime show signatures of merger of two dots to form a single composite dot and in strong coupling regime the behaviour of the system resembles the two decoupled dots.

  15. Ga@C-dots as an antibacterial agent for the eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar VB

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vijay Bhooshan Kumar,1 Michal Natan,2 Gila Jacobi,2 Ze’ev Porat,3,4 Ehud Banin,2 Aharon Gedanken1,5 1Department of Chemistry, 2Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar Ilan Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, 3Division of Chemistry, Nuclear Research Center-Negev, 4Institutes of Applied Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Be’er-Sheva, Israel; 5National Cheng Kung University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tainan, Taiwan Abstract: The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infections that are difficult to treat by antibiotic therapy. This research article reports on the synthesis of gallium (Ga doped in carbon (C-dots (Ga@C-dots and their antimicrobial activity against free-living P. aeruginosa bacteria. The synthesis of Ga@C-dots was carried out by sonicating molten Ga (for 2.5 h in polyethylene glycol-400, which acts as both a medium and carbon source. The resultant Ga@C-dots, having an average diameter of 9±2 nm, showed remarkably enhanced antibacterial activity compared with undoped C-dots. This was reflected by the much lower concentration of Ga doped within Ga@C-dots which was required for full inhibition of the bacterial growth. These results highlight the possibility of using Ga@C-dots as potential antimicrobial agents. Keywords: C-dots, Ga@C-dots, sonochemistry, gallium, antibacterial, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  16. Quantum dynamics of the Walden inversion reaction Cl - +CH3Cl --> ClCH3+Cl -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, David C.; Palma, Juliana

    1997-01-01

    Quantum scattering calculations on the SN2 reaction Cl-+CH3Cl→ClCH3+Cl- are reported. The rotating bond approximation (RBA) has been adapted so that three degrees of freedom including the C-Cl stretching vibration and the CH3 umbrella mode are treated explicitly. The calculations have been done with minor modifications of a potential due to Vande Linde and Hase. It is found that initial excitation of the C-Cl vibration has a large effect on the reaction probabilities, while excitation of the CH3 umbrella vibration is less significant. The reaction is dominated by scattering resonances with lifetimes ranging from 0.1 to 10 ps. It is found that the length of the C-Cl bond at the transition state of the reaction has a particularly pronounced effect on the reaction probabilities. The magnitude of the quantum reaction probabilities compares quite well with those calculated using the quasiclassical trajectory method.

  17. Reassessing the role of DotF in the Legionella pneumophila type IV secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly C Sutherland

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' Disease, survives and replicates within both protozoan hosts and human alveolar macrophages. Intracellular survival is dependent upon secretion of a plethora of protein effectors that function to form a replicative vacuole, evade the endocytic pathway and subvert host immune defenses. Export of these factors requires a type IV secretion system (T4SS called Dot/Icm that is composed of twenty-seven proteins. This report focuses on the DotF protein, which was previously postulated to have several different functions, one of which centered on binding Dot/Icm substrates. In this report, we examined if DotF functions as the T4SS inner membrane receptor for Dot/Icm substrates. Although we were able to recapitulate the previously published bacterial two-hybrid interaction between DotF and several substrates, the interaction was not dependent on the Dot/Icm substrates' signal sequences as predicted for a substrate:receptor interaction. In addition, binding did not require the cytoplasmic domain of DotF, which was anticipated to be involved in recognizing substrates in the cytoplasm. Finally, inactivation of dotF did not abolish intracellular growth of L. pneumophila or translocation of substrates, two phenotypes dependent on the T4SS receptor. These data strongly suggest that DotF does not act as the major receptor for Dot/Icm substrates and therefore likely performs an accessory function within the core-transmembrane subcomplex of the L. pneumophila Dot/Icm type IV secretion system.

  18. Single quantum dot nanowire photodetectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.; Van Weert, M.H.M.; Reimer, M.E.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report InP nanowire photodetectors with a single InAsP quantum dot as light absorbing element. With excitation above the InP band gap, the nanowire photodetectors are efficient (quantum efficiency of 4%). Under resonant excitation of the quantum dot, the photocurrent amplitude depends on the line

  19. Isomerization effect of counter anion on the spin crossover transition in [Fe(4-NH{sub 2}trz){sub 3}](CH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SO{sub 3}){sub 2{center_dot}}nH{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, A; Enomoto, M; Kojima, N, E-mail: cnori@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.j [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, 3-8-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated the spin crossover transition of the triazole bridged one dimensional Fe{sup II} complexes, [Fe(4-NH{sub 2}trz){sub 3}](o-, m-, p-tos){sub 2{center_dot}}nH{sub 2}O (tosH = toluenesulfonic acid), in order to study the isomerization effect of counter anion on the spin crossover phenomenon by means of {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurement. In the heating process, the spin transition of the all salts occurs around room temperatures, i.e. those of o-, m-, p-tos salts are 330 K, 319 K and 320 and 350 K, respectively. In the cooling process, the structural isomerization effect of counter anion on the spin crossover phenomenon is more remarkable than that in the heating process. In the case of o-tos salt, the spin transition occurs at 250 K with thermal hysteresis of 80 K. On the other hand, in the case of the m-tos salt, the spin transition occurs abruptly at 319 K with negligible small hysteresis. In the case of the p-tos salt, the spin transition occurs abruptly at 295 K in the cooling process in spite of stepwise spin transitions in the heating process.

  20. Structure determination of a complex tubular uranyl phenylphosphonate, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, from conventional x-ray powder diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poojary, D.M. [Texas A& M Univ. College Station, TX (United States); Cabeza, A.; Aranda, A.G. [Universidad de Malaga (Spain)] [and others

    1996-03-13

    The three-dimensional structure of a complex tubular uranyl phosphonate, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, was determined ab initio from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and refined by the Rietveld method. The crystals belong to the space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with {alpha} = 17.1966(2) {Angstrom}, b = 7.2125(2) {Angstrom}, c = 27.8282(4) {Angstrom}, and Z = 4. The structure consists of three independent uranium atoms, among which two are seven-coordinated and the third is eight-coordinated. These metal atoms are connected by four different phosphonate groups to form a one-dimensional channel structure along the b axis. The phenyl groups are arranged on the outer periphery of the channels, and their stacking forces keep the channels intact in the lattice. The determination of this structure which contains 50 non-hydrogen atoms in the asymmetric unit, from conventional X-ray powder data, represents significant progress in the application of powder techniques to structure of complex inorganic compounds, including organometallic compounds.

  1. One-Step Synthesis and Photoluminescence Eva-luation of Cadmium-containing Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nisha Shukla; Michael M Nigra; Abigail D Ondeck

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a simple one-step process for synthesis of ternary quantum dots (ZnCdSe, MgCdSe) with photoluminescence wavelengths ranging from the red to the blue region of the visible spectrum. The primary aim of this work was to develop a synthesis for the preparation of Cd-containing quantum dots using a Cd precursor with lower toxicity than those used in common syntheses. This synthesis makes use of Cd(acac)2 which is significantly less toxic than precursors such as CdO and CdCl2 . We have studied the effect of solvent boiling point, precursors and reaction time on the photoluminescence properties of the ternary quantum dots. Ternary quantum dots synthesized from Cd(acac)2 in low boiling point solvents have photoluminescence wavelengths in the blue region, while those synthesized in high boiling point solvents have photoluminescence wavelengths in the red region.

  2. Donor Centers in a Gaussian Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2007-01-01

    We study a neutral donor center (D0) and a negatively charged donor center (D-) trapped by a quantum dot, which is subjected to a Gaussian potential confinement. Calculations are made by using the method of numerical diagonalization of Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. The dependence of the ground state of the neutral shallow donor and the negatively charged donor on the dot size and the potential depth is investigated. The same calculations performed with the parabolic approximation of the Gaussian potential lead to the results that are qualitatively and quantitatively different from each other.

  3. Wetting layers effect on InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Chao [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 49(BUPT), Xitucheng Road No. 10, Beijing 100876 (China); Lu Pengfei, E-mail: photon.bupt@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 49(BUPT), Xitucheng Road No. 10, Beijing 100876 (China); Yu Zhongyuan; Cao Huawei; Zhang Lidong [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 49(BUPT), Xitucheng Road No. 10, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2012-11-15

    FEM combining with the K{center_dot}P theory is adopted to systematically investigate the effect of wetting layers on the strain-stress profiles and electronic structures of self-organized InAs quantum dot. Four different kinds of quantum dots are introduced at the same height and aspect ratio. We found that 0.5 nm wetting layer is an appropriate thickness for InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Strain shift down about 3%{approx}4.5% for the cases with WL (0.5 nm) and without WL in four shapes of quantum dots. For band edge energy, wetting layers expand the potential energy gap width. When WL thickness is more than 0.8 nm, the band edge energy profiles cannot vary regularly. The electron energy is affected while for heavy hole this impact on the energy is limited. Wetting layers for the influence of the electronic structure is obviously than the heavy hole. Consequently, the electron probability density function spread from buffer to wetting layer while the center of hole's function moves from QDs internal to wetting layer when introduce WLs. When WLs thickness is larger than 0.8 nm, the electronic structures of quantum dots have changed obviously. This will affect the instrument's performance which relies on the quantum dots' optical properties.

  4. Spin Quantum Beats in InP Quantum Dots in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP013252 TITLE: Spin Quantum Beats in InP Quantum Dots in a Magnetic Field...Technology" SRPN.05 St Petersburg, Russia, June 18-22, 2001 (0 2001 loffe Institute Spin quantum beats in InP quantum dots in a magnetic field L A... quantum dots . A detailed description of the structure is given in [ ]. The luminescence was excited by 3 ps pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser, 40 meV above

  5. Optimization of Quantum-Dot Molecular Beam Epitaxy for Broad Spectral Bandwidth Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Majid, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The optimization of the key growth parameters for broad spectral bandwidth devices based on quantum dots is reported. A combination of atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence of test samples, and optoelectronic characterization of superluminescent diodes (SLDs) is used to optimize the growth conditions to obtain high-quality devices with large spectral bandwidth, radiative efficiency (due to a reduced defective-dot density), and thus output power. The defective-dot density is highlighted as being responsible for the degradation of device performance. An SLD device with 160 nm of bandwidth centered at 1230 nm is demonstrated.

  6. Three-photon excitation of quantum dots with a telecom band ultrafast fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Petrasiunas, M J; Kielpinski, D; Streed, E W

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate three-photon excitation in quantum dots with a mode-locked fiber laser operating in the telecommunications band. We compare spectra and intensity dependence of fluorescence from one- and three-photon excitation of commercially available 640 nm quantum dots, using a 372 nm diode laser for one-photon excitation and 116 fs pulses from a mode-locked fiber laser with a center wavelength of 1575 nm for three-photon excitation.

  7. Growth and micromagnetism of self-assembled epitaxial fcc(111) cobalt dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchart, O; Masseboeuf, A; Toussaint, J C; Bayle-Guillemaud, P

    2013-12-11

    We develop the self-assembly of epitaxial submicrometer-sized face-centered-cubic (fcc) Co(111) dots using pulsed laser deposition. The dots display atomically flat facets, from which the ratios of surface and interface energies for fcc Co are deduced. Zero-field magnetic structures are investigated with magnetic force and Lorentz microscopies, revealing vortex-based flux-closure patterns. A good agreement is found with micromagnetic simulations.

  8. Quantifying Local and Cooperative Components in the Ferroelectric Distortion of BaTiO3: Learning from the Off-Center Motion in the MnCl65– Complex Formed in KCl:Mn+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; García-Fernández, P.; Calle-Vallejo, F.

    2014-01-01

    The delicate balance between cooperative and local contributions in the ferroelectric distortions of BaTiO3 is explored by means of ab initio calculations. As a salient feature, it is found that a single Ti4+ ion in BaTiO3 is not allowed to move off-center at ambient pressure, while this is no lo...... at ambient pressure. The present results thus stress the deep link between the structural phase transitions of ferroelectric materials and local phase transitions displayed by transition-metal impurities in insulators....

  9. Quantum dots: Rethinking the electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Dimple

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the Quantum dots are quite interesting for the electronics industry. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale crystals, which have unique photo physical, quantum electrical properties, size-dependent optical properties, There small size means that electrons do not have to travel as far as with larger particles, thus electronic devices can operate faster. Cheaper than modern commercial solar cells while making use of a wider variety of photon energies, including "waste heat" from the sun's energy. Quantum dots can be used in tandem cells, which are multi junction photovoltaic cells or in the intermediate band setup. PbSe (lead selenide) is commonly used in quantum dot solar cells.

  10. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  11. Hydrophobin-Encapsulated Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shohei; Sandiford, Lydia; Cooper, Maggie; Rosca, Elena V; Ahmad Khanbeigi, Raha; Fairclough, Simon M; Thanou, Maya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Wohlleben, Wendel; von Vacano, Bernhard; de Rosales, Rafael T M; Dobson, Peter J; Owen, Dylan M; Green, Mark

    2016-02-01

    The phase transfer of quantum dots to water is an important aspect of preparing nanomaterials that are suitable for biological applications, and although numerous reports describe ligand exchange, very few describe efficient ligand encapsulation techniques. In this report, we not only report a new method of phase transferring quantum dots (QDs) using an amphiphilic protein (hydrophobin) but also describe the advantages of using a biological molecule with available functional groups and their use in imaging cancer cells in vivo and other imaging applications.

  12. Quantum Dots in Cell Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso, Margarida M.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that have broad excitation spectra, narrow emission spectra, tunable emission peaks, long fluorescence lifetimes, negligible photobleaching, and ability to be conjugated to proteins, making them excellent probes for bioimaging applications. Here the author reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using quantum dots in bioimaging applications, such as single-particle tracking and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, to study receptor-mediated t...

  13. Quantum dots in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida M

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that have broad excitation spectra, narrow emission spectra, tunable emission peaks, long fluorescence lifetimes, negligible photobleaching, and ability to be conjugated to proteins, making them excellent probes for bioimaging applications. Here the author reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using quantum dots in bioimaging applications, such as single-particle tracking and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, to study receptor-mediated transport.

  14. Concerted evolution of the tandemly repeated genes encoding primate U2 small nuclear RNA (the RNU2 locus) does not prevent rapid diversification of the (CT){sub n} {center_dot} (GA){sub n} microsatellite embedded within the U2 repeat unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, D.; Weiner, A.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-12-10

    The RNU2 locus encoding human U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is organized as a nearly perfect tandem array containing 5 to 22 copies of a 5.8-kb repeat unit. Just downstream of the U2 snRNA gene in each 5.8-kb repeat unit lies a large (CT){sub n}{center_dot}(GA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat (n {approx} 70). This form of genomic organization, in which one repeat is embedded within another, provides an unusual opportunity to study the balance of forces maintaining the homogeneity of both kinds of repeats. Using a combination of field inversion gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction, we have been able to study the CT microsatellites within individual U2 tandem arrays. We find that the CT microsatellites within an RNU2 allele exhibit significant length polymorphism, despite the remarkable homogeneity of the surrounding U2 repeat units. Length polymorphism is due primarily to loss or gain of CT dinucleotide repeats, but other types of deletions, insertions, and substitutions are also frequent. Polymorphism is greatly reduced in regions where pure (CT){sub n} tracts are interrupted by occasional G residues, suggesting that irregularities stabilize both the length and the sequence of the dinucleotide repeat. We further show that the RNU2 loci of other catarrhine primates (gorilla, chimpanzee, ogangutan, and baboon) contain orthologous CT microsatellites; these also exhibit length polymorphism, but are highly divergent from each other. Thus, although the CT microsatellite is evolving far more rapidly than the rest of the U2 repeat unit, it has persisted through multiple speciation events spanning >35 Myr. The persistence of the CT microsatellite, despite polymorphism and rapid evolution, suggests that it might play a functional role in concerted evolution of the RNU2 loci, perhaps as an initiation site for recombination and/or gene conversion. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Influence of calcium on transport properties, band spectrum and superconductivity of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} and YBa{sub 1.5}La{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}{sup {center_dot}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasumyants, V.E.; Vladimirskaya, E.V. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Patrina, I.B. [Institute of Silicate Chemistry, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The comparative investigation of transport phenomena in Y{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (0y>6.87 and 6.73y>6.96) and YBa{sub 2-x}La{sub x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (0center_dot}}. The results obtained suggest that Ca gives rise to some peculiarities in band spectrum of this compound.

  16. Influence of collision energy on cross section and stereodynamical properties for the reaction H + OCl {yields} OH + Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Shengwen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116021 (China); Wang Yunhui [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lu Ruifeng, E-mail: rflu@mail.njust.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2012-06-19

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first QCT investigation for the reaction H + OCl {yields} OH + Cl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of collision energy on scalar properties including reaction probability and the integral cross-section. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full information about stereodynamics of product alignment and orientation. - Abstract: The quasi-classical trajectory calculations are carried out for the reaction H + OCl {yields} OH + Cl on the singlet ground state potential energy surface. The reaction probability for total angular momentum J = 0 and the integral cross section as a function of collision energy are presented. Furthermore, the product rotational alignment center_dot} k)> has been obtained, and the value tends to decrease with the increasing of collision energy with fluctuations. To investigate the collision-energy-dependent effects on chemical stereodynamics, the four generalized polarization-dependent differential cross sections (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 00}/d{omega}{sub t}), (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 20}/d{omega}{sub t}), (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 22+}/d{omega}{sub t}) and (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 21-}/d{omega}{sub t}), the distribution P({theta}{sub r}) of the angle between j Prime -k and the angle distribution P({phi}{sub r}) in terms of k-k Prime -j Prime correlation have also been calculated.

  17. Fuzzy dot ideals and fuzzy dot H-ideals of BCH-algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jia-yin

    2008-01-01

    The notions of fuzzy dot ideals and fuzzy dot H-ideals in BCH-algebras are intro duced,several appropriate examples are provided,and their some properties are investigated.The relations among fuzzy ideal,fuzzy H-ideal,fuzzy dot ideal and fuzzy dot H-ideals in BCH algebras are discussed,several equivalent depictions of fuzzy dot ideal are obtained. How to deal with the homomorphic image and inverse image of fuzzy dot ideals (fuzzy dot H-ideals) are studied. The relations between a fuzzy dot ideal (fuzzy dot H-ideal) in BCH-algebras and a fuzzy dot ideal (fuzzy dot H-ideal) in the product algebra of BCH-algebras are given.

  18. Translocation of PEGylated quantum dots across rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlollahi F

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Farnoosh Fazlollahi1,8, Arnold Sipos1,2, Yong Ho Kim1,2, Sarah F Hamm-Alvarez6, Zea Borok1–3, Kwang-Jin Kim1,2,5–7, Edward D Crandall1,2,4,8 1Will Rogers Institute Pulmonary Research Center, 2Department of Medicine, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Physiology and Biophysics, 6Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, 8Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: In this study, primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECM were used to investigate transalveolar epithelial quantum dot trafficking rates and underlying transport mechanisms. Methods: Trafficking rates of quantum dots (PEGylated CdSe/ZnS, core size 5.3 nm, hydrodynamic size 25 nm in the apical-to-basolateral direction across RAECM were determined. Changes in bioelectric properties (ie, transmonolayer resistance and equivalent active ion transport rate of RAECM in the presence or absence of quantum dots were measured. Involvement of endocytic pathways in quantum dot trafficking across RAECM was assessed using specific inhibitors (eg, methyl-ß-cyclodextrin, chlorpromazine, and dynasore for caveolin-, clathrin-, and dynamin-mediated endocytosis, respectively. The effects of lowering tight junctional resistance on quantum dot trafficking were determined by depleting Ca2+ in apical and basolateral bathing fluids of RAECM using 2 mM EGTA. Effects of temperature on quantum dot trafficking were studied by lowering temperature from 37°C to 4°C. Results: Apical exposure of RAECM to quantum dots did not elicit changes in transmonolayer resistance or ion transport rate for up to 24 hours; quantum dot trafficking rates were not surface charge-dependent; methyl-ß-cyclodextrin, chlorpromazine, and dynasore did not decrease quantum dot trafficking rates; lowering of temperature

  19. Estado nutricional de pacientes com esquizofrenia frequentadores do Centro de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre Nutritional status of patients with schizophrenia who attend the Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Zortéa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o estado nutricional de pacientes com esquizofrenia, atendidos por um programa de reabilitação social (CAPS. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo transversal com 40 pacientes com diagnóstico de esquizofrenia, em uso de antipsicóticos, atendidos no CAPS do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Foram verificados medidas antropométricas (peso, estatura, circunferência abdominal, percentual de gordura corporal, pressão arterial e tabagismo. RESULTADOS: A amostra constitui-se de 65% de homens. A média de peso encontrada foi de 75,39 ± 15,73 kg. O índice de massa corporal médio apresentou-se dentro dos parâmetros de sobrepeso (26,76 ± 4,78 kg/m², sendo 55% dos pacientes com sobrepeso ou obesidade segundo a classificação da OMS/1998. A circunferência abdominal e o percentual de gordura corporal apresentaram-se elevados na maioria dos pacientes (62,5% e 92,5%, respectivamente. Adicionalmente, não houve associação significativa entre IMC e a classificação de antipsicóticos (típicos, atípicos, clozapina. Encontrou-se uma correlação entre o tempo de doença com o percentual de gordura (r = 0,39, p = 0,033 e escolaridade com o peso (r = 0,362, p = 0,046 e IMC (r = 0,372, p = 0,039. Na regressão linear, 13% da variabilidade do percentual de gordura foi explicada pelo tempo de doença (r² = 0,131, B = 0,233, p = 0,049; 13% da variação do peso foi explicada pela escolaridade (r² = 0,131, B = 1,415, p = 0,046 e 13,8% da variação do IMC foi explicada pela escolaridade (r² = 0,138, B = 0,411, p = 0,039. CONCLUSÃO: Os pacientes apresentaram níveis aumentados de circunferência abdominal, percentual de gordura corporal e peso. Aparentemente, o ganho de peso ocorre em todos os pacientes expostos a antipsicóticos, independentemente do tipo de medicação e de resposta clínica, e a qualquer momento ao longo da evolução da doença. Sugere-se que, adicionalmente, a avaliação dos hábitos alimentares e o

  20. Binding Energy of an Exciton Bound to Ionized Acceptor in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2001-01-01

    Binding energiesfor an exciton (X ) trapped in the two-dimensional quantum dot by a negative ion located on the z axis at a distance from the dot plane are calculated by using the method of few-body physics.This configuration is called a barrier (A-,X) center.The dependence of the binding energy of the ground state of the barrier (A-,X)center on the electron-to-hole mass ratio for a few values of the distance d between the fixed negative ion on the z axis and the dot plane is obtained.We find that when d → 0,the barrier (A-,X) center has not any bound state.We also studied the stability and binding energy of the ground state of the barrier (A-,X) center in a parabolic quantum dot as a function of the distance d between the fixed negative ion on the z axis and the dot plane.``

  1. Optically active quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  2. Fabrication and single-electron-transfer operation of a triple-dot single-electron transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Mingyu, E-mail: mingyujo@eis.hokudai.ac.jp; Uchida, Takafumi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan); Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0198 (Japan); Ono, Yukinori [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroshi [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1, Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    A triple-dot single-electron transistor was fabricated on silicon-on-insulator wafer using pattern-dependent oxidation. A specially designed one-dimensional silicon wire having small constrictions at both ends was converted to a triple-dot single-electron transistor by means of pattern-dependent oxidation. The fabrication of the center dot involved quantum size effects and stress-induced band gap reduction, whereas that of the two side dots involved thickness modulation because of the complex edge structure of two-dimensional silicon. Single-electron turnstile operation was confirmed at 8 K when a 100-mV, 1-MHz square wave was applied. Monte Carlo simulations indicated that such a device with inhomogeneous tunnel and gate capacitances can exhibit single-electron transfer.

  3. Quantum-dot emitters in photonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots is strongly influenced by the environment in which they are placed. This can be used to determine fundamental optical properties of the quantum dots as well as to manipulate and control the quantum-dot emission itself....

  4. Beer's law in semiconductor quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Adamashvili, G T

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of a coherent optical linear wave in an ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots is considered. It is shown that a distribution of transition dipole moments of the quantum dots changes significantly the polarization and Beer's absorption length of the ensemble of quantum dots. Explicit analytical expressions for these quantities are presented.

  5. Membrane analysis with amphiphilic carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sukhendu; Malishev, Ravit; Parambath Kootery, Kaviya; Mirsky, Yelena; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Jelinek, Raz

    2014-09-14

    Newly-synthesized amphiphilic carbon dots were used for spectroscopic analysis and multicolour microscopic imaging of membranes and live cells. We show that Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred from the amphiphilic carbon dots to different membrane-associated fluorescence acceptors. The amphiphilic carbon dots enabled imaging of membrane disruption by the beta-amyloid peptide.

  6. Atomic scale investigations on Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}Se quantum dots: Correlation between the composition and emission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benallali, H., E-mail: hammouda.benallali@im2np.fr; Hoummada, K.; Mangelinck, D. [Aix-Marseille Université, IM2NP-CNRS, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Cremel, T.; André, R.; Tatarenko, S.; Kheng, K. [University of Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC, F-38054 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst. NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-08-04

    Atom probe tomography and photoluminescence spectroscopy have been used to study Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}Se quantum dots embedded in a ZnSe layer grown on a (001) GaAs substrate. Atom probe tomography analyses show significant cadmium incorporation in the center of the dots surrounded by poor cadmium region. These measurements illustrate that the maximum cadmium concentration in the quantum dots is significantly higher than the concentration estimated by transmission electron microscopy. The composition and size of quantum dots obtained by atom probe tomography have been used to calculate the transition energies including excitonic and strain effects.

  7. Nanoscale quantum-dot supercrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Turkov, Vadim K.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-09-01

    We develop a theory allowing one to calculate the energy spectra and wave functions of collective excitations in twoand three-dimensional quantum-dot supercrystals. We derive analytical expressions for the energy spectra of twodimensional supercrystals with different Bravias lattices, and use them to analyze the possibility of engineering the supercrystals' band structure. We demonstrate that the variation of the supercrystal's parameters (such as the symmetry of the periodic lattice and the properties of the quantum dots or their environment) enables an unprecedented control over its optical properties, thus paving a way towards the development of new nanophotonics materials.

  8. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-10-15

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T{sub 1}=20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T{sub 1}{proportional_to}B{sup -5} has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T{sub 1}{proportional_to}T{sup -1}. The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T{sub 1}{sup h

  9. Thermochemistry of uranium compounds: XVI, Calorimetric determination of the standard molar enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K, low-temperature heat capacity, and high-temperature enthalpy increments of UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O (schoepite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, I.R.; O`Hare, P.A.G.; Lewis, B.M.; Johnson, G.K.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1987-08-01

    Three precise calorimetric methods, viz., low-temperature adiabatic, high-temperatuare drop, and solution-reaction, have been used to determine as a function of temperature the key chemical thermodynamic properties of a pure sample of schoepite, UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O. The following results have been obtained at the standard reference temperature T = 298.15 K:standard molar enthalpy of formation {Delta}/sub f/H/sub m/{sup 0}(T) = {minus}1825.4 +- 2.1 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/; molar heat capacity C/sub p,m/{sup 0}(T) = 172.07 +- 0.34 JK/sup {minus}1/; and the standard molar entropy S/sub m/{sup 0}(T) = 188.54 +- 0.38 JK/sup {minus}1/ mol/sup {minus}1/. The molar enthalpy increments relative to 298.15 K and the molar heat capacity are given by the polynomials: {H{sub m}{sup 0}(T) {minus} H{sub m}{sup 0}(298.15 K)}/(J mol/sup {minus}1/) = {minus}38209.0 + 84.2375 (T/K) + 0.1472958 (T/K){sup 2} and C/sub p,m/{sup 0}(T)/(JK/sup {minus}1/ mol/sup {minus}1/) = 84.238 + 0.294592 (T/K), where 298.15 K < T < 400 K. The present result for {Delta}/sup f/H/sub m/{sup 0} at 298.15 K has been combined with three other closely-agreeing values from the literature to give a recommended weighted mean {Delta}/sub f/H/sub m/{sup 0} = {minus}1826.4 +- 1.7 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/, from which is calculated the standard Gibbs energy of formation {Delta}/sub f/G/sub m/{sup 0} = {minus}1637.0 +- 1.7 kJ mol/sup {minus}1/ at 298.15 K. Complete thermodynamic properties of schoepite are tabulated from 298.15 to 423.15 K. 19 refs., 6 tabs.

  10. Chlorine doped graphene quantum dots: Preparation, properties, and photovoltaic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jianhong; Xiang, Jinzhong, E-mail: jzhxiang@ynu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Tang, Libin, E-mail: scitang@163.com; Ji, Rongbin, E-mail: jirongbin@gmail.com; Yuan, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Ruiyun; Tai, Yunjian; Song, Liyuan [Kunming Institute of Physics, Kunming 650223 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are becoming one of the hottest advanced functional materials because of the opening of the bandgap due to quantum confinement effect, which shows unique optical and electrical properties. The chlorine doped GQDs (Cl-GQDs) have been fabricated by chemical exfoliation of HCl treated carbon fibers (CFs), which were prepared from degreasing cotton through an annealing process at 1000 °C for 30 min. Raman study shows that both G and 2D peaks of GQDs may be redshifted (softened) by chlorine doping, leading to an n-type doping. The first vertical (Cl)-GQDs based photovoltaic detectors have been demonstrated, both the light absorbing and electron-accepting roles for (Cl)-GQDs in photodetection have been found, resulting in an exceptionally big ratio of photocurrent to dark current as high as ∼10{sup 5} at room temperature using a 405 nm laser irradiation under the reverse bias voltage. The study expands the application of (Cl)-GQDs to the important optoelectronic detection devices.

  11. Polymer-coated quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, Nikodem; Liu, Rongrong; Vancso, Julius G.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with distinct photophysical properties finding applications in biology, biosensing, and optoelectronics. Polymeric coatings of QDs are used primarily to provide long-term colloidal stability to QDs dispersed in solutions and also as a source of addit

  12. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  13. Nuclear Spins in Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erlingsson, S.I.

    2003-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is the hyperfine interaction between the many lattice nuclear spins and electron spins localized in GaAs quantum dots. This interaction is an intrinsic property of the material. Despite the fact that this interaction is rather weak, it can, as shown in this thesis, stro

  14. Luminescent Surface Quaternized Carbon Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-10

    Thermal oxidation of a salt precursor made from the acid base combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and betaine hydrochloride results in light-emitting surface quaternized carbon dots that are water-dispersible, display anion exchange properties, and exhibit uniform size/surface charge. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Spin transport through quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, A.T. da Cunha; Anda, Enrique V. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Full text: We investigate the spin polarized transport properties of a nanoscopic device constituted by a quantum dot connected to two leads. The electrical current circulates with a spin polarization that is modulated via a gate potential that controls the intensity of the spin-orbit coupling, the Rashba effect. We study a polarized field-effect transistor when one of its parts is constituted by a small quantum dot, which energies are controlled by another gate potential operating inside the confined region. The high confinement and correlation suffered by the charges inside the dot gives rise to novel phenomena. We show that through the manipulation of the gate potential applied to the dot it is possible to control, in a very efficient way, the intensity and polarization of the current that goes along the system. Other crucial parameters to be varied in order to understand the behavior of this system are the intensity of the external applied electric and magnetic field. The system is represented by the Anderson Impurity Hamiltonian summed to a spin-orbit interaction, which describes the Rashba effect. To obtain the current of this out-of-equilibrium system we use the Keldysh formalism.The solution of the Green function are compatible with the Coulomb blockade regime. We show that under the effect of a external magnetic field, if the dot is small enough the device operates as a complete spin filter that can be controlled by the gate potential. The behavior of this device when it is injected into it a polarized current and modulated by the Rashba effect is as well studied. (author)

  16. Short term inhalation toxicity of a liquid aerosol of glutaraldehyde-coated CdS/Cd(OH)2 core shell quantum dots in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Hock, L; Farias, P M A; Hofmann, T; Andrade, A C D S; Silva, J N; Arnaud, T M S; Wohlleben, W; Strauss, V; Treumann, S; Chaves, C R; Gröters, S; Landsiedel, R; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2014-02-10

    Quantum dots exhibit extraordinary optical and mechanical properties, and the number of their applications is increasing. In order to investigate a possible effect of coating on the inhalation toxicity of previously tested non-coated CdS/Cd(OH)2 quantum dots and translocation of these very small particles from the lungs, rats were exposed to coated quantum dots or CdCl2 aerosol (since Cd(2+) was present as impurity), 6h/d for 5 consecutive days. Cd content was determined in organs and excreta after the end of exposure and three weeks thereafter. Toxicity was determined by examination of broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and microscopic evaluation of the entire respiratory tract. There was no evidence for translocation of particles from the respiratory tract. Evidence of a minimal inflammatory process was observed by examination of broncho-alveolar lavage fluid. Microscopically, minimal to mild epithelial alteration was seen in the larynx. The effects observed with coated quantum dots, non-coated quantum dots and CdCl2 were comparable, indicating that quantum dots elicited no significant effects beyond the toxicity of the Cd(2+) ion itself. Compared to other compounds with larger particle size tested at similarly low concentrations, quantum dots caused much less pronounced toxicological effects. Therefore, the present data show that small particle sizes with corresponding high surfaces are not the only factor triggering the toxic response or translocation.

  17. Excel Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Citigroup,one of the World top 500 companies,has now settled in Excel Center,Financial Street. The opening ceremony of Excel Center and the entry ceremony of Citigroup in the center were held on March 31.Government leaders of Xicheng District,the Excel CEO and the heads of Asia-Pacific Region leaders of Citibank all participated in the ceremony.

  18. Development of CCS (coalter dot cartridgeter dot system). CCS (coalter dot cartridgeter dot system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraoka, Y. (Idemitsu Kosan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-09-20

    In the CCS, finely pulverized coal is packed together with an inert gas into a tightly sealed container for direct transport to the end users. The coal is not exposed to an open air. This system eliminates the need for coal yards, makes coal transport much easier and eliminates the need for laborious ash disposal. CCS supply centers, where coal will be processed into granular fuel and then injected into cartridges, are to be built in various districts throughout Japan. The cartridges will be delivered by bulk lorry or container. Used cartridges will be recovered and brought back to the centers in the same way. The CCS Promotion Association completed a demonstration plant in 1984 at Tokuyama and a test boiler at Iwakuni in 1985, and finished the first phase of experimental test in September, 1987 as scheduled. From April, 1988, it is promoting the second phase of the technology for desulfurization in an easy way. Commercial use of this revolutionary system will make it possible to handle an inexpensive coal as easily as a heavy oil. This will be of great benefit to the users of energies, especially smaller companies that have hitherto had virtually no access to coal because the transportation and the storage problems were seen as insurmountable problems. 6 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Interaction of different poisons with MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub 4} based Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri-Laleh, Naeimeh, E-mail: n.bahri@ippi.ac.ir

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • The interactions between different classes of poison molecules and TiCl{sub 4}/MgCl{sub 2} type Ziegler-Natta catalyst is considered. • Poisons strongly stabilize MgCl{sub 2} crystal surfaces, mostly Ti active center relative to the unpoisoned solid. • Poison molecules decrease catalyst activity by increasing E{sub TS} in olefin polymerization. • Poison molecules do not have significant effect in stereospecifity of ZN catalysts in propylene polymerization. - Abstract: Adsorption of different poison molecules on activated MgCl{sub 2} is investigated within DFT using a cluster model of the MgCl{sub 2} surface with (MgCl{sub 2}){sub 16} formula containing four 4-coordinated and eight 5-coordinated Mg atoms as (110) and (104) surfaces, respectively. Studied poison molecules are chosen as possible impurities in hydrocarbon solvents and monomer feeds and contain water, hydrogensulfide, carbondioxide, molecular oxygen and methanol. First, adsorption of 1–4 molecules of different poisons to the (104) and (110) lateral cuts of MgCl{sub 2}, as well as their adsorption on [MgCl{sub 2}]/TiCl{sub 2}Et active center and AlEt{sub 3} cocatalyst is considered. Results reveal that poisons strongly stabilize both crystal surfaces, mostly Ti active center relative to the unpoisoned solid. Second, energy barrier (E{sub TS}) for ethylene insertion in the presence of different poisons located on the first and second Mg atom relative to the active Ti is calculated. While poison molecule located on the second Mg does not change E{sub TS}, coordination of it into the first Mg atom increases E{sub TS} by 0.9–1.2 kcal mol{sup −1}. In the last part of this manuscript, the stereoselective behavior of active Ti species, with and without poison molecules and external electron donor, is fully explored.

  20. Spin wave eigenmodes in single and coupled sub-150 nm rectangular permalloy dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlotti, G., E-mail: giovanni.carlotti@fisica.unipg.it; Madami, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR (CNR-IOM), Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia (Italy); Gubbiotti, G.; Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W. [Center for Nano Science and Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We present the results of a Brillouin light scattering investigation of thermally excited spin wave eigenmodes in square arrays of either isolated rectangular dots of permalloy or twins of dipolarly coupled elements, placed side-by-side or head-to-tail. The nanodots, fabricated by e-beam lithography and lift-off, are 20 nm thick and have the major size D in the range between 90 nm and 150 nm. The experimental spectra show the presence of two main peaks, corresponding to modes localized either at the edges or in the center of the dots. Their frequency dependence on the dot size and on the interaction with adjacent elements has been measured and successfully interpreted on the basis of dynamical micromagnetic simulations. The latter enabled us also to describe the spatial profile of the eigenmodes, putting in evidence the effects induced by the dipolar interaction between coupled dots. In particular, in twinned dots the demagnetizing field is appreciably modified in proximity of the “internal edges” if compared to the “external” ones, leading to a splitting of the edge mode. These results can be relevant for the exploitation of sub-150 nm magnetic dots in new applications, such as magnonic metamaterials, bit-patterned storage media, and nano-magnetic logic devices.

  1. Assembly of CdS Quantum Dots onto Hierarchical TiO2 Structure for Quantum Dots Sensitized Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mansoor Ali

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (QD sensitized solar cells based on Hierarchical TiO2 structure (HTS consisting of spherical nano-urchins on transparent conductive fluorine doped tin oxide glass substrate is fabricated. The hierarchical TiO2 structure consisting of spherical nano-urchins on transparent conductive fluorine doped tin oxide glass substrate synthesized by hydrothermal route. The CdS quantum dots were grown by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction deposition method. The quantum dot sensitized solar cell based on the hierarchical TiO2 structure shows a current density JSC = 1.44 mA, VOC = 0.46 V, FF = 0.42 and η = 0.27%. The QD provide a high surface area and nano-urchins offer a highway for fast charge collection and multiple scattering centers within the photoelectrode.

  2. Carbon dots as antioxidants and prooxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ingeborg Lie; Sun, Ya-Ping; Juzenas, Petras

    2011-10-01

    In this study we report the effect of classical CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and novel spherical carbon dots on generation of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions in vitro. Free radicals were initiated either chemically using 2,2'-azodiisobutyramidine dihydrochloride (AAPH) or by radiation with a blue light source emitting 390-470 nm (peak 420 nm). Two reagents, dihydrorhodamine 123 (Dhr123) and singlet oxygen sensor green (SOSG), were used as radical probes. Quantum dots and carbon dots inhibited oxidation of the radical probes under decomposition of AAPH. However, when subjected to the blue light both the quantum dots and carbon dots induced oxidation of Dhr123 to a greater extent than SOSG in water. Generation of singlet oxygen was remarkably enhanced in deuterium oxide solutions while oxidation of Dhr123 remained unchanged. For comparison, traditional photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX mainly induced oxidation of SOSG in water. In conclusion, upon external radiation carbon dots or quantum dots generate reactive oxygen species acting as prooxidants. Carbon dots or quantum dots also scavenge free radicals that are generated chemically by an azo compound. Such dual properties of these nanoparticles can be used for photodynamic and photocatalytic or antioxidant applications.

  3. Probing silicon quantum dots by single-dot techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychugov, Ilya; Valenta, Jan; Linnros, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Silicon nanocrystals represent an important class of non-toxic, heavy-metal free quantum dots, where the high natural abundance of silicon is an additional advantage. Successful development in mass-fabrication, starting from porous silicon to recent advances in chemical and plasma synthesis, opens up new possibilities for applications in optoelectronics, bio-imaging, photovoltaics, and sensitizing areas. In this review basic physical properties of silicon nanocrystals revealed by photoluminescence spectroscopy, lifetime, intensity trace and electrical measurements on individual nanoparticles are summarized. The fabrication methods developed for accessing single Si nanocrystals are also reviewed. It is concluded that silicon nanocrystals share many of the properties of direct bandgap nanocrystals exhibiting sharp emission lines at low temperatures, on/off blinking, spectral diffusion etc. An analysis of reported results is provided in comparison with theory and with direct bandgap material quantum dots. In addition, the role of passivation and inherent interface/matrix defects is discussed.

  4. Properties of strong-coupling magneto-bipolaron qubit in quantum dot under magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu-Fang, Bai; Ying, Zhang; Wuyunqimuge; Eerdunchaolu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the variational method of Pekar type, we study the energies and the wave-functions of the ground and the first-excited states of magneto-bipolaron, which is strongly coupled to the LO phonon in a parabolic potential quantum dot under an applied magnetic field, thus built up a quantum dot magneto-bipolaron qubit. The results show that the oscillation period of the probability density of the two electrons in the qubit decreases with increasing electron-phonon coupling strength α, resonant frequency of the magnetic field ω c, confinement strength of the quantum dot ω 0, and dielectric constant ratio of the medium η the probability density of the two electrons in the qubit oscillates periodically with increasing time t, angular coordinate φ 2, and dielectric constant ratio of the medium η the probability of electron appearing near the center of the quantum dot is larger, and the probability of electron appearing away from the center of the quantum dot is much smaller. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2013407119) and the Items of Institution of Higher Education Scientific Research of Hebei Province and Inner Mongolia, China (Grant Nos. ZD20131008, Z2015149, Z2015219, and NJZY14189).

  5. Cl- channels in apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Sirianant, Lalida

    2016-01-01

    , and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cellular apoptosis. LRRC8A-E has been identified as a volume-regulated anion channel expressed in many cell types. It was shown to be required for regulatory and apoptotic volume decrease (RVD, AVD) in cultured cell lines. Its presence also......(-) channels or as regulators of other apoptotic Cl(-) channels, such as LRRC8. CFTR has been known for its proapoptotic effects for some time, and this effect may be based on glutathione release from the cell and increase in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although we find that CFTR is activated...... by cell swelling, it is possible that CFTR serves RVD/AVD through accumulation of ROS and activation of independent membrane channels such as ANO6. Thus activation of ANO6 will support cell shrinkage and induce additional apoptotic events, such as membrane phospholipid scrambling....

  6. First far-infrared high resolution analysis of the ν6 band of phosgene 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaud, J.-M.; Tchana, F. Kwabia; Lafferty, W. J.; Manceron, L.; Ndao, M.

    2016-08-01

    A Fourier transform spectrum of phosgene (Cl2CO) has been recorded in the 22.5 μm spectral region at a resolution of 0.00102 cm-1 using a Bruker IFS125HR spectrometer coupled to synchrotron radiation leading to the observation of the ν6 vibrational bands of the two isotopologues 35Cl2CO and 35Cl37ClCO. The corresponding upper state ro-vibrational levels were fit using Watson-type Hamiltonians. In this way it was possible to reproduce the upper state ro-vibrational levels to within the experimental uncertainty i.e. ∼0.30 × 10-3 cm-1. Very accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were derived from the fit together with the following band centers: ν0(ν6,35Cl2CO) = 443.172062(15) cm-1, ν0(ν6,35Cl37ClCO) = 440.534956(17) cm-1.

  7. CL2QCD - Lattice QCD based on OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    Philipsen, Owe; Sciarra, Alessandro; Bach, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We present the Lattice QCD application CL2QCD, which is based on OpenCL and can be utilized to run on Graphic Processing Units as well as on common CPUs. We focus on implementation details as well as performance results of selected features. CL2QCD has been successfully applied in LQCD studies at finite temperature and density and is available at http://code.compeng.uni-frankfurt.de/projects/clhmc.

  8. Dot-in-Well Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith; Ting, David; Hill, cory; Liu, John; Mumolo, Jason; Chang, Yia Chung

    2008-01-01

    Dot-in-well (DWELL) quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) [DWELL-QDIPs] are subjects of research as potentially superior alternatives to prior QDIPs. Heretofore, there has not existed a reliable method for fabricating quantum dots (QDs) having precise, repeatable dimensions. This lack has constituted an obstacle to the development of uniform, high-performance, wavelength-tailorable QDIPs and of focal-plane arrays (FPAs) of such QDIPs. However, techniques for fabricating quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) having multiple-quantum- well (MQW) structures are now well established. In the present research on DWELL-QDIPs, the arts of fabrication of QDs and QWIPs are combined with a view toward overcoming the deficiencies of prior QDIPs. The longer-term goal is to develop focal-plane arrays of radiationhard, highly uniform arrays of QDIPs that would exhibit high performance at wavelengths from 8 to 15 m when operated at temperatures between 150 and 200 K. Increasing quantum efficiency is the key to the development of competitive QDIP-based FPAs. Quantum efficiency can be increased by increasing the density of QDs and by enhancing infrared absorption in QD-containing material. QDIPs demonstrated thus far have consisted, variously, of InAs islands on GaAs or InAs islands in InGaAs/GaAs wells. These QDIPs have exhibited low quantum efficiencies because the numbers of QD layers (and, hence, the areal densities of QDs) have been small typically five layers in each QDIP. The number of QD layers in such a device must be thus limited to prevent the aggregation of strain in the InAs/InGaAs/GaAs non-lattice- matched material system. The approach being followed in the DWELL-QDIP research is to embed In- GaAs QDs in GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum- well (MQW) structures (see figure). This material system can accommodate a large number of QD layers without excessive lattice-mismatch strain and the associated degradation of photodetection properties. Hence, this material

  9. Brightness-equalized quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung Jun; Zahid, Mohammad U.; Le, Phuong; Ma, Liang; Entenberg, David; Harney, Allison S.; Condeelis, John; Smith, Andrew M.

    2015-10-01

    As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fluorescence and molecular concentration. Here we introduce a new class of light-emitting quantum dots with tunable and equalized fluorescence brightness across a broad range of colours. The key feature is independent tunability of emission wavelength, extinction coefficient and quantum yield through distinct structural domains in the nanocrystal. Precise tuning eliminates a 100-fold red-to-green brightness mismatch of size-tuned quantum dots at the ensemble and single-particle levels, which substantially improves quantitative imaging accuracy in biological tissue. We anticipate that these materials engineering principles will vastly expand the optical engineering landscape of fluorescent probes, facilitate quantitative multicolour imaging in living tissue and improve colour tuning in light-emitting devices.

  10. A new phenomenon of quantum-dot cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Ifan external point charge and the movable charges of an isolated quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) cell have the same polarity, the point charge greatly affects the polarization (P) of the cell only when it is in a narrow band with periodically changing width. The center of the band is on a radius R circle. The ratio of R to the electric charge (q) is a constant determined by the parameters of the cell. A QCA cell can be used as charge detector based on the above phenomenon.

  11. Connecting the Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, A. Blythe; Eheman, Christie; Styles, Timothy; Rycroft, Randi; Snyder, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors, the medical community, public health professionals, researchers, and policymakers all need information about newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths to better understand and address the disease burden. CDC collects cancer data on 96% of the U.S. population through the National Program of Cancer Registries. The National Program of Cancer Registries routinely collects data on all cancer occurrences, deaths, and the types of initial treatment received by the patients, and recently CDC has made advances in its cancer surveillance activities that have direct applicability to cancer survivorship research and care. This Special Article examines CDC’s innovative uses of the National Program of Cancer Registries infrastructure and data as a recruitment source for survivorship research studies and behavioral interventions; comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research; and for the collection, consolidation, and dissemination of treatment summaries for cancer survivors and their providers. This paper also discusses long-term, idealistic plans for additional data linkages and sharing among public health, providers, and the cancer survivor through innovative concepts such as patient portals and rapid-learning health care. PMID:26590648

  12. Determination of atropine using Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots as novel luminescent sensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizi, Seyed Naser [Analytical Division, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar 4741695447 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chaichi, Mohammad Javad, E-mail: jchaichi@yahoo.com [Analytical Division, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar 4741695447 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakeri, Parmis [Analytical Division, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar 4741695447 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bekhradnia, Ahmadreza [Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    A novel chemiluminescence (CL) method using water-soluble Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers is proposed for the chemiluminometric determination of atropine in pharmaceutical formulation. Water-soluble Mn-doped ZnS QDs were synthesized by using L-cysteine as stabilizer in aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles were structurally and optically characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy. It was found that ZnS quantum dots acted as enhancers of the weak CL emission produced upon oxidation of sulfite by Ce(IV) in acidic medium. Trace amounts of atropine improved the sensitize effect of ZnS quantum dots yielding a significant chemiluminescence enhancement of the Ce(IV)–SO{sub 3}{sup 2−}–ZnS QD system. Therefore, a new CL analysis system was developed for the determination of atropine. Under the optimum conditions, there is a good linear relationship between the relative chemiluminescence intensity and the concentration of atropine in the range of 1×10{sup −9}–1×10{sup −6} M of atropine with a correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) of 0.9992. The limit of detection of this system was found to be 2.54×10{sup −10} M. This method is not only simple, sensitive and low cost, but also reliable for practical applications. -- Highlights: • Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots could enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) of cerium(IV)–sodium sulfite system. • ZnS quantum dots were used as the nanocatalyst. • Trace amounts of atropine improved the sensitize effect of ZnS quantum dots. • This work is introduced as a new method for the determination of atropine commercial drugs. • Detection limit of atropine was obtained 2.54×10{sup −10} mol L{sup −1}.

  13. Synthesis and applications of carbon dots

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Andrew Steven

    2015-01-01

    The use of non-invasive methods to visualise and monitor processes inside living organisms is vital in the understanding and diagnosis of disease. The work in this thesis details the synthesis and applications of a new imaging modality; carbon dots, whose inherent fluorescence and non-toxic nature makes them attractive alternatives to more traditional ‘quantum dots’. In this thesis, different methods of carbon dot synthesis were attempted in order to produce carbon dots of t...

  14. Colloidal quantum dots: synthesis, properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichkin, S. B.; Razumov, V. F.

    2016-12-01

    Key recent results obtained in studies of a new class of luminophores, colloidal quantum dots, are analyzed. Modern methods for the synthesis and post-synthetic treatment of colloidal quantum dots that make it possible to achieve record high quantum yield of luminescence and to modify their characteristics for specific applications are considered. Currently important avenues of research on colloidal quantum dots and the problems in and prospects for their practical applications in various fields are discussed. The bibliography includes 272 references.

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Investments Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Mike

    2014-01-01

    NASA is moving forward with prioritized technology investments that will support NASA's exploration and science missions, while benefiting other Government agencies and the U.S. aerospace enterprise. center dotThe plan provides the guidance for NASA's space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon center dotThis plan will help ensure that NASA develops technologies that enable its 4 goals to: 1.Sustain and extend human activities in space, 2.Explore the structure, origin, and evolution of the solar system, and search for life past and present, 3.Expand our understanding of the Earth and the universe and have a direct and measurable impact on how we work and live, and 4.Energize domestic space enterprise and extend benefits of space for the Nation.

  16. Perfil clínico-epidemiológico das doenças sexualmente transmissíveis em crianças atendidas em um centro de referência na cidade de Manaus, Amazonas, Brasil Clinical and epidemiological profile of sexually transmitted diseases in children attending a referral center in the city of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Barros da Rocha Ribas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis em crianças permanecem um problema de saúde pública pouco estudado, sendo ainda necessários esclarecimentos sobre seu manejo e a relação destas com o abuso sexual infantil. OBJETIVOS: Descrever o perfil clínico-epidemiológico das Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis em crianças atendidas em centro de referência na cidade de Manaus. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se estudo descritivo exploratório para verificar características clínicas, epidemiológicas e laboratoriais das Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis em crianças atendidas durante o período de janeiro/2003 a dezembro/2007. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídas no estudo 182 crianças que apresentavam DST. A maioria era do sexo feminino (65,4% e de cor parda; a média de idade foi de 8,5 anos; 89% eram procedentes da cidade de Manaus; os pais foram os principais acompanhantes na consulta; verruga genital foi o principal diagnóstico em ambos os sexos; e, 90,1% apresentavam apenas uma DST. CONCLUSÃO: As frequências e características clínicas das DST nas crianças do estudo não diferiram do encontrado na literatura. Embora, com base em sinais e sintomas referentes tão somente às DST nas crianças, não se tenham parâmetros fidedignos de confirmação de abuso, deve-se sempre estar alerta para esta possibilidade, visto que estas doenças podem ser sinalizadoras de ofensas sexuais, por vezes, dissimuladas e repetidas.BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted diseases in children remain a public health concern that is relatively ignored. Further data are required on the management of these diseases and their association with child sexual abuse. OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical and epidemiological profile of sexually transmitted diseases in children receiving care at a referral center in the city of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. METHODS: A descriptive, exploratory study was conducted to evaluate the clinical, epidemiological and laboratory

  17. Thermoelectric energy harvesting with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Björn; Sánchez, Rafael; Jordan, Andrew N

    2015-01-21

    We review recent theoretical work on thermoelectric energy harvesting in multi-terminal quantum-dot setups. We first discuss several examples of nanoscale heat engines based on Coulomb-coupled conductors. In particular, we focus on quantum dots in the Coulomb-blockade regime, chaotic cavities and resonant tunneling through quantum dots and wells. We then turn toward quantum-dot heat engines that are driven by bosonic degrees of freedom such as phonons, magnons and microwave photons. These systems provide interesting connections to spin caloritronics and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  18. Synthetic Developments of Nontoxic Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Adita; Snee, Preston T

    2016-03-03

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots (QDs), are candidates for biological sensing, photovoltaics, and catalysis due to their unique photophysical properties. The most studied QDs are composed of heavy metals like cadmium and lead. However, this engenders concerns over heavy metal toxicity. To address this issue, numerous studies have explored the development of nontoxic (or more accurately less toxic) quantum dots. In this Review, we select three major classes of nontoxic quantum dots composed of carbon, silicon and Group I-III-VI elements and discuss the myriad of synthetic strategies and surface modification methods to synthesize quantum dots composed of these material systems.

  19. POLARON IN CYLINDRICAL AND SPHERICAL QUANTUM DOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C.Fai

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polaron states in cylindrical and spherical quantum dots with parabolic confinement potentials are investigated applying the Feynman variational principle. It is observed that for both kinds of quantum dots the polaron energy and mass increase with the increase of Frohlich electron-phonon coupling constant and confinement frequency. In the case of a spherical quantum dot, the polaron energy for the strong coupling is found to be greater than that of a cylindrical quantum dot. The energy and mass are found to be monotonically increasing functions of the coupling constant and the confinement frequency.

  20. Random Feature Maps for Dot Product Kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Kar, Purushottam

    2012-01-01

    Approximating non-linear kernels using feature maps has gained a lot of interest in recent years due to applications in reducing training and testing times of SVM classifiers and other kernel based learning algorithms. We extend this line of work and present low distortion embeddings for dot product kernels into linear Euclidean spaces. We base our results on a classical result in harmonic analysis characterizing all dot product kernels and use it to define randomized feature maps into explicit low dimensional Euclidean spaces in which the native dot product provides an approximation to the dot product kernel with high confidence.

  1. Semiconductor quantum-dot lasers and amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Borri, Paola; Ledentsov, N. N.

    2002-01-01

    -power surface emitting VCSELs. We investigated the ultrafast dynamics of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. The dephasing time at room temperature of the ground-state transition in semiconductor quantum dots is around 250 fs in an unbiased amplifier, decreasing to below 50 fs when the amplifier...... is biased to positive net gain. We have further measured gain recovery times in quantum dot amplifiers that are significantly lower than in bulk and quantum-well semiconductor optical amplifiers. This is promising for future demonstration of quantum dot devices with high modulation bandwidth...

  2. Dissipative tunneling in structures with quantum dots and quantum molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Dahnovsky, Yu. I.; Krevchik, V. D.; Semenov, M. B.; Yamamoto, K.; Zhukovsky, V. Ch.; Aringazin, A. K.; Kudryashov, E. I.; Mayorov, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of tunneling control in systems "quantum dot - quantum well" (as well as "quantum dot - quantum dot" or quantum molecule) and "quantum dot - bulk contact" is studied as a quantum tunneling with dissipation process in the semiclassical (instanton) approximation. For these systems temperature and correlation between a quantum dot radius and a quantum well width (or another quantum dot radius) are considered to be control parameters. The condition for a single electron blockade is fo...

  3. Tuning the Emission Energy of Chemically Doped Graphene Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor-Ul-Ain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuning the emission energy of graphene quantum dots (GQDs and understanding the reason of tunability is essential for the GOD function in optoelectronic devices. Besides material-based challenges, the way to realize chemical doping and band gap tuning also pose a serious challenge. In this study, we tuned the emission energy of GQDs by substitutional doping using chlorine, nitrogen, boron, sodium, and potassium dopants in solution form. Photoluminescence data obtained from (Cl- and N-doped GQDs and (B-, Na-, and K-doped GQDs, respectively exhibited red- and blue-shift with respect to the photoluminescence of the undoped GQDs. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS revealed that oxygen functional groups were attached to GQDs. We qualitatively correlate red-shift of the photoluminescence with the oxygen functional groups using literature references which demonstrates that more oxygen containing groups leads to the formation of more defect states and is the reason of observed red-shift of luminescence in GQDs. Further on, time resolved photoluminescence measurements of Cl- and N-GQDs demonstrated that Cl substitution in GQDs has effective role in radiative transition whereas in N-GQDs leads to photoluminescence (PL quenching with non-radiative transition to ground state. Presumably oxidation or reduction processes cause a change of effective size and the bandgap.

  4. Frecuencia de virus respiratorios y características clínicas de niños que acuden a un hospital en México Frequency of respiratory viruses and clinical characteristics in children attending a care center in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Wong-Chew

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Describir la frecuencia de virus respiratorios y características clínicas en niños con cuadros respiratorios de un hospital de tercer nivel en México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se incluyeron niños con diagnóstico de infección respiratoria y un resultado positivo por inmunofluorescencia de enero 2004 a octubre 2006. RESULTADOS. De 986 muestras nasofaríngeas, 138 (14% fueron positivas. La frecuencia fue: 80% virus sincicial respiratorio (VSR, 8% parainfluenza 1, 5% parainfluenza3, 2% adenovirus, 2% influenza A, 1% parainfluenza 2 y 1% influenza B. CONCLUSIONES. La frecuencia de virus respiratorios fue de 14%. El VSR se identificó asociado con más frecuencia, a neumonía y bronquiolitis en menores de 3 años.OBJECTIVE. To describe the frequency of respiratory viruses and clinical characteristics in children with respiratory signs and symptoms in a tertiary care center in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory infection and a positive immunofluorescence result (Light Diagnostics from January 2004 to October 2006 were included. RESULTS. From the 986 nashopharyngeal samples, 138 (14% were positive by immunofluorescence. The frequency was: 80% RSV, 8% parainfluenza 1, 5% parainfluenza 3, 2% adenovirus, 2% influenza A, 1% parainfluenza 2 and 1% influenza B. CONCLUSIONS. Respiratory viruses were detected in 14% of samples tested. RSV was the most frequently identified virus and was associated with pneumonia and bronchiolitis in children younger than 3 years old.

  5. Evidència científica en l’ús dels antídots

    OpenAIRE

    Corominas Garcia, Núria

    2012-01-01

    L’objectiu principal d’aquesta tesi es identificar i avaluar l’evidència científica, pel que fa a l’eficàcia i seguretat, que recolza l’ús dels següents antídots inclosos a la Guia d’antídots de l’Hospital Clínic (GAHC): Anticossos Fab antidigoxina en la intoxicació per digoxina, Flumazenil per revertir els efectes centrals de la sobredosificació per benzodiazepines, Fomepizol en la intoxicació per la ingesta de metanol i etilenglicol, Hidroxocobalamina en la intoxicació per cianur, i N-acet...

  6. Quantum Dot Spectrum Converters for Enhanced High Efficiency Photovoltaics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research proposes to enhance solar cell efficiency, radiation resistance and affordability. The Quantum Dot Spectrum Converter (QDSC) disperses quantum dots...

  7. Bis[N,N′-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenylethane-1,2-diimine]-1κ2N,N′;2κ2N,N′-tri-μ-trichlorido-1:2κ6Cl:Cl-chlorido-1κCl-tetrahydrofuran-2κO-dichromium(II dichloromethane 4.5-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Rosenthal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the molecular structure of the title compound, [Cr2Cl4(C26H36N22(C4H8O]·4.5CH2Cl2, the two CrII centers are bridged by three Cl atoms, forming a dinuclear complex. Each CrII center is coordinated by one chelating bis(2,6-diisopropylphenylethane-1,2-diimine ligand via both N atoms. An additional chloride ion binds to one chromium center, whereas an additional tetrahydrofuran molecule coordinates to the second CrII center. The coordination geometry at each CrII center can be best described as distorted octahedral.

  8. Distribution center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Distribution center is a logistics link fulfill physical distribution as its main functionGenerally speaking, it's a large and hiahly automated center destined to receive goods from various plants and suppliers,take orders,fill them efficiently,and deliver goods to customers as quickly as possible.

  9. Interaction of different poisons with MgCl2/TiCl4 based Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri-Laleh, Naeimeh

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption of different poison molecules on activated MgCl2 is investigated within DFT using a cluster model of the MgCl2 surface with (MgCl2)16 formula containing four 4-coordinated and eight 5-coordinated Mg atoms as (110) and (104) surfaces, respectively. Studied poison molecules are chosen as possible impurities in hydrocarbon solvents and monomer feeds and contain water, hydrogensulfide, carbondioxide, molecular oxygen and methanol. First, adsorption of 1-4 molecules of different poisons to the (104) and (110) lateral cuts of MgCl2, as well as their adsorption on [MgCl2]/TiCl2Et active center and AlEt3 cocatalyst is considered. Results reveal that poisons strongly stabilize both crystal surfaces, mostly Ti active center relative to the unpoisoned solid. Second, energy barrier (ETS) for ethylene insertion in the presence of different poisons located on the first and second Mg atom relative to the active Ti is calculated. While poison molecule located on the second Mg does not change ETS, coordination of it into the first Mg atom increases ETS by 0.9-1.2 kcal mol-1. In the last part of this manuscript, the stereoselective behavior of active Ti species, with and without poison molecules and external electron donor, is fully explored.

  10. PREFACE: Quantum dots as probes in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2013-05-01

    photosynthetic systems. The next paper, by Olejnik et al, discussed metallic QDs which enhance photosynthetic function in light-harvesting biomolecular complexes. Such hybrid structures with gold QDs are shown to exhibit a strong increase in the fluorescence quantum yield. The next two papers, by Sikora et al and Kaminska et al deal with the ZnO nanoparticles passivated by MgO. In the first of these two papers, the authors describe the behavior of ZnO/MgO when introduced to human cancer cells. In the second, the authors describe the QDs with an extra outer layer of Fe2O3 which makes the nanoparticles superparamagnetic and also capable of generation of reactive oxygen species which could be applied to form localized centers of toxicity for cancer treatment. Finally, in the last paper by Yatsunenko et al, the authors discuss several semiconducting QDs like ZnO with various rare-earth dopands. They propose a microwave-driven hydrothermal technology to make them, characterize their luminescence and demonstrate their usefulness in the early recognition of cancer tissues. Quantum dots as probes in biology contents Quantum dots as probes in biologyMarek Cieplak Luminescent nanoparticles and their applications in the life sciencesVarun K A Sreenivasan, Andrei V Zvyagin and Ewa M Goldys Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase in junction with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: characteristics of an enzymatically active nanohybrid Krzysztof Szczepaniak, Remigiusz Worch and Joanna Grzyb Spectroscopic studies of plasmon coupling between photosynthetic complexes and metallic quantum dotsMaria Olejnik, Bartosz Krajnik, Dorota Kowalska, Guanhua Lin and Sebastian Mackowski Luminescence of colloidal ZnO nanoparticles synthesized in alcohols and biological application of ZnO passivated by MgOBożena Sikora, Krzysztof Fronc, Izabela Kamińska, Kamil Koper, Piotr Stępień and Danek Elbaum Novel ZnO/MgO/Fe2O3 composite optomagnetic nanoparticles I Kamińska, B Sikora, K Fronc, P Dziawa, K Sobczak, R Minikayev, W

  11. Enhanced chemiluminescence of CdTe quantum dots-H2O2 by horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junli; Li, Baoxin

    In this study, it was found that horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme could effectively enhance the CL emission of CdTe quantum dots (QDs)-H2O2 system, whereas HRP could not enhance the CL intensity. The CL enhancement mechanism was investigated, and the CL enhancement was supposed to originate from the catalysis of HRP-mimicking DNAzyme on the CL reaction between CdTe QDs and H2O2. Meantime, compared with CdTe QDs-H2O2 CL system, H2O2 concentration was markedly decreased in QDs-H2O2-HRP-mimicking DNAzyme CL system, improving the stability of QDs-H2O2 CL system. The QDs-based CL system was used to detect sensitively CdTe QDs and HRP-mimicking DNAzyme (as biologic labels). This work gives a path for enhancing CL efficiency of QDs system, and will be helpful to promote the step of QDs application in various fields such as bioassay and trace detection of analyte.

  12. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for "green" Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Pengfei; Cong, Shan; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Lijun; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Yi, Qinghua; Zou, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    Considering the environment protection, "green" materials are increasingly explored for photovoltaics. Here, we developed a kind of quantum dots solar cell based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots were prepared by direct pyrolysis of citric acid and ammonia. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots' excitonic absorption depends on the N-doping content in the carbon dots. The N-doping can be readily modified by the mass ratio of reactants. The constructed "green" nitrogen-doped carbon dots solar cell achieves the best power conversion efficiency of 0.79 % under AM 1.5 G one full sun illumination, which is the highest efficiency for carbon dot-based solar cells.

  13. Fluorescence intermittency in self-assembled InP quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, M; Ren, H W; Nishi, K; Masumoto, Y

    2001-05-21

    Fluorescence intermittency in InP self-assembled dots is investigated by means of far field imaging and single dot spectroscopy. Based on our observation that blinking dots are found in the vicinity of scratches and the blinking frequency is drastically enhanced under a near-infrared laser irradiation, we attribute the origin of the fluorescence intermittency to a local electric field due to a carrier trapped at a deep localized center in the Ga0.5In0.5P matrix. The validity of this explanation is confirmed by a thermal activation-type behavior of the switching rate and artificial reproduction of the blinking phenomenon by an external electric field.

  14. Bidirectional photoinduced energy transfer in nanoassemblies of quantum dots and luminescent metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandra, Srinidhi; Reinhoudt, David N. [Twente Univ., Entschede (Netherlands). Lab. of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology and MESA Inst. of Nanotechnology; Strassert, Cristian Alejandro [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst. and Center for Nanotechnology (CeNTech); Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Condensed Matter and Interfaces; Cola, Luisa de [Twente Univ., Entschede (Netherlands). Lab. of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology and MESA Inst. of Nanotechnology; Muenster Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst. and Center for Nanotechnology (CeNTech)

    2014-02-15

    This work describes the synthesis and photophysical characterization of Ir(III) and Ru(II) complexes bearing terminal amino groups, which act as anchoring units for the attachment to quantum dots, QDs. The photophysical properties of the metal complexes in combination with different types of QDs, allows directional photoinduced processes in the assemblies. In particular, we show photoinduced energy transfer from the luminescent excited Ir(III) unit to the CdTe nanocrystals, with an efficiency of 40 %. The directionality was then inverted by employing an emitting Ru(II) complex as energy acceptor, in combination with photoluminescent CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The efficiency of the photoinduced energy transfer from the nanocrystals to the Ru(II) center was estimated to be as high as 75 %. This work provides model systems for nanoassemblies based on quantum dots and metal complexes for optoelectronic applications, and as active light-harvesting systems. (orig.)

  15. Effect of the Electron-Phonon Coupling on Barrier D- Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the electron-phonon coupling on the energy of low-lying states of the barrier D- center,which consists of a positive ion located on the z-axis at a distance from the two-dimensional quantum dot plane and two electrons in the dot plane bound by the ion, is investigated at arbitrary strength of magnetic field by making use of the method of few-body physics. Discontinuous ground-state energy transitions induced by the magnetic field are reported.The dependence of the binding energy of the D- ground state on the quantum dot radius is obtained. A considerable enhancement of the binding is found for the D- ground state, which results from the confinement of electrons and electron-phonon coupling.

  16. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  17. Optically active quantum-dot molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlykov, Alexander I; Baimuratov, Anvar S; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2017-02-20

    Chiral molecules made of coupled achiral semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots, show great promise for photonic applications owing to their prospective uses as configurable building blocks for optically active structures, materials, and devices. Here we present a simple model of optically active quantum-dot molecules, in which each of the quantum dots is assigned a dipole moment associated with the fundamental interband transition between the size-quantized states of its confined charge carriers. This model is used to analytically calculate the rotatory strengths of optical transitions occurring upon the excitation of chiral dimers, trimers, and tetramers of general configurations. The rotatory strengths of such quantum-dot molecules are found to exceed the typical rotatory strengths of chiral molecules by five to six orders of magnitude. We also study how the optical activity of quantum-dot molecules shows up in their circular dichroism spectra when the energy gap between the molecular states is much smaller than the states' lifetime, and maximize the strengths of the circular dichroism peaks by optimizing orientations of the quantum dots in the molecules. Our analytical results provide clear design guidelines for quantum-dot molecules and can prove useful in engineering optically active quantum-dot supercrystals and photonic devices.

  18. Research on Self-Assembling Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-30

    0K. in a second phase of this contract we turned our efforts to the fabrication and studies of self assembled quantum dots . We first demonstrated a...method for producing InAs-GasAs self assembled quantum dots (SAD) using MBE. (AN)

  19. Double Acceptor Interaction in Semimagnetic Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Merwyn Jasper D. Reuben

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of geometry of the semimagnetic Quantum Dot on the Interaction energy of a double acceptor is computed in the effective mass approximation using the variational principle. A peak is observed at the lower dot sizes as a magnetic field is increased which is attributed to the reduction in confinement.

  20. Quantum Dots Coupled to a Superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellinggaard, Anders Robert

    are tuned electrostatically. This includes tuning the odd occupation of the dot through a quantum phase transition, where it forms a singlet with excitations in the superconductor. We detail the fabrication of these bottom gated devices, which additionally feature ancillary sensor dots connected...

  1. Detecting the chirality for coupled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Huijuan [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Hu Lian [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)], E-mail: huliancaohj@yahoo.com

    2008-04-21

    We propose a scheme to detect the chirality for a system consisting of three coupled quantum dots. The chirality is found to be determined by the frequency of the transition between chiral states under the chiral symmetry broken perturbation. The results are important to construct quantum gates and to demonstrate chiral entangle states in the triangle spin dots.

  2. Optical anisotropy in vertically coupled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Ping; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Leosson, Kristjan;

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the polarization of surface and edge-emitted photoluminescence (PL) from structures with vertically coupled In0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The PL polarization is found to be strongly dependent on the number of stacked layers. While single...... number due to increasing dot size....

  3. Optical studies of capped quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuister, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and spectroscopy of CdSe and CdTe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The first chapter gives an introduction into the unique size dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent QDs of CdSe and CdTe were prepared via a high temperature method

  4. Optical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perinetti, U.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents different optical experiments performed on semiconductor quantum dots. These structures allow to confine a small number of electrons and holes to a tiny region of space, some nm across. The aim of this work was to study the basic properties of different types of quantum dots mad

  5. Kinetic isotope effects in the gas phase reactions of OH and Cl with CH3Cl, CD3Cl, and 13CH3Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Sellevåg

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CH3Cl, 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH radicals and Cl atoms were studied in relative rate experiments at 298±2K and 1013±10mbar. The reactions were carried out in a smog chamber using long path FTIR detection and the spectroscopic data analyzed employing a non-linear least squares spectral fitting method using measured high-resolution infrared spectra as well as absorption cross sections from the HITRAN database. The reaction rates of 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH and Cl were determined relative to CH3Cl as: kOH + CH3Cl/kOH + 13CH3Cl=1.059±0.008, kOH + CH3Cl/kOH + CD3Cl=3.9±0.4, kCl + CH3Cl/kCl + 13CH3Cl=1.070±0.010 and kCl + CH3Cl/kCl + CD3Cl=4.91±0.07. The uncertainties given are 2σ from the statistical analyses and do not include possible systematic errors. The unusually large 13C kinetic isotope effect in the OH reaction of CH3Cl has important implications for the global emission inventory of CH3Cl.

  6. Delay in DOTS for new pulmonary tuberculosis patient from rural area of Wardha District, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Bawankule

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Vast majority of active tuberculosis patients seeks treatment, do so promptly, still many patients spend a great deal of time and money “shopping for health” and too often they do not receive either accurate diagnosis or effective treatment, despite spending considerable resources. Objective: To find out the time taken to, for diagnosis of tuberculosis and to put patient on DOTS from the onset of symptoms and pattern of health seeking behavior of new pulmonary tuberculosis patients. A cross-sectional rapid assessment using qualitative (FGD and quantitative (Interview methods conducted at DOTS center of tertiary care hospital from rural Wardha. Participants: 53 pulmonary tuberculosis patients already on DOTS, in intensive phase. Main outcome measure: Delay in initiation of DOTS & health seeking behavior Results: Median total delay for starting DOTS was 111 days, (range: 10 to 321 days. Patient delay was more than provider delay. Patients delay was more in patients above 60 years, illiterate, per-capita income below 650 Rupees and HIV TB co-infection. Pattern of health seeking behavior was complex. Family physician was the preferred health care provider. Patient visited on an average four providers and spent around 1450 rupees (only direct cost before DOTS begin. Time taken from the onset of symptoms and start of DOT is a cause of concern for the tuberculosis control program. Early case detection is important rather than mere achieving target of 70% new case detection. Program manager needs to implement locally relevant & focused strategies for early case detection to improve the treatment success, especially in rural area of India.

  7. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  8. Quadro clínico e nutricional de pacientes com fibrose cística: 20 anos de seguimento no HC-UFMG Clinical and nutritional aspects of a Center of Cystic Fibrosis-HC-UFMG: 20 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. C. Reis

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: A fibrose cística (FC é a doença genética letal, de herança autossômica recessiva, mais comum entre pacientes de cor branca. O presente estudo foi realizado com o objetivo de identificar o quadro clínico e nutricional à admissão dos pacientes no Centro de Tratamento de FC do HC-UFMG e avaliar a sobrevida a longo prazo. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Em um período de 20 anos, 127 pacientes portadores de FC foram acompanhados longitudinalmente e submetidos a protocolo previamente estabelecido, após confirmação do diagnóstico pelo teste do suor. Foram obtidos na admissão dados demográficos, da apresentação clínica, nutricionais e laboratoriais. O genótipo foi obtido de 106 pacientes pela técnica do PCR. Os pacientes foram seguidos por mediana de 44 meses. A análise de sobrevida foi realizada utilizando-se o método de Kaplan-Meier. RESULTADOS: A mediana da idade do diagnóstico da FC foi de 33 meses. A manifestação clínica predominante na época do diagnóstico foi a associação de sintomas respiratórios e gastrointestinais crônicos, presentes em 61% das crianças. A mutação mais freqüente encontrada foi a deltaF508: 17 pacientes (16% eram homozigotos para essa mutação e 30 (28% eram heterozigotos. Houve uma prevalência de desnutrição à admissão de 63% tendo sido reduzida para 45% ao final do seguimento. Um total 20 pacientes (15,7% evoluiu para o óbito. A probabilidade estimada de sobrevida nos primeiros 12 meses após o diagnóstico foi de 96% e após 5 anos de seguimento de 80%. CONCLUSÕES: O diagnóstico da FC é ainda tardio em nosso meio e a sobrevida é menor quando comparada a dados internacionais. O seguimento desses pacientes em centro especializado permitiu uma melhora no estado nutricional apesar da inerente evolução da doença.BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common severe autosomal recessive disease in caucasian population. The life expectancy of patients with CF has improved

  9. Biocompatible quantum dots for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Sandra J; Chang, Jerry C; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James R; Tomlinson, Ian D

    2011-01-28

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, size-tunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots.

  10. Quantum-dot supercrystals for future nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-01-01

    The study of supercrystals made of periodically arranged semiconductor quantum dots is essential for the advancement of emerging nanophotonics technologies. By combining the strong spatial confinement of elementary excitations inside quantum dots and exceptional design flexibility, quantum-dot supercrystals provide broad opportunities for engineering desired optical responses and developing superior light manipulation techniques on the nanoscale. Here we suggest tailoring the energy spectrum and wave functions of the supercrystals' collective excitations through the variation of different structural and material parameters. In particular, by calculating the excitonic spectra of quantum dots assembled in two-dimensional Bravais lattices we demonstrate a wide variety of spectrum transformation scenarios upon alterations in the quantum dot arrangement. This feature offers unprecedented control over the supercrystal's electromagnetic properties and enables the development of new nanophotonics materials and devices.

  11. Blood Compatibility Evaluations of Fluorescent Carbon Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Guo, Zhong; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Liu, Zonghua

    2015-09-02

    Because of their unique advantages, fluorescent carbon dots are gaining popularity in various biomedical applications. For these applications, good biosafety is a prerequisite for their use in vivo. Studies have reported the preliminary biocompatibility evaluations of fluorescent carbon dots (mainly cytotoxicity); however, to date, little information is available about their hemocompatibility, which could impede their development from laboratory to bedside. In this work, we evaluated the hemocompatibility of fluorescent carbon dots, which we prepared by hydrothermal carbonization of α-cyclodextrin. The effects of the carbon dots on the structure and function of key blood components were investigated at cellular and molecular levels. In particular, we considered the morphology and lysis of human red blood cells, the structure and conformation of the plasma protein fibrinogen, the complement activation, platelet activation, and in vitro and in vivo blood coagulation. We found that the carbon dots have obvious concentration-dependent effects on the blood components. Overall, concentrations of the fluorescent carbon dots at ≤0.1 mg/mL had few adverse effects on the blood components, but at higher doses, the carbon dots impair the structure and function of the blood components, causing morphological disruptions and lysis of red blood cells, interference in the local microenvironments of fibrinogen, activation of the complement system, and disturbances in the plasma and whole blood coagulation function in vitro. However, the carbon dots tend to activate platelets only at low concentrations. Intravenous administration of the carbon dots at doses up to 50 mg/kg did not impair the blood coagulation function. These results provide valuable information for the clinical application of fluorescent carbon dots.

  12. Peptide dot immunoassay and immunoblotting: electroblotting from aluminum thin-layer chromatography plates and isoelectric focusing gels to activated nitrocellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, O.J.; Holm, A.; Lauritzen, Edgar;

    1993-01-01

    Peptide dot immunoassay, electroblotting, activated nitrocellulose, dot blot, membranes, peptides and proteins......Peptide dot immunoassay, electroblotting, activated nitrocellulose, dot blot, membranes, peptides and proteins...

  13. OpenCL programming guide

    CERN Document Server

    Munshi, Aaftab; Mattson, Timothy G; Fung, James; Ginsburg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Using the new OpenCL (Open Computing Language) standard, you can write applications that access all available programming resources: CPUs, GPUs, and other processors such as DSPs and the Cell/B.E. processor. Already implemented by Apple, AMD, Intel, IBM, NVIDIA, and other leaders, OpenCL has outstanding potential for PCs, servers, handheld/embedded devices, high performance computing, and even cloud systems. This is the first comprehensive, authoritative, and practical guide to OpenCL 1.1 specifically for working developers and software architects. Written by five leading OpenCL authorities, OpenCL Programming Guide covers the entire specification. It reviews key use cases, shows how OpenCL can express a wide range of parallel algorithms, and offers complete reference material on both the API and OpenCL C programming language. Through complete case studies and downloadable code examples, the authors show how to write complex parallel programs that decompose workloads across many different devices. They...

  14. Aspectos clínicos de pacientes com pitiríase versicolor atendidos em um centro de referência em dermatologia tropical na cidade de Manaus (AM, Brasil Clinical aspects of patients with pityriasis versicolor seen at a referral center for tropical dermatology in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Motta de Morais

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A pitiríase versicolor (tinha versicolor é uma micose superficial crônica, causada por leveduras do gênero Malassezia spp. comensais das camadas queratinizadas da pele e que, sob determinadas condições ainda não esclarecidas, se torna patogênica, determinando as manifestações clínicas da doença. É uma dermatose recidivante e, mesmo após tratamento, pode deixar hipopigmentação persistente, causando problemas sociais aos indivíduos acometidos. OBJETIVO: Descrever as características clínicas e epidemiológicas de pacientes com diagnóstico de tinha versicolor atendidos em uma unidade de referência em Dermatologia (Fundação Alfredo da Matta. MÉTODOS: Estudo de série de casos em que foram detalhadas as manifestações cutâneas e as características epidemiológicas de pacientes atendidos na Fundação Alfredo da Matta com diagnóstico de tinha versicolor. RESULTADOS: Cento e dezesseis pacientes foram incluídos no estudo no período de janeiro a agosto de 2008. A maioria dos indivíduos é do sexo masculino, de cor parda, da faixa etária jovem e formada por estudantes, que apresentavam fatores predisponentes ao surgimento das manchas. Também a maioria apresentava lesões extensas e história passada da doença. CONCLUSÃO: O estudo mostrou alta proporção de indivíduos com quadros extensos e de longa duração da doença.BACKGROUND: Pityriasis versicolor (tinea versicolor is a chronic superficial mycosis caused by yeasts of the Malassezia spp. genus commensal of the keratinized layers of the skin. Under conditions not yet understood, it becomes pathogenic determining the clinical manifestations of the disease. It is a recurrent skin condition and persistent hypopigmentation may remain after treatment, causing social problems to those affected. OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical and epidemiological features of patients diagnosed with tinea versicolor treated at a referral center for dermatology (Alfredo da

  15. Perfil clínico e sociodemográfico dos portadores de doença venosa crônica atendidos em centros de saúde de Maceió (AL Clinical and socio-demographic profile of patients with venous disease treated in health centers of Maceió (AL, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Maranhão Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A doença venosa crônica (DVC consiste em alteração do sistema venoso causando uma incompetência valvar associada à obstrução de fluxo ou não. Acomete 10 a 20% da população mundial, tendo maior prevalência no sexo feminino. Apresenta como sintomas mais comuns dor e edema e na forma avançada, a úlcera venosa. Traz limitações funcionais e isolamento social, afetando a qualidade de vida. OBJETIVO: Traçar o perfil dos portadores de DVC, pelo levantamento de dados clínicos e sociodemográficos que indiquem características que possam contribuir para possível mudança de hábito na vida de pacientes que, por motivos de trabalho, falta de conhecimento e/ou instruções, tiveram sua rotina afetada pela doença, com consequente diminuição da sua qualidade de vida. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo, observacional do tipo transversal, sendo avaliados portadores de DVC atendidos em centros de saúde de Maceió (AL, aplicando um formulário para coleta de dados, como classificação CEAP, Critério de Classificação Econômica Brasil e Questionário SF-36. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi composta por 66 pacientes com DVC; 83% eram do sexo feminino e 17%, do masculino, a faixa etária predominante foi entre 50 a 60 anos; eram sedentários, assumindo ortostatismo prolongado, baixo nível de escolaridade e classe econômica, doença clínica grave (C6 sintomático e qualidade de vida variável. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados demonstraram predomínio da doença no sexo feminino, entre 50 a 60 anos de idade, com fatores desencadeadores e/ou agravantes para desenvolvimento da DVC como falta de atividade física, baixo nível de escolaridade e baixa renda econômica, afetando a qualidade de vida.BACKGROUND: Chronic venous disease (CVD is to change the system causing a venous valvular incompetence associated with obstruction of flow or not. It affects 10 to 20% of world population, with higher prevalence in females. It presents as the most common

  16. Calidad de vida en el trabajo: Profesionales de la salud de Clínica Río Blanco y Centro de Especialidades Médicas Quality of life at work: Health Professionals Clinica Rio Blanco and Center Especialidades Médicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diemen Delgado García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar un constructo sobre la calidad de vida en el trabajo de los médicos/as y enfermeros/as de Clínica Río Blanco y Centro de Especialidades Médicas. Métodos y Materiales: Estudio transversal y analítico. Se aplicó un cuestionario de datos socio-laborales integrados por 10 ítems y el instrumento CVT-GOHISALO, el cual consta de 74 ítems y mide la calidad de vida en el trabajo en siete dimensiones Resultados: En un grupo de 20 trabajadores entre médicos/as y enfermeros/as, el 40 % cuenta con dos trabajos, el 20 % reporta ausentismo por enfermedad el año previo. El 60 % se desempeñan principalmente en turno mixto. El 40 % tiene una antigüedad de dos a cinco años y el 30 % menos de dos años. El número de horas semanales que dedican al descanso es menor a 20 horas en un 50 % de los trabajadores. Las siete dimensiones evaluadas: soporte institucional para el trabajo, seguridad en el trabajo, integración al puesto de trabajo, satisfacción por el trabajo, bienestar a través del trabajo, desarrollo personal y administración del tiempo libre, reflejan grados de insatisfacción en la calidad de vida en el trabajo. Conclusiones: Los trabajadores de la salud evaluados muestran una serie de percepciones subjetivas que reflejan una realidad de su medio laboral.Objective: To identify a construct on quality of life in the work of doctors and nurses Clínica Río Blanco and Center Especialidades Médicas. Methods and Materials: Cross-sectional and analytical. A questionnaire was social and labor data consisting of 10 question and CVT-GOHISALO instrument, which consists of 74 question and measures the quality of life at work in seven dimensions. Results: In a group of 20 workers among doctors and nurses, 40 % have two jobs, 20 % reported absenteeism due to illness the previous year. 60 % work mainly in mixed shift. 40 % have a length of two to five years and 30 % less than two years. The number of hours per week devoted to rest

  17. Kinetic isotope effects in the gas phase reactions of OH and Cl with CH3Cl, CD3Cl, and 13CH3Cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic isotope effects in the reactions of CH3Cl, 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH radicals and Cl atoms were studied in relative rate experiments at 298±2 K and 1013±10 mbar. The reactions were carried out in a smog chamber using long path FTIR detection and the spectroscopic data analyzed employing a non-linear least squares spectral fitting method using measured high-resolution infrared spectra as well as absorption cross sections from the HITRAN database. The reaction rates of 13CH3Cl and CD3Cl with OH and Cl were determined relative to CH3Cl as: kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+13CH3Cl}kOH+13CH3Cl=1.059±0.008, kOH+CH3ClkOH+CH3Cl/kOH+CD3ClkOH+CD3Cl=3.9±0.4, kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+13CH3ClkCl+13CH3Cl =1.070±0.010 and kCl+CH3ClkCl+CH3Cl/kCl+CD3ClkCl+CD3Cl=4.91±0.07. The uncertainties given are 2σ from the statistical analyses and do not include possible systematic errors. The unexpectedly large 13C kinetic isotope effect in the OH reaction of CH3Cl has important implications for the global emission inventory of CH3Cl.

  18. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  19. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  20. Carbon-dot-decorated TiO2 nanotube arrays used for photo/voltage-induced organic pollutant degradation and the inactivation of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lingyan; Sun, Hanjun; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-01

    Photoluminescent carbon dots (c-dots) have recently attracted growing interest as a new member of the carbon-nanomaterial family. Here, we report for the first time that c-dot-decorated TiO2 nanotube arrays (c-dot/TiNTs) exhibit highly enhanced abilities regarding photo/voltage-induced organic pollutant degradation and bacterial inactivation. By applying UV irradiation (365 nm) or an electrochemical potential over 3 V (versus Ag/AgCl), an organic dye and a herbicide were efficiently degraded. Moreover, the inactivation of Gram-positive S. aureus and Gram-negative E. coli bacteria was realized on a c-dot/TiNT film. The c-dots were able to absorb light efficiently resulting in multiple exciton generation and also a reduction in the recombination of the e-/h+ pair produced in c-dot/TiNT film during photo/voltage-induced degradation. It was also possible to readily regenerate the surface using ultraviolet light irradiation, leaving the whole film structure undamaged and with high reproducibility and stability.

  1. Energies and wave functions of an off-centre donor in hemispherical quantum dot: Two-dimensional finite difference approach and ritz variational principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakra Mohajer, Soukaina; El Harouny, El Hassan [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, B.P. 2121 M’Hannech II, 93030 Tétouan (Morocco); Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d’Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); Laboratoire d’Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); El Khamkhami, Jamal [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, B.P. 2121 M’Hannech II, 93030 Tétouan (Morocco); and others

    2016-09-15

    Eigenvalues equation solutions of a hydrogen-like donor impurity, confined in a hemispherical quantum dot deposited on a wetting layer and capped by an insulating matrix, are determined in the framework of the effective mass approximation. Conduction band alignments at interfaces between quantum dot and surrounding materials are described by infinite height barriers. Ground and excited states energies and wave functions are determined analytically and via one-dimensional finite difference approach in case of an on-center donor. Donor impurity is then moved from center to pole of hemispherical quantum dot and eigenvalues equation is solved via Ritz variational principle, using a trial wave function where Coulomb attraction between electron and ionized donor is taken into account, and by two-dimensional finite difference approach. Numerical codes developed enable access to variations of donor total energy, binding energy, Coulomb correlation parameter, spatial extension and radial probability density with respect to hemisphere radius and impurity position inside the quantum dot.

  2. Cathodoluminescence Imaging Using Nanodiamond Color Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, David; Zhang, Huiliang; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Trifonov, Alexei; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff; Walsworth, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate a nanoscale imaging technique based on cathodoluminescence (CL) emitted by color centers in nanodiamonds (NDs) under excitation by an electron beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). We have identified several classes of color centers that are spectrally distinct at room temperature and can be obtained with high reliability in NDs with diameters on the order of 50 nm or smaller. Compared to standard CL markers, ND color centers are bright and highly stable under SEM excitation. In conjunction with appropriate functionalization of the ND surfaces, ND-CL will provide nanoscale information about molecular function to augment the structural information obtained with standard SEM techniques. We discuss an exciting application of this approach to neuroscience, specifically in the generation of high-resolution maps of the connections between neurons (``Connectomics'').

  3. Quantum dots with single-atom precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölsch, Stefan; Martínez-Blanco, Jesús; Yang, Jianshu; Kanisawa, Kiyoshi; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Quantum dots are often called artificial atoms because, like real atoms, they confine electrons to quantized states with discrete energies. However, although real atoms are identical, most quantum dots comprise hundreds or thousands of atoms, with inevitable variations in size and shape and, consequently, unavoidable variability in their wavefunctions and energies. Electrostatic gates can be used to mitigate these variations by adjusting the electron energy levels, but the more ambitious goal of creating quantum dots with intrinsically digital fidelity by eliminating statistical variations in their size, shape and arrangement remains elusive. We used a scanning tunnelling microscope to create quantum dots with identical, deterministic sizes. By using the lattice of a reconstructed semiconductor surface to fix the position of each atom, we controlled the shape and location of the dots with effectively zero error. This allowed us to construct quantum dot molecules whose coupling has no intrinsic variation but could nonetheless be tuned with arbitrary precision over a wide range. Digital fidelity opens the door to quantum dot architectures free of intrinsic broadening-an important goal for technologies from nanophotonics to quantum information processing as well as for fundamental studies of confined electrons.

  4. Scanning gate microscopy of ultra clean carbon nanotube quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Jiamin; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; LeRoy, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We perform scanning gate microscopy on individual suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. The size and position of the quantum dots can be visually identified from the concentric high conductance rings. For the ultra clean devices used in this study, two new effects are clearly identified. Electrostatic screening creates non-overlapping multiple sets of Coulomb rings from a single quantum dot. In double quantum dots, by changing the tip voltage, the interactions between the quantum dots can b...

  5. Extracellular biosynthesis of CdTe quantum dots by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum and their anti-bacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Asad; Ahmad, Absar

    2013-04-01

    The growing demand for semiconductor [quantum dots (Q-dots)] nanoparticles has fuelled significant research in developing strategies for their synthesis and characterization. They are extensively investigated by the chemical route; on the other hand, use of microbial sources for biosynthesis witnessed the highly stable, water dispersible nanoparticles formation. Here we report, for the first time, an efficient fungal-mediated synthesis of highly fluorescent CdTe quantum dots at ambient conditions by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum when reacted with a mixture of CdCl2 and TeCl4. Characterization of these biosynthesized nanoparticles was carried out by different techniques such as Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. CdTe nanoparticles shows antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The fungal based fabrication provides an economical, green chemistry approach for production of highly fluorescent CdTe quantum dots.

  6. Time-bin Entanglement from Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Weihs, Gregor; Predojević, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The desire to have a source of single entangled photon pairs can be satisfied using single quantum dots as emitters. However, we are not bound to pursue only polarization entanglement, but can also exploit other degrees of freedom. In this chapter we focus on the time degree of freedom, to achieve so-called time-bin entanglement. This requires that we prepare the quantum dot coherently into the biexciton state and also build special interferometers for analysis. Finally this technique can be extended to achieve time-bin and polarization hyper-entanglement from a suitable quantum dot.

  7. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  8. Quantum dot devices for optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    . The main property of semiconductor quantum dots compared to bulk material or even quantum well structures is the discrete nature of the allowed states, which means that inversion of the medium can be obtained for very low electron densities. This has led to the fabrication of quantum dot lasers with record......-low threshold currents and amplifiers with record-high power levels. In this tutorial we will review the basic properties of quantum dots, emphasizing the properties which are important for laser and amplifier applications, as well as devices for all-optical signal processing. The high-speed properties...

  9. Electronic properties of aperiodic quantum dot chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaev, P. Yu.; Vekilov, Yu. Kh.; Kaputkina, N. E.

    2012-04-01

    The electronic spectral and transport properties of aperiodic quantum dot chains are investigated. The systems with singular continuous energy spectrum are considered: Thue-Morse chain, double-periodic chain, Rudin-Shapiro chain. The influence of electronic energy in quantum dot on the spectral properties, band structure, density of states and spectral resistivity, is discussed. Low resistivity regions correspond to delocalized states and these states could be current states. Also we discuss the magnetic field application as the way to tune electronic energy in quantum dot and to obtain metallic or insulating conducting states of the systems.

  10. Amplification Without Inversion in Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibadali, A.; Abbasian, K.; Rostami, A.

    In this paper, we have realized amplification without inversion (AWI) in quantum dot (QD). A Y-type four-level system of InxGa1-xN quantum dot has been obtained and investigated for AWI. It has been shown that, with proper setting of control fields' amplitude, we can obtain reasonable gain. With proper setting of phase difference of control fields and probe field, we can obtain considerable gain in resonant wavelength. We have designed this system by solving the Schrödinger-Poisson equations for InxGa1-xN quantum dot in GaN substrate, self-consistently.

  11. Quantum dot heterojunction solar cells: the mechanism of device operation and impacts of quantum dot oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Ihly, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the understanding of the chemistry and physics of colloidal quantum dots for practical solar energy photoconversion. Solar cell devices that make use of PbS quantum dots generally rely on constant and unchanged optical properties such that band gap energies remain tuned within the device. The design and development of unique experiments to ascertain mechanisms of optical band gap shifts occurring in PbS quantum dot thin-films exposed to air are discussed. The systematic s...

  12. A structure of CdS/CuxS quantum dots sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ting; Bian, Lu; Li, Bo; Zheng, Kaibo; Pullerits, Tönu; Tian, Jianjun

    2016-05-23

    This work introduces a type of CdS/CuxS quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers in quantum dot sensitized solar cells by in-situ cationic exchange reaction method where CdS photoanode is directly immersed in CuCl2 methanol solution to replace Cd(2+) by Cu(2+). The p-type CuxS layer on the surface of the CdS QDs can be considered as hole transport material, which not only enhances the light harvesting of photoanode but also boosts the charge separation after photo-excitation. Therefore, both the electron collection efficiency and power conversion efficiency of the solar cell are improved from 80% to 92% and from 1.21% to 2.78%, respectively.

  13. ClEST cluster :Cl_contig0243 [ClEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cl_contig0243 barrier-to-autointegration factor Cimex lectularius nuclear gene 428 ...TAATAAATACAGTATGATGTGCG fb29038 fs25084 mb23031 3 barrier to autointegration factor [Rhodnius prolixus] AEL79235 5.9E-56 GO:0003677 ...

  14. ClEST cluster :Cl_singleton1662 [ClEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cl_singleton1662 PREDICTED: hypothetical protein LOC100740269 [Bombus impatiens] Ci...CTCCTAAGCCAATTAAATAGAAGTTCAATAGCATACTGTAATAAATTAACAACAAAGTG fw20035 1 PREDICTED: hypothetical protein LOC100740269 [Bombus impatiens] XP_003491307 7.11708E-15 ...

  15. Tailoring Magnetism in Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutic, Igor; Abolfath, Ramin; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2007-03-01

    We study magnetism in magnetically doped quantum dots as a function of particle numbers, temperature, confining potential, and the strength of Coulomb interaction screening. We show that magnetism can be tailored by controlling the electron-electron Coulomb interaction, even without changing the number of particles. The interplay of strong Coulomb interactions and quantum confinement leads to enhanced inhomogeneous magnetization which persists at substantially higher temperatures than in the non-interacting case or in the bulk-like dilute magnetic semiconductors. We predict a series of electronic spin transitions which arise from the competition between the many-body gap and magnetic thermal fluctuations. Cond-mat/0612489. [1] R. Abolfath, P. Hawrylak, I. Zuti'c, preprint.

  16. A simple turn on fluorescent sensor for the selective detection of thiamine using coconut water derived luminescent carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purbia, Rahul; Paria, Santanu

    2016-05-15

    In this study microwave-assisted hydrothermal method was used to prepare highly luminescent carbon dots (1-6 nm size) within a minute from tender coconut (Cocos nucifera) water. The synthesized carbon dots (C-dots) exhibit emission of blue and green lights while excited at 390 and 450 nm wavelengths, respectively. As an application, these C-dots were tested for a simple "turn on" fluorescent sensor for rapid detection of thiamine (vitamin B1). The detection of thiamine in human body is very important to prevent various diseases such as beriberi, neurological disorders, optic neuropathy, etc. The fluorescence emission intensity of C-dots quenches after addition of Cu(2+) ion and then again increases selectively (turn on) after the addition of thiamine. The fluorescence emission intensity enhancement of Cu(2+) ion modified C-dots in the presence of thiamine exhibits a linear relationship within the thiamine concentration range of 10-50 μM. The limit of detection was found to be 280 nM from this study. The selectivity of the detection was also tested in the presence of different organic molecules and inorganic ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), SO4(2-), and NO3(-)) which are present in blood serum and urine and found to be almost no interference in the detection. Finally, to see the applicability in real samples a commercial vitamin capsule was tested and found less than 3% error in the detected concentration. The C-dots were also used for bioimaging of fungus and the results show they are also suitable for this application too.

  17. Spin-dynamics simulations of vortex precession in 2-D magnetic dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depondt, Ph., E-mail: depondt@insp.jussieu.fr [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7588 CNRS, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Levy, J.-C.S., E-mail: jean-claude.levy@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Denis Diderot, UMR 7162 CNRS, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: → Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots of finite size. → A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly erratic ones. → Pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided. -- Abstract: Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots. The Landau-Lifshitz equation with exchange and dipolar interactions was integrated at a low temperature with initial conditions consisting in a single vortex situated aside from the central position. This vortex precesses around the center of the sample and either can be expelled or converges towards the center. These relaxation processes are systematically studied. A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly somewhat erratic ones. Intrinsic pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided.

  18. Large quantum dots with small oscillator strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Schlereth, T.W.; Höfling, S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the oscillator strength and quantum efficiency of excitons confined in large InGaAs quantum dots by recording the spontaneous emission decay rate while systematically varying the distance between the quantum dots and a semiconductor-air interface. The size of the quantum dots...... is measured by in-plane transmission electron microscopy and we find average in-plane diameters of 40 nm. We have calculated the oscillator strength of excitons of that size assuming a quantum-dot confinement given by a parabolic in-plane potential and a hard-wall vertical potential and predict a very large...... oscillator strength due to Coulomb effects. This is in stark contrast to the measured oscillator strength, which turns out to be so small that it can be described by excitons in the strong confinement regime. We attribute these findings to exciton localization in local potential minima arising from alloy...

  19. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  20. The white dot syndromes Síndromes dos pontos brancos retinianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Nunes Galvarro Vianna

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Several entities must be considered when a patient presents with a white dot syndrome. In most cases these can be distinguished from one another based on the appearance or distribution of the lesions, the clinical course, or patient variables such as age, sex, laterality, and functional and image examinations. In this paper we review the distinctive and shared features of the white dot syndromes, highlighting the clinical findings, diagnostic test results, proposed etiologies, treatment, and prognosis.Várias doenças devem ser consideradas quando nos deparamos com paciente com uma entidade clínica incluída no grupo das "síndromes dos pontos brancos retinianos". O diagnóstico diferencial na maioria das vezes é baseado na aparência e/ou na distribuição das lesões, no curso clínico, ou por algumas variáveis relacionadas ao paciente, tais como idade, sexo, lateralidade, bem como por meio de exames funcionais e de imagem. O presente artigo revisa os achados clínicos das doenças que fazem parte do grupo das "síndromes dos pontos brancos retinianos", enfatizando as similaridades e as diferenças entre essas entidades. Os exames complementares, bem como a etiologia, o tratamento e o prognóstico de cada uma delas são descritos e comentados.

  1. Desmin detection by facile prepared carbon quantum dots for early screening of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-feng; Yan, Zhen-kun; Chen, Li-bo; Jin, Jing-peng; Li, Dan-dan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Th aim of this study was to develop a new facile chemical method for early screening of colorectal cancer. The -C(O)OH groups modified Carbon Quantum Dots (CQDs) were prepared by an facile innovative route of acid attacking on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The -C(O)OH groups were further transported into -C(O)Cl groups by SOCl2 treating. The obtained ClCQDs were conjugated onto the anti-Desmin, which were applied for testing the Desmin concentration in serum by using linearly fitted relationship with photoluminescence (PL) intensity. The obtained carbon quantum dots are quasispherical graphite nanocrystals with photoluminescence at about 455 nm. The Desmin with concentration of 1 ng/mL can lead to a decrease of PL intensity for anti-Desmin conjugated CQDs with good linearity. This assay had good specificity for Desmin with in interferential substances of immunoglobulin G (IgG), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), and carcinoembryoic antigen (CEA). A new facile acid attack method was developed to prepare ClCQDs, which could conjugate onto the anti-Desmin for detection of Desmin in serum with high sensitivity and specificity. As the detection limit is lower than 1 ng/ mL, this work provides a promising strategy for the evaluation of colorectal cancer risk with low cost and excellent sensing performance. PMID:28151847

  2. Historia clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Martínez Hernández

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La historia clínica ha estado regulada hasta la actualidad por diferentes disposiciones legislativas con base en la Ley General de Sanidad 14/1986, de 25 de abril. Con la Ley 41/2002, de 14 de noviembre, básica y reguladora de la autonomía del paciente y de derechos y obligaciones en materia de información y documentaciónclínica, se actualizan los derechos y obligaciones de los pacientes o usuarios y profesionales, entre ellos los relativos a la historia clínica. En el presente artículo, se expone el contenido de la Ley 41/2002 y referencias a otras normas legislativas y fuentes bibliográficas. La Ley define la historia clínica, sus contenidos, funciones y usos, su soporte y conservación, aclara la propiedad de la historia clínica y recoge las características de acceso y custodia, así como la privacidad y confidencialidad de la historia clínica.

  3. Start Shift of Individual Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-18

    We will here describe the results of the influence of electric field on InP quantum dots embedded in GalnP, lattice matched to GaAs. Experimental...details The sample we used was grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy, and contained InP quantum dots in GanP, lattice matched to GaAs (n-type

  4. Exciton in type-II quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Ortega, J; Escorcia, R A [Universidad del Magdalena, A. A. 731, Santa Marta (Colombia); Mikhailov, I D, E-mail: jsierraortega@gmail.co [Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    We study the quantum-size effect and the influence of the external magnetic field on the exciton ground state energy in the type-II InP quantum disk, lens and pyramid deposited on a wetting layer and embedded in a GaInP matrix. We show that the charge distribution over and below quantum dot and wetting layer induced by trapped exciton strongly depends on the quantum dot morphology and the strength of the magnetic field.

  5. Random Feature Maps for Dot Product Kernels

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Purushottam; Karnick, Harish

    2012-01-01

    Approximating non-linear kernels using feature maps has gained a lot of interest in recent years due to applications in reducing training and testing times of SVM classifiers and other kernel based learning algorithms. We extend this line of work and present low distortion embeddings for dot product kernels into linear Euclidean spaces. We base our results on a classical result in harmonic analysis characterizing all dot product kernels and use it to define randomized feature maps into explic...

  6. Chaotic quantum dots with strongly correlated electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Shankar, R.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum dots pose a problem where one must confront three obstacles: randomness, interactions and finite size. Yet it is this confluence that allows one to make some theoretical advances by invoking three theoretical tools: Random Matrix theory (RMT), the Renormalization Group (RG) and the 1/N expansion. Here the reader is introduced to these techniques and shown how they may be combined to answer a set of questions pertaining to quantum dots

  7. Study on Interaction Between Chitosan and CdS Quantum Dots via Photoluminescence Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan LI; Yu Min DU; Yan WEN

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between CdS quantum dots and amino polysaccharide chitosan in aqueous solution was studied via photoluminescence(PL)spectra. The surface binding of chitosan with different molecular weight(MW)quenched the luminescence of QDs due to the elimination of radioactive anion vacancy centers.This process fits well with the Perrin model;lower MW chitosan exhibits higher quenching efficiency due to better availability to the surface.

  8. CATHODIC BEHAVIORS OF CAO IN MOLTEN SALTS CaCl2 AND EQUIMOLAR CaCl2-X(X=NaCl,BaCl2,LiCl)%CaO在CaCl2和等摩尔CaCl2-X(X=NaCl,BaCl2,LiCl)熔盐中的阴极行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淑兰; 王伟; 王川华; 张丽君

    2008-01-01

    采用循环伏安方法研究了1173 K时CaCl2-0.5%CaO(摩尔分数)和等摩尔CaCl2-X-0.5%CaO(X=NaCl,BaCl2,LiCl)熔盐中CaO在Mo电极上的阴极行为.研究结果表明,CaCl2与CaO电离的Ca计具有不同的离子结构和还原电势,在1173 K时其还原峰电势分别为-2.15和-1.51 V.等摩尔混合熔盐CaCl2-x-0.5%CaO(x=NaCl,BaCl2)中,CaO诱发电解质产生低电位沉积,降低了混合熔盐的电化学稳定性.通过阴极扫描电流峰密度与扫描速率的关系,计算出1173 K时CaO电离的Ca2+在CaCl2-0.5%CaO,等摩尔的CaCl2-NaCl-0.5%CaO,CaCl2-BaCl2-0.5%CaO和CaCl2-LiCl-0.5%CaO熔盐中的扩散系数,分别为6.42×10-5,1.56×10-5,1.20×10-5和6.79×10-5 cm2/s.

  9. Dot-dye-immunoassay for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Teles Rabello

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available A new serological assay dot-dye-immunoassay (dot-DIA was evaluated for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni. This method consist of four steps: (a biding of antigens to a nitrocellulose membrane (NC; (b blocking of free sites of the NC; (c incubation in specific primary antibody; (d detection of primary antibody reactivity by color development using second antibody coupled to textile dyes. Sera from 82 individuals, 61 with Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the stool and 21 stool negative were tested by ELISA, dot-ELISA, and dotDIA. A high level of agreement between the methods tested was observed for all sera tested: ELISA x dot-ELISA: 95.1%, ELISA x dot-DIA: 92.7% and dot-ELISA x dot-DIA: 97.6%. In this study, dot-DIA proved to be a feasible, sensitive, rapid and practical test for the diagnosis of shcistosomiasis.

  10. Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2015-07-15

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Heteroepitaxy - atomically aligned growth of a crystalline film atop a different crystalline substrate - is the basis of electrically driven lasers, multijunction solar cells, and blue-light-emitting diodes. Crystalline coherence is preserved even when atomic identity is modulated, a fact that is the critical enabler of quantum wells, wires, and dots. The interfacial quality achieved as a result of heteroepitaxial growth allows new combinations of materials with complementary properties, which enables the design and realization of functionalities that are not available in the single-phase constituents. Here we show that organohalide perovskites and preformed colloidal quantum dots, combined in the solution phase, produce epitaxially aligned \\'dots-in-a-matrix\\' crystals. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, we reveal heterocrystals as large as about 60 nanometres and containing at least 20 mutually aligned dots that inherit the crystalline orientation of the perovskite matrix. The heterocrystals exhibit remarkable optoelectronic properties that are traceable to their atom-scale crystalline coherence: photoelectrons and holes generated in the larger-bandgap perovskites are transferred with 80% efficiency to become excitons in the quantum dot nanocrystals, which exploit the excellent photocarrier diffusion of perovskites to produce bright-light emission from infrared-bandgap quantum-tuned materials. By combining the electrical transport properties of the perovskite matrix with the high radiative efficiency of the quantum dots, we engineer a new platform to advance solution-processed infrared optoelectronics.

  11. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-10-05

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  12. Performance characterization of Watson Ahumada motion detector using random dot rotary motion stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Jain

    Full Text Available The performance of Watson & Ahumada's model of human visual motion sensing is compared against human psychophysical performance. The stimulus consists of random dots undergoing rotary motion, displayed in a circular annulus. The model matches psychophysical observer performance with respect to most parameters. It is able to replicate some key psychophysical findings such as invariance of observer performance to dot density in the display, and decrease of observer performance with frame duration of the display.Associated with the concept of rotary motion is the notion of a center about which rotation occurs. One might think that for accurate estimation of rotary motion in the display, this center must be accurately known. A simple vector analysis reveals that this need not be the case. Numerical simulations confirm this result, and may explain the position invariance of MST(d cells. Position invariance is the experimental finding that rotary motion sensitive cells are insensitive to where in their receptive field rotation occurs.When all the dots in the display are randomly drawn from a uniform distribution, illusory rotary motion is perceived. This case was investigated by Rose & Blake previously, who termed the illusory rotary motion the omega effect. Two important experimental findings are reported concerning this effect. First, although the display of random dots evokes perception of rotary motion, the direction of motion perceived does not depend on what dot pattern is shown. Second, the time interval between spontaneous flips in perceived direction is lognormally distributed (mode approximately 2 s. These findings suggest the omega effect fits in the category of a typical bistable illusion, and therefore the processes that give rise to this illusion may be the same processes that underlie much of other bistable phenomenon.

  13. Accommodation and pupil responses to random-dot stereograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryakumar, Rajaraman; Allison, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of accommodative and pupillary responses to random-dot stereograms presented in crossed and uncrossed disparity in six visually normal young adult subjects (mean age=25.8±3.1 years). Accommodation and pupil measures were monitored monocularly with a custom built photorefraction system while subjects fixated at the center of a random-dot stereogram. On each trial, the stereogram initially depicted a flat plane and then changed to depict a sinusoidal corrugation in depth while fixation remained constant. Increase in disparity specified depth resulted in pupil constriction during both crossed and uncrossed disparity presentations. The change in pupil size between crossed and uncrossed disparity conditions was not significantly different (p>0.05). The change in pupil size was also accompanied by a small concomitant increase in accommodation. In addition, the dynamic properties of pupil responses varied as a function of their initial (starting) diameter. The finding that accommodation and pupil responses increased with disparity regardless of the sign of retinal disparity suggests that these responses were driven by apparent depth rather than shifts in mean simulated distance of the stimulus. Presumably the need for the increased depth of focus when viewing stimuli extended in depth results in pupil constriction which also results in a concomitant change in accommodation. Starting position effects in pupil response confirm the non-linearity in the operating range of the pupil.

  14. Evolução clínica de um grupo de pacientes com TB multirresistente atendidos em um centro de referência na cidade do Rio de Janeiro Clinical evolution of a group of patients with multidrug-resistant TB treated at a referral center in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Ribeiro de Siqueira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as características clínicas e a evolução de um grupo de pacientes com culturas de escarro positivas para Mycobacterium tuberculosis multirresistente (MR e tratados em um centro de referência no município do Rio de Janeiro. MÉTODOS: A partir dos resultados de M. tuberculosis MR em culturas de escarro, foram selecionados 50 pacientes cujos dados clínicos foram obtidos através do Banco de Dados TBMR do Ministério da Saúde. Foram considerados a frequência de abandono, as recidivas, as falências e os tratamentos prévios para TB até o diagnóstico de TBMR. O padrão radiológico foi classificado em uni- ou bilateral, e cavitário ou não. Dois anos após o término do tratamento padronizado para TBMR, o desfecho (cura, falência, abandono ou óbito de cada paciente foi avaliado e repetido a cada dois anos. O período de seguimento foi de oito anos após o tratamento. RESULTADOS: A média do número de tratamentos prévios foi de 2,3 ± 0,9. O tempo médio entre o diagnóstico inicial e o desenvolvimento de TBMR foi de 2 ± 1,7 anos. Após dois anos do tratamento inicial para TBMR houve 2 abandonos, 8 óbitos, 18 curas e 22 falências. A análise bivariada mostrou que o comprometimento pulmonar bilateral e o padrão cavitário reduziram acentuadamente a chance de cura, com risco relativo de 1-0,6 (40% e 1-0,7 (30%, respectivamente. Ao final do seguimento, houve 2 abandonos, 9 falências, 17 curas e 22 óbitos. CONCLUSÕES: O comprometimento pulmonar bilateral e lesões cavitárias reduziram a possibilidade de cura dos pacientes com TBMR. A maioria dos pacientes com falha de tratamento evoluiu para óbito no período de 8 anos.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical characteristics and evolution of a group of patients with positive sputum cultures for multidrug-resistant (MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated at a referral center in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: Based on the positive results in sputum

  15. Orifice diseases project - experience of the "Hospital das Clínicas" University of São Paulo Medical Center in day-hospital of anorectal disease Projeto doenças orificiais experiência do HCFMUSP em hospital-dia e doenças anorretais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carlos Nahas

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of malignant or benign colorectal pathologies that require more complex management are priorities in tertiary hospitals such as "Hospital das Clínicas" University of São Paulo Medical Center (HCFMUSP. Therefore, benign, uncomplicated orifice conditions are relegated to second place. The number of patients with hemorrhoids, perianal fistulas, fissures, condylomas and pilonidal cysts who seek treatment at the HFMUSP is very great, resulting in over-crowding in the outpatient clinics and a long waiting list for recommended surgical treatment (at times over 18 months. The authors describe the experience of the HCFMUSP over an eight-day period with day-hospital surgery in which 140 patients underwent surgery. Data was prospectively taken on the patients undergoing surgery for benign orifice pathologies including age, sex, diagnosis, surgery performed, immediate and late postoperative complications, and follow-up. 140 patients operated on over eight days were studied. 68 were males (48.75% with ages ranging from 25 to 62 (mean 35.2 yrs.. Hemorrhoids was the most frequent condition encountered (82 hemorrhoidectomies, 58.6%, followed by perineal fistula (28 fistula repairs, 20.0%. The most common complication was headache secondary to rachianesthesia occurring in 9 patients (6.4%. One patient (0.7% developed bleeding immediately PO that required reoperation. Mean follow-up was 104 days. Day-surgery characterized by quality care and low morbidity is feasible in tertiary public hospitals, permitting surgery for benign orifice pathologies on many patients within a short period of time.O tratamento das patologias colorretais malignas ou benignas, que necessitam tratamento com maior grau de complexidade são prioridades em hospitais terciários, como é o Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HCFMUSP, permanecendo assim as patologias orificiais benignas em um segundo plano. Todavia devido à sua

  16. Anion coordination complex [Cl Pt(bpt)4]Cl (bpt=N,N'- bis(3-pyridylmethyl)-2-thiourea)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; LI Hui; YU ShuYan; LI YiZhi

    2009-01-01

    The anion coordination complex, [Cl Pt(bpt)4]Cl (bpt=N,N'-bis(3-pyridylmethyl)-2-thiourea), was synthesized and studied by X-ray crystal structure analysis, NMR and FAB mass spectre. In the solid state, the Pt(bpt)4 anion receptor adopts a cone conformation to bind the chloride anion through hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interaction in which the four branches of the thiourea ligands bind the chloride anion to form N-H...Cl- hydrogen bonds (3.49--3.81 A). The entraped chloride anion is situated above the Pt(Ⅱ) center at 3.52 A. Further second-sphere coordination assemby from the Pt(bpt)4 core with 8 zinc(Ⅱ) tetraphenylporphyrins (ZnPr) is discussed.

  17. Experiments towards size and dopant control of germanium quantum dots for solar applications

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    While the literature for the doping of silicon quantum dots (QDs) and nanocrystals (NCs) is extensive, reports of doping their germanium analogs are sparse. We report a range of attempts to dope Ge QDs both during and post-synthesis. The QDs have been characterized by TEM, XPS, and I/V measurements of SiO2 coated QD thin films in test cells using doped Si substrates. The solution synthesis of Ge QDs by the reduction of GeCl4 with LiAlH4 results in Ge QDs with a low level of chlorine atoms on ...

  18. Centering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katan, Lina Hauge; Baarts, Charlotte

    and collected 24 portfolios in which students reflect auto-ethnographically on their educational practices. Analyzing this qualitative material, we explore how researchers and students respectively read and write to develop and advance their thinking in those learning processes that the two groups fundamentally...... share as the common aim of both research and education. Despite some similarities, we find that how the two groups engage in and benefit from reading and writing diverges significantly. Thus we have even more reason to believe that centering practice-based teaching on these aspects of research is a good...

  19. Magnetic alteration of entanglement in two-electron quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Simonovic, N S

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement is analyzed thoroughly in the case of the ground and lowest states of two-electron axially symmetric quantum dots under a perpendicular magnetic field. The individual-particle and the center-of-mass representations are used to study the entanglement variation at the transition from interacting to noninteracting particle regimes. The mechanism of symmetry breaking due to the interaction, that results in the states with symmetries related to the later representation only, being entangled even at the vanishing interaction, is discussed. The analytical expression for the entanglement measure based on the linear entropy is derived in the limit of noninteracting electrons. It reproduces remarkably well the numerical results for the lowest states with the magnetic quantum number M>2 in the interacting regime. It is found that the entanglement of the ground state is a discontinuous function of the field strength. A method to estimate the entanglement of the ground state, characterized by the quan...

  20. Diamagnetic susceptibility of a confined donor in inhomogeneous quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, K.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.

    2011-03-01

    The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility χdia are estimated for a shallow donor confined to move in GaAs-GaAlAs inhomogeneous quantum dots. The calculation was performed within the effective mass approximation and using the variational method. The results show that the binding energy and the diamagnetic susceptibility χdia depend strongly on the core radius and the shell radius. We have demonstrated that there is a critical value of the ratio of the inner radius to the outer radius which may be important for nanofabrication techniques. The binding energy Eb shows a minimum for a critical value of this ratio depending on the value of the outer radius and shows a maximum when the donor is placed at the center of the spherical layer. The diamagnetic susceptibility is more sensitive to variations of the radius for a large spherical layer. The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility depend strongly on the donor position.

  1. Advancements in the Field of Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sambeet; Tripathy, Pratyasha; Sinha, Swami Prasad.

    2012-08-01

    Quantum dots are defined as very small semiconductor crystals of size varying from nanometer scale to a few micron i.e. so small that they are considered dimensionless and are capable of showing many chemical properties by virtue of which they tend to be lead at one minute and gold at the second minute.Quantum dots house the electrons just the way the electrons would have been present in an atom, by applying a voltage. And therefore they are very judiciously given the name of being called as the artificial atoms. This application of voltage may also lead to the modification of the chemical nature of the material anytime it is desired, resulting in lead at one minute to gold at the other minute. But this method is quite beyond our reach. A quantum dot is basically a semiconductor of very tiny size and this special phenomenon of quantum dot, causes the band of energies to change into discrete energy levels. Band gaps and the related energy depend on the relationship between the size of the crystal and the exciton radius. The height and energy between different energy levels varies inversely with the size of the quantum dot. The smaller the quantum dot, the higher is the energy possessed by it.There are many applications of the quantum dots e.g. they are very wisely applied to:Light emitting diodes: LEDs eg. White LEDs, Photovoltaic devices: solar cells, Memory elements, Biology : =biosensors, imaging, Lasers, Quantum computation, Flat-panel displays, Photodetectors, Life sciences and so on and so forth.The nanometer sized particles are able to display any chosen colour in the entire ultraviolet visible spectrum through a small change in their size or composition.

  2. Surface plasmon-assisted optical bistability in the quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chengjun; Qi, Yihong; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigated optical bistability (OB) of a coupled excition-plasmon hybrid system in a unidirectional ring cavity. It is found that the threshold and the region of OB can be tuned by adjusting the center-center distance between the quantum dot and metal nanoparticle (MNP), the Rabi frequency of the control field and the radius of the MNP. Due to the significantly enhanced optical nonlinearity by the surface plasmon effect, the threshold of OB can be decreased greatly when the probe field is parallel to the major axis of the hybrid system. The enhanced OB may have promising applications in optical switching and optical storage.

  3. Submonolayer Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Chang, Yia-Chang

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed for inserting submonolayer (SML) quantum dots (QDs) or SML QD stacks, instead of conventional Stranski-Krastanov (S-K) QDs, into the active region of intersubband photodetectors. A typical configuration would be InAs SML QDs embedded in thin layers of GaAs, surrounded by AlGaAs barriers. Here, the GaAs and the AlGaAs have nearly the same lattice constant, while InAs has a larger lattice constant. In QD infrared photodetector, the important quantization directions are in the plane perpendicular to the normal incidence radiation. In-plane quantization is what enables the absorption of normal incidence radiation. The height of the S-K QD controls the positions of the quantized energy levels, but is not critically important to the desired normal incidence absorption properties. The SML QD or SML QD stack configurations give more control of the structure grown, retains normal incidence absorption properties, and decreases the strain build-up to allow thicker active layers for higher quantum efficiency.

  4. Quantum dots as biophotonics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of quantum dots (QDs) physics, applications, and perspectives. The main advantage of QDs over bulk semiconductors is the fact that the size became a control parameter to tailor the optical properties of new materials. Size changes the confinement energy which alters the optical properties of the material, such as absorption, refractive index, and emission bands. Therefore, by using QDs one can make several kinds of optical devices. One of these devices transforms electrons into photons to apply them as active optical components in illumination and displays. Other devices enable the transformation of photons into electrons to produce QDs solar cells or photodetectors. At the biomedical interface, the application of QDs, which is the most important aspect in this book, is based on fluorescence, which essentially transforms photons into photons of different wavelengths. This chapter introduces important parameters for QDs' biophotonic applications such as photostability, excitation and emission profiles, and quantum efficiency. We also present the perspectives for the use of QDs in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), so useful in modern microscopy, and how to take advantage of the usually unwanted blinking effect to perform super-resolution microscopy.

  5. Electromechanical transition in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micchi, G.; Avriller, R.; Pistolesi, F.

    2016-09-01

    The strong coupling between electronic transport in a single-level quantum dot and a capacitively coupled nanomechanical oscillator may lead to a transition towards a mechanically bistable and blocked-current state. Its observation is at reach in carbon-nanotube state-of-art experiments. In a recent publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 206802 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.206802] we have shown that this transition is characterized by pronounced signatures on the oscillator mechanical properties: the susceptibility, the displacement fluctuation spectrum, and the ring-down time. These properties are extracted from transport measurements, however the relation between the mechanical quantities and the electronic signal is not always straightforward. Moreover the dependence of the same quantities on temperature, bias or gate voltage, and external dissipation has not been studied. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap and provide a detailed description of the transition. Specifically we find (i) the relation between the current-noise and the displacement spectrum; (ii) the peculiar behavior of the gate-voltage dependence of these spectra at the transition; (iii) the robustness of the transition towards the effect of external fluctuations and dissipation.

  6. Quantum dots for terahertz generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H C; Aslan, B; Gupta, J A; Wasilewski, Z R; Aers, G C; SpringThorpe, A J; Buchanan, M [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, K1A 0R6 (Canada)], E-mail: h.c.liu@nrc.ca

    2008-09-24

    Nanostructures made of semiconductors, such as quantum wells and quantum dots (QD), are well known, and some have been incorporated in practical devices. Here we focus on novel structures made of QDs and related devices for terahertz (THz) generation. Their potential advantages, such as low threshold current density, high characteristic temperature, increased differential gain, etc, make QDs promising candidates for light emitting applications in the THz region. Our idea of using resonant tunneling through QDs is presented, and initial results on devices consisting of self-assembled InAs QDs in an undoped GaAs matrix, with a design incorporating a GaInNAs/GaAs short period superlattice, are discussed. Moreover, shallow impurities are also being explored for possible THz emission: the idea is based on the tunneling through bound states of individual donor or acceptor impurities in the quantum well. Initial results on devices having an AlGaAs/GaAs double-barrier resonant tunneling structure are discussed.

  7. The Cl Isotope Composition of the Moon as evidence for an Anhydrous Mantle (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Shearer, C., Jr.; McKeegan, K. D.; Barnes, J.; Wang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The chlorine isotope composition of primitive terrestrial basalts and carbonaceous chondrites cover a narrow range centered around 0‰ with a total variation of ± 0.5‰. In contrast, the chlorine isotope composition of bulk samples and in situ ion microprobe analyses of lunar basalts and glasses cover a range of 25‰. Three possibilities were considered to explain the large spread: 1) initial isotopic heterogeneities, 2) devolatilization from solar wind/micrometeorite bombardment, 3) degassing under anhydrous conditions. The first of these possibilities is rejected because the Moon went through an magma ocean stage which would have homogenized any isotopic heterogeneities. To examine surface effects, we chose samples that have extremely different degrees of surface exposure. We find no correlation between the Cl isotope composition and surface exposure. We also conducted a laboratory experiment in which a thin film of NaCl was bombarded with a proton source for 24 hours with no change in Cl isotope composition. The third possibility is that the fractionation is explained by the anhydrous character of the Moon. On Earth, the volatiling Cl species is HCl. HCl is known to preferentially incorporate 37Cl relative to 35Cl due to the high bond strength of the molecule. This is offset by the higher translational velocity of H35Cl, so that overall, there is very little Cl isotope fractionation during degassing. We propose that lunar basalts were anhydrous and the volatile Cl species were metal chlorides, such as ZnCl2, NaCl, FeCl2, etc. The bond strength of metal chlorides and Cl dissolved in a basalt are similar, so that fractionation is caused mainly by volatilization, with the light isotopologue preferentially lost to the vapor phase. This idea is supported by the consistent lower Cl isotope ratios of water soluble salt fraction (~10 ‰ lower) and the lowest lunar Cl isotope values close to those of bulk Earth. The H content of lunar magmas must have been lower

  8. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging with a single diamond NV center

    CERN Document Server

    Beams, Ryan; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  9. Inorganic passivation and doping control in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Hoogland, Sjoerd H.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss strategies to reduce midgap trap state densities in colloidal quantum dot films and requirements to control doping type and magnitude. We demonstrate that these improvements result in colloidal quantum dot solar cells with certified 7.0% efficiency.

  10. Photoluminescence of carbon dots from mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. K.; Razbirin, B. S.; Starukhin, A. N.; Eurov, D. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Stovpiaga, E. Yu; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Photophysical properties of carbon dots were investigated under various excitation conditions and over a wide temperature region - from room to liquid helium temperatures. The carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized using mesoporous silica particles as a reactor and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) as a precursor. The photoluminescence spectra of CDs exhibit a strong dependence on the excitation wavelength and demonstrate a significant inhomogeneous broadening. Lowering sample temperature reveals the doublet structure of the spectra, which is associated with the vibronic structure of radiative transitions. The vibration energy ∼1200 cm-1 is close to the energy of Csbnd O stretching vibration. Long-lived phosphorescence of carbon dots with its decay time ∼0.2 s at T = 80 K was observed. The fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra are shown to be spectrally separated. The long-lived component of the emission was ascribed to optically forbidden triplet-singlet transitions. The value of the singlet-triplet splitting was found to be about 0.3 eV. Photo-induced polarization of the luminescence of carbon dots was revealed. The degree of the linear polarization is dependent on the wavelengths of both excitation and emitted light. The effect indicates a hidden anisotropy of optical dipole transitions in the dots and demonstrates the loss of the dipole orientation during the electron energy relaxation.

  11. Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Nanodiamonds: Cathodoluminescence Imaging Marker in the Near Infrared

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huiliang; Aharonovich, Igor; Glenn, David R.; Schalek, R.; Magyar, Andrew P.; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that nanodiamonds fabricated to incorporate silicon-vacancy (Si-V) color centers provide bright, spectrally narrow, and stable cathodoluminescence (CL) in the near-infrared. Si-V color centers containing nanodiamonds are promising as non-bleaching optical markers for correlated CL and secondary electron microscopy, including applications to nanoscale bioimaging.

  12. Impact of Community-Based DOT on Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiYang Zhang

    treatment outcomes according to the pooled results of included studies in this review. Studies on strategies for implementation of patient-centered and community-centered CB-DOT deserve further attention.

  13. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Z. O. Lipatova; E. V. Kolobkova; V. A. Aseev

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been fou...

  14. Coherence and dephasing in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    We measured dephasing times in InGaAl/As self-assembled quantum dots at low temperature using degenerate four-wave mixing. At 0K, the coherence time of the quantum dots is lifetime limited, whereas at finite temperatures pure dephasing by exciton-phonon interactions governs the quantum dot...... coherence. The inferred homogeneous line widths are significantly smaller than the line widths usually observed in the photoluminescence from single quantum dots indicating an additional inhomogeneours broadening mechanism in the latter....

  15. Quantum Dots and Their Multimodal Applications: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Holloway, Paul H; Teng-Kuan Tseng; Lei Qian; Debasis Bera

    2010-01-01

    Semiconducting quantum dots, whose particle sizes are in the nanometer range, have very unusual properties. The quantum dots have band gaps that depend in a complicated fashion upon a number of factors, described in the article. Processing-structure-properties-performance relationships are reviewed for compound semiconducting quantum dots. Various methods for synthesizing these quantum dots are discussed, as well as their resulting properties. Quantum states and confinement of their excitons ...

  16. Filtering algorithm for dotted interferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterloh, K., E-mail: kurt.osterloh@bam.de [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Division VIII.3, Radiological Methods, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Division VIII.3, Radiological Methods, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Bock, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    An algorithm has been developed to remove reliably dotted interferences impairing the perceptibility of objects within a radiographic image. This particularly is a major challenge encountered with neutron radiographs collected at the NECTAR facility, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II): the resulting images are dominated by features resembling a snow flurry. These artefacts are caused by scattered neutrons, gamma radiation, cosmic radiation, etc. all hitting the detector CCD directly in spite of a sophisticated shielding. This makes such images rather useless for further direct evaluations. One approach to resolve this problem of these random effects would be to collect a vast number of single images, to combine them appropriately and to process them with common image filtering procedures. However, it has been shown that, e.g. median filtering, depending on the kernel size in the plane and/or the number of single shots to be combined, is either insufficient or tends to blur sharp lined structures. This inevitably makes a visually controlled processing image by image unavoidable. Particularly in tomographic studies, it would be by far too tedious to treat each single projection by this way. Alternatively, it would be not only more comfortable but also in many cases the only reasonable approach to filter a stack of images in a batch procedure to get rid of the disturbing interferences. The algorithm presented here meets all these requirements. It reliably frees the images from the snowy pattern described above without the loss of fine structures and without a general blurring of the image. It consists of an iterative, within a batch procedure parameter free filtering algorithm aiming to eliminate the often complex interfering artefacts while leaving the original information untouched as far as possible.

  17. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  18. AHE measurements of very thin films and nanosized dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikuchi, N.; Murillo, R.; Lodder, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present anomalous Hall effect analysis from very thin Co (0.5 nm) film, Co/Pt multilayers and large areas of nanosized dots as well as from a few magnetic dots having a diameter of 120 nm. The dot arrayis prepared from Co/Pt multilayer by using laser interference lithography (LIL) w

  19. Evidence for curvilinear interpolation from dot alignment judgements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, MA; Vos, PG

    1999-01-01

    Visual interpolation between dots responsible for rectilinear versus curvilinear contour interpretation was examined with the psychophysical forced directional response (FDR) paradigm. Regular four-dot polygon segments, together with a target dot, were presented to the subjects for 150 ms. Subjects

  20. Toward structurally defined carbon dots as ultracompact fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCroy, Gregory Ethan; Sonkar, Sumit Kumar; Yang, Fan; Veca, L Monica; Wang, Ping; Tackett, Kenneth N; Yu, Jing-Jiang; Vasile, Eugeniu; Qian, Haijun; Liu, Yamin; Luo, Pengju George; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2014-05-27

    There has been much discussion on the need to develop fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as ultracompact probes, with overall size profiles comparable to those of the genetically encoded fluorescent tags. In the use of conventional semiconductor QDs for such a purpose, the beautifully displayed dependence of fluorescence color on the particle diameter becomes a limitation. More recently, carbon dots have emerged as a new platform of QD-like fluorescent nanomaterials. The optical absorption and fluorescence emissions in carbon dots are not bandgap in origin, different from those in conventional semiconductor QDs. The absence of any theoretically defined fluorescence color-dot size relationships in carbon dots may actually be exploited as a unique advantage in the size reduction toward having carbon dots serve as ultracompact QD-like fluorescence probes. Here we report on carbon dots of less than 5 nm in the overall dot diameter with the use of 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) (EDA) molecules for the carbon particle surface passivation. The EDA-carbon dots were found to be brightly fluorescent, especially over the spectral range of green fluorescent protein. These aqueous soluble smaller carbon dots also enabled more quantitative characterizations, including the use of solution-phase NMR techniques, and the results suggested that the dot structures were relatively simple and better-defined. The potential for these smaller carbon dots to serve as fluorescence probes of overall sizes comparable to those of fluorescent proteins is discussed.

  1. Coupling of single quantum dots to a photonic crystal waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Toke; Stobbe, Søren; Julsgaard, Brian;

    . An alternative approach is to couple the quantum dot directly to the propagating mode of a photonic waveguide. We demonstrate the coupling of single quantum dots to a photonic crystal waveguide using time-resolved spontaneous emission measurements. A pronounced effect is seen in the decay rates of dots coupled...

  2. Historia Clínica

    OpenAIRE

    Micó, Lydia; Bretó, Patricia; Soriano, José Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Uso del video educativo y el podcasting como fortalecimiento en el aprendizaje de la Dietoterapia. La anámnesis e historia clínica es el primer acercamiento del profesional frente a sus pacientes. En este vídeo se explican los principales puntos que se deberían desarrollar para realizar el tratamiento dietoterapéutico como herramienta clave del diagnóstico nutricional.

  3. Charged-Exciton Complexes in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2001-01-01

    It is known experimentally that stable charged-exciton complexes can exist in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. Much less is known about the properties of such charged-exciton complexes since three-body problems are very difficult to be solved, even numerically. Here we introduce the correlated hyperspherical harmonics as basis functions to solve the hyperangular equation for negatively and positively charged excitons (trions) in a harmonic quantum dot. By using this method, we have calculated the energy spectra of the low-lying states of a charged exciton as a function of the radius of quantum dot. Based on symmetry analysis, the level crossover as the dot radius increases can be fully explained as the results of symmetry constraint.``

  4. Branch management into micropipeline joint dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Tyanev

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers problems related to hardware implementation of computational process with conditional jumps. Hardware refers to asynchronous pipeline organization at microoperational level. Exploration is dedicated to one of the tasks presented in (Tyanev, D., 2009 concerning to micropipeline controller design to control micropipeline stage into joint dot of branch algorithm. Joint dot is the point at which few preceding branches are combined. It appears inevitably into conditional jump structures and this is the reason for the actuality of its problem. Analysis of this new task is presented and request arbitration functioning principles are formulated for the incoming to joint dot requests. The arbiter is responsible for the fair choice on which depends steady peformance of separate pipeline brances. Paper also describes pipeline controller synthesis and analysis of its operation in two variants: about 2-phase and 4-phase data transfer protocol. The synthesized asynchronous arbiter scheme is invariant to the type of pipeline protocol.

  5. Angiogenic Profiling of Synthesized Carbon Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shereema, R M; Sruthi, T V; Kumar, V B Sameer; Rao, T P; Shankar, S Sharath

    2015-10-20

    A simple method was employed for the synthesis of green luminescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) from styrene soot. The CQDs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopy. The prepared carbon quantum dots did not show cellular toxicity and could successfully be used for labeling cells. We also evaluated the effects of carbon quantum dots on the process of angiogenesis. Results of a chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay revealed the significant decrease in the density of branched vessels after their treatment with CQDs. Further application of CQDs significantly downregulated the expression levels of pro-angiogenic growth factors like VEGF and FGF. Expression of VEGFR2 and levels of hemoglobin were also significantly lower in CAMs treated with CQDs, indicating that the CQDs inhibit angiogenesis. Data presented here also show that CQDs can selectively target cancer cells and therefore hold potential in the field of cancer therapy.

  6. Quantum Dots in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollner, Immo Nathanael

    This Thesis is focused on the study of quantum electrodynamics in photonic crystal waveguides. We investigate the interplay between a single quantum dot and the fundamental mode of the photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate experimental coupling eciencies for the spontaneous emission...... into the mode exceeding 98% for emitters spectrally close to the band-edge of the waveguide mode. In addition we illustrate the broadband nature of the underlying eects, by obtaining coupling eciencies above 90% for quantum dots detuned from the band edge by as far as 20nm. These values are in good agreement...... quantum-dot-waveguide coupling. Such a structure is ideally suited for a number of applications in quantum information processing and among others we propose an on-chip spin-photon interface, a single photon transistor, and a deterministic cNOT gate....

  7. The interaction of CsCl with films of solid water

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, A; Krischok, S; Kempter, V

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of CsCl molecules with films of solid water (three layers thick, typically), deposited on a tungsten crystal at 130 K, was studied. Metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES) and UPS(HeI) were applied to study the emission from Cl3p and Cs5p and the highest occupied states 1b sub 1 , 3a sub 1 and 1b sub 2 of molecular water. Below a critical stoichiometry of about CsCl centre dot nH sub 2 O with n=6 the UPS spectra are quite similar to those from chlorides solvated in liquid water in as much as the relative positions and intensities of the water and salt features are concerned; very little emission from the ionization of Cl3p and Cs5p is observed with MIES. We conclude that the CsCl molecules become solvated in the water film. As long as n>6, the water spectrum remains characteristic for condensed water; at n6, water molecules not involved directly into the hydration of the salt molecules desorb around 140 K. Around 160 K all water has disappeared from the surface. Above this temperature o...

  8. Glowing graphene quantum dots and carbon dots: properties, syntheses, and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xin Ting; Ananthanarayanan, Arundithi; Luo, Kathy Qian; Chen, Peng

    2015-04-08

    The emerging graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon dots (C-dots) have gained tremendous attention for their enormous potentials for biomedical applications, owing to their unique and tunable photoluminescence properties, exceptional physicochemical properties, high photostability, biocompatibility, and small size. This article aims to update the latest results in this rapidly evolving field and to provide critical insights to inspire more exciting developments. We comparatively review the properties and synthesis methods of these carbon nanodots and place emphasis on their biological (both fundamental and theranostic) applications.

  9. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao HC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hanchun Yao,1,2 Li Su,1 Man Zeng,1 Li Cao,1 Weiwei Zhao,1 Chengqun Chen,3 Bin Du,1,2 Jie Zhou1,2 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, 2Collaborative Innovation Center of Drug Research and Safety Evaluation, Henan Province, 3Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Carbon dots (CDs are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as optical imaging nanoprobes, which are used for labeling cells in cancer treatment mainly due to their biocompatibility and unique optical properties. In this study, gadolinium (Gd-complex-containing CDs were obtained through a one-step microwave method to develop multimodal nanoprobes integrating the advantages of optical and magnetic imaging. The obtained Gd-CDs exhibited highly fluorescent properties with excellent water solubility and biological compatibility. Natural apoferritin (AFn nanocages, an excellent drug delivery carrier, are hollow in structure, with their pH-dependent, unfolding–refolding process at pH 2.0 and 7.4. The chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX can be highly effective and encapsulated into AFn cavity. A widely used tumor-targeting molecule, folic acid (FA, functionalized the surface of AFn to obtain an active tumor targeting effect on MCF-7 cells and malignant tumors in mice models. In this study, an AFn nanocarrier encapsulating high concentration of DOX labeled with magnetic and fluorescent Gd-CDs probe was developed. Gd-CDs exhibited a unique green photoluminescence and almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Furthermore, Gd-doped CDs significantly increased the circulation time and decreased the toxicity of Gd3+ in in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated that the AFn nanocages labeled with Gd-CD compounds could serve as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. The self

  10. Determining the applicability of the Landauer nanoDot as a general public dosimeter in a research imaging facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael A; Thoreson, Kelly F; Cerecero, Jennifer A

    2012-11-01

    The Research Imaging Institute (RII) building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) houses two cyclotron particle accelerators, positron emission tomography (PET) machines, and a fluoroscopic unit. As part of the radiation protection program (RPP) and meeting the standard for achieving ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable), it is essential to minimize the ionizing radiation exposure to the general public through the use of controlled areas and area dose monitoring. Currently, thirty-four whole body Luxel+ dosimeters, manufactured by Landauer, are being used in various locations within the RII to monitor dose to the general public. The intent of this research was to determine if the nanoDot, a single point dosimeter, can be used as a general public dosimeter in a diagnostic facility. This was tested by first verifying characteristics of the nanoDot dosimeter including dose linearity, dose rate dependence, angular dependence, and energy dependence. Then, the response of the nanoDot dosimeter to the Luxel+ dosimeter when placed in a continuous, low dose environment was investigated. Finally, the nanoDot was checked for appropriate response in an acute, high dose environment. Based on the results, the current recommendation is that the nanoDot should not replace the Luxel+ dosimeter without further work to determine the energy spectra in the RII building and without considering the limitation of the microStar reader, portable on-site OSL reader, at doses below 0.1 mGy (10 mrad).

  11. Resonant tunneling in graphene pseudomagnetic quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zenan; Bahamon, D A; Pereira, Vitor M; Park, Harold S; Campbell, D K; Neto, A H Castro

    2013-06-12

    Realistic relaxed configurations of triaxially strained graphene quantum dots are obtained from unbiased atomistic mechanical simulations. The local electronic structure and quantum transport characteristics of y-junctions based on such dots are studied, revealing that the quasi-uniform pseudomagnetic field induced by strain restricts transport to Landau level- and edge state-assisted resonant tunneling. Valley degeneracy is broken in the presence of an external field, allowing the selective filtering of the valley and chirality of the states assisting in the resonant tunneling. Asymmetric strain conditions can be explored to select the exit channel of the y-junction.

  12. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  13. Polymers in Carbon Dots: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqun Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dots (CDs have been widely studied since their discovery in 2004 as a green substitute of the traditional quantum dots due to their excellent photoluminescence (PL and high biocompatibility. Meanwhile, polymers have increasingly become an important component for both synthesis and modification of CDs to provide polymeric matrix and enhance their PL property. Furthermore, critical analysis of composites of CDs and polymers has not been available. Herein, in this review, we summarized the use of polymers in the synthesis and functionalization of CDs, and the applications of these CDs in various fields.

  14. Bilayer graphene quantum dot defined by topgates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, André; Kaestner, Bernd; Hohls, Frank; Weimann, Thomas; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W., E-mail: hans.w.schumacher@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-06-21

    We investigate the application of nanoscale topgates on exfoliated bilayer graphene to define quantum dot devices. At temperatures below 500 mK, the conductance underneath the grounded gates is suppressed, which we attribute to nearest neighbour hopping and strain-induced piezoelectric fields. The gate-layout can thus be used to define resistive regions by tuning into the corresponding temperature range. We use this method to define a quantum dot structure in bilayer graphene showing Coulomb blockade oscillations consistent with the gate layout.

  15. Mitigation of quantum dot cytotoxicity by microencapsulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Romoser

    Full Text Available When CdSe/ZnS-polyethyleneimine (PEI quantum dots (QDs are microencapsulated in polymeric microcapsules, human fibroblasts are protected from acute cytotoxic effects. Differences in cellular morphology, uptake, and viability were assessed after treatment with either microencapsulated or unencapsulated dots. Specifically, QDs contained in microcapsules terminated with polyethylene glycol (PEG mitigate contact with and uptake by cells, thus providing a tool to retain particle luminescence for applications such as extracellular sensing and imaging. The microcapsule serves as the "first line of defense" for containing the QDs. This enables the individual QD coating to be designed primarily to enhance the function of the biosensor.

  16. Spectroscopic characteristics of carbon dots (C-dots) derived from carbon fibers and conversion to sulfur-bridged C-dots nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, John C; Ferrer, Ivonne M; Guterry, Nathan W; Colón, Verónica M; Destino, Joel F; Bright, Frank V; Colón, Luis A

    2015-09-01

    We synthesized sub-10 nm carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) consistent with photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) from carbon fiber starting material. The production of different C-dots fractions was monitored over seven days. During the course of the reaction, one fraction of C-dots species with relatively high photoluminescence was short-lived, emerging during the first hour of reaction but disappearing after one day of reaction. Isolation of this species during the first hour of the reaction was crucial to obtaining higher-luminescent C-dots species. When the reaction proceeded for one week, the appearance of larger nanostructures was observed over time, with lateral dimensions approaching 200 nm. The experimental evidence suggests that these larger species are formed from small C-dot nanoparticles bridged together by sulfur-based moieties between the C-dot edge groups, as if the C-dots polymerized by cross-linking the edge groups through sulfur bridges. Their size can be tailored by controlling the reaction time. Our results highlight the variety of CNP products, from sub-10 nm C-dots to ~200 nm sulfur-containing carbon nanostructures, that can be produced over time during the oxidation reaction of the graphenic starting material. Our work provides a clear understanding of when to stop the oxidation reaction during the top-down production of C-dots to obtain highly photoluminescent species or a target average particle size.

  17. Características epidemiológicas e clínicas das reações hansênicas em indivíduos paucibacilares e multibacilares, atendidos em dois centros de referência para hanseníase, na Cidade de Recife, Estado de Pernambuco Characteristics of leprosy reactions in paucibacillary and multibacillary individuals attended at two reference centers in Recife, Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Almeida Galvão Teixeira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As reações são frequentes e importantes no contexto da hanseníase, representando uma significativa parcela de pacientes com incapacidades e submetidos ao retratamento da hanseníase. A caracterização clínico-epidemiológica dos padrões reacionais é primordial para o manejo dos pacientes. O objetivo desse trabalho é descrever as características epidemiológicas e clínicas das reações hansênicas em indivíduos paucibacilares e multibacilares. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal onde foram avaliados 201 pacientes com história de quadro reacional, atendidos em dois centros de referência para tratamento da hanseníase. Variáveis como baciloscopia inicial, sexo, idade, fototipo, procedência, forma clínica, tipo de tratamento e de reação, índice baciloscópico final e período de surgimento da reação em relação ao tratamento foram avaliados. A análise estatística foi realizada usando-se frequências simples. Para cálculo dos fatores de risco para as formas multibacilares, foram realizadas análises univariada e multivariada. RESULTADOS: Sexo masculino, idade entre 30-44 anos, fototipo V, a forma clínica borderline, tratamento regular, reação tipo I, neurite, presença de 10 a 20 nódulos e surgimento da reação hansênica durante o tratamento foram os achados mais frequentes. CONCLUSÕES: Predominaram os indivíduos do sexo masculino que se associaram a um maior risco de desenvolvimento da forma multibacilar. As reações hansênicas foram mais frequentes durante o tratamento, os pacientes multibacilares foram mais propensos ao retratamento da hanseníase e aqueles com reações tipo I e II, apresentaram maior frequência de neurite, linfadenopatia, artrite e irite do que aqueles com reação isolada.INTRODUCTION: Significant reactions frequently occur among leprosy cases, and thus a significant proportion of leprosy patients present disabilities and undergo leprosy retreatment. Clinical

  18. Structure and function of collectin liver 1 (CL-L1) and collectin 11 (CL-11, CL-K1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selman, Lana; Hansen, Soren

    2012-01-01

    . Their genomic organization and protein structure reveal many similarities. However, CL-11 is a serum protein, whereas CL-L1 appears to be restricted to the cytosol of cells such as hepatocytes. Specificity analyses of the CRDs reveal some differences in their preferences for saccharides: CL-11 binds most avidly...

  19. C-Cl activation by group IV metal oxides in solid argon matrixes: matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical investigations of the reactions of MOx (M = Ti, Zr; x = 1, 2) with CH3Cl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanying

    2013-07-11

    Reactions of the ground-state titanium and zirconium monoxide and dioxide molecules with monochloromethane in excess argon matrixes have been investigated in solid argon by infrared absorption spectroscopy and density functional theoretical calculations. The results show that the ground-state MOx (M = Ti, Zr; x = 1, 2) molecules react with CH3Cl to first form the weakly bound MO(CH3Cl) and MO2(CH3Cl) complexes. The MO(CH3Cl) complexes can rearrange to the CH3M(O)Cl isomers with the Cl atom of CH3Cl coordination to the metal center of MO upon UV light irradiation (λ MOx mechanism was interpreted by the calculated potential energy profiles.

  20. 76 FR 477 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2A12 (CL-601) and CL-600-2B16 (CL-601-3A...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ...: Ice and Rain Protection and Pneumatic, respectively. Reason (e) The mandatory continuing airworthiness... applicable Time Limits/ Maintenance Checks manual, whichever occurs first. CL-600-2B16 (CL-604 Variants)...

  1. Ultra-large scale synthesis of high electrochemical performance SnO{sub 2} quantum dots within 5 min at room temperature following a growth self-termination mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Hongtao, E-mail: htcui@ytu.edu.cn; Xue, Junying; Ren, Wanzhong; Wang, Minmin

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • SnO{sub 2} quantum dots were prepared at an ultra-large scale at room temperature within 5 min. • The grinding of SnCl{sub 2}⋅2H{sub 2}O and ammonium persulphate with morpholine produces quantum dots. • The reactions were self-terminated through the rapid consumption of water. • The obtained SnO{sub 2} quantum dots own high electrochemical performance. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} quantum dots are prepared at an ultra-large scale by a productive synthetic procedure without using any organic ligand. The grinding of solid mixture of SnCl{sub 2}⋅2H{sub 2}O and ammonium persulphate with morpholine in a mortar at room temperature produces 1.2 nm SnO{sub 2} quantum dots within 5 min. The formation of SnO{sub 2} is initiated by the reaction between tin ions and hydroxyl groups generated from hydrolysis of morpholine in the released hydrate water from SnCl{sub 2}⋅2H{sub 2}O. It is considered that as water is rapidly consumed by the hydrolysis reaction of morpholine, the growth process of particles is self-terminated immediately after their transitory period of nucleation and growth. As a result of simple procedure and high toleration to scaling up of preparation, at least 50 g of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots can be produced in one batch in our laboratory. The as prepared quantum dots present high electrochemical performance due to the effective faradaic reaction and the alternative trapping of electrons and holes.

  2. Development of cadmium-free quantum dot for intracellular labelling through electroporation or lipid-calcium-phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Feng; Hung, Wei-Ling; Hou, Tzh-Yin; Huang, Hsiu-Ying; Lin, Cheng-An J.

    2016-04-01

    Traditional fluorescent labelling techniques has severe photo-bleaching problem such as organic dyes and fluorescent protein. Quantum dots made up of traditional semiconductor (CdSe/ZnS) material has sort of biological toxicity. This research has developed novel Cd-free quantum dots divided into semiconductor (Indium phosphide, InP) and noble metal (Gold). Former has lower toxicity compared to traditional quantum dots. Latter consisting of gold (III) chloride (AuCl3) and toluene utilizes sonochemical preparation and different stimulus to regulate fluorescent wavelength. Amphoteric macromolecule surface technology and ligand Exchange in self-Assembled are involved to develop hydrophilic nanomaterials which can regulate the number of grafts per molecule of surface functional groups. Calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticle (NP) with an asymmetric lipid bilayer coating technology developed for intracellular delivery and labelling has synthesized Cd-free quantum dots possessing high brightness and multi-fluorescence successfully. Then, polymer coating and ligand exchange transfer to water-soluble materials to produce liposome nanomaterials as fluorescent probes and enhancing medical applications of nanotechnology.

  3. Photoluminescence studies of single InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are considered a promising material system for future optical devices and quantum computers. We have studied the low-temperature photoluminescence properties of single InGaAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs. The high spatial resolution required for resolving single dots...... to resolve luminescence lines from individual quantum dots, revealing an atomic-like spectrum of sharp transition lines. A parameter of fundamental importance is the intrinsic linewidth of these transitions. Using high-resolution spectroscopy we have determined the linewidth and investigated its dependence...... on temperature, which gives information about how the exciton confined to the quantum dot interacts with the surrounding lattice....

  4. The Influence of Formulating a Damping Solution on Dot Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povilas Mikalainis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Difference in dot gain using various additives to the damping solution was investigated on two offset web presses. Dot gain was measured using a densitometer and calculated considering CIE L*a*b* coordinates. It was found that while using a non alcohol additive instead of the alcohol one, dot gain became smaller and printing stability was lower. Changes in dot gain depend on the ink that may vary in colours. The influence of changes in dot gain on the colour was determined. Besides, it was found that differences in colour were unacceptable in many cases.Article in Lithuanian

  5. Photoluminescent carbon dots from 1,4-addition polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Nolan, Andrew; Walton, Jeffrey G A; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Zhang, Rong; Bradley, Mark

    2014-08-25

    Photoluminescent carbon dots were synthesised directly by thermopyrolysis of 1,4-addition polymers, allowing precise control of their properties. The effect of polymer composition on the properties of the carbon dots was investigated by TEM, IR, XPS, elemental analysis and fluorescence analysis, with carbon dots synthesised from nitrogen-containing polymers showing the highest fluorescence. The carbon dots with high nitrogen content were observed to have strong fluorescence in the visible region, and culture with cells showed that the carbon dots were non-cytotoxic and readily taken up by three different cell lines.

  6. Electrically addressing a single self-assembled quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, D J P; Atkinson, P; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the use of an aperture in an aluminum oxide layer to restrict current injection into a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot, from an ensemble of such dots within a large mesa. The insulating aperture is formed through the wet-oxidation of a layer of AlAs. Under photoluminescence we observe that only one quantum dot in the ensemble exhibits a Stark shift, and that the same single dot is visible under electroluminescence. Autocorrelation measurements performed on the electroluminescence confirm that we are observing emission from a single quantum dot.

  7. Sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Uskov, A V

    2004-05-15

    The sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback is analyzed with a Lang-Kobayashi approach applied to a standard quantum-dot laser model. The carriers are injected into a quantum well and are captured by, or escape from, the quantum dots through either carrier-carrier or phonon-carrier interaction. Because of Pauli blocking, the capture rate into the dots depends on the carrier occupancy level in the dots. Here we show that different carrier capture dynamics lead to a strong modification of the damping of the relaxation oscillations. Regions of increased damping display reduced sensitivity to optical feedback even for a relatively large alpha factor.

  8. High-resolution photoluminescence studies of single semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Østergaard, John Erland; Jensen, Jacob Riis;

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots, especially those formed by self-organized growth, are considered a promising material system for future optical devices [1] and the optical properties of quantum dot ensembles have been investigated in detail over the past years. Recently, considerable interest has...... developed in the study of single quantum dots, characterized by sharp atomic-like transition lines revealing their zero-dimensional density of states. Substantial information about the fundamental properties of individual quantum dots, as well as their interactions with other dots and the host lattice, can...

  9. Strong reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in superlattices and quantum dot superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, V. M.; Nika, D. L.; Cocemasov, A. I.; Isacova, C. I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal transport is theoretically investigated in the planar Si/Ge superlattices and Si/Ge quantum dot superlattices. The phonon states in the considered nanostructures are obtained using the Face-centered Cubic Cell model of lattice dynamics. A significant reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity is revealed in both considered structures in a wide range of temperatures from 100 K to 400 K. This effect is explained by the removal of the high-energy and high-velocity phonon modes from the heat flux due to their localization in superlattice segments and the phonon scattering on the interfaces. The obtained results show prospects of the planar superlattices and quantum-dot superlattices for thermoelectric and thermo-insulating applications.

  10. Cluster-seeded synthesis of doped CdSe:Cu4 quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Ali M; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Wink, Donald J; Page, Leah E; Snee, Preston T

    2013-04-23

    We report here a method for synthesizing CdSe quantum dots (QDs) containing copper such that each QD is doped with four copper ions. The synthesis is a derivative of the cluster-seed method, whereby organometallic clusters act as nucleation centers for quantum dots. The method is tolerant of the chemical identity of the seed; as such, we have doped four copper ions into CdSe QDs using [Na(H2O)3]2[Cu4(SPh)6] as a cluster seed. The controlled doping allows us to monitor the photophysical properties of guest ions with X-ray spectroscopy, specifically XANES and EXAFS at the copper K-edge. These data reveal that copper can capture both electrons and holes from photoexcited CdSe QDs. When the dopant is oxidized, photoluminescence is quenched and the copper ions translocate within the CdSe matrix, which slows the return to an emissive state.

  11. A study of the lunisolar secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$

    CERN Document Server

    Celletti, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of small bodies around the Earth has gained a renewed interest, since the awareness of the problems that space debris can cause in the nearby future. A relevant role in space debris is played by lunisolar secular resonances, which might contribute to an increase of the orbital elements, typically of the eccentricity. We concentrate our attention on the lunisolar secular resonance described by the relation $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, where $\\omega$ and $\\Omega$ denote the argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node of the space debris. We introduce three different models with increasing complexity. We show that the growth in eccentricity, as observed in space debris located in the MEO region at the inclination about equal to $56^\\circ$, can be explained as a natural effect of the secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, while the chaotic variations of the orbital parameters are the result of interaction and overlapping of nearby resonances.

  12. Synthesis of CdSe quantum dots for quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Neetu, E-mail: singh.neetu1985@gmail.com; Kapoor, Avinashi [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi-110 021 (India); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Mehra, R. M. [School of Engineering and Technology, Sharda University, Greater Noida-201 306, U.P. (India)

    2014-04-24

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) of size 0.85 nm were synthesized using chemical route. ZnO based Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cell (QDSSC) was fabricated using CdSe QDs as sensitizer. The Pre-synthesized QDs were found to be successfully adsorbed on front ZnO electrode and had potential to replace organic dyes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). The efficiency of QDSSC was obtained to be 2.06 % at AM 1.5.

  13. Observation of the intermediate states in the (Xe-Cl 2)*→ XeCl* (B,C) + Cl reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivineau, M.; Le Calvé, J.; Castex, M. C.; Jouvet, C.

    1986-10-01

    The Xe-Cl 2 van der Waals complex formed in a supersonic expansion is excited in a two-photon process. The XeCl(B,C) reaction spectra (excitation of the complex and detection of the XeCl (B→X) and (C→A) fluorescence) are obtained in the region 290-310 nm. In addition to a diffuse band also obtained in the C action spectrum, the B action spectrum presents a vibronic structure similar to the Xe-Cl (B←X) absorption band. Xe-Cl 2 ( 1Π u) resonantly enhanced two-photon process with two chromophores is proposed to account for the results.

  14. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  15. Optical Properties of Quantum-Dot-Doped Liquid Scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Aberle, C; Weiss, S; Winslow, L

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) were studied in the context of liquid scintillator development for upcoming neutrino experiments. The unique optical and chemical properties of quantum dots are particularly promising for the use in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Liquid scintillators for large scale neutrino detectors have to meet specific requirements which are reviewed, highlighting the peculiarities of quantum-dot-doping. In this paper, we report results on laboratory-scale measurements of the attenuation length and the fluorescence properties of three commercial quantum dot samples. The results include absorbance and emission stability measurements, improvement in transparency due to filtering of the quantum dot samples, precipitation tests to isolate the quantum dots from solution and energy transfer studies with quantum dots and the fluorophore PPO.

  16. A flow injection chemiluminescence method for determination of nalidixic acid based on KMnO₄-morin sensitized with CdS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataee, Alireza; Lotfi, Roya; Hasanzadeh, Aliyeh; Iranifam, Mortaza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-02-05

    A simple and sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence (CL) method was developed for determination of nalidixic acid by application of CdS quantum dots (QDs) in KMnO4-morin CL system in acidic medium. Optical and structural features of L-cysteine capped CdS quantum dots which were synthesized via hydrothermal approach were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Moreover, the potential mechanism of the proposed CL method was described using the results of the kinetic curves of CL systems, the spectra of CL, PL and UV-Vis analyses. The CL intensity of the KMnO4-morin-CdS QDs system was considerably increased in the presence of nalidixic acid. Under the optimum condition, the enhanced CL intensity was linearly proportional to the concentration of nalidixic acid in the range of 0.0013 to 21.0 mg L(-1), with a detection limit of (3σ) 0.003 mg L(-1). Also, the proposed CL method was utilized for determination of nalidixic acid in environmental water samples, and commercial pharmaceutical formulation to approve its applicability. Furthermore, corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) method was utilized for determination of nalidixic acid and the results of real sample analysis by two proposed methods were compared. Comparison the analytical features of these methods represented that the proposed CL method is preferable to CD-IMS method for determination of nalidixic acid due to its high sensitivity and precision.

  17. Producing Quantum Dots by Spray Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banger, Kulbinder; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2006-01-01

    An improved process for making nanocrystallites, commonly denoted quantum dots (QDs), is based on spray pyrolysis. Unlike the process used heretofore, the improved process is amenable to mass production of either passivated or non-passivated QDs, with computer control to ensure near uniformity of size.

  18. Enabling biomedical research with designer quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Janczewski, D.; Dorokhin, D.V.; Han, M-Y; Vancso, G.J.; Navarro, Melba; Planell, Josep A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are a new class of semiconductor nanoparticulate luminophores, which are actively researched for novel applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this review, the recent progress in the design and applications of QD labels for in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells is presented.

  19. Electron Scattering in Intrananotube Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchs, G.; Bercioux, D.; Ruffieux, P.; Gröning, P.; Grabert, H.; Gröning, O.

    2009-01-01

    Intratube quantum dots showing particle-in-a-box-like states with level spacings up to 200 meV are realized in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes by means of low dose medium energy Ar+ irradiation. Fourier-transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy compared to results of a Fabry-Perot electron r

  20. Quantum dot waveguides: ultrafast dynamics and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyze, based on numerical simulations, the dynamics of semiconductor devices incorporating quantum dots (QDs). In particular we emphasize the unique ultrafast carrier dynamics occurring between discrete QD bound states, and its influence on QD semiconductor optical amplifiers...... (SOAs). Also the possibility of realizing an all-optical regenerator by incorporating a QD absorber section in an amplifier structure is discussed....

  1. Amphoteric CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad A

    2008-06-25

    The nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) charge states strongly influence their electrical transport properties in photovoltaic and electroluminescent devices, optical gains in NQD lasers, and the stability of the dots in thin films. We report a unique electrostatic nature of CdSe NQDs, studied by electrophoretic methods. When we submerged a pair of metal electrodes, in a parallel plate capacitor configuration, into a dilute solution of CdSe NQDs in hexane, and applied a DC voltage across the pair, thin films of CdSe NQDs were deposited on both the positive and the negative electrodes. Extensive characterizations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman studies revealed that the films on both the positive and the negative electrodes were identical in every respect, clearly indicating that: (1) a fraction (<1%) of the CdSe NQDs in free form in hexane solution are charged and, more importantly, (2) there are equal numbers of positive and negative CdSe NQDs in the hexane solution. Experiments also show that the number of deposited dots is at least an order of magnitude higher than the number of initially charged dots, indicating regeneration. We used simple thermodynamics to explain such amphoteric nature and the charging/regeneration of the CdSe NQDs.

  2. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-10-05

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  3. Decoherence in Nearly-Isolated Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folk, J.; M. Marcus, C.; Harris jr, J.

    2000-01-01

    Decoherence in nearly-isolated GaAs quantum dots is investigated using the change in average Coulomb blockade peak height upon breaking time-reversal symmetry. The normalized change in average peak height approaches the predicted universal value of 1/4 at temperatures well below the single...

  4. System and method for making quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2015-05-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of making quantum dots (QDs) (passivated or unpassivated) using a continuous flow process, systems for making QDs using a continuous flow process, and the like. In one or more embodiments, the QDs produced using embodiments of the present disclosure can be used in solar photovoltaic cells, bio-imaging, IR emitters, or LEDs.

  5. Saturating optical resonances in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Selvakumar V.; Rustagi, K. C.

    Optical bistability in quantum dots, recently proposed by Chemla and Miller, is studied in a two-resonance model. We show that for such classical electromagnetic resonances the applicability of a two-resonance model is far more restrictive than for those in atoms.

  6. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows:...

  7. Carbon dots (C-dots) from cow manure with impressive subcellular selectivity tuned by simple chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelis do E S Barbosa, Cintya; Corrêa, José R; Medeiros, Gisele A; Barreto, Gabrielle; Magalhães, Kelly G; de Oliveira, Aline L; Spencer, John; Rodrigues, Marcelo O; Neto, Brenno A D

    2015-03-23

    Improved cellular selectivity for nucleoli staining was achieved by simple chemical modification of carbon dots (C-dots) synthesized from waste carbon sources such as cow manure (or from glucose). The C-dots were characterized and functionalized (amine-passivated) with ethylenediamine, affording amide bonds that resulted in bright green fluorescence. The new modified C-dots were successfully applied as selective live-cell fluorescence imaging probes with impressive subcellular selectivity and the ability to selectively stain nucleoli in breast cancer cell lineages (MCF-7). The C-dots were also tested in four other cellular models and showed the same cellular selection in live-cell imaging experiments.

  8. NaCl Potentiates Human Fibrocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nehemiah Cox; Darrell Pilling; Gomer, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive NaCl intake is associated with a variety of fibrosing diseases such as renal and cardiac fibrosis. This association has been attributed to increased blood pressure as the result of high NaCl intake. However, studies in patients with high NaCl intake and fibrosis reveal a connection between NaCl intake and fibrosis that is independent of blood pressure. We find that increasing the extracellular concentration of NaCl to levels that may occur in human blood after high-salt intake can p...

  9. un clúster empresarial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Marcela López Posada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Los clústeres empresariales se han constituido en mecanismos para impulsar la competitividad de sectores en regiones y tradicionalmente han sido analizados desde la perspectiva económica (por su aporte en variables macroeconómicas, pero para su consolidación todo conglomerado empresarial requiere la comprensión de relaciones sociales, culturales y políticas. Resulta difícil estudiar estas relaciones desde teorías organizacionales tradicionales como la estructuralista o la contingencial, y se debe recurrir a otras perspectivas como el neoinstitucionalismo sociológico, enfoque que es utilizado en la presente investigación. La investigación fundamento del artículo se hizo en un sector considerado dinámico para el eje cafetero como es el de herramientas, la cual fue abordada desde un enfoque cualitativo mediante la aplicación de dos guías de entrevista semiestructurada (se aplicaron a treinta empresas de la cadena productiva y a nueve entidades de apoyo, diario de campo y análisis de fuentes documentales. Se concluye que en el clúster predominan el individualismo, la descon- fianza y la ausencia de elementos identitarios, simultáneamente con fuertes lazos comerciales y prácticas de gestión que se han institucionalizado por procesos isomórficos.

  10. On the second houses, rental houses, vacant houses. At the castle town in the map of Hirato; 1792; Jokamachi no Kakemochi {center_dot} Kariya {center_dot} Akiya. Hirato chizu {center_dot} kansei 4 nen (1792)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojina, Kyoji; Iida, Toshihiko; Oya, Maki

    1999-03-01

    We found un-occupied dwellings; the vacant houses and the second houses in the map of Hirato castle town on 1792. There were 69 vacant houses belonging to the second houses and 19 vacant houses belonging non-dwellers at Hirato castle town on 1792. There were 937 lots and 79 lodging households at there, then public watch boxis were eleven spots, public wells were four lots and six warehouses on 1792, so the upper limits of households were 995 and the under limits of households were 916 at there. Thus the ratio of the unoccupied houses in total dwellings was between 8.84 % and 9.61 % at Hirato castle town on 1792. the second houses were composed of three elements; 1st was own-using (Kake-Mochi), 2nd was rental houses (Kariya) and 3rd was vacants (kake-mochi Akiya). The own-using houses were thirty-one, the rental houses were thirty-seven and the vacants of the second houses were sixty-nine. The total of the second houses were 137. We couldn't find the names of some owners of the second houses and vacants in Hirato on 1792, perhaps the non-dweller was died without any heir or heiress, or transfered to another town for the some reasons. Sooner or later these unoccupied dwellings belonging non-dwellers in this town would belonged to some citizens in Hirato, therefore these vacants shall enter on their second houses. So these second house shall be divided into own-using, rental houses or vacants. As mentioned above the second houses-or the third and more-were 110 lots, but the four lots owner was only one, the three lots owners were four cases and the two lots owners were ten cases, the single owners were 118 cases. The four lots owner was Kimono Fabric. The three lots owners were three Sake-Brewing and a Dyer, both were subordinative offices. In the cases of two lots owner; Oil Dealer were three and Unknown were two, Sake-Brewing, Wholesale, Dyer, Kimono Fabric and Mason was one. Except two cases of duplicated lots were all subordinative. The owners of the second houses belong to subordinative offices were 53 among total 124; on the case of 'Machi-Toshiyori Kaku' were 20 among total 23 and on the case of 'Soryo-Kaku' were 24 among total 75 and on the case of 'Otusna-Kaku' were 12 among total 71 and on the case of 'Toryo-Kaku' were 4 among total 5. While the owners of the second houses belonging 'Gonin-Gumi' were 34 among total 652; the ratio of the second owners belonging this group was 5 % and the ratio of the second owners belonging subordinative offices was about 44 %. (author)

  11. Synthesis, Isolation, and Characterization of Dimeric Compounds Containing Two Different Exocyclic Ligands on the Group 13 Center. X-Ray Crystal Structures of R(Me3SiCH2)InE(SiMe3)22 (R=Ph, E=As; R=Me, E=As, P; R=Cl, E-P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-07

    Aval liibI~jitr Codag Dist special. OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Grant NOO014-89-J-1545 R&T Code 4135008 Technical Report No. DU/DC/’IR-29 Synthesis...2484. 19 John C. Huffman , Molecular Structure Center, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, In. 27205 (USA), unpublished results. 20

  12. LiYbCl4(THF4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Richtera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, di-μ-chlorido-dichlorido-1κ2Cl-tetrakis(tetrahydrofuran-1κ2O,2κ2O-lithiumytterbium(III, [LiYbCl4(C4H8O4], was prepared by the reaction of YbCl3(THF3 with LiCl in THF (THF is tetrahydrofuran. The central motif of the structure is a Yb(μ-Cl2Li ring. The Yb atom is hexacoordinated to four Cl atoms and two THF molecules oriented in a trans fashion. The Li atom has a tetrahedral environment and is coordinated to two Cl atoms and two THF molecules. No intermolecular interactions other than van der Waals forces were observed. Two of the THF molecules are disordered over two positions.

  13. High-order Cu(II) chloro-complexes in LiCl brines: Insights from density function theory and molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Ji; Yi, Hai-Bo; Xu, Jia-Jia

    2015-09-01

    Cu(II) complexation by chloride is relevant to the transport of copper in near-surface geologic environments, yet the existence of high-order Cu(II) chloro-complexes still remains in dispute. In this study, the structure characteristics and stabilities of [CuClx]2-xaq (x = 3, 4, 5) complexes have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) methods and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. [CuCl3]- and [CuCl4]2- species can both be tracked, while the [CuCl5]3-aq complex cannot be recorded during MD simulations of trace Cu2+ in chloride-rich brines. DFT calculations indicate that contact ion pair (CIP) conformers of [CuCl3]- species are less stable than its solvent separated ion pair (SSIP) conformers, in which one Cl- stays in the second coordination sphere of the centered Cu2+. MD simulations also reveal that the SSIP conformer is apt to appear in the aqueous solution than its CIP conformer. It seems that the third Cl- is more likely in the second coordination shell of center Cu2+ in [CuCl3]-. Meanwhile, the characteristic peak around 385 nm resolved in UV-Vis spectra experiments, which was attributed to the [CuCl3]- complex, could also be resulted from some SSIP structures of the [CuCl3]- complex. In MD simulations, the complex [CuCl4]2-aq is found more stable than [CuCl3]-aq. The surrounding water molecules around [CuClx]2-xaq (x = 3, 4) enhance their stabilities in Cl- brines, especially for [CuCl4]2-aq. The hydration shell of [CuCl4]2-aq species is more intact than that of [CuCl3]2-aq, and the residence time of a water molecule in the second coordination sphere of Cu ion in the [CuCl4]2-aq complex is also obviously longer than that of [CuCl3]-aq. The [CuCl4]2-aq complex can even be recorded in the less concentrated (6.33 m) Cl- solution, while the [CuCl3]-aq complex is tracked only in the 16.32 m Cl- brine. Meanwhile, the possibilities of [CuCl3]-aq and [CuCl4]2-aq complexes found in 16.32 m Cl- solutions both decrease with increasing temperature

  14. Influence of NaCl-CaCl2 on Decomposing REPO4 with CaO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The influence of NaCl-CaCl2 on thermal decomposition of REPO4 (RE: Ce, La, Nd, Th) with CaO was studied.The heat decomposing process of REPO4 was tested with TG-DTA experiments.The results showed that the decomposition temperature of REPO4 with CaO was reduced because of adding NaCl-CaCl2 mixture (NaCl:CaCl2=1:1).The influence of the addition of NaCl-CaCl2, roasting temperature and roasting time on decomposition ratio of REPO4 with CaO was studied.The results showed that the decomposition ratio of REPO4with CaO was 79% when the addition percentage of NaCl-CaCl2 was 10%, the roasting temperature was 750℃, and the roasting time was 1 h.

  15. Thermodynamic Optimization of DyCl3 -NaCl System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶信宇; 孙益民; 张静; 谈君君

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the phase diagram of the DyCl3 -NaCl system is optimized and calculated with CALPHAD ( calculation of phase diagram ) technology. A set of thermodynamic functions of compounds Na3 DyCl6, NaDyCl4, and NaDY2 Cl7 have been optimized and calculated based on an interactive computer-assisted analysis. The optimized thermodynamic parameters, calculated phase diagram and experimental phase diagram are thermodynamically serf-consistent.

  16. Dot-ELISA for the detection of anti-Cysticercus cellulosae antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid using a new solid phase (resin-treated polyester fabric and Cysticercus longicollis antigens Teste dot-ELISA para detecção de anticorpos anti-Cysticercus cellulosae em líquido cefalorraquiano utilizando um novo suporte (tecido de poliéster-resina e antígenos de Cysticercus longicollis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaide José Vaz

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available A dot-ELISA was developed for the detection of antibodies in CSF in the immunologic diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis, using antigen extracts of the membrane and scolex of Cysticercus cellulosae (M+S-Cc and, alternately, membrane (M and vesicular fluid (VF of Cysticercus longicollis (Cl covalently bound to a new solid phase consisting of polyester fabric treated with N-methylol-acrylamide resin (dot-RT. The test was performed at room temperature, with reduced incubation times and with no need for special care in the manipulation of the support. The sensitivity rates obtained were 95.1% for antigen Cc and 97.6% for antigen Cl. Specificity was 90.6% when Cc was used, and 96.9% and 100% when M-Cl and VF-Cl were used, respectively. No significant differences in titer were observed between tests carried out with homologous and heterologous antigens. The low cost and easy execution of the dot-RT test using antigen extracts of Cysticercus longicollis indicate the test for use in the immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.Foi desenvolvido o teste dot-ELISA para detecção de anticorpos em líquido cefalorraquiano (LCR no diagnóstico imunológico da neurocisticercose humana, utilizando antígenos de membrana e escólex de Cysticercus cellulosae (M+E-Cc e, alternativamente, membrana (M e líquido vesicular (LV de Cysticercus longicollis (Cl covalentemente ligados a um novo suporte constituído de tecido de poliéster-resina de N-metilol-acrilamida (dot-TR. O teste foi realizado à temperatura ambiente, com tempos de incubação reduzidos e sem necessidade de cuidados na manipulação do suporte. A sensibilidade obtida foi de 95,1% para o antígeno Cc e 97,6% para o Cl. A especificidade foi de 90,6% quando o antígeno Cc foi usado, e 96,9% e 100% para M-Cl e LV-Cl, respectivamente. Não foi observada diferença significativa entre os antígenos homólogo e heterólogo. O baixo custo e a fácil execução do teste dot-TR empregando extratos antig

  17. Entrapment in phospholipid vesicles quenches photoactivity of quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generalov R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Roman Generalov1,2, Simona Kavaliauskiene1, Sara Westrøm1, Wei Chen3, Solveig Kristensen2, Petras Juzenas11Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 2School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 3Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USAAbstract: Quantum dots have emerged with great promise for biological applications as fluorescent markers for immunostaining, labels for intracellular trafficking, and photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy. However, upon entry into a cell, quantum dots are trapped and their fluorescence is quenched in endocytic vesicles such as endosomes and lysosomes. In this study, the photophysical properties of quantum dots were investigated in liposomes as an in vitro vesicle model. Entrapment of quantum dots in liposomes decreases their fluorescence lifetime and intensity. Generation of free radicals by liposomal quantum dots is inhibited compared to that of free quantum dots. Nevertheless, quantum dot fluorescence lifetime and intensity increases due to photolysis of liposomes during irradiation. In addition, protein adsorption on the quantum dot surface and the acidic environment of vesicles also lead to quenching of quantum dot fluorescence, which reappears during irradiation. In conclusion, the in vitro model of phospholipid vesicles has demonstrated that those quantum dots that are fated to be entrapped in endocytic vesicles lose their fluorescence and ability to act as photosensitizers.Keywords: fluorescence lifetime, free radicals, liposomes, lipodots, reactive oxygen species

  18. Entrapment in phospholipid vesicles quenches photoactivity of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, Roman; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Westrøm, Sara; Chen, Wei; Kristensen, Solveig; Juzenas, Petras

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots have emerged with great promise for biological applications as fluorescent markers for immunostaining, labels for intracellular trafficking, and photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy. However, upon entry into a cell, quantum dots are trapped and their fluorescence is quenched in endocytic vesicles such as endosomes and lysosomes. In this study, the photophysical properties of quantum dots were investigated in liposomes as an in vitro vesicle model. Entrapment of quantum dots in liposomes decreases their fluorescence lifetime and intensity. Generation of free radicals by liposomal quantum dots is inhibited compared to that of free quantum dots. Nevertheless, quantum dot fluorescence lifetime and intensity increases due to photolysis of liposomes during irradiation. In addition, protein adsorption on the quantum dot surface and the acidic environment of vesicles also lead to quenching of quantum dot fluorescence, which reappears during irradiation. In conclusion, the in vitro model of phospholipid vesicles has demonstrated that those quantum dots that are fated to be entrapped in endocytic vesicles lose their fluorescence and ability to act as photosensitizers.

  19. Studies of silicon quantum dots prepared at different substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Agel, Faisal A.; Suleiman, Jamal; Khan, Shamshad A.

    2017-03-01

    In this research work, we have synthesized silicon quantum dots at different substrate temperatures 193, 153 and 123 K at a fixed working pressure 5 Torr. of Argon gas. The structural studies of these silicon quantum dots have been undertaken using X-ray diffraction, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The optical and electrical properties have been studied using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy and I-V measurement system. X-ray diffraction pattern of Si quantum dots prepared at different temperatures show the amorphous nature except for the quantum dots synthesized at 193 K which shows polycrystalline nature. FESEM images of samples suggest that the size of quantum dots varies from 2 to 8 nm. On the basis of UV-visible spectroscopy measurements, a direct band gap has been observed for Si quantum dots. FTIR spectra suggest that as-grown Si quantum dots are partially oxidized which is due exposure of as-prepared samples to air after taking out from the chamber. PL spectra of the synthesized silicon quantum dots show an intense peak at 444 nm, which may be attributed to the formation of Si quantum dots. Temperature dependence of dc conductivity suggests that the dc conductivity enhances exponentially by raising the temperature. On the basis above properties i.e. direct band gap, high absorption coefficient and high conductivity, these silicon quantum dots will be useful for the fabrication of solar cells.

  20. Red-shift of the photoluminescent emission peaks of CdTe quantum dots due to the synergistic interaction with carbon quantum dot mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, E.; Zazueta, A.; López-Delgado, R.; Saucedo, E.; Ruelas, R.; Ayón, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report the relatively large red-shift effect observed in down-shifting carbon quantum dots (CQDs) that is anticipated to have a positive impact on the power conversion efficiency of solar cells. Specifically, with an excitation wavelength of 390 nm, CQDs of different sizes, exhibited down-shifted emission peaks centered around 425 nm. However, a solution comprised of a mixture of CQDs of different sizes, was observed to have an emission peak red-shifted to 515 nm. The effect could arise when larger carbon quantum dots capture the photons emitted by their smaller counterparts followed by the subsequent re-emission at longer wavelengths. Furthermore, the red-shift effect was also observed in CdTe QDs when added to a solution with the aforementioned mixture of Carbon QDs. Thus, whereas a solution solely comprised of a collection of CdTe QDs of different sizes, exhibited a down-shifted photoluminescence centered around 555 nm, the peak was observed to be further red-shifted to 580 nm when combined with the solution of CQDs of different sizes. The quantum dot characterization included crystal structure analysis as well as photon absorption and photoluminescence wavelengths. Subsequently, the synthesized QDs were dispersed in a polymeric layer of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and incorporated on functional and previously characterized solar cells, to quantify their influence in the electrical performance of the photovoltaic structures. We discuss the synthesis and characterization of the produced Carbon and CdTe QDs, as well as the observed improvement in the power conversion efficiency of the fabricated photovoltaic devices.

  1. Tuberculose associada à AIDS: características demográficas, clínicas e laboratoriais de pacientes atendidos em um serviço de referência do sul do Brasil Tuberculosis associated to AIDS: demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients cared for at a reference center in the south of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Marta Santos Boffo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A sinergia entre a tuberculose e o vírus da imunodeficiência humana é responsável pelo aumento da morbi-mortalidade dos pacientes com AIDS. OBJETIVO: Delinear o perfil de pacientes com tuberculose e AIDS na cidade de Rio Grande (RS relacionando dados demográficos, clínicos e laboratoriais. MÉTODO: A amostra foi constituída por todos os casos de tuberculose confirmados pelo isolamento de Mycobacterium tuberculosis ocorridos no Serviço de AIDS do Hospital Universitário/FURG entre setembro de 1997 e dezembro de 2000, em 31 pacientes reportados como casos definidos de AIDS. Foram examinados 33 materiais clínicos pulmonares e extrapulmonares através da cultura pelo método de Ogawa-Kudoh e da baciloscopia pelo Kinyoun. A identificação de M. tuberculosis foi feita pelos métodos fenotípicos usuais. Para determinação da resistência das cepas isoladas foi empregado o método das proporções. RESULTADOS: A média de idade foi de 33,8 ± 9,9 anos, com uma relação homem/mulher de 2,87:1. Eram brancos 80,7% dos pacientes. Todos os pacientes apresentavam manifestações clínicas gerais e/ou específicas de tuberculose no momento da suspeita diagnóstica. Em 20 deles foram constatados fatores de risco: uso de droga endovenosa, alcoolismo, desnutrição, encarceramento. A doença pulmonar ocorreu em 19 casos, a extrapulmonar em 10 e a associada em 2 deles. Entre aqueles com a forma extrapulmonar, predominou o comprometimento ganglionar. As 33 cepas isoladas foram identificadas como M. tuberculosis, e 28 mostraram sensibilidade à isoniazida e à rifampicina. CONCLUSÃO: A tuberculose nos pacientes com AIDS apresentou-se com manifestações clínicas variáveis, comprometendo homens e mulheres em condições sociais desfavoráveis, em plena fase produtiva de suas vidas.BACKGROUND: Synergism between tuberculosis and HIV is responsible for the increased morbidity-mortality rate in AIDS patients. OBJECTIVE: To delineate the

  2. Tendencias de cesáreas en relación con factores no clínicos en un centro de educación para el parto en la Ciudad de México Trends in caesarean sections associated with non-clinical factors in a Birthing Educational Center in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Campero

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Describir las tendencias de la operación cesárea (OC asociadas con factores no clínicos en mujeres que asistieron al Centro de Educación para el Parto (CEPAPAR en la Ciudad de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se analizó información de 992 nacimientos de 847 mujeres, ocurridos entre 1988 y 2000. Se utilizó el método de regresión lineal para identificar el comportamiento de factores no clínicos con respecto a la tendencia de OC. RESULTADOS: La incidencia global de OC fue de 32.8%, con 8% de incremento promedio anual. El porcentaje de OC se mantuvo por debajo de 30% hasta 1994; durante los siguientes años se incrementó hasta 40%. Al analizar la tendencia de OC en relación con factores no clínicos se encontró que, a lo largo del periodo 1988-2000, el aumento en la incidencia de la OC fue mayor en nacimientos sin instructora presente, entre mujeres primigestas y en hospitales grandes (con más de 50 camas. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados muestran que el aumento en la incidencia de OC está asociado a factores no clínicos, como el tamaño del hospital y la presencia de una instructora. Un modelo de apoyo a mujeres, que cuente con asesoría, información y presencia de una instructora durante el trabajo de parto, puede contribuir a disminuir el riesgo de tener una OC innecesaria en poblaciones como la estudiada.OBJECTIVES: To describe the trends in caesarian sections (CS associated with non-clinical factors in women who attended a birthing educational facility, also known as 'Centro de Educación,' (CEPAPAR in Mexico City. METHODS: Data from 992 births of 847 women that occurred from 1988-2000 were analyzed using linear regression to identify the association between non-clinical factors and time-trends in CS. RESULTS: The overall incidence of CS was 32.8%, with an 8% average annual increase. Until 1994 the percentage of CS remained relatively steady at 30%, increasing to 40% in subsequent years. In analyzing trends in CS and their

  3. Metal halide hydrates as lewis acid catalysts for the conjugated friedel-crafts reactions of indoles and activated olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalm, Cristiane S.; Ceschi, Marco Antonio; Russowsky, Dennis, E-mail: dennis@iq.ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IQ/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    Metal halide hydrates such as SnCl{sub 2{center_dot}}2H{sub 2}O, MnCl{sub 2{center_dot}}4H{sub 2}O, SrCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O, CrCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O, CoCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O e CeCl{sub 3{center_dot}}7H{sub 2}O were investigated as mild Lewis acids catalysts for the conjugate Friedel-Crafts reaction between indoles and activated olefins. The reactions were carried out with aliphatic unsaturated ketones over a period of days at room temperature, while chalcones reacted only under reflux conditions. The reactions with nitrostyrene s were either performed in solvent or under solventless conditions. In all cases reasonable to good yields were obtained. (author)

  4. The Galactic Center Weather Forecast

    CERN Document Server

    Moscibrodzka, Monika; Gammie, Charles F; Dolence, Joshua C

    2012-01-01

    In accretion-based models for Sgr A* the X-ray, infrared, and millimeter emission arise in a hot, geometrically thick accretion flow close to the black hole. The spectrum and size of the source depend on the black hole mass accretion rate $\\dot{M}$. Since Gillessen et al. have recently discovered a cloud moving toward Sgr A* that will arrive in summer 2013, $\\dot{M}$ may increase from its present value $\\dot{M}_0$. We therefore reconsider the "best-bet" accretion model of Moscibrodzka et al., which is based on a general relativistic MHD flow model and fully relativistic radiative transfer, for a range of $\\dot{M}$. We find that for modest increases in $\\dot{M}$ the characteristic ring of emission due to the photon orbit becomes brighter, more extended, and easier to detect by the planned Event Horizon Telescope submm VLBI experiment. If $\\dot{M} \\gtrsim 8 \\dot{M}_0$ this "silhouette of the black hole will be hidden beneath the synchrotron photosphere at 230 GHz, and for $\\dot{M} \\gtrsim 16 \\dot{M}_0$ the silh...

  5. Doença de Chagas aguda: vias de transmissão, aspectos clínicos e resposta à terapêutica específica em casos diagnosticados em um centro urbano Acute Chagas' disease: transmission mechanisms, clinical features and specific therapeutic response in cases diagnosed in an urban center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Shikanai-Yasuda

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o quadro clínico de 27 pacientes com doença de Chagas aguda, acompanhados no ambulatório da Clínica de Doenças Infecciosas e Parasitárias do Hospital das Clínicas da FM-USP no período de 1974 a 1987. As vias de transmissão envolvidas foram: vetorial em 7 casos, transfusional em 9, transplante de rim e/ou transfusional em 4, acidental em 1, via oral em 3, provável aleitamento materno em 1, congênita ou aleitamento materno em 1, congênita ou transfusional em 1. Pacientes com infecção por via vetorial eram procedentes da Bahia e Minas Gerais, tendo 6 apresentado a doença de 1974 a 1980 e um em 1987. Já os pacientes infectados por via transfusional adquiriram a doença na Grande São Paulo, 7 deles após 1983. O quadro clínico foi oligossintomático ou assintomático em 4 pacientes, sendo 3 deles imunodeprimidos por doença de base ou por medicamentos. Em outros 2 pacientes imunodeprimidos ocorreu miocardite grave com insuficiência cardíaca congestiva. O quadro clínico foi também mais grave em 5 de 6 crianças menores de dois anos de idade, qualquer que fosse a via de transmissão. A avaliação de 16 pacientes tratados na fase aguda com benzonidazol (4-10mg/kg/dia por 30 a 60 dias mostrou falha terapêutica em 4/16 (25,0%, possível sucesso terapêutico em 9/16 (56,2%, sendo inconclusivos os resultados em 3/16 (18,8%. A reação de LMC foi concordante com o xenodiagóstico em 18 e 22 casos (agudos e na fase crônica inicial, e se negativou mais precocemente que as RSC. No seguimento pós-terapêutico, observou-se aparecimento de doença linfoproliferativa em um paciente com anemia aplástica e que recebia corticosteróide 6 anos após o emprego de benzonidazol.The authors report clinical features and therapeutic response of 24 outpatients with acute Chagas' disease, and 3 in the initial chronic phase, referred to the Clinic for Infectious and Parasitic Diseases of the FMUSP "Clínicas" Hospital between 1974 and 1987

  6. Lanthanide modification of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Johannes Rytter; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Burks, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Lanthanide-modified CdSe quantum dots (CdSe(Ln) QDs) have been prepared by heating a solution of Cd(oleate)(2), SeO2, and Ln(bipy)(S2CNEt2)(3) (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine) to 180-190 degrees C for 10-15 min. The elemental compositions of the resulting CdSe(Ln) cores and CdSe(Ln)/ZnS core/shell QDs show...... sensitized lanthanide-centered PL upon higher energy excitation of the nanocrystal host but not upon excitation at the lowest energy QD absorption band. Growth of the ZnS shell led to the depletion of about 60% of the lanthanide ions present together with depletion of nearly all of the lanthanide-centered PL....... On these bases, we conclude that the lanthanide-centered PL from the CdSe(Ln) cores originates with Ln(3+)-related trap states associated with the QD surface....

  7. NaCl potentiates human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nehemiah; Pilling, Darrell; Gomer, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    Excessive NaCl intake is associated with a variety of fibrosing diseases such as renal and cardiac fibrosis. This association has been attributed to increased blood pressure as the result of high NaCl intake. However, studies in patients with high NaCl intake and fibrosis reveal a connection between NaCl intake and fibrosis that is independent of blood pressure. We find that increasing the extracellular concentration of NaCl to levels that may occur in human blood after high-salt intake can potentiate, in serum-free culture conditions, the differentiation of freshly-isolated human monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. NaCl affects the monocytes directly during their adhesion. Potassium chloride and sodium nitrate also potentiate fibrocyte differentiation. The plasma protein Serum Amyloid P (SAP) inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. High levels of extracellular NaCl change the SAP Hill coefficient from 1.7 to 0.8, and cause a four-fold increase in the concentration of SAP needed to inhibit fibrocyte differentiation by 95%. Together, our data suggest that NaCl potentiates fibrocyte differentiation. NaCl-increased fibrocyte differentiation may thus contribute to NaCl-increased renal and cardiac fibrosis.

  8. NaCl potentiates human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehemiah Cox

    Full Text Available Excessive NaCl intake is associated with a variety of fibrosing diseases such as renal and cardiac fibrosis. This association has been attributed to increased blood pressure as the result of high NaCl intake. However, studies in patients with high NaCl intake and fibrosis reveal a connection between NaCl intake and fibrosis that is independent of blood pressure. We find that increasing the extracellular concentration of NaCl to levels that may occur in human blood after high-salt intake can potentiate, in serum-free culture conditions, the differentiation of freshly-isolated human monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. NaCl affects the monocytes directly during their adhesion. Potassium chloride and sodium nitrate also potentiate fibrocyte differentiation. The plasma protein Serum Amyloid P (SAP inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. High levels of extracellular NaCl change the SAP Hill coefficient from 1.7 to 0.8, and cause a four-fold increase in the concentration of SAP needed to inhibit fibrocyte differentiation by 95%. Together, our data suggest that NaCl potentiates fibrocyte differentiation. NaCl-increased fibrocyte differentiation may thus contribute to NaCl-increased renal and cardiac fibrosis.

  9. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr \\'1 m \\'2) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH 2 groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.© 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  10. Nanobeam photonic crystal cavity quantum dot laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yiyang; Shambat, Gary; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James S; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The lasing behavior of one dimensional GaAs nanobeam cavities with embedded InAs quantum dots is studied at room temperature. Lasing is observed throughout the quantum dot PL spectrum, and the wavelength dependence of the threshold is calculated. We study the cavity lasers under both 780 nm and 980 nm pump, finding thresholds as low as 0.3 uW and 19 uW for the two pump wavelengths, respectively. Finally, the nanobeam cavity laser wavelengths are tuned by up to 7 nm by employing a fiber taper in near proximity to the cavities. The fiber taper is used both to efficiently pump the cavity and collect the cavity emission.

  11. Efficient Luminescence from Perovskite Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Younghoon

    2015-11-18

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Nanocrystals of CsPbX3 perovskites are promising materials for light-emitting optoelectronics because of their colloidal stability, optically tunable bandgap, bright photoluminescence, and excellent photoluminescence quantum yield. Despite their promise, nanocrystal-only films of CsPbX3 perovskites have not yet been fabricated; instead, highly insulating polymers have been relied upon to compensate for nanocrystals\\' unstable surfaces. We develop solution chemistry that enables single-step casting of perovskite nanocrystal films and overcomes problems in both perovskite quantum dot purification and film fabrication. Centrifugally cast films retain bright photoluminescence and achieve dense and homogeneous morphologies. The new materials offer a platform for optoelectronic applications of perovskite quantum dot solids.

  12. Mesoscopic Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics with Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Childress, L I; Lukin, M D

    2003-01-01

    We describe an electrodynamic mechanism for coherent, quantum mechanical coupling between spacially separated quantum dots on a microchip. The technique is based on capacitive interactions between the electron charge and a superconducting transmission line resonator, and is closely related to atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics. We investigate several potential applications of this technique which have varying degrees of complexity. In particular, we demonstrate that this mechanism allows design and investigation of an on-chip double-dot microscopic maser. Moreover, the interaction may be extended to couple spatially separated electron spin states while only virtually populating fast-decaying superpositions of charge states. This represents an effective, controllable long-range interaction, which may facilitate implementation of quantum information processing with electron spin qubits and potentially allow coupling to other quantum systems such as atomic or superconducting qubits.

  13. Energy level statistics of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsau, Chien-Yu; Nghiem, Diu; Joynt, Robert; Woods Halley, J

    2007-05-08

    We investigate the charging energy level statistics of disordered interacting electrons in quantum dots by numerical calculations using the Hartree approximation. The aim is to obtain a global picture of the statistics as a function of disorder and interaction strengths. We find Poisson statistics at very strong disorder, Wigner-Dyson statistics for weak disorder and interactions, and a Gaussian intermediate regime. These regimes are as expected from previous studies and fundamental considerations, but we also find interesting and rather broad crossover regimes. In particular, intermediate between the Gaussian and Poisson regimes we find a two-sided exponential distribution for the energy level spacings. In comparing with experiment, we find that this distribution may be realized in some quantum dots.

  14. Design of tunneling injection quantum dot lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Guo-zhi; YAO Jiang-hong; SHU Yong-chun; WANG Zhan-guo

    2007-01-01

    To implement high quality tunneling injection quantum dot lasers,effects of primary factors on performance of the tunneling injection quantum dot lasers were investigated. The considered factors were tunneling probability,tunneling time and carriers thermal escape time from the quantum well. The calculation results show that with increasing of the ground-state energy level in quantum well,the tunneling probability increases and the tunneling time decreases,while the thermal escape time decreases because the ground-state energy levelis shallower. Longitudinal optical phonon-assisted tunneling can be an effective method to solve the problem that both the tunneling time and the thermal escape time decrease simultaneously with the ground-state energy level increasing in quantum well.

  15. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Pandey; Manoj K Harbola; V Ranjan; Vijay A Singh

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as ‘artificial atoms’ by some, they are much larger (1 100 nm) than real atoms. One can study a variety of manyelectron effects in them, which are otherwise difficult to observe in a real atom. We have treated these effects within the local density approximation (LDA) and the Harbola–Sahni (HS) scheme. HS is free of the selfinteraction error of the LDA. Our calculations have been performed in a three-dimensional quantum dot. We have carried out a study of the size and shape dependence of the level spacing. Scaling laws for the Hubbard ‘’ are established.

  16. Energy level statistics of quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsau, C-Y [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nghiem, Diu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Joynt, Robert [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Halley, J Woods [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2007-05-08

    We investigate the charging energy level statistics of disordered interacting electrons in quantum dots by numerical calculations using the Hartree approximation. The aim is to obtain a global picture of the statistics as a function of disorder and interaction strengths. We find Poisson statistics at very strong disorder, Wigner-Dyson statistics for weak disorder and interactions, and a Gaussian intermediate regime. These regimes are as expected from previous studies and fundamental considerations, but we also find interesting and rather broad crossover regimes. In particular, intermediate between the Gaussian and Poisson regimes we find a two-sided exponential distribution for the energy level spacings. In comparing with experiment, we find that this distribution may be realized in some quantum dots.

  17. Energy level statistics of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsau, Chien-Yu; Nghiem, Diu; Joynt, Robert; Halley, J. Woods

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the charging energy level statistics of disordered interacting electrons in quantum dots by numerical calculations using the Hartree approximation. The aim is to obtain a global picture of the statistics as a function of disorder and interaction strengths. We find Poisson statistics at very strong disorder, Wigner-Dyson statistics for weak disorder and interactions, and a Gaussian intermediate regime. These regimes are as expected from previous studies and fundamental considerations, but we also find interesting and rather broad crossover regimes. In particular, intermediate between the Gaussian and Poisson regimes we find a two-sided exponential distribution for the energy level spacings. In comparing with experiment, we find that this distribution may be realized in some quantum dots.

  18. Light emission from Si quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe M. Fauchet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Si quantum dots (QDs as small as ∼2 nm in diameter have been synthesized by a variety of techniques. Because of quantum confinement and the elimination of bulk or surface defects, these dots can emit light from the near infrared throughout the visible with quantum efficiencies in excess of 10%. The luminescence wavelength range has been extended to longer wavelengths by the addition of light-emitting rare earths such as erbium (Er. Light-emitting devices (LEDs have been fabricated and their performances are starting to approach those of direct band gap semiconductor or organic LEDs. A search for a Si QD-based laser is even under way. The state-of-the-art in the materials science, physics, and device development of luminescent Si QDs is reviewed and areas of future research are pointed out.

  19. Peptide-Decorated Tunable-Fluorescence Graphene Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Bedanga; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Lin, Hao-Yu Greg; Liang, Wentao; Champion, Paul; Wanunu, Meni

    2017-03-22

    We report here the synthesis of graphene quantum dots with tunable size, surface chemistry, and fluorescence properties. In the size regime 15-35 nm, these quantum dots maintain strong visible light fluorescence (mean quantum yield of 0.64) and a high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section (6500 Göppert-Mayer units). Furthermore, through noncovalent tailoring of the chemistry of these quantum dots, we obtain water-stable quantum dots. For example, quantum dots with lysine groups bind strongly to DNA in solution and inhibit polymerase-based DNA strand synthesis. Finally, by virtue of their mesoscopic size, the quantum dots exhibit good cell permeability into living epithelial cells, but they do not enter the cell nucleus.

  20. Single quantum dots fundamentals, applications, and new concepts

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapid growing field of semiconductor quantum dots by contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the field. Special focus is given to the optical and electronic properties of single quantum dots due to their potential applications in devices operating with single electrons and/or single photons. This includes quantum dots in electric and magnetic fields, cavity-quantum electrodynamics, nonclassical light generation, and coherent optical control of excitons. Single Quantum Dots also addresses various growth techniques as well as potential device applications such as quantum dot lasers, and new concepts like a single-photon source, and a single quantum dot laser.

  1. Principles of conjugating quantum dots to proteins via carbodiimide chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fayi; Chan, Warren C W

    2011-12-09

    The covalent coupling of nanomaterials to bio-recognition molecules is a critical intermediate step in using nanomaterials for biology and medicine. Here we investigate the carbodiimide-mediated conjugation of fluorescent quantum dots to different proteins (e.g., immunoglobulin G, bovine serum albumin, and horseradish peroxidase). To enable these studies, we developed a simple method to isolate quantum dot bioconjugates from unconjugated quantum dots. The results show that the reactant concentrations and protein type will impact the overall number of proteins conjugated onto the surfaces of the quantum dots, homogeneity of the protein-quantum dot conjugate population, quantum efficiency, binding avidity, and enzymatic kinetics. We propose general principles that should be followed for the successful coupling of proteins to quantum dots.

  2. Mode Competition in Dual-Mode Quantum Dots Semiconductor Microlaser

    CERN Document Server

    Chusseau, Laurent; Viktorovitch, P; Letartre, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling of quantum dots lasers with the aim of assessing the conditions for stable cw dual-mode operation when the mode separation lies in the THz range. Several possible models suited for InAs quantum dots in InP barriers are analytically evaluated, in particular quantum dots electrically coupled through a direct exchange of excitation by the wetting layer or quantum dots optically coupled through the homogeneous broadening of their optical gain. A stable dual-mode regime is shown possible in all cases when quantum dots are used as active layer whereas a gain medium of quantum well or bulk type inevitably leads to bistable behavior. The choice of a quantum dots gain medium perfectly matched the production of dual-mode lasers devoted to THz generation by photomixing.

  3. Quantum Dots and Their Multimodal Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Holloway

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting quantum dots, whose particle sizes are in the nanometer range, have very unusual properties. The quantum dots have band gaps that depend in a complicated fashion upon a number of factors, described in the article. Processing-structure-properties-performance relationships are reviewed for compound semiconducting quantum dots. Various methods for synthesizing these quantum dots are discussed, as well as their resulting properties. Quantum states and confinement of their excitons may shift their optical absorption and emission energies. Such effects are important for tuning their luminescence stimulated by photons (photoluminescence or electric field (electroluminescence. In this article, decoupling of quantum effects on excitation and emission are described, along with the use of quantum dots as sensitizers in phosphors. In addition, we reviewed the multimodal applications of quantum dots, including in electroluminescence device, solar cell and biological imaging.

  4. Templated self-assembly of SiGe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dais, Christian

    2009-08-19

    This PhD thesis reports on the fabrication and characterization of exact aligned SiGe quantum dot structures. In general, SiGe quantum dots which nucleate via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode exhibit broad size dispersion and nucleate randomly on the surface. However, to tap the full potential of SiGe quantum dots it is necessary to control the positioning and size of the dots on a nanometer length, e.g. for electronically addressing of individual dots. This can be realized by so-called templated self-assembly, which combines top-down lithography with bottom-up selfassembly. In this process the lithographically defined pits serve as pre-defined nucleation points for the epitaxially grown quantum dots. In this thesis, extreme ultraviolet interference lithography at a wavelength of e=13.4 nm is employed for prepatterning of the Si substrates. This technique allows the precise and fast fabrication of high-resolution templates with a high degree of reproducibility. The subsequent epitaxial deposition is either performed by molecular beam epitaxy or low-pressure chemical vapour deposition. It is shown that the dot nucleation on pre-patterned substrates depends strongly on the lithography parameters, e.g. size and periodicity of the pits, as well as on the epitaxy parameters, e.g. growth temperature or material coverage. The interrelations are carefully analyzed by means of scanning force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Provided that correct template and overgrowth parameters are chosen, perfectly aligned and uniform SiGe quantum dot arrays of different period, size as well as symmetry are created. In particular, the quantum dot arrays with the so far smallest period (35 nm) and smallest size dispersion are fabricated in this thesis. Furthermore, the strain fields of the underlying quantum dots allow the fabrication of vertically aligned quantum dot stacks. Combining lateral and vertical dot alignment results in three

  5. Ac response of a coupled double quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jie; W.Z. Shangguan; Zhan Shi-Chang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phase-breaking process on the ac response of a coupled double quantum dot is studied in this paper based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism. A general expression is derived for the ac current in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. The ac conductance is numerically computed and the results are compared with those in [Anatram M P and Datts S 1995 Phys. Rev. B 51 7632]. Our results reveal that the inter-dot electron tunnelling interplays with that between dots and electron reservoirs, and contributes prominently to the ac current when inter-dot tunnelling coupling is much larger than the tunnelling coupling between dots and electron reservoirs. In addition, the phase-breaking process is found to have a significant effect on the ac transport through the coupled double dot.

  6. Electric and Magnetic Interaction between Quantum Dots and Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tighineanu, Petru

    a future challenge for the droplet-epitaxy technique. A multipolar theory of spontaneous emission from quantum dots is developed to explain the recent observation that In(Ga)As quantum dots break the dipole theory. The analysis yields a large mesoscopic moment, which contains magnetic-dipole and electric......-matter interaction of both electric and magnetic character. Our study demonstrates that In(Ga)As quantum dots lack parity symmetry and, as consequence, can be employed for locally probing the parity symmetry of complex photonic nanostructures. This opens the prospect for interfacing quantum dots with optical......The present thesis reports research on the optical properties of quantum dots by developing new theories and conducting optical measurements. We demonstrate experimentally singlephoton superradiance in interface-uctuation quantum dots by recording the temporal decay dynamics in conjunction...

  7. DLTS measurements on GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegner, Annika; Nowozin, Tobias; Marent, Andreas; Bimberg, Dieter [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Berlin (Germany); Tseng, Chi-Che [Institute of Photonics Technologies, NTHU (China); Lin, Shih-Yen [Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, NTOU (China)

    2010-07-01

    Memory devices based on hole storage in self-organized quantum dots offer significant advantages with respect to storage time and scalability. Recently, we demonstrated a first prototype based on InAs/GaAs quantum dots at low temperatures. To enable feasible storage times at room temperature the localisation energy of the quantum dots has to be increased by using other material systems. A first step in this direction is the use of GaSb quantum dots within a GaAs matrix. We have characterized self-organized GaSb/GaAs quantum dots embedded into a n{sup +}p-diode structure. DLTS measurements on hole emission were conducted and yield a strong peak from which a mean emission energy of about 400 meV can be extracted. The reference sample without the quantum dots (containing only the wetting layer) shows no such peak.

  8. Quantum dot spectroscopy using a single phosphorus donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büch, Holger; Fuechsle, Martin; Baker, William; House, Matthew G.; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2015-12-01

    Using a deterministic single P donor placed with atomic precision accuracy next to a nanoscale silicon quantum dot, we present a way to analyze the energy spectrum of small quantum dots in silicon by tunnel-coupled transport measurements. The energy-level structure of the quantum dot is observed as resonance features within the transport bias triangles when the donor chemical potential is aligned with states within the quantum dot as confirmed by a numeric rate equation solver SIMON. This technique allows us to independently extract the quantum dot level structure irrespective of the density of states in the leads. Such a method is useful for the investigation of silicon quantum dots in the few-electron regime where the level structure is governed by an intricate interplay between the spin- and the valley-orbit degrees of freedom.

  9. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the state density and optical transitions in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindez-Ramirez, G; Perez-Merchancano, S T [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Cauca, calle 5 4-70, Popayan (Colombia); Paredes Gutierrez, H [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Gonzalez, J D, E-mail: jdavid0831@gmail.co [Grupo de Investigacion en teorIa de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Magdalena, A.A. 731, Santa Marta (Colombia)

    2010-09-01

    Using the effective mass approximation and variational method we have computed the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the absorption and photoluminescence spectra in spherical quantum dot GaAs-(Ga, Al) As, considering a finite confinement potential of this particular work we show the optical transitions in quantum of various sizes in the presence of hydrogenic impurities and hydrostatic pressure effects. Our first result describes the spectrum of optical absorption of 500 A QD for different values of hydrostatic pressure P = 0, 20 and 40 Kbar. The absorption peaks are sensitive to the displacement of the impurity center to the edge of the quantum dot and even more when the hydrostatic pressure changes in both cases showing that to the extent that these two effects are stronger quantum dots respond more efficiently. Also this result can be seen in the study of the photoluminescence spectrum as in the case of acceptor impurities consider them more efficiently capture carriers or electrons that pass from the conduction band to the valence band. Density states with randomly distributed impurity show that the additional peaks in the curves of the density of impurity states appear due to the presence of the additional hydrostatic pressure effects.

  10. Heterogeneous computing with OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous Computing with OpenCL teaches OpenCL and parallel programming for complex systems that may include a variety of device architectures: multi-core CPUs, GPUs, and fully-integrated Accelerated Processing Units (APUs) such as AMD Fusion technology. Designed to work on multiple platforms and with wide industry support, OpenCL will help you more effectively program for a heterogeneous future. Written by leaders in the parallel computing and OpenCL communities, this book will give you hands-on OpenCL experience to address a range of fundamental parallel algorithms. The authors explore memory spaces, optimization techniques, graphics interoperability, extensions, and debugging and profiling. Intended to support a parallel programming course, Heterogeneous Computing with OpenCL includes detailed examples throughout, plus additional online exercises and other supporting materials.

  11. THE GALACTIC CENTER WEATHER FORECAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscibrodzka, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, 4505 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Shiokawa, H.; Gammie, C. F. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Dolence, J. C., E-mail: monikam@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    In accretion-based models for Sgr A*, the X-ray, infrared, and millimeter emission arise in a hot, geometrically thick accretion flow close to the black hole. The spectrum and size of the source depend on the black hole mass accretion rate M-dot . Since Gillessen et al. have recently discovered a cloud moving toward Sgr A* that will arrive in summer 2013, M-dot may increase from its present value M-dot{sub 0}. We therefore reconsider the 'best-bet' accretion model of Moscibrodzka et al., which is based on a general relativistic MHD flow model and fully relativistic radiative transfer, for a range of M-dot . We find that for modest increases in M-dot the characteristic ring of emission due to the photon orbit becomes brighter, more extended, and easier to detect by the planned Event Horizon Telescope submillimeter Very Long Baseline Interferometry experiment. If M-dot {approx}>8 M-dot{sub 0}, this 'silhouette' of the black hole will be hidden beneath the synchrotron photosphere at 230 GHz, and for M-dot {approx}>16 M-dot{sub 0} the silhouette is hidden at 345 GHz. We also find that for M-dot > 2 M-dot{sub 0} the near-horizon accretion flow becomes a persistent X-ray and mid-infrared source, and in the near-infrared Sgr A* will acquire a persistent component that is brighter than currently observed flares.

  12. The Silicon:Colloidal Quantum Dot Heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Masala, Silvia

    2015-10-13

    A heterojunction between crystalline silicon and colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is realized. A special interface modification is developed to overcome an inherent energetic band mismatch between the two semiconductors, and realize the efficient collection of infrared photocarriers generated in the CQD film. This junction is used to produce a sensitive near infrared photodetector. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Mehra, Neelesh K; Jain, Keerti; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have captured the fascination and attention of scientists due to their simultaneous targeting and imaging potential in drug delivery, in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In the present study, we have exhaustively reviewed various aspects of QDs, highlighting their pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, pharmacology, interactions, and toxicological manifestations. The eventual use of QDs is to dramatically improve clinical diagnostic tests for early detection of cancer. In recent years, QDs were introduced to cell biology as an alternative fluorescent probe.

  15. Depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhouse, D.A.R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY, 10598 (United States); Debnath, Ratan; Kramer, Illan J.; Zhitomirsky, David; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Quantum Solar Power Corporation, 1055 W. Hastings, Ste. 300, Vancouver, BC, V6E 2E9 (Canada); Etgar, Lioz; Graetzel, Michael [Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Barrier Engineered Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Advisor, Space Based Advanced Sensing and Protection //SIGNED// JOHN BEAUCHEMIN Chief Engineer, Spacecraft Technology Division Space Vehicles...QD based device can be further improved by planting the dots into a CE DWELL structure to reduce the operating bias while maintaining good...noteworthy low operating bias voltage indicates its feasibility for fabrication of FPA using commercially available silicon read-out circuits. Figure 3. (a

  17. Quantum-dot excitons in nanostructured environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between light and quantum-dot (QD) excitons is strongly influenced by the environment in which the QD is placed. We have investigated the interaction by measuring the time-resolved spontaneous-emission rate of QD excitons in different nanostructured environments. Thereby, we have...... is demonstrated and the influence of disorder is discussed. The findings have a strong bearing on future nanophotonic devices....

  18. Quantum-dot excitons in nanostructured environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between light and quantum-dot (QD) excitons is strongly influenced by the environment in which the QD is placed. We have investigated the interaction by measuring the time-resolved spontaneous-emission rate of QD excitons in different nanostructured environments. Thereby, we have...... is demonstrated and the influence of disorder is discussed. The findings have a strong bearing on future nanophotonic devices....

  19. The pinning effect in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monisha, P. J., E-mail: pjmonisha@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, D V R College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad-502285 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The pinning effect is studied in a Gaussian quantum dot using the improved Wigner-Brillouin perturbation theory (IWBPT) in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. The electron ground state plus one phonon state is degenerate with the electron in the first excited state. The electron-phonon interaction lifts the degeneracy and the first excited states get pinned to the ground state plus one phonon state as we increase the confinement frequency.

  20. Clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of acute primary headaches at an emergency center: why are we still neglecting the evidence? Características clínicas, diagnóstico e tratamento das cefaléias primárias agudas em um serviço de emergência: por que ainda negligenciamos as evidências?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facundo Burgos Ruiz Jr

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the clinical features, approach and treatment of patients with acute primary headaches seen at the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University of Uberlândia (HC-UFU throughout 2005, the medical charts of 109 patients were evaluated through a standardized questionnaire as to age, gender, main diagnosis, characteristics of the headache attacks, diagnostic tests and treatment. Probable migraine was the most common type of primary headache (47.7%, followed by probable tension-type headache (37.6%, unspecified headache (11.9%, and headache not elsewhere classified (2.8%. As to characteristics of the crisis, the location of the pain was described in 86.2% of the patients. The most commonly used drugs for treatment of acute headache attacks were dipyrone (74.5%, tenoxicam (31.8%, diazepam (20.9%, dimenhydrate (10.9%, and metochlopramide (9.9%. The data collected are in agreement with those reported in literature. In most cases, treatment was not what is recommended by consensus or clinical studies with appropriate methodology. Therefore, we suggest the introduction of a specific acute headache management protocol which could facilitate the diagnosis, treatment and management of these patients.Com o objetivo de avaliar as características clínicas, abordagem e tratamento das cefaléias agudas primárias atendidas no Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (HC-UFU no ano de 2005, 109 prontuários foram analisados através de questionário padronizado, segundo idade, sexo, diagnóstico principal, características das crises, propedêutica e tratamento. A distribuição dos pacientes quanto ao tipo de cefaléia foi a seguinte: provável enxaqueca 47,7%, provável cefaléia tensional 37,6%, cefaléia não classificada 11,9% e cefaléia não classificada em outro local 2,8%. No que tange às características da crise, a localização da dor foi descrita em 86,2% dos pacientes. No tratamento dos pacientes com crise

  1. InAs/GaAs submonolayer quantum-dot superluminescent diodes with active multimode interferometer configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin-Kun; Jin Peng; Liang De-Chun; Wu Ju; Wang Zhan-Guo

    2013-01-01

    With a chirped InAs/GaAs SML-QD (quantum dot) structure serving as the active region,the superluminescent diodes emitting at wavelength of around 970 nm are fabricated.By using an active multimode interferometer configuration,these devices exhibit high continue-wave output powers from the narrow ridge waveguides.At continue-wave injection current of 800 mA,an output power of 18.5 mW,and the single Gaussian-like emission spectrum centered at 972 nm with a full width at half maximum of 18 nm are obtained.

  2. InAs/GaAs quantum-dot superluminescent diodes monolithically grown on a Ge substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qi; Tang, Mingchu; Chen, Siming; Wu, Jiang; Seeds, Alwyn; Liu, Huiyun

    2014-09-22

    We report the first InAs/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) superluminescent diode (SLD) monolithically grown on a Ge substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The QD SLD exhibits a 3 dB emission bandwidth of ~60 nm centered at 1252 nm with output power of 27 mW at room temperature. The 3 dB bandwidth is very stable over the temperature range from 20 °C to 100 °C, which highlights the potential for integration with high performance ICs.

  3. Effects of impurity on the energy spectra of quantum-dot lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vatansever, Z.D., E-mail: zeynep.demir@deu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Dokuz Eylül University, 35390 İzmir (Turkey); Dokuz Eylül University, Graduate School of Natural & Applied Sciences, 35390 İzmir (Turkey); Sakiroglu, S.; Akgungor, K.; Sokmen, I. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Dokuz Eylül University, 35390 İzmir (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the effects of an off-center attractive Gaussian impurity on the ground-state energy and spin properties of parabolic quantum-dot lithium are investigated with Configuration Interaction Method. Phase transition between spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 states of the system is obtained for various strengths of the impurity potential and the electron–electron interaction. Charge densities of the system are studied in different interaction regimes. Numerical results reveal that the gap between two spin states is increased by the impurity which consequently yields to the suppression of the polarization.

  4. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yao HC; Su L.; Zeng M; Cao L.; Zhao WW; Chen CQ; Du B; Zhou J

    2016-01-01

    Hanchun Yao,1,2 Li Su,1 Man Zeng,1 Li Cao,1 Weiwei Zhao,1 Chengqun Chen,3 Bin Du,1,2 Jie Zhou1,2 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, 2Collaborative Innovation Center of Drug Research and Safety Evaluation, Henan Province, 3Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Carbon dots (CDs) are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as opt...

  5. A novel high-efficiency single-mode quantum dot single photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerard, J.M.; Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Torben Roland;

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel single-mode single photon source exploiting the emission of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) located inside a photonic wire. Besides an excellent coupling (>95%) of QD spontaneous emission to the fundamental guided mode [1], we show that a single photon collection efficiency...... above 80% within a 0.5 numerical aperture can be achieved using a bottom Bragg mirror and a tapering of the nanowire tip. Because this photon collection strategy does not exploit the Purcell effect, it could also be efficiently applied to broadband single photon emitters such as F-centers in diamond....

  6. The structure of the muscle protein complex 4Ca{sup 2+} {center_dot}troponin C {center_dot} troponin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olah, G.A.; Trewhella, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of scattering data based on a Monte Carlo integration method was used to 2+ obtain a low resolution model of the 4Ca{sup 2+}{circ} troponin C{circ}troponin I complex. This modeling method allows rapid testing of plausible structures where the best fit model can be ascertained by a comparison between model structure scattering profiles and measured scattering data. In the best fit model, troponin I appears as a spiral structure 2+ that wraps around 4Ca{sup 2+}{circ}troponin C which adopts an extended dumbbell conformation similar to that observed in the crystal structures of troponin C. The Monte Carlo modeling method can be applied to other biological systems in which detailed structural information is lacking.

  7. Local Gate Control of a Carbon Nanotube Double Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    Nanotube Double Quantum Dot N. Mason,*† M. J. Biercuk,* C. M. Marcus† We have measured carbon nanotube quantum dots with multiple electro- static gates and...used the resulting enhanced control to investigate a nano- tube double quantum dot. Transport measurements reveal honeycomb charge stability diagrams...This ability to control electron interactions in the quantum regime in a molecular conductor is important for applications such as quantum

  8. Gates controlled parallel-coupled bilayer graphene double quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lin-Jun; Wei, Da; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Chang, A M

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication and quantum transport measurements of gates controlled parallel-coupled bilayer graphene double quantum dot. It is shown that the interdot coupling strength of the parallel double dots can be effectively tuned from weak to strong regime by both the in-plane plunger gates and back gate. All the relevant energy scales and parameters of the bilayer graphene parallel-coupled double dot can be extracted from the honeycomb charge stability diagrams revealed through the transport measurements.

  9. Electron States of Few-Electron Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴振宏; 孙金祚; 张立德; 李作宏; 黄士勇; 隋鹏飞

    2002-01-01

    We study few-electron semiconductor quantum dots using the unrestricted Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method based on the Gaussian basis. Our emphasis is on the energy level calculation for quantum dots. The confinement potential in a quantum dot is assumed to be in a form of three-dimensional spherical finite potential well. Some valuable results, such as the rearrangement of the energy level, have been obtained.

  10. Aerial measurement error with a dot planimeter: Some experimental estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuill, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    A shape analysis is presented which utilizes a computer to simulate a multiplicity of dot grids mathematically. Results indicate that the number of dots placed over an area to be measured provides the entire correlation with accuracy of measurement, the indices of shape being of little significance. Equations and graphs are provided from which the average expected error, and the maximum range of error, for various numbers of dot points can be read.

  11. Local Quantum Dot Tuning on Photonic Crystal Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Faraon, Andrei; Fushman, Ilya; Stoltz, Nick; Petroff, Pierre; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Quantum networks based on InGaAs quantum dots embedded in photonic crystal devices rely on QDs being in resonance with each other and with the cavities they are embedded in. We developed a new technique based on temperature tuning to spectrally align different quantum dots located on the same chip. The technique allows for up to 1.8nm reversible on-chip quantum dot tuning.

  12. Exciton lifetime measurements on single silicon quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangghaleh, Fatemeh; Bruhn, Benjamin; Schmidt, Torsten; Linnros, Jan

    2013-06-01

    We measured the exciton lifetime of single silicon quantum dots, fabricated by electron beam lithography, reactive ion etching and oxidation. The observed photoluminescence decays are of mono-exponential character with a large variation (5-45 μs) from dot to dot, even for the same emission energy. We show that this lifetime variation may be the origin of the heavily debated non-exponential (stretched) decays typically observed for ensemble measurements.

  13. Recent advances in carbon-based dots for electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulong, Ying; Xinsheng, Peng

    2016-04-25

    Carbon-based dots represent a new type of quantum dot with unique and well-defined properties owing to their quantum confinement and edge effects, which are widely employed in sensing, light-emitting diodes, nanomedicine, photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, bioimaging, etc. In this review, we update the latest research results of carbon-based dots in this rapidly evolving field of electroanalysis, place emphases on their applications as sensors and give future perspectives for developing more smart sensors.

  14. Production and targeting of monovalent quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Daeha; Farlow, Justin; Southard, Kade; Jun, Young-Wook; Gartner, Zev J

    2014-10-23

    The multivalent nature of commercial quantum dots (QDs) and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent dots have limited their applications in biology, where clustering and the spatial organization of biomolecules is often the object of study. We describe here a protocol to produce monovalent quantum dots (mQDs) that can be accomplished in most biological research laboratories via a simple mixing of CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs with phosphorothioate DNA (ptDNA) of defined length. After a single ptDNA strand has wrapped the QD, additional strands are excluded from the surface. Production of mQDs in this manner can be accomplished at small and large scale, with commercial reagents, and in minimal steps. These mQDs can be specifically directed to biological targets by hybridization to a complementary single stranded targeting DNA. We demonstrate the use of these mQDs as imaging probes by labeling SNAP-tagged Notch receptors on live mammalian cells, targeted by mQDs bearing a benzylguanine moiety.

  15. Interference and interactions in open quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, J P; Ferry, D K; Moura, A P S; Lai, Y C; Indlekofer, K M

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we review the results of our joint experimental and theoretical studies of electron-interference, and interaction, phenomena in open electron cavities known as quantum dots. The transport through these structures is shown to be heavily influenced by the remnants of their discrete density of states, elements of which remain resolved in spite of the strong coupling that exists between the cavity and its reservoirs. The experimental signatures of this density of states are discussed at length in this report, and are shown to be related to characteristic wavefunction scarring, involving a small number of classical orbits. A semiclassical analysis of this behaviour shows it to be related to the effect of dynamical tunnelling, in which electrons are injected into the dot tunnel through classically forbidden regions of phase space, to access isolated regular orbits. The dynamical tunnelling gives rise to the formation of long-lived quasi-bound states in the open dots, and the many-body implications a...

  16. Probing relaxation times in graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Christian; Neumann, Christoph; Kazarski, Sebastian; Fringes, Stefan; Engels, Stephan; Haupt, Federica; Müller, André; Stampfer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots are attractive candidates for solid-state quantum bits. In fact, the predicted weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interaction promise spin qubits with long coherence times. Graphene quantum dots have been extensively investigated with respect to their excitation spectrum, spin-filling sequence and electron-hole crossover. However, their relaxation dynamics remain largely unexplored. This is mainly due to challenges in device fabrication, in particular concerning the control of carrier confinement and the tunability of the tunnelling barriers, both crucial to experimentally investigate decoherence times. Here we report pulsed-gate transient current spectroscopy and relaxation time measurements of excited states in graphene quantum dots. This is achieved by an advanced device design that allows to individually tune the tunnelling barriers down to the low megahertz regime, while monitoring their asymmetry. Measuring transient currents through electronic excited states, we estimate a lower bound for charge relaxation times on the order of 60–100 ns. PMID:23612294

  17. Nonrenewal statistics in transport through quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszyński, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of waiting times between successive tunneling events is an already established method to characterize current fluctuations in mesoscopic systems. Here, I investigate mechanisms generating correlations between subsequent waiting times in two model systems, a pair of capacitively coupled quantum dots and a single-level dot attached to spin-polarized leads. Waiting time correlations are shown to give insight into the internal dynamics of the system; for example they allow distinction between different mechanisms of the noise enhancement. Moreover, the presence of correlations breaks the validity of the renewal theory. This increases the number of independent cumulants of current fluctuation statistics, thus providing additional sources of information about the transport mechanism. I also propose a method for inferring the presence of waiting time correlations based on low-order current correlation functions. This method gives a way to extend the analysis of nonrenewal current fluctuations to the systems for which single-electron counting is not experimentally feasible. The experimental relevance of the findings is also discussed; for example reanalysis of previous results concerning transport in quantum dots is suggested.

  18. Transplant Center Search Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Your Story Give Us Feedback - A + A Transplant Center Search Form Welcome to the Blood & Marrow ... transplant centers for patients with a particular disease. Transplant Center login Username: * Password: * Request new password Join ...

  19. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  20. Characterization of [ bmim]Cl/FeCl3 ionic liquid%[bmim]Cl/FeCl3离子液体的表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈继华

    2005-01-01

    本文利用1HNMR、FT-IR、FAB(Fast Atom Bombardment)、Raman光谱分析方法表征了[bmim]Cl/FeCl3离子液体,结果表明:酸性离子液体中,阴离子主要形式是FeCl4-、Fe2Cl7-;碱性离子液体中,阴离子主要是Cl-、FeCl4-,并且三者之间存在着平衡.根据分析结果及化学软件的计算,可以推断,阴离子分布在阳离子的两边,即在[bmim]平面的两边,根据能量最低原理,Cl-与FeCl4-或Fe2Cl7-离子只能连接在靠近甲基一侧,此时,分子能量最低,结构最稳定.

  1. Spectroscopic Interpretation: The High Vibrations of CDBrClF

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, C; Taylor, H S

    2004-01-01

    We extract the dynamics implicit in an algebraic fitted model Hamiltonian for the deuterium chromophore's vibrational motion in the molecule CDBrClF. The original model has 4 degrees of freedom, three positions and one representing interbond couplings. A conserved polyad allows in a semiclassical approach the reduction to 3 degrees of freedom. For most quantum states we can identify the underlying motion that when quantized gives the said state. Most of the classifications, identifications and assignments are done by visual inspection of the already available wave function semiclassically transformed from the number representation to a representation on the reduced dimension toroidal configuration space corresponding to the classical action and angle variables. The concentration of the wave function density to lower dimensional subsets centered on idealized simple lower dimensional organizing structures and the behavior of the phase along such organizing centers already reveals the atomic motion. Extremely li...

  2. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of lipid-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Mélanie; Di Giorgio, Carole; Berque-Bestel, Isabelle; Aime, Ahissan; Pichon, Benoit P; Jammes, Yves; Barthélémy, Philippe; De Méo, Michel

    2013-01-20

    We proposed to evaluate the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of a new quantum dots (QDs) nanoplatform (QDsN), consisting of CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs encapsulated by a natural fusogenic lipid (1,2-di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)) and functionalized by a nucleolipid N-[5'-(2',3'-di-oleoyl) uridine]-N',N',N'-trimethylammoniumtosylate (DOTAU). This QDs nanoplatform may represent a new therapeutic tool for the diagnosis and treatment of human cancers. The genotoxic, mutagenic and clastogenic effects of QDsN were compared to those of cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)). Three assays were used: (1) the Salmonella/microsome assay with four tester strains, (2) the comet assay and (3) the micronucleus test on CHO cells. The contribution of simulated sunlight was studied in the three assays while oxidative events were only explored in the comet assay in aliquots pretreated with the antioxidant l-ergothioneine. We found that QDsN could enter CHO-K1 cells and accumulate in cytoplasmic vesicles. It was not mutagenic in the Salmonella/mutagenicity test whereas CdCl(2) was weakly positive. In the dark, both the QDsN and CdCl(2) similarly induced dose-dependent increases in single-strand breaks and micronuclei. Exposure to simulated sunlight significantly potentiated the genotoxic activities of both QDsN and CdCl(2), but did not significantly increase micronucleus frequencies. l-Ergothioneine significantly reduced but did not completely suppress the DNA-damaging activity of QDsN and CdCl(2). The present results clearly point to the genotoxic properties and the risk of long-term adverse effects of such a nanoplatform if used for human anticancer therapy and diagnosis in the future.

  3. Thermoelectric study of dissipative quantum-dot heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Bitan; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the thermoelectric response of a dissipative quantum-dot heat engine based on the Anderson-Holstein model in two relevant operating limits, (i) when the dot phonon modes are out of equilibrium, and (ii) when the dot phonon modes are strongly coupled to a heat bath. In the first case, a detailed analysis of the physics related to the interplay between the quantum-dot level quantization, the on-site Coulomb interaction, and the electron-phonon coupling on the thermoelectric performance reveals that an n -type heat engine performs better than a p -type heat engine. In the second case, with the aid of the dot temperature estimated by incorporating a thermometer bath, it is shown that the dot temperature deviates from the bath temperature as electron-phonon interaction in the dot becomes stronger. Consequently, it is demonstrated that the dot temperature controls the direction of phonon heat currents, thereby influencing the thermoelectric performance. Finally, the conditions on the maximum efficiency with varying phonon couplings between the dot and all the other macroscopic bodies are analyzed in order to reveal the nature of the optimum junction.

  4. Highly fluorescent xerogels with entrapped carbon dots for organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaranta, A., E-mail: quaranta@ing.unitn.it [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Carturan, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Campagnaro, A.; Dalla Palma, M. [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Giarola, M.; Daldosso, N. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Maggioni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Mariotto, G. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    Organically modified silicate thin film and bulk samples were prepared using [3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyl]trimethoxysilane (AEAP-TMOS) as precursor with the addition of different amounts of AEAP-TMOS functionalized C-dots, prepared by reaction of AEAP-TMOS and citric acid at high temperature. The synthesis of surface functionalized C-dots was followed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and the C-dots optical properties were characterized by optical absorption and UV–vis fluorescence. Thin xerogel films and bulk samples were studied by FTIR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Intense blue-green emission was observed by UV excitation of functionalized C-dots. Carbon quantum dot (CQD) luminescence was preserved also in the xerogel matrices, and the energy transfer from the matrix to CQDs, which is a key characteristic for scintillation detectors, was investigated in the two systems. - Highlights: • Functionalized carbon dots were synthesized. • Carbon dots were dispersed in hybrid xerogel bulk and thin film. • Carbon dots exhibit a strong tunable blue luminescence. • Xerogels were characterized by FT-IR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies. • Energy transfer processes were evidenced between C-dots and xerogel matrix.

  5. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Gloria G. [Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G. [Mechanical Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 154 Mechanical Engineering Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1270 Digital Computer Laboratory, MC-278, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-08-03

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure.

  6. Multicolor Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for Live Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengyi; Li, Jianan; Hua, Ye; Zhang, Miaomiao; Zhou, Zhou; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Jun; Peng, Wanxin; Zhang, Li; Xia, Sheng; Wang, Dongqing; Yang, Shiming; Xu, Wenrong; Gong, Aihua; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-05-01

    Doping carbon dots with nitrogen atoms considerably enhances their fluorescence properties. However, the mechanism by which the carbon dots are doped is not fully understood. We developed a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process that uses glucose and glycine as precursors for the synthesis of photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped carbon dots were mono-dispersed spherical particles with a diameter of -2.8 nm. The doped nitrogen atoms assumed pyridinic type and pyrrolic type configurations to participate in the nanocrystal structure of the carbon dots. It appeared that the nitrogen doping introduces a new internal structure. The aqueous solution of nitrogen-doped carbon dots showed excitation wavelength-dependent multicolor photoluminescence. Further, these nitrogen-doped carbon dots readily entered the cytoplasm of A549 cancer cells and showed no significant cytotoxicity. The internalized nitrogen-doped carbon dots were localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm, particularly around the nucleus. Further, the as-prepared, biocompatible, nitrogen-doped carbon dots demonstrated the potential to be used as fluorescent probes for multicolor live cell labeling, tracking, and imaging.

  7. An Exciton Bound to a Neutral Donor in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文方

    2002-01-01

    The binding energies for an exciton (X) trapped in a two-dimensional quantum dot by a neutral donor have been calculated using the method of few-body physics for the heavy hole (σ= 0.196) and the light hole (σr = 0.707).We find that the (D0, X) complex confined in a quantum dot has in general a larger binding energy than those in a two-dimensional quantum well and a three-dimensional bulk semiconductor, and the binding energy increases with the decrease of the dot radius. At dot radius R →∞, we compare our calculated result with the previous results.

  8. Nonequilibrium Electron Transport Through a Quantum Dot from Kubo Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Rong; ZHANG Guang-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Kubo formula for an electron tunneling junction, we revisit the nonequilibrium transport properties through a quantum dot. Since the Fermi level of the quantum dot is set by the conduction electrons of the leads, we calculate the electron current from the left side by assuming the quantum dot coupled to the right lead as another side of the tunneling junction, and the other way round is used to calculate the current from the right side. By symmetrizing these two currents, an effective local density states on the dot can be obtained, and is discussed at high and low temperatures, respectively.

  9. Synthesis of CdSe Quantum Dots Using Fusarium oxysporum

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Yamaguchi; Yoshijiro Tsuruda; Tomohiro Furukawa; Lumi Negishi; Yuki Imura; Shohei Sakuda; Etsuro Yoshimura; Michio Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    CdSe quantum dots are often used in industry as fluorescent materials. In this study, CdSe quantum dots were synthesized using Fusarium oxysporum. The cadmium and selenium concentration, pH, and temperature for the culture of F. oxysporum (Fusarium oxysporum) were optimized for the synthesis, and the CdSe quantum dots obtained from the mycelial cells of F. oxysporum were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Ultra-thin sections of F. oxysporum showed that the CdSe quantum dots were pr...

  10. Advanced Architecture for Colloidal PbS Quantum Dot Solar Cells Exploiting a CdSe Quantum Dot Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianshuo; Goodwin, Earl D; Guo, Jiacen; Wang, Han; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2016-09-22

    Advanced architectures are required to further improve the performance of colloidal PbS heterojunction quantum dot solar cells. Here, we introduce a CdI2-treated CdSe quantum dot buffer layer at the junction between ZnO nanoparticles and PbS quantum dots in the solar cells. We exploit the surface- and size-tunable electronic properties of the CdSe quantum dots to optimize its carrier concentration and energy band alignment in the heterojunction. We combine optical, electrical, and analytical measurements to show that the CdSe quantum dot buffer layer suppresses interface recombination and contributes additional photogenerated carriers, increasing the open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current of PbS quantum dot solar cells, leading to a 25% increase in solar power conversion efficiency.

  11. Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH dependent hetero-interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Yi, Qinghua; Wang, Yun; Cong, Shan; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Yinghui; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Qian, Zhicheng [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Huang, Jianwen; Xiong, Jie, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Luo, Hongmei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Due to the different emission mechanism between fluorescent carbon dots and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), it is of interest to explore the potential emission in hetero-structured carbon dots/semiconducting QDs. Herein, we design carbon dots coated CdTe QDs (CDQDs) and investigate their inherent emission. We demonstrate switchable emission for the hetero-interactions of the CDQDs. Optical analyses indicate electron transfer between the carbon dots and the CdTe QDs. A heterojunction electron process is proposed as the driving mechanism based on N atom protonation of the carbon dots. This work advances our understanding of the interaction mechanism of the heterostructured CDQDs and benefits the future development of optoelectronic nanodevices with new functionalities.

  12. Synthesis and photoluminescence enhancement of nano-PAA-ZnCl2 with controllable dimension and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianguo; Wang, Kaige; Zhou, Yukun; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Guiren; Bai, Jintao

    2016-12-01

    One kind of ZnCl2 nano-films with controllable dimension and morphology is successfully synthesized on the top surface of nano-porous anodic alumina membrane (nano-PAAM) by self-organized method. The nano-PAA-ZnCl2 composite films are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer, and laser confocal Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that the concentration of initial ZnCl2 solution, the depth of nano-PAAM substrate and the growth time of ZnCl2 crystals have important influences on the properties of nano-composite films. Furthermore, the characteristics of nano-composites such as the photoluminescence (PL) spectra are investigated. Compared with the nano-PAAM substrate, at room temperature, all of the nano-PAA-ZnCl2 composite films have both the same excitation center (335 nm) and emission center (430 nm), no matter what the nano-composite morphologies being; and the PL intensity of nano-PAA-ZnCl2 composite films are all enhanced and the maximum enhancement is two times; after annealing at 500 °C, the emission spectra of the nano-composite films stabilized at the 385 nm, 402 nm and 430 nm. The research provides a new, simple, economical and practical technology to fabricate nano-PAA composite films with higher luminousintensity.

  13. Linfoma não-Hodgkin na infância: características clínico-epidemiológicas e avaliação de sobrevida em um único centro no Nordeste do Brasil Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in childhood: clinical and epidemiological characteristics and survival analysis at a single center in Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Ferreira Pedrosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever o perfil clínico-epidemiológico dos pacientes portadores de linfoma não-Hodgkin diagnosticados no Serviço de Oncologia Pediátrica do Instituto Materno-Infantil Professor Fernando Figueira em um período de 9 anos, bem como descrever sobrevida e possíveis associações prognósticas com as variáveis clínico-epidemiológicas estudadas. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo de corte transversal, realizado através da análise dos prontuários de 110 pacientes com linfoma não-Hodgkin admitidos na instituição no período de maio de 1994 a maio de 2003. As sobrevidas global e livre de doença foram analisadas através da técnica de Kaplan-Meier, e o teste de log rank foi utilizado para avaliar diferenças entre os grupos. RESULTADOS: A idade média foi de 6,1 anos, e a relação masculino-feminino, 2,4:1. O subtipo histológico mais freqüente foi o linfoma de Burkitt. A maioria dos pacientes foi diagnosticada em estádio III e IV da classificação de Murphy e provinha da zona rural. Renda familiar per capita inferior a 1/2 salário mínimo foi observada em 36,4%, e analfabetismo materno, em 12,7% dos casos. A probabilidade de sobrevida global e livre de doença aos 5 anos foi de 70±4% e 68±4%, respectivamente. Nenhuma das variáveis clínico-epidemiológicas analisadas mostrou associação estatística significante com a probabilidade de sobrevida dos pacientes (p > 0,05. CONCLUSÃO: Observamos incidência mais elevada do subtipo Burkitt e de crianças acometidas em idade mais jovem quando comparada à descrita em literatura estrangeira. A sobrevida observada aproximou-se dos resultados descritos pelos principais grupos cooperativos de tratamento de câncer infantil. As variáveis clínico-epidemiológicas analisadas não apresentaram associação prognóstica estatística significante.OBJECTIVE:To describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients diagnosed at the Pediatric Oncology Unit

  14. Chlorine-catalyzed ozone destruction: Cl atom production from ClOOCl photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmouth, David M; Hanisco, Thomas F; Stimpfle, Richard M; Anderson, James G

    2009-12-24

    Recent laboratory measurements of the absorption cross sections of the ClO dimer, ClOOCl, have called into question the validity of the mechanism that describes the catalytic removal of ozone by chlorine. Here we describe direct measurements of the rate-determining step of that mechanism, the production of Cl atoms from the photolysis of ClOOCl, under laboratory conditions similar to those in the stratosphere. ClOOCl is formed in a cold-temperature flowing system, with production initiated by a microwave discharge of Cl(2) or photolysis of CF(2)Cl(2). Excimer lasers operating at 248, 308, and 352 nm photodissociate ClOOCl, and the Cl atoms produced are detected with time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence. Cl(2), the primary contaminant, is measured directly for the first time in a ClOOCl cross section experiment. We find the product of the quantum yield of the Cl atom production channel of ClOOCl photolysis and the ClOOCl absorption cross section, (phisigma)(ClOOCl) = 660 +/- 100 at 248 nm, 39.3 +/- 4.9 at 308 nm, and 8.6 +/- 1.2 at 352 nm (units of 10(-20) cm(2) molecule(-1)). The data set includes 468 total cross section measurements over a wide range of experimental conditions, significantly reducing the possibility of a systematic error impacting the results. These new measurements demonstrate that long-wavelength photons (lambda = 352 nm) are absorbed by ClOOCl directly, producing Cl atoms with a probability commensurate with the observed rate of ozone destruction in the atmosphere.

  15. Southern California Particle Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the Southern California Particle Center, center researchers will investigate the underlying mechanisms that produce the health effects associated with exposure to...

  16. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  17. Determination of 2-methoxyestradiol by chemiluminescence based on luminol-KMnO4-CdTe quantum dots system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Wang, Tiantian; Han, Shuping; Cao, Xiaohui; Qu, Tiantian; Zhao, Feifei; Guo, Xinhong; Yao, Hanchun

    2015-02-05

    In this study, water-soluble CdTe quantum-dots (QDs) capped with glutathione (GSH) was synthesized. It was found that CdTe QDs could greatly enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) emission from the luminol-KMnO4 system in alkaline medium, and 4 nm CdTe QDs was used as catalysts to enhance the reaction sensitivity. The CL intensity of CdTe QDs-luminol-KMnO4 was strongly inhibited in the presence of 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) and the relative CL intensity was in linear correlation with the concentration of 2-ME. Based on this inhibition, a novel CL method with a lower detection limit and wider linear range was developed for the determination of 2-ME. The detection limit of plasma samples was 3.07×10(-10) g mL(-1) with a relative standard deviation of 0.24% for 8.0×10(-9) g mL(-1) 2-ME. The method was successfully applied for determination of 2-ME in plasma samples. The possible CL reaction mechanism was also discussed briefly.

  18. Nitrogen doped graphene quantum dots based long-persistent chemiluminescence system for ascorbic acid imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongjun; Wang, Qin; Shen, Qinpeng; Liu, Xin; Li, Wang; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2017-05-15

    High photo-intensity and sluggish flight attenuation are important to highly sensitive chemluminescence imaging. Herein, we present a copper ion catalyzed long-persistent chemiluminescent imaging system of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) for ascorbic acid detection in fruit. NGQDs as luminescent probe are fabricated, emitting out chemluminescence with the direct oxidation by H2O2. In addition, Cu(2+) ion enlarges over two order magnitudes of NGQDs CL intensity (214 times) due to its catalyzed Fenton-like reaction for H2O2 decomposition, and displaying unique specificity against other metal ions. As a result, the twinkling luminescence of NGQDs is boosted and changes to hold persistent with small decay in the presence of copper ion exhibiting potential for CL imaging. As an imaging model, a visual sensor based on Cu(2+)/NGQDs/H2O2 is developed for AA quantitative monitoring with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5μM (S/N=3) and applied in real AA detection in fruit. The CL imaging method demonstrated with high stability and proper sensitivity would provide a convenient and visual tool for AA determination, displaying promising candidates for imaging sensing.

  19. Standardization of dot-ELISA for the serological diagnosis of toxocariasis and comparision of the assay with ELISA Padronização do teste dot-ELISA para o diagnóstico da toxocaríase, estudo comparativo com o teste imunoenzimático ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Dias Camargo

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available The dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA was standardized using somatic (S and excretory-secretory (ES antigens of Toxocara-canis for the detection of specific antibodies in 22 serum samples from children aged 1 to 15 years, with clinical signs of toxocariasis. Fourteen serum samples from apparently normal individuals and 28 sera from patients with other pathologies were used as controls. All samples were used before and after absorption with Ascaris suum extract. When the results were evaluated in comparison with ELISA, the two tests were found to have similar sensitivity, but dot-ELISA was found to be more specific in the presence of the two antigens studied. Dot-ELISA proved to be effective for the diagnosis of human toxocariasis, presenting advantages in terms of yield, stability, time and ease of execution and low cost.Padronizou-se o teste imunoenzimático dot-ELISA, empregando-se os antígenos somático (S e excretor-secretor (ES de Toxocara canis, para pesquisa de anticorpos específicos em 22 soros de pacientes com idades entre 5 a 15 anos, com dados clínicos de toxocaríase. Como grupo controle, foram estudados 14 soros de indivíduos supostamente normais e 28 soros de pacientes com outras patologias. Todas as amostras em estudo foram empregadas antes e após absorção com extrato de Ascaris suum. Os resultados obtidos foram avaliados comparativamente com o teste ELISA evidenciando, nos dois testes estudados, comportamento semelhante quanto à sensibilidade e maior especificidade para o dot-ELISA, com qualquer dos dois antígenos estudados. O teste dot-ELISA mostrou-se eficiente para o diagnóstico da toxocaríase humana, apresentando vantagens quanto ao rendimento, estabilidade, tempo e facilidade de execução e baixo custo.

  20. Point defects and luminescence in single NaCl: Cu crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E.; Ramos B, S.; Negron M, A. [ICN-UNAM, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Barboza F, M. [CIF, UNISON, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Murrieta S, H.; Hernandez A, J. [IFUNAM, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Optical absorption, thermally stimulated luminescence and photoluminescence experiments were performed in NaCl:Cu(0.4%) and NaCl:Cu(0.8%) crystals blocks grown by Czochralski technique. The monocrystals NaCl:Cu were exposed to gamma rays from {sup 60} Co source up to 30 kGy as well as to UV radiation. The radiation-induced defects were mainly in the F-centers form and their optical absorption bands were found to be dependent from the Cu impurity concentration. It was observed that the gamma induced absorption band at 256.7 nm was shifted toward 236.3 nm when the crystals were irradiated with UV light. At high radiation dose (20 kGy) the F-centers were bleached with F-light. The change in the glow curve after bleaching suggests that the recombination occurs around the impurity of the doped crystal. (Author)

  1. The Electron-Hole Pair in a Single Quantum Dot and That in a Vertically Coupled Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEWen-Fang; ZHUWu

    2003-01-01

    The energy spectra of low-lying states of an exciton in a single and a vertically coupled quantum dots are studied under the influence of a perpendicularly applied magnetic field. Calculations are made by using the method of numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. We also calculated the binding energy of the ground and the excited states of an exciton in a single quantum dot and that in a vertically coupled quantum dot as a function of the dot radius for different vaJues of the distance and the magnetic field strength.

  2. The Electron-Hole Pair in a Single Quantum Dot and That in a Vertically Coupled Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang; ZHU Wu

    2003-01-01

    The energy spectra of low-lying states of an exciton in a single and a vertically coupled quantum dots arestudied under the influence of a perpendicularly applied magnetic field. Calculations are made by using the method ofnumerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. We also calculated the bindingenergy of the ground and the excited states of an exciton in a single quantum dot and that in a vertically coupledquantum dot as a function of the dot radius for different values of the distance and the magnetic field strength.

  3. Zero-Pressure Organic Superconductor: Di-(Tetramethyltetraselenafulvalenium)-Perchlorate [(TMTSF)2ClO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Klaus; da Costa Carneiro, Kim; Olsen, Malte;

    1981-01-01

    Evidence for superconductivity in the organic conductor di-(tetramethyltetraselenafulvalenium)-perchlorate [(TMTSF)2ClO4] has been found by resistance measurements in the absence of applied pressure. For different crystals the transitions are approximately 0.3 K wide and are centered around...

  4. 75 FR 8461 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-1A11 (CL-600), CL-600-2A12 (CL-601), and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... TR 600-1/19, dated August 16, 2006, to the Canadair Challenger Model CL-600-1A11 AFM (Winglets...-1A11 AFM (Winglets). We agreed and proposed to revise Table 2 of AD 2009-06-05 accordingly in the NPRM..., 2006.. Canadair Challenger Model CL-600-1A11 AFM (Winglets). (iii) 601/14 August 16, 2006.....

  5. Atmospheric production rate of {sup 36}Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrat, Y.; Hajdas, W.; Baltensperger, U.; Synal, H.A.; Kubik, P.W.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Using experimental cross sections, a new calculation of the atmospheric production rate of {sup 36}Cl was carried out. A mean production rate of 20 atoms m{sup -2}s{sup -1} was obtained, which is lower than mean {sup 36}Cl deposition rates. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  6. Nanometer range correlations between molecular orientations in liquids of molecules with perfect tetrahedral shape: CCl4, SiCl4, GeCl4, and SnCl4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoczki, Sz.; Temleitner, L.; Jóvári, P.; Kohara, S.; Pusztai, L.

    2009-02-01

    Neutron and x-ray weighted total scattering structure factors of liquid carbon, silicon, germanium, and tin tetrachlorides, CCl4, SiCl4, GeCl4, and SnCl4, have been interpreted by means of reverse Monte Carlo modeling. For each material the two sets of diffraction data were modeled simultaneously, thus providing sets of particle coordinates that were consistent with two experimental structure factors within errors. From these particle configurations, partial radial distribution functions, as well as correlation functions characterizing mutual orientations of molecules as a function of distance between molecular centers were calculated. Via comparison with reference systems, obtained by hard sphere Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that orientational correlations characterizing these liquids are much longer ranged than expected, particularly in carbon tetrachloride.

  7. Nanometer range correlations between molecular orientations in liquids of molecules with perfect tetrahedral shape: CCl(4), SiCl(4), GeCl(4), and SnCl(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoczki, Sz; Temleitner, L; Jóvári, P; Kohara, S; Pusztai, L

    2009-02-14

    Neutron and x-ray weighted total scattering structure factors of liquid carbon, silicon, germanium, and tin tetrachlorides, CCl(4), SiCl(4), GeCl(4), and SnCl(4), have been interpreted by means of reverse Monte Carlo modeling. For each material the two sets of diffraction data were modeled simultaneously, thus providing sets of particle coordinates that were consistent with two experimental structure factors within errors. From these particle configurations, partial radial distribution functions, as well as correlation functions characterizing mutual orientations of molecules as a function of distance between molecular centers were calculated. Via comparison with reference systems, obtained by hard sphere Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that orientational correlations characterizing these liquids are much longer ranged than expected, particularly in carbon tetrachloride.

  8. Fractals of graphene quantum dots in photoluminescence of shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razbirin, B. S.; Rozhkova, N. N.; Sheka, E. F.; Nelson, D. K.; Starukhin, A. N.

    2014-05-01

    Viewing shungite as loosely packed fractal nets of graphene-based (reduced graphene oxide, rGO) quantum dots (GQDs), we consider photoluminescence of the latter as a convincing proof of the structural concept as well as of the GQD attribution to individual rGO fragments. We study emission from shungite GQDs for colloidal dispersions in water, carbon tetrachloride, and toluene at both room and low temperatures. As expected, the photoluminescence of the GQD aqueous dispersions is quite similar to that of synthetic GQDs of the rGO origin. The morphological study of shungite dispersions shows a steady trend of GQDs to form fractals and to drastically change the colloid fractal structure caused by the solvent exchange. Spectral study reveals a dual character of the emitting centers: individual GQDs are responsible for the spectra position while the fractal structure of GQD colloids ensures high broadening of the spectra due to structural inhomogeneity, thus causing a peculiar dependence of the photoluminescence spectra on the excitation wavelength. For the first time, photoluminescence spectra of individual GQDs were observed in frozen toluene dispersions, which paves the way for a theoretical treatment of the GQD photonics.

  9. MBE growth of Ge quantum dot structures in oxide windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmous, A; Kirfel, O; Oehme, M; Kasper, E; Schulze, J, E-mail: karmous@iht.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik - Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    The implementation of Quantum Dots (QDs) in devices allows novel electronic and opto-electronic functions. Strain driven Stranski-Krastanov growth mode enables the formation of nanometric islands (on wetting layer) whose density and geometry depend on growth conditions (temperature, rate) and surface structure (cleaning). The island positions are random. However, they can be influenced by surface patterning. In this work, the MBE growth of self-organized Ge QD structures in oxide windows is investigated. The studied Ge QD structures are composed by either a single Ge layer directly grown on a Si substrate, or double layer formed by a Ge QD layer on top of a Si buffer layer. Different surface preparation (dry etching with and without anisotropic wet etching) and cleaning (HF dip or RCA cleaning) schemes have been used. It is found that the cleaning and the Si buffer layer growth have strong influence on island nucleation. Preferred nucleation at the window edge and/or nucleation at the window center is observed under certain conditions. Interestingly, negligible influence (this is needed for most device works) is found only if Ge is grown directly on the RCA cleaned window.

  10. Cs3ScCl6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Ward

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of tricaesium scandium(III hexachloride were obtained as a side product from the reaction of U, SnCl2, Sc, and S in a CsCl flux at 1073 K. Cs3ScCl6 crystallizes in the Rb3YCl6 structure type. The asymmetric unit comprises three Cs sites, two Sc sites, and six Cl sites, all of which have site symmetry 1, except for the two Sc sites that have site symmetries of 2 and -1, respectively. The structure is composed of isolated [ScCl6]3− octahedra that are surrounded by Cs+ cations. Two Cs+ cations have interactions with eight Cl− anions, while the third has interactions with ten Cl− anions.

  11. Electronic spectrum of non-tetrahedral acceptors in CdTe:Cl and CdTe:Bi,Cl single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivobok, V. S., E-mail: krivobok@lebedev.ru [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, S. N.; Bagaev, V. S.; Pruchkina, A. A.; Onishchenko, E. E.; Kolosov, S. A.; Klevkov, Yu. V.; Skorikov, M. L. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-07

    The electronic spectra of complex acceptors in compensated CdTe:Cl, CdTe:Ag,Cl, and CdTe:Bi,Cl single crystals are studied using low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements under both nonresonant and resonant excitation of distant donor–acceptor pairs (DAP). The wavelength modulation of the excitation source combined with the analysis of the differential PL signal is used to enhance narrow spectral features obscured because of inhomogeneous line broadening and/or excitation transfer for selectively excited DAPs. For the well-known tetrahedral (T{sub D}) Ag{sub Cd} acceptor, the energies of four excited states are measured, and the values obtained are shown to be in perfect agreement with the previous data. Moreover, splitting between the 2P{sub 3/2} (Γ{sub 8}) and 2S{sub 3/2} (Γ{sub 8}) states is clearly observed for Ag{sub Cd} centers located at a short distance (5–7 nm) from a hydrogen-like donor (Cl{sub Te}). This splitting results from the reduction of the T{sub D} symmetry taking place when the acceptor is a member of a donor–acceptor pair. For the Cl-related complex acceptor with an activation energy of ∼121 meV (A-center), the energies of eight excited states are measured. It is shown that this defect produces low-symmetry central-cell correction responsible for the strong splitting of S-like T{sub D} shells. The energy spectrum of the Bi-related shallow acceptor with an activation energy of ∼36 meV is measured as well. The spectrum obtained differs drastically from the hydrogen-like set of levels, which indicates the existence of repulsive low-symmetry perturbation of the hydrogen-like Coulomb potential. It is also shown that the spectra of selectively excited PL recorded for a macroscopic ensemble of distant donor–acceptor pairs allow one to detect the low symmetry of acceptors of a given type caused by their complex nature or by the Jahn–Teller distortion. This method does not require any additional (external) field and is

  12. Student Success Center Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  13. Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuJie

    2004-01-01

    There are three major space launch bases in China, the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center,the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center and the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. All the three launch centers are located in sparsely populated areas where the terrain is even and the field of vision is broad. Security, transport conditions and the influence of the axial rotation

  14. Tunnel-coupled quantum dots: Atomistic Theory of Quantum Dot Molecules and Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Garnett W.; Aizpurua, J.; Jaskolski, W.; Zielinski, Michal

    2003-03-01

    Quantum dots are studied as artificial atoms for building novel artificial solids, as nanodevices in nanoelectronics, and as bio/nanohybrids. We present an atomistic tight-binding theory of coupled CdS nanocrystals and vertically and laterally coupled InAs self-assembled dots. Electron states of coupled dots follow the analogy of coupled dots as artificial molecules. Symmetric/antisymmetric pairs are formed with strongest coupling between states with high density at interdot interfaces. Complex coupling of hole states, with significant departures from the artificial molecule analogy, occurs because the coupling is determined by the hole envelope function and the hole atomic state. Some hole states couple to form symmetric/antisymmetric pairs. Other hole states couple through additional intermediate states to form two strongly split symmetric states and an antisymmetric state insensitive to coupling. These coupling effects lead to level reordering, changes in state symmetry, conversion of dark states to bright states and vice versa, and tailored polarization dependence.

  15. CdTe quantum dots@luminol as signal amplification system for chrysoidine with chemiluminescence-chitosan/graphene oxide-magnetite-molecularly imprinting sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huimin; Li, Leilei; Wang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Yanhui; Li, Jianbo; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-01-15

    A sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) sensor based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) in CdTe quantum dots@luminol (CdTe QDs@luminol) nanomaterials combined with chitosan/graphene oxide-magnetite-molecularly imprinted polymer (Cs/GM-MIP) for sensing chrysoidine was developed. CdTe QDs@luminol was designed to not only amplify the signal of CL but also reduce luminol consumption in the detection of chrysoidine. On the basis of the abundant hydroxy and amino, Cs and graphene oxide were introduced into the GM-MIP to improve the adsorption ability. The adsorption capacities of chrysoidine by both Cs/GM-MIP and non-imprinted polymer (Cs/GM-NIP) were investigated, and the CdTe QDs@luminol and Cs/GM-MIP were characterized by UV-vis, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The proposed sensor can detect chrysoidine within a linear range of 1.0×10(-7) - 1.0×10(-5) mol/L with a detection limit of 3.2×10(-8) mol/L (3δ) due to considerable chemiluminescence signal enhancement of the CdTe quantum dots@luminol detector and the high selectivity of the Cs/GM-MIP system. Under the optimal conditions of CL, the CdTe QDs@luminol-Cs/GM-MIP-CL sensor was used for chrysoidine determination in samples with satisfactory recoveries in the range of 90-107%.

  16. Improved method for efficient imaging of intracellular Cl(-) with Cl-Sensor using conventional fluorescence setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Perrine; Bregestovski, Piotr; Medina, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis is known to be fundamental for central nervous system functioning. Alterations in intracellular Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)]i) and changes in the efficacy of Cl(-) extrusion are involved in numerous neurological disorders. Therefore, there is a strong need for studies of the dynamics of [Cl(-)]i in different cell types under physiological conditions and during pathology. Several previous works reported having successfully achieved recording of [Cl(-)]i using genetically encoded Cl-Sensor that is composed of the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and Cl(-)-sensitive mutant of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFPCl). However, all reported works were performed using specially designed setups with ultra-sensitive CCD cameras. Our multiple attempts to monitor Cl(-)-dependent fluorescence of Cl-Sensor using conventional epifluorescence microscopes did not yield successful results. In the present work, we have analysed the reason of our failures and found that they were caused by a strong inactivation of the YFPCl component of Cl-Sensor during excitation of the CFP with 430 nm light. Based on the obtained results, we reduced 20-fold the intensity of the 430 nm excitation and modified the recording protocol that allows now stable long-lasting ratiometric measurements of Cl-Sensor fluorescence in different cell types including cultured hippocampal neurons and their tiny dendrites and spines. Simultaneous imaging and patch clamp recording revealed that in mature neurons, the novel protocol allows detection of as little as 2 mM changes of [Cl(-)]i from the resting level of 5-10 mM. We demonstrate also a usefulness of the developed [Cl(-)]i measurement procedure for large scale screening of the activity of exogenously expressed potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2, a major neuronal Cl(-) extruder that is implicated in numerous neurological disorders and is a target for novel therapeutical treatments.

  17. Improved method for efficient imaging of intracellular Cl- with Cl-Sensor using conventional fluorescence setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrine eFriedel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chloride (Cl- homeostasis is known to be fundamental for central nervous system functioning. Alterations in intracellular Cl- concentration ([Cl-]i and changes in the efficacy of Cl- extrusion are involved in numerous neurological disorders. Therefore there is a strong need for studies of the dynamics of [Cl-]i in different cell types under physiological conditions and during pathology. Several previous works reported having successfully achieved recording of [Cl-]i using genetically encoded Cl-Sensor that is composed of the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP and Cl--sensitive mutant of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFPCl. However all reported works were performed using specially designed setups with ultra-sensitive CCD cameras. Our multiple attempts to monitor Cl--dependent fluorescence of Cl-Sensor using conventional epifluorescence microscopes did not yield successful results. In the present work, we have analysed the reason of our failures and found that they were caused by a strong inactivation of the YFPCl component of Cl-Sensor during excitation of the CFP with 430 nm light. Based on the obtained results, we reduced 20-fold the intensity of the 430 nm excitation and modified the recording protocol that allows now stable long-lasting ratiometric measurements of Cl-Sensor fluorescence in different cell types including cultured hippocampal neurons and their tiny dendrites and spines. Simultaneous imaging and patch clamp recording revealed that in mature neurons, the novel protocol allows detection of as little as 2 mM changes of [Cl-]i from the resting level of 5-10 mM. We demonstrate also a usefulness of the developed [Cl-]i measurement procedure for large scale screening of the activity of exogenously expressed potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2, a major neuronal Cl- extruder, that is implicated in numerous neurological disorders and is a target for novel therapeutical treatments.

  18. Aminophosphines: A Double Role in the Synthesis of Colloidal Indium Phosphide Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Mickael D; De Nolf, Kim; Dupont, Dorian; Sinnaeve, Davy; De Roo, Jonathan; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-11

    Aminophosphines have recently emerged as economical, easy-to-implement precursors for making InP nanocrystals, which stand out as alternative Cd-free quantum dots for optoelectronic applications. Here, we present a complete investigation of the chemical reactions leading to InP formation starting from InCl3 and tris(dialkylamino)phosphines. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction, we demonstrate that injection of the aminophosphine in the reaction mixture is followed by a transamination with oleylamine, the solvent of the reaction. In addition, mass spectrometry and NMR indicate that the formation of InP concurs with that of tetra(oleylamino)phosphonium chloride. The chemical yield of the InP formation agrees with this 4 P(+III) → P(-III) + 3 P(+V) disproportionation reaction occurring, since full conversion of the In precursor was only attained for a 4:1 P/In ratio. Hence it underlines the double role of the aminophosphine as both precursor and reducing agent. These new insights will guide further optimization of high quality InP quantum dots and might lead to the extension of synthetic protocols toward other pnictide nanocrystals.

  19. Stimulated emission and lasing from all-inorganic perovskite quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Handong; Wang, Yue; Li, Xiaoming; Haibo, Zeng

    We present superior optical gain and lasing properties in a new class of emerging quantum materials, the colloidal all-inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots (IPQDs) (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I). Our result has indicated that such material system show combined merits of both colloidal quantum dots and halide perovskites. Low-threshold and ultrastable stimulated emission was demonstrated under atmospheric condition. The flexibility and advantageous optical gain properties of these CsPbX3 IPQDs were manifested by demonstration of an optically pumped micro-laser. The nonlinear optical properties including the multi-photon absorption and resultant photoluminescence of the CsPbX3 nanocrystals were investigated. A large two-photon absorption cross-section of up to ~1.2×105 GM is determined from 9 nm-sized CsPbBr3 nanocrystals. Moreover, low-threshold frequency-upconverted stimulated emission by two-photon absorption was observed from the thin films of close-packed CsPbBr3 nanocrystals. We further realize the three-photon pumped stimulated emission in green spectra range from colloidal IPQD.

  20. Fast synthesize ZnO quantum dots via ultrasonic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weimin; Zhang, Bing; Ding, Nan; Ding, Wenhao; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-05-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic sol-gel method. The ZnO quantum dots were synthesized in various ultrasonic temperature and time. Photoluminescence properties of these ZnO quantum dots were measured. Time-resolved photoluminescence decay spectra were also taken to discover the change of defects amount during the reaction. Both ultrasonic temperature and time could affect the type and amount of defects in ZnO quantum dots. Total defects of ZnO quantum dots decreased with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time. The dangling bonds defects disappeared faster than the optical defects. Types of optical defects first changed from oxygen interstitial defects to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial defects. Then transformed back to oxygen interstitial defects again. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by both ultrasonic temperature and time as well. That is, with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased. Moreover, concentrated raw materials solution brought larger sizes and more optical defects of ZnO quantum dots.

  1. Single-photon superradiance from a quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tighineanu, Petru; Daveau, Raphaël Sura; Lehmann, Tau Bernstorff

    2016-01-01

    We report on the observation of single-photon superradiance from an exciton in a semiconductor quantum dot. The confinement by the quantum dot is strong enough for it to mimic a two-level atom, yet sufficiently weak to ensure superradiance. The electrostatic interaction between the electron and t...

  2. A Nanowire-Based Plasmonic Quantum Dot Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jinfa; Tatebayashi, Jun; Sergent, Sylvain; Fong, Chee Fai; Ota, Yasutomo; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-13

    Quantum dots enable strong carrier confinement and exhibit a delta-function like density of states, offering significant improvements to laser performance and high-temperature stability when used as a gain medium. However, quantum dot lasers have been limited to photonic cavities that are diffraction-limited and further miniaturization to meet the demands of nanophotonic-electronic integration applications is challenging based on existing designs. Here we introduce the first quantum dot-based plasmonic laser to reduce the cross-sectional area of nanowire quantum dot lasers below the cutoff limit of photonic modes while maintaining the length in the order of the lasing wavelength. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition grown GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires containing InGaAs quantum dot stacks are placed directly on a silver film, and lasing was observed from single nanowires originating from the InGaAs quantum dot emission into the low-loss higher order plasmonic mode. Lasing threshold pump fluences as low as ∼120 μJ/cm(2) was observed at 7 K, and lasing was observed up to 125 K. Temperature stability from the quantum dot gain, leading to a high characteristic temperature was demonstrated. These results indicate that high-performance, miniaturized quantum dot lasers can be realized with plasmonics.

  3. Exciton dephasing in single InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Østergaard, John Erland; Jensen, Jacob Riis;

    2000-01-01

    . The homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening of InGaAs quantum dot luminescence is of central importance for the potential application of this material system in optoelectronic devices. Recent measurements of MOCVD-grown InAs/InGaAs quantum dots indicate a large homogeneous broadening at room temperature due...

  4. Teaching Beginning Chemistry Students Simple Lewis Dot Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiff, Peter; Czerwinski, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Students beginning their initial study of chemistry often have a difficult time mastering simple Lewis dot structures. Textbooks show students how to manipulate Lewis structures by moving valence electron dots around the chemical structure so each atom has an octet or duet. However, an easier method of teaching Lewis structures for simple…

  5. Electron Energy Level Statistics in Graphene Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Katsnellson, M. I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental observations of size quantization of electron energy levels in graphene quantum dots [7] we investigate the level statistics in the simplest tight-binding model for different dot shapes by computer simulation. The results are in a reasonable agreement with the experi

  6. Imaging vasculature and lymphatic flow in mice using quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballou, Byron; Ernst, Lauren A.; Andreko, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are ideal probes for fluorescent imaging of vascular and lymphatic tissues. On injection into appropriate sites, red- and near-infrared-emitting quantum dots provide excellent definition of vasculature, lymphoid organs, and lymph nodes draining both normal tissues and tumors. We deta...

  7. Negative Trions Trapped by a Spherical Parabolic Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a negatively charged exciton trapped by a spherical parabolic quantum dot has been investigated. The energy spectra of low-lying states are calculated by means of matrix diagonalization. The important feature of the low-lying states of the negatively charged excitons in a spherical quantum dot is obtained via an analysis of the energy spectra.

  8. 49 CFR 41.119 - DOT regulated buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and additions to existing buildings will ensure that each DOT regulated building is designed and... section pertains to all new building projects for which development of detailed plans and specifications.... (d) For DOT regulated buildings a certification of compliance with the seismic design...

  9. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alex

    2012-07-29

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantum dot density studies for quantum dot intermediate band solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, Sedsel Fretheim; Zhou, Dayong; Vitelli, Stefano; Mayani, Maryam Gholami; Fimland, Bjoern-Ove; Reenaas, Turid Worren

    2010-07-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been an active area of research for many years and have been implemented in several applications, such as lasers and detectors. During the last years, some attempts have been made to increase the absorption and efficiency of solar cells by inserting QDs into the intrinsic region of pin solar cells. So far, these attempts have been successful in increasing the absorption, but not the cell efficiency. There are probably several reasons for this lack of efficiency increase, but we believe that one important reason is the low density of the implemented QDs. In this work, samples of single layer InAs QDs on n-GaAs(001) substrates have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and we have performed a systematic study of how deposition parameters affect the QD density. The aim is to achieve densities > 1011 cm-2. The nominal substrate temperature (360 - 500 deg. C), the InAs growth rate (0.085 - 1 ML/s) and thickness (2.0 - 2.8 ML) have been varied in a systematic way for two different deposition methods of InAs, i.e. continuous deposition or deposition with interruptions. In addition, we have for the continuous growth samples also varied the As-flux (0.5 - 6 centre dot10-6 torr). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been the main characterization method to determine quantum dot sizes and densities, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used for evaluation of the quantum dot heights. We find that the QD density increases with reduced growth temperature and that it is higher for samples grown continuously than for samples grown with growth interruptions. The homogeneity is also strongly affected by temperature, InAs deposition method and the As-flux. We have observed QD densities as high as 2.5 centre dot1011 cm-2 for the samples grown at the lowest growth temperatures. (Author)

  11. Silicon Quantum Dots for Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    A. J. Ferguson , A. S. Dzurak, and R. G. Clark. Gate-defined quantum dots in intrinsic silicon. Nano Letters, 7(7), 2051 (2007). 4, 21, 44, 68, 99 132...B, 80(7), 075310 (2009). 66 [105] M. Field, C. Smith, M. Pepper , D. Ritchie, J. Frost, G. Jones, and D. Hasko. Measurements of Coulomb blockade with a...transistor as an integrated charge sensor. Applied Physics Letters, 97(26), 262113 (2010). 68, 74 [111] G. Podd, S. Angus, D. Williams, and A. Ferguson

  12. Graphene Quantum Dots for Theranostics and Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Kathryn L; Goreham, Renee V; Nann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Since their advent in the early 1990s, nanomaterials hold promise to constitute improved technologies in the biomedical area. In particular, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were conjectured to produce new or improve current methods used for bioimaging, drug delivery, and biomarker sensors for early detection of diseases. This review article critically compares and discusses current state-of-the-art use of GQDs in biology and health sciences. It shows the ability of GQDs to be easily functionalised for use as a targeted multimodal treatment and imaging platform. The in vitro and in vivo toxicity of GQDs are explored showing low toxicity for many types of GQDs.

  13. Resonance fluorescence from a telecom-wavelength quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khuzheyri, R; Huwer, J; Santana, T S; Szymanska, J Skiba-; Felle, M; Ward, M B; Stevenson, R M; Farrer, I; Tanner, M G; Hadfield, R H; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J; Gerardot, B D

    2016-01-01

    We report on resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot emitting at telecom wavelengths. We perform high-resolution spectroscopy and observe the Mollow triplet in the Rabi regime--a hallmark of resonance fluorescence. The measured resonance-fluorescence spectra allow us to rule out pure dephasing as a significant decoherence mechanism in these quantum dots. Combined with numerical simulations, the experimental results provide robust characterisation of charge noise in the environment of the quantum dot. Resonant control of the quantum dot opens up new possibilities for on-demand generation of indistinguishable single photons at telecom wavelengths as well as quantum optics experiments and direct manipulation of solid-state qubits in telecom-wavelength quantum dots.

  14. Quantum dots in diagnostics and detection: principles and paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanic, T R; Zhang, Y; Wang, T H

    2014-06-21

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit exceptional optical and electrical behaviors not found in their bulk counterparts. Following seminal work in the development of water-soluble quantum dots in the late 1990's, researchers have sought to develop interesting and novel ways of exploiting the extraordinary properties of quantum dots for biomedical applications. Since that time, over 10,000 articles have been published related to the use of quantum dots in biomedicine, many of which regard their use in detection and diagnostic bioassays. This review presents a didactic overview of fundamental physical phenomena associated with quantum dots and paradigm examples of how these phenomena can and have been readily exploited for manifold uses in nanobiotechnology with a specific focus on their implementation in in vitro diagnostic assays and biodetection.

  15. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. O. Lipatova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been found to be dependent on the registration wavelength in the range from 450 to 700 nm. Obtained fluorophosphate glasses with CdS quantum dots can find their application as fluorescent materials with intensive luminescence band and long excited-state natural lifetime.

  16. Single-electron Spin Resonance in a Quadruple Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Ito, Takumi; Sugawara, Retsu; Noiri, Akito; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are good candidates of quantum bits for quantum information processing. Basic operations of the qubit have been realized in recent years: initialization, manipulation of single spins, two qubit entanglement operations, and readout. Now it becomes crucial to demonstrate scalability of this architecture by conducting spin operations on a scaled up system. Here, we demonstrate single-electron spin resonance in a quadruple quantum dot. A few-electron quadruple quantum dot is formed within a magnetic field gradient created by a micro-magnet. We oscillate the wave functions of the electrons in the quantum dots by applying microwave voltages and this induces electron spin resonance. The resonance energies of the four quantum dots are slightly different because of the stray field created by the micro-magnet and therefore frequency-resolved addressable control of each electron spin resonance is possible.

  17. Colloidal-quantum-dot spasers and plasmonic amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Kress, Stephan J P; Rohner, Patrik; Kim, David K; Antolinez, Felipe V; Zaininger, Karl-Augustin; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Richner, Patrizia; McPeak, Kevin M; Poulikakos, Dimos; Norris, David J

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots are robust, efficient, and tunable emitters now used in lighting, displays, and lasers. Consequently, when the spaser, a laser-like source of surface plasmons, was first proposed, quantum dots were specified as the ideal plasmonic gain medium. Subsequent spaser designs, however, have required a single material to simultaneously provide gain and define the plasmonic cavity, an approach ill-suited to quantum dots and other colloidal nanomaterials. Here we develop a more open architecture that decouples the gain medium from the cavity, leading to a versatile class of quantum-dot-based spasers that allow controlled generation, extraction, and manipulation of plasmons. We first create high-quality-factor, aberration-corrected, Ag plasmonic cavities. We then incorporate quantum dots via electrohydrodynamic printing18,19 or drop-casting. Photoexcitation under ambient conditions generates monochromatic plasmons above threshold. This signal is extracted, directed through an integrated amplifier,...

  18. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Haug, R. J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstr. 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Zwicknagl, G. [Institut für Mathematische Physik, TU Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Schuh, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätstr. 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik, ETH Zürich, Schafmattstr. 16, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland and Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätstr. 31, 93053 Regens (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    The competition between the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida (RKKY) interaction is investigated in a double quantum dots system, coupled via a central open conducting region. A perpendicular magnetic field induces the formation of Landau Levels which in turn give rise to the so-called Kondo chessboard pattern in the transport through the quantum dots. The two quantum dots become therefore chirally coupled via the edge channels formed in the open conducting area. In regions where both quantum dots exhibit Kondo transport the presence of the RKKY exchange interaction is probed by an analysis of the temperature dependence. The thus obtained Kondo temperature of one dot shows an abrupt increase at the onset of Kondo transport in the other, independent of the magnetic field polarity, i.e. edge state chirality in the central region.

  19. Synthesis of biocompatible multicolor luminescent carbon dots for bioimaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaprasad Puvvada, B N Prashanth Kumar, Suraj Konar, Himani Kalita, Mahitosh Mandal and Amita Pathak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble carbon dots (C-dots were prepared through microwave-assisted pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of dextrin in the presence of sulfuric acid. The C-dots produced showed multicolor luminescence in the entire visible range, without adding any surface-passivating agent. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed the graphitic nature of the carbon and the presence of hydrophilic groups on the surface, respectively. The formation of uniformly distributed C-dots and their luminescent properties were, respectively, revealed from transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The biocompatible nature of C-dots was confirmed by a cytotoxicity assay on MDA-MB-468 cells and their cellular uptake was assessed through a localization study.

  20. Second-harmonic imaging of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld;

    2000-01-01

    Resonant second-harmonic generation is observed at room temperature in reflection from self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots grown on a GaAs (001) substrate. The detected second-harmonic signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm corresponding to the quantum-dot photoluminescence maximum....... In addition, the second-harmonic spectrum exhibits another smaller but well-pronounced peak at 765 nm not found in the linear experiments. We attribute this peak to the generation of second-harmonic radiation in the AlGaAs spacer layer enhanced by the local symmetry at the quantum-dot interface. We further...... observe that second-harmonic images of the quantum-dot surface structure show wavelength-dependent spatial variations. Imaging at different wavelength is used to demonstrate second-harmonic generation from the semiconductor quantum dots. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  1. Non-blinking quantum dot with a plasmonic nanoshell resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Botao; Giovanelli, Emerson; Habert, Benjamin; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Nasilowski, Michel; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lequeux, Nicolas; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Dubertret, Benoit

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are fluorescent nanocrystals exhibiting exceptional optical properties, but their emission intensity strongly depends on their charging state and local environment. This leads to blinking at the single-particle level or even complete fluorescence quenching, and limits the applications of quantum dots as fluorescent particles. Here, we show that a single quantum dot encapsulated in a silica shell coated with a continuous gold nanoshell provides a system with a stable and Poissonian emission at room temperature that is preserved regardless of drastic changes in the local environment. This novel hybrid quantum dot/silica/gold structure behaves as a plasmonic resonator with a strong Purcell factor, in very good agreement with simulations. The gold nanoshell also acts as a shield that protects the quantum dot fluorescence and enhances its resistance to high-power photoexcitation or high-energy electron beams. This plasmonic fluorescent resonator opens the way to a new family of plasmonic nanoemitters with robust optical properties.

  2. Coherent Dynamics of Quantum Dots in Photonic-Crystal Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg

    deviations. Similar measurements on a quantum dot in a photonic-crystal cavity sow a Rabi splitting on resonance, while time-resolved measurements prove that the system is in the weak coupling regime. Whle tuning the quantum dot through resonance of the high-Q mode we observe a strong and surprisingly...... Successfully model the decay rates with a microscopic model that allows us to for the first time extract the effective phonon density of states, which we can model with bulk phonons. Studies on a quantum dot detuned from a low-Q mode of a photonic-crystal cavity show a high collection efficiency at the first......In this thesis we have performed quantum-electrodynamics experiments on quantum dots embedded in photonic-crystal cavities. We perform a quantitative comparison of the decay dynamics and emission spectra of quantum dots embedded in a micropillar cavity and a photonic-crystal cavity. The light...

  3. Homogeneous linewidth of self-assembled III-V quantum dots observed in single-dot photoluminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan; Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg;

    2003-01-01

    We report photoluminescence emission from single self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots, which is broadened purely by dephasing processes. We observe linewidths as low as 6+/-3@meV at 10K, which agrees with the homogeneous linewidth derived from four-wave mixing experiments. By selecting dots that ...

  4. DotFETs: MOSFETs strained by a Single SiGE dot in a Low-Temperature ELA Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biasotto, C.

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was performed in the context of the European Sixth Framework Program FP6 project “Disposable Dot Field Effect Transistor for High Speed Si Integrated Circuits”, referred to as the D-DotFET project. The project had the goal of realizing strain-enhanced mobility in CM

  5. OpenCL parallel programming development cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    OpenCL Parallel Programming Development Cookbook will provide a set of advanced recipes that can be utilized to optimize existing code. This book is therefore ideal for experienced developers with a working knowledge of C/C++ and OpenCL.This book is intended for software developers who have often wondered what to do with that newly bought CPU or GPU they bought other than using it for playing computer games; this book is also for developers who have a working knowledge of C/C++ and who want to learn how to write parallel programs in OpenCL so that life isn't too boring.

  6. Cost Effectiveness of DOTS and Non—DOTS Strategies for Smear—Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU-QUN; JINSHUI-GAO; 等

    2000-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of DOTS(Directly Observed Treatment,short course)and nonDOTS strategies for smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Beijing was evaluated.Cost calculation was based on the experses of drugs ,chest X-ray films,sputm smears and cultures for the patients.Effectiveness of the intervention was assessed in two aspects:direct benefits to the patients treated and indirect benefits to the others through reduced transmission of tuberculsis;disability adjusted life of year(DALY) was used as an index.The results showed that one DALY could be saved with 45.7 Yuan by DOTS and 471.4 Yuan by non-DOTS.DOTS is a good control strategy for smear-positive tuberculosis.

  7. Cost Effectiveness of DOTS and Non-DOTS Strategies for Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment, short course) and non-DOTS strategies for smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Beijing was evaluated. Cost calculation was based on the expenses of drugs, chest X-ray films, sputum smears and cultures for the patients. Effectiveness of the intervention was assessed in two aspects: direct benefits to the patients treated and indirect benefits to the others through reduced transmission of tuberculosis; disability adjusted life of year (DALY) was used as an index. The results showed that one DALY could be saved with 45.7 Yuan by DOTS and 471.4 Yuan by non-DOTS. DOTS is a good control strategy for smear-positive tuberculosis.

  8. Electrons, holes, and excitons in superlattice of cylindrical quantum dots with weakest coupling of quasiparticles between quantum dots layers

    CERN Document Server

    Tkach, N V; Zegrya, G G

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical investigation of the spectrum of electrons, holes, and excitons in the superlattice of cylindrical quantum dots with weakest coupling of quasiparticles between vertical layers of quantum dots is carried out. The calculations are fulfilled by the example of cylindrical quantum dots of beta-HgS introduced into beta-CdS as the superlattice. It is shown that electron and hole in such system form quasi-two-dimensional energy minibands, but excitons are described by the Sugano-Shinada model. The dependence of quasiparticle spectra on geometric parameters of the superlattice with cylindrical quantum dots is studied. It is shown that the position of minibands of all quasiparticles is very sensitive to variation of the quantum dot height

  9. Perfil clínico-epidemiológico de los pacientes atendidos y censados en el Centro Paraibano de Ostomizados-João Pessoa, Brasil Clinical epidemiological profile of patients seen and enumerated in The Center Paraibano of Ostomized João Pessoa (Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Marques Andrade de Souza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudio descriptivo con un abordaje cuantitativo realizado en el Centro Paraibano de Ostomizados en João Pessoa. La muestra fue de 19 participantes censados en el servicio de ostomizados, utilizándose para la recogida de datos un forrmulario con la información de la caracterización socio-demográfica de los portadores de colostomía y sus necesidades. Los resultados informan sobre los aspectos personales del portador de colostomía, y especialmente de los aspectos negativos para algunas necesidades en el día a día, en relación con las necesidades psicosociobiológicas, de eliminación e integridad de la piel periestomal. Los resultados de esta investigación sustentan la necesidad de la existencia del grupo de apoyo con la participación de los profesionales de la salud de las diversas especialidades implicados, para reducir la mayoría de complicaciones secundarias a las colostomías.Descriptive study with a quantitative approach realized in the Center Paraibano of Ostomized Patients of João Pessoa. The sample included 19 participants registered in the service of ostomized patients, using for the withdrawal of information a form, with information of social and demographic characteristics of the carriers of colostomy and his needs. The results report on personal aspects of the carrier of colostomy, and specially of the negative aspects for some needs in daily life, in relation with the psychological, social and biological needs, of elimination and integrity of the skin around the ostomy. The results of this investigation support the need of the existence of the group of support with the participation of health professionals for the diverse specialities implied, in order to reduce most of the side effects of the colostomies.

  10. Historia clínica de enfermería: un instrumento de aprendizaje y mucho más

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Isabel Hernández-López

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: Éste articulo muestra un documento denominado Historia Clínica de Enfermería (HCE), el cual actúa como instrumento y estrategia de enseñanza- aprendizaje, en la docencia de la práctica clínica para el cuidado disciplinar. Para ello todos los conocimientos teóricos del área, su epistemología y el pensamiento científico se combinan dotándolo de la calidad documental que exige la normatividad de la sociedad moderna. Materiales y Métodos: El artículo de reflexión presenta un documen...

  11. Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics: A Path Forward

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-11-22

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer a path toward high-efficiency photovoltaics based on low-cost materials and processes. Spectral tunability via the quantum size effect facilitates absorption of specific wavelengths from across the sun\\'s broad spectrum. CQD materials\\' ease of processing derives from their synthesis, storage, and processing in solution. Rapid advances have brought colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic solar power conversion efficiencies of 6% in the latest reports. These achievements represent important first steps toward commercially compelling performance. Here we review advances in device architecture and materials science. We diagnose the principal phenomenon-electronic states within the CQD film band gap that limit both current and voltage in devices-that must be cured for CQD PV devices to fulfill their promise. We close with a prescription, expressed as bounds on the density and energy of electronic states within the CQD film band gap, that should allow device efficiencies to rise to those required for the future of the solar energy field. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  13. Quantum Computer Using Coupled Quantum Dot Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, N J; Natori, A; Yasunaga, H; Wu*, Nan-Jian

    1999-01-01

    We propose a method for implementation of a quantum computer using artificial molecules. The artificial molecule consists of two coupled quantum dots stacked along z direction and one single electron. One-qubit and two-qubit gates are constructed by one molecule and two coupled molecules, respectively.The ground state and the first excited state of the molecule are used to encode the |0> and |1> states of a qubit. The qubit is manipulated by a resonant electromagnetic wave that is applied directly to the qubit through a microstrip line. The coupling between two qubits in a quantum controlled NOT gate is switched on (off) by floating (grounding) the metal film electrodes. We study the operations of the gates by using a box-shaped quantum dot model and numerically solving a time-dependent Schridinger equation, and demonstrate that the quantum gates can perform the quantum computation. The operating speed of the gates is about one operation per 4ps. The reading operation of the output of the quantum computer can...

  14. Application of Quantum Dots in Biological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are a group of semiconducting nanomaterials with unique optical and electronic properties. They have distinct advantages over traditional fluorescent organic dyes in chemical and biological studies in terms of tunable emission spectra, signal brightness, photostability, and so forth. Currently, the major type of QDs is the heavy metal-containing II-IV, IV-VI, or III-V QDs. Silicon QDs and conjugated polymer dots have also been developed in order to lower the potential toxicity of the fluorescent probes for biological applications. Aqueous solubility is the common problem for all types of QDs when they are employed in the biological researches, such as in vitro and in vivo imaging. To circumvent this problem, ligand exchange and polymer coating are proven to be effective, besides synthesizing QDs in aqueous solutions directly. However, toxicity is another big concern especially for in vivo studies. Ligand protection and core/shell structure can partly solve this problem. With the rapid development of QDs research, new elements and new morphologies have been introduced to this area to fabricate more safe and efficient QDs for biological applications.

  15. Quantum dot imaging for embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambhir Sanjiv S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs hold increasing potential for cellular imaging both in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we aimed to evaluate in vivo multiplex imaging of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells labeled with Qtracker delivered quantum dots (QDs. Results Murine embryonic stem (ES cells were labeled with six different QDs using Qtracker. ES cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation were not adversely affected by QDs compared with non-labeled control cells (P = NS. Afterward, labeled ES cells were injected subcutaneously onto the backs of athymic nude mice. These labeled ES cells could be imaged with good contrast with one single excitation wavelength. With the same excitation wavelength, the signal intensity, defined as (total signal-background/exposure time in millisecond was 11 ± 2 for cells labeled with QD 525, 12 ± 9 for QD 565, 176 ± 81 for QD 605, 176 ± 136 for QD 655, 167 ± 104 for QD 705, and 1,713 ± 482 for QD 800. Finally, we have shown that QD 800 offers greater fluorescent intensity than the other QDs tested. Conclusion In summary, this is the first demonstration of in vivo multiplex imaging of mouse ES cells labeled QDs. Upon further improvements, QDs will have a greater potential for tracking stem cells within deep tissues. These results provide a promising tool for imaging stem cell therapy non-invasively in vivo.

  16. Nano-laser on silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Qin, Chao-Jian; Lü, Quan; Xu, Li

    2011-04-01

    A new conception of nano-laser is proposed in which depending on the size of nano-clusters (silicon quantum dots (QD)), the pumping level of laser can be tuned by the quantum confinement (QC) effect, and the population inversion can be formed between the valence band and the localized states in gap produced from the surface bonds of nano-clusters. Here we report the experimental demonstration of nano-laser on silicon quantum dots fabricated by nanosecond pulse laser. The peaks of stimulated emission are observed at 605 nm and 693 nm. Through the micro-cavity of nano-laser, a full width at half maximum of the peak at 693 nm can reach to 0.5 nm. The theoretical model and the experimental results indicate that it is a necessary condition for setting up nano-laser that the smaller size of QD (d nano-laser will be limited in the range of 1.7-2.3 eV generally due to the position of the localized states in gap, which is in good agreement between the experiments and the theory.

  17. Study of metallothionein-quantum dots interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tmejova, Katerina; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Krizkova, Sona; Blazkova, Iva; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles have gained increasing interest in medical and in vivo applications. Metallothionein (MT) is well known as a maintainer of metal ions balance in intracellular space. This is due to high affinity of this protein to any reactive species including metals and reactive oxygen species. The purpose of this study was to determine the metallothionein-quantum dots interactions that were investigated by spectral and electrochemical techniques. CuS, CdS, PbS, and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were analysed. The highest intensity was shown for CdTe, than for CdS measured by fluorescence. These results were supported by statistical analysis and considered as significant. Further, these interactions were analysed using gel electrophoresis, where MT aggregates forming after interactions with QDs were detected. Using differential pulse voltammetry Brdicka reaction, QDs and MT were studied. This method allowed us to confirm spectral results and, moreover, to observe the changes in MT structure causing new voltammetric peaks called X and Y, which enhanced with the prolonged time of interaction up to 6 h.

  18. Kondo effects in triangular triple quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Akira; Numata, Takahide; Nisikawa, Yunori; Hewson, A. C.

    2009-03-01

    We study the conductance through a triangular triple quantum dot, which is connected to two noninteracting leads, using the numerical renormalization group (NRG). It is found that the system shows a variety of Kondo effects depending on the filling of the triangle. The SU(4) Kondo effect occurs at half-filling, and a sharp conductance dip due to a phase lapse appears in the gate-voltage dependence. Furthermore, when four electrons occupy the three sites on average, a local S=1 moment, which is caused by the Nagaoka mechanism, is induced along the triangle. The temperature dependence of the entropy and spin susceptibility of the triangle shows that this moment is screened by the conduction electrons via two separate stages at different temperatures. The two-terminal and four-terminal conductances show a clear difference at the gate voltages, where the SU(4) or the S=1 Kondo effects occur[1]. We will also discuss effects of deformations of the triangular configuration, caused by the inhomogeneity in the inter-dot couplings and in the gate voltages. [4pt] [1] T.Numata, Y.Nisikawa, A.Oguri, and A.C.Hewson: arXiv:0808.3496.

  19. Using quantum dot photoluminescence for load detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, M.; Martin, J.; Hartwig, M.; Baumann, R. R.; Otto, T.; Gessner, T.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel concept for an integrable and flexible sensor capable to visualize mechanical impacts on lightweight structures by quenching the photoluminescence (PL) of CdSe quantum dots. Considering the requirements such as visibility, storage time and high optical contrast of PL quenching with low power consumption, we have investigated a symmetrical and an asymmetrical layer stack consisting of semiconductor organic N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis(3-methylphenyl)-3,3'-dimethylbenzidine (HMTPD) and CdSe quantum dots with elongated CdS shell. Time-resolved series of PL spectra from layer stacks with applied voltages of different polarity and simultaneous observation of power consumption have shown that a variety of mechanisms such as photo-induced charge separation and charge injection, cause PL quenching. However, mechanisms such as screening of external field as well as Auger-assisted charge ejection is working contrary to that. Investigations regarding the influence of illumination revealed that the positive biased asymmetrical layer stack is the preferred sensor configuration, due to a charge carrier injection at voltages of 10 V without the need of coincident illumination.

  20. Polymersomes containing quantum dots for cellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camblin M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine Camblin,1 Pascal Detampel,1 Helene Kettiger,1 Dalin Wu,2 Vimalkumar Balasubramanian,1,* Jörg Huwyler1,*1Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Quantum dots (QDs are highly fluorescent and stable probes for cellular and molecular imaging. However, poor intracellular delivery, stability, and toxicity of QDs in biological compartments hamper their use in cellular imaging. To overcome these limitations, we developed a simple and effective method to load QDs into polymersomes (Ps made of poly(dimethylsiloxane-poly(2-methyloxazoline (PDMS-PMOXA diblock copolymers without compromising the characteristics of the QDs. These Ps showed no cellular toxicity and QDs were successfully incorporated into the aqueous compartment of the Ps as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Ps containing QDs showed colloidal stability over a period of 6 weeks if stored in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at physiological pH (7.4. Efficient intracellular delivery of Ps containing QDs was achieved in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2 and was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Ps containing QDs showed a time- and concentration-dependent uptake in HepG2 cells and exhibited better intracellular stability than liposomes. Our results suggest that Ps containing QDs can be used as nanoprobes for cellular imaging.Keywords: quantum dots, polymersomes, cellular imaging, cellular uptake

  1. Using quantum dot photoluminescence for load detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moebius

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel concept for an integrable and flexible sensor capable to visualize mechanical impacts on lightweight structures by quenching the photoluminescence (PL of CdSe quantum dots. Considering the requirements such as visibility, storage time and high optical contrast of PL quenching with low power consumption, we have investigated a symmetrical and an asymmetrical layer stack consisting of semiconductor organic N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(3-methylphenyl-3,3′-dimethylbenzidine (HMTPD and CdSe quantum dots with elongated CdS shell. Time-resolved series of PL spectra from layer stacks with applied voltages of different polarity and simultaneous observation of power consumption have shown that a variety of mechanisms such as photo-induced charge separation and charge injection, cause PL quenching. However, mechanisms such as screening of external field as well as Auger-assisted charge ejection is working contrary to that. Investigations regarding the influence of illumination revealed that the positive biased asymmetrical layer stack is the preferred sensor configuration, due to a charge carrier injection at voltages of 10 V without the need of coincident illumination.

  2. Oxocentered Cu(II) lead selenite honeycomb lattices hosting Cu(I)Cl2 groups obtained by chemical vapor transport reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovrugin, Vadim M; Colmont, Marie; Siidra, Oleg I; Mentré, Olivier; Al-Shuray, Alexander; Gurzhiy, Vladislav V; Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2015-06-11

    Chemical vapor transport (CVT) reactions were used to prepare three modular mixed-valent Cu(I)-Cu(II) compounds, (Pb2Cu(2+)9O4)(SeO3)4(Cu(+)Cl(2))Cl5 (1), (PbCu(2+)5O2)(SeO3)2(Cu(+)Cl2)Cl3 (2), and (Pb(x)Cu(2+)(6-x)O2)(SeO3)2(Cu(+)Cl2)K(1-x)Cl(4-x) (x = 0.20) (3). In their crystal structures chains of anion-centered (OCu(2+)4) and (OCu(2+)3Pb) tetrahedra form honeycomb-like double layers with cavities occupied by linear [Cu(+)Cl2](-) groups.

  3. Ultrashort Dynamics in Quantum Dot Waveguides: Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehrig, E.; Poel, Mike van der; Birkedal, Dan;

    2004-01-01

    Experimental pump-probe measurements and computational modeling on the basis of spatially resolved Quantum Dot Maxwell-Bloch equations allow identification of the processes underlying the ultrafast dot dynamics.......Experimental pump-probe measurements and computational modeling on the basis of spatially resolved Quantum Dot Maxwell-Bloch equations allow identification of the processes underlying the ultrafast dot dynamics....

  4. On Sensitivity of HE CL-20

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu. V. Sheikov; L. A. Andrievskikh; V. G. Vasipenko; S. A. Vakhmistrov; N. N. Zhbanova; V. B. Kosolapov; L.V.Fomicheva

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recently a series of publications appeared in literature devoted to study of properties of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitan( CL-20), which is considered as an explosive with performance higher than that of HMX, and which has moderate sensitivity[1].

  5. FeCl3 catalyzed diarylmethanes formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Xian Li; Zheng Duan; Yang Jie Wu

    2009-01-01

    Under mild condition,using FeCl3 as catalyst,a series of functionalized diarylmethanes were prepared efficiently from the reactions of arenes with paraformaldehyde.This catalytic system is not sensitive to air and moisture.

  6. LatticeQCD using OpenCL

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Matthias; Pinke, Christopher; Schäfer, Christian; Zeidlewicz, Lars

    2011-01-01

    We report on our implementation of LatticeQCD applications using OpenCL. We focus on the general concept and on distributing different parts on hybrid systems, consisting of both CPUs (Central Processing Units) and GPUs (Graphic Processing Units).

  7. Problems of contamination in 36Cl studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. R.; Shahgholi, N.; Jenkinson, A.; Smith, A.; Fifield, L. K.; Ophel, T.; Allan, G.

    1990-12-01

    The joint ANSTO/ANU 36Cl program has now measured more than 700 samples from many different locations. During the course of this work, a variety of contamination problems have affected a small number of results which have provided valuable information on the effects of ion source cross-talk, sample preparation and storage procedures and sources of high- 36Cl material. A sample of Weeks Island halite is processed along with every batch of field samples and the observed ratio provides a clear distinction between normal batches and those subject to contamination. Over three years, the long-term average ratio of {36Cl}/{Cl} for normal halite samples is (1 ± 1) × 10 -15. The sample handling procedures developed during the course of this work provide a useful guide to the techniques that must be used to achieve the sensitivity limits which are potentially available using AMS.

  8. Kennedy Space Center Five Year Sustainability Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann T.

    2016-01-01

    The Federal Government is committed to following sustainable principles. At its heart, sustainability integrates environmental, societal and economic solutions for present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Building upon its pledge towards environmental stewardship, the Administration generated a vision of sustainability spanning ten goals mandated within Executive Order (EO) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade. In November 2015, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) responded to this EO by incorporating it into a new release of the NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP). The SSPP recognizes the importance of aligning environmental practices in a manner that preserves, enhances and strengthens NASA's ability to perform its mission indefinitely. The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is following suit with KSC's Sustainability Plan (SP) by promoting, maintaining and pioneering green practices in all aspects of our mission. KSC's SP recognizes that the best sustainable solutions use an interdisciplinary, collaborative approach spanning civil servant and contractor personnel from across the Center. This approach relies on the participation of all employees to develop and implement sustainability endeavors connected with the following ten goals: Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Design, build and maintain sustainable buildings, facilities and infrastructure. Leverage clean and renewable energy. Increase water conservation. Improve fleet and vehicle efficiency and management. Purchase sustainable products and services. Minimize waste and prevent pollution. Implement performance contracts for Federal buildings. Manage electronic equipment and data centers responsibly. Pursue climate change resilience. The KSC SP details the strategies and actions that address the following objectives: Reduce Center costs. center dot Increase energy and water efficiencies. Promote smart

  9. Equations for calculation of NaCl/( NaCl + CaCl2 ) ratios and salinities from hydrohalite-melting and ice-melting temperatures in the H2O-NaCl-CaCl2 system%利用H2O-NaCl-CaCl2体系水盐化合物和冰的融化温度计算NaCl/(NaCl+CaCl2)比值和盐度的方程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoxiang Chi; Pei Ni

    2007-01-01

    The composition of fluid inclusions in the H2O-NaCl-CaCl2 system has been generally graphically estimated using the melting temperatures of hydrohalite ( Tm-HH ) and ice ( Tm-ice ). Here we present two equations that can be used to calculate the relative proportion of NaCl ( i. e. , NaCt/[ NaCl + CaCl2 ], or XNaCl) and the total salinity ( i. e. , NaCl + CaCl2, wt% ) for fluid inclusions with ice as the last melting phase. XNaCl can be calculated from Tm-HH using the following equation:y= ( a + bx)-1/c where y is XNaCl, x is Tm-HH, a =0. 33124402, b = -0.031518028, and c =0. 22932736. In the cases where only Tm-ice is measured and Tm-HH is not known, Tm-ice can be used as the maximum possible Tm-HH to calculate the maximum value of XNaCl using the above equation. In these cases, the following equation can be used to calculate the maximum total salinity: y = (a +bx +cx2) -1 where y is salinity, x is Tm-HH, a = 0. 057184817, b = 0. 00078565757, and c = 5. 7262766E-6. Because the isothems in the field of ice are sub-parallel to the NaCl-CaCl2 binary side in the H2O-NaCl-CaCl2 ternary system, the errors in salinity calculation introduced by the above approximation are small ( less than 2 wt% ). A Windows program for calculation of XNacl and salinity is available at: http ://uregina. ca/~ chiguox.

  10. OpenCL programming using Python syntax

    OpenAIRE

    Massimo Di Pierro

    2013-01-01

    We describe ocl, a Python library built on top of p yOpenCL and numpy. It allows programming GPU devices using Python. Python functions which ar e marked up using the provided decorator, are converted into C99/OpenCL and compil ed using the JIT at runtime. This approach lowers the barrier to entry to programming GPU devices since it requires only Python syntax and no external compilation or linkin g steps. The resulting Pyth...

  11. Highly tuneable hole quantum dots in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauns, Matthias; Ridderbos, Joost; Li, Ang; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2016-10-01

    We define single quantum dots of lengths varying from 60 nm up to nearly half a micron in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires. The charging energies scale inversely with the quantum dot length between 18 and 4 meV. Subsequently, we split up a long dot into a double quantum dot with a separate control over the tunnel couplings and the electrochemical potential of each dot. Both single and double quantum dot configurations prove to be very stable and show excellent control over the electrostatic environment of the dots, making this system a highly versatile platform for spin-based quantum computing.

  12. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  13. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  14. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aid & Attendance & Housebound Caregivers Community Living Centers (CLC) Community Nursing Homes Domiciliaries (Please contact your local VA Medical Center) Homemaker & Home Health Aid Care Hospice and Palliative Care State Veterans ...

  15. BKG Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  16. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  17. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  18. Center of Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, J. Steven; Wood-Steed, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how college and university student centers are becoming the institution's marketing tools. Explores how the Millennium Center at the University of Missouri in St. Louis exemplifies this new trend. (GR)

  19. RSW Cell Centered Grids

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New cell centered grids are generated to complement the node-centered ones uploaded. Six tarballs containing the coarse, medium, and fine mixed-element and pure tet....

  20. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  1. National Rehabilitation Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including News and Notes) Welcome to the National Rehabilitation Information Center! We are conducting improvements to the ... experience. We apologize for any inconvenience The National Rehabilitation Information Center ( NARIC ) is the library of the ...

  2. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external) within the A. James Clark School...

  3. Automating the Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  5. "JCE" Classroom Activity Connections: NaCl or CaCl[subscript 2], Smart Polymer Gel Tells More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yueh-Huey; Lin, Jia-Ying; Wang, Yu-Chen; Yaung, Jing-Fun

    2010-01-01

    This classroom activity connection demonstrates the differences between the effects of NaCl (a salt of monovalent metal ions) and CaCl[subscript 2] (a salt of polyvalent metal ions) on swollen superabsorbent polymer gels. Being ionic compounds, NaCl and CaCl[subscript 2] both collapse the swollen polymer gels. The gel contracted by NaCl reswells…

  6. Exposing the Data Center

    OpenAIRE

    Sergejev, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid growth in the importance of the Internet, data centers - the buildings that store information on the web - are quickly becoming the most critical infrastructural objects in the world. However, so far they have received very little, if any, architectural attention. This thesis proclaims data centers to be the 'churches' of the digital society and proposes a new type of a publicly accessible data center. The thesis starts with a brief overview of the history of data centers ...

  7. Electric properties of Ge quantum dot embedded in Si matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xi-ying; SHI Wei-lin

    2005-01-01

    The electric characteristics of Ge quantum dot grown by molecular beam epitaxy in Si matrix were investigated by admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy. The admittance spectroscopy measurements show that the activation energy of 0.341 eV can be considered as the emitting energy of hole from the ground state of the quantum dot. And the capacitance variation with temperature of the sample shows a platform at various frequencies with reverse bias 0.5 V, which indicates that the boundary of space charge region is located at the quantum dot layer where the large confined hole concentration blocks the further extension of space charge region. When the temperature increases from 120 K to 200 K, the holes in the dot emit out completely. The position of the platform shifting with the increase of the applied frequency shows the frequency effects of the charges in the quantum dot. The deep level transient spectroscopy results show that the charge concentration in the Ge quantum dot is a function of the pulse duration and the reverse bias voltage, the activation energy and capture cross-section of hole decrease with the increase of pulse duration due to the Coulomb charging effect. The valence-band offsets of hole in Ge dot obtained by admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy are 0.341 and 0.338 eV, respectively.

  8. Bis[N,N′-bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine]-1κ2 N,N′;2κ2 N,N′-tri-μ-trichlorido-1:2κ6 Cl:Cl-chlorido-1κCl-tetra­hydro­furan-2κO-dichromium(II) dichloro­methane 4.5-solvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, Stephan; Peulecke, Normen; Müller, Bernd H.; Spannenberg, Anke; Rosenthal, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In the mol­ecular structure of the title compound, [Cr2Cl4(C26H36N2)2(C4H8O)]·4.5CH2Cl2, the two CrII centers are bridged by three Cl atoms, forming a dinuclear complex. Each CrII center is coordinated by one chelating bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine ligand via both N atoms. An additional chloride ion binds to one chromium center, whereas an additional tetra­hydro­furan mol­ecule coordinates to the second CrII center. The coordination geometry at each CrII center can be best described as distorted octa­hedral. PMID:21578607

  9. Data center cooling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  10. Reduction behavior of cerium(Ⅲ) ions in NaCl-2CsCl melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xue; ZHU Hongmin

    2005-01-01

    The cathodic process of cerium(Ⅲ) ions in NaCl-2CsCl melt was studied by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry with tungsten and gold electrodes at 873 K. The two electroanalytical methods yield similar results. The cathodic process of cerium(Ⅲ) ions consists of two reversible steps: Ce3+ + e-= Ce2+ and Ce2+ + 2e-= Ce. The half wave potentials of Ce3+/Ce2+ and Ce2+/Ce were determined as -2.525 V vs. Cl2/Cl- and -2.975 V vs. Cl2/Cl-, respectively. The diffusion coefficient of Ce3+ was also determined as 5.5 × 10-5 cm2·s-1.

  11. Self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots and quantum dot laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Systematic study of molecular beam epitaxy-grown self-assembled In(Ga)As/GaAs, InAlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs, and InAs/InAlAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) is demonstrated. By adjusting growth conditions, surprising alignment, preferential elongation, and pronounced sequential coalescence of dots under the specific condition are realized. Room-temperature (RT) continuous-wave (CW) lasing at the wavelength of 960 nm with output power of 1 W is achieved from vertical coupled InAs/GaAs QDs ensemble. The RT threshold current density is 218 A/cm2. An RT CW output power of 0.53 W ensures at least 3 000 h lasing (only drops 0.83 db). This is one of the best results ever reported.

  12. Standardization of the dot enzyme-lynked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA for experimental plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M. L. Montenegro

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available A dot enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA was previously developed to detect specific antibodies in rabbits sera immunized against FIA protein obtained from Yersina pestis. This antigen was covalently linked onto the surface of dacron (polyethyleneterephthalate. Here, standard conditions are described for the optimization of this procedure: an amount of 20 ng of FIA protein was fixed onto dacron; anti-rabbit IgG peroxidase conjugate diluted 1:8,000 and 30% non-fat instant milk as blocking substance were used throughout the method. This procedure was compared with that employing nitrocellulose as solid-phase which showed to be more sensitive. However, the method based on dacron did not show false positive reactions against non-immunized rabbits sera at low antigen amount and diluted anti-IgG peroxidase conjugate.

  13. Self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots and quantum dot laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王占国; 刘峰奇; 梁基本; 徐波

    2000-01-01

    Systematic study of molecular beam epitaxy-grown self-assembled ln(Ga)As/GaAs, In-AlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs, and InAs/InAIAs/lnP quantum dots (QDs) is demonstrated. By adjusting growth conditions, surprising alignment, preferential elongation, and pronounced sequential coalescence of dots under the specific condition are realized. Room-temperature (RT) continuous-wave (CW) lasing at the wavelength of 960 nm with output power of 1 W is achieved from vertical coupled InAs/GaAs QDs ensemble. The RT threshold current density is 218 A/cm2. An RT CW output power of 0.53 W ensures at least 3 000 h lasing (only drops 0.83 db). This is one of the best results ever reported.

  14. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging of an optical antenna with a single diamond NV center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, Ryan; Smith, Dallas; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2013-08-14

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter, we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  15. Linewidth broadening of a quantum dot coupled to an off-resonant cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Arka; Kim, Erik; Englund, Dirk; Kim, Hyochul; Petroff, Pierre; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    We study the coupling between a photonic crystal cavity and an off-resonant quantum dot under resonant excitation of the cavity or the quantum dot. Linewidths of the quantum dot and the cavity as a function of the excitation laser power are measured. We show that the linewidth of the quantum dot, measured by observing the cavity emission, is significantly broadened compared to the theoretical estimate. This indicates additional incoherent coupling between the quantum dot and the cavity.

  16. Charge sensing of a few-donor double quantum dot in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, T. F., E-mail: tfwatson15@gmail.com; Weber, B.; Büch, H.; Fuechsle, M.; Simmons, M. Y., E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate the charge sensing of a few-donor double quantum dot precision placed with atomic resolution scanning tunnelling microscope lithography. We show that a tunnel-coupled single electron transistor (SET) can be used to detect electron transitions on both dots as well as inter-dot transitions. We demonstrate that we can control the tunnel times of the second dot to the SET island by ∼4 orders of magnitude by detuning its energy with respect to the first dot.

  17. Computation of energy states of hydrogenic quantum dot with two-electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakar, Y.; Özmen, A.; ćakır, B.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we have investigated the electronic structure of the hydrogenic quantum dot with two electrons inside an impenetrable potential surface. The energy eigenvalues and wavefunctions of the ground and excited states of spherical quantum dot have been calculated by using the Quantum Genetic Algorithm (QGA) and Hartree-Fock Roothaan (HFR) method, and the energies are investigated as a function of dot radius. The results show that as dot radius increases, the energy of quantum dot decreases.

  18. UV Nano Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot-Plasmon Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0072 UV Nano-Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot-Plasmon Coupling Eric Waclawik QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 06...Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)  03 Feb 2014 to 02 Feb 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE UV Nano-Lights - Nonlinear Quantum Dot-Plasmon Coupling 5a...SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Dots, Energy Conversion, Up-conversion, Modeling 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES

  19. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Stan; Williams, Phillip; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide are presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dot application technique are discussed.

  20. Quantum dots microstructured optical fiber for x-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.; Burke, E. R.

    2016-02-01

    A novel concept for the detection of x-rays with microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide is presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dots application technique are discussed.