WorldWideScience

Sample records for center complex publications

  1. Information Center Complex publications and presentations, 1971-1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, A.B.; Hawthorne, S.W.

    1981-08-01

    This indexed bibliography lists publications and presentations of the Information Center Complex, Information Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, from 1971 through 1980. The 659 entries cover such topics as toxicology, air and water pollution, management and transportation of hazardous wastes, energy resources and conservation, and information science. Publications range in length from 1 page to 3502 pages and include topical reports, books, journal articles, fact sheets, and newsletters. Author, title, and group indexes are provided. Annual updates are planned.

  2. Preschool children and excess weight: the impact of a low complexity intervention in public day care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Viviane Gabriela; Silva, Janaína Paula Costa da; Machado, Thais Costa; Bertoli, Ciro João; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia [UNESP; Leone, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: childhood obesity is a major public health problem, affecting children even at early ages. Objective: to assess the impact of dietary intervention and relatively simple physical activity on the nutritional state of preschoolers. Method: this was an intervention study in public daycare centers targeting children from 2 to 4 years of age, in the State of São Paulo. The sample consisted of 9 daycare centers covering 578 children, with 264 children in the intervention group (IG) and...

  3. [Communication center in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, W; Grimminger, F; Krause, B

    2002-06-01

    The Communications Center's portfolio covers areas such as marketing, contacts, distribution of information, sales activities and collection of bills by telephone (encashment). A special emphasis is Customer Care Management (Customer Relationship Management) to the patient and his caregivers (relatives), the customers, especially the physicians who send their patients to the hospital and the hospital doctor. By providing communication centers, the hospital would be able to improve the communication with the G.P.s, and identify the wishes and requirements more accurately and easily from the beginning. Dealing effectively with information and communication is already also of special importance for hospital doctors today. One can assume that the demands on doctors in this respect will become even more complex in the future. Doctors who are involved in scientific research are of course fully aware of the growing importance of the Internet with its new information and communication channels. Therefore analysing the current situation, the demands on a future information management system can be formulated: A system that will help doctors to avoid dealing with little goal-oriented information and thus setting up effective communication channels; an information system which is multi-media oriented towards the interests and needs of the patients and patient's relatives and which is further developed continually and directly by those involved.

  4. Public relations for pastoral counseling centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R J

    1984-12-01

    Outlines a public relations program in terms of setting objectives, developing programs, and evaluating effectiveness. Details an example of a PR campaign for a Samaritan Center. Notes ways in which a well-planned PR program can increase a pastoral counseling center's effectiveness and visibility.

  5. National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH) is an academic center tasked with leading federal, and coordinating national, efforts to develop...

  6. Oxygen-centered hexatantalum tetradecaimido cluster complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, Jamin L; Anderson, Laura L; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G

    2008-02-04

    The syntheses and characterization of several octahedral hexatantalum cluster compounds of formula (ArN)14Ta6O are described (Ar=Ph, p-MeC6H4, p-MeOC6H4, p-t-BuC6H4, p-BrC6H4, m-ClC6H4). Treatment of Bn3Ta=N-t-Bu (Bn=CH2C6H5) or pentakis(dimethylamido)tantalum with an excess of the appropriate aniline and stoichiometric water or tantalum oxide afforded varying yields of arylimido clusters. The structures of two species were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the identity of the central oxygen atom was elucidated by electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) using 17O/18O-enriched material. The title species are very air- and moisture-sensitive but quite thermally stable in solution. Experimentally determined optical properties and oxidation/reduction potentials, as well as some computational results, indicate that they possess an electronic structure wherein the highest occupied molecular orbitals are ligand-centered, while the lowest unoccupied orbitals are metal-centered and delocalized throughout the tantalum cage. Whereas chemical oxidation resulted in cluster decomposition, reduction with decamethylcobaltocene yielded stable salts of formula [Cp*2Co][(ArN)14Ta6O] (Ar=Ph, Ar=p-MeC6H4). Small-molecule reactivity studies on one of these clusters showed that its imido functionalities are moderately reactive toward oxide donors but inert with respect to metallaheterocycle-forming processes. Clean imido/oxo exchange was observed with aldehydes and ketones, leading cleanly to organic imines with no soluble byproducts being observed. This exchange was also observed with a rhenium oxo compound (generating an imidorhenium complex as the only soluble species). All 14 imido groups were transferred in these reactions, and no mixed-ligand cluster intermediates were ever observed.

  7. Conflict Resolution and Public Participation Center of Expertise

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — On October 17, 2008, the Conflict Resolution and Public Participation Center (CPCX) was named a Corps Center of Expertise (CX) and Directory of Expertise (DX). The...

  8. Public Works Center Pearl Harbor Fleet Moorings Underwater Inspection Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-15

    AOA17 6 228 PUBLIC MORKS CENTER PERL HARBO FLEET MOORINGS 1/1 UNDERWATER INSPECTION PLAN(O) NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND WASHINGTON DC...PUBLIC WORKS .......... CENTER.... ..... PEARL HARBOR.... 00~ D...... CENRWTTE E 4PAR INSPCTIO voOEA ENGINEEORINS *...... AND.. COSTUCIN.ROET.FFC...Public Works Center Pearl Habor F’aet Moorings Underwater Inspection Plan 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF

  9. Polypharmacy Treatment of Hypertensionin Public Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthi A/P Nayagam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is one of the most prominent global diseases. Despite the availability of effective therapies, hypertension remains poorly controlled in Indonesia. In many cases, patient’s noncompliance may be attributable to the low patients’ knowledge, attitude, and life-style practices such as polypharmacy. Polypharmacy is defined as the administration of many drugs at in one prescription. Polypharmacy increases expenses, possible adverse reaction to a single agent, incidence of drug interactions, and decreases patient’s compliance This study aimed to identify the practice of polypharmacy in hypertension treatment in primary health centers. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive observational study was carried out on 60 patients from two primary health centers in Jatinangor, West Java, Indonesia in October 2013. Sociodemographic profile, degree of hypertension, types of antihypertensive drugs, concomitant drugs given together with antihypertensive drugs, and treatment compliance data were collected and presented in tables and figures. Results: The incidence of hypertension was more common among male patients compared to female patients. Thirty-three patients (55% have low compliance to their medication. Twenty-nine patients (48% received single drug and 31 patients (52% received more than one drugs. Conclusions: The percentage of polypharmacy practice in treating hypertension in primary health centers is 52%. The most frequently prescribed anti-hypertensive are angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors and calcium-channel blockers (CCB. Most of hypertensive patients have low compliance to therapy.

  10. Centers for Catholic Studies and the Public Voice of Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Erin

    2011-01-01

    This article explores debates about the public role of religion in a secular context. Drawing on the work of critical theorist, Jurgen Habermas, this article claims that the United States requires a viable public sphere in which religious and secular voices can learn from each other. Highlighting the work of the Lane Center for Catholic Studies…

  11. [Analysis of the nursing interventions performed by public health nurses in health centers using the NIC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Souk-Young; Chin, Young Ran; Oh, Vock-Chang; Park, Eun-Jun; Yun, Soon Nyoung; Lee, In Sook

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify nursing interventions performed by public health nurses in health centers. Data was collected by the taxonomy of Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC 3rd: 486 nursing interventions) from 131 public health nurses in health centers and analyzed using descriptive statistics. As its result, more than 50% of public health nurses performed 137 nursing interventions at least monthly. The most frequently used intervention class was "activity and exercise management", followed by "physical comfort promotion", "community health promotion", "life span care", "coping assistance", "self care facilitation", "information management", "nutrition support", "community risk management" and "patient education". One hundred twenty nursing interventions were rarely performed by 90% or more of the nurses. Most of them were in the physical complex domain. In conclusion, 137 interventions were performed by public health nurses at least monthly. NIC is helpful to build a standardized language for public health nursing.

  12. Internet Clubs in Cultural Centers and Public Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Batouch

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A Study about the internet clubs in Cultural Centers and Public Libraries in Algeria, it defines the concept of culture and its relation to internet, then deals the internet clubs and its cultural role and its negatives. Finally, talks about the electronic space and culture in Algeria.

  13. Financing Public Higher Education: The Impact of Responsibility Center Management on a Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, David J.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the impacts on public universities of implementing an incentive-based budgeting system, this dissertation focuses on one university's extensive experience with Responsibility Center Management. The financial and non-financial impacts of Responsibility Center Management will be considered by examining the extent to which commonly held…

  14. Public Use Plan Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The intent of the Public Use Plan for the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex is to assist with fulfilling future management needs of the Complex. This will...

  15. CLASSIFICATION AND COMPLEX STATE VALUE OF SHOPPING CENTERS: PROJECT-ORIENTED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрій Павлович РАК

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Was done the analysis of projects objects of trade and entertainment centers from the perspective of improving the life safety and is proposed the definition of "Trade and entertainment center", "Trade and entertainment center" and "Complex value of trade and entertainment center." A classification of shopping centers on the classification criteria and the criteria are characterized by increased security status and attractiveness of their operation. The classification of trade and entertainment centers on the criteria of classification features were made. It characterizes the security situation and will increase the attractiveness of their operation. In the nearest future the most secure and modern TEC will be those buildings who will have unique qualities such as safety systems, excellent customer service, and thus by a high level of trust (the client to the mall. The important role will play those TEC, who have clearly formed value oriented project management, including communication values using innovative methods and models. Trade and entertainment centers as an organization are included in the complex process of interaction management. They being both as an enterprise that serves the public and satisfying a great range of his interests and architectural site, which is leased and increases the business attractiveness of the district of TEC location. This duality of the essence of TEC center makes difficult to assess the effectiveness of its security.

  16. Supervisor’s behavioral complexity: Ineffective in the call center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico R. León

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An ample repertoire of leadership behaviors available to the manager is expected to guarantee his/her effectiveness transcending situations, but research in the call-center context has identified a specific form of effective supervision: people-oriented leadership. The purpose of this paper is to compare the effectiveness of leader behavioral complexity vis-à-vis people-oriented supervision. 268 employees out of 728 of a Peruvian call center filled in an on-line survey that included, among other questionnaires, the Competing Values Framework Managerial Behavior Instrument in reference to their front-line supervisor. The study analyzed the relationships between supervisory leadership and subordinate turnover intention and absenteeism. Behavioral complexity, like people-oriented leadership, predicted subordinate turnover intention but did not predict subordinate absenteeism, which people-oriented leadership did when other leadership orientations (to change, results, processes were held constant. Our explanations consider that absenteeism is a concrete behavior and turnover intention an abstract attitude. The findings are consistent with the call-center literature, suggest important boundaries to the concept of manager behavioral complexity, and highlight the need for contingency theories of leadership effectiveness.

  17. 76 FR 63615 - Environmental Science Center Microbiology Laboratory; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ...] Environmental Science Center Microbiology Laboratory; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection... at the EPA Environmental Science Center Microbiology Laboratory. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  18. Anarchy in the Streets: Restoring Public Security in Complex Contingencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castle, James

    1998-01-01

    When US military forces are performing public security functions during complex contingency operations, what conditions must they establish in order to transfer those functions successfully back to the host nation...

  19. Managing the Entanglement: Complexity Leadership in Public Sector Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Joanne; Rhodes, Mary Lee; Meek, Jack W.; Denyer, David

    2016-01-01

    Complexity in public sector systems requires leaders to balance the administrative practices necessary to be aligned and efficient in the management of routine challenges and the adaptive practices required to respond to dynamic circumstances. Conventional notions of leadership in the field of public administration do not fully explain the role of leadership in balancing the entanglement of formal, top-down, administrative functions and informal, emergent, adaptive functions within public sec...

  20. OPEN PUBLIC SPACE ATTRIBUTES AND CATEGORIES – COMPLEXITY AND MEASURABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Čavić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of architectural and urban research, this work addresses the complexity of contemporary public space, both in a conceptual and concrete sense. It aims at systematizing spatial attributes and their categories and discussing spatial complexity and measurability, all this in order to reach a more comprehensive understanding, description and analysis of public space. Our aim is to improve everyday usage of open public space and we acknowledged users as its crucial factor. There are numerous investigations on the complex urban and architectural reality of public space that recognise importance of users. However, we did not find any that would holistically account for what users find essential in public space. Based on the incompleteness of existing approaches on open public space and the importance of users for their success, this paper proposes a user-orientated approach. Through an initial survey directed to users, we collected the most important aspects of public spaces in the way that contemporary humans see them. The gathered data is analysed and coded into spatial attributes from which their role in the complexity of open public space and measurability are discussed. The work results in an inventory of attributes that users find salient in public spaces. It does not discuss their qualitative values or contribution in generating spatial realities. It aims to define them clearly so that any further logical argumentation on open space concerning users may be solidly constructed. Finally, through categorisation of attributes it proposes the disciplinary levels necessary for the analysis of complex urban-architectural reality

  1. Science for What Public? Addressing Equity in American Science Museums and Science Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Noah Weeth; Meshoulam, David

    2014-01-01

    Science museums and science centers exist (in large part) to bring science to the public. But what public do they serve? The challenge of equity is embodied by the gulf that separates a museum's actual public and the more diverse publics that comprise our society. Yet despite growing scholarly interest in museums and science centers, few…

  2. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  3. 75 FR 58411 - Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public...: ``Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) eSubmitter Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to..., Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-100), Food and Drug Administration, 7520 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD...

  4. Procuring complex performance: the transition process in public infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Roehrich, Jens; Frederiksen, Lars; Davies, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The paper analyses how public buyers transition from procuring single products and services to procuring complex performance (PCP). The aim is to examine the change in the interactions between buyer and supplier, the emergence of value co-creation and the capability development during the

  5. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  6. Romanian complex data center for dense seismic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Ionescu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

  1. The Role of Research Centers in Fulfilling the Community Engagement Mission of Public Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toof, Robin A.

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are seen by the public as having unique resources to identify and solve complex societal problems. Public universities, in particular, were originally established to be of service to communities and the nation to advance public good and solve problems. However, community engagement is not an easy task for…

  2. The Public Health Responsibility Deal: how should such a complex public health policy be evaluated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petticrew, Mark; Eastmure, Elizabeth; Mays, Nicholas; Knai, Cecile; Durand, Mary Alison; Nolte, Ellen

    2013-12-01

    The Public Health Responsibility Deal (RD) in England was launched in 2011 as a public-private partnership which aims to 'tap into the potential for businesses and other influential organisations to make a significant contribution to improving public health by helping us to create this environment'. It has come under criticism from public health advocates and others, who have suggested that it will be ineffective or perhaps even harmful. Like many public health policies, there have also been demands to know whether it 'works'. We conducted a scoping review and used this, supplemented with interviews with stakeholders, to develop a detailed logic model of the RD (presented here) to help understand its likely outcomes and the pathways by which these may be achieved as a basis for planning an evaluation. Evaluations of complex interventions require not just assessment of effects (including outcomes), but also a clear conceptualization of the intervention and its processes. The way the RD and the pledges made by participant organizations has been presented makes it difficult at this stage to evaluate whether the RD 'works' in terms of improving health. Instead, any evaluation needs to put together a jigsaw of evidence about processes, mechanisms and potential future health and non-health impacts, in part using the current scientific evidence. This task is ongoing.

  3. Western Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center--providing comprehensive earth science for complex societal issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David G.; Wallace, Alan R.; Schneider, Jill L.

    2010-01-01

    supports approximately 40 USGS research specialists who utilize cooperative agreements with universities, industry, and other governmental agencies to support their collaborative research and information exchange. Scientists of the WMERSC study how and where non-fuel mineral resources form and are concentrated in the earth's crust, where mineral resources might be found in the future, and how mineral materials interact with the environment to affect human and ecosystem health. Natural systems (ecosystems) are complex - our understanding of how ecosystems operate requires collecting and synthesizing large amounts of geologic, geochemical, biologic, hydrologic, and meteorological information. Scientists in the Center strive to understand the interplay of various processes and how they affect the structure, composition, and health of ecosystems. Such understanding, which is then summarized in publicly available reports, is used to address and solve a wide variety of issues that are important to society and the economy. WMERSC scientists have extensive national and international experience in these scientific specialties and capabilities - they have collaborated with many Federal, State, and local agencies; with various private sector organizations; as well as with foreign countries and organizations. Nearly every scientific and societal challenge requires a different combination of scientific skills and capabilities. With their breadth of scientific specialties and capabilities, the scientists of the WMERSC can provide scientifically sound approaches to a wide range of societal challenges and issues. The following sections describe examples of important issues that have been addressed by scientists in the Center, the methods employed, and the relevant conclusions. New directions are inevitable as societal needs change over time. Scientists of the WMERSC have a diverse set of skills and capabilities and are proficient in the collection and integration of

  4. Hurricane Public Health Research Center at Louisiana State University a Case of Academia Being Prepared

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, I. L.

    2006-12-01

    Recent floods along the Atlantic and Gulf seaboards and elsewhere in the world before Katrina had demonstrated the complexity of public health impacts including trauma; fires; chemical, sewerage, and corpse contamination of air and water; and diseases. We realized that Louisiana's vulnerability was exacerbated because forty percent of the state is coastal zone in which 70% of the population resides. Ninety percent of this zone is near or below sea level and protected by man-made hurricane-protection levees. New Orleans ranked among the highest in the nation with respect to potential societal, mortality, and economic impacts. Recognizing that emergency responders had in the past been unprepared for the extent of the public health impacts of these complex flooding disasters, we created a multi-disciplinary, multi-campus research center to address these issues for New Orleans. The Louisiana Board of Regents, through its millennium Health Excellence Fund, awarded a 5-year contract to the Center in 2001. The research team combined the resources of natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, and the mental health and medical communities. We met annually with a Board of Advisors, made up of federal, state, local government, and non-governmental agency officials, first responders and emergency managers. Their advice was invaluable in acquiring various datasets and directing aspects of the various research efforts. Our center developed detailed models for assessment and amelioration of public health impacts due to hurricanes and major floods. Initial research had showed that a Category 3 storm would cause levee overtopping, and that most levee systems were unprotected from the impacts of storm-induced wave erosion. Sections of levees with distinct sags suggested the beginnings of foundation and subsidence problems. We recognized that a slow moving Cat 3 could flood up to the eaves of houses and would have residence times of weeks. The resultant mix of sewage, corpses

  5. Centralization and Decentralization of Public Policy in a Complex Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria ROSARIA ALFANO

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The public economic literature of the past century is characterized by a traditional paradigm that ascribes little attention to the spatial dimension. However, contemporary globalization requires that researchers and economists expand their perspectives to consider space conceptualization. What is required in the 21st century is a richer and more realistic framework that broadens existing concepts of socio-economic analysis while overcoming narrow national borders. Although national governments will remain prominent performers in the global market, regional and local governments cannot be ignored because citizens worldwide are exerting greater self-determination in influencing governmental decisions. This paper is focused on the opportunity to analyze the governance of decentralization by the new optimizing procedures provided by complex system theory. The first section of the paper explores the positive and normative issues related to centralization and decentralization in a globalized framework as well as the increased interdependence in power sharing among different jurisdictional level. In the second section, Kauffman’s (1993 contributions are examined as a means of determining if the fitness landscape allows combining the institutional evolution. Finally, this paper concludes highlighting that complex system theory is one of the possible tools useful to redesign the map of institutional sharing power in an era of globalization, considering that it allows catching Pareto improving in the level of welfare.

  6. The Client-Centered Approach as a Foundation for Teaching the Introductory Course in Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najor, Michele A.; Motschall, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the authors use a broad-based, client-centered model to teach an introductory course in public relations, integrating writing assignments for "clients" into course topics, which include history, ethics, theory, research, program planning, publicity, crisis management, and evaluation methods. Discusses course objectives, and notes…

  7. Flood Hazards: Communicating Hydrology and Complexity to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R. R.; Blanchard, S. F.; Mason, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    user specifies. In the future, with new GPS enabled cell-phones, notifications could be sent to users based on their proximity to flood hazards. Educational measures also should communicate the hydrologic underpinnings and uncertainties of the complex science of flood hydrology in an understandable manner to a non-technical public. Education can be especially beneficial and important for those in a policy-making role or those who find themselves in an area of potential flood hazards. Case studies, such as the fatal June 11, 2010 flash flood on the Little Missouri River in Arkansas, if presented in a way that the public will absorb, powerfully illustrate the importance of flood hazard awareness and the cost of living unaware. Additionally, such crucial points as the connection between the accuracy of flood-probability estimates and the density (and longevity) of the basic data sources (such as the USGS streamgage or the National Weather Service raingage networks) and the residual risks that both communities and individuals face have to continually be stressed to the general public and policy makers alike. In short, success in flood hazards communication (both prescriptive warnings and education) requires a fusion of the social sciences and hydrology.

  8. Managing Madness: Mental Health and Complexity in Public Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hickie

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the concept of collaborative care, particularly in relation to a range of new models of organisation and service that are emerging in response to one of the most problematic areas of public policy – mental health. These emerging models of coordinated mental health care are testing the limits of the evidence supporting coordinated care, and require critical evaluation. Myriad concepts of collaborative or coordinated care in health, including mental health, have created multiple definitions. Once definitional issues have been surmounted, however, the evidence for coordination of health care is reasonably strong. There is considerable research about which treatments and programs are best for people with a mental illness. There are few areas seemingly as complex as mental health, given that responsibility for policy and service lies across all three tiers of Australian government and across multiple jurisdictions. It also engages public, private and non-government sectors. Co-morbidities are commonplace, particularly drug and alcohol problems among younger people. Governments in Australia have traditionally taken responsibility for policy, programs and services, either as direct service providers or through contracting outputs from others. Yet the evidence indicates that for people with a mental illness, the best solutions are often not found in government but in the community and in organisations outside of government. New organisations and new structures are attempting more holistic management approaches, combining clinical care, community support, housing, employment and other services. This paper considers some of these new models in the light of existing evidence. The key challenge facing continued reform in mental health is not uncertainty regarding programs or services, but rather how to drive coordinated care for consumers across departments, governments and providers. This review will highlight the key changes that

  9. Using science centers to expose the general public to the microworld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)]|[Science and Technology Interactive Center, Aurora, IL (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Despite the remarkable progress in the past decades in understanding our Universe, we particle physicists have failed to communicate the wonder, excitement, and beauty of these discoveries to the general public. I am sure all agree there is a need, if our support from public funds is to continue at anywhere approximating the present level, for us collectively to educate and inform the general public of what we are doing and why. Informal science education and especially science and technology centers can play an important role in efforts to raise public awareness of particle physics in particular and of basic research in general. Science Centers are a natural avenue for particle physicists to use to communicate with and gain support from the general public.

  10. Government Campuses, Feature class of building footprints of the Rock County Complex. Includes 911 Comm Center, Health Care Center, and Rock Haven., Published in 2005, Rock County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Government Campuses dataset current as of 2005. Feature class of building footprints of the Rock County Complex. Includes 911 Comm Center, Health Care Center, and...

  11. Open Access Data Centers as an Essential Partner to a Data Publication Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D.; Pfeiffenberger, H.

    2016-12-01

    The success of Earth System Science Data derives in part from key infrastructure: digital object identifiers (doi) and open access data centers. Our concept that a data journal should promote access and exchange through publication of reviewed data descriptions presupposed third parties to hold the data. As minimum criteria for those data centers we expected international reputation for quality of service and an active lifetime extending at least a decade into the future. We also expected modern access interfaces offering geographic, topical and parameter-based browsing - so that users could discover related holdings through an ESSD link or discover ESSD by way of links in data sets revealed through the center's browse tools - and true open access. True open access means one or two clicks from abstract in ESSD to the data itself without barriers. We started with Pangaea and CDIAC. Data providers already used these centers, the staff welcomed the ESSD initiative and all parties cooperated on doi. With this initial support ESSD proved the basic concept of data publication and demonstrated utility to a larger group of data providers, many of whom suggested additional centers. So long as those data centers met expectations for open access and quality and durability of service, ESSD agreed to collaborate. Through back-door collaborations - e.g. service on particular data sets - ESSD developed working partnerships with more than 30 data centers in 13 countries. Data centers ask to join our list. We encourage those centers to stimulate local providers to submit a data set to ESSD, thus preserving our practical data-set by data-set partnership mode. For a few data centers where national policies impose a registration step, center staff and ESSD editors created bypass access routes to facilitate anonymous reviews. For ESSD purposes, open access and doi cooperation leading to reliable curation allows a win, win, win partnership among centers, providers, and journal.

  12. Adaptation of a best practice guideline to strengthen client-centered care in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwal, Lorraine; Marchuk, Brenda; Laforêt-Fliesser, Yvette; Castanza, Joyce; Davis, Lori; LaSalle, Marg

    2014-01-01

    Best practice guidelines (BPGs) were developed by the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO) to support evidence-based nursing practice. One Ontario public health unit chose to implement the BPG on client-centered care (CCC). A critical review of this BPG revealed issues that would hinder successful implementation within a public health setting. These included a focus on the client as an individual, the predominance of acute care exemplars and training resources that were not representative of public health nursing practice, and the need to reconcile the enforcement roles of public health with the BPG principles. The purpose of this article is to describe the process of adapting the CCC BPG to more accurately reflect the broad scope of public health nursing practice. A model for CCC in public health nursing context is presented and processes for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining CCC are described. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Magnetochemistry of Model Complexes for the Water Oxidation Center of Photosystem II and High Nuclearity Manganese Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hui-Lien

    1995-01-01

    Several polynuclear oxo-bridged manganese compounds have been synthesized, and their structural, magnetic, and spectroscopic properties have been characterized. The tetranuclear complexes have been investigated as models of the manganese cluster in the water oxidation center of photosystem II. As the nuclearity increases, manganese complexes are no longer good model complexes. However, they exhibit interesting magnetic properties. Some have high spin ground states as a result of the spin frustration mechanism, or they show some quite unusual properties, such as relaxation behavior shown in superparamagnetic materials. The work described in this thesis focuses on characterizing the electronic structure of polynuclear manganese complexes that have from three to twelve manganese atoms. Of the complexes synthesized, (Mn_3 O(O_2C_2Cl _3)(HO_2CMe) _2(H_2O)) crystallizes in triclinic space group P1 and possesses asymmetric Mn_3 units and is a valence trapped Mn^{II}Mn^ {III}_2 complex. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility studies have been performed for four trinuclear Mn complexes. The ground state is calculated to have S = 3/2 or S = 1/2 for rm Mn^ {II}Mn^{III}_2 complexes. The Mn^{III} _3 complexes have S = 0 ground state. By changing the ratio of the exchange interaction constant in a Mn_3O complex, it is possible to stabilize ground states with different total spin S _{T} for a rm Mn^{II}Mn^{III} _2 complex. The Mn_4 cubane complexes have been characterized to have an S = 9/2 ground state. Changing the mu_3-bridging ligand or the terminal ligand does not change the ground state of the cubane complexes. The cubane complexes show appreciable zero-field splitting thus have a large anisotropy energy. Because of this relaxation process be seen in theses molecules and shows an out-of-phase component in the AC susceptibility. Mn _8 and Mn_9 clusters show S = 11 and S = 3 ground state respectively. Neutral an reduced Mn_{12} complexes were also synthesized. All of

  14. Fish culture: an annotated bibliography of publications of the National Fisheries Center, Leetown, 1972-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Joyce A.; Catrow, Violet J.; McKenzie, Lora C.; Engle, Faye V.

    1982-01-01

    This is an annotated bibliography of the publications authored or co-authored by the staff of the National Fisheries Center - Leetown (NFC-L) from 1972 through 1980. It includes publications from NFC-L staff at the Fish Farming Experimental Station, Stuttgart, AR; the Fish Genetics Laboratory, Beulah, WY; the Hagerman Field Station of the Tunison Laboratory of Fish Nutrition, Hagerman, ID; the National Fisheries Research and Development Laboratory, Marison, AL; and, the Tunison Laboratory of Fish Nutrition, Cortland, NY. It also includes publications from NFC-L staff at the Aquaculture Production/Demonstration Station, Fisheries Academy, Fish Genetics Station, National Fish Health Research Laboratory, and Technical Information Services, each located in Kearneysville, WV. Prior to 1977, each functioned as a separate entity within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1977, the administrative and program activities of these components were merged into the Natkonal Fisheries Center. This bibliography lists the publications issued by each of these entities both before and after becoming joined into the Center. Publications from these components prior to 1972 are documents in U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, Resource Publication 120, Bibliography of Research Publications of the U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, 1928-72. Entries in this bibliography are arranged under broad subject categories, similar to those used in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fishery Abstracts. Within these categories, the publications are then arranged alphabetically by author and sequentially by date of publication. They cover a wide range of scientific and technical disciplines applicable to the field of aquaculture. The annotations were submitted by each NFC-L component, and were modified to some extent for uniformity. An author index is included at the end of the bibliography.

  15. Performance Analysis of Heterogeneous Data Centers in Cloud Computing Using a Complex Queuing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hua Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance evaluation of modern cloud data centers has attracted considerable research attention among both cloud providers and cloud customers. In this paper, we investigate the heterogeneity of modern data centers and the service process used in these heterogeneous data centers. Using queuing theory, we construct a complex queuing model composed of two concatenated queuing systems and present this as an analytical model for evaluating the performance of heterogeneous data centers. Based on this complex queuing model, we analyze the mean response time, the mean waiting time, and other important performance indicators. We also conduct simulation experiments to confirm the validity of the complex queuing model. We further conduct numerical experiments to demonstrate that the traffic intensity (or utilization of each execution server, as well as the configuration of server clusters, in a heterogeneous data center will impact the performance of the system. Our results indicate that our analytical model is effective in accurately estimating the performance of the heterogeneous data center.

  16. Intake of protein, calcium and sodium in public child day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Longo-Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To assess calcium, protein and sodium intake, of children that attend public day-care centers and to compare it with the recommended one.METHODS:Cross-sectional descriptive study in seven public day care centers of São Paulo city, Southeast Brazil, which enrolled 366 children between 12 and 36 months of age. The data collection occurred between September and December 2010. Each day care center was evaluated for three non-consecutive days, totaling 42 days and 210 meals. Dietary intake was assessed by a direct food weighing method. For the nutritional calculation, DietWin(r Profissional 2.0 was used, and the adequacy was calculated according to the recommendations of the National School Feeding Program for energy, protein, calcium and sodium. The calcium/protein relation was also calculated, as well as calcium density (mg/1,000kcal.RESULTS: The energy (406.4kcal, protein (18.2g and calcium (207.6mg consumption did not reach the recommended values ​​in all the evaluated day care centers. Sodium intake exceeded up to three times the recommendation. The calcium/protein ratio of 11.7mg/g was less than the adequate one (20mg/g.CONCLUSIONS: There was inadequacy of calcium, protein and sodium dietary intake, in children attending public day-care centers.

  17. Defining Family-Centered Early Education: Beliefs of Public School, Child Care, and Head Start Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christine B.

    1992-01-01

    The beliefs of 280 early childhood teachers regarding aspects of family-centered programing were assessed using the Family Involvement Survey. Results showed that public school teachers reported less positive beliefs about parents' interests and abilities and lower competence in relating to families than did either child care or Head Start…

  18. Audiovisual Aids and Publications Available from the VIMS/Sea Grant Marine Education Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammisch, Sue, Comp.

    This catalog contains an inventory of 16mm films, filmstrips, film loops, slide programs, records, and publications about the marine sciences and sea life that are available from VIMS/Sea Grant Marine Education Center; information on the borrowing of the AV materials is included, as well as prices for books and leaflets. The entries are listed…

  19. 76 FR 60505 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is opening a comment period for the...

  20. Analgesic Usage in Elderly at Public Health Center: A study in West Java, Indonesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gembong Soeyono Putro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various analgesics prescriptions for elderly are not appropriate according to the guideline and can cause the increase of side effects such as gastric problems. Puskesmas as a public health center in Indonesia has an important role in anticipating this problem. The objectives of this study was to identify the analgesic usage in elderly patients at the public health center. Methods: This retrospective descriptive study was conducted for 3 months at Tanjungsari public health center, Sumedang, West Java, Indonesia, using total sampling. The data was taken from 417 medical records from 2013. The data taken from medical records were: sex, analgesic drug, diagnosis, and drug for gastric problem. Results: From the collected data, the most analgesics prescribed for the elderly patients was paracetamol, followed by Piroxicam, Mefenamic acid, and Ibuprofen. Not all of the elderly patients who received NSAIDs, were given gastric drug. Conclusions: The most prescribed analgesic drug given to elderly patients at the public health center is paracetamol. [AMJ.2017;4(1:16–9

  1. 77 FR 31329 - Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods, Hole, MA; Public Meeting/Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ..., (207) 228-1625. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Stock Structure of Atlantic Cod in the Gulf of Maine... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods, Hole, MA; Public Meeting/Workshop AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  2. The Einstein Observatory: A New Public/Private Observatory Complex for Community Education and Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowell, J.

    1999-12-01

    The Development Authority of Cherokee County (Georgia) is leading a public/private partnership of business/industry professionals, educators, and university scientists that seeks to develop a national prototype educational and scientific research facility for grades K-12, as well as college-level research, that will inspire our youth to become literate in science and technology. In particular, the goal is to make this complex a science, math, and engineering magnet learning facility and to raise the average SAT scores of local area students by 100 points. A dark-site mountain, nestled on the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains at the northern-most edge of Atlanta, will become the home for the "Einstein" Observatory. The complex will have four telescopes: one 50-inch, one 24-inch, and two 16-inch telescopes. Each telescope will have digital cameras and an optic-fiber feed to a single, medium-resolution spectroscope. All four telescopes will be electronically accessible from local schools. Professional astronomers will establish suitable observational research projects and will lead K-12 and college students in the acquisition and analysis of data. Astronomers will also assist the local area schoolteachers in methods for nurturing children's scientific inquiry. The observatory mountain will have 100 platform locations for individual viewing by visiting families, school groups, and amateur astronomers. The Atlanta Astronomer Club will provide numerous evening programs and viewing opportunities for the general public. An accompanying Planetarium & Science Center will be located on the nearby campus of Reinhardt College. The Planetarium & Science Center will be integrated with Reinhardt College's theme of learning focused upon studying the past and present as a basis for projecting the future.

  3. Appropriateness of physicians’ lumbosacral MRI requests in private and public centers in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Navid; Farahmand, Ferial; Hadizadeh Kharazi, Homayoun; Mojdehipanah, Hossein; Karampour, Hossein; Nojomi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Back pain is a common patients’ complaint, and its etiology is important because of different potential treatment approaches (based on causes). For a better diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in clinical settings that may result in inappropriate requests. This study aims to evaluate the appropriateness of the lumbosacral MRI requests in patients with back pain in two public/referral and private imaging centers in Tehran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 279 patients from both centers were recruited in 2014. A checklist was developed based on the internationally recognized clinical guidelines (NICE, and AHRQ) for determining the indications. An expert panel of related specialties finalized them. Patients’ demographic and some anthropometric measures, as well as MRI reports, were collected. Results: The mean±SD age of patients was 47.9±14.78 years with a dominance of females (M/F=38.4/61.6). About 77% (n=214) of lumbosacral MRIs were requested in accordance with the guidelines. Indicated MRI requests were significantly higher in the private imaging center (p=0.019, OR=2.087, CI 95%: 1.13-3.85). In the private center, 80.6% and in the public center, 70.4% of the MRI requests were in accordance with the guidelines. Conclusion: The proportion of non-indicated MRI requests based on the valid guidelines is about ¼ of all requests that is compatible with some other studies mostly from developed countries. PMID:28210580

  4. Implementing the patient-centered medical home in complex adaptive systems: Becoming a relationship-centered patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flieger, Signe Peterson

    This study explores the implementation experience of nine primary care practices becoming patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) as part of the New Hampshire Citizens Health Initiative Multi-Stakeholder Medical Home Pilot. The purpose of this study is to apply complex adaptive systems theory and relationship-centered organizations theory to explore how nine diverse primary care practices in New Hampshire implemented the PCMH model and to offer insights for how primary care practices can move from a structural PCMH to a relationship-centered PCMH. Eighty-three interviews were conducted with administrative and clinical staff at the nine pilot practices, payers, and conveners of the pilot between November and December 2011. The interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using both a priori and emergent themes. Although there is value in the structural components of the PCMH (e.g., disease registries), these structures are not enough. Becoming a relationship-centered PCMH requires attention to reflection, sensemaking, learning, and collaboration. This can be facilitated by settings aside time for communication and relationship building through structured meetings about PCMH components as well as the implementation process itself. Moreover, team-based care offers a robust opportunity to move beyond the structures to focus on relationships and collaboration. (a) Recognize that PCMH implementation is not a linear process. (b) Implementing the PCMH from a structural perspective is not enough. Although the National Committee for Quality Assurance or other guidelines can offer guidance on the structural components of PCMH implementation, this should serve only as a starting point. (c) During implementation, set aside structured time for reflection and sensemaking. (d) Use team-based care as a cornerstone of transformation. Reflect on team structures and also interactions of the team members. Taking the time to reflect will facilitate greater sensemaking and learning and

  5. Influence of oxygen-vacancy complex /A center/ on piezoresistance of n-type silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, M. A.; Loggins, C. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in both magnitude and temperature dependence of the piezoresistance of electron-irradiated n-type silicon, induced by the latter's oxygen-vacancy complex (A center), are shown to be due to the fact that the presence of the A center causes the total conduction-band electron concentration to change with an applied stress. This change in electron concentration leads to an additional piezoresistance contribution that is expected to be important in certain many-valley semiconductors. This offers the possibility of tailoring the thermal variations of semiconductor mechanical sensors to more desirable values over limited temperature ranges.

  6. Chinese Herb Use by Patients at a San Francisco Chinatown Public Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Oliver; Tsourounis, Candy; Chan, Lenny Lok Shun; Dennehy, Cathi

    2016-09-01

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) use has not been well characterized in persons living in the United States who receive care by Western-trained healthcare providers. The primary objective of this study was to characterize use of CHM taken in the last 12 months by patients seen at a Chinatown public health center. Convenience sample survey. Data collection occurred over 3 months at a San Francisco Chinatown public health center. Adult patients visiting their primary care provider. Completion of a voluntary 24-question survey on CHM use. Prevalence, type, and indications for use. Survey response rate was 29% (50/170). Seventy percent (35/50) of respondents had used CHM in the last 12 months and 94% (33/35) were also taking prescription medicines. The three most commonly used CHM were goji berry (37%), Dioscorea (31%), and ginseng (23%). The most common indications for herbs used in the last 12 months were general wellness (34%), cold/flu (25%), and headache (6%). Sixty-four percent of respondents had used Western medicine in combination with CHM within the last 12 months. Sixty-nine percent of respondents who used CHM did not tell their Western provider about this use. No patient had CHM use documented in the electronic medical record. Patients seen at a Chinatown public health center frequently used CHM products in conjunction with Western prescription medicines. Providers should routinely enquire about CHM use for health as a soup, tea, food, or pill and document this use in the medical record.

  7. Monitoring children’s health in a public daycare center: focus on their nutritional profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanielly Cristina Carvalho de Brito Santos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One aimed to identify the nutritional profile of children in a public daycare center in the city of Cuité-Paraíba, from the perspective of health surveillance. This is a cross-sectional, exploratory-descriptive, field study with a quantitative approach, performed in 2011, with 55 children from 6 to 60 months of life, assisted full time in a public daycare center, who met the selection criteria: be attending the daycare center; and not present any disability. One used for evaluation the anthropometric measurements of weight, height and Body Mass Index, according to the growth curve suggested by the Ministry of Health. One identified that 96.4% had adequate nutritional status, however, 7.3% had overweight risk and 3.6% underweight risk, especially girls. It is important to raise managers’, professionals’ and parents’ awareness about the health surveillance of children in daycare centers for identification and intervention against nutritional changes, encouraging an adequate child growth.

  8. Telemedicine spirometry training and quality assurance program in primary care centers of a public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina Malanda, Nuria; López de Santa María, Elena; Gutiérrez, Asunción; Bayón, Juan Carlos; Garcia, Larraitz; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2014-04-01

    Forced spirometry is essential for diagnosing respiratory diseases and is widely used across levels of care. However, several studies have shown that spirometry quality in primary care is not ideal, with risks of misdiagnosis. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and performance of a telemedicine-based training and quality assurance program for forced spirometry in primary care. The two phases included (1) a 9-month pilot study involving 15 centers, in which spirometry tests were assessed by the Basque Office for Health Technology Assessment, and (2) the introduction of the program to all centers in the Public Basque Health Service. Technicians first received 4 h of training, and, subsequently, they sent all tests to the reference laboratory using the program. Quality assessment was performed in accordance with clinical guidelines (A and B, good; C-F, poor). In the first phase, 1,894 spirometry tests were assessed, showing an improvement in quality: acceptable quality tests increased from 57% at the beginning to 78% after 6 months and 83% after 9 months (pspirometry tests were assessed after the inclusion of 36 additional centers, maintaining the positive trend (61%, 87%, and 84% at the same time points; pspirometry tests improved in all centers. (2) The program provides a tool for transferring data that allows monitoring of its quality and training of technicians who perform the tests. (3) This approach is useful for improving spirometry quality in the routine practice of a public health system.

  9. Relation of people-centered public health and person-centered healthcare management: a case study to reduce burn-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, Drozdstoj S; Cloninger, C Robert

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare management is one practical tool for mediation and implementation of public health into clinical healthcare outcomes and is taken in our case study as an exemplar arena to demonstrate the vital importance of the person-centered approach. Healthcare personnel are frequently at risk for the 'burn-out' syndrome. However, modern measures of burn-out recognize burn-out only at a late stage when it is fully developed. There are no available methods to assess the risk for vulnerability to burnout in healthcare systems. Our aim was therefore to design a complex person-centered model for detection of high risk for burn-out at an early stage, that has been termed 'flame-out'. We accept the observation that decreased personal performance is one crucial expression of burn-out. Low personal performance and negative emotions are strongly related to low self-directedness as measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). At the same time, burn-out is characterized by decreased interest and positive emotions from work. Decreased positive emotion is directly related to low self-transcendence as measured by the TCI. Burn-out is also frequently associated with feelings of social alienation or inadequacy of support, which is in turn related to low TCI Cooperativeness. However, high Persistence and Harm Avoidance are predisposing traits for burn-out in healthcare professionals who are often overly perfectionistic and compulsive, predisposing them to anxiety, depression, suicide and burn-out. Hence, people at risk for future burn-out are often highly conscientious over-achievers with intense mixtures of positive and negative emotions. The high demand for perfection comes from both intrinsic characteristics and from features of the social milieu in their psychological climate. Letting go of the unfulfillable desire to be perfect by increasing self-transcendence allows acceptance of the imperfection of the human condition, thereby preventing burn-out and other

  10. Impact of Location of the Central Activities on Development of Open Public Space in the City Centers of Small Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volgemut, Mateja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas of the central activities with mixed land use are crucial for the development of city center, even in small cities. In the last decades or two the attention is drawn on the retail and service activities that are usually located outside of cities near main roads. Municipalities had already detected this problem, but they are not implementing any of the measures (Rebernik, 2010. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the central activities in small cities in Slovenia are located in freestanding buildings, which is most appropriate in terms of forming the open public space in the city center. In this research we compared ten central activities (Vrišer, 1988, 1990, Kokole, 1971 in 34 small cities. We selected only those small cities (Prosen et al, 2008 which have among other activities a county court. The results showed the differences and commonalities of the central activities in selected small cities according to the indicators. Litija, Domžale and Sevnica are small cities, where activities that could articulate open public space are located in the larger building complexes. The phenomenon is similar to a modern machine, where action in it and indirectly the insight into the functioning of the society is invisible to the observer (Kos, 2008. We found out that in these tree cities the central activities are not forming the open public spaces in front of the public buildings (Vertelj Nared, 2014. The result is problematic image of the city and changed forces of the city life.

  11. Public Health Emergency Operations Center - A critical component of mass gatherings management infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elachola, Habidah; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Turkestani, Abdulhafiz; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-08-31

    Mass gatherings (MG) are characterized by the influx of large numbers of people with the need to have infrastructural changes to support these gatherings. Thus, Public Health Emergency Operations Center (PHEOC) is critical management infrastructure for both the delivery of public health functions and for mounting adequate response during emergencies. The recognition of the importance of PHEOC at the leadership and political level is foundational for the success of any public health intervention during MG. The ability of the PHEOC to effectively function depends on appropriate design and infrastructure, staffing and command structure, and plans and procedures developed prior to the event. Multi-ministerial or jurisdictional coordination will be required and PHEOC should be positioned with such authorities. This paper outlines the essential concepts, elements, design, and operational aspects of PHEOC during MG.

  12. Real-time automated failure identification in the Control Center Complex (CCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Sarah; Lauritsen, Janet; Pack, Ginger; Ha, Anhhoang; Jowers, Steven; Mcnenny, Robert; Truong, The; Dell, James

    1993-01-01

    A system which will provide real-time failure management support to the Space Station Freedom program is described. The system's use of a simplified form of model based reasoning qualifies it as an advanced automation system. However, it differs from most such systems in that it was designed from the outset to meet two sets of requirements. First, it must provide a useful increment to the fault management capabilities of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Control Center Complex (CCC) Fault Detection Management system. Second, it must satisfy CCC operational environment constraints such as cost, computer resource requirements, verification, and validation, etc. The need to meet both requirement sets presents a much greater design challenge than would have been the case had functionality been the sole design consideration. The choice of technology, discussing aspects of that choice and the process for migrating it into the control center is overviewed.

  13. Using resources of public health centers for education and professional societies to incorporate homeland security topics into public teacher continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret E

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Education, the Association of Schools of Public Health, and national professional societies dedicated to teaching and dissemination of information for health and education in the public sector can form a clearinghouse on information and manpower on Homeland Security by affiliation with Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP). The state licensed or regional societies can contribute further information and guidelines. In the HPS the Science Teacher Workshop (STW) and Public Education (PEC) Committees can assist a CPHP on radiation issues.

  14. Preparation and characterization of novel oxo-centered basic p-chlorobenzoic bridging trinuclear complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD YAZDANBAKHSH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Three new oxo-centered trinuclear complexes, one of them a mixed-valence complex [Mn3O(C7H4O2Cl6(Py3]Py (1 and the others, mixed-metal complexes of [Fe2MnO(C7H4O2Cl6(Py3]NO3 (2 and [Fe2CoO(C7H4O2Cl6(Py3] (3 were synthesized by the direct reaction between metal nitrates and p-chlorobenzoic acid. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses (CHN, atomic absorption spectroscopy and spectral (IR, electronic studies. These are new type of oxo-bridged mixed-metal complexes in which the carboxylate ligand is p-chlorobenzoic acid. The UV spectra of the complexes exhibited a strong band in the region 42,500 cm-1 which is related to the (π → π* transitions of the pyridine ligand. The IR spectra of these compounds showed two strong stretching vibrations bands, indicating a bridging coordination mode of the carboxylic group of the ligand in the complexes.

  15. Fair comparison of complexity between a multi-band CAP and DMT for data center interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J L; Sanchez, C; Giacoumidis, E

    2017-10-01

    We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first known detailed analysis and fair comparison of complexity of a 56 Gb/s multi-band carrierless amplitude and phase (CAP) and discrete multi-tone (DMT) over 80 km dispersion compensation fiber-free single-mode fiber links based on intensity modulation and direct detection for data center interconnects. We show that the matched finite impulse response filters and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT)/FFT take the majority of the complexity of the multi-band CAP and DMT, respectively. The choice of the multi-band CAP sub-band count and the DMT IFFT/FFT size makes significant impact on the system complexity or performance, and trade-off must be considered.

  16. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Five-year report, September 15, 1987--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, Peter; Darvill, Alan

    1992-05-01

    The Complex Carbohydrate Research Center (CCRC) is the home of ten independent but complementary interdisciplinary research groups led by nine regular faculty and one adjunct faculty. The research of these groups represents a broad spectrum of interests, and they are involved in about 90 collaborations with their CCRC and UGA colleagues and with scientists at other institutions and companies in the US, Canada, Europe, Israel, and Japan. The hallmark of the CCRC is the collaborative, interactive environment encouraged by its directors, faculty and tong-term staff. Newcomers to the CCRC or short-term members soon learn that everyone benefits from this process. The team-oriented approach in carbohydrate science translates into the day-today generous giving of one's time and expertise to the work of others, whether it be in sharing specialized instrumentation, participating in the design of experiments and interpretalon of data, providing service to scientists outside the CCRC, or joining collaborative projects. The CCRC is founded on the principle that the cross-fertilization of ideas and know-how leads to the synergistic advancement of science. This report contains a series of appendices that document the extent and breadth of the Plant and Microbial Carbohydrate Center's contributions to collaborative research and education. Several collaborative research projects that have received postdoctoral research associate support from the Grant are highlighted, as these projects are particularly illustrative of the wide-ranging collaborations that have evolved as a result of this Grant and the quality of the science that the Grant enables.

  17. Governability Framework for the Evaluation and Implementation of Complex Public Health Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Joe; Kutty, V. Raman

    2012-01-01

    Background: The dominant theoretical basis of our public health practice originates from a positivist or reductionist paradigm. It fails to take into account the complexity emerging out of public health's multiple influences originating from biological and social worlds. A deeper understanding of the interaction of elements that characterize the…

  18. Innovation in user-centered skills and performance improvement for sustainable complex service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    In order to leverage individual and organizational learning and to remain competitive in current turbulent markets it is important for employees, managers, planners and leaders to perform at high levels over time. Employee competence and skills are extremely important matters in view of the general shortage of talent and the mobility of employees with talent. Two factors emerged to have the greatest impact on the competitiveness of complex service systems: improving managerial and employee's knowledge attainment for skills, and improving the training and development of the workforce. This paper introduces the knowledge-based user-centered service design approach for sustainable skill and performance improvement in education, design and modeling of the next generation of complex service systems. The rest of the paper cover topics in human factors and sustainable business process modeling for the service industry, and illustrates the user-centered service system development cycle with the integration of systems engineering concepts in service systems. A roadmap for designing service systems of the future is discussed. The framework introduced in this paper is based on key user-centered design principles and systems engineering applications to support service competitiveness.

  19. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Brown, Richard E; Brown, Richard; Masanet, Eric; Nordman, Bruce; Tschudi, Bill; Shehabi, Arman; Stanley, John; Koomey, Jonathan; Sartor, Dale; Chan, Peter; Loper, Joe; Capana, Steve; Hedman, Bruce; Duff, Rebecca; Haines, Evan; Sass, Danielle; Fanara, Andrew

    2007-08-02

    This report was prepared in response to the request from Congress stated in Public Law 109-431 (H.R. 5646),"An Act to Study and Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Computer Servers in the United States." This report assesses current trends in energy use and energy costs of data centers and servers in the U.S. (especially Federal government facilities) and outlines existing and emerging opportunities for improved energy efficiency. It also makes recommendations for pursuing these energy-efficiency opportunities broadly across the country through the use of information and incentive-based programs.

  20. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Brown, Richard E; Brown, Richard; Masanet, Eric; Nordman, Bruce; Tschudi, Bill; Shehabi, Arman; Stanley, John; Koomey, Jonathan; Sartor, Dale; Chan, Peter; Loper, Joe; Capana, Steve; Hedman, Bruce; Duff, Rebecca; Haines, Evan; Sass, Danielle; Fanara, Andrew

    2007-08-02

    This report is the appendices to a companion report, prepared in response to the request from Congress stated in Public Law 109-431 (H.R. 5646),"An Act to Study and Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Computer Servers in the United States." This report assesses current trends in energy use and energy costs of data centers and servers in the U.S. (especially Federal government facilities) and outlines existing and emerging opportunities for improved energy efficiency. It also makes recommendations for pursuing these energy-efficiency opportunities broadly across the country through the use of information and incentive-based programs.

  1. Publications of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Appendix A: January 2016 December 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Publications Date Publication Mar 2016 Proceedings from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ...ER D C/ IT L SR -1 7- 1 Publications of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Appendix A: January 2016-December 2016...In fo rm at io n Te ch no lo gy L ab or at or y Compiled by James A. Dolan May 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  2. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Annual report, September 15, 1990--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  3. Environmental Assessment for Central Campus Complex John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankert, Donald

    2013-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment addresses the Proposed Action to consolidate multiple facilities in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Industrial Area by constructing two new buildings in the existing headquarters area between NASA Parkway, 3rd Street, C Avenue, and D Avenue. Under the Proposed Action, the historic Headquarters Building will be demolished and a new building will be constructed closer to the Operations and Checkout Building by centering it on D A venue (Hunton Brady Architects, P A and Jones Edmunds and Associates, Inc. 2011). This option was selected from a group of 15 initial sketches as the most viable option during a Central Campus Complex Siting Study completed in February 2011. A No-Action Alternative is also presented in which no demolition or construction of new facilities would occur. Implementing the Proposed Action will have major impacts to cultural resources, while the remaining environmental impacts will be minor.

  4. How to make complexity look simple? Conveying ecosystems restoration complexity for socio-economic research and public engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ortega, Julia; Glenk, Klaus; Byg, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Ecosystems degradation represents one of the major global challenges at the present time, threating people's livelihoods and well-being worldwide. Ecosystem restoration therefore seems no longer an option, but an imperative. Restoration challenges are such that a dialogue has begun on the need to re-shape restoration as a science. A critical aspect of that reshaping process is the acceptance that restoration science and practice needs to be coupled with socio-economic research and public engagement. This inescapably means conveying complex ecosystem's information in a way that is accessible to the wider public. In this paper we take up this challenge with the ultimate aim of contributing to making a step change in science's contribution to ecosystems restoration practice. Using peatlands as a paradigmatically complex ecosystem, we put in place a transdisciplinary process to articulate a description of the processes and outcomes of restoration that can be understood widely by the public. We provide evidence of the usefulness of the process and tools in addressing four key challenges relevant to restoration of any complex ecosystem: (1) how to represent restoration outcomes; (2) how to establish a restoration reference; (3) how to cope with varying restoration time-lags and (4) how to define spatial units for restoration. This evidence includes the way the process resulted in the creation of materials that are now being used by restoration practitioners for communication with the public and in other research contexts. Our main contribution is of an epistemological nature: while ecosystem services-based approaches have enhanced the integration of academic disciplines and non-specialist knowledge, this has so far only followed one direction (from the biophysical underpinning to the description of ecosystem services and their appreciation by the public). We propose that it is the mix of approaches and epistemological directions (including from the public to the

  5. Simulation-Based Learning Environments to Teach Complexity: The Missing Link in Teaching Sustainable Public Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Deegan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available While public-sector management problems are steeped in positivistic and socially constructed complexity, public management education in the management of complexity lags behind that of business schools, particularly in the application of simulation-based learning. This paper describes a Simulation-Based Learning Environment for public management education that includes a coupled case study and System Dynamics simulation surrounding flood protection, a domain where stewardship decisions regarding public infrastructure and investment have direct and indirect effects on businesses and the public. The Pointe Claire case and CoastalProtectSIM simulation provide a platform for policy experimentation under conditions of exogenous uncertainty (weather and climate change as well as endogenous effects generated by structure. We discuss the model in some detail, and present teaching materials developed to date to support the use of our work in public administration curricula. Our experience with this case demonstrates the potential of this approach to motivate sustainable learning about complexity in public management settings and enhance learners’ competency to deal with complex dynamic problems.

  6. Alternative Fuel News: Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center, Vol. 6, No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-01-01

    Official publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center featuring alternative fuels activity in every state, dealer incentives for AFV sales, and news from the Automakers.

  7. Navato Center Regulatory Permit Application by Novato Center Inc. Marin County, California Public Notice 10138-33R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    selection of goods which are usually offered in several dif- ferent stores. Comparison goods include general merchandise , apparel, furni- ture and... supermarket . 77 TABLE 1 7 TYPES OF RETAIL CONCENTRATTONS Neighborhood Cornunity Regional Center Center Center Major Tenants Supermarket Variety store, Two...or more full- and/or drug. discount, or junior line department department store, stores of at least supermarket . 100,000 sq. ft. Typical Retail

  8. Chemical proprieties of the iron-quinone complex in mutated reaction centers of Rb. sphaeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hałas, Agnieszka; Derrien, Valerie; Sebban, Pierre; Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Józef; Kruk, Jerzy; Burda, Kvĕtoslava

    2012-03-01

    We investigated type II bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers, which contain a quinone - iron complex (QA-Fe-QB) on their acceptor side. Under physiological conditions it was observed mainly in a reduced high spin state but its low spin ferrous states were also observed. Therefore, it was suggested that it might regulate the dynamical properties of the iron-quinone complex and the protonation and deprotonation events in its neighbourhood. In order to get insight into the molecular mechanism of the NHFe low spin state formation, we preformed Mössbauer studies of a wild type of Rb. sphaeroides and its two mutated forms. Our Mössbauer measurements show that the hydrophobicity of the QA binding site can be crucial for stabilization of the high spin ferrous state of NHFe.

  9. Chemical proprieties of the iron-quinone complex in mutated reaction centers of Rb. sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halas, Agnieszka [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Poland); Derrien, Valerie; Sebban, Pierre [University of Paris XI, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (France); Matlak, Krzysztof; Korecki, Jozef [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Solid State Physics (Poland); Kruk, Jerzy [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology (Poland); Burda, Kvetoslava, E-mail: kvetoslava.burda@fis.agh.edu.pl [AGH University, Faculty of Physics and Computer Science, Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Poland)

    2012-03-15

    We investigated type II bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers, which contain a quinone - iron complex (Q{sub A}-Fe-Q{sub B}) on their acceptor side. Under physiological conditions it was observed mainly in a reduced high spin state but its low spin ferrous states were also observed. Therefore, it was suggested that it might regulate the dynamical properties of the iron-quinone complex and the protonation and deprotonation events in its neighbourhood. In order to get insight into the molecular mechanism of the NHFe low spin state formation, we preformed Moessbauer studies of a wild type of Rb. sphaeroides and its two mutated forms. Our Moessbauer measurements show that the hydrophobicity of the Q{sub A} binding site can be crucial for stabilization of the high spin ferrous state of NHFe.

  10. Parameterization of the prosthetic redox centers of the bacterial cytochrome bc(1) complex for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaszuba, K.; Postila, P. A.; Cramariuc, O.

    2013-01-01

    studied in large-scale classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In part, this is due to lack of suitable force field parameters, centered atomic point charges in particular, for the complex's prosthetic redox centers. Accurate redox center charges are needed to depict realistically the inter-molecular......Cytochrome (cyt) bc(1) is a multi-subunit membrane protein complex that is a vital component of the respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although the complex's dimer structure has been solved using X-ray crystallography, it has not yet been...

  11. Piloting CenteringParenting in Two Alberta Public Health Well-Child Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jennifer Cyne; McNeil, Deborah; van der Lee, Germaeline; MacLeod, Cheryl; Uyanwune, Yvonne; Hill, Kaitlyn

    2017-05-01

    To pilot a group health service delivery model, CenteringParenting, for new parents, to assess its feasibility and impact on maternal and infant outcomes. Families attended six, 2-hr group sessions in their child's first year of life with three to seven other families. Health assessments, parent-led discussions, and vaccinations occurred within the group. Demographic, breastfeeding, vaccination, maternal psychosocial health, parenting, and satisfaction data were collected and compared to a representative cohort. Four groups ran in two clinics. Four to eight parent/infant dyads participated in each group, 24 total dyads. Most participating parents were mothers. Dyads in the group model received 12 hr of contact with Public Health over the year compared to 3 hr in the typical one-on-one model. Participants were younger, more likely to have lower levels of education, and lower household income than the comparison group. Parents reported improvements in parenting experiences following the program. At 4 months, all CenteringParenting babies were vaccinated compared to 95% of babies in the comparison group. The pilot was successfully completed. Additional research is required to examine the effectiveness of CenteringParenting. Data collected provide insight into potential primary outcomes of interest and informs larger, rigorously designed longitudinal studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Citations in Life Science Patents to Publicly Funded Research at Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampat, Bhaven N; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2015-12-01

    The contributions of Academic Medical Centers (AMCs) to biomedical innovation have been difficult to measure because of the challenges involved in tracing knowledge flows from their origin to their uses. The authors examined patent citation linkages between AMC research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and patents. In prospective analyses, they examine the extent to which articles resulting from NIH grants to AMCs awarded between 1990 and 1995 were cited in drug and medical patents. The authors then examine the extent to which these patents are associated with marketed drugs. In retrospective analyses, they examine the share of drugs approved between 2000 and 2009 that have citation links to NIH-funded AMC research. The prospective analyses show over a third of AMC grants resulted in publications that were cited in patents. Most the patents are drug and biotechnology patents, and are assigned to private firms. Patents citing NIH-funded AMC publications were associated with 106 new FDA approved drugs, half of which are new molecular entities and a quarter of which are priority NMEs. The retrospective analyses showed that about half of the new molecular entities approved over the 2000-2009 period had citations links to NIH-funded AMC research. There are strong links between articles from NIH-funded AMC research and private sector medical patenting, including drugs. More research is needed to better understand the types of links the citations represent and their implications for public policy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mechanistic insight on the catecholase activity of dinuclear copper complexes with distant metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Quijano, María Rosa; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor M; Gasque, Laura

    2012-04-28

    The catecholase activity of two dinuclear Cu(II) complexes with distant metal centers is discussed together with solid state and solution studies. The crystal structure for one of them, [Cu(2)(diep)(H(2)O)(4)](ClO(4))(4)·2H(2)O, is described, showing the two copper ions are 7.457 Å apart and in a square pyramidal coordination. Both complexes display a weak antiferromagnetic coupling in the solid state that is manifest in the dimer EPR spectra obtained in frozen solution. The pH-potentiometric speciation performed in 1:1 MeOH-H(2)O allowed the assignment of hydrolyzed copper species as those catalytically active in the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (DTBC). The kinetic measurements led us to propose behavior consistent with Michaelis-Menten plus a linear dependence of the initial rate on [DTBC]. This can be associated with the presence of more than one catalytically active species, which is consistent with the evidence of several differently hydrolyzed species shown in the predominance diagrams. Product characterization studies led to establishing the formation of hydrogen peroxide during the catalytic cycle, while semiquinone and superoxide radicals were detected by EPR spectroscopy, supporting one-electron transference at each of the copper centers. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  14. Ruthenium polypyridine complexes. On the route to biomimetic assemblies as models for the photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, H; Bossmann, S

    2001-11-01

    We describe in this Account the preparation of RuL(3) complexes and their significance as biomimetic models for the photosynthetic reation center. Their preparation from simple or more complicated bypyridine ligands L and their photophysical data, especially their stability, are reported. Biomimetic models involving three concepts of the interaction of RuL(3) with acceptors in coordinatively, mechanically, or covalently linked supramolecular assemblies are also presented. The electron transfer (ET) of the noncovalently linked assemblies of RuL(3) complexes carrying polyether chains with one or two anisyl binding sites (4 or 5) with the cyclic bisviologen was studied. Molecular modeling and NMR titration clearly show the formation of supramolecular assemblies. Time-resolved spectroscopy demonstrated that ET and charge separation in the RuL(3) complexes with two binding sites are more efficient. The more constrained RuL(3)-bisviologen-catenane (6) possesses two conformations which exhibit different efficiency in ET, creating a charge-separated state in the microsecond domain. The covalently linked Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)-viologen assemblies having one (7, diad) or two bisviologen arms (8, diad) result in efficient ET. Addition of linear polyethers, cyclic polyethers, or crowns generates new triads and tetrads of the pseudorotaxane type. Molecular modeling and NMR titration clearly indicate the formation of supramolecular assemblies. The analysis of time-resolved studies proves fast ET and especially long-lived charge-separated states in these pseudorotaxanes. These data, compared with the findings for the photosynthetic reation center, show conclusive results. The lifetimes of the charge-separated states increase clearly in the sequence for noncovalently < mechanically < and covalently linked assemblies.

  15. Dinuclear Palladium Complexes with Two Ligand-Centered Radicals and a Single Bridging Ligand: Subtle Tuning of Magnetic Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broere, D.L.J.; Demeshko, S.; de Bruin, B.; Pidko, E.A.; Reek, J.N.H.; Siegler, M.A.; Lutz, M.; van der Vlugt, J.I.

    2015-01-01

    The facile and tunable preparation of unique dinuclear [(L-center dot) Pd-X-Pd(L-center dot)] complexes (X = Cl or N-3), bearing a ligand radical on each Pd, is disclosed, as well as their magnetochemistry in solution and solid state is reported. Chloride abstraction from [PdCl(NNOISQ)] (NNOISQ =

  16. Changing the Paradigm in Public Health and Disability through a Knowledge Translation Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri A. Vanderbom

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available People with disabilities are a health disparity population that face many barriers to health promotion opportunities in their communities. Inclusion in public health initiatives is a critical approach to address the health disparities that people with disabilities experience. The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD is tackling health disparities in the areas of physical activity, healthy nutrition, and healthy weight management. Using the NCHPAD Knowledge Adaptation, Translation, and Scale-up Framework, NCHPAD is systematically facilitating, monitoring, and evaluating inclusive programmatic, policy, systems, and environmental (PPSE changes in communities and organizations at a local and national level. Through examples we will highlight the importance of adapting knowledge, facilitating uptake, developing strategic partnerships and building community capacity that ultimately creates sustainable, inclusive change.

  17. Determining rules for closing customer service centers: A public utility company's fuzzy decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekorvin, Andre; Shipley, Margaret F.

    1992-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the general problem of knowledge acquisition under uncertainty. A commonly used method is to learn by examples. We observe how the expert solves specific cases and from this infer some rules by which the decision was made. Unique to this work is the fuzzy set representation of the conditions or attributes upon which the decision make may base his fuzzy set decision. From our examples, we infer certain and possible rules containing fuzzy terms. It should be stressed that the procedure determines how closely the expert follows the conditions under consideration in making his decision. We offer two examples pertaining to the possible decision to close a customer service center of a public utility company. In the first example, the decision maker does not follow too closely the conditions. In the second example, the conditions are much more relevant to the decision of the expert.

  18. Analysis of public perception about impaired odor in center fishery processing industry Tegalsari Tegal city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Tri Setyo; Purwanto, P.; Yulianto, Bambang

    2017-03-01

    The Coastal Fishing Port (CFP) Tegalsari is one of the largest center of the fishery industries in Central Java Indonesia. In addition to producing fish-based products such as fish fillets, salted fish and fish meal are distributed to most major cities in Indonesia, but also generate waste and wastewater which potentially disrupt the environment. The purpose of this study describe the perception of the public about the negative impact of the activities in center fishery processing industry. The research method uses qualitative research design with the population living around the center of the fishing industry, with samples taken by purposive sampling numbered 30 people and 3 location sample to know concentration of ammoniac and hydrogen Sulfide. Data research in 2016 was processed using statistical methods. The results of research showed very significant, 80% of respondents who said the fishing activities causing nuisance odor. The remaining 20% stated that the odor nuisance almost imperceptibly. The nuisance of odor are perceived by 53% of respondents for a full day. There are 70% of respondents living around the center of the fishing industry who lived more than seven years, and the remaining 30% of respondents who lived less than 7 years. Conclusion respondent who live more than seven years and said there was no odor nuisance around 57%, are more than 50% of the respondents. The odor of the most influential parameter on the fishing industry is an element of ammoniac (NH3) instead of Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S), because the value at these three locations for Hydrogen Sulfide measurement results show the same number that is equal to 0.001 g/m3. While ammoniac levels at most locations smelled according to perceptions of examiners showed the highest scores, while the zone that did not feel the smell indicates a low value, the test results showed a clear level of distinction. So the need to manage the environment at the center of the fishing industry with a approach of

  19. Stroke quality metrics: systematic reviews of the relationships to patient-centered outcomes and impact of public reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Carol; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J

    2012-01-01

    Stroke quality metrics play an increasingly important role in quality improvement and policies related to provider reimbursement, accreditation, and public reporting. We conducted 2 systematic reviews examining the relationships between compliance with stroke quality metrics and patient-centered outcomes, and public reporting of stroke metrics and quality improvement, quality of care, or outcomes. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify studies that evaluated the relationship between stroke quality metric compliance and patient-centered outcomes in acute hospital settings and public reporting of stroke quality metrics and quality improvement activities, quality of care, or patient outcomes. We specifically excluded studies that evaluated the effect of stroke units or hospital certification. Fourteen studies met eligibility criteria for the review of stroke quality metric compliance and patient-centered outcomes; 9 found mostly positive associations, whereas 5 found no or very limited associations. Only 2 eligible studies were found that directly addressed the public reporting of stroke quality metrics. Some studies have found positive associations between stroke metric compliance and improved patient-centered outcomes. However, high-quality studies are lacking and several methodological difficulties make the interpretation of the reported associations challenging. Information on the impact of public reporting of stroke quality metric data is extremely limited. Legitimate questions remain as to whether public reporting of stroke metrics is accurate, effective, or has the potential for unintended consequences. The generation of high-quality data examining quality metrics and stroke outcomes as well as the impact of public reporting should be given priority.

  20. Utilization of Dental Services in Public Health Center: Dental Attendance, Awareness and Felt Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewa, Preksha; Garla, Bharath K; Dagli, Rushabh; Bhateja, Geetika Arora; Solanki, Jitendra

    2015-10-01

    In rural India, dental diseases occur due to many factors, which includes inadequate or improper use of fluoride and a lack of knowledge regarding oral health and oral hygiene, which prevent proper screening and dental care of oral diseases. The objective of the study was to evaluate the dental attendance, awareness and utilization of dental services in public health center. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 251 study subjects who were visiting dental outpatient department (OPD) of public health centre (PHC), Guda Bishnoi, and Jodhpur using a pretested proforma from month of July 2014 to October 2014. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding socioeconomic status and demographic factors affecting the utilization of dental services. Pearson's Chi-square test and step-wise logistic regression were applied for the analysis. Statistically significant results were found in relation to age, educational status, socioeconomic status and gender with dental attendance, dental awareness and felt needs. p-value dental services, thereby increasing the oral health status of the population.

  1. General surgeon management of complex hepatopancreatobiliary trauma at a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilen, Peter; Greenbaum, Alissa; Miskimins, Richard; Rojo, Manuel; Preda, Razvan; Howdieshell, Thomas; Lu, Stephen; West, Sonlee

    2017-09-01

    The impact of general surgeons (GS) taking trauma call on patient outcomes has been debated. Complex hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) injuries present a particular challenge and often require specialized care. We predicted no difference in the initial management or outcomes of complex HPB trauma between GS and trauma/critical care (TCC) specialists. A retrospective review of patients who underwent operative intervention for complex HPB trauma from 2008 to 2015 at an ACS-verified level I trauma center was performed. Chart review was used to obtain variables pertaining to demographics, clinical presentation, operative management, and outcomes. Patients were grouped according to whether their index operation was performed by a GS or TCC provider and compared. 180 patients met inclusion criteria. The GS (n = 43) and TCC (n = 137) cohorts had comparable patient demographics and clinical presentations. Most injuries were hepatic (73.3% GS versus 72.6% TCC) and TCC treated more pancreas injuries (15.3% versus GS 13.3%; P = 0.914). No significant differences were found in HPB-directed interventions at the initial operation (41.9% GS versus 56.2% TCC; P = 0.100), damage control laparotomy with temporary abdominal closure (69.8% versus 69.3%; P = 0.861), LOS, septic complications or 30-day mortality (13.9% versus 10.2%; P = 0.497). TCC were more likely to place an intraabdominal drain than GS (52.6% versus 34.9%; P = 0.043). We found no significant differences between GS and TCC specialists in initial operative management or clinical outcomes of complex HPB trauma. The frequent and proper use of damage control laparotomy likely contribute to these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxygen activation by mononuclear Mn, Co, and Ni centers in biology and synthetic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Adam T; Fischer, Anne A

    2017-04-01

    The active sites of metalloenzymes that catalyze O2-dependent reactions generally contain iron or copper ions. However, several enzymes are capable of activating O2 at manganese or nickel centers instead, and a handful of dioxygenases exhibit activity when substituted with cobalt. This minireview summarizes the catalytic properties of oxygenases and oxidases with mononuclear Mn, Co, or Ni active sites, including oxalate-degrading oxidases, catechol dioxygenases, and quercetin dioxygenase. In addition, recent developments in the O2 reactivity of synthetic Mn, Co, or Ni complexes are described, with an emphasis on the nature of reactive intermediates featuring superoxo-, peroxo-, or oxo-ligands. Collectively, the biochemical and synthetic studies discussed herein reveal the possibilities and limitations of O2 activation at these three "overlooked" metals.

  3. The George W. Comstock Center for Public Health Research and Prevention: A Century of Collaboration, Innovation, and Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coresh, Josef; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has been engaged in public health research and practice in Washington County, Maryland, nearly since its inception a century ago. In 2005, the center housing this work was renamed the George W. Comstock Center for Public Health Research and Prevention to honor its pioneering leader. Principles that guided innovation and translation well in the past included: research synergies and opportunities for translation realized through longstanding connection with the community; integration of training with public health research; lifelong learning, mentorship, and teamwork; and efficiency through economies of scale. These principles are useful to consider as we face the challenges of improving the health of the population over the next 100 years. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Coordination functionalization of graphene oxide with tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of nickel(II): Generation of paramagnetic centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A., E-mail: basiuk@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Alzate-Carvajal, Natalia [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Henao-Holguín, Laura V. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Rybak-Akimova, Elena V. [Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elbg1111@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry,Tufts University, 62 Talbot Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • [Ni(cyclam)]{sup 2+} and [Ni(tet b)]{sup 2+} cations coordinate to carboxylic groups of GO. • The coordination takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based medium. • The coordination results in the conversion from low-spin to high-spin Ni(II). • Functionalized GO samples were characterized by various instrumental techniques. - Abstract: We describe a novel approach to functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) which allows for a facile generation of paramagnetic centers from two diamagnetic components. Coordination attachment of [Ni(cyclam)]{sup 2+} or [Ni(tet b)]{sup 2+} tetraazamacrocyclic cations to carboxylic groups of GO takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based reaction medium. The procedure is very straightforward and does not require high temperatures or other harsh conditions. Changing the coordination geometry of Ni(II) from square-planar tetracoordinated to pseudooctahedral hexacoordinated brings about the conversion from low-spin to high-spin state of the metal centers. Even though the content of tetraazamacrocyclic complexes in functionalized GO samples was found to be relatively low (nickel content of ca. 1 wt%, as determined by thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements easily detected the appearance of paramagnetic properties in GO + [Ni(cyclam)] and GO + [Ni(tet b)] nanohybrids, with effective magnetic moments of 1.95 BM and 2.2 BM for, respectively. According to density functional theory calculations, the main spin density is localized at the macrocyclic complexes, without considerable extension to graphene sheet, which suggests insignificant ferromagnetic coupling in the nanohybrids, in agreement with the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements. The coordination attachment of Ni(II) tetraazamacrocycles to GO results in considerable changes in Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra

  5. Leadership, collaboration, and effective training principles and practices from a decade of training by a center for public health preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, William Michael; Brown, Lisa M; Landis, Danielle C

    2014-01-01

    To review a decade's experience of a Centers for Disease Control and Preparedness (CDC) funded Center for Public Health Preparedness (hereafter referred to as the Center) and to identify interventions that led to surmounting serious obstacles to achieving the Center's CDC-mandated goals and objectives. The Center's purpose was to train the public health workforce to protect the population from bioterrorism, infectious diseases, and emerging public health threats. This case study used the concepts of the judgment process as developed by Noel Tichy and Warren Bennis to describe the experiences and actions of the Center's leaders. Center staff used public health principles of collaboration, the use of relevant science, and professional training principles in developing and delivering training in epidemiology, behavioral health, crisis leadership, and other fields through distance learning and on-site methods. The study's primary focus was on training in Florida, although the program's reach was national and international. Preparedness training was provided to approximately 10,000 public health officials, primarily drawn from Florida. This is a descriptive study of the Center's activities. The interventions were the steps taken by Center leadership to accomplish the federal and state goals of the program, despite meeting major challenges. The outcome measures were degrees of success, as measured by federal and state officials and other indicators, in delivering high quality training that met CDC and state goals. The Center delivered trainings in fields determined to be needed in Florida and nationally. Participant and observer evaluations were strongly positive. Nationally published papers and presentations contributed to the training evidence base. The Florida Department of Health incorporated the trainings into Florida's mandatory training for Incident Command strike teams. The leaders of the Center and the Florida Department of Health developed a formal statement of

  6. Does problem complexity matter for environmental policy delivery? How public authorities address problems of water governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschke, Sabrina; Newig, Jens; Völker, Jeanette; Borchardt, Dietrich

    2017-07-01

    Problem complexity is often assumed to hamper effective environmental policy delivery. However, this claim is hardly substantiated, given the dominance of qualitative small-n designs in environmental governance research. We studied 37 types of contemporary problems defined by German water governance to assess the impact of problem complexity on policy delivery through public authorities. The analysis is based on a unique data set related to these problems, encompassing both in-depth interview-based data on complexities and independent official data on policy delivery. Our findings show that complexity in fact tends to delay implementation at the stage of planning. However, different dimensions of complexity (goals, variables, dynamics, interconnections, and uncertainty) impact on the different stages of policy delivery (goal formulation, stages and degrees of implementation) in various ways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. How to Lead the Way Through Complexity, Constraint, and Uncertainty in Academic Health Science Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieff, Susan J; Yammarino, Francis J

    2017-05-01

    Academic medicine is in an era of unprecedented and constant change due to fluctuating economies, globalization, emerging technologies, research, and professional and educational mandates. Consequently, academic health science centers (AHSCs) are facing new levels of complexity, constraint, and uncertainty. Currently, AHSC leaders work with competing academic and health service demands and are required to work with and are accountable to a diversity of stakeholders. Given the new challenges and emerging needs, the authors believe the leadership methods and approaches AHSCs have used in the past that led to successes will be insufficient. In this Article, the authors propose that AHSCs will require a unique combination of old and new leadership approaches specifically oriented to the unique complexity of the AHSC context. They initially describe the designer (or hierarchical) and heroic (military and transformational) approaches to leadership and how they have been applied in AHSCs. While these well-researched and traditional approaches have their strengths in certain contexts, the leadership field has recognized that they can also limit leaders' abilities to enable their organizations to be engaged, adaptable, and responsive. Consequently, some new approaches have emerged that are taking hold in academic work and professional practice. The authors highlight and explore some of these new approaches-the authentic, self, shared, and network approaches to leadership-with attention to their application in and utility for the AHSC context.

  8. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  9. The academic health center in complex humanitarian emergencies: lessons learned from the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Christine; Theodosis, Christian; Bills, Corey; Kim, Jimin; Kinet, Melodie; Turner, Madeleine; Millis, Michael; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Olopade, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    On January 12, 2010, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Haiti. The event disrupted infrastructure and was marked by extreme morbidity and mortality. The global response to the disaster was rapid and immense, comprising multiple actors-including academic health centers (AHCs)-that provided assistance in the field and from home. The authors retrospectively examine the multidisciplinary approach that the University of Chicago Medicine (UCM) applied to postearthquake Haiti, which included the application of institutional structure and strategy, systematic deployment of teams tailored to evolving needs, and the actual response and recovery. The university mobilized significant human and material resources for deployment within 48 hours and sustained the effort for over four months. In partnership with international and local nongovernmental organizations as well as other AHCs, the UCM operated one of the largest and more efficient acute field hospitals in the country. The UCM's efforts in postearthquake Haiti provide insight into the role AHCs can play, including their strengths and limitations, in complex disasters. AHCs can provide necessary intellectual and material resources as well as technical expertise, but the cost and speed required for responding to an emergency, and ongoing domestic responsibilities, may limit the response of a large university and hospital system. The authors describe the strong institutional backing, the detailed predeployment planning and logistical support UCM provided, the engagement of faculty and staff who had previous experience in complex humanitarian emergencies, and the help of volunteers fluent in the local language which, together, made UCM's mission in postearthquake Haiti successful.

  10. Possible giant metamorphic core complex at the center of Artemis Corona, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Hundreds of circular features on Venus known as coronae are characterized by annular fractures and commonly associated radial fractures and lava flows. Coronae are thought to have been produced by buoyant mantle diapirs that flatten and spread at the base of the lithosphere and cause fracturing, uplift, and magmatism. The interior of Artemis Corona, by far the largest corona at 2100 km diameter, is divided in half by a northeast-trending deformation belt that contains numerous rounded ridges resembling antiforms. The largest of these ridges, located at the center of Artemis Corona, is ???5 km high on its steep northwest flank where it is adjacent to a flat-bottomed, 10-km-wide trough interpreted as a rift valley. The 280-km-long antiformal ridge is marked by perpendicular grooves that cross the ???50-km-wide ridge and extend southeastward as far as 120 km across adjacent plains. The grooves abruptly terminate northwestward at the rift trough. The large antiformal ridge terminates southwestward at a transform shear zone that parallels the grooves. These features-rift valley, antiformal uplift, grooves, and transform shear zone-are morphologically and geometrically similar to grooved, elevated, submarine metamorphic core complexes on the inside corners of ridge-transform intersections of slow-spreading ridges on Earth. As with submarine core complexes, the grooved surface on Venus is interpreted as the footwall of a large-displacement normal fault, and the grooves are inferred to be the product of plastic molding of the footwall to irregularities on the underside of the hanging wall followed by tectonic exhumation of the molded grooves and conveyer-belt-like transport up and over the large antiform and across the southeastern plains. According to this interpretation, the trend of the grooves records the direction of extension, which is perpendicular to the thrusts at the leading edge of the annular thrust belt 1000 km to the southeast. Both may have formed at the

  11. The complex interplay between clinical and person-centered diabetes outcomes in the two genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maria Chiara; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Pintaudi, Basilio; Bulotta, Angela; Gentile, Sandro; Scardapane, Marco; Skovlund, Soren Eik; Vespasiani, Giacomo; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2017-02-21

    New approaches to cope with clinical and psychosocial aspects of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are needed; gender influences the complex interplay between clinical and non-clinical factors. We used data from the BENCH-D study to assess gender-differences in terms of clinical and person-centered measures in T2DM. Clinical quality of care indicators relative to control of HbA1c, lipid profile, blood pressure, and BMI were derived from electronic medical records. Ten self-administered validated questionnaires (SF-12 Health Survey; WHO-5 well-being index; Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) 5, Health Care Climate Questionnaire, Patients Assessment of Chronic Illness Care, Diabetes Empowerment Scale, Diabetes Self-care Activities, Global Satisfaction for Diabetes Treatment, Barriers to Taking Medications, Perceived Social Support) were adopted as person-centered outcomes indicators. Overall, 26 diabetes clinics enrolled 2,335 people (men: 59.7%; women: 40.3%). Lower percentages of women reached HbA1c levels psychological well-being, self-care activities dedicated to physical activities, empowerment, diabetes-related distress, satisfaction with treatment, barriers to medication taking, satisfaction with access to chronic care and healthcare communication, and perceived social support than men; 24.8% of women and 8.8% of men had WHO-5  40 (high levels of diabetes-related distress) (p 40 was associated with a higher likelihood of HbA1c ≥8.0% in women (OR = 1.15; 95%CI 1.05-1.25) but not in men (OR = 1.00; 95%CI 0.93-1.08). In T2DM, women show poorer clinical and person-centered outcomes indicators than men. Diabetes-related distress plays a role as a correlate of metabolic control in women but not in men. The study provides new information about the interplay between clinical and person-centered indicators in men and women which may guide further improvements in diabetes education and support programs.

  12. Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.

    2012-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced, 6-meter-long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and aboveground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall-of-potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the grounding impedance of the downconductors, an Earth Ground Clamp (EGC) (a stakeless device for measuring grounding impedance) and an Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model of the LPS are used. The EGC is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor, and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding resistance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the EGC measurements.

  13. On the road to a stronger public health workforce: visual tools to address complex challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drehobl, Patricia; Stover, Beth H; Koo, Denise

    2014-11-01

    The public health workforce is vital to protecting the health and safety of the public, yet for years, state and local governmental public health agencies have reported substantial workforce losses and other challenges to the workforce that threaten the public's health. These challenges are complex, often involve multiple influencing or related causal factors, and demand comprehensive solutions. However, proposed solutions often focus on selected factors and might be fragmented rather than comprehensive. This paper describes approaches to characterizing the situation more comprehensively and includes two visual tools: (1) a fishbone, or Ishikawa, diagram that depicts multiple factors affecting the public health workforce; and (2) a roadmap that displays key elements-goals and strategies-to strengthen the public health workforce, thus moving from the problems depicted in the fishbone toward solutions. The visual tools aid thinking about ways to strengthen the public health workforce through collective solutions and to help leverage resources and build on each other's work. The strategic roadmap is intended to serve as a dynamic tool for partnership, prioritization, and gap assessment. These tools reflect and support CDC's commitment to working with partners on the highest priorities for strengthening the workforce to improve the public's health. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. 10 years of data publication with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) at the World Data Center for Climate (WDCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhause, Martina; Lautenschlager, Michael; Höck, Heinke; Toussaint, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The World Data Center for Climate (WDCC) has been Data DOI publication agency for 10 years. Before issuing the first Data DOI, five years were spent on the development of a concept out of the idea to make scientific data citable. Apart from the unique and persistent identification of data objects, questions e.g. about the organizational structure including the roles of libraries and data centers, cost models, data quality, and the granularity of data publications were targeted in this pre-phase. The first Data DOI publication system was developed within the German project 'std_doi' (Scientific and Technical Data DOI) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) acted as DOI Registration Agency and the data centers PANGAEA, GFZ and WDCC as publication agencies and long-term data archives. The first publication of scientific data came from WDCC in March 2004 (doi:10.1594/WDCC/EH4_OPYC_SRES_A2). About five years after the first data publications, in December 2009, the international organization DataCite was formed, leading to several organizational as well as technical changes affecting WDCC's scientific data publication process. Recently, WDCC became the data publisher for the decentrally disseminated data of the project CMIP5 (Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) and participated in the development of the data publication system 'atarrabi', requiring several additions and changes in WDCC's established data publication procedure. The challenges for the future of WDCC's scientific data publication lie in the connections of data to other DOI objects like scientific publications or to other persistent identifiers such as e.g. ORCID for persons or EPIC Handles for changeable data objects in the scientific workflow. Issues like data quality and data granularity have not been solved for the time being but are still under investigation.

  15. Health professionals' job satisfaction and associated factors at public health centers in West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deriba, Beyazin Kebede; Sinke, Shimele Ololo; Ereso, Berhane Megersa; Badacho, Abebe Sorsa

    2017-05-30

    Human resources are vital for delivering health services, and health systems cannot function effectively without sufficient numbers of skilled, motivated, and well-supported health workers. Job satisfaction of health workers is important for motivation and efficiency, as higher job satisfaction improves both employee performance and patient satisfaction. Even though several studies have addressed job satisfaction among healthcare professionals in different part of the world, there are relatively few studies on healthcare professionals' job satisfaction in Ethiopia. A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted among health professionals working in health centers in April 2015 using self-administered structured questionnaires. All 322 health professionals working in 23 randomly selected public health centers were included. Factor scores were computed for the identified items by varimax rotation to represent satisfaction. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed, and the effect of independent variables on the regression factor score quantified. Three hundred eight respondents participated with a response rate of 95.56%. The overall level of job satisfaction was 41.46%. Compensation (benefits) (beta 0.448 [95% CI 0.341 to 0.554]), recognition by management (beta 0.132 [95% CI 0.035 to 0.228]), and opportunity for development (beta 0.123 [95% CI 0.020 to 0.226]) were associated with job satisfaction. A unit increase in salary and incentives and recognition by management scores resulted in 0.459 (95% CI 0.356 to 0.561) and 0.156 (95% CI 0.065 to 0.247) unit increases in job satisfaction scores, respectively. The overall level of job satisfaction in health professionals was low. Salary and incentives, recognition by management, developmental opportunities, and patient appreciation were strong predictors of job satisfaction.

  16. Genomics in Public Health: Perspective from the Office of Public Health Genomics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridgely Fisk Green

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The national effort to use genomic knowledge to save lives is gaining momentum, as illustrated by the inclusion of genomics in key public health initiatives, including Healthy People 2020, and the recent launch of the precision medicine initiative. The Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC partners with state public health departments and others to advance the translation of genome-based discoveries into disease prevention and population health. To do this, OPHG has adopted an “identify, inform, and integrate” model: identify evidence-based genomic applications ready for implementation, inform stakeholders about these applications, and integrate these applications into public health at the local, state, and national level. This paper addresses current and future work at OPHG for integrating genomics into public health programs.

  17. Genomics in Public Health: Perspective from the Office of Public Health Genomics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk Green, Ridgely; Dotson, W. David; Bowen, Scott; Kolor, Katherine; Khoury, Muin J.

    2015-01-01

    The national effort to use genomic knowledge to save lives is gaining momentum, as illustrated by the inclusion of genomics in key public health initiatives, including Healthy People 2020, and the recent launch of the precision medicine initiative. The Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partners with state public health departments and others to advance the translation of genome-based discoveries into disease prevention and population health. To do this, OPHG has adopted an “identify, inform, and integrate” model: identify evidence-based genomic applications ready for implementation, inform stakeholders about these applications, and integrate these applications into public health at the local, state, and national level. This paper addresses current and future work at OPHG for integrating genomics into public health programs. PMID:26636032

  18. A decade of public health genomics in the United States: centers for disease control and prevention 1997-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, M J; Bowen, S; Bradley, L A; Coates, R; Dowling, N F; Gwinn, M; Kolor, K; Moore, C A; St Pierre, J; Valdez, R; Yoon, P W

    2009-01-01

    Since 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has collaborated with numerous partners to develop and chart the course of the multidisciplinary field of public health genomics in the USA and globally. During this period, CDC has developed major initiatives for the appropriate integration of genomics into public health research, policy and programs. In this paper, we review briefly the progress in public health genomics made over the past decade in the USA, including population research, the human genome epidemiology network (HuGENet(TM)), the evaluation of genomic applications in practice and prevention (EGAPP), the family history public health initiative, and efforts in building the public health genomics capacity. We also outline a vision for public health genomics for the next decade. Copyright © 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers: Using a Public Health Systems Approach to Improve All-Hazards Preparedness and Response

    OpenAIRE

    Leinhos, Mary; Qari,Shoukat H.; Williams-Johnson, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) prepared a report identifying knowledge gaps in public health systems preparedness and emergency response and recommending near-term priority research areas. In accordance with the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act mandating new public health systems research for preparedness and emergency response, CDC provided competitive awards establishing nine Preparedness and Emergenc...

  20. Commentary: The battle of Louisville: money, power, politics, and publicity at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Edward C

    2011-10-01

    In 2009, the entire clinical faculty of the Department of Neurosurgery of the University of Louisville School of Medicine elected to become employees of a nearby community hospital. This took place in the context of the financial burden of caring for the indigent, declining reimbursement, clinical demands for neurosurgical coverage of a level 1 trauma center, rising salaries for neurosurgeons, and competitive pressure on hospitals. The author, who was dean of the school of medicine at the time, would not accept the abrupt withdrawal of these clinicians from the faculty practice plan, single-point contracting, and academic governance of clinical work assignments. Politicians, the press, and accreditation bodies quickly weighed in as the university, the school, and the public good were placed in jeopardy. The motivations for this event-the community hospital defending its market share and physician recruitment and retention pipeline, the dean defending principles of academic governance and the faculty practice plan-and the responses of the participants offer an instructive case study for academic medical management. The author concludes that one might view the protagonists of this episode not as defenders of principles but, rather, as pawns in a larger drama playing out related to a perfect storm of economic and social pressures in American medicine.

  1. The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository: A large database of fluorescence microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riffle Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the development of computational methods to analyze fluorescent microscopy images and enable automated large-scale analysis of the subcellular localization of proteins. Determining the subcellular localization is an integral part of identifying a protein's function, and the application of bioinformatics to this problem provides a valuable tool for the annotation of proteomes. Training and validating algorithms used in image analysis research typically rely on large sets of image data, and would benefit from a large, well-annotated and highly-available database of images and associated metadata. Description The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository (YRC PIR is a large database of images depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins. Designed especially for computational biologists who need large numbers of images, the YRC PIR contains 532,182 TIFF images from nearly 85,000 separate experiments and their associated experimental data. All images and associated data are searchable, and the results browsable, through an intuitive web interface. Search results, experiments, individual images or the entire dataset may be downloaded as standards-compliant OME-TIFF data. Conclusions The YRC PIR is a powerful resource for researchers to find, view, and download many images and associated metadata depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins, or classes of proteins, in a standards-compliant format. The YRC PIR is freely available at http://images.yeastrc.org/.

  2. The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository: A large database of fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffle, Michael; Davis, Trisha N

    2010-05-19

    There is increasing interest in the development of computational methods to analyze fluorescent microscopy images and enable automated large-scale analysis of the subcellular localization of proteins. Determining the subcellular localization is an integral part of identifying a protein's function, and the application of bioinformatics to this problem provides a valuable tool for the annotation of proteomes. Training and validating algorithms used in image analysis research typically rely on large sets of image data, and would benefit from a large, well-annotated and highly-available database of images and associated metadata. The Yeast Resource Center Public Image Repository (YRC PIR) is a large database of images depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins. Designed especially for computational biologists who need large numbers of images, the YRC PIR contains 532,182 TIFF images from nearly 85,000 separate experiments and their associated experimental data. All images and associated data are searchable, and the results browsable, through an intuitive web interface. Search results, experiments, individual images or the entire dataset may be downloaded as standards-compliant OME-TIFF data. The YRC PIR is a powerful resource for researchers to find, view, and download many images and associated metadata depicting the subcellular localization and colocalization of proteins, or classes of proteins, in a standards-compliant format. The YRC PIR is freely available at http://images.yeastrc.org/.

  3. Investigating reliability centered maintenance (RCM for public road mass transportation vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopkinson James

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently public road mass transportation organisations maintain their vehicles using scheduled corrective maintenance which is carried out at the discretion of the organisation. Operating a corrective maintenance policy means that equipment are allowed to operate to failure and are only repaired or replaced when it fails. Corrective maintenance is generally recognised as an inefficient approach to maintaining equipment as the costs in terms of finance and time can be excessive. In many industries, from aerospace to oil production, a system of reliability centered maintenance (RCM is utilised. RCM estimates when equipment failure can be expected to occur and ensures that maintenance is performed before it does. Using the RCM approach usually results in assets being more reliable, with low equipment failure rates within its mechanical systems. This often results in significant financial benefit to the organisation as operating equipment become more reliable allowing the vehicles to be in service for longer and achieving higher safety standards. This investigation has predicted that potential equipment failure could take place between the vehicle mileage of 6000 -12000 miles. Using the consecutive reading /sampling method together with a set oil spray diameter size alert value of 130 mm, it was possible to further narrow down the potential equipment failure to a vehicle mileage of 10000 miles.

  4. Ecological complexity and West Nile virus: perspectives on improving public health response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainham, Daniel G C

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of West Nile Virus, as well as other emerging diseases, is linked to complex ecosystem processes such as climate change and constitutes an important threat to population health. Traditional public health intervention activities related to vector surveillance and control tend to be reactive and limited in their ability to deal with multiple epidemics and in their consideration of population health determinants. This paper reviews the current status of West Nile Virus in Canada and describes how complex systems and geographical perspectives help to acknowledge the influence of ecosystem processes on population health. It also provides examples of how these perspectives can be integrated into population-based intervention strategies.

  5. Volpe Center Annual Accomplishments: Advancing Transportation Innovation for the Public Good - January 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The Volpe Centers Annual Accomplishments highlights our best work of 2017 and illustrates the sustained impact of the Volpe Center in supporting the U.S. DOTs top priorities and strategic goals: safety, infrastructure, innovation, and accountab...

  6. A Survey of Digital Humanities Centers in the United States. CLIR Publication No. 143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorich, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for the 2008 Scholarly Communications Institute (SCI 6) focused on humanities research centers, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) commissioned a survey of digital humanities centers (DHCs). The immediate goals of the survey were to identify the extent of these centers and to explore their financing,…

  7. A burn center paradigm to fulfill deferred consent public disclosure and community consultation requirements for emergency care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Martha G; Falletta, Lynn; Andrews, David A; Reed, Michael D

    2012-09-01

    To fulfill Food and Drug Administration and Department of Health and Human Services emergency care research informed consent requirements, our burn center planned and executed a deferred consent strategy gaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval to proceed with the clinical study. These federal regulations dictate public disclosure and community consultation unique to acute care research. Our regional burn center developed and implemented a deferred consent public notification and community consultation paradigm appropriate for a burn study. Published accounts of deferred consent strategies focus on acute care resuscitation practices. We adapted those strategies to design and conduct a comprehensive public notification/community consultation plan to satisfy deferred consent requirements for burn center research. To implement a robust media campaign we engaged the hospital's public relations department, distributed media materials, recruited hospital staff for speaking engagements, enlisted community volunteers, and developed initiatives to inform "hard-to-reach" populations. The hospital's IRB determined we fulfilled our obligation to notify the defined community. Our communication strategy should provide a paradigm other burn centers may appropriate and adapt when planning and executing a deferred consent initiative. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Fish intake and type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Yumi; Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Kato, Masayuki; Oba, Shino; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2011-01-01

    .... The participants were 22,921 men and 29,759 women aged 45-75 y who completed a questionnaire of the second survey for the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study and who had no history of diabetes...

  9. National Center for Education Research Publication Handbook: Publications from Funded Education Research Grants, FY 2002 to FY 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Research, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 2002, the National Center for Education Research (NCER) in the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has funded over 700 education research grants and over 60 education training grants. The research grants have supported exploratory research to build theory or generate hypotheses on factors that may affect educational…

  10. Preparedness and emergency response research centers: using a public health systems approach to improve all-hazards preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinhos, Mary; Qari, Shoukat H; Williams-Johnson, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) prepared a report identifying knowledge gaps in public health systems preparedness and emergency response and recommending near-term priority research areas. In accordance with the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act mandating new public health systems research for preparedness and emergency response, CDC provided competitive awards establishing nine Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs) in accredited U.S. schools of public health. The PERRCs conducted research in four IOM-recommended priority areas: (1) enhancing the usefulness of public health preparedness and response (PHPR) training, (2) creating and maintaining sustainable preparedness and response systems, (3) improving PHPR communications, and (4) identifying evaluation criteria and metrics to improve PHPR for all hazards. The PERRCs worked closely with state and local public health, community partners, and advisory committees to produce practice-relevant research findings. PERRC research has generated more than 130 peer-reviewed publications and nearly 80 practice and policy tools and recommendations with the potential to significantly enhance our nation's PHPR to all hazards and that highlight the need for further improvements in public health systems.

  11. Knowledge transfer on complex social interventions in public health: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Christian; Malo, Marie; Robert, Émilie; Ouimet, Mathieu; Berthelette, Diane; Ridde, Valéry

    2013-01-01

    Scientific knowledge can help develop interventions that improve public health. The objectives of this review are (1) to describe the status of research on knowledge transfer strategies in the field of complex social interventions in public health and (2) to identify priorities for future research in this field. A scoping study is an exploratory study. After searching databases of bibliographic references and specialized periodicals, we summarized the relevant studies using a predetermined assessment framework. In-depth analysis focused on the following items: types of knowledge transfer strategies, fields of public health, types of publics, types of utilization, and types of research specifications. From the 1,374 references identified, we selected 26 studies. The strategies targeted mostly administrators of organizations and practitioners. The articles generally dealt with instrumental utilization and most often used qualitative methods. In general, the bias risk for the studies is high. Researchers need to consider the methodological challenges in this field of research in order to improve assessment of more complex knowledge transfer strategies (when they exist), not just diffusion/dissemination strategies and conceptual and persuasive utilization.

  12. Hearing abilities and language development in anemic children of a public daycare center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juliana Nunes; Lemos, Stela Maris Aguiar; Rates, Silmar Paulo Moreira; Lamounier, Joel Alves

    2008-01-01

    the relationship between anemia and development. to compare the auditory and language development in anemic and non-anemic children, with ages ranging from three to six years, of a public daycare center in Belo Horizonte city. a transversal study; blind case and control format. A digital puncture was performed in all children to detect iron-deficiency anemia (hemoglobin = 11.3g/dL). The research group was composed of 19 anemic children and the control group of 38 healthy children, selected through randomized paired sampling. The children's hearing was evaluated through otoacoustic emissions, tympanometry and a simplified evaluation of the central auditory processing was performed. The language development of each child was observed using the behavior observation guidelines for children with ages from zero to six years. Performance indexes were created in order to classify the language responses of the children. the groups did not differ in terms of age, gender, breast-feeding and mother's literacy. The following variables presented statistically significant differences: hemoglobin values (10.6g/dL, 12.6g/dL); presence of the acoustic reflex (63%, 92%); reception performance indexes (72.8, 90.1); emission (50.6, 80.6) and cognitive aspects of language (47.8, 76.0) in anemic and non-anemic children respectively. The hearing abilities in the verbal and non-verbal sequential memory and the sonorous localization were inadequate in most of the children, especially in those with anemia. anemic children differed statically from non-anemic children in terms of alterations in the acoustic reflex and language development and also presented a higher prevalence of alterations in the hearing evaluation.

  13. Prevalence of overweight preschool children in public day care centers: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Gabriela Nascimento

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Brazil is undergoing a period of epidemiological transition associated with demographic and nutritional changes. The prevalence of obesity is also increasing in children and is causing numerous health problems that are becoming public health issues. The aim here was to evaluate the prevalence of overweight among children of two and three years of age. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in municipal day care centers in Taubaté, state of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Weight and height measurements were made on 447 preschool children forming a probabilistic randomized sample. Their body mass index (BMI was calculated. Their nutritional status was classified using the World Health Organization reference cutoff points (2006. Their mean weight, height and BMI were compared according to their age and sex. RESULTS: The mean values for the final sample (n = 447 were as follows: mean age: 38.6 months (± 3.5 and Z scores for: weight/height (W/H: 0.50 (± 1.22; height/age: -0.03 (± 1.07; weight/age (W/A: 0.51 (± 1.23; and BMI: 0.51(± 1.23. The prevalence of overweight children (BMI > 1 z was 28.86%, while the prevalence of underweight children (BMI < -2 z was 0.89%. There were no differences in mean BMI among the two and three-year age groups (P = 0.66. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of overweight was observed in the sample of two and three-year-old children, with practically no malnutrition, thus showing that a significant nutritional transition may already be occurring, even in medium-sized cities of developing countries.

  14. Toxocariasis: critical analysis of serology in patients attending a public referral center for ophthalmology in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsky-Elefant, Guita; Yamamoto, Joyce H; Hirata, Carlos E; Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz E

    2018-01-01

    To analyze the contribution of IgG anti-Toxocara antibodies in the diagnosis of ocular toxocariasis (OT) in serum samples of patients attending a public referral center for ophthalmology in Brazil and to determine the most frequent ocular signs and symptoms. This was a retrospective descriptive study of a cohort of outpatients followed from December 1989 to May 2006. IgG anti-Toxocara antibody titers were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results were correlated with the clinical and funduscopic findings. Of the diagnoses for the 126 patients, 42 were considered as probable OT, 48 as negative, and 36 as inconclusive. The median IgG anti-Toxocara antibody titers of the patients with probable OT were significantly higher than those of the patients in the negative or inconclusive groups (P = 0.0001). Higher titers were observed more frequently in patients in the probable OT group (P = 0.01) than in the negative group, in which titers were absent or lower in most patients (P < 0.0001). The right eye was affected more in the OT group than in the negative group (P = 0.01), and inflammation was located mostly in the intermediate and posterior poles. The mean age of the patients diagnosed with probable OT was significantly lower (mean, 8 years) than that of the negative patients (mean, 14.5 years) (P = 0.006). Higher levels of antibodies could help with the diagnosis of OT in patients with symptoms and clinical signs; however, negative results cannot exclude possible OT. Conversely, patients with negative serology or low titers make the diagnosis of OT less likely.

  15. Center for Plant and Microbial Complex Carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center: Progress Report for the Funding Period November 1, 2002 - October 31, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, Peter [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Darvill, Alan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2003-10-31

    This progress report describes the research, service, and training activities conducted with the support of the DOE center grant. The research activities are summarized in the form of reprints or abstracts of 46 papers citing support from the DOE center grant that were produced during the reporting period. These papers include those that are published, in press, submitted, or in preparation. The papers include those produced entirely by CCRC personnel and those papers representing research work conducted in collaboration with scientists at other institutions. (See Appendix I.) A major component of this grant is to provide service to researchers at other academic institutions and industries located throughout the US and other parts of the world. A summary of all our service activities during the reporting period is also included with this report, including samples of poly/oligosaccharides and antibodies distributed to scientists (see Appendix II). A description of the three training courses held at the CCRC during 2003 is also provided, together with the names and affiliations of participants who attended the courses (see Appendix III).

  16. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS)) in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers) in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government); for 6 months duration from 1(st) Jan 2014 to 1(st) July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30%) and presence of health staff (100 vs 92%) were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future.

  17. Development of a Community-Based Palliative Care Model for Advance Cancer Patients in Public Health Centers in Busan, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Nam; Choi, Soon-Ock; Shin, Seong Hoon; Ryu, Ji-Sun; Baik, Jeong-Won

    2017-07-01

    A feasible palliative care model for advance cancer patients is needed in Korea with its rapidly aging population and corresponding increase in cancer prevalence. This study describes the process involved in the development of a community-based palliative care (CBPC) model implemented originally in a Busan pilot project. The model development included steps I and II of the pilot project, identification of the service types, a survey exploring the community demand for palliative care, construction of an operational infrastructure, and the establishment of a service delivery system. Public health centers (including Busan regional cancer centers, palliative care centers, and social welfare centers) served as the regional hubs in the development of a palliative care model. The palliative care project included the provision of palliative care, establishment of a support system for the operations, improvement of personnel capacity, development of an educational and promotional program, and the establishment of an assessment system to improve quality. The operational infrastructure included a service management team, provision teams, and a support team. The Busan Metropolitan City CBPC model was based on the principles of palliative care as well as the characteristics of public health centers that implemented the community health projects. The potential use of the Busan CBPC model in Korea should be explored further through service evaluations.

  18. Complexity of Innovation in the Public Sector: A Workgroup-Level Analysis of Related Factors and Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arundel, A.V.; Torugsa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Complex innovation incorporates more than one innovation type. Using the number of dimensions of the ‘most significant innovation’ implemented by each public employee’s workgroup as a proxy for innovation complexity, this study explores factors that are associated with complexity and examines how

  19. Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) 2016 Annual Report. Publication No. STA 17-74

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2017

    2017-01-01

    During 2015-2016, the membership of the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) grew to more than 400 institutions making this the largest and most comprehensive report on college students seeking mental health treatment to date. College and university counseling centers make this report possible by participating in a broad range of activities…

  20. Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) 2013 Annual Report. Publication No. STA 14-43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes data contributed to Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) during the 2012-2013 academic year, closing on June 30, 2013. Data was contributed by 132 college and university counseling centers describing more than 95,00 unique college students seeking mental health treatment, 3,000 clinicians, and over 500,000…

  1. Epidemiologic methods lessons learned from environmental public health disasters: Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville, South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Erik R; Runkle, Jennifer R; Dhara, Venkata Ramana; Lin, Shao; Naboka, Marina; Mousseau, Timothy A; Bennett, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants may have devastating effects. While much is known about their immediate devastation, far less is known about long-term impacts of these disasters. Extensive latent and chronic long-term public health effects may occur. Careful evaluation of contaminant exposures and long-term health outcomes within the constraints imposed by limited financial resources is essential. Here, we review epidemiologic methods lessons learned from conducting long-term evaluations of four environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants at Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville (South Carolina, USA). We found several lessons learned which have direct implications for the on-going disaster recovery work following the Fukushima radiation disaster or for future disasters. These lessons should prove useful in understanding and mitigating latent health effects that may result from the nuclear reactor accident in Japan or future environmental public health disasters.

  2. Food, health, and complexity: towards a conceptual understanding to guide collaborative public health action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon E. Majowicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background What we eat simultaneously impacts our exposure to pathogens, allergens, and contaminants, our nutritional status and body composition, our risks for and the progression of chronic diseases, and other outcomes. Furthermore, what we eat is influenced by a complex web of drivers, including culture, politics, economics, and our built and natural environments. To date, public health initiatives aimed at improving food-related population health outcomes have primarily been developed within ‘practice silos’, and the potential for complex interactions among such initiatives is not well understood. Therefore, our objective was to develop a conceptual model depicting how infectious foodborne illness, food insecurity, dietary contaminants, obesity, and food allergy can be linked via shared drivers, to illustrate potential complex interactions and support future collaboration across public health practice silos. Methods We developed the conceptual model by first conducting a systematic literature search to identify review articles containing schematics that depicted relationships between drivers and the issues of interest. Next, we synthesized drivers into a common model using a modified thematic synthesis approach that combined an inductive thematic analysis and mapping to synthesize findings. Results The literature search yielded 83 relevant references containing 101 schematics. The conceptual model contained 49 shared drivers and 227 interconnections. Each of the five issues was connected to all others. Obesity and food insecurity shared the most drivers (n = 28. Obesity shared several drivers with food allergy (n = 11, infectious foodborne illness (n = 7, and dietary contamination (n = 6. Food insecurity shared several drivers with infectious foodborne illness (n = 9 and dietary contamination (n = 9. Infectious foodborne illness shared drivers with dietary contamination (n = 8. Fewer drivers were

  3. Immunophenotypic characterization of acute leukemia at a public oncology reference center in Maranhão, northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Noronha, Elda Pereira; Marinho, Heliana Trindade; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Silva, Cintia Assunção; Veras, Geni Lourdes Ramos; Oliveira, Raimundo Antônio Gomes

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: The incidence of acute leukemia (AL) subtypes varies according to geographical distribution. The aim here was to determine the incidence of morphological and immunophenotypic AL subtypes in the state of Maranhão, Brazil, and to correlate the expression of aberrant phenotypes in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with prognostic factors. DESIGN AND SETTING: Single prospective cohort study at a public oncology reference center in Maranhão. METHODS: Seventy ...

  4. The Correlation Of Knowledge And Education Level Of The Patients With The Gastritis Incident At Sindangbarang Public Health Center Cianjur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drs. Oktoruddin Harun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastritis is usually regarded as a thing paltry but gastritis was the beginning of a a disease that can be big problem for us. Based on the previous research at Public Health Center sindangbarang cianjur District were found scene gastritis from 10 patients 7 had less knowledgeable 1 respondents had knowledge cased and 2 respondents had good of knowledge. It is suspected that the incidence of gastritis has to do with knowledge and education level of the patients. The purpose of this research is to identify corelation betwen knowledge and education level of the patients outpatient with the gastritis at Public Health Center sindangbarang cianjur District. Research methodology used survey analytic correlative with design cross sectional .Data analyzed by univariat and bivariat with statistics chi square test. Population in this research were out patients Public Health Center sindangbarag. The sample 120 respondents with total of sampling. The results of the study were corelation knowledge of to gastritis incident based on the analysis of bivariat by using test chi-square computerized the results of statistical corel tests obtained p value 0.013 0.05 so H0 rejected. While relations education level with the gastritis incident based on the results of the analysis bivariat test chi-square use computerized obtained the results of statistical tests obtained p value 0.0001 0.05 so H0 rejected it could be concluded a significant between knowledge and the level of education with the gastritis incident corelation at Public Health Center sindangbarang cianjur District it is advised that need to effort to promotional and preventive especially with regard to knowledge of gastritis as information about gastritis and counseling on a preventive manner gastritis that can reduce or prevent disease gastritis.

  5. Marketing Booze to Blacks. A Report from the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, George A.; And Others

    Beer, wine, and liquor manufacturers aggressively seek to maximize sales of their products to blacks, despite public health and safety problems associated with those products. Rather than act to protect the public from the over-promotion of alcohol, government has set few effective constraints on the sales stratagems of alcoholic beverage…

  6. 75 FR 39265 - National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ...), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards Staff, Announces the Following Meeting Name: ICD-9-CM... for Disease Control and Prevention, Classifications and Public Health Data Standards, 3311 Toledo Road... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  7. 78 FR 9055 - National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ...), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards Staff, Announces the Following Meeting Name: ICD-9-CM... Information: Donna Pickett, Medical Systems Administrator, Classifications and Public Health Data Standards... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  8. 78 FR 53148 - National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ...), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards Staff, Announces the Following Meeting Name: ICD-9-CM..., Medical Systems Administrator, Classifications and Public Health Data Standards Staff, NCHS, 3311 Toledo... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  9. Identifying Head Start and Public Pre-K Participation in NSECE Data on Center-Based ECE Programs. NSECE Technical Report Supplement. OPRE Report 2015-92b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerge, Robert; Datta, A. Rupa; Xia, Kanru; Witte, Ann D.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Milesi, Carolina; Brandon, Richard; Guzman, Lina; Zanoni, Wladimir

    2015-01-01

    The analyses presented in the Technical Report, "Which Centers Participate in Head Start or Public Pre-Kindergarten" characterize centers that have at least one child whose enrollment is funded through Head Start or Public Pre-K funds. This supplement to the technical report provides interested readers with technical details of the…

  10. Center for information management and intelligence of the School of Public Legal Defense of the State of Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Coelho Neves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experience report about the implementation of the Center for Information Management and Intelligence administered by the Library of the Public Defender of the State of Bahia. The Center aims to corroborate the information stock, based on capturing the tacit knowledge of public Defenders of DPE. Aspires to social inclusion and the preservation of memory used in human rights activities defensoriais developed. The biggest benefit of creating the Center for Information Management and Intelligence is to provide the availability of information gained by the defenders in a structured way, to all persons interested in the topics defensoriais seized through legal experiences, conferences, training courses, seminars, workshops , Among others. The Center for Information Management and Intelligence of the DPE Library is an important way to efficiently connect "those who know" with those who "need to know" and converting personal knowledge into the organization's memory. For this, the proposal develops the collection, storage, management and dissemination of knowledge with a methodology based on models of the authors Nonaka and Takeuchi, with the help of teenagers "apprentices" in fulfillment of socio-educational measure the Mother City Foundation.

  11. Work Centered Support System Design: Using Frames to Reduce Work Complexity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eggleston, Robert G; Whitaker, Randall D

    2002-01-01

    .... Based on our experience implementing the design of three WCSSs we have distilled a set of three form-based design principles that help insure a work-centered perspective is expressed in the interface...

  12. Tinicum National Environmental Center Complex: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Tinicum National Environmental Center outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  13. Tinicum National Environmental Center Complex Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Tinicum National Environmental Center outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  14. Tinicum National Environmental Center Complex Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Tinicum National Environmental Center outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  15. A comparative evaluation of public health centers with private health training centers on primary healthcare parameters in India: a study by data envelopment analysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Davey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government; for 6 months duration from 1 st Jan 2014 to 1 st July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. Results: The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30% and presence of health staff (100 vs 92% were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P < 0.0001. Conclusions: The evaluation of primary healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future.

  16. Meeting the public health challenge of pain in later life: what role can senior centers play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Karen R; Lama, Sonam D; Parker, Samantha J; Henderson, Charles R; Nickerson, Allison J; Reid, M Carrington

    2014-12-01

    Interest in nonpharmacologic approaches for managing pain continues to grow. The aim of this study was to determine the types of pain-relevant programs offered by senior centers and whether the programs varied by clients' race/ethnicity status and center size. A telephone survey was conducted. Respondents were presented with a list of 15 programs and the option to choose "other" and asked (1) whether the activity was offered and, if so, how often; (2) if they believed the programs had value for seniors with pain; and (3) whether the classes were advertised as a means of achieving pain relief. Of 204 center staff contacted, 195 (95.6%) participated. The most common programs offered were movement-based, including exercise (by 91.8% of the centers), dance (72.3%), walking clubs (71.8%), yoga (65.6%), and Tai Chi (53.3%) classes. Creative arts programs were also frequently offered, including music (58.5%) and fine arts (47.7%). Programs such as stress management (27%) and relaxation (26%) classes were less commonly offered. Most respondents identified movement-based programs as helpful for seniors with pain, but few identified creative arts classes as potentially beneficial. The programs/classes offered were infrequently advertised as a means of helping seniors manage pain and varied by clients' race/ethnicity status and center size. Programs that have potential utility for older adults with pain are commonly offered by senior centers. Future research should determine optimal strategies for engaging older adults in these programs in the senior center setting. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Qualitative evaluation of the menu and plate waste in public day care centers in São Paulo city, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Longo-Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study assessed menu quality and plate waste in public day care centers of São Paulo (SP, Brazil. METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected data from the nurseries of seven day care centers, totaling 366 children aged 12 to 36 months. Each day care center was assessed for three days, totaling 42 days and 210 meals. Menu quality was assessed by the Qualitative Analysis of Menu Preparations method (Análise Qualitativa das Preparações do Cardápio, adapted for day care centers, which provides nutritional and sensory criteria. Food waste was determined by the Plate Waste-Ingestion Index. RESULTS: The supply of vegetables was inadequate in more than 90% of the days, and the amount of leafy vegetables and high-sulfur foods met the recommended amounts on 50% of the days. The supply of sweets and foods containing trans fatty acids was considerable. The Plate Waste-Ingestion Index for daycare centers varied from 25% to 43%, and the Plate Waste-Ingestion Index for food items varied from 11% to 47%. CONCLUSION: The preparations served and serving sizes clearly need to be reviewed, and new menu creation strategies are needed to control food waste.

  18. The Second Galactic Center Black Hole? A Possible Detection of Ionized Gas Orbiting around an IMBH Embedded in the Galactic Center IRS13E Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Tsutsumi, Takahiro; Uehara, Kenta; Miyoshi, Makoto; Miyawaki, Ryosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi

    2017-11-01

    The Galactic Center is the nuclear region of the nearest spiral galaxy, the Milky Way, and contains the supermassive black hole with M∼ 4× {10}6 {M}ȯ , Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). One of the basic questions about the Galactic Center is whether or not Sgr A* is the only “massive” black hole in the region. The IRS13E complex is a very intriguing infrared (IR) object that contains a large dark mass comparable to the mass of an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) from the proper motions of the main member stars. However, the existence of the IMBH remains controversial. There are some objections to accepting the existence of the IMBH. In this study, we detected ionized gas with a very large velocity width ({{Δ }}{v}{FWZI}∼ 650 km s‑1) and a very compact size (r∼ 400 au) in the complex using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We also found an extended component connecting with the compact ionized gas. The properties suggest that this is an ionized gas flow on the Keplerian orbit with high eccentricity. The enclosed mass is estimated to be {10}4 {M}ȯ by the analysis of the orbit. The mass does not conflict with the upper limit mass of the IMBH around Sgr A*, which is derived by the long-term astrometry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). In addition, the object probably has an X-ray counterpart. Consequently, a very fascinating possibility is that the detected ionized gas is rotating around an IMBH embedded in the IRS13E complex.

  19. Unpacking complexity in public health interventions with the Actor-Network Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Angèle; Potvin, Louise

    2016-08-04

    This article proposes a sociologically informed theoretical and methodological framework to address the complexity of public health interventions (PHI). It first proposes three arguments in favour of using the Actor-Network Theory (ANT) for the framework. ANT: (1) deals with systems made of human and non-human entities and proposes a relational view of action; (2) provides an understanding of the intervention-context interactions and (3) is a tool for opening the intervention's black box. Three principles derived from ANT addressing theoretical problems with conceptualisation of PHI as complex systems are proposed: (1) to focus on the process of connecting the network entities instead of their stabilised form; (2) both human and non-human entities composing networks have performative capacities and (3) network and intervention shape one another. Three methodological guidelines are further derived: (1) the researcher's task consists in documenting the events that transform the network and intervention; (2) events must be ordered chronologically to represent the intervention's evolution and (3) a broad range of data is needed to capture complex interventions' evolution. Using ANT as a guide, this paper helps reconcile technicist and social views of PHI and provides a mean to integrate process and effect studies of interventions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A review of injection and antibiotic use at primary health care (public and private centers in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Ofori-Asenso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a review to study antibiotic and injections use at primary care centers (PHCs within the World Health Organization African region. This was part of a larger study on prescribing indicators at PHCs within the region. We analyzed antibiotic and injection use reported in studies published between 1993 and June 2013, which were identified through searches conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of science, Africa-Wide NiPAD, Africa Journals Online, Google Scholar, and International Network for Rational Use of Drugs bibliography databases. Sub-group analysis was carried out for private and public centers. Data were retrieved from 18 studies in 6 countries involving 21,283 patient encounters across 338 PHCs. The percentage of patient encounters with antibiotics prescribed was 51.5% (IQR 41.1-63.3%. The percentage of patient encounters which resulted in the prescription of an injection was 36.8% (IQR 20.7-57.6%. Injection use rate at private facilities was 38% (IQR 19.1-42.7 while that of the public was 32.3% (IQR 20.6-57.6. Rate of antibiotic prescribing at public centers was 49.7% (IQR 51.1-75.7 and that of private facilities 57.6 (IQR 39.0-69.5.The percentage use of injections and antibiotics is high in Africa. The excessive use of antibiotics and injections are particularly more problematic in private than public facilities. Further research is needed to understand fully the underlying factors for the observed patterns and ways of improving medicines use.

  1. The Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers: advancing standardized evaluation of public health preparedness and response trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Lisle S; Sass, Marcia M; D'Ambrosio, Luann; Brown, Lisa M; Wendelboe, Aaron M; Peters, Karen E; Sobelson, Robyn K

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLCs) across the United States. The PERLCs provide training to state, local, and tribal public health organizations to meet workforce development needs in the areas of public health preparedness and response, specialized training, education, and consultation. Using Donald Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model, the PERLC network established 4 evaluation working groups that developed evaluation criteria to address each level of the model. The purpose of the working groups was to inform and promote center-level and program-level evaluation across the PERLC network; identify common training evaluation methods and measures; and share materials, resources, and lessons learned with state, local, and tribal public health organizations for potential replication. The evaluation of education and training, irrespective of its modality (eg, in-person, online, webinars, seminars, symposia) can be accomplished using Kirkpatrick's 4-level taxonomy. The 4 levels aim to measure the following aspects of training programs: (1) trainees' reaction; (2) knowledge acquired, skills improved, or attitudes changed; (3) behavior changed; and (4) results or impact. To successfully evaluate emergency preparedness training, drills and exercises, it is necessary to understand the fundamental tenets of each level and how to apply each to measure training outcomes. The PERLC evaluators have adopted the basic schema of Kirkpatrick's 4-level model and applied its structure to a wide variety of preparedness and emergency response training and related activities. The PERLC evaluation working groups successfully developed and tested survey methods and instruments for each of the 4 levels of Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model. Each can be used for replication by state, local, and tribal public health professionals.

  2. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center selects Verity Ultraseek for public and internal Web Sites

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Verity Inc., a provider of enterprise software has announced the latest version of its powerful, downloadable Verity(R) Ultraseek(R) enterprise search engine is being used by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, a research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Stanford University (1/2 page).

  3. Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) 2012 Annual Report. Publication No. STA 13-68

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report is based on the 2011-2012 Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) data set, which closed on June 30, 2012. Data was contributed by 120 colleges and universities describing 81,000 unique college students seeking treatment, 2,823 clinicians, and over 730,567 appointments. In addition to summarizing data, these annual reports are…

  4. Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) 2015 Annual Report. Publication No. STA 15-108

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2015

    2015-01-01

    College student mental health received widespread attention during the 2014-2015 academic year with in depth commentary appearing in numerous major media outlets. These articles examined college student mental health from various perspectives including the experiences of students and parents, counseling centers, the rise of anxiety in higher…

  5. 78 FR 4859 - Notice of Proposed Information for Public Comment for: Energy and Performance Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Information Center (``EPIC'') data system to track the amount and types of Energy Efficiency Measures (EEMs... conjunction with Low Income Housing Tax Credits; other planning collections and performance reports presently...: The Department has recognized the need for improving energy efficiency in affordable housing and has...

  6. Insights Into Collaborative Networks Of Nonprofit, Private, And Public Organizations That Address Complex Health Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Rachel A; Varda, Danielle

    2016-11-01

    Community networks that include nonprofit, public, and private organizations have formed around many health issues, such as chronic disease management and healthy living and eating. Despite the increases in the numbers of and funding for cross-sector networks, and the growing literature about them, there are limited data and methods that can be used to assess their effectiveness and analyze their designs. We addressed this gap in knowledge by analyzing the characteristics of 260 cross-sector community health networks that collectively consisted of 7,816 organizations during the period 2008-15. We found that nonprofit organizations were more prevalent than private firms or government agencies in these networks. Traditional types of partners in community health networks such as hospitals, community health centers, and public health agencies were the most trusted and valued by other members of their networks. However, nontraditional partners, such as employer or business groups and colleges or universities, reported contributing relatively high numbers of resources to their networks. Further evidence is needed to inform collaborative management processes and policies as a mechanism for building what the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation describes as a culture of health. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. What Are Cancer Centers Advertising to the Public? A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B.; Donohue, Julie M.; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Background Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, the content of these advertisements has not been analyzed. Objective To characterize the informational and emotional content of cancer center advertisements. Design Systematic analysis of all cancer center advertisements in top U.S. consumer magazines (N=269) and television networks (N=44) in 2012. Measurements Using a standardized codebook, we assessed (1) types of clinical services promoted; (2) information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, and costs; (3) use of emotional advertising appeals; and (4) use of patient testimonials. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti. Kappa values ranged from 0.77 to 1.0. Results A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%; padvertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%; padvertisements mentioned insurance coverage or costs (5%). Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), most often evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and evoking fear (30%). Nearly half of advertisements included patient testimonials, usually focused on survival or cure. Testimonials rarely included disclaimers (15%) and never described the results a typical patient might expect. Limitations Internet advertisements were not included. Conclusions Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy using emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, or costs. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. PMID:24863081

  8. Proof Nets and the Complexity of Processing Center-Embedded Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper shows how proof nets can be used to formalize the notion of ``incomplete dependency'' used in psycholinguistic theories of the unacceptability of center-embedded constructions. Such theories of human language processing can usually be restated in terms of geometrical constraints on proof nets. The paper ends with a discussion of the relationship between these constraints and incremental semantic interpretation.

  9. Caries risk assessment tool and prevention protocol for public health nurses in mother and child health centers, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natapov, Lena; Dekel-Markovich, Dan; Granit-Palmon, Hadas; Aflalo, Efrat; Zusman, Shlomo Paul

    2018-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease in children. Caries risk assessment tools enable the dentists, physicians, and nondental health care providers to assess the individual's risk. Intervention by nurses in primary care settings can contribute to the establishment of oral health habits and prevention of dental disease. In Israel, Mother and Child Health Centers provide free preventive services for pregnant women and children by public health nurses. A caries prevention program in health centers started in 2015. Nurses underwent special training regarding caries prevention. A customized Caries Risk Assessment tool and Prevention Protocol for nurses, based on the AAPD tool, was introduced. A two-step evaluation was conducted which included a questionnaire and in-depth phone interviews. Twenty-eight (out of 46) health centers returned a completed questionnaire. Most nurses believed that oral health preventive services should be incorporated into their daily work. In the in-depth phone interviews, nurses stated that the integration of the program into their busy daily schedule was realistic and appropriate. The lack of specific dental module for computer program was mentioned as an implementation difficulty. The wide use of our tool by nurses supports its simplicity and feasibility which enables quick calculation and informed decision making. The nurses readily embraced the tool and it became an integral part of their toolkit. We provide public health nurses with a caries risk assessment tool and prevention protocol thus integrating oral health into general health of infants and toddlers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. DHM in human-centered product design: a case-study on public transport vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, V; Guimarães, C P; Franca, G A N; Cid, G L; Paranhos, A G

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the advantages on the use of 3D Digital Human Models (DHM) on the design of public transport vehicles. In this case, the subjects were scanned using the WBX Cyberware 3D Whole Body Scanner, with functional and daily postures according to the use of public transportation and some especial cases, such as a mother with her offspring or a business man with his valise, so the volume of the person would be taken in consideration. A data collection was created to simulate several situations of the daily use of the vehicle.

  11. Perceived Impacts of a Public Health Training Center Field Placement Program among Trainees: Findings from a Small Group Externship Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Patrik; Grimm, Brandon; Abdel-Monem, Tarik; Hoffman, Stacey J; DeKraai, Mark; McMillan, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    There is heightened interest in identifying the impact of the federally funded Public Health Training Center (PHTC) program. Although evaluation studies have been conducted of public health training in general, evaluations of PHTC programs are rare. Field placement components are congressionally mandated requirements of PHTCs. Field placements are typically intensive, supervised externships for students to gain public health experience with local health departments or non-profit organizations. We have found no published evaluations of PHTC field placement components. This may be because of their small size and unique nature. We designed and evaluated a 200-h field placement program at an established PHTC. The evaluation included pre/post surveys measuring public health core competencies, and post-experience interviews. We found significant increases in three competency domains among trainees: policy development and program planning, communication skills, and community dimensions of practice. These outcomes contribute to evidence based on the efficacy of PHTC field placement programs, and underscore their role in public health training.

  12. Variation of community consultation and public disclosure for a pediatric multi-centered "Exception from Informed Consent" trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsti, Maija; Zemek, Roger; Baren, Jill; Stanley, Rachel M; Mahajan, Prashant; Vance, Cheryl; Brown, Kathleen M; Gonzalez, Victor; King, Denise; Jacobsen, Kammy; Shreve, Kate; van de Bruinhorst, Katrina; Jones, Anne Marie; Chamberlain, James M

    2015-02-01

    The US federal regulation "Exception from Informed Consent for Emergency Research," 21 Code of Federal Regulations 50.24, permits emergency research without informed consent under limited conditions. Additional safeguards to protect human subjects include requirements for community consultation and public disclosure prior to starting the research. Because the regulations are vague about these requirements, Institutional Review Boards determine the adequacy of these activities at a local level. Thus, there is potential for broad interpretation and practice variation. To describe the variation of community consultation and public disclosure activities approved by Institutional Review Boards, and the effectiveness of this process for a multi-center, Exception from Informed Consent, pediatric status epilepticus clinical research trial. Community consultation and public disclosure activities were analyzed for each of the 15 participating sites. Surveys were conducted with participants enrolled in the status epilepticus trial to assess the effectiveness of public disclosure dissemination prior to study enrollment. Every Institutional Review Board, among the 15 participating sites, had a varied interpretation of Exception from Informed Consent regulations for community consultation and public disclosure activities. Institutional Review Boards required various combinations of focus groups, interviews, surveys, and meetings for community consultation, and news releases, mailings, and public service announcements for public disclosure. At least 4335 patients received information about the study from these efforts. In all, 158 chose to be included in the "Opt Out" list. Of the 304 participants who were enrolled under Exception from Informed Consent, 12 (5%) had heard about the study through community consultation or public disclosure activities. The activities reaching the highest number of participants were surveys and focus groups associated with existing meetings. Public

  13. [Activities and awareness of public health nurses working at local government facilities and health centers regarding potential nuclear accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamiya, Chiaki

    2011-05-01

    The purpose was to study public health service activities developed during non-emergency periods to respond to potential nuclear accidents and to contribute to an understanding of public health nurses' awareness of the possibility of such accidents. For the purpose of this study, we chose prefectural health centers located in a prefecture with a nuclear power plant and in two adjacent prefectures, along with all local administrative bodies (cities, towns, and villages) in these prefectures. For each one of 124 entities, we selected one public health nurse in charge of health crisis management from among the personnel to be targeted for a questionnaire survey conducted by mail. The survey period was from October to November 2009, and the questionnaire contained questions on the following: whether there had been any disasters over the past ten years; whether the respondent had received training in public health services regarding nuclear accidents; and public health service activities developed during non-emergency periods to respond to potential nuclear accidents (and the amount of work done in this regard). The response rate for our survey was 71.8%. Of the total of 124 entities chosen, 9 were aware of the possibility of radiation accidents and 12 had manuals on radiation accidents. Two local governments and five health centers had participated in accident drills, and at both of two local governments, public health nurses were expected to act as guides during resident evacuation in the event of a nuclear accident. Public health nurses were sent to participate in workshops on radiation at four facilities located in the prefecture with a nuclear power plant. Our analysis revealed a lack of knowledge (beta = -0.404, P public health nurses in the event of disaster. The results of our survey lead us to believe that apart from creation of manuals, provision of opportunities to gain knowledge of materials regarding past damage to the health of residents and how such

  14. Impact of introduction of endoscopic ultrasound on volume, success, and complexity of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandrapu, Harathi; Elhanafi, Sherif; Chowdhury, Farhanaz; Liu, Jiayang; Onate, Eduardo J; Dwivedi, Alok; Othman, Mohamed O

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is commonly used to examine pancreaticobiliary disorders. We hypothesize that the introduction of EUS service may change the pattern and the complexity of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies (ERCPs) performed. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of introducing EUS on the volume, success, and complexity of ERCP. This is a single-center retrospective data review of ERCP procedures done "before" and "after" the introduction of EUS (before EUS and after EUS). Patients' demographics, ERCP indications, types of sedation, therapeutic interventions, outcomes, complications, and complexity of ERCP were collected. The categorical and continuous variables were compared using Fisher's exact test and the unpaired t-test, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to compare ERCP outcomes. A total of 945 ERCPs performed over a 3-year period between January 2010 and January 2013 (411 and 534 in the "before EUS" and "after EUS" time periods, respectively) were included in this study. There was a 30% relative increase in the volume of ERCPs after the introduction of EUS. ERCP success rate was higher after the introduction of EUS, even after adjusting the complexity grade [odds ratio (OR) = 4.54, P = 0.001]. Significant increase in the complexity of ERCP was observed after the introduction of EUS service. The OR of performing grade 4 ERCP was 4.44 (P = 0.0005) after the introduction of EUS. The introduction of a new EUS service in our tertiary referral university medical center is associated with an increase in the volume, success, and complexity of ERCP procedures. EUS expertise may be valuable for better ERCP outcomes.

  15. 1977 Bibliography of Publications of the Wisconsin Research and Development Center for Cognitive Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Research and Development Center for Learning and Re-Education.

    This publication consists of a bibliographic listing of technical reports, theoretical papers, practical papers, and books concerned with cognitive learning research. Documents are divided into six major sections: (1) Research Components; (2) Developmental Components; (3) Service Sections; (4) Completed Projects; (5) Curriculum Materials; and (6)…

  16. 75 FR 4402 - Strengthening the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's 510(k) Review Process; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    .... In order to keep each open session focused on the discussion topic at hand, each oral presentation... will be assigned to the discussion group. FDA will attempt to have a range of constituencies participate in the discussion group. Others in attendance at the public meeting will have an opportunity to...

  17. Public meeting: Western New York Nuclear Service Center options study. [Problem of West Valley plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    This document is a transcript of the meeting, with additional written comments. The main topic is the West Valley Processing Plant and how to dispose of it and its high-level wastes. Objective is to get public input on this topic. (DLC)

  18. What are cancer centers advertising to the public?: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Donohue, Julie M; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2014-06-17

    Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, analyses of the content of these advertisements are lacking. To characterize the informational and emotional content of direct-to-consumer cancer center advertisements. Content analysis. Top U.S. consumer magazines (n = 269) and television networks (n = 44) in 2012. Types of clinical services promoted; information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, costs, and insurance availability; use of emotional advertising appeals; and use of patient testimonials were assessed. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti, and κ values ranged from 0.77 to 1.00. A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%). Benefits of advertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%) but were rarely quantified (2%). Few advertisements mentioned coverage or costs (5%), and none mentioned specific insurance plans. Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and inducing fear (30%). Nearly one half of advertisements included patient testimonials, which were usually focused on survival, rarely included disclaimers (15%), and never described the results that a typical patient may expect. Internet advertisements were not included. Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy with emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, costs, or insurance availability. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. National Institutes of Health.

  19. Complex PTSD: research directions for nosology/assessment, treatment, and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian D. Ford

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD in children and adolescents extends beyond the core PTSD symptoms to dysregulation in three psychobiological domains: (1 emotion processing, (2 self-organization (including bodily integrity, and (3 relational functioning. CPTSD research directions for the next decade and beyond are identified in three areas: (1 diagnostic classification (establishing the empirical integrity of CPTSD as a distinct form of psychopathology and psychometric assessment [validation and refinement of measures of childhood polyvictimization and developmental trauma disorder (DTD], (2 rigorous evaluation and refinement of interventions (and algorithms for their delivery developed or adapted for CPTSD and DTD, and (3 the epidemiology of CPTSD and DTD, and their public health and safety impact, across the lifespan and intergenerationally, for populations, nations, and cultures.

  20. Complex Network Theory Applied to the Growth of Kuala Lumpur's Public Urban Rail Transit Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Ding

    Full Text Available Recently, the number of studies involving complex network applications in transportation has increased steadily as scholars from various fields analyze traffic networks. Nonetheless, research on rail network growth is relatively rare. This research examines the evolution of the Public Urban Rail Transit Networks of Kuala Lumpur (PURTNoKL based on complex network theory and covers both the topological structure of the rail system and future trends in network growth. In addition, network performance when facing different attack strategies is also assessed. Three topological network characteristics are considered: connections, clustering and centrality. In PURTNoKL, we found that the total number of nodes and edges exhibit a linear relationship and that the average degree stays within the interval [2.0488, 2.6774] with heavy-tailed distributions. The evolutionary process shows that the cumulative probability distribution (CPD of degree and the average shortest path length show good fit with exponential distribution and normal distribution, respectively. Moreover, PURTNoKL exhibits clear cluster characteristics; most of the nodes have a 2-core value, and the CPDs of the centrality's closeness and betweenness follow a normal distribution function and an exponential distribution, respectively. Finally, we discuss four different types of network growth styles and the line extension process, which reveal that the rail network's growth is likely based on the nodes with the biggest lengths of the shortest path and that network protection should emphasize those nodes with the largest degrees and the highest betweenness values. This research may enhance the networkability of the rail system and better shape the future growth of public rail networks.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Brazilian-adapted version of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire in public child daycare centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueiras, Alberto; Pires, Pedro; Maissonette, Silvia; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2013-08-01

    Well-designed screening assessment instruments that can evaluate child development in public daycare centers represent an important resource to help improve the quality of these programs, as an early detection method for early developmental delay. The Ages and Stages Questionnaire, 3rd edition (ASQ-3), comprises a series of 21 questionnaires designed to screen developmental performance in the domains of communication, gross motor skills, fine motor skills, problem solving, and personal-social ability in children aged 2 to 66 months. The purpose of the present work was to translate and adapt all of the ASQ-3 questionnaires for use in Brazilian public child daycare centers and to explore their psychometric characteristics with both Classical Test Theory and Rating Scale analyses from the Rasch model family. A total of 18 Ages & Stages Questionnaires - Brazilian translation (ASQ-BR) questionnaires administered at intervals from 6 to 60 months of age were analyzed based on primary caregiver evaluations of 45,640 children distributed in 468 public daycare centers in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The results indicated that most of the ASQ-BR questionnaires had adequate internal consistency. Exploratory factor analyses yielded a one-factor solution for each domain of all of the ASQ-BR questionnaires. The only exception was the personal-social domain in some of the questionnaires. Item Response Theory based on Rating Scale analysis (infit and outfit mean squares statistics) indicated that only 44 of 540 items showed misfit problems. In summary, the ASQ-BR questionnaires are psychometrically sound developmental screening instruments that can be easily administered by primary caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sentiment Diffusion of Public Opinions about Hot Events: Based on Complex Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Hao

    Full Text Available To study the sentiment diffusion of online public opinions about hot events, we collected people's posts through web data mining techniques. We calculated the sentiment value of each post based on a sentiment dictionary. Next, we divided those posts into five different orientations of sentiments: strongly positive (P, weakly positive (p, neutral (o, weakly negative (n, and strongly negative (N. These sentiments are combined into modes through coarse graining. We constructed sentiment mode complex network of online public opinions (SMCOP with modes as nodes and the conversion relation in chronological order between different types of modes as edges. We calculated the strength, k-plex clique, clustering coefficient and betweenness centrality of the SMCOP. The results show that the strength distribution obeys power law. Most posts' sentiments are weakly positive and neutral, whereas few are strongly negative. There are weakly positive subgroups and neutral subgroups with ppppp and ooooo as the core mode, respectively. Few modes have larger betweenness centrality values and most modes convert to each other with these higher betweenness centrality modes as mediums. Therefore, the relevant person or institutes can take measures to lead people's sentiments regarding online hot events according to the sentiment diffusion mechanism.

  3. Sentiment Diffusion of Public Opinions about Hot Events: Based on Complex Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoqing; An, Haizhong; Zhang, Lijia; Li, Huajiao; Wei, Guannan

    2015-01-01

    To study the sentiment diffusion of online public opinions about hot events, we collected people's posts through web data mining techniques. We calculated the sentiment value of each post based on a sentiment dictionary. Next, we divided those posts into five different orientations of sentiments: strongly positive (P), weakly positive (p), neutral (o), weakly negative (n), and strongly negative (N). These sentiments are combined into modes through coarse graining. We constructed sentiment mode complex network of online public opinions (SMCOP) with modes as nodes and the conversion relation in chronological order between different types of modes as edges. We calculated the strength, k-plex clique, clustering coefficient and betweenness centrality of the SMCOP. The results show that the strength distribution obeys power law. Most posts' sentiments are weakly positive and neutral, whereas few are strongly negative. There are weakly positive subgroups and neutral subgroups with ppppp and ooooo as the core mode, respectively. Few modes have larger betweenness centrality values and most modes convert to each other with these higher betweenness centrality modes as mediums. Therefore, the relevant person or institutes can take measures to lead people's sentiments regarding online hot events according to the sentiment diffusion mechanism.

  4. The Drivers of Academic Success in Cleft and Craniofacial Centers: A 10-Year Analysis of over 2000 Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana, Natalie M; Massie, Jonathan P; Stern, Marleigh J; Alperovich, Michael; Runyan, Christopher M; Staffenberg, David A; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Grayson, Barry H; Diaz-Siso, J Rodrigo; Flores, Roberto L

    2017-02-01

    Cleft and craniofacial centers require significant investment by medical institutions, yet variables contributing to their academic productivity remain unknown. This study characterizes the elements associated with high academic productivity in these centers. The authors analyzed cleft and craniofacial centers accredited by the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Variables such as university affiliation; resident training; number of plastic surgery, oral-maxillofacial, and dental faculty; and investment in a craniofacial surgery, craniofacial orthodontics fellowship program, or both, were obtained. Craniofacial and cleft-related research published between July of 2005 and June of 2015 was identified. A stepwise multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to measure outcomes of total publications, summative impact factor, basic science publications, total journals, and National Institutes of Health funding. One hundred sixty centers were identified, comprising 920 active faculty, 34 craniofacial surgery fellowships, and eight craniofacial orthodontic fellowships; 2356 articles were published in 191 journals. Variables most positively associated with a high number of publications were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.608), craniofacial surgery fellowships (β = 0.231), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.213), and university affiliation (β = 0.165). Variables most positively associated with high a number of journals were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.550), university affiliation (β = 0.251), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.230), and craniofacial surgery fellowship (β = 0.218). Variables most positively associated with a high summative impact factor were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.648), craniofacial surgery fellowship (β = 0.208), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.207), and university affiliation

  5. Scientific Project, SciencesPo-LIEPP Interdisciplinary research center for the evaluation of public policies

    OpenAIRE

    Etienne Wasmer; Cornelia Woll

    2011-01-01

    Sciences Po develops an interdisciplinary research program for the evaluation of public policies (in French: Laboratoire interdisciplinaire d’évaluation des politiques publiques, LIEPP), based on four founding units: Department of Economics, Centre de Sociologie des Organisations, Centre d’Etudes Européennes and Observatoire Sociologique du Changement. Its aim is to be (1) independent and non-partisan to ensure its credibility, (2) international to learn from experiences in other countries, a...

  6. Index of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and associated publications available in the Coordination and Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza, B.G.

    1991-02-01

    This publication was created by the Coordination and Information Center (CIC) to provide a readily available research tool for use by researchers interested in a specific area covered in the holdings of the CIC Archives. The Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) was formed and functioned in agreement with Planning Directive NVO-76 (July 29, 1970 and revised January 1, 1974, (CIC-165845 and CIC-16439) respectively) to coordinate the ecological and other environmental programs necessary to support the continued nuclear testing activities; and to provide a mechanism to effectively comply with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, Executive Order 11514, and AEC Manual Chapter 0510.'' The publication contains only citations to documents currently available at the CIC. It represents a significant portion of the principal research findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group.

  7. How Well Do Student Nurses Write Case Studies? A Cohesion-Centered Textual Complexity Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dascalu, Mihai; Dessus, Philippe; Thuez, Laurent; Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Starting from the presumption that writing style is proven to be a reliable predictor of comprehension, this paper investigates the extent to which textual complexity features of nurse students’ essays are related to the scores they were given. Thus, forty essays about case studies on infectious

  8. Remarkably Intense Emission from Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Multiple Borane Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Atsushi; Sakuda, Eri; Ito, Akitaka; Kitamura, Noboru

    2015-11-02

    The electrochemical, spectroscopic, and phophysical properties of a series of Ru(II) complexes having a triarylborane-appended 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligand(s) (RuBbpys: [Ru(Bbpy)n(bpy)(3-n)](2+) (B1n) and [Ru(B2bpy)n(bpy)(3-n)](2+) (B2n), B = (dimesityl)boryldurylethynyl group(s) at the 4- or 4,4'-position(s) in bpy, n = 1-3) are described. In the excited states of the complexes, the intramolecular charge transfer transitions between the π-orbital of the aryl group and the vacant p-orbital on the boron atom (π(aryl)-p(B) CT) synergistically interact with the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions. The molar absorption coefficient of the MLCT band (ε(MLCT)) of the complex increased with increasing n, and B23 showed extremely intense absorption with ε(MLCT) = 5.6 × 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1) at 488 nm. Furthermore, B23 showed the highest emission quantum yield (0.43) among those of the polypyridine Ru(II) complexes hitherto reported. As one of the interesting results, we report that the radiative rate constant of B2n shows the correlation with ε(MLCT). The effects of the synergistic MLCT/π(aryl)-p(B) CT interactions on the spectroscopic and photophysical characteristics of RuBbpys are discussed in detail.

  9. A dicopper complex with distant metal centers. Structure, magnetic properties, electrochemistry and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasque, Laura; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor Manuel; Membrillo, Ingrid; Olguín, Juan; Mijangos, Edgar; Bernès, Sylvain; González, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of a dinuclear copper(II) complex of the ligand [2,8-dimethyl-5,11-di-(dimethylethyleneamine) 1,4,5,6,7,10,11,12-octahydroimidazo [4,5-h] imidazo [4,5-c] [1,6]diazecine] dimeim have been investigated. Also, its catecholase activity has been explored in different solvent mixtures: MeCN/H2O and OH/H2O, each at several pH values. In CH3OH/H2O, where the activity was superior, the optimal pH value for the catalytic activity was found to be lower than in CH3CN/H2O. The study of the complex's electrochemical behavior (cyclic voltammetry) which was also investigated in these various media, revealed that although an increase in pH in both solvent mixtures results in an increase both in Me oxidizing power (E(1/2)) and reversibility (ipa/ipc) the change of solvent system seems to be a more influencing factor. The superior catalytic activity found in MeOH/H2O pH=8.0, is associated with a significantly more reversible behavior displayed in this medium. Potentiometric determination of the overall formation constant and three successive pKas for the complex, suggest the formation of stable hydroxo complexes which could be the catalytically active species.

  10. Identification of protein W, the elusive sixth subunit of the Rhodopseudomonas palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philip J; Hitchcock, Andrew; Swainsbury, David J K; Qian, Pu; Martin, Elizabeth C; Farmer, David A; Dickman, Mark J; Canniffe, Daniel P; Neil Hunter, C

    2017-11-07

    The X-ray crystal structure of the Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) palustris reaction center-light harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex revealed the presence of a sixth protein component, variably referred to in the literature as helix W, subunit W or protein W. The position of this protein prevents closure of the LH1 ring, possibly to allow diffusion of ubiquinone/ubiquinol between the RC and the cytochrome bc1 complex in analogous fashion to the well-studied PufX protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The identity and function of helix W have remained unknown for over 13 years; here we use a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, molecular genetics and electron microscopy to identify this protein as RPA4402 in Rps. palustris CGA009. Protein W shares key conserved sequence features with PufX homologs, and although a deletion mutant was able to grow under photosynthetic conditions with no discernible phenotype, we show that a tagged version of protein W pulls down the RC-LH1 complex. Protein W is not encoded in the photosynthesis gene cluster and our data indicate that only approximately 10% of wild-type Rps. palustris core complexes contain this non-essential subunit; functional and evolutionary consequences of this observation are discussed. The ability to purify uniform RC-LH1 and RC-LH1-protein W preparations will also be beneficial for future structural studies of these bacterial core complexes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Organizational scope of practice: assessing the primary care and public health activities of health centers and health departments in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Brad; Ugwi, Patience; Nice, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    The objective was to understand how Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and local health departments (LHDs) address their shared mission of improving population health by determining the scope of primary care and public health activities each provides in their community. A brief mail survey was designed and fielded among executive directors at all 14 FQHCs in Iowa, and 13 LHDs in Iowa representing counties with and without an FQHC. This survey contained a mixture of questions adapted from previously validated primary care and public health survey instruments. Using survey responses, each FQHC and LHD was given 2 scores (each ranging from 0-100) measuring the extent of their primary care and public health activities, respectively. The overall response rate was 85.2%; the response rate was 78.6% within FQHCs and 91.7% within LHDs. Overall, FQHCs had higher scores (73.8%) compared to LHDs (27.3%) on total primary care services, while both LHDs (79.3%) and FQHCs (70.9%) performed particularly well on public health services. FQHCs and LHDs in Iowa address a variety of public health and primary care issues, including but not limited to screening for chronic diseases, nutrition counseling, immunizations, and behavioral health. However, FQHCs provide a higher amount of primary care services and nearly as many public health services when compared to LHDs. In a value-based health care delivery system, integrating to improve population health is a wise strategy to maximize efficiency, but this will require maximizing coordination and minimizing duplication of services across different types of safety net providers.

  12. Epidemiologic Methods Lessons Learned from Environmental Public Health Disasters: Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville, South Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. Mousseau

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants may have devastating effects. While much is known about their immediate devastation, far less is known about long-term impacts of these disasters. Extensive latent and chronic long-term public health effects may occur. Careful evaluation of contaminant exposures and long-term health outcomes within the constraints imposed by limited financial resources is essential. Methods: Here, we review epidemiologic methods lessons learned from conducting long-term evaluations of four environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants at Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville (South Carolina, USA. Findings: We found several lessons learned which have direct implications for the on-going disaster recovery work following the Fukushima radiation disaster or for future disasters. Interpretation: These lessons should prove useful in understanding and mitigating latent health effects that may result from the nuclear reactor accident in Japan or future environmental public health disasters.

  13. [Provincial public center for crisis intervention and psycho-social rehabilitation. A path towards communitary suicidology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This work on the systematic comprehensive approach towards the Prevention and Postvencion of Suicide started to develop back in mid 2011 in Río Gallegos, capital of Santa Cruz Province. The first step on this development was a Pilot Plan for the Training of Professionals and also field intervention. The Center for Crisis Intervention and Psycho-social Rehabilitation was founded eight months later. The case-client in crisis plus family group- undergoes quantitative and qualitative evaluation by means of a triage system, all of which allows starting intensive face-to-face and also phone follow up according to the Crisis Intervention Model. Such intervention is developed by means of the participation in the "Grupo Sostén", the Adolescents Group if the client fits into that age, and also family relationship interviews as well as Multi-family meetings open to the Community. There is also a Community Team in the Center which performs collective assessment in schools, in conjunction with the "Equidad en Redes" Educational Specialty Team, belonging to the Provincial Education Council. The approach takes place on the field, and works as a screening step for the early detection of risk. Such risk is dealt with by means of short term intervention group programs involving the whole of the educational community. When facing situations of committed suicide there are interventions in communities to the interior of the province, fundamentally through the Hospital Team which works as the cluster convener for the social intersectoral frame-work.

  14. Light-harvesting complex 1 stabilizes P+QB- charge separation in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Dezi, Manuela; Rebecchi, Alberto; Mallardi, Antonia; Palazzo, Gerardo; Melandri, Bruno Andrea; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2004-11-09

    The kinetics of charge recombination following photoexcitation by a laser pulse have been analyzed in the reaction center-light harvesting complex 1 (RC-LH1) purified from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In RC-LH1 core complexes isolated from photosynthetically grown cells P(+)Q(B)(-) recombines with an average rate constant, k approximately 0.3 s(-1), more than three times smaller than that measured in RC deprived of the LH1 (k approximately 1 s(-1)). A comparable, slowed recombination kinetics is observed in RC-LH1 complexes purified from a pufX-deleted strain. Slowing of the charge recombination kinetics is even more pronounced in RC-LH1 complexes isolated from wild-type semiaerobically grown cells (k approximately 0.2 s(-1)). Since the kinetics of P(+)Q(A)(-) recombination is unaffected by the presence of the antenna, the P(+)Q(B)(-) state appears to be energetically stabilized in core complexes. Determinations of the ubiquinone-10 (UQ(10)) complement associated with the purified RC-LH1 complexes always yield UQ(10)/RC ratios larger than 10. These quinone molecules are functionally coupled to the RC-LH1 complex, as judged from the extent of exogenous cytochrome c(2) rapidly oxidized under continuous light excitation. Analysis of P(+)Q(B)(-) recombination, based on a kinetic model which considers fast quinone equilibrium at the Q(B) binding site, indicates that the slowing down of charge recombination kinetics observed in RC-LH1 complexes cannot be explained solely by a quinone concentration effect and suggests that stabilization of the light-induced charge separation is predominantly due to interaction of the Q(B) site with the LH1 complex. The high UQ(10) complements detected in RC-LH1 core complexes, but not in purified light-harvesting complex 2 and in RC, are proposed to reflect an in vivo heterogeneity in the distribution of the quinone pool within the chromatophore bilayer.

  15. Publications of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center: October 1999-December 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    io n Te ch no lo gy L ab or at or y Compiled by James A. Dolan January 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The... Geology as it Pertains to Modeling Uplift in Jointed Rock: A Basis for Inclusion of Uncertainty in Flow Models, by W.L. Murphy, R.M. Ebeling, and J.M...Attenborough, and M.J. White ADA452588 ERDC TR-06-6 Sep 2006 A GIS System for Inferring Subsurface Geology and Material Properties: Proof of

  16. Public Support As A Center Of Gravity For National Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    program. Walt Disney helped to engage the American public with space through his show “Man in Space” which first aired in 1955 and was viewed by “an...believed that America’s devotion to space fiction in the early 1950s could be channeled into interest in space fact.”45 Disney later said, after touring...we already discussed how Walt Disney collaborated with rocket scientists of the day to create realistic and inspiring programing. Back in 1986, the

  17. Twin-based DNA methylation analysis takes the center stage of studies of human complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Li, Shuxia; Tan, Qihua

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of complex diseases is characterized by the interaction between the genome and environmental conditions and the interface of epigenetics may be a central mechanism. Current technologies already allow us high-throughput profiling of epigenetic patterns at genome level. However, our...... and complex traits. In the era of functional genomics, the valuable samples of twins are helping to bridge the gap between gene activity and environmental conditions through epigenetic mechanisms unlimited to DNA sequence variations. We review the recent progresses in using twins to study disease...... understanding of the epigenetic processes remains limited. Twins are special samples in genetic studies due to their genetic similarity and rearing-environment sharing. In the past decades, twins have made a great contribution in dissecting the genetic and environmental contributions to human diseases...

  18. [Study of knowledge in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillation in sports instructors of public sport centers in Asturias (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Cuervo, Coral; Cuartas Álvarez, Tatiana; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Arcos González, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the level of knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillation (AED) in sport instructors working in public sport centers in Asturias. A cross-sectional study was conducted on sports instructors in May 2014, by completing a self-administered questionnaire on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of AED, with 25 items and four possible answers, only one valid, divided into five categories (emergency medical system in Asturias, initial assessment, circulation,airway and use of AED). Age, gender, work experience as sports instructor, previous training courses, education and training and employment contract were studied as epidemiological variables. A total 26 questionnaires (52%) were collected in public sports centers, and 84% of total responses were correct. It should be emphasized that among the wrong answers, 42.30% did not know what was the first action in a cardiac arrest, and 36.62% did not know how to perform a complete cardiopulmonary resuscitation if the person affected had a perioral injury, with 46.15% not knowing how to respond to a cardiac arrest due to drowning. It is recommended to include the management of cardiac arrest in their workplace in the training plans and the continuing education of sports instructors, at least every two years, according to national laws and laws from Asturias, including also training on the use and management of AED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Calculating the Lightning Protection System Downconductors' Grounding Resistance at Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos; Mata, Angel

    2011-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulation installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. Nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each downconductor is connected to a 7.62-meter-radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced. 6-meter-1ong vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping. enclosures, raceways. and. cable trays. within 7.62 meters of. counterpoise, to be bonded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways and cable trays that run in multiple directions around LC39B.

  20. [Work features of the psychologist in the primary health care centers of the public health care system in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharager Goldenberg, Judith; Molina Aguayo, María Loreto

    2007-09-01

    To define work characteristics of psychologists in public primary health care centers in Chile and the degree to which their functions conform to the standards set by the National Plan on Mental Health and Psychiatry (NPMHP). From December 2003 to November 2004, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted employing a questionnaire sent to a nonrandom sample of 486 professionals working in public primary care centers of Chile's 29 health districts. The total response rate was 34.4% (167 completed questionnaires). The questionnaire gathered general information and demographics; frequency, distribution, and type of activities performed; the mental health issues treated; personal perspectives on the efficiency of care, factors affecting interventions, and the quality of work conditions; and competence level regarding diagnosis and treatment strategies, as well as the educational background needed to fulfill the role of psychologist at the primary health care centers. Descriptive statistics with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the quantitative data. Content analysis techniques were applied to the responses to open-ended questions. Considerably more time is being devoted to individual consultations and interventions than to group and community promotion and prevention activities. Over 93% of the survey participants were satisfied with their work and valued their peers; however, more than half gave a negative rating to their work conditions and job security. The majority indicated that preparation for the role must include coursework on the health system, specifically the primary health care setting, and topics such as clinical and group psychology, public health policy, and primary health care management and specifics. Most critical to the work were a knowledge of diagnostic tools and classification systems, i.e., the International Classification of Diseases and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Contrary to NPMHP

  1. Linear growth of children attending public daycare centers in the municipality of Campina Grande, Paraíba, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa

    2016-01-01

    To identify variables predictors of linear growth in preschool children attending public child day care centers of Campina Grande, Paraíba. A cross-sectional study on a probabilistic sample of 335 children attending child day care centers. Were obtained information about socioeconomic, maternal and children's characteristics. The height/age (Z-score) was analyzed as continuous dependent variable. Anthropometric data were obtained in compliance with the recommendations of the World Health Organization. The Multicentre Growth Reference Study was used as the reference population. The data were subjected to multiple linear regression analysis using the hierarchical model. Children who slept in rooms with at least two people, households without garbage collection, households with no refrigerator, rural zone, illiterate mothers, mothers of short stature, low birth weight and stay in child day care center at part time were the conditions associated with worse height/age of children. There is a clear difference in linear growth with multicausal characteristic in which the low birth weight, as an expression of adverse history, and the socioeconomic conditions, as an expression of health inequities, profiling the genetic potential of growth.

  2. [Presence of Cryptosporidium spp in children with acute diarrhea in a public daycare center in Recife, State of Pernambuco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Wheverton Ricardo Correia do; Cavalcanti, Isabella Macário Ferro; Irmão, João Inácio; Rocha, Francisca Janaina Soares

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the frequency of oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp in fecal samples from children aged one to fourteen years at a public daycare center located in a needy community in the city of Recife, Pernambuco. The investigation was carried out between June 28, 2006, and April 3, 2007, and involved 182 children. Among the samples analyzed, 59 (32.4%) were positive regarding the presence of oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp, and the age group most affected was between three and five years (54.2%). The high frequency of samples positive for Cryptosporidium spp obtained in this study confirms that daycare centers are an environment that favors such occurrences, because of the direct contact between children or between children and staff. The most important infection route for Cryptosporidium spp is person-to-person transmission, which is well illustrated in daycare centers. Immaturity, deficiencies of the immune system and inadequate hygiene habits are factors that also contribute towards this type of infection.

  3. Utility of intracardiac echocardiography for catheter ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias in a medium-volume training center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueiras-Rama, David; de Torres-Alba, Fernando; Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Estrada, Alejandro; Figueroa, Jorge; Salvador-Montañés, Óscar; López, Teresa; Moreno-Yanguela, Mar; López Sendón, José L; Merino, José L

    2015-04-01

    New electrophysiology tools like intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) might help to minimize and early detect complications during cardiac ablation procedures. The aim of the study was to assess the utility and vascular safety of ICE during catheter ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias in a medium-volume training center. Prospective, observational study consisted of consecutive patients who underwent catheter-based ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias. All procedures were performed using three-dimensional electro-anatomical mapping and routine cannulation of right and left femoral veins. The ICE probe was initially positioned at the mid-level of the right atrium and properly moved to monitor different steps of the procedure and identify complications. All procedure-related vascular complications were registered. One hundred two patients (age 61.4 ± 13.1 years, 69 male) underwent 110 ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation was the most common ablation substrate (55.4%). Ventricular tachycardia (17.2%) and left atrial flutter procedures (16.4%) were also common. The use of ICE enabled us to early initiate anticoagulation and to optimize the transseptal puncture. It also provided the capability to early detect life-threatening complications such as tamponade (3.6%), along with important information during the procedure such as exact catheter location, lesion formation, and stability during radiofrequency delivery. Such benefits were not associated with a higher number of vascular complications. The use of ICE during catheter-based ablation of complex cardiac substrates provides technical features that may decrease complications and increase accuracy while applying radiofrequency, especially in training centers where fellows start to perform complex procedures. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii Complex in a Belgian Burn Wound Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert; Rose, Thomas; Keersebilck, Elkana; Bosmans, Petra; Pieters, Thierry; Hing, Mony; Heuninckx, Walter; De Pauw, Frank; Soentjens, Patrick; Merabishvili, Maia; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Bogaerts, Pierre; Glupczynski, Youri; Pot, Bruno; van der Reijden, Tanny J; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, all members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, are a major cause of hospital acquired infection. In the burn wound center of the Queen Astrid military hospital in Brussels, 48 patients were colonized or infected with Acb complex over a 52-month period. We report the molecular epidemiology of these organisms, their clinical impact and infection control measures taken. A representative set of 157 Acb complex isolates was analyzed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) (DiversiLab) and a multiplex PCR targeting OXA-51-like and OXA-23-like genes. We identified 31 rep-PCR genotypes (strains). Representatives of each rep-type were identified to species by rpoB sequence analysis: 13 types to A. baumannii, 10 to A. pittii, and 3 to A. nosocomialis. It was assumed that isolates that belonged to the same rep-type also belonged to the same species. Thus, 83.4% of all isolates were identified to A. baumannii, 9.6% to A. pittii and 4.5% to A. nosocomialis. We observed 12 extensively drug resistant Acb strains (10 A. baumannii and 2 A. nosocomialis), all carbapenem-non-susceptible/colistin-susceptible and imported into the burn wound center through patients injured in North Africa. The two most prevalent rep-types 12 and 13 harbored an OXA-23-like gene. Multilocus sequence typing allocated them to clonal complex 1 corresponding to EU (international) clone I. Both strains caused consecutive outbreaks, interspersed with periods of apparent eradication. Patients infected with carbapenem resistant A. baumannii were successfully treated with colistin/rifampicin. Extensive infection control measures were required to eradicate the organisms. Acinetobacter infection and colonization was not associated with increased attributable mortality.

  5. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii Complex in a Belgian Burn Wound Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilocq, Florence; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert; Rose, Thomas; Keersebilck, Elkana; Bosmans, Petra; Pieters, Thierry; Hing, Mony; Heuninckx, Walter; De Pauw, Frank; Soentjens, Patrick; Merabishvili, Maia; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Bogaerts, Pierre; Glupczynski, Youri; Pot, Bruno; van der Reijden, Tanny J.; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, all members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, are a major cause of hospital acquired infection. In the burn wound center of the Queen Astrid military hospital in Brussels, 48 patients were colonized or infected with Acb complex over a 52-month period. We report the molecular epidemiology of these organisms, their clinical impact and infection control measures taken. A representative set of 157 Acb complex isolates was analyzed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) (DiversiLab) and a multiplex PCR targeting OXA-51-like and OXA-23-like genes. We identified 31 rep-PCR genotypes (strains). Representatives of each rep-type were identified to species by rpoB sequence analysis: 13 types to A. baumannii, 10 to A. pittii, and 3 to A. nosocomialis. It was assumed that isolates that belonged to the same rep-type also belonged to the same species. Thus, 83.4% of all isolates were identified to A. baumannii, 9.6% to A. pittii and 4.5% to A. nosocomialis. We observed 12 extensively drug resistant Acb strains (10 A. baumannii and 2 A. nosocomialis), all carbapenem-non-susceptible/colistin-susceptible and imported into the burn wound center through patients injured in North Africa. The two most prevalent rep-types 12 and 13 harbored an OXA-23-like gene. Multilocus sequence typing allocated them to clonal complex 1 corresponding to EU (international) clone I. Both strains caused consecutive outbreaks, interspersed with periods of apparent eradication. Patients infected with carbapenem resistant A. baumannii were successfully treated with colistin/rifampicin. Extensive infection control measures were required to eradicate the organisms. Acinetobacter infection and colonization was not associated with increased attributable mortality. PMID:27223476

  6. Imposed information seeking in public libraries and school library media centers: a common behaviour?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The imposed query model provides a new way of thinking about whom the user is in information proving organizations and environments. It does this by making a distinction between questions that are self-generated (internally motivated by personal context and those that are imposed (thought up by one person then given to someone else to resolve. While the imposed query model represents familiar behaviour, it is a dimension of information seeking that has only recently been explicitly addressed and isolated for study. This article summarizes research on the imposed query in two different information providing contexts: the elementary school and the adult reference desk at the public library. Results reveal whom the imposers and agent users are in these environments and provide an assessment of how common imposed queries are in these contexts.

  7. HIV and infant feeding in Malawi: public health simplicity in complex social and cultural contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinkonde Jacqueline R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The question of when and how to best wean infants born to mothers with HIV requires complex answers. There are clinical guidelines on best approaches but limitations persist when applying them in diverse low-income settings. In such settings, infant-feeding practices are not only dependent on individual women’s choices but are also subject to social and cultural pressures. However, when developing infant-feeding policies little attention has been paid to these pressures, even though they may yield useful empirical knowledge on the various forces that shape the infant-feeding dilemmas confronting women with HIV. This study aimed to a identify the infant-feeding challenges that women with HIV faced when they were advised to wean their children at an early age of six months and b explore how the women adhered to their infant-feeding options while facing and managing these challenges. Methods This study was conducted between February 2008 and April 2009 at two public health facilities where services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV were implemented. Repeated in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 HIV-positive women. Two of the 20 women were also chosen for case studies which included home visits. Results Several interdependent factors including the conflicting pressures of sexual morality and the demands of nurturing and motherhood, in conditions of abject poverty, impeded the participating women from following medical advice on infant feeding. If they adhered to the medical advice, the women would encounter difficulty maintaining their ascribed roles as respected wives, mothers and members of the society at large. The necessity of upholding their moral standing through continued breastfeeding, which signified HIV-negative status, put pressure on them to ignore the medical advice. Conclusions The infant-feeding dilemmas for women with HIV are complex. The integration of public health efforts with context

  8. Versatile annotation and publication quality visualization of protein complexes using POLYVIEW-3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meller Jaroslaw

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macromolecular visualization as well as automated structural and functional annotation tools play an increasingly important role in the post-genomic era, contributing significantly towards the understanding of molecular systems and processes. For example, three dimensional (3D models help in exploring protein active sites and functional hot spots that can be targeted in drug design. Automated annotation and visualization pipelines can also reveal other functionally important attributes of macromolecules. These goals are dependent on the availability of advanced tools that integrate better the existing databases, annotation servers and other resources with state-of-the-art rendering programs. Results We present a new tool for protein structure analysis, with the focus on annotation and visualization of protein complexes, which is an extension of our previously developed POLYVIEW web server. By integrating the web technology with state-of-the-art software for macromolecular visualization, such as the PyMol program, POLYVIEW-3D enables combining versatile structural and functional annotations with a simple web-based interface for creating publication quality structure rendering, as well as animated images for Powerpoint™, web sites and other electronic resources. The service is platform independent and no plug-ins are required. Several examples of how POLYVIEW-3D can be used for structural and functional analysis in the context of protein-protein interactions are presented to illustrate the available annotation options. Conclusion POLYVIEW-3D server features the PyMol image rendering that provides detailed and high quality presentation of macromolecular structures, with an easy to use web-based interface. POLYVIEW-3D also provides a wide array of options for automated structural and functional analysis of proteins and their complexes. Thus, the POLYVIEW-3D server may become an important resource for researches and educators in

  9. Human-Centered Design as an Approach for Place-Based Innovation in Public Health: A Case Study from Oakland, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vechakul, Jessica; Shrimali, Bina Patel; Sandhu, Jaspal S

    2015-12-01

    This case study provides a high-level overview of the human-centered design (HCD) or "design thinking" process and its relevance to public health. The Best Babies Zone (BBZ) initiative is a multi-year project aimed at reducing inequities in infant mortality rates. In 2012, BBZ launched pilot programs in three US cities: Cincinnati, Ohio; New Orleans, Louisiana; and Oakland, California. The Alameda County Public Health Department (ACPHD), the lead for the Oakland BBZ site, identified HCD as a promising approach for addressing the social and economic conditions that are important drivers of health inequities. HCD is a process for creating innovative products, services, and strategies that prioritizes the needs of the intended population. ACPHD partnered with the Gobee Group (a social innovation design consultancy) to develop the Design Sprint. The Design Sprint was a 12-week pilot in which 14 professionals from nine organizations used the HCD process to develop concepts for stimulating a vibrant local economy in the Oakland Best Babies Zone. Thirty- to sixty-minute semi-structured interviews were conducted with all 14 individuals involved in the Design Sprint. With the exception of one interview, the interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and inductively coded to identify themes. Our experience suggests that HCD can: enhance community engagement; expedite the timeframe for challenge identification, program design, and implementation; and create innovative programs that address complex challenges.

  10. Interconnection of industrial centers with the electric network of the public service; Interconexion de centros industriales con la red electrica del servicio publico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales Sedano, Inocente; Lopez Velazquez, Juan Jose; Garcia Paredes, Job; Robles Pimentel, Edgar [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Garcia Alvarez, David; Guzman Camacho, Benigno [Petroleos Mexicanos (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The large industrial centers that have continuous production processes and consume high amounts of electrical energy, generally have their own power generation. The petrochemical complexes, the paper and steel factories and the sugar mills are examples of this type of centers. On the other hand, the new regulation for the generation of electrical energy that allows to the electrical energy interchange between private companies and the public network, has originated the necessity of connecting systems that formerly operated isolated. Since the original design of the isolated electrical systems was to operate in an independent form, making the interconnection can generate technical problems that must be analyzed and solved. In this paper, some experiences related with the behavior of electrical equipment when connected to operate with the public network, are presented. [Spanish] Los grandes centros industriales que tienen procesos de produccion continua y consumen altas cantidades de energia electrica, generalmente cuentan con generacion propia. Los complejos petroquimicos, las fabricas de papel y acero y los ingenios azucareros son ejemplos de este tipo de centros. Por otro lado, la nueva reglamentacion de generacion de energia electrica que permite el intercambio de energia electrica entre las companias privadas y la red publica, ha originado la necesidad de conectar sistemas que antes operaban aislados. Debido a que el diseno original de los sistemas electricos aislados fue trabajar en forma independiente, el realizar la interconexion puede generar problemas tecnicos que tienen que analizarse y resolverse. En este articulo, se presentan algunas experiencias relacionadas con el comportamiento del equipo electrico al operar conectado con la red publica.

  11. Sulfide oxidation by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by iron complexes: two metal centers are better than one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekmouche, Yasmina; Hummel, Helga; Ho, Raymond Y N; Que, Lawrence; Schünemann, Volker; Thomas, Fabrice; Trautwein, Alfred X; Lebrun, Colette; Gorgy, Karine; Leprêtre, Jean-Claude; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Fontecave, Marc; Ménage, Stéphane

    2002-03-01

    Peroxoiron species have been proposed to be involved in catalytic cycles of iron-dependent oxygenases and in some cases as the active intermediates during oxygen-transfer reactions. The catalytic properties of a mononuclear iron complex, [Fe(II)(pb)(2)(CH(3)CN)(2)] (pb=(-)4,5-pinene-2,2'-bipyridine), have been compared to those of its related dinuclear analogue. Each system generates specific peroxo adducts, which are responsible for the oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides. The dinuclear catalyst was found to be more reactive and (enantio)selective than its mononuclear counterpart, suggesting that a second metal site affords specific advantages for stereoselective catalysis. These results might help for the design of future enantioselective iron catalysts.

  12. Emission and fs/ns-TRANSIENT Absorption of Organometallic Complexes Bound to a Dinuclear Metal Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Christopher B.; Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Chisholm, Malcolm H.

    2012-06-01

    Compounds containing a MM quadruple bond (M = Mo or W) of the form M2L2L'2, where L and L' are conjugated organic ligands, show interesting photophysical properties along with a metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band that is tunable throughout the UV-Vis-NIR spectra. Recently, our attention has shifted towards ligands that incorporate a secondary transition metal complex bound to an organic moiety. Along with allowing for a second tunable MLCT band for better coverage of the solar spectrum, these hybrid molecules show unique spectroscopic properties that were explored using fs/ns-transient absorption and UV-Vis/NIR emission. These techniques allow for the elucidation of the electronic character of the excited states as well as their lifetimes. This knowledge will be put to use in the design of new materials that could later be incorporated into next generation photovoltaic devices.

  13. Characterization of Complex Fractionated Atrial Electrograms by Sample Entropy: An International Multi-Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Cirugeda–Roldán

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most commonly clinically-encountered arrhythmia. Catheter ablation of AF is mainly based on trigger elimination and modification of the AF substrate. Substrate mapping ablation of complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAEs has emerged to be a promising technique. To improve substrate mapping based on CFAE analysis, automatic detection algorithms need to be developed in order to simplify and accelerate the ablation procedures. According to the latest studies, the level of fractionation has been shown to be promisingly well estimated from CFAE measured during radio frequency (RF ablation of AF. The nature of CFAE is generally nonlinear and nonstationary, so the use of complexity measures is considered to be the appropriate technique for the analysis of AF records. This work proposes the use of sample entropy (SampEn, not only as a way to discern between non-fractionated and fractionated atrial electrograms (A-EGM, Entropy 2015, 17 7494 but also as a tool for characterizing the degree of A-EGM regularity, which is linked to changes in the AF substrate and to heart tissue damage. The use of SampEn combined with a blind parameter estimation optimization process enables the classification between CFAE and non-CFAE with statistical significance (p < 0:001, 0.89 area under the ROC, 86% specificity and 77% sensitivity over a mixed database of A-EGM combined from two independent CFAE signal databases, recorded during RF ablation of AF in two EU countries (542 signals in total. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, it can be suggested that the use of SampEn is suitable for real-time support during navigation of RF ablation of AF, as only 1.5 seconds of signal segments need to be analyzed.

  14. Polycomb repressive complex 2 targets murine cytomegalovirus chromatin for modification and associates with viral replication centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Abraham

    Full Text Available Regulation of viral transcription by chromatin structure has emerged as a fundamental determinant in the establishment of lytic and latent herpesvirus infections. The Polycomb group (PcG of epigenetic repressors promotes heterochromatin formation by trimethylating histone H3 on lysine-27 (H3K27me3 and regulates development, stem cell renewal and differentiation and the cell cycle. These cellular processes are tightly coupled to the molecular switch between lytic and latent herpesvirus infections. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we observed enrichment of H3K27me3 at the major immediate-early (MIE locus of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV very early following infection of permissive fibroblasts. As lytic replication progressed, we observed a loss of H3K27me3 enrichment concomitant with the appearance of H3K4me3. However, late during infection, as viral replication centers are established, we observed a significant increase in PcG protein association with chromatin. Additionally, in co-immunofluorescence assays using confocal microscopy, we detected strong enrichments for PcG protein within the viral replication compartment, suggesting an association between viral DNA synthesis machinery and PcG proteins. Together, our results suggest a novel, dynamic interaction between PcG epigenetic repressors and MCMV genomes.

  15. The layered sensing operations center: a modeling and simulation approach to developing complex ISR networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Christopher; Lenzo, Matthew; McClure, Matthew; Preiss, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    In order to anticipate the constantly changing landscape of global warfare, the United States Air Force must acquire new capabilities in the field of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR). To meet this challenge, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing a unifying construct of "Layered Sensing" which will provide military decision-makers at all levels with the timely, actionable, and trusted information necessary for complete battlespace awareness. Layered Sensing is characterized by the appropriate combination of sensors and platforms (including those for persistent sensing), infrastructure, and exploitation capabilities to enable this synergistic awareness. To achieve the Layered Sensing vision, AFRL is pursuing a Modeling & Simulation (M&S) strategy through the Layered Sensing Operations Center (LSOC). An experimental ISR system-of-systems test-bed, the LSOC integrates DoD standard simulation tools with commercial, off-the-shelf video game technology for rapid scenario development and visualization. These tools will help facilitate sensor management performance characterization, system development, and operator behavioral analysis. Flexible and cost-effective, the LSOC will implement a non-proprietary, open-architecture framework with well-defined interfaces. This framework will incentivize the transition of current ISR performance models to service-oriented software design for maximum re-use and consistency. This paper will present the LSOC's development and implementation thus far as well as a summary of lessons learned and future plans for the LSOC.

  16. Rational Consumption of Water in Administrative Public Buildings: The Experience of the Bahia Administrative Center, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara Fernanda da Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The government has to lead, by example, the effort for more rational water use. Nevertheless, public buildings in countries like Brazil lack the operational and maintenance organization necessary to induce better environmental practices. This paper presents the results of a five-year effort to control and reduce water use in governmental facilities in Salvador, Bahia. Seventeen state government headquarters in Bahia took part in this initiative. The basic actions taken include: daily monitoring and analysis of water consumption, inspections and adjustments of hydraulic equipment flow, rapid repair of leaks and layout improvements in toilets. All of these are part of the main initiative, which aims to implement water management in the facilities. Ecoteams were created and trained to conduct these efforts. Water control, consumption analysis and communication have been made using AGUAPURA VIANET, an Internet software designed by the Federal University of Bahia for this specific purpose. From June 2008, to December 2013, an estimated 270,000 m3 of potable water have been saved, which represents US$ 2.7 million in water and waste water costs. This represents a monthly savings of 31% in expenses compared to the practices before the program started.

  17. Characteristics of environmental pollution related with public complaints in an industrial shipbuilding complex, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae-Woo; Lee, Myoung-Eun; Lee, Hyeon-Don

    2011-06-01

    The shipbuilding industry of Korea, ranked number one in the world in annual amount of ship orders, has contributed to national economic growth; however, this has resulted in various environmental problems. Characteristics of environmental pollution, such as particulate matters, odor, and noise, which are closely related with public complaints, were evaluated in an industrial shipbuilding complex. The concentrations of PM-10 and TSP were significantly affected by the distance between the measurement site and shipbuilding workplace, as well as the height of the measurement site. Average PM-10 concentrations in the residential area ranged from 40.10 to 44.10 μg/m(3), which were not high in comparison with the ambient air quality standard and those of major cities in Korea. Paint particles could affect a wider area than typical particulate matters due to their generation and transport properties. The properties of odor in the study area were widely affected by the work intensity in shipyards and the temperature. Twenty-five out of total 54 samples collected in the residential area exceeded the dilution factor of 10, which is the tolerable limit adopted in Korea. Noise had an influence on a limited area due to the extinction effect with distance from the shipyards, while severe noise levels higher than 90 dB(A) were frequently found inside the shipyards.

  18. Social mixing through densification? The struggle over the Little Mountain public housing complex in Vancouver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosol, Marit

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In times of peak-oil and the on-going ‘urban renaissance’ (Porter and Shaw 2009, urban densification becomes increasingly more important. Densification is promoted not only for environmental reasons – in the sense of developing more compact and thus more sustainable cities – but also, as is the case in Vancouver, in the name of ‘social mixing’. Taking the conflict over “Little Mountain” – the oldest public housing complex in the province of British Columbia, Canada – as example, the article shows the conflicts that can arise in the process of densification. Despite the protests of residents and their supporters and without any concrete plans for redevelopment, almost all of the once 224 social housing units were demolished in 2009 to make room for at least 1,400 market condos (besides the 1-for-1 replacement of the social units. The example shows that densification processes that lack social measures for securing tenure for long-time residents lead to the displacement of poorer people, and to increased socio-spatial disparities. Furthermore, densification will not alleviate the affordability crisis but intensify it, if all the additionally created housing units will be market-housing only. Based on this example, the article shows that a purported social-mix policy is mainly motivated by recapturing prime real-estate, and identifies the rhetoric of ‘social mixing’ as ‘gentrification by stealth’ (Bridge et al. 2012.

  19. Advancing Public Health Using Regulatory Science to Enhance Development and Regulation of Medical Products: Food and Drug Administration Research at the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusinitz, Marc; Braunstein, Emily; Wilson, Carolyn A

    2017-01-01

    Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research enhances and supports regulatory decision-making and policy development. This work contributes to our regulatory mission, advances medical product development, and supports Food and Drug Administration's regulatory response to public health crises. This review presents some examples of our diverse scientific work undertaken in recent years to support our regulatory and public health mission.

  20. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reach G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gérard Reach1,2 1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases, Avicenne Hospital AP-HP, 2EA 3412, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Ile-de-France (CRNH-IDF, Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France Abstract: According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients’ nonadherence and doctors’ clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. Keywords: person-centered

  1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence-based Practice Center methods for systematically reviewing complex multicomponent health care interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Chang, Christine; Viswanathan, Meera; Glick, Susan; Treadwell, Jonathan; Umscheid, Craig A; Whitlock, Evelyn; Fu, Rongwei; Berliner, Elise; Paynter, Robin; Anderson, Johanna; Motu'apuaka, Pua; Trikalinos, Tom

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence-based Practice Center methods white paper was to outline approaches to conducting systematic reviews of complex multicomponent health care interventions. We performed a literature scan and conducted semistructured interviews with international experts who conduct research or systematic reviews of complex multicomponent interventions (CMCIs) or organizational leaders who implement CMCIs in health care. Challenges identified include lack of consistent terminology for such interventions (eg, complex, multicomponent, multidimensional, multifactorial); a wide range of approaches used to frame the review, from grouping interventions by common features to using more theoretical approaches; decisions regarding whether and how to quantitatively analyze the interventions, from holistic to individual component analytic approaches; and incomplete and inconsistent reporting of elements critical to understanding the success and impact of multicomponent interventions, such as methods used for implementation the context in which interventions are implemented. We provide a framework for the spectrum of conceptual and analytic approaches to synthesizing studies of multicomponent interventions and an initial list of critical reporting elements for such studies. This information is intended to help systematic reviewers understand the options and tradeoffs available for such reviews. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Online Job Tutorials @ the Public Library: Best Practices from Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh's Job & Career Education Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea M. Hebert

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the Job & Career Education Center (JCEC tutorial project completed in September of 2012. The article also addresses the website redesign implemented to highlight the tutorials and improve user engagement with JCEC online resources. Grant monies made it possible for a Digital Outreach Librarian to create a series of tutorials with the purpose of providing job-related assistance beyond the JCEC in the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh—Main location. Benchmarking, planning, implementation, and assessment are addressed. A set of best practices for all libraries (public, academic, school, special are presented. Best practices are applicable to tutorials created with software other than Camtasia, the software used by the JCEC project.

  3. The Efficacy and Safety of Using Extension Catheters in Complex Coronary Interventions: A Single Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Shiang; Wu, Chun-I; Chang, Fu-Hsiang; Chang, Hsien-Yuan; Lee, Po-Tseng; Chen, Ju-Yi; Lee, Wen-Huang; Lin, Chih-Chan; Chan, Shih-Hung; Liu, Ping-Yen; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Background The extension catheter was originally developed to facilitate stent delivery to challenging lesions. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of using an extension catheter in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Methods Two interventional cardiologists reviewed the records of all consecutive patients who, between November 2011 and October 2015, had undergone PCI with a GuideLiner or Heartrail ST-01 extension catheter. Clinical demographics, vessel characteristics, procedural details, and outcomes were recorded. Results We identified 136 (3.7%) eligible patients (male: 81.6%; mean age: 66.2 ± 11.2 years) in 3665 PCI procedures. Seventy-two (52.9%) cases required increased support to cross severely calcified lesions. The remainder were coronary tortuosity [47 (34.6%)], chronic total occlusions [35 (25.7%)], previously deployed proximal stents [16 (11.8%)], and anomalous origin of coronary artery [9 (6.6%)]. There were 43 type B and 91 type C lesions. The success rate was 86.8% (118) and the complication rate was 6.6% (7 coronary dissections, 1 thrombus formation, and 1 stent dislodgement). All complications were successfully managed using endovascular interventions. The failure rate significantly (25.5%) increased if more than 3 of 6 peri-procedural factors coexisted: 1) long lesions (> 30 mm), 2) tortuosity, 3) calcification, 4) chronic total occlusion, 5) previous intervention history, and 6) previously deployed proximal stents. Conclusions Using an extension catheter for challenging complex PCIs is safe and highly successful if the practitioner has adequate experience manipulating extension catheters. PMID:28959098

  4. Neutron scattering shows a droplet of oleic acid at the center of the BAMLET complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Gilbert, Elliot P; Doherty, Greg; Knott, Robert B; Church, W Bret

    2017-07-01

    The anti-cancer complex, Bovine Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumors (BAMLET), has intriguing broad-spectrum anti-cancer activity. Although aspects of BAMLET's anti-cancer mechanism are still not known, it is understood that it involves the oleic acid or oleate component of BAMLET being preferentially released into cancer cell membranes leading to increased membrane permeability and lysis. The structure of the protein component of BAMLET has previously been elucidated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to be partially unfolded and dramatically enlarged. However, the structure of the oleic acid component of BAMLET and its disposition with respect to the protein component was not revealed as oleic acid has the same X-ray scattering length density (SLD) as water. Employing the difference in the neutron SLDs of hydrogen and deuterium, we carried out solvent contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments of hydrogenated BAMLET in deuterated water buffers, to reveal the size, shape, and disposition of the oleic acid component of BAMLET. Our resulting analysis and models generated from SANS and SAXS data indicate that oleic acid forms a spherical droplet of oil incompletely encapsulated by the partially unfolded protein component. This model provides insight into the anti-cancer mechanism of this cache of lipid. The model also reveals a protein component "tail" not associated with the oleic acid component that is able to interact with the tail of other BAMLET molecules, providing a plausible explanation of how BAMLET readily forms aggregates. Proteins 2017; 85:1371-1378. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Communicating A Controversial and Complex Project to the Public: Yucca Mountain Tours - Real and Virtual Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.B. Benson; P.V. Nelson; M. d' Ouville

    2000-03-01

    ;'Environmental activists, local residents and governmental officials are protesting proposed waste facilities from Taiwan to Texas''. Here in Nevada, Yucca Mountain is no exception. The Department's study of the Yucca Mountain site for possible development as a permanent repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste has been criticized by many, for many reasons. The Yucca Mountain Project is both controversial and complex--a fact that makes communication with the public a challenge.

  6. Introduction of soft drinks and processed juice in the diet of infants attending public day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Longo-Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Identifying at what age infants enrolled in public day care centers are introduced to soft drinks and industrialized juice, as well as comparing the nutritional composition of these goods with natural fruit juice. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the mothers of 636 children (aged 0 to 36 months from nurseries of day care centers, who were asked questions about the age of feeding introduction. This study evaluated the proximate composition of soft drinks and artificial juice, comparing them with those of natural fruit juice regarding energy, sugar, fiber, vitamin C, and sodium values. The chemical composition of fruit juice was obtained by consulting the Table of Food Composition and, for industrialized drinks, the average nutritional information on the labels of the five most consumed product brands. RESULTS: The artificial drinks were consumed before the first year of life by more than half of the children studied, however, approximately 10% consumed them before the age of 6 months. With regard to the comparison among the drinks, artificial fruit juice beverages and soft drinks proved to contain from nine to 13 times higher amounts of sodium, and 15 times less vitamin C than natural juices. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of soft drinks and industrialized juice in the diet of infants was inopportune and premature.. When compared to natural fruit juice, these have inferior nutritional composition, which suggests the urgent need for measures based on strategies for food and nutrition education in order to promote awareness and the maintenance of healthy eating habits.

  7. Introduction of soft drinks and processed juice in the diet of infants attending public day care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Toloni, Maysa Helena de Aguiar; de Menezes, Risia Cristina Egito; Asakura, Leiko; Oliveira, Maria Alice Araújo; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Identifying at what age infants enrolled in public day care centers are introduced to soft drinks and industrialized juice, as well as comparing the nutritional composition of these goods with natural fruit juice. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the mothers of 636 children (aged 0 to 36 months) from nurseries of day care centers, who were asked questions about the age of feeding introduction. This study evaluated the proximate composition of soft drinks and artificial juice, comparing them with those of natural fruit juice regarding energy, sugar, fiber, vitamin C, and sodium values. The chemical composition of fruit juice was obtained by consulting the Table of Food Composition and, for industrialized drinks, the average nutritional information on the labels of the five most consumed product brands. RESULTS: The artificial drinks were consumed before the first year of life by more than half of the children studied, however, approximately 10% consumed them before the age of 6 months. With regard to the comparison among the drinks, artificial fruit juice beverages and soft drinks proved to contain from nine to 13 times higher amounts of sodium, and 15 times less vitamin C than natural juices. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of soft drinks and industrialized juice in the diet of infants was inopportune and premature.. When compared to natural fruit juice, these have inferior nutritional composition, which suggests the urgent need for measures based on strategies for food and nutrition education in order to promote awareness and the maintenance of healthy eating habits. PMID:25662561

  8. Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry Area (SWMU# 107) Annual Long-Term Monitoring Report (Year 1) Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill W.; Towns, Crystal

    2015-01-01

    This document has been prepared by Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. (Geosyntec) to present and discuss the findings of the 2014 and 2015 Long-Term Monitoring (LTM) activities that were completed at the Launch Complex 39 (LC39) Observation Gantry Area (OGA) located at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida (Site). The remainder of this report includes: (i) a description of the Site location; (ii) summary of Site background and previous investigations; (iii) description of field activities completed as part of the annual LTM program at the Site; (iv) groundwater flow evaluation; (v) presentation and discussion of field and analytical results; and (vi) conclusions and recommendations. Applicable KSC Remediation Team (KSCRT) Meeting minutes are included in Attachment A. This Annual LTM Letter Report was prepared by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for NASA under contract number NNK12CA13B, Delivery Order NNK13CA39T project number PCN ENV2188.

  9. The Organization of Two Soft (Cu2Ө, Ni2Ө) Metal Centers in Heterotrinuclear Complexes of a Macrocyclic Ligand by Cocomplexation with Ba2Ө

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Bos, M.; Harkema, Sybolt; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    1989-01-01

    The short distances between the two transitionmetal centers in the trinuclear complexes 3 are caused by cocomplexation of Ba2Ө: Cu2Ө:...Cu2Ө 3.50, Ni2Ө ...Ni2Ө 3.42 Å. The macrocyclic ligand is formed as the complex 2 from o-phenylenediamine and 1 in the presence of Ba2Ө. Complexes 3, in turn, are

  10. Publishing protocols for trials of complex interventions before trial completion - potential pitfalls, solutions and the need for public debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anna Purna; Pearse, Janice Elizabeth; Rapley, Tim

    2017-01-09

    Open Science is 'the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society'. In the spirit of the Open Science movement, advance publication of protocols for clinical trials is now being advocated by BioMed Central, BMJ Open and others. Simultaneously, participants are becoming increasingly active in their pursuit and sharing of trial- and health- related information. Whilst access to protocols alongside published trial findings has clear benefits, advance publication of trial protocols is potentially problematic for trials of complex behavioural interventions. In this article we explain, with examples, how this could lead to unblinding, 'contamination' between intervention and control groups and deliberate biasing of assessment outcomes by participants. We discuss potential solutions and demonstrate the need for public debate about how this issue is best managed. Triallists may still be underestimating participants' interest in information. This needs to change: joint and open discussions with the public are needed to inform how we should proceed.

  11. Peculiarities of applying complex marketing elements in the activity of public administration bodies in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy ZBYRANIK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many practices are implemented in the activity of public administration bodies, which are used by the representatives of the business sector at the current stage of development of Ukraine. One of these practices is marketing. The article considers the theoretical aspects of marketing that can be applied in the work of public authorities. The fundamental differences between the sphere of public administration and the business are stated in this context. The main elements of the marketing mix are analysed and the peculiarities of marketing tools, which can be applied to the sphere of public administration, are noted.

  12. Molecular Analysis of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Isolates from a Portuguese Cystic Fibrosis Center: a 7-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mónica V.; Leitão, Jorge H.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Vandamme, Peter; Lito, Luís; Barreto, Celeste; Salgado, Maria José; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    This work reports results of a systematic molecular analysis involving 113 Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates obtained from 23 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients under surveillance over a 7-year period at the major Portuguese CF center, the Santa Maria Hospital in Lisbon. The majority of the isolates were serial isolates from persistently infected patients (more than one-half of the population examined). In agreement with previous studies, B. cenocepacia (formerly genomovar III) was the most prevalent species; it was isolated from 52% of the patients infected with B. cepacia complex isolates. Contrasting with previous studies, a very significant percentage of the Portuguese CF subpopulation examined was infected with B. cepacia genomovar I (36%) and B. stabilis (18%). B. multivorans was recovered from two of the infected patients. All four of the species or genomovars were associated with poor clinical outcome, including the cepacia syndrome, and gave rise to chronic and transient infections, with the clinical condition depending on the patient and other still-unidentified factors. The B. cepacia epidemic strain marker region was found exclusively in genomovar III strains, while cblA was detected in genomovars I and III, only. There was no clear relation between the presence of these markers and transmissibility. Altogether, our results indicate that the use of these markers or the genomovar status in identifying patients at higher risk for infection is uncertain. PMID:12958234

  13. Fort Collins Science Center Ecosystem Dynamics branch--interdisciplinary research for addressing complex natural resource issues across landscapes and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wilson, Juliette T.

    2013-01-01

    The Ecosystem Dynamics Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center offers an interdisciplinary team of talented and creative scientists with expertise in biology, botany, ecology, geology, biogeochemistry, physical sciences, geographic information systems, and remote-sensing, for tackling complex questions about natural resources. As demand for natural resources increases, the issues facing natural resource managers, planners, policy makers, industry, and private landowners are increasing in spatial and temporal scope, often involving entire regions, multiple jurisdictions, and long timeframes. Needs for addressing these issues include (1) a better understanding of biotic and abiotic ecosystem components and their complex interactions; (2) the ability to easily monitor, assess, and visualize the spatially complex movements of animals, plants, water, and elements across highly variable landscapes; and (3) the techniques for accurately predicting both immediate and long-term responses of system components to natural and human-caused change. The overall objectives of our research are to provide the knowledge, tools, and techniques needed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, state agencies, and other stakeholders in their endeavors to meet the demand for natural resources while conserving biodiversity and ecosystem services. Ecosystem Dynamics scientists use field and laboratory research, data assimilation, and ecological modeling to understand ecosystem patterns, trends, and mechanistic processes. This information is used to predict the outcomes of changes imposed on species, habitats, landscapes, and climate across spatiotemporal scales. The products we develop include conceptual models to illustrate system structure and processes; regional baseline and integrated assessments; predictive spatial and mathematical models; literature syntheses; and frameworks or protocols for improved ecosystem monitoring, adaptive management, and program evaluation. The descriptions

  14. Google Scholar makes it Hard - the complexity of organizing one's publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, Hans L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306025; van Kreveld, Marc|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07492253X

    2014-01-01

    With Google Scholar, scientists can maintain their publications on personal prole pages, while the citations to these works are automatically collected and counted. Maintenance of publications is done manually by the researcher herself, and involves deleting erroneous ones, merging ones that are the

  15. Google Scholar makes it hard - the complexity of organizing one's publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, Hans L.; van Kreveld, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    With Google Scholar, scientists can maintain their publications on personal profile pages, while the citations to these works are automatically collected and counted. Maintenance of publications is done manually by the researcher herself, and involves deleting erroneous ones, merging ones that are

  16. [Introduction of soft drinks and processed juice in the diet of infants attending public day care centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Toloni, Maysa Helena de Aguiar; de Menezes, Risia Cristina Egito; Asakura, Leiko; Oliveira, Maria Alice Araújo; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2015-01-01

    Identifying at what age infants enrolled in public day care centers are introduced to soft drinks and industrialized juice, as well as comparing the nutritional composition of these goods with natural fruit juice. A cross-sectional study with the mothers of 636 children (aged 0 to 36 months) from nurseries of day care centers, who were asked questions about the age of feeding introduction. This study evaluated the proximate composition of soft drinks and artificial juice, comparing them with those of natural fruit juice regarding energy, sugar, fiber, vitamin C, and sodium values. The chemical composition of fruit juice was obtained by consulting the Table of Food Composition and, for industrialized drinks, the average nutritional information on the labels of the five most consumed product brands. The artificial drinks were consumed before the first year of life by more than half of the children studied, however, approximately 10% consumed them before the age of 6 months. With regard to the comparison among the drinks, artificial fruit juice beverages and soft drinks proved to contain from nine to 13 times higher amounts of sodium, and 15 times less vitamin C than natural juices. The introduction of soft drinks and industrialized juice in the diet of infants was inopportune and premature. When compared to natural fruit juice, these have inferior nutritional composition, which suggests the urgent need for measures based on strategies for food and nutrition education in order to promote awareness and the maintenance of healthy eating habits. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Public stigma against people with mental illness in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC) in Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Eshetu; Tesfaye, Markos; Froeschl, Guenter; Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria; Müller, Norbert; Dehning, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Public understanding about mental illnesses and attitudes towards people with mental illness (PWMI) play a paramount role in the prevention and treatment of mental illness and the rehabilitation of PWMI. The aim of this study was to measure public stigma against PWMI and the factors associated with stigma in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC) in Southwest Ethiopia. This community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted from June to August 2012 among 845 randomly selected respondents by using the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale, an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data was entered with EPI-DATA and then exported to STATA for analysis. Simple descriptive and linear regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of stigma against PWMI. Of the total of 845 respondents, 68.17% were from rural districts. The mean stigma score was 2.62 on a 5-point score. The majority of the respondents (75.27%) believed that mental illness can be cured. Stress, poverty, and rumination were the most often perceived causes of mental illness. Rural residents had significantly higher stigma scores (std. β = 0.61, Pstigma (std. β = -0.14, Pstigma (std. β = 0.07, Pstigma levels. The study found a more undermining but less avoidant attitude towards PWMI. Rural residents showed higher levels of stigma. Stigma against PWMI was lower in people with an explanatory concept about the causes of mental illness and a higher level of education. Information, education, and communication about the causes, signs, and nature of mental illnesses would help to reduce stigma.

  18. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context...

  19. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Davey; Santosh Kumar Raghav; Jai Vir Singh; Anuradha Davey; Nirankar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and...

  20. Adaptive practices in heart failure care teams: implications for patient-centered care in the context of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tait GR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Glendon R Tait,1 Joanna Bates,2 Kori A LaDonna,3 Valerie N Schulz,4 Patricia H Strachan,5 Allan McDougall,3 Lorelei Lingard3 1Department of Psychiatry and Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 2Centre for Health Education Scholarship, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, 3Centre for Education Research and Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 4Palliative Care, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, London; 5School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Heart failure (HF, one of the three leading causes of death, is a chronic, progressive, incurable disease. There is growing support for integration of palliative care’s holistic approach to suffering, but insufficient understanding of how this would happen in the complex team context of HF care. This study examined how HF care teams, as defined by patients, work together to provide care to patients with advanced disease. Methods: Team members were identified by each participating patient, generating team sampling units (TSUs for each patient. Drawn from five study sites in three Canadian provinces, our dataset consists of 209 interviews from 50 TSUs. Drawing on a theoretical framing of HF teams as complex adaptive systems (CAS, interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with constructivist grounded theory. Results: This paper centers on the dominant theme of system practices, how HF care delivery is reported to work organizationally, socially, and practically, and describes two subthemes: “the way things work around here”, which were commonplace, routine ways of doing things, and “the way we make things work around here”, which were more conscious, effortful adaptations to usual practice in response to emergent needs. An adaptive practice, often a small alteration to routine, could have amplified effects beyond those intended by the innovating team

  1. The impact of Fogarty International Center research training programs on public health policy and program development in Kenya and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sara; Paina, Ligia; Ssengooba, Freddie; Waswa, Douglas; M'Imunya, James M

    2013-08-21

    The Fogarty International Center (FIC) has supported research capacity development for over twenty years. While the mission of FIC is supporting and facilitating global health research conducted by U.S. and international investigators, building partnerships between health research institutions in the U.S. and abroad, and training the next generation of scientists to address global health needs, research capacity may impact health policies and programs and therefore have positive impacts on public health. We conducted an exploratory analysis of how FIC research training investments affected public health policy and program development in Kenya and Uganda. We explored the long term impacts of all FIC supported research training programs using case studies, in Kenya and Uganda. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 53 respondents and 29 focus group discussion participants across the two countries. Qualitative methods were supplemented by structured surveys of trainees and document review, including a review of evidence cited in policy documents. In the primary focal areas of FIC grants, notably HIV/AIDS, there were numerous examples of work conducted by former FIC trainees that influenced national and global policies. Facilitators for this influence included the strong technical skills and scientific reputations of the trainees, and professional networks spanning research and policy communities. Barriers included the fact that trainees typically had not received training in research communication, relatively few policy makers had received scientific training, and institutional constraints that undermined alignment of research with policy needs. While FIC has not focused its programs on the goal of policy and program influence, its investments have affected global and national public health policies and practice. These influences have occurred primarily through strengthening research skills of scientists and developing strong in-country networks

  2. Alaska Peninsula/Becharof National Wildlife Refuge Complex public use management plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Enclosed is the Alaska Peninsula/Becharof National Wildlife Refuge Public Use Management Plan. This plan has been prepared to implement some provisions of the Alaska...

  3. Seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer in women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikawa, Takehiro; Inoue, Manami; Shimazu, Taichi; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-05-01

    Iodine is a suspected risk factor for thyroid cancer. Seaweed accounts for about 80% of Japanese people's iodine intake. We examined the association between seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer in Japanese women. Women participating in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (n=52 679; age: 40-69 years) were followed up for a mean of 14.5 years; 134 new thyroid cancer cases, including 113 papillary carcinoma cases, were identified. Seaweed consumption was assessed using a food-frequency questionnaire and divided into three categories: 2 days/week or less (reference); 3-4 days/week; and almost daily. The Cox proportional hazards model was applied to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seaweed consumption was clearly associated with an increased risk of papillary carcinoma (HR for almost daily consumption compared with 2 days/week or less=1.71; 95% CI: 1.01-2.90; trend P=0.04). After stratification for menopausal status, an increased risk was observed in postmenopausal women (papillary carcinoma HR for almost daily consumption compared with 2 days/week or less=3.81, 95% CI: 1.67-8.68; trend Pwomen (HR=0.91, 95% CI: 0.44-1.91; trend P=0.76). This study identified a positive association between seaweed consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer (especially for papillary carcinoma) in postmenopausal women.

  4. Stillbirth history and Toxoplasma gondii infection in women attending public health centers in a northern Mexican City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, C.; Pacheco-Vega, S. J.; Salcedo-Jaquez, M.; Sánchez-Anguiano, L. F.; Hernández-Tinoco, J.; Rábago-Sánchez, E.; Centeno-Tinoco, M. M.; Flores-Garcia, I. D.; Ramos-Nevarez, A.; Cerrillo-Soto, S. M.; Guido-Arreola, C. A.; Beristain-García, I.; Liesenfeld, O.; Berumen-Segovia, L. O.; Saenz-Soto, L.; Sifuentes-Álvarez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Through a cross-sectional study design, 150 women attending public health centers with a history of stillbirths were examined for anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies in Durango City, Mexico. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of T. gondii seropositivity with the characteristics of the women with stillbirth history. Of the 150 women (mean age: 32.09 ± 9.16 years) studied, 14 (9.3%) had anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies and six (42.9%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii seropositivity was associated with high frequency (4–7 days a week) of eating meat (OR = 5.52; 95% CI: 1.48–20.59; P = 0.01), history of lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.52; 95% CI: 1.14–17.82; P = 0.03), and history of surgery (OR = 8.68; 95% CI: 1.04–72.15; P = 0.04). This is the first study on the seroepidemiology of T. gondii infection in women with a history of stillbirths in Mexico. The association of T. gondii exposure with a history of surgery warrants for further research. Risk factors for T. gondii infection found in the present survey may help to design optimal educational programs to avoid T. gondii infection. PMID:26185685

  5. Combined impact of five lifestyle factors and subsequent risk of cancer: the Japan Public Health Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sawada, Norie; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate whether 5 combined healthy lifestyle factors (not smoking, moderate drinking, eating minimum salt-preserved foods, being physically active, and having appropriate body mass index) are associated with reduced risk of cancer. Participants were enrolled in the Japan Public Health Center Study and responded to the 5-year follow-up questionnaire covering lifestyle factors in 1995-1999 at ages 45-74 years. During follow up through December 31, 2006, 3451 and 2125 cases of cancer were newly identified in men and women, respectively. For men and women, a factor-dependent risk reduction was observed for healthy lifestyles and cancer development. Compared to 0-1 healthy lifestyle factors, the adjusted RRs and 95% CIs for adherence to 2, 3, 4, and 5 healthy factors were 0.86 (0.78-0.95), 0.72 (0.65-0.80), 0.61 (0.54-0.69), and 0.57 (0.45-0.72), respectively, for men (P for trendlifestyle for men and women, respectively. Risk reduction was more pronounced among elderly women. These combined lifestyle factors have a considerable impact on preventing cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Teaching Tacting of Private Events Based on Public Accompaniments: Effects of Contingencies, Audience Control, and Stimulus Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Hart, John M

    2014-06-01

    Our current understanding of the role of private events in the science of behavior is based largely on Skinner's natural science interpretation of private events. Skinner described public accompaniments as one source of control for a verbal community to differentially reinforce verbal behavior regarding private events. In this study, we developed an experimental analogue to study variables influencing tacting of private events. The participant had exclusive access to one set of stimuli (the private stimuli), and the experimenter attempted to teach tacts for private stimuli based on their correspondence with public stimuli accessible to both the experimenter and participant. Results of experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that reports of private stimuli were a function of degree of public-private correspondence, reinforcement contingency, and audience control. In some cases, we encountered reports controlled exclusively by public stimuli. Results of experiment 3 showed that public control was less likely when public stimuli were more complex and the experimenter had a unique behavioral history with respect to those stimuli that was not shared by the learner. The orderly patterns of data obtained suggest that analogue arrangements might be a useful, and even necessary, starting point for experimental investigations of how private events may enter into the analysis of behavior.

  7. Public Communication of Science and Technology in Museums and Interactive Centers in MedellÍn (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Inés Jiménez-G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the simple and complex deficit and democratic model approaches, this paper analyses the communication strategies applied in several museums and interactive centers —Parque Explora, Museo Interactivo Empresas Públicas de Medellín, Planetario Jesús Emilio Ramírez and Museo Universitario from the University of Antioquia in the city of Medellín—. We argue that communicating scientific and technological developments at a conjunctural moment —because of the pressure exerted by the demand side to bring knowledge within the reach of the man in the street— involves recognizing science and technology issues should not be conveyed in a language increasingly distanced from layman’s understanding and should allow for citizens’ critical thinking formation face to techno-scientific developments. By analysing the communication approaches mentioned above, we found significant obstacles to be overcome in the communication strategies applied by museum staff in order to come to an understanding of science and technology.

  8. Complexity, public reporting, and choice of doctors: a look inside the blackest box of consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Mark; Kanouse, David E; Martino, Steven C; Shaller, Dale; Rybowski, Lise

    2014-10-01

    Health care consumers often make choices that are imperfectly informed and inconsistent with their expressed preferences. Past research suggests that these shortcomings become more pronounced as choices become more complex, through either additional options or more performance metrics. But it is unclear why this is true: Consumer choice remains a "black box" that research has scarcely illuminated. In this article, we identify four pathways through which complexity may impair consumer choice. We examine these pathways using data from an experiment in which consumers (hypothetically) selected a primary care physician. Some of the loss of decision quality accompanying more complex choice sets can be explained by consumers' skills and decision-making style, but even after accounting for these factors, complexity undermines the quality of decision making in ways that cannot be fully explained. We conclude by discussing implications for report designers, sponsors, and policy makers aspiring to promote consumer empowerment and health care quality. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Address Points, Points of Interest: AIRPORT_PRIVATE, AIRPORT_PUBLIC, ARMORY, ASSISTED LIVING, CAMPGROUND, CHILD CARE CENTERS, CHURCH, COLLEGE, COMMUNITY ENTRANCE, COMMUNITY REC CENTER, COURT, FARMERS MARKET, FIRE DEPT, GOVERNMENT BUILDING, HEALTH CENTER, HOSPITAL, etc, Published in 2011, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Anne Arundal County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Address Points dataset current as of 2011. Points of Interest: AIRPORT_PRIVATE, AIRPORT_PUBLIC, ARMORY, ASSISTED LIVING, CAMPGROUND, CHILD CARE CENTERS, CHURCH,...

  10. Metropolitan Transportation Management Center : a case study : Houston TranStar maximizing safety and mobility for the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    The following case study provides a snapshot of Houston's TranStar transportation management center. It follows the outline provided in the companion document, Metropolitan Transportation Management Center Concepts of Operation - A Cross Cutting Stud...

  11. Polynuclear complexes incorporating Cu(II) and Mn(II) centers bridged by acetylenedicarboxylate: Structure, thermal stability and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Min; Li, Ming-Xing; Dai, Hui; Lu, Wen-Cong; An, Bao-Li

    2007-03-01

    Two acetylenedicarboxylate complexes, [Mn 2(C 4O 4)(phen) 4(H 2O) 2](ClO 4) 2·H 2O ( 1) and [Cu(C 4O 4)(2,2'-bpy)] n ( 2), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses and IR spectra. Mn II ions have distorted octahedral coordination geometry and bridged by C 4O 42- to form a binuclear structure. Thermal analysis shows C 4O 42- released in the range of 180-280 °C. Cu II is five-coordinated by 2,2'-bipyridine and three oxygen atoms from three different C 4O 42- ligands, leading to a square-pyramidal coordination geometry. Each C 4O 42- links three Cu II centers through bifunctional carboxylate to form a polymeric structure of (4, 4) layers with nodes being dimer of Cu 2O 2 and bridges of C 4O 42-. Its variable-temperature magnetism was also investigated.

  12. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  13. Energy efficiency and acoustic comfort in Public Education Integrated Centers (PEICs); Eficiencia energetica e conforto acustico em CIEPs (Centros Intregrados de Educacao Publica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Mariane Brito; Goncalves, Aldo Carlos de Moura [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Fac. de Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Arquitetura], e-mail: mariane.azevedo@ufrj.br, e-mail: aldo@msl.com.br; Salama, Jules Ghislain [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: julessslama@msl.com.br

    2008-07-01

    This paper intends to analyse the situation of the Rio de Janeiro Public Education Integrated Centers (PEICs) and presents proposals for reducing the existing acoustic problem, due to their facades and divisors, trying to harmonize the natural ventilation with control of sound pollution.

  14. Peer-to-Peer JXTA Architecture for Continuing Mobile Medical Education Incorporated in Rural Public Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Rajkumar; Iyengar, Nallani Chackravatula Sriman Narayana

    2013-04-01

    Mobile technology helps to improve continuing medical education; this includes all aspects of public health care as well as keeping one's knowledge up-to-date. The program of continuing medical and health education is intertwined with mobile health technology, which forms an imperative component of national strategies in health. Continuing mobile medical education (CMME) programs are designed to ensure that all medical and health-care professionals stay up-to-date with the knowledge required through mobile JXTA to appraise modernized strategies so as to achieve national goals of health-care information distribution. In this study, a 20-item questionnaire was distributed to 280 health professionals practicing traditional training learning methodologies (180 nurses, 60 doctors, and 40 health inspectors) in 25 rural hospitals. Among the 83% respondents, 56% are eager to take new learning methodologies as part of their evaluation, which is considered for promotion to higher grades, increments, or as part of their work-related activities. The proposed model was executed in five public health centers in which nurses and health inspectors registered in the JXTA network were referred to the record peer group by administrators. A mobile training program on immunization was conducted through the ADVT, with the lectures delivered on their mobiles. Credits are given after taking the course and completing an evaluation test. The system is faster compared with traditional learning. Medical knowledge management and mobile-streaming application support the CMME system through JXTA. The mobile system includes online lectures and practice quizzes, as well as assignments and interactions with health professionals. Evaluation and assessments are done online and credits certificates are provided based on the score the student obtains. The acceptance of mobile JXTA peer-to-peer learning has created a drastic change in learning methods among rural health professionals. The professionals

  15. Public stigma against people with mental illness in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC in Southwest Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshetu Girma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Public understanding about mental illnesses and attitudes towards people with mental illness (PWMI play a paramount role in the prevention and treatment of mental illness and the rehabilitation of PWMI. The aim of this study was to measure public stigma against PWMI and the factors associated with stigma in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC in Southwest Ethiopia. METHODS: This community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted from June to August 2012 among 845 randomly selected respondents by using the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI scale, an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data was entered with EPI-DATA and then exported to STATA for analysis. Simple descriptive and linear regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of stigma against PWMI. RESULTS: Of the total of 845 respondents, 68.17% were from rural districts. The mean stigma score was 2.62 on a 5-point score. The majority of the respondents (75.27% believed that mental illness can be cured. Stress, poverty, and rumination were the most often perceived causes of mental illness. Rural residents had significantly higher stigma scores (std. β = 0.61, P<0.001. A statistically significant inverse relationship was found between the level of education and degree of stigma (std. β = -0.14, P<0.01, while higher income was significantly associated with more stigma (std. β = 0.07, P<0.05. Respondents with higher scores for perceived supernatural causes (std. β = -0.09, P<0.01 and perceived psychosocial and biological causes (std. β = -0.14, P<0.001 had significantly lower stigma levels. CONCLUSIONS: The study found a more undermining but less avoidant attitude towards PWMI. Rural residents showed higher levels of stigma. Stigma against PWMI was lower in people with an explanatory concept about the causes of mental illness and a higher level of education. Information, education, and communication about the

  16. Elements for Critical and Complex Research of Public Opinion in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Andrés Venegas Vergara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss and propose theoretical elements considered relevant to open and develop a theoretical-empiric line of research on the public opinion (PO in Chile today. We suggest that there are different conceptions, practices and actors involved in “making PO”, recognizing five areas in this field: media system, subaltern counter-publics, social digital networks, survey industry and elites. In each of these areas it is necessary to inquire into their specific actors, practices and senses mobilized in the process of production of PO.The paper focuses on discussing the development of the main current comprehensive modalities of the PO and presenting a conceptual proposal for each of the five areas described above, as well as a brief characterization of these areas in Chile. We consider these definitions as a basic starting point to habilitate a line of research that allows us to design a device for monitoring PO. The device will be hosted at the PO observatory and it will contribute to activate networks of knowledge and action in the public sphere by providing periodically with public information regarding issues of general interest to the actors involved in the production of PO.

  17. Public Safety Networks--Examining Mimetic, Complexity, and Legacy Effects on Interorganizational Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Martin A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine information systems-enabled interorganizational collaborations called public safety networks--their proliferation, information systems architecture, and technology evolution. These networks face immense pressures from member organizations, external stakeholders, and environmental contingencies. This…

  18. Association between parity and dentition status among Japanese women: Japan public health center-based oral health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Ohara, Satoko; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2013-10-22

    Several studies have shown that parity is associated with oral health problems such as tooth loss and dental caries. In Japan, however, no studies have examined the association. The purpose of this study was to determine whether parity is related to dentition status, including the number of teeth present, dental caries and filled teeth, and the posterior occlusion, in a Japanese population by comparing women with men. A total of 1,211 subjects, who participated both in the Japan Public Health Center-Based (JPHC) Study Cohort I in 1990 and the dental survey in 2005, were used for the study. Information on parity or number of children was collected from a self-completed questionnaire administered in 1990 for the JPHC Study Cohort I, and health behaviors and clinical dentition status were obtained from the dental survey in 2005. The association between parity or number of children and dentition status was analyzed, by both unadjusted-for and adjusted-for socio-demographic and health behavioral factors, using a generalized linear regression model. Parity is significantly related to the number of teeth present and n-FTUs (Functional Tooth Units of natural teeth), regardless of socio-demographic and health behavioral factors, in female subjects. The values of these variables had a significantly decreasing trend with the rise of parity: numbers of teeth present (p for trend = 0.046) and n-FTUs (p for trend = 0.026). No relationships between the number of children and dentition status were found in male subjects. Higher-parity women are more likely to lose teeth, especially posterior occluding relations. These results suggest that measures to narrow the discrepancy by parity should be taken for promoting women's oral health. Delivery of appropriate information and messages to pregnant women as well as enlightenment of oral health professionals about dental management of pregnant women may be an effective strategy.

  19. Dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanri, A; Shimazu, T; Takachi, R; Ishihara, J; Mizoue, T; Noda, M; Inoue, M; Tsugane, S

    2013-01-01

    Dietary patterns in Western populations have been linked to type 2 diabetes, but the association of distinctive dietary patterns of Japanese population remains unclear. We prospectively investigated the association between dietary patterns and risk of developing type 2 diabetes among Japanese adults. Participants were 27, 816 men and 36,889 women aged 45-74 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study and had no history of diabetes. Dietary patterns were derived by using principal component analysis of the consumption of 134 food and beverage items ascertained by a food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios of self-reported physician-diagnosed type 2 diabetes over 5 year were estimated using logistic regression analysis. A total of 1194 new cases (692 men and 502 women) of type 2 diabetes were self-reported. We identified three dietary patterns: prudent, westernized and traditional Japanese patterns. Any dietary pattern was not significantly associated with type 2 diabetes risk after adjustment for covariates in both men and women. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for type 2 diabetes for the highest versus lowest quartile of each dietary pattern score in men and women, respectively, were 0.93 (0.74-1.16) and 0.90 (0.69-1.16) for the prudent pattern, 1.15 (0.90-1.46) and 0.81 (0.61-1.08) for the westernized pattern, and 0.97 (0.74-1.27) and 0.87 (0.66-1.15) for the traditional pattern. Although a small protective effect of the prudent dietary pattern cannot be excluded, dietary patterns may not be appreciably associated with type 2 diabetes risk in Japanese.

  20. Social support and suicide in Japanese men and women - the Japan Public Health Center (JPHC)-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Matsushita, Yumi; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2011-12-01

    Although the important role of social support in mental health is acknowledged, no prospective study has yet examined the relation of social support to suicide. Here, we investigated the association between social support and suicide in a cohort of Japanese men and women. A total of 26,672 men and 29,865 women aged 40-69 years enrolled in the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study in 1993-1994 completed a self-administered questionnaire which included four items of social support, and were followed for death through December 2005. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of suicidal death by social support index were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. A total of 180 suicidal deaths were recorded during an average of 12 years' follow-up. Men and women with the highest level of social support had a significantly decreased risk of suicide, with HRs (95% CI) for the highest versus lowest social support group of 0.56 (0.33-0.94) and 0.38 (0.16-0.89) in men and women, respectively. Esteem support and having four or more friends were associated with a lower risk of suicide in women [0.32 (0.13-0.77)] and in both sexes [men: 0.56 (0.36-0.88); women: 0.65 (0.32-1.30)], respectively, whereas confident support was not. These findings suggest that social support may be important for suicide prevention. Avoiding social isolation may decrease the incidence of suicide in men and women, and esteem support can provide additional benefit for women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Profile and prevalence of HBV among HIV affected individuals attending the largest public HIV care center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Suneeta; Girish Kumar, C P; Selvaraj, V; Prabu, R; Chandrasekar, C; Valan, A S; Suria Kumar, J; Raja, K

    2016-09-01

    A large number of people living with HIV/AIDS residing in HBV endemic regions such as in India are highly susceptible to acquire co-infections like HBV but also transmit them to other due to their high risk behaviours. The present study aimed to estimate HBV prevalence and distribution of various HBV serological markers among HIV infected individuals. This cross sectional survey covered HIV infected individuals attending the largest HIV care center in India. Socio-demographic details and blood samples to screen for HBV seromarkers using commercial ELISA kits were collected. Among 1160 HIV infected patients, prevalence of HBcAb, HBsAb, HBsAg and HBeAg was 66, 29.4, 16.6 and 5.8 % respectively. Overall, 28.9 % individuals had no evidence of any of the four markers, indicating lack of previous exposure and future risk of acquiring HBV infection. Presence of anti-HBsAg in a mere 0.9 % of individuals reflected low levels HBV vaccine conferred immunity which could be due to poor HBV vaccine coverage in this high risk population. With high prevalence and evidence of exposure to HBV as well as considering the growing literature on increase in hepatic complications in HIV-HBV co-infected individuals, the need for mandatory HBV screening of all HIV infected individuals cannot be over-emphasised. The policy makers and HIV programme managers must consider HBV vaccination for newly detected HBV naive HIV infected individuals and also focus on creating public awareness on HBV and HIV prevention.

  2. Fish intake and type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Yumi; Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Kato, Masayuki; Oba, Shino; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2011-09-01

    Although fish intake can improve glucose metabolism, results of some prospective studies in Western populations suggest potential adverse effects of environmental contaminants in fish on type 2 diabetes risk. However, data from populations with high fish consumption are scarce. We prospectively investigated the association between fish intake and type 2 diabetes risk in Japanese adults. The participants were 22,921 men and 29,759 women aged 45-75 y who completed a questionnaire of the second survey for the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study and who had no history of diabetes. Diet was ascertained by using a 147-item food-frequency questionnaire. ORs of self-reported, physician-diagnosed type 2 diabetes over 5 y were estimated by using logistic regression. During the 5-y period, 971 new cases (572 men and 399 women) of type 2 diabetes were self-reported. In men, fish intake was significantly associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes; multivariable-adjusted ORs of type 2 diabetes for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of intake were 0.73 (95% CI: 0.54, 1.00; P-trend = 0.04) for total fish and seafood and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50, 0.92; P-trend = 0.016) for small and medium fish (horse mackerel and sardine, saury and mackerel, and eel). Additional analysis by fat content of fish did not detect any significant association for each category. In women, fish intake was not appreciably associated with type 2 diabetes risk. In a population with high fish and seafood intake, fish consumption was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in men but not in women.

  3. Educational Levels and Risk of Suicide in Japan: The Japan Public Health Center Study (JPHC) Cohort I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takashi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Honjo, Kaori; Ikehara, Satoyo; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-06-05

    Suicide rates have been related to educational level and other socioeconomic statuses. However, no prospective study has examined the association between educational level and the risk of suicide in Japan. We examined the association of education level and suicide risk in a population-based cohort of Japanese men and women aged 40-59 years in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Cohort I. In the baseline survey initiated in 1990, a total of 46 156 subjects (21 829 men and 24 327 women) completed a self-administered questionnaire, which included a query of educational level, and were followed up until the end of December 2011. Educational levels were categorized into four groups (junior high school, high school, junior or career college, and university or higher education). During a median follow-up of 21.6 years, the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of suicide according to educational level were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for age; study area; previous history of stroke, ischemic heart disease, or cancer; self-reported stress; alcohol consumption; smoking; living with spouse; and employment status. A total of 299 deaths attributed to suicide occurred. The HR for university graduates or those with higher education versus junior high school graduates was 0.47 (95% CI, 0.24-0.94) in men, and that for high school graduates versus junior high school graduates was 0.44 (95% CI, 0.24-0.79) in women. High educational levels were associated with a reduced risk of suicide for both Japanese men and women.

  4. Applying the PDCA Cycle to the Complex Task of Teaching and Assessing Public Relations Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John E.; Allen, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Teaching skills, knowledge and abilities appropriate for career-ready graduates and assessing learning are complex issues. Developing a valid and reliable approach is often by trial and error. Instead, the authors employed Deming's PDCA Cycle of continuous improvement as a systematic procedure to incrementally move closer to their goal. This paper…

  5. Ambiguities in the Early Stages of Public Sector Enterprise Architecture Implementation: Outlining Complexities of Interoperability

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    Part 4: Architecture, Security and Interoperability; International audience; In recent years the development of eGovernment has increasingly gone from service provision to striving for an interoperable public sector, with Enterprise Architectures being an increasingly popular approach. However, a central issue is the coordination of work, due to differing perceptions among involved actors. This paper provides a deepened understanding of this by addressing the question of how differing interpr...

  6. A routine method to determine the chlorophyll a, pheophytin a and B-carotene contents of isolated photosystem II reaction center complexes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijckelhoff, C.; Dekker, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The most simple way in which the stoichiometry of chlorophyll a, pheophytin a and ̄-carotene in isolated Photosystem II reaction center complexes can be determined is by analysis of the spectrum of the extracted pigments in 80% acetone. We present two different calculation methods using the

  7. Genotypic and Phenotypic Correlations of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-A. calcoaceticus Complex Strains Isolated from Patients at the National Naval Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex (ABC) infections have complicated the care of U.S. combat casualties. In this study, 102 ABC isolates from wounded soldiers treated at National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) were characterized by phenotype and genotype to identify clones in this population...

  8. The Role of Wrist Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in Diagnosing Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears; Experience at King Hussein Medical Center, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem A. Al-Hiari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of the study were to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA of the wrist in detecting full-thickness tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and to compare the results of the magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA with the gold standard arthroscopic findings. Methods:The study was performed at King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan, between January 2008 and December 2011. A total of 42 patients (35 males and 7 females who had ulnar-sided wrist pain and clinical suspicions of TFCC tears were included in the study. All patients underwent wrist magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA and then a wrist arthroscopy. The results of MRA were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results: After comparison with the arthroscopic findings, the MRA had three false-negative results (sensitivity = 93% and no false-positive results. A total of 39 patients were able to return to work. Satisfaction was high in 38 of the patients and 33 had satisfactorypain relief. The sensitivity of the wrist MRA in detecting TFCC full-thickness tears was 93% (39, and specificity was 80% (16/20. The overall accuracy of wrist arthroscopy in detecting a full-thickness tear of the TFCC in our study was 85% (29/34. Conclusion: These results illustrate the role of wrist MRA in assessing the TFCC pathology and suggest its use as the first imaging technique, following a plain X-ray, in evaluating patients with chronic ulnar side wrist pain with suspected TFCC injuries.

  9. Institutional complexity: a bibliometric on recent publication in institutional theory [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2016009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Reis da Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this bibliometric study we discuss the institutional complexity in eleven journals in business administration and organization studies. We try to identify the main features of the present Institutional Theory discussion in organization theory. The main research techniques we used were citation, co-citation, factorial bibliometric analysis and multidimensional scaling to identify the most influential studies and the main themes that are interwoven in institutional complexity (institutional logics, conflicts, changes and identity. The sample consisted of 43 articles and more than 3000 references cited. The most cited works were grouped into three factors that represent the emergent topics in institutional complexity. The results show the emergence of a new set of important concepts in the context of the institutional theory, such as institutional logics, conflict, change, identity, strategy. That set of concepts is diverse from that one typical of the institutionalism in organizations, in the 90´s. Complementarily, we identify authors and papers that can be considered central in organizational institutionalism, according to the journals that we take as part of our sample.

  10. Potential prescription patterns and errors in elderly adult patients attending public primary health care centers in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Corona-Rojo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available José Antonio Corona-Rojo1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Laura Vázquez-Cervantes1, Edilberto Pérez-Montoya2, Consuelo Rubio-Poo31Division of Biological Sciences and Health, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Xochimilco (UAM-X, Xochimilco, México; 2National Polytechnical Institute (IPN, México DF; 3Faculty of Higher Studies – Zaragoza (FES-Zaragoza, National Autonomous University of México (UNAM, México City, MéxicoIntroduction: Six out of every 10 elderly persons live in developing countries.Objective: To analyze and assess the drug prescription patterns and errors in elderly outpatients attending public health care centers in Mexico City, Mexico.Materials and methods: A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 2007. Fourteen hundred prescriptions were analyzed. Prescriptions of ambulatory adults aged >70 years who were residents of Mexico City for at least two years were included. Prescription errors were divided into two groups: (1 administrative and legal, and (2 pharmacotherapeutic. In group 2, we analyzed drug dose strength, administration route, frequency of drug administration, treatment length, potential drug–drug interactions, and contraindications. Variables were classified as correct or incorrect based on clinical literature. Variables for each drug were dichotomized as correct (0 or incorrect (1. A Prescription Index (PI was calculated by considering each drug on the prescription. SPSS statistical software was used to process the collected data (95% confidence interval; p < 0.05.Results: The drug prescription pattern in elderly outpatients shows that 12 drugs account for 70.72% (2880 of prescribed drugs. The most prescribed drugs presented potential pharmacotherapeutic errors (as defined in the present study. Acetylsalicylic acid–captopril was the most common potential interaction (not clinically assessed. Potential prescription error was high (53% of total prescriptions. Most

  11. Adapting, piloting and evaluating complex public health interventions: lessons learned from the Nurse-Family Partnership in Canadian public health settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP is a home-visit program for young and first-time, socially and economically disadvantaged mothers. Evidence from three United States randomized controlled trials (RCTs on the effectiveness of this intervention at improving pregnancy outcomes, improving child health and development, and increasing maternal economic self-sufficiency is robust. However, the effectiveness of the NFP in Canada, with its different health and social care context, needs to be determined. The purpose of this article is to describe the complex process for moving the NFP from the research arena to full implementation in Canada. Methods: This process of evaluation in Canada includes (1 adapting the intervention; (2 piloting the intervention in small-scale feasibility and acceptability studies; and (3 conducting an RCT and process evaluation through a study called the British Columbia Healthy Connections Project (BCHCP. This large-scale evaluation also creates an opportunity to expand the NFP evidence base by conducting an additional study to examine potential biological mechanisms linking intervention and behavioural outcomes in children. Results: Adaptation of the NFP home-visit materials is a continuous process. A pilot project determined that it was feasible to enrol eligible women into the NFP. This pilot also determined that, in Canada, it was most appropriate for public health agencies to implement the NFP and for public health nurses to deliver the intervention. Finally, the pilot showed that this intensive home-visit program was acceptable to clients, their family members and health care providers. Through the BCHCP, the next steps—the RCT and process evaluation—are currently underway. The BCHCP will also set the foundation for long-term evaluation of key public health outcomes in a highly vulnerable population of families.

  12. Adapting, piloting and evaluating complex public health interventions: lessons learned from the Nurse–Family Partnership in Canadian public health settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, S. M.; Catherine, N.; Gonzalez, A.; MacMillan, H. L.; Sheehan, D.; Waddell, C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The Nurse–Family Partnership (NFP) is a home-visit program for young and first-time, socially and economically disadvantaged mothers. Evidence from three United States randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of this intervention at improving pregnancy outcomes, improving child health and development, and increasing maternal economic self-sufficiency is robust. However, the effectiveness of the NFP in Canada, with its different health and social care context, needs to be determined. The purpose of this article is to describe the complex process for moving the NFP from the research arena to full implementation in Canada. Methods: This process of evaluation in Canada includes (1) adapting the intervention; (2) piloting the intervention in small-scale feasibility and acceptability studies; and (3) conducting an RCT and process evaluation through a study called the British Columbia Healthy Connections Project (BCHCP). This large-scale evaluation also creates an opportunity to expand the NFP evidence base by conducting an additional study to examine potential biological mechanisms linking intervention and behavioural outcomes in children. Results: Adaptation of the NFP home-visit materials is a continuous process. A pilot project determined that it was feasible to enrol eligible women into the NFP. This pilot also determined that, in Canada, it was most appropriate for public health agencies to implement the NFP and for public health nurses to deliver the intervention. Finally, the pilot showed that this intensive home-visit program was acceptable to clients, their family members and health care providers. Through the BCHCP, the next steps—the RCT and process evaluation—are currently underway. The BCHCP will also set the foundation for long-term evaluation of key public health outcomes in a highly vulnerable population of families. PMID:26605564

  13. Adapting, piloting and evaluating complex public health interventions: lessons learned from the Nurse-Family Partnership in Canadian public health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, S M; Catherine, N; Gonzalez, A; MacMillan, H L; Sheehan, D; Waddell, D

    2015-01-01

    The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) is a home-visit program for young and first-time, socially and economically disadvantaged mothers. Evidence from three United States randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of this intervention at improving pregnancy outcomes, improving child health and development, and increasing maternal economic self-sufficiency is robust. However, the effectiveness of the NFP in Canada, with its different health and social care context, needs to be determined. The purpose of this article is to describe the complex process for moving the NFP from the research arena to full implementation in Canada. This process of evaluation in Canada includes (1) adapting the intervention; (2) piloting the intervention in small-scale feasibility and acceptability studies; and (3) conducting an RCT and process evaluation through a study called the British Columbia Healthy Connections Project (BCHCP). This large-scale evaluation also creates an opportunity to expand the NFP evidence base by conducting an additional study to examine potential biological mechanisms linking intervention and behavioural outcomes in children. Adaptation of the NFP home-visit materials is a continuous process. A pilot project determined that it was feasible to enrol eligible women into the NFP. This pilot also determined that, in Canada, it was most appropriate for public health agencies to implement the NFP and for public health nurses to deliver the intervention. Finally, the pilot showed that this intensive home-visit program was acceptable to clients, their family members and health care providers. Through the BCHCP, the next steps - the RCT and process evaluation - are currently underway. The BCHCP will also set the foundation for long-term evaluation of key public health outcomes in a highly vulnerable population of families.

  14. Treatment of breast cancer patients from a public healthcare system in a private center: costs of care for a pilot public-private partnership in oncology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha; Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Bognar, Cinthia Leite Frizzera Borges; Santos, Kelly Cristine Carvalho; Bromberg, Sílvio Eduardo; Amaral, Paulo Gustavo Tenório do; Karnakis, Theodora; Chen, Michael; Andrade, Cláudia Toledo de; Dantas, Joacira; Escobosa, Daísa de Mesquita; Del Giglio, Auro

    2013-01-01

    To describe the flow and costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of patients with breast cancer who come from the public healthcare system and were treated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein...

  15. How to prove the validity of a complex ballot encryption to the voter and the public

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim, Rui

    2014-01-01

    One crucial aspect of any verifiable electronic voting system that uses encryption is the proof that the vote encryption is well-formed, i.e. the proof that the vote encryption encrypts a valid vote accordingly to the race specification. It makes no sense accepting an encrypted vote if, at the end of the election, the vote cannot be included in the tally because it is badly formed. Proving the validity of a complex vote encryption, without revealing the vote, is a hard problem. This paper...

  16. Academic-health department collaborative relationships are reciprocal and strengthen public health practice: results from a study of academic research centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Elizabeth M; Ballman, Marie R; Lu, Hua; Greenlund, Kurt J; Grunbaum, Jo Anne

    2014-01-01

    Collaborations between academic institutions and state and local health departments have been shown to enhance the public health core functions of Assurance by improving the public health workforce's knowledge and skills. Few studies have analyzed how academic-health department collaborations enhance Assessment and Policy Development core functions. This qualitative study explores types of collaborations between health departments and Prevention Research Centers (PRCs) and how they align with the core functions. Prevention Research Centers are academic institutions funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to conduct public health research and translate research results for policies and practices. We reviewed each PRC's annual report from fiscal year 2011 and abstracted descriptions of PRC-health department collaborations. We identified 14 themes of PRC-health department collaborations and conducted a qualitative analysis to describe the dimensions and distribution of themes. Of the 37 PRCs, 36 reported 215 collaborations with 19 city, 97 county, 31 state, and 46 tribal health departments. Themes of research, survey, and surveillance aligned with the Assessment core function and evaluation, strategic planning, technical assistance, and program implementation supported the Policy Development and Assurance core functions. Overall, health departments provided on-the-ground expertise to inform PRC research, ensuring its applicability to public health practice. Reciprocally, PRCs improved data quality, increased the scientific rigor of health department processes and programs, and filled knowledge gaps within health departments. Both PRCs and health departments enhanced the relevance of public health programs and practices by grounding implementation and evaluation in community needs and views. Findings from this study demonstrate that PRC-health department collaborations often enhanced multiple core functions that could lead to implementation of evidence

  17. Collecting and analysing cost data for complex public health trials: reflections on practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batura, Neha; Pulkki-Brännström, Anni-Maria; Agrawal, Priya; Bagra, Archana; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Bozzani, Fiammetta; Colbourn, Tim; Greco, Giulia; Hossain, Tanvir; Sinha, Rajesh; Thapa, Bidur; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for the conduct of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) are mainly applicable to facility-based interventions in high-income settings. Differences in the unit of analysis and the high cost of data collection can make these guidelines challenging to follow within public health trials in low- and middle- income settings. Objective This paper reflects on the challenges experienced within our own work and proposes solutions that may be useful to others attempting to collect, analyse, and compare cost data between public health research sites in low- and middle-income countries. Design We describe the generally accepted methods (norms) for collecting and analysing cost data in a single-site trial from the provider perspective. We then describe our own experience applying these methods within eight comparable cluster randomised, controlled, trials. We describe the strategies used to maximise adherence to the norm, highlight ways in which we deviated from the norm, and reflect on the learning and limitations that resulted. Results When the expenses incurred by a number of small research sites are used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of delivering an intervention on a national scale, then deciding which expenses constitute ‘start-up’ costs will be a nontrivial decision that may differ among sites. Similarly, the decision to include or exclude research or monitoring and evaluation costs can have a significant impact on the findings. We separated out research costs and argued that monitoring and evaluation costs should be reported as part of the total trial cost. The human resource constraints that we experienced are also likely to be common to other trials. As we did not have an economist in each site, we collaborated with key personnel at each site who were trained to use a standardised cost collection tool. This approach both accommodated our resource constraints and served as a knowledge sharing and capacity building process within the

  18. Detecting themes of public concern: a text mining analysis of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Ebola live Twitter chat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Allison J; Scheinfeld, Emily; Bernhardt, Jay M; Wilcox, Gary B; Suran, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    A diagnosis of Ebola on US soil triggered widespread panic. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a live Twitter chat to address public concerns. This study applied a textual analytics method to reveal insights from these tweets that can inform communication strategies. User-generated tweets were collected, sorted, and analyzed to reveal major themes. The public was concerned with symptoms and lifespan of the virus, disease transfer and contraction, safe travel, and protection of one's body. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's ... Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff ...

  20. Menaquinone-7 in the reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme functions as the electron acceptor A1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, B; Frigaard, N-U; Yang, F

    1998-01-01

    Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules of menaqui......Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules...... of menaquinone-7/reaction center. No other quinones were detected in the isolated reaction centers, whereas membrane preparations also contained chlorobiumquinone. The possible involvement of quinones in electron transport was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. A highly.......7 mT, consistent with its identification as a quinone. This spectrum is highly similar in terms of g values and line widths to photoaccumulated A1- in photosystem I of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. The results indicate that menaquinone-7 in the green sulfur bacterial reaction center is analogous...

  1. Bipolar Alq{sub 3}-based complexes: Effect of hole-transporting substituent on the properties of Alq{sub 3}-center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Jianxin [Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Department of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Institute of Technology, Hengyang, Hunan 421002 (China); Lu Mangeng, E-mail: mglu@gic.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Yang Chaolong [Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Tong Bihai [Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China); Liang Liyan [Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Two bipolar Alq{sub 3}-based complexes, tris{l_brace}5-[(carbazole-9'-yl)methyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline{r_brace} aluminum (Al(CzHQ){sub 3}) and tris{l_brace}5-[(phenothiazine-9'-yl)methyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline{r_brace} aluminum (Al(PHQ){sub 3}), involving an Alq{sub 3}-center and three hole-transporting substituents (carbazole or phenothiazine), were prepared and characterized. Effects of hole-transporting substituent on the properties of Alq{sub 3}-center were investigated in detail. It is found that the two complexes have improved hole-transporting performance and appropriate thermal stability (the 5%-weight-loss temperatures T{sub 5%}>260 Degree-Sign C). Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that both energy transfer and electron transfer can take place simultaneously in the PL process of these complexes. Both thermodynamics and dynamics of the electron transfer were studied and corresponding parameters were calculated. Energy transfer is favorable for the PL of Alq{sub 3}-center, while electron transfer is unfavorable for the PL of Alq{sub 3}-center. These results will be useful to explore novel OLEDs material with increased efficiency. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of substituent on the properties of Alq{sub 3}-center were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer and electron transfer can transfer from substituent to Alq{sub 3}-center. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermodynamics and dynamics of electron transfer were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanisms of PL and EL of Al(CzHQ){sub 3} were studied and compared with each other.

  2. Electroreduction of CO 2 Catalyzed by a Heterogenized Zn–Porphyrin Complex with a Redox-Innocent Metal Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yueshen; Jiang, Jianbing; Weng, Zhe; Wang, Maoyu; Broere, Daniël L.J.; Zhong, Yiren; Brudvig, Gary W.; Feng, Zhenxing; Wang, Hailiang (Yale); (Oregon State U.)

    2017-07-26

    Transition-metal-based molecular complexes are a class of catalyst materials for electrochemical CO2 reduction to CO that can be rationally designed to deliver high catalytic performance. One common mechanistic feature of these electrocatalysts developed thus far is an electrogenerated reduced metal center associated with catalytic CO2 reduction. Here we report a heterogenized zinc–porphyrin complex (zinc(II) 5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin) as an electrocatalyst that delivers a turnover frequency as high as 14.4 site–1 s–1 and a Faradaic efficiency as high as 95% for CO2 electroreduction to CO at -1.7 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode in an organic/water mixed electrolyte. While the Zn center is critical to the observed catalysis, in situ and operando X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies reveal that it is redox-innocent throughout the potential range. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that the porphyrin ligand may act as a redox mediator. Chemical reduction of the zinc–porphyrin complex further confirms that the reduction is ligand-based and the reduced species can react with CO2. This represents the first example of a transition-metal complex for CO2 electroreduction catalysis with its metal center being redox-innocent under working conditions.

  3. Supporting the Social Media Needs of Emergency Public Information Officers with Human-Centered Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amanda Lee

    2012-01-01

    Emergency response agencies, which operate as command-and-control organizations, push information to members of the public with too few mechanisms to support communication flowing back. Recently, information communication technologies (ICTs) such as social media have challenged this one-way model by allowing the public to participate in emergency…

  4. Laparoscopic Repair of Primary Inguinal Hernia Performed in Public Hospitals or Low-Volume Centers Have Increased Risk of Reoperation for Recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Kristoffer; Friis-Andersen, Hans; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inguinal hernia repair is traditionally carried out as either open or laparoscopic repair. Laparoscopic repair has been shown to be superior in terms of pain and discomfort, but has a higher risk of reoperation. Quality of inguinal hernia repair is related to factors such as method...... of care. METHODS: This study was based on data from the Danish Hernia Database covering the period from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2013. Hernia repairs included in this study were laparoscopic repair of primary, inguinal hernias in the elective setting, performed on adult male patients. RESULTS...... reoperation rate compared with public centers: 5.36% versus 8.53%, P ≤ .0001. Type of center and center volume were both independent risk factors for reoperation in a Cox regression model. CONCLUSION: Hospital volume had an effect on the reoperation rate for recurrence after laparoscopic inguinal hernia...

  5. The structure of the muscle protein complex 4Ca{sup 2+} {center_dot}troponin C {center_dot} troponin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olah, G.A.; Trewhella, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of scattering data based on a Monte Carlo integration method was used to 2+ obtain a low resolution model of the 4Ca{sup 2+}{circ} troponin C{circ}troponin I complex. This modeling method allows rapid testing of plausible structures where the best fit model can be ascertained by a comparison between model structure scattering profiles and measured scattering data. In the best fit model, troponin I appears as a spiral structure 2+ that wraps around 4Ca{sup 2+}{circ}troponin C which adopts an extended dumbbell conformation similar to that observed in the crystal structures of troponin C. The Monte Carlo modeling method can be applied to other biological systems in which detailed structural information is lacking.

  6. Effect of oxygen impurity on the efficiency of the formation of complexes with H-bond and aggregation of color centers in lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebogin, S. A.; Bryukvina, L. I.; Ivanov, N. A.; Glazunov, D. S.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of impurities on the efficiency of the formation of color centers and hydrogen-bonded molecular complexes upon exposure to various radiations in lithium fluoride crystals grown in air is studied. The results of experiments for measuring optical properties, IR vibrational spectra, luminescence, and thermally stimulated luminescence are presented. The fact that the band in the range of 1800-2300 cm-1 corresponds to stretching vibrations of a complex with strong hydrogen bond is proved based on the Fermi-resonance perturbation in the region of 2080 cm-1, shaped as the Evans hole and bands A, B, and C. It is shown that the composition of these complexes includes an OH- ion and an HF molecule. The crucial role of O2‒ V a + oxygen dipoles in the aggregation efficiency and gradient distribution of color centers and radiation resistance of hydroxyl ions is revealed. It is shown that products of radiation decomposition of OH- ions stimulate, while decay of O2‒ V a + dipoles suppress, the formation of positively charged color centers.

  7. Critical roles of mTOR Complex 1 and 2 for T follicular helper cell differentiation and germinal center responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialong; Lin, Xingguang; Pan, Yun; Wang, Jinli; Chen, Pengcheng; Huang, Hongxiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Gao, Jimin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-09-30

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play critical roles for germinal center responses and effective humoral immunity. We report here that mTOR in CD4 T cells is essential for Tfh differentiation. In Mtor(f/f)-Cd4Cre mice, both constitutive and inducible Tfh differentiation is severely impaired, leading to defective germinal center B cell formation and antibody production. Moreover, both mTORC1 and mTORC2 contribute to Tfh and GC B cell development but may do so via distinct mechanisms. mTORC1 mainly promotes CD4 T cell proliferation to reach the cell divisions necessary for Tfh differentiation, while Rictor/mTORC2 regulates Tfh differentiation by promoting Akt activation and TCF1 expression without grossly influencing T cell proliferation. Together, our results reveal crucial but distinct roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in CD4 T cells during Tfh differentiation and germinal center responses.

  8. The Little Rascals Day Care Center Case: A Perspective on Medical Testimony in a Prominent Public Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jean C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three medical examiners involved in the Little Rascals Day Care Center (Edenton, NC) child sexual abuse case discuss their experiences. They were surprised to find themselves in an adversarial position against their peers, and the fact that medical evidence of child sexual abuse is controversial created difficulties that could not be solved in a…

  9. 78 FR 20928 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health: Health of Women Program; Public Workshop; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ...-representation of women in clinical trials Baseline differences in anatomy, physiology, risk factors, disease... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health: Health of Women...

  10. Characteristics of Public Elementary and Secondary School Library Media Centers in the United States: Results from the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey. First Look. NCES 2013-315

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Amy; Gray, Lucinda; Goldring, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This report presents selected findings from the Public School Library Media Center Data File of the 2011-12 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public and private K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. School districts associated with public schools…

  11. Micro practices of coordination based on complex adaptive systems: user needs and strategies for coordinating public health in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Deleuran Terkildsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many highly formalised approaches to coordination poorly fit public health and recent studies call for coordination based on complex adaptive systems. Our contribution is two-fold. Empirically, we focus on public health, and theoretically we build on the patient perspective and treat coordination as a process of contingent, two-level negotiations of user needs. Theory and Methods: The paper draws on the concept of user needs-based coordination and sees coordination as a process, whereby needs emerging from the life world of the user are made amenable to the health system through negotiations. The analysis is based on an explorative case study of a health promotion initiative in Denmark. It adopts an anthropological qualitative approach and uses a range of qualitative data. Results: The analysis identifies four strategies of coordination: the coordinator focusing on the individual user or on relations with other professionals; and the manager coaching the coordinator or providing structural support. Crucially, the coordination strategies by management remain weak as they do not directly relate to specific user needs. Discussion: In process of bottom-up negotiations user needs become blurred and this is especially a challenge for management. The study therefore calls for an increased focus on the level nature of negotiations to bridge the gap that currently weakens coordination strategies by management.

  12. Micro practices of coordination based on complex adaptive systems: user needs and strategies for coordinating public health in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Deleuran Terkildsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many highly formalised approaches to coordination poorly fit public health and recent studies call for coordination based on complex adaptive systems. Our contribution is two-fold. Empirically, we focus on public health, and theoretically we build on the patient perspective and treat coordination as a process of contingent, two-level negotiations of user needs.Theory and Methods: The paper draws on the concept of user needs-based coordination and sees coordination as a process, whereby needs emerging from the life world of the user are made amenable to the health system through negotiations. The analysis is based on an explorative case study of a health promotion initiative in Denmark. It adopts an anthropological qualitative approach and uses a range of qualitative data.Results: The analysis identifies four strategies of coordination: the coordinator focusing on the individual user or on relations with other professionals; and the manager coaching the coordinator or providing structural support. Crucially, the coordination strategies by management remain weak as they do not directly relate to specific user needs.Discussion: In process of bottom-up negotiations user needs become blurred and this is especially a challenge for management. The study therefore calls for an increased focus on the level nature of negotiations to bridge the gap that currently weakens coordination strategies by management.

  13. Playing the Lynx: Creating The Writer's Complex as a Virtual Writing Center for Students at a Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Elaine; Oaks, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the planning and implementation of an online writing center for adult students of SUNY Empire State College, a non-residential, independent-study distance-learning institution. Highlights informational and facilitative properties of hypertext and the need for a personalized instructor "voice." Components of the program included…

  14. Managing scientific complexity in public policy: the case of U.S. climate change legislation in the 111th Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. A.; Runci, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent passage of the American Climate and Energy Security Act by the U.S. House of Representatives in June of this year was a landmark in U.S. efforts to move climate change legislation through Congress. Although an historic achievement, the bill (and surrounding debate) highlights many concerns about the processes by which lawmakers and the public inform themselves about scientifically relevant problems and, subsequently, by which policy responses are crafted in a context of complexity, uncertainty, and competition for resources and attention. In light of the ever-increasing specialization of expertise in the sciences and other technical fields, and the inherent complexity of scientifically relevant problems such as climate change, society faces significant hurdles in its efforts to integrate knowledge and develop sufficient understanding of these problems to which it must respond with legislation or other effective collective or individual action. The emergence of a new class of experts who act as science-policy brokers may not be sufficient to cross these hurdles. Herein, we explore how society and the scientific community in particular can work toward closing the ever-growing gap between technical knowledge and society’s ability to comprehend and use it. Both authors are currently legislative fellows working on energy and climate change issues in the U.S. Senate.

  15. Examples of applied public health through the work of the Epidemic Intelligence Service officers at CDC's National Center for Environmental Health: 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Yulia I; Rashid, Fauzia A; Falk, Henry; Howley, Meredith M

    2017-01-01

    The Epidemic Intelligence Service officers (EISOs) at the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) respond to public health outbreaks, assist public health surveillance, and recommend public health actions. We summarize the breadth of work done by EISOs assigned to NCEH/ATSDR during 2006-2015. We used the Web of Science, Scopus, and PubMed databases to identify articles authored by the EISOs, number and types of epidemiologic assistance field investigations (Epi-Aids), and interviewed NCEH/ATSDR programs with EISO assignees. The largest number of NCEH/ATSDR EISO publications (n = 61) and Epi-Aids (n = 110) related to toxic chemicals (23 and 37, respectively), followed by natural disasters and those caused by humans (19 and 25, respectively), extreme temperature-related illness (9), and chronic diseases (8). The investigations raised awareness, identified risk factors and public health needs, and introduced better prevention and protection measures for human health. Through field investigations and other technical assistance, NCEH/ATSDR provided leadership and staff scientists to assist in the field, as well as knowledge transfer to local, state, territorial, and international health departments.

  16. [Nasopharyngeal Hib Carriage Among Healthy Children Attending Daycare Centers in Yokohama After One Year of a Publicly Funded Vaccine Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ayako; Sumita, Hiroko; Minohara, Yutaka; Fujita, Shinji; Yazaki, Shigeyoshi; Kitamura, Miyoshi; Kawai, Shigehiko; Kamata, Kazumi; Oota, Yoshimi; Yamada, Mikiko; Matsumoto, Yuko; Takeyasu, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Yokohama city started a regular, free vaccine program for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) from February of 2011. This study was completed to verify the effectiveness of the vaccine on the nasopharyngeal Hib carriage among healthy children attending daycare centers in the Isogo area. The research was conducted during the late spring (Jun--Jul) and fall (Oct-Nov) of 2012. There was a significant decrease in the Hib carriage rate (spring 8.8%, fall 1.6%). During this period there was no increase in the Hib vaccine coverage. The Hib carriage rate of each daycare center was 0-18.4% in spring and 0-4.9% in fall. There was no significant relationship between the rate of non immunized children and that of Hib carriage. This improvement in nasopharyngeal Hib carriage shows the impact of community immunity.

  17. Catalog of Authorized Subjects for Community Adult Schools and Occupational Centers: Graduation Requirements and Curricula. Publication No. AC-100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA. Div. of Career and Continuing Education.

    The catalog contains descriptions of approved courses in the Los Angeles City Schools, course numbers, and amounts of high school credit that may be earned. These courses are classified into nine areas: academic, business, civic and public services, elementary and citizenship, fine arts and crafts, health, homemaking, industrial (subdivided into…

  18. User-Centered Design of a Tablet Waiting Room Tool for Complex Patients to Prioritize Discussion Topics for Primary Care Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Courtney R; Altschuler, Andrea; Chawla, Neetu; Kowalski, Christine; McQuillan, Deanna; Bayliss, Elizabeth; Heisler, Michele; Grant, Richard W

    2016-09-14

    Complex patients with multiple chronic conditions often face significant challenges communicating and coordinating with their primary care physicians. These challenges are exacerbated by the limited time allotted to primary care visits. Our aim was to employ a user-centered design process to create a tablet tool for use by patients for visit discussion prioritization. We employed user-centered design methods to create a tablet-based waiting room tool that enables complex patients to identify and set discussion topic priorities for their primary care visit. In an iterative design process, we completed one-on-one interviews with 40 patients and their 17 primary care providers, followed by three design sessions with a 12-patient group. We audiorecorded and transcribed all discussions and categorized major themes. In addition, we met with 15 key health communication, education, and technology leaders within our health system to further review the design and plan for broader implementation of the tool. In this paper, we present the significant changes made to the tablet tool at each phase of this design work. Patient feedback emphasized the need to make the tablet tool accessible for patients who lacked technical proficiency and to reduce the quantity and complexity of text presentation. Both patients and their providers identified specific content choices based on their personal experiences (eg, the ability to raise private or sensitive concerns) and recommended targeting new patients. Stakeholder groups provided essential input on the need to augment text with video and to create different versions of the videos to match sex and race/ethnicity of the actors with patients. User-centered design in collaboration with patients, providers, and key health stakeholders led to marked evolution in the initial content, layout, and target audience for a tablet waiting room tool intended to assist complex patients with setting visit discussion priorities.

  19. [Factors associated with neurodevelopment in children 6-18 months of age in public daycare centers in João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ângela Cristina Dornelas da; Engstron, Elyne Montenegro; Miranda, Cláudio Torres de

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of altered neurodevelopment in children in public daycare centers in João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Brazil, and to analyze factors associated with child development. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of children 6 to 18 months of age enrolled in daycare. Child development was assessed by the Denver II Screening Test. Biological, riables were studied with a questionnaire and form. Associations were adjusted using logistic regression. Altered development was present in 52.7% of the children and was associated with age > 12 months (OR = 4.3), vaginal delivery (OR = 4.4), neonatal phototherapy (OR = 7.9), and daycare centers not supported by the Family Health Strategy (OR = 2.9). The findings suggest that child development reflects the family's conditions and the care received from educational and healthcare services.

  20. Mössbauer spectroscopic studies and structural characterization of oxo-centered trinuclear iron carboxylato-aquo complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Nakamoto, T.; Katada, M.; Endo, K.; Sano, H.

    1994-12-01

    Mixed-valence states of [Fe3O(CH2ClCO2)6(H2O)3] nH2O ( n=0 and 3) were studied by means of Mössbauer spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The number of water molecules of crystallization was determined by X-ray crystallography. The dehydrated complex was obtained by storing the trihydrated complex under a dry atmosphere. It was found that the temperature dependence of the mixed-valence state is affected by the hydrated water molecules.

  1. The C-terminus of PufX plays a key role in dimerisation and assembly of the reaction center light-harvesting 1 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Pu; Martin, Elizabeth C; Ng, Irene W; Hunter, C Neil

    2017-09-01

    In bacterial photosynthesis reaction center-light-harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) complexes trap absorbed solar energy by generating a charge separated state. Subsequent electron and proton transfers form a quinol, destined to diffuse to the cytochrome bc1 complex. In bacteria such as Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides and Rba. capsulatus the PufX polypeptide creates a channel for quinone/quinol traffic across the LH1 complex that surrounds the RC, and it is therefore essential for photosynthetic growth. PufX also plays a key role in dimerization of the RC-LH1-PufX core complex, and the structure of the Rba. sphaeroides complex shows that the PufX C-terminus, particularly the region from X49-X53, likely mediates association of core monomers. To investigate this putative interaction we analysed mutations PufX R49L, PufX R53L, PufX R49/53L and PufX G52L by measuring photosynthetic growth, fractionation of detergent-solubilised membranes, formation of 2-D crystals and electron microscopy. We show that these mutations do not affect assembly of PufX within the core or photosynthetic growth but they do prevent dimerization, consistent with predictions from the RC-LH1-PufX structure. We obtained low resolution structures of monomeric core complexes with and without PufX, using electron microscopy of negatively stained single particles and 3D reconstruction; the monomeric complex with PufX corresponds to one half of the dimer structure whereas LH1 completely encloses the RC if the gene encoding PufX is deleted. On the basis of the insights gained from these mutagenesis and structural analyses we propose a sequence for assembly of the dimeric RC-LH1-PufX complex. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Perceived stress level and risk of cancer incidence in a Japanese population: the Japan Public Health Center (JPHC)-based Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Huan; Saito, Eiko; Sawada, Norie; Abe, Sarah K.; Hidaka, Akihisa; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Goto, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Ye, Weimin; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-01-01

    Evidence regarding stress as a risk factor for cancer onset is inconsistent. In this study, based on the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study, we enrolled 101,708 participants aged 40–69 years from 1990–1994. The self-reported perceived stress level was collected at baseline and updated through 5-year follow-up. The association between perceived stress and cancer risk was measured by Cox proportional hazards regression model, adjusted for all known confounders. During follow-up ...

  3. The publication of scientific data by World Data Centers and the National Library of Science and Technology in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Brase

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In its 2004 report "Data and information", the International Council for Science (ICSU strongly recommended a new strategic framework for scientific data and information. On an initiative from a working group from the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA, the German Research Foundation (DFG has started the project "Publication and Citation of Scientific Primary Data" as part of the program "Information-infrastructure of network -based scientific-cooperation and digital publication" in 2004. Starting with the field of earth science, the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB is now established as a registration agency for scientific primary data as a member of the International DOI Foundation (IDF.

  4. The person centered approach, gerontological attention and national policy of humanization: approaches among theory, praxis and public policy

    OpenAIRE

    Caires, Cristiano Santos; Faculdade de Medicina do ABC - FMABC; Araujo, Eliana Novaes P.; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to improve understanding of care focused on elderly population growing, based on singularity values and attitude that privilege an active and participatory aging at public network services. Thus, the possibilities of fit among Rogerian theory, as a care guide focused on elderly attention, and the SUS humanization primer aim the Brazilian gerontological care improvement. New meanings and thoughts that overlap, in terms of those professionals attitudes that, based o...

  5. Medical Research Publications: A Bibliography of Walter Reed Army Medical Center Staff, 1986-1992. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    bond strength of elastomer tray adhesives to thermoplastic and acrylic resin tray materials. J Prosthet Dent 1992 Apr;67(4):541-3. Dental Activity...Hogans WR 3d, Agar JR. The bond strength of elastomer tray adhesives to thermoplastic and acrylic resin tray materials. J Prosthet Dent 1992 Apr;67(4...Endocrine-Metabolic. 302 Dental Activity Publications 1986-1992 1. Agar JR, Law DB, Seymour HC. Impression tray hanger for disinfection . J Prosthet Dent

  6. Self-reported use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits to purchase soda in a public health center population: Los Angeles County, California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan, Noel; Gase, Lauren; Butler, Rebecca; Smith, Lisa; Simon, Paul; Kuo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    To better inform local program planning for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health used self-reported data from a public health center population to examine the prevalence of benefits used to purchase soda. We performed statistical analyses, including multivariable regression modeling, using data from a local health and nutrition examination survey. The survey response rate was 69% (n=1,503). More than one-third of survey participants reported receiving, or living in a household where someone receives, nutrition assistance benefits. When asked, 33% (n=170) reported using these benefits to purchase soda "sometimes" and 18% (n=91) reported "often" or "always," suggesting that the use of program benefits to purchase soda was not uncommon in this subpopulation. These findings have meaningful policy and planning implications, as they contribute to ongoing dialogue about strategies for optimizing nutrition among SNAP recipients.

  7. Closing gaps between open software and public data in a hackathon setting: User-centered software prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Ben; Lesko, Matthew; Federer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In genomics, bioinformatics and other areas of data science, gaps exist between extant public datasets and the open-source software tools built by the community to analyze similar data types.  The purpose of biological data science hackathons is to assemble groups of genomics or bioinformatics professionals and software developers to rapidly prototype software to address these gaps.  The only two rules for the NCBI-assisted hackathons run so far are that 1) data either must be housed in public data repositories or be deposited to such repositories shortly after the hackathon's conclusion, and 2) all software comprising the final pipeline must be open-source or open-use.  Proposed topics, as well as suggested tools and approaches, are distributed to participants at the beginning of each hackathon and refined during the event.  Software, scripts, and pipelines are developed and published on GitHub, a web service providing publicly available, free-usage tiers for collaborative software development. The code resulting from each hackathon is published at https://github.com/NCBI-Hackathons/ with separate directories or repositories for each team.

  8. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Raquel Rodrigues; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals. This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy. Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis. The results of the present study demonstrated the importance of referral centers in support of basic health services within the decentralization strategy. But, the success of the program depends on the advent of new developmental tools to augment diagnostic accuracy for leprosy. However, it should be emphasized that for new diagnostic methods to be developed, a greater commitment on the part of the health care system regarding research is urgently needed.

  9. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rodrigues Barbieri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals.This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy.Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis.The results of the present study demonstrated the importance of referral centers in support of basic health services within the decentralization strategy. But, the success of the program depends on the advent of new developmental tools to augment diagnostic accuracy for leprosy. However, it should be emphasized that for new diagnostic methods to be developed, a greater commitment on the part of the health care system regarding research is urgently needed.

  10. How do you assign persistent identifiers to extracts from large, complex, dynamic data sets that underpin scholarly publications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, Lesley; Car, Nicholas; Evans, Benjamin; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Persistent identifiers in the form of a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) are becoming more mainstream, assigned at both the collection and dataset level. For static datasets, this is a relatively straight-forward matter. However, many new data collections are dynamic, with new data being appended, models and derivative products being revised with new data, or the data itself revised as processing methods are improved. Further, because data collections are becoming accessible as services, researchers can log in and dynamically create user-defined subsets for specific research projects: they also can easily mix and match data from multiple collections, each of which can have a complex history. Inevitably extracts from such dynamic data sets underpin scholarly publications, and this presents new challenges. The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has been experiencing and making progress towards addressing these issues. The NCI is large node of the Research Data Services initiative (RDS) of the Australian Government's research infrastructure, which currently makes available over 10 PBytes of priority research collections, ranging from geosciences, geophysics, environment, and climate, through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and social sciences. Data are replicated to, or are produced at, NCI and then processed there to higher-level data products or directly analysed. Individual datasets range from multi-petabyte computational models and large volume raster arrays, down to gigabyte size, ultra-high resolution datasets. To facilitate access, maximise reuse and enable integration across the disciplines, datasets have been organized on a platform called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). Combined, the NERDIP data collections form a rich and diverse asset for researchers: their co-location and standardization optimises the value of existing data, and forms a new resource to underpin data-intensive Science. New publication

  11. X-ray crystal structure and theoretical study of a new dinuclear Cu(II) complex with two different geometry centers bridged with an oxo group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Azimi, Saeid; Molaei, Atefeh; Hatami, Masoud; Notash, Behrouz

    2017-10-01

    A new Schiff base ligand HL, 1,3-bis(2-((Z)-(2-aminoethylimino)methyl)phenoxy)ethylene di amine, has been synthesized from the reaction of a new aldehyde and ethylenediamine. After preparation the Schiff base, a new dinuclear Cu(II) complex with two different geometry for each metal ion was synthesized. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis of the complex Cu(II) showed that the complex is binuclear and all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of ligand (N4O3) are coordinated to two Cu(II) center ions. The crystal structure studying shows, a perchlorate ion has been coordinated to the two Cu(II) metal centers as bridged and another perchlorate coordinated to the one of Cu(II) ion as terminal. However, two interesting structures square pyramidal and distorted octahedral Cu(II) ions are bridged asymmetrically by a perchlorate ion and oxygen of hydroxyl group of Schiff base ligand. In addition, we had a theoretical study to have a comparison of experimental and theoretical results we determined the HOMO and LUMO orbitals.

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's Freedoms ... PTSD: National Center for PTSD » Public » Videos PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and Staff Disaster Responders Medical Doctors Community Providers and Clergy ... Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  16. The Description of Medication Adherence for Patients of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 in Public Health Center Yogyakarta

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Rasdianah; Suwaldi Martodiharjo; Tri M. Andayani; Lukman Hakim

    2016-01-01

    According to the Basic Health Research (Riskesdas 2013), the highest prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Indonesia is in Yogyakarta. Diabetes mellitus is chronic disease that needs the complex and a long term medical treatment, one of the success factor in the therapy depends on the patient adherence. The purpose of this research was to know and describe patient’s characteristics including gender, age, education, duration of the disease, comorbid, AOD usage through the adherence of type 2 diab...

  17. Heterologous Production of the Photosynthetic Reaction Center and Light Harvesting 1 Complexes of the Thermophile Thermochromatium tepidum in the Mesophile Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Thermal Stability of a Hybrid Core Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, D; Huang, V; Beatty, J T

    2017-10-15

    The photosynthetic complexes of the thermophile Thermochromatium tepidum are of considerable interest in biohybrid solar cell applications because of the ability of thermophilic proteins to tolerate elevated temperatures. Synthetic operons encoding reaction center (RC) and light harvesting 1 (LH1) pigment-protein complexes of T. tepidum were expressed in the mesophile Rhodobacter sphaeroides The T. tepidum RC (TRC) was assembled and was found to be functional with the addition of menadione to populate the QA pocket. The production of T. tepidum LH1 (TLH1) was increased by selection of a phototrophy-capable mutant after UV irradiation mutagenesis, which yielded a hybrid RC-TLH1 core complex consisting of the R. sphaeroides RC and T. tepidum TLH1, confirmed by the absorbance peak of TLH1 at 915 nm. Affinity chromatography partial purification and subsequent sucrose gradient analysis of the hybrid RC-TLH1 core complex indicated that this core complex assembled as a monomer. Furthermore, the RC-TLH1 hybrid core complex was more tolerant of a temperature of 70°C than the R. sphaeroides RC-LH1 core complexes in both the dimeric and monomeric forms; after 1 h, the hybrid complex retained 58% of the initial starting value, compared to values of 11% and 53% for the R. sphaeroides RC-LH1 dimer and monomer forms, respectively.IMPORTANCE This work is important because it is a new approach to bioengineering of photosynthesis proteins for potential use in biophotovoltaic solar energy capture. The work establishes a proof of principle for future biohybrid solar cell applications. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. [Private charity - public health service. Comparison between British and German birthing centers of the 18th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumbohm, Jürgen

    In the eighteenth century, lying-in hospitals were founded in many European towns and cities. The way in which these institutions were financed differed greatly across Europe. In the UK, most of them were "charities" and relied on donations from wealthy benefactors, whereas on the continent they were usually funded by "public" money, be it from the state or local communities. The paper focuses on British charities and German hospitals, and explores the corollaries of the mode of financing. In the eighteenth century, a market emerged in Britain where numerous charities with different aims competed for donations from the well-to-do. For attracting benefactors, a charity had to convince potential donors that its clientele and purpose were particularly deserving, and that it used the money donated in a cost-efficient way. In Germany, it was mainly bureaucrats and governments who had to be persuaded, but public opinion did matter as well. In British lying-in charities, the main donors acted as governors, and benefactors could recommend persons for being admitted. In publicly funded German hospitals, the medical directors had much more power. In the competitive market, in which British charities acted, out-patient dispensaries (policlinics) became increasingly important, since they could argue that they were more cost-efficient and had lower mortality. In Germany, however, hospitals remained the dominant type of assistance in this field, in spite of the criticism they received. The different sources of finance appear to have been one of the reasons for this divergence. Teaching was the main purpose of most German lying-in hospitals. They either trained medical students or midwife apprentices or both. Since the patients served as teaching objects, all women were welcomed, and in fact most patients were single mothers. By contrast, most of the British institutions admitted only married women, because donors did not wish to encourage immorality. The charities staged the

  19. Spin densities from subsystem density-functional theory: Assessment and application to a photosynthetic reaction center complex model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyeva, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and efficient alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT for large systems composed of several weakly interacting subunits. Here, we provide a systematic investigation of the spin-density distributions obtained in subsystem DFT calculations for radicals in explicit environments. This includes a small radical in a solvent shell, a π-stacked guanine-thymine radical cation, and a benchmark application to a model for the special pair radical cation, which is a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll pigments, from the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria. We investigate the differences in the spin densities resulting from subsystem DFT and Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In these comparisons, we focus on the problem of overdelocalization of spin densities due to the self-interaction error in DFT. It is demonstrated that subsystem DFT can reduce this problem, while it still allows to describe spin-polarization effects crossing the boundaries of the subsystems. In practical calculations of spin densities for radicals in a given environment, it may thus be a pragmatic alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In our calculation on the special pair radical cation, we show that the coordinating histidine residues reduce the spin-density asymmetry between the two halves of this system, while inclusion of a larger binding pocket model increases this asymmetry. The unidirectional energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers is related to the asymmetry introduced by the protein environment.

  20. Spin densities from subsystem density-functional theory: Assessment and application to a photosynthetic reaction center complex model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solovyeva, Alisa [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Technical University Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Pavanello, Michele [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Neugebauer, Johannes [Technical University Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Str. 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-05-21

    Subsystem density-functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and efficient alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT for large systems composed of several weakly interacting subunits. Here, we provide a systematic investigation of the spin-density distributions obtained in subsystem DFT calculations for radicals in explicit environments. This includes a small radical in a solvent shell, a {pi}-stacked guanine-thymine radical cation, and a benchmark application to a model for the special pair radical cation, which is a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll pigments, from the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria. We investigate the differences in the spin densities resulting from subsystem DFT and Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In these comparisons, we focus on the problem of overdelocalization of spin densities due to the self-interaction error in DFT. It is demonstrated that subsystem DFT can reduce this problem, while it still allows to describe spin-polarization effects crossing the boundaries of the subsystems. In practical calculations of spin densities for radicals in a given environment, it may thus be a pragmatic alternative to Kohn-Sham DFT calculations. In our calculation on the special pair radical cation, we show that the coordinating histidine residues reduce the spin-density asymmetry between the two halves of this system, while inclusion of a larger binding pocket model increases this asymmetry. The unidirectional energy transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers is related to the asymmetry introduced by the protein environment.

  1. Designing for Social Infrastructures in Complex Service Systems: A Human-Centered and Social Systems Perspective on Service Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke van der Bijl-Brouwer

    Full Text Available Service design is one of the keys to improving how we target today’s complex societal problems. The predominant view of service systems is mechanistic and linear. A service infrastructure—which includes solutions like service blueprints, scripts, and protocols—is, in some ways, designed to control the behavior of service professionals at the service interface. This view undermines the intrinsic motivation, expertise, and creativity of service professionals. This article presents a different perspective on service design. Using theories of social systems and complex responsive processes, I define service organizations as ongoing iterated patterns of relationships between people, and identify them as complex social service systems. I go on to show how the human-centeredness of design practices contributes to designing for such service systems. In particular, I show how a deep understanding of the needs and aspirations of service professionals through phenomenological themes contributes to designing for social infrastructures that support continuous improvement and adaptation of the practices executed by service professionals at the service interface.

  2. Alternative Fuel News: Official Publication of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center; Vol. 2, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-05-01

    Official publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center featuring alternative fuels activity in every state, the Clean Cities game plan '98, and news from the Automakers.

  3. Dinuclear palladium complexes with two ligand-centered radicals and a single bridging ligand: subtle tuning of magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broere, Daniël L J; Demeshko, Serhiy; de Bruin, Bas; Pidko, Evgeny A; Reek, Joost N H; Siegler, Maxime A; Lutz, Martin; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-04-07

    The facile and tunable preparation of unique dinuclear [(L(⋅))Pd-X-Pd(L(⋅))] complexes (X = Cl or N3), bearing a ligand radical on each Pd, is disclosed, as well as their magnetochemistry in solution and solid state is reported. Chloride abstraction from [PdCl(NNO(ISQ))] (NNO(ISQ) = iminosemiquinonato) with TlPF6 results in an unusual monochlorido-bridged dinuclear open-shell diradical species, [{Pd(NNO(ISQ))}2(μ-Cl)](+), with an unusually small Pd-Cl-Pd angle (ca. 93°, determined by X-ray). This suggests an intramolecular d(8)-d(8) interaction, which is supported by DFT calculations. SQUID measurements indicate moderate antiferromagnetic spin exchange between the two ligand radicals and an overall singlet ground state in the solid state. VT EPR spectroscopy shows a transient signal corresponding to a triplet state between 20 and 60 K. Complex 2 reacts with PPh3 to generate [Pd(NNO(ISQ))(PPh3)](+) and one equivalent of [PdCl(NNO(ISQ))]. Reacting an 1:1 mixture of [PdCl(NNO(ISQ))] and [Pd(N3)(NNO(ISQ))] furnishes the 1,1-azido-bridged dinuclear diradical [{Pd(NNO(ISQ))}2(κ(1)-N;μ-N3](+), with a Pd-N-Pd angle close to 127° (X-ray). Magnetic and EPR measurements indicate two independent S = 1/2 spin carriers and no magnetic interaction in the solid state. The two diradical species both show no spin exchange in solution, likely because of unhindered rotation around the Pd-X-Pd core. This work demonstrates that a single bridging atom can induce subtle and tunable changes in structural and magnetic properties of novel dinuclear Pd complexes featuring two ligand-based radicals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chemotaxis in densely populated tissue determines germinal center anatomy and cell motility: a new paradigm for the development of complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Jared B; Jones, Mark T; Plassmann, Paul E; Thorley-Lawson, David A

    2011-01-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are complex dynamic structures that form within lymph nodes as an essential process in the humoral immune response. They represent a paradigm for studying the regulation of cell movement in the development of complex anatomical structures. We have developed a simulation of a modified cyclic re-entry model of GC dynamics which successfully employs chemotaxis to recapitulate the anatomy of the primary follicle and the development of a mature GC, including correctly structured mantle, dark and light zones. We then show that correct single cell movement dynamics (including persistent random walk and inter-zonal crossing) arise from this simulation as purely emergent properties. The major insight of our study is that chemotaxis can only achieve this when constrained by the known biological properties that cells are incompressible, exist in a densely packed environment, and must therefore compete for space. It is this interplay of chemotaxis and competition for limited space that generates all the complex and biologically accurate behaviors described here. Thus, from a single simple mechanism that is well documented in the biological literature, we can explain both higher level structure and single cell movement behaviors. To our knowledge this is the first GC model that is able to recapitulate both correctly detailed anatomy and single cell movement. This mechanism may have wide application for modeling other biological systems where cells undergo complex patterns of movement to produce defined anatomical structures with sharp tissue boundaries.

  5. Chemotaxis in densely populated tissue determines germinal center anatomy and cell motility: a new paradigm for the development of complex tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared B Hawkins

    Full Text Available Germinal centers (GCs are complex dynamic structures that form within lymph nodes as an essential process in the humoral immune response. They represent a paradigm for studying the regulation of cell movement in the development of complex anatomical structures. We have developed a simulation of a modified cyclic re-entry model of GC dynamics which successfully employs chemotaxis to recapitulate the anatomy of the primary follicle and the development of a mature GC, including correctly structured mantle, dark and light zones. We then show that correct single cell movement dynamics (including persistent random walk and inter-zonal crossing arise from this simulation as purely emergent properties. The major insight of our study is that chemotaxis can only achieve this when constrained by the known biological properties that cells are incompressible, exist in a densely packed environment, and must therefore compete for space. It is this interplay of chemotaxis and competition for limited space that generates all the complex and biologically accurate behaviors described here. Thus, from a single simple mechanism that is well documented in the biological literature, we can explain both higher level structure and single cell movement behaviors. To our knowledge this is the first GC model that is able to recapitulate both correctly detailed anatomy and single cell movement. This mechanism may have wide application for modeling other biological systems where cells undergo complex patterns of movement to produce defined anatomical structures with sharp tissue boundaries.

  6. Association between education level and dentition status in Japanese adults: Japan public health center-based oral health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Ohara, Satoko; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an educational gradient in dentition status among Japanese adults who are under the universal public health insurance system. Subjects were 1201 community residents aged 55-75 years as of May 2005 who completed a self-administered questionnaire and had a standard clinical oral examination. Analysis focused on the association of three education levels (junior high school, senior high school, and any college or higher education) with dentition status. The proportion of subjects with 20 or more teeth (P education level after adjusting for confounders. The significant trend of these values in dental indexes indicated a poorer dentition status with a lower education level. The results suggest that the level of education has an independent impact on dentition status in a group of Japanese adults, even after taking into account oral health-related factors. Therefore, providing appropriate oral health information from an early age within a compulsory school education program appears necessary to enhance health literacy and lessen the inequalities in dental health by educational level. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Soy food and isoflavone intake and endometrial cancer risk: the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhathoki, S; Iwasaki, M; Sawada, N; Yamaji, T; Shimazu, T; Sasazuki, S; Inoue, M; Tsugane, S

    2015-02-01

    Compared with western populations, the consumption of soy foods among Japanese is very high and the incidence of endometrial cancer very low. We evaluated the association of soy food and isoflavone intake with endometrial cancer risk in Japanese women. Prospective cohort study. Ten public health centre areas in Japan. Forty nine thousand one hundred and twenty-one women of age 45-74 years who responded to a 5-year follow-up survey questionnaire. Intakes of soy foods as well as other covariates were assessed in 1995-1998 by a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Incidence of endometrial cancer. During an average of 12.1 years of follow up, 112 newly diagnosed endometrial cancer cases were identified. Energy-adjusted intakes of soy food and isoflavone were not associated with the risk of endometrial cancer. The multivariate-adjusted HR per 25 g/day increase in the intake of soy food was 1.02 (95% CI 0.94-1.10), and the corresponding value for isoflavone intake per 15 mg/day was 1.01 (95% CI 0.84-1.22). In this population-based prospective cohort study of Japanese women, we observed no evidence of a protective association between soy food or isoflavone intake and endometrial cancer risk. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. The Description of Medication Adherence for Patients of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 in Public Health Center Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Rasdianah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the Basic Health Research (Riskesdas 2013, the highest prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Indonesia is in Yogyakarta. Diabetes mellitus is chronic disease that needs the complex and a long term medical treatment, one of the success factor in the therapy depends on the patient adherence. The purpose of this research was to know and describe patient’s characteristics including gender, age, education, duration of the disease, comorbid, AOD usage through the adherence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This research used an observational method with cross-sectional analysis that conducted retrospectively to 123 outpatients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in Yogyakarta Primary Health Care during August–September 2015. The sampling method the accidental sampling technique. Morisky Medication Adherence (MMAS questionnaire was used and analyzed with Chi Square. The result of this research showed that the entirety of medication’s adherence level is low. The correlation between patients characteristic, gender (p=0.275, ages (p=0.473, educational level (p=0.157, disease’s duration (p=0.097, number of cormobid (p=0.79, and ADO (p=0.401 against the medication’s adherence level were not significant (p>0.05.

  9. Quality of diet and mortality among Japanese men and women: Japan Public Health Center based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotani, Kayo; Akter, Shamima; Kashino, Ikuko; Goto, Atsushi; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-03-22

    To examine the association between adherence to the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top and total and cause specific mortality. Large scale population based prospective cohort study in Japan with follow-up for a median of 15 years. 11 public health centre areas across Japan. 36,624 men and 42,970 women aged 45-75 who had no history of cancer, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, or chronic liver disease. Deaths and causes of death identified with the residential registry and death certificates. Higher scores on the food guide (better adherence) were associated with lower total mortality; the multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of total mortality for the lowest through highest scores were 1.00, 0.92 (0.87 to 0.97), 0.88 (0.83 to 0.93), and 0.85 (0.79 to 0.91) (P<0.001 for trend) and the multivariable adjusted hazard ratio associated with a 10 point increase in food guide scores was 0.93 (0.91 to 0.95; P<0.001 for trend). This score was inversely associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio associated with a 10 point increase 0.93, 0.89 to 0.98; P=0.005 for trend) and particularly from cerebrovascular disease (0.89, 0.82 to 0.95; P=0.002 for trend). There was some evidence, though not significant, of an inverse association for cancer mortality (0.96, 0.93 to 1.00; P=0.053 for trend). Closer adherence to Japanese dietary guidelines was associated with a lower risk of total mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease, particularly from cerebrovascular disease, in Japanese adults. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Sweat test and cystic fibrosis: overview of test performance at public and private centers in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidoni, Maria Fátima; Gomez, Carla Cristina Souza; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera; Ribeiro, Maria Ângela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The sweat test (ST) measures chloride levels in sweat and is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the reliability of a ST depends on their being performed by experienced technicians and in accordance with strict guidelines. Our aim was to evaluate how sweat stimulation, sweat collection, and chloride measurement are performed at 14 centers (9 public centers and 5 private centers) that routinely perform STs in the state of São Paulo, which has the highest frequency of CF in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional cohort study, using a standardized questionnaire administered in loco to the staff responsible for conducting STs. No uniformity regarding the procedures was found among the centers. Most centers were noncompliant with the international guidelines, especially regarding the collection of sweat (the samples were insufficient in 10-50% of the subjects tested); availability of stimulation equipment (which was limited at 2 centers); modernity and certification of stimulation equipment (most of the equipment having been used for 3-23 years); and written protocols (which were lacking at 12 centers). Knowledge of ST guidelines was evaluated at only 1 center. Our results show that STs largely deviate from internationally accepted guidelines at the participating centers. Therefore, there is an urgent need for standardization of STs, training of qualified personnel, and acquisition/certification of suitable equipment. These are essential conditions for a reliable diagnosis of CF, especially with the increasing demand due to newborn screening nationwide, and for the assessment of a possible clinical benefit from the use of modulator drugs. O teste do suor (TS) mede os níveis de cloro no suor e é considerado o padrão ouro para o diagnóstico da fibrose cística (FC). Contudo, a confiabilidade do TS depende de sua realização por técnicos experientes e segundo diretrizes rígidas. Nosso objetivo foi avaliar como s

  11. Animal welfare: a complex domestic and international public-policy issue--who are the key players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayvel, A C David; Cross, Nicki

    2010-01-01

    Animal-welfare issues are usually portrayed in the media in a black-and-white fashion, with simple, single-perspective solutions proposed for what are often, in fact, complex policy issues. In this article, we argue that animal welfare is a multifaceted international and domestic public-policy issue that must take account of not only scientific, ethical, and economic issues but also religious, cultural, and international trade policy considerations. Management of animal welfare at a government policy level also requires an approach based on incremental change. Such change must be both science based and ethically principled, and the rate of change must recognize both the expectations of society and the constraints on the animal user. Ideally, such change should involve full ownership and buy-in from the affected animal user group. The range of stakeholders involved in the animal-welfare debate includes industry and producer groups, science bodies, and animal-welfare non-governmental organizations and professional groups, including the veterinary and legal professions. The veterinary profession, in particular, is expected to play an animal-welfare leadership role, and we discuss expectation versus reality at both a national and an international level. This latter discussion includes specific reference to the role of the World Organisation for Animal Health (the OIE) as an intergovernmental organization representing 175 countries and details some of the major achievements since the OIE assumed its international animal-welfare standard-setting role in 2002. We also address the role of the veterinary profession at national, regional, and international levels.

  12. [Certification and quality management of a complex university cardiac center according to law EN ISO 9001: 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beholz, Sven; Koch, Christina; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2003-04-01

    Quality management systems can improve quality in health care units. The introduction of a quality management system according to ISO 9001: 2000 in a university department of cardiovascular surgery is described. First a thorough analysis of all processes of patient treatment and clinical research was obtained. Multiple interfaces had to be defined to different departments as well as to administration units. All necessary resources were evaluated and optimised. Customer satisfaction was evaluated by surveys of patients and collaborating physicians. Quality rounds including physicians, nurses and technicians were instituted. Based on these preparatory works all processes including their responsibilities and necessary resources were redefined and described in the quality manual. After 18 months' of certification of our quality management system according to ISO 9001: 2000 was recommended by an independent, accredited organisation. In summary, certification of a university department of cardiovascular surgery according to ISO 9001: 2000 is possible and may represent the first step towards total quality management. In complex health care units the certification of individual departments may help to generate a consciousness for quality on the road to total quality management.

  13. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  14. Clouds, weather, climate, and modeling for K-12 and public audiences from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Russell, R. M.; Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; Burt, M. A.; Genyuk, J.

    2010-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fifth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  15. Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers: A Collaboration Between the Earthquake Country Alliance and Free-Choice Learning Institutions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroot, R. M.; Springer, K.; Brooks, C. J.; Schuman, L.; Dalton, D.; Benthien, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    In 1999 the Southern California Earthquake Center initiated an effort to expand its reach to multiple target audiences through the development of an interpretive trail on the San Andreas fault at Wallace Creek and an earthquake exhibit at Fingerprints Youth Museum in Hemet. These projects and involvement with the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands beginning in 2007 led to the creation of Earthquake Education and Public Information Centers (EPIcenters) in 2008. The impetus for the development of the network was to broaden participation in The Great Southern California ShakeOut. In 2009 it has grown to be more comprehensive in its scope including its evolution into a statewide network. EPIcenters constitute a variety of free-choice learning institutions, representing museums, science centers, libraries, universities, parks, and other places visited by a variety of audiences including families, seniors, and school groups. They share a commitment to demonstrating and encouraging earthquake preparedness. EPIcenters coordinate Earthquake Country Alliance activities in their county or region, lead presentations or organize events in their communities, or in other ways demonstrate leadership in earthquake education and risk reduction. The San Bernardino County Museum (Southern California) and The Tech Museum of Innovation (Northern California) serve as EPIcenter regional coordinating institutions. They interact with over thirty institutional partners who have implemented a variety of activities from displays and talks to earthquake exhibitions. While many activities are focused on the time leading up to and just after the ShakeOut, most EPIcenter members conduct activities year round. Network members at Kidspace Museum in Pasadena and San Diego Natural History Museum have formed EPIcenter focus groups on early childhood education and safety and security. This presentation highlights the development of the EPIcenter network, synergistic activities resulting from this

  16. How Should Public Administration Education Curriculum Within Indiana Higher Education Institutions Evolve to Reflect the Complex Homeland Security Issues Faced by Future Public Sector Employees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    integrated with appropriate departments, agencies, and jurisdictions ” (DHS, 2007, p. 6). This approach highlights the need for each level of...usually have a close relationship with CI/KR facilities within their jurisdiction . State and local officials provide the day-to-day support of these...and exercise system with the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center (MUTC) and through exercises such as Ardent Sentry and Hoosier Sentry , one of the

  17. Visible light-induced electron transfer from di-mu-oxo-bridged dinuclear Mn complexes to Cr centers in silica nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weare, Walter W; Pushkar, Yulia; Yachandra, Vittal K; Frei, Heinz

    2008-08-27

    The compound (bpy) 2Mn (III)(mu-O) 2Mn (IV)(bpy) 2, a structural model relevant for the photosynthetic water oxidation complex, was coupled to single Cr (VI) charge-transfer chromophores in the channels of the nanoporous oxide AlMCM-41. Mn K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy confirmed that the di-mu-oxo dinuclear Mn core of the complex is unaffected when loaded into the nanoscale pores. Observation of the 16-line EPR signal characteristic of Mn (III)(mu-O) 2Mn (IV) demonstrates that the majority of the loaded complexes retained their nascent oxidation state in the presence or absence of Cr (VI) centers. The FT-Raman spectrum upon visible light excitation of the Cr (VI)-O (II) --> Cr (V)-O (I) ligand-to-metal charge transfer reveals electron transfer from Mn (III)(mu-O) 2Mn (IV) (Mn-O stretch at 700 cm (-1)) to Cr (VI), resulting in the formation of Cr (V) and Mn (IV)(mu-O) 2Mn (IV) (Mn-O stretch at 645 cm (-1)). All initial and final states are directly observed by FT-Raman or EPR spectroscopy, and the assignments are corroborated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The endoergic charge separation products (Delta E o = -0.6 V) remain after several minutes, which points to spatial separation of Cr (V) and Mn (IV)(mu-O) 2Mn (IV) as a consequence of hole (O (I)) hopping as a major contributing mechanism. This is the first observation of visible light-induced oxidation of a potential water oxidation complex by a metal charge-transfer pump in a nanoporous environment. These findings will allow for the assembly and photochemical characterization of well-defined transition metal molecular units, with the ultimate goal of performing endothermic, multielectron transformations that are coupled to visible light electron pumps in nanostructured scaffolds.

  18. Visible Light-Induced Electron Transfer from Di-mu-oxo Bridged Dinuclear Mn Complexes to Cr Centers in Silica Nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Heinz; Weare, Walter W.; Pushkar, Yulia; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-03

    The compound (bpy)2MnIII(mu-O)2MnIV(bpy)2, a structural model relevant for the photosynthetic water oxidation complex, was coupled to single CrVI charge-transfer chromophores in the channels of the nanoporous oxide AlMCM-41. Mn K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy confirmed that the di-mu-oxo dinuclear Mn core of the complex is unaffected when loaded into the nanoscale pores. Observation of the 16-line EPR signal characteristic of MnIII(mu-O)2MnIV demonstrates that the majority of the loaded complexes retained their nascent oxidation state in the presence or absence of CrVI centers. The FT-Raman spectrum upon visible light excitation of the CrVI-OII --> CrV-OI ligand-to-metal charge-transfer reveals electron transfer from MnIII(mu-O)2MnIV (Mn-O stretch at 700 cm-1) to CrVI, resulting in the formation of CrV and MnIV(mu-O)2MnIV (Mn-O stretch at 645 cm-1). All initial and final states are directly observed by FT-Raman or EPR spectroscopy, and the assignments corroborated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The endoergic charge separation products (DELTA Eo = -0.6 V) remain after several minutes, which points to spatial separation of CrV and MnIV(mu-O)2MnIV as a consequence of hole (OI) hopping as a major contributing mechanism. This is the first observation of visible light-induced oxidation of a potential water oxidation complex by a metal charge-transfer pump in a nanoporous environment. These findings will allow for the assembly and photochemical characterization of well defined transition metal molecular units, with the ultimate goal of performing endothermic, multi-electron transformations that are coupled to visible light electron pumps in nanostructured scaffolds.

  19. Investigation of the redox interaction between Mn-bicarbonate complexes and reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26, Chromatium minutissimum, and Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, V V; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shkuropatova, V A; Shuvalov, V A; Klimov, V V

    2011-12-01

    The change in the dark reduction rate of photooxidized reaction centers (RC) of type II from three anoxygenic bacteria (Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26, Chromatium minutissimum, and Chloroflexus aurantiacus) having different redox potentials of the P(+)/P pair and availability of RC for exogenous electron donors was investigated upon the addition of Mn(2+) and HCO(3)(-). It was found that the dark reduction of P(870)(+) from Rb. sphaeroides R-26 is considerably accelerated upon the combined addition of 0.5 mM MnCl(2) and 30-75 mM NaHCO(3) (as a result of formation of "low-potential" complexes [Mn(HCO(3))(2)]), while MnCl(2) and NaHCO(3) added separately had no such effect. The effect is not observed either in RC from Cf. aurantiacus (probably due to the low oxidation potential of the primary electron donor, P(865), which results in thermodynamic difficulties of the redox interaction between P(865)(+) and Mn(2+)) or in RC from Ch. minutissimum (apparently due to the presence of the RC-bound cytochrome preventing the direct interaction between P(870)(+) and Mn(2+)). The absence of acceleration of the dark reduction of P(870)(+) in the RC of Rb. sphaeroides R-26 when Mn(2+) and HCO(3)(-) were replaced by Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) and by formate, oxalate, or acetate, respectively, reveals the specificity of the Mn2+-bicarbonate complexes for the redox interaction with P(+). The results of this work might be considered as experimental evidence for the hypothesis of the participation of Mn(2+) complexes in the evolutionary origin of the inorganic core of the water oxidizing complex of photosystem II. © Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2011.

  20. Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Patients with Complex Diabetes Who Are Served by National Safety-Net Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Vivian; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Simon, Melissa; Crawford, Phil; Leo, Michael; Rachman, Fred; Cottrell, Erika; Dant, Lydia; Oneha, Mary; Chang Weir, Rosy

    2016-01-01

    Recent research demonstrates an increased need to understand the contribution of social determinants of health (SDHs) in shaping an individual's health status and outcomes. We studied patients with diabetes in safety-net centers and evaluated associations of their disease complexity, demographic characteristics, comorbidities, insurance status, and primary language with their HbA1c level over time. Adult patients with diabetes with at least 3 distinct primary care visits between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2013, were identified in the CHARN data warehouse. These patients were categorized into 4 groups: those without a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) or depression; those with CVD but not depression; those with depression but not CVD; and those with CVD and depression. Charlson score; demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and race/ethnicity; and SDHs such as primary language and insurance status were used as predictors. The outcome measure was HbA1c. Hypothesis testing was conducted using 3-level hierarchical linear models. Baseline HbA1c differed significantly across the 4 diabetes groups and by race/ethnicity. The amount of HbA1c change over time differed by insurance status. Patients who were continuously insured tended to have lower baseline HbA1c and a smaller increase. Chinese-speaking patients tended to have lower baseline HbA1c but a larger increase over time compared with English speakers. There were various unexpected associations: compared with the diabetes-only group, mean HbA1c tended to be lower among the other more complex groups at baseline; women tended to have lower measures at baseline; older age and higher Charlson scores were associated with lower HbA1c. There is still unexplained variability relating to both baseline HbA1c values and change over time in the model. SDHs, such as insurance status and primary language, are associated with HbA1c, and results suggest that these relationships vary with disease status among

  1. Excellence in Promoting Participation: Striving for the 10 Cs-Client-Centered Care, Consideration of Complexity, Collaboration, Coaching, Capacity Building, Contextualization, Creativity, Community, Curricular Changes, and Curiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Lisa A

    2017-07-01

    Participation of children with physical disabilities is critical to optimizing their life roles and lived experiences. This perspective explores the complex and multidimensional construct of participation and presents recommendations for practice, education, and research to transform pediatric physical therapy service delivery. Two models are reviewed of participation-based service delivery grounded in client-centered care and the principles of coaching to engage clients in their rehabilitation. The roles and responsibilities of the physical therapist and the importance of team collaboration are emphasized. Considerations are presented for ecological measurements and interventions to support client participation goals for children of all ages in home and community settings. Practitioners, educators, and researchers are encouraged to be advocates and change agents to ensure that services support meaningful participation for children in real-life contexts.

  2. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of CGLSS II and U.S. NLDN Using Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 398, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Rakov, V. A.; Nag, A.; Saul, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A new comprehensive lightning instrumentation system has been designed for Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This new instrumentation system includes six synchronized high-speed video cameras, current sensors installed on the nine downcouductors of the new lightning protection system (LPS) for LC39B; four dH/dt, 3-axis measurement stations; and five dE/dt stations composed of two antennas each. The LPS received 8 direct lightning strikes (a total of 19 strokes) from March 31 through December 31, 2011. The measured peak currents and locations are compared to those reported by the CGLSS 11 and the NLDN. Results of comparison are presented and analyzed in this paper.

  3. A model for restoration of the vegetation complex in the ENEA Trisaia research center; Un modello per il riassetto della vegetazione nel centro di ricerche ENEA della Trisaia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, L.; Pace, S.; Marannino, P. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella, MT (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Cassano, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella, MT (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Cirio, U. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Casaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, RM (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    A model for management of the vegetation complex in the ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) Trisaia research center in Rotondella (Southern Italy), based on the restoration of wild potential vegetation and application of sustainable agriculture practices, is proposed. Benefits on environmental status and vegetation management are discussed. [Italian] Viene presentato un modello di intervento di rsistemazione della vegetazione nel centro di ricerche ENEA della Trisaia di Rotondella (Matera), finalizzato a ricostruire aree di copertura boschiva e a macchia, riconducibili alla vegetazione naturale potenziale del sito, in equilibrio con agrositemi gestiti secondo le tecniche dell'agricoltura sostenibile, e tenendo conto delle esigenze di urbanizzazione del centro. Sono discussi i vantaggi ottenibili dall'applicazione del modello di intervento sull'ambiente locale e sulla gestione del verde.

  4. The potential global market size and public health value of an HIV-1 vaccine in a complex global market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetta, Carol A; Lee, Stephen S; Wrobel, Sandra J; Singh, Kanwarjit J; Russell, Nina; Esparza, José

    2010-07-05

    An effective HIV vaccine will be essential for the control of the HIV pandemic. This study evaluated the potential global market size and value of a hypothetical HIV vaccine and considered clade diversity, disease burden, partial prevention of acquisition, impact of a reduction in viral load resulting in a decrease in transmission and delay to treatment, health care system differences regarding access, and HIV screening and vaccination, across all public and private markets. Vaccine product profiles varied from a vaccine that would have no effect on preventing infection to a vaccine that would effectively prevent infection and reduce viral load. High disease burden countries (HDBC; HIV prevalence > or = 1%) were assumed to routinely vaccinate pre-sexually active adolescents (10 years old), whereas low disease burden countries (LDBC; HIV prevalence rate vaccinate higher risk populations only. At steady state, routine vaccination demand for vaccines that would prevent infection only was 22-61 million annual doses with a potential market value of $210 million to $2.7 billion, depending on the vaccine product profile. If one-time catch-up campaigns were included (11-14 years old for HDBC and higher risk groups for LDBC), the additional cumulative approximately 70-237 million doses were needed over a 10-year period with a potential market value of approximately $695 million to $13.4 billion, depending on the vaccine product profile. Market size and value varied across market segments with the majority of the value in high income countries and the majority of the demand in low income countries. However, the value of the potential market in low income countries is still significant with up to $550 million annually for routine vaccination only and up to $1.7 billion for a one-time only catch-up campaign in 11-14 years old. In the most detail to date, this study evaluated market size and value of a potential multi-clade HIV vaccine, accounting for differences in disease

  5. Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness: findings from the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC), Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Eshetu; Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria; Müller, Norbert; Dehning, Sandra; Froeschl, Guenter; Tesfaye, Markos

    2014-02-21

    Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness is a negative attitude by the public which blame family members for the mental illness of their relatives. Family stigma can result in self social restrictions, delay in treatment seeking and poor quality of life. This study aimed at investigating the degree and correlates of family stigma. A quantitative cross-sectional house to house survey was conducted among 845 randomly selected urban and rural community members in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center, Southwest Ethiopia. An interviewer administered and pre-tested questionnaire adapted from other studies was used to measure the degree of family stigma and to determine its correlates. Data entry was done by using EPI-DATA and the analysis was performed using STATA software. Unadjusted and adjusted linear regression analysis was done to identify the correlates of family stigma. Among the total 845 respondents, 81.18% were female. On a range of 1 to 5 score, the mean family stigma score was 2.16 (± 0.49). In a multivariate analysis, rural residents had significantly higher stigma scores (std. β = 0.43, P mental illness increased, the stigma scores decreased significantly. High supernatural explanation of mental illness was significantly correlated with lower stigma among individuals with lower level of exposure to people with mental illness (PWMI). On the other hand, high exposure to PWMI was significantly associated with lower stigma among respondents who had high education. Stigma scores increased with increasing income among respondents who had lower educational status. Our findings revealed moderate level of family stigma. Place of residence, perceived signs and explanations of mental illness were independent correlates of public stigma against family members of people with mental illness. Therefore, mental health communication programs to inform explanations and signs of mental illness need to be implemented.

  6. Demographic and anthropometrical analysis and genotype distribution of chronic hepatitis C patients treated in public and private reference centers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Focaccia

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a serious public health problem, since 80% to 85% of HCV carriers develop a persistent infection that can progress into liver cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. Considering that the response of hepatitis C patients to combination therapy with interferon and ribavirin depends on HCV characteristics as well as on host features, we made a retrospective analysis of demographic and anthropometrical data and HCV genotype distribution of chronic hepatitis C patients treated in public and private reference centers in Brazil. The medical records of 4,996 patients were reviewed, 81% from public and 19% from private institutions. Patients' median age was 46 years, and there was a higher prevalence of male (62% and white patients (80%. The analysis of HCV-infecting strains showed a predominance of genotype 1 (64% over genotypes 2 and 3. The patients' mean weight was 70.6 kg, and 65% of the patients weighed less than 77kg. Overweight and obesity were observed in 37.8% and 13.6% of the patients, respectively. Since a body weight of 75 kg or less has been considered an independent factor that significantly increases the odds of achieving a sustained virological response, the Brazilian population seems to have a more favorable body weight profile to achieve a sustained response than the American and European populations. The finding that 65% of chronic hepatitis C patients have a body weight of 77 kg or less may have a positive pharmacoeconomic impact on the treatment of genotype 1 HCV patients with weight-based doses of peginterferon.

  7. A modelling tool for policy analysis to support the design of efficient and effective policy responses for complex public health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jo-An; Page, Andrew; Wells, Robert; Milat, Andrew; Wilson, Andrew

    2015-03-03

    In the design of public health policy, a broader understanding of risk factors for disease across the life course, and an increasing awareness of the social determinants of health, has led to the development of more comprehensive, cross-sectoral strategies to tackle complex problems. However, comprehensive strategies may not represent the most efficient or effective approach to reducing disease burden at the population level. Rather, they may act to spread finite resources less intensively over a greater number of programs and initiatives, diluting the potential impact of the investment. While analytic tools are available that use research evidence to help identify and prioritise disease risk factors for public health action, they are inadequate to support more targeted and effective policy responses for complex public health problems. This paper discusses the limitations of analytic tools that are commonly used to support evidence-informed policy decisions for complex problems. It proposes an alternative policy analysis tool which can integrate diverse evidence sources and provide a platform for virtual testing of policy alternatives in order to design solutions that are efficient, effective, and equitable. The case of suicide prevention in Australia is presented to demonstrate the limitations of current tools to adequately inform prevention policy and discusses the utility of the new policy analysis tool. In contrast to popular belief, a systems approach takes a step beyond comprehensive thinking and seeks to identify where best to target public health action and resources for optimal impact. It is concerned primarily with what can be reasonably left out of strategies for prevention and can be used to explore where disinvestment may occur without adversely affecting population health (or equity). Simulation modelling used for policy analysis offers promise in being able to better operationalise research evidence to support decision making for complex problems

  8. High prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization among healthy children attending public daycare centers in informal settlements in a large urban center in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Eneida Dias Vianna; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; de Freitas, Maria de Fátima Nogueira; de e Silva, Monique Oliveira; Correa, Thami Valadares; Snyder, Robert E; de Araújo, Verônica Afonso; Marlow, Mariel Asbury; Riley, Lee W; Setúbal, Sérgio; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; Araújo Cardoso, Claudete Aparecida

    2014-10-06

    In the past decade methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly prevalent in community settings. Attending a daycare center (DCC) is a known risk factor for colonization with MRSA. Brazil operates free, public DCCs for low-income families, some of which are located in census tracts defined by the Brazilian Census Bureau as informal settlements (aglomerados subnormais, AGSN). Physical and demographic characteristics of AGSNs suggest that S. aureus colonization prevalence would be higher, but little is known about the prevalence of MRSA in these settings. We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess risk factors for S. aureus and MRSA colonization among children attending DCCs located in AGSN vs non-AGSN. Nasal swabs were collected from children aged three months to six years in 23 public DCCs in Niterói, Brazil between August 2011 and October 2012. Of 500 children enrolled in the study, 240 (48%) were colonized with S. aureus and 31 (6.2%) were colonized with MRSA. Children attending DCCs in AGSNs were 2.32 times more likely to be colonized with S. aureus (95% CI: 1.32, 4.08), and 3.27 times more likely to be colonized with MRSA than children attending non-AGSN DCCs (95% CI: 1.52, 7.01), adjusted for confounding variables. S. aureus and MRSA colonization prevalence among children attending DCCs in informal settlement census tracts was higher than previously reported in healthy pre-school children in Latin America. Our data suggest that transmission may occur more frequently in DCCs rather than at home, highlighting the importance of DCCs in AGSNs as potential MRSA reservoirs. This finding underscores the importance of local epidemiologic surveillance in vulnerable AGSN communities.

  9. Implementation of an Interdisciplinary, Team-Based Complex Care Support Health Care Model at an Academic Medical Center: Impact on Health Care Utilization and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Christine; Andersen, Robin; Eng, Jessica; Garrigues, Sarah K; Intinarelli, Gina; Kao, Helen; Kawahara, Suzanne; Patel, Kanan; Sapiro, Lisa; Thibault, Anne; Tunick, Erika; Barnes, Deborah E

    2016-01-01

    The Geriatric Resources for the Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE) program has been shown to decrease acute care utilization and increase patient self-rated health in low-income seniors at community-based health centers. To describe adaptation of the GRACE model to include adults of all ages (named Care Support) and to evaluate the process and impact of Care Support implementation at an urban academic medical center. 152 high-risk patients (≥5 ED visits or ≥2 hospitalizations in the past 12 months) enrolled from four medical clinics from 4/29/2013 to 5/31/2014. Patients received a comprehensive in-home assessment by a nurse practitioner/social worker (NP/SW) team, who then met with a larger interdisciplinary team to develop an individualized care plan. In consultation with the primary care team, standardized care protocols were activated to address relevant key issues as needed. A process evaluation based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research identified key adaptations of the original model, which included streamlining of standardized protocols, augmenting mental health interventions and performing some assessments in the clinic. A summative evaluation found a significant decline in the median number of ED visits (5.5 to 0, p = 0.015) and hospitalizations (5.5 to 0, phealth increased from 31% at enrollment to 64% at 9 months (p = 0.002). Semi-structured interviews with Care Support team members identified patients with multiple, complex conditions; little community support; and mild anxiety as those who appeared to benefit the most from the program. It was feasible to implement GRACE/Care Support at an academic medical center by making adaptations based on local needs. Care Support patients experienced significant reductions in acute care utilization and significant improvements in self-rated health.

  10. Desempenho motor de lactentes frequentadores de berçários em creches públicas Motor performance of infants attending the nurseries of public day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Baltieri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o desempenho motor axial, apendicular e global e sua correlação com as características neonatais, familiares e de tempo de exposição à creche em crianças com idade entre 12-24 meses, frequentadoras de creches públicas. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 40 lactentes (idade média 14,3±2,4 meses frequentadores de creches públicas. Os participantes foram avaliados quanto ao desempenho motor com a Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III, a qual possibilita análise do desempenho motor e comparação dos domínios motores axial e apendicular. Foram coletados dados neonatais, familiares e de exposição à creche e pesquisou-se a correlação destes fatores ao desempenho motor. Foi utilizado o teste t pareado para comparar médias e a correlação de Pearson. RESULTADOS: O desempenho motor do grupo esteve, em média, abaixo da referência, com 22,5% das crianças classificadas como suspeitas de atraso nos desempenhos axial e global, contrastando com nenhuma no domínio apendicular. A comparação axial e apendicular apontou diferença significativa, com desempenho axial aquém do apendicular, além de 35% do grupo ter apresentado discrepância significativa entre esses domínios. Não foi encontrada correlação linear entre os domínios motores avaliados e as variáveis neonatais, familiares e de exposição à creche. CONCLUSÕES: O desempenho motor global do grupo esteve abaixo da média de referência, com desempenho motor axial inferior ao apendicular e importante discrepância entre esses. Recomenda-se atenção às habilidades motoras axiais e às oportunidades de exploração que o ambiente em creches pode propiciar, especialmente no decorrer dos dois primeiros anos de vida.OBJECTIVE: To analyze gross, fine and global motor performance and its correlation with neonatal and familial variables and day care exposure among children between 12-24 months of age attending public day care centers. METHODS: This

  11. Properties of hybrid complexes composed of photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and quantum dots in lecithin liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagidullin, V E; Lukashev, E P; Knox, P P; Seifullina, N Kh; Sokolova, O S; Pechnikova, E V; Lokstein, H; Paschenko, V Z

    2014-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) can absorb ultraviolet and long-wavelength light energy much more efficiently than natural light-harvesting proteins and transfer the excitation energy to photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Inclusion into liposomes of RC membrane pigment-protein complexes combined with QDs as antennae opens new opportunities for using such hybrid systems as a basis for artificial energy-transforming devices that potentially can operate with greater efficiency and stability than devices based only on biological components. RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and QDs with fluorescence maximum at 530 nm (CdSe/ZnS with hydrophilic covering) were embedded in lecithin liposomes by extrusion of a solution of multilayer lipid vesicles through a polycarbonate membrane or by dialysis of lipids and proteins dispersed with excess detergent. The dimensions of the resulting hybrid systems were evaluated using dynamic light scattering and by transmission cryoelectron microscopy. The efficiency of RC and QD interaction within the liposomes was estimated using fluorescence excitation spectra of the photoactive bacteriochlorophyll of the RCs and by measuring the fluorescence decay kinetics of the QDs. The functional activity of the RCs in hybrid complexes was fully maintained, and their stability was even increased.

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... America's Freedoms Special Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer Sports Clinic Training - ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ... Search Tips Modify Your Search How to Obtain Articles Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact Us ... PTSD PTSD Home For the Public Public Section Home PTSD Overview ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ...

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Specific Providers VA Providers and Staff Disaster Responders Medical Doctors Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ...

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Contact ... PTSD PTSD Home For the Public Public Section Home PTSD Overview ...

  18. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3-70). Volume 2, Public comments and NRC response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (Volume 1), was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to assess the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana by Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are co on, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the site. In order to help assure that releases from the operation of the facility and potential impacts on the public are as low as reasonably achievable, an environmental monitoring program was developed by LES to detect significant changes in the background levels of uranium around the site. Other issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment, and proposes to issue a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility. The letters in this Appendix have been divided into three sections. Section One contains letters to which the NRC responded by addressing specific comments. Section Two contains the letters that concerned the communities of Forest Grove and Center Springs. Section Three is composed of letters that required no response. These letters were generally in support of the facility.

  19. Public Airports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set is a vector point digital data structure that contains the locations of General Public Use Airports in the State of New Mexico. It only contains those...

  20. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Saki; Inoue, Manami; Saito, Eiko; Abe, Sarah K; Sawada, Norie; Ishihara, Junko; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Shibuya, Kenji; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested a protective effect of dietary fiber intake on breast cancer risk while the results have been inconsistent. Our study aimed to investigate the association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk and to explore whether this association is modified by reproductive factors and hormone receptor status of the tumor. A total of 44,444 women aged 45 to 74 years from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study were included in analyses. Dietary intake assessment was performed using a validated 138-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer incidence were calculated by multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models. During 624,423 person-years of follow-up period, 681 breast cancer cases were identified. After adjusting for major confounders for breast cancer risk, inverse trends were observed but statistically non-significant. Extremely high intake of fiber was associated with decreased risk of breast cancer but this should be interpreted with caution due to limited statistical power. In stratified analyses by menopausal and hormone receptor status, null associations were observed except for ER-PR- status. Our findings suggest that extreme high fiber intake may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer but the level of dietary fiber intake among Japanese population might not be sufficient to examine the association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk.

  1. Coffee and Green Tea Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Malignant Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma in Japan: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugai, Tomotaka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-08-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of coffee and green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma in a large-scale population-based cohort study in Japan.Methods: In this analysis, a total of 95,807 Japanese subjects (45,937 men and 49,870 women; ages 40-69 years at baseline) of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study who completed a questionnaire about their coffee and green tea consumption were followed up until December 31, 2012, for an average of 18 years. HRs and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using a Cox regression model adjusted for potential confounders as a measure of association between the risk of malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma associated with coffee and green tea consumption at baseline.Results: During the follow-up period, a total of 411 malignant lymphoma cases and 138 multiple myeloma cases were identified. Overall, our findings showed no significant association between coffee or green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma for both sexes.Conclusions: In this study, we observed no significant association between coffee or green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma.Impact: Our results do not support an association between coffee or green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1352-6. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Drop-out from the tuberculosis contact investigation cascade in a routine public health setting in urban Uganda: A prospective, multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong-Hough, Mari; Turimumahoro, Patricia; Meyer, Amanda J; Ochom, Emmanuel; Babirye, Diana; Ayakaka, Irene; Mark, David; Ggita, Joseph; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David; Mugabe, Frank; Fair, Elizabeth; Haberer, Jessica E; Katamba, Achilles; Davis, J Lucian

    2017-01-01

    Seven public tuberculosis (TB) units in Kampala, Uganda, where Uganda's national TB program recently introduced household contact investigation, as recommended by 2012 guidelines from WHO. To apply a cascade analysis to implementation of household contact investigation in a programmatic setting. Prospective, multi-center observational study. We constructed a cascade for household contact investigation to describe the proportions of: 1) index patient households recruited; 2) index patient households visited; 3) contacts screened for TB; and 4) contacts completing evaluation for, and diagnosed with, active TB. 338 (33%) of 1022 consecutive index TB patients were eligible for contact investigation. Lay health workers scheduled home visits for 207 (61%) index patients and completed 104 (50%). Among 287 eligible contacts, they screened 256 (89%) for symptoms or risk factors for TB. 131 (51%) had an indication for further TB evaluation. These included 59 (45%) with symptoms alone, 58 (44%) children contacts found to be symptomatic or at risk, 26 (20%) contacts completed evaluation, including five (19%) diagnosed with and treated for active TB, for an overall yield of 1.7%. The cumulative conditional probability of completing the entire cascade was 5%. Major opportunities exist for improving the effectiveness and yield of TB contact investigation by increasing the proportion of index households completing screening visits by lay health workers and the proportion of at-risk contacts completing TB evaluation.

  3. Perceived stress level and risk of cancer incidence in a Japanese population: the Japan Public Health Center (JPHC)-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huan; Saito, Eiko; Sawada, Norie; Abe, Sarah K; Hidaka, Akihisa; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Goto, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Ye, Weimin; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-10-11

    Evidence regarding stress as a risk factor for cancer onset is inconsistent. In this study, based on the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study, we enrolled 101,708 participants aged 40-69 years from 1990-1994. The self-reported perceived stress level was collected at baseline and updated through 5-year follow-up. The association between perceived stress and cancer risk was measured by Cox proportional hazards regression model, adjusted for all known confounders. During follow-up (mean = 17.8 years), we identified 17,161 cancer cases. We found no association between baseline perceived stress level and cancer incidence. However, by taking account of the dynamic changes in perceived stress, time-varying analyses revealed a slightly (4-6%) increased overall cancer risk for subjects under elevated perceived stress levels compared to the 'low stress level' group. Analyses concerning long-term perceived stress level showed that individuals with constantly high perceived stress level had an 11% (95% confidence interval 1-22%) excess risk for cancer compared to subjects with persistently low stress levels. This association was confined to men (20% excess risk), and was particularly strong among smokers, alcohol drinkers, obese subjects, and subjects without family history of cancer. Therefore, we concluded high perceived stress level might contribute to excess overall cancer incidence among men.

  4. Cultural tailoring for mammography and fruit and vegetable intake among low-income African-American women in urban public health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, Matthew W; Sugg-Skinner, Celette; Holt, Cheryl L; Clark, Eddie M; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Fu, Qiang; Booker, Angela C; Steger-May, Karen; Bucholtz, Dawn

    2005-07-01

    It is widely accepted that disease prevention efforts should consider cultural factors when addressing the needs of diverse populations, yet there is surprisingly little evidence that doing so enhances effectiveness. The Institute of Medicine has called for randomized studies directly comparing approaches that do and do not consider culture. In a randomized trial, 1227 lower-income African-American women from 10 urban public health centers were assigned to either a usual care control group, or to receive a series of six women's health magazines with content tailored to each individual. By random assignment, these magazines were generated from either behavioral construct tailoring (BCT), culturally relevant tailoring (CRT) or both (BCT + CRT). The CRT magazines were based on four cultural constructs: religiosity, collectivism, racial pride, and time orientation. All tailored magazines sent to women ages 40-65 promoted use of mammography; magazines sent to women ages 18-39 promoted fruit and vegetable (FV) intake. Analyses examined changes from baseline to 18-month follow-up in use of mammography and servings of FV consumed daily. Women receiving BCT + CRT magazines were more likely than those in the BCT, CRT, and control groups to report getting a mammogram (76% vs. 65% vs. 64% vs. 55%, respectively), and had greater increases in FV servings consumed daily (+0.96 vs. + 0.43 vs. + 0.25 vs. + 0.59). Systematically integrating culture into tailored cancer prevention and control interventions may enhance their effectiveness in diverse populations.

  5. CDBG Public Improvements Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to public improvements, including senior centers, youth centers, parks, street improvements, water/sewer improvements, child care centers, fire...

  6. Molecular analysis and distribution of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates belonging to clonal complex 17 in a tertiary care center in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterococcus faecium has recently emerged as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen involved in outbreaks worldwide. A high rate of resistance to different antibiotics has been associated with virulent clonal complex 17 isolates carrying the esp and hyl genes and the purK1 allele. Results Twelve clinical vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) isolates were obtained from pediatric patients at the Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez (HIMFG). Among these VREF isolates, 58.3% (7/12) were recovered from urine, while 41.7% (5/12) were recovered from the bloodstream. The VREF isolates showed a 100% rate of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, gentamicin, rifampicin, erythromycin and teicoplanin. In addition, 16.7% (2/12) of the isolates were resistant to linezolid, and 66.7% (8/12) were resistant to tetracycline and doxycycline. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the vanA gene in all 12 VREF isolates, esp in 83.3% (10/12) of the isolates and hyl in 50% (6/12) of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis via molecular typing was performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and demonstrated 44% similarity among the VREF isolates. MLST analysis identified four different sequence types (ST412, ST757, ST203 and ST612). Conclusion This study provides the first report of multidrug-resistant VREF isolates belonging to clonal complex 17 from a tertiary care center in Mexico City. Multidrug resistance and genetic determinants of virulence confer advantages among VREF in the colonization of their host. Therefore, the prevention and control of the spread of nosocomial infections caused by VREF is crucial for identifying new emergent subclones that could be challenging to treat in subsequent years. PMID:24330424

  7. The green, the nuclear and the public opinion: complex and ambiguous relations; Les verts, le nucleaire et l'opinion publique: des relations complexes et ambigues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazile, F. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-15

    Four points are the subject of controversy between the Green and the nuclear energy. the nuclear wastes, the Chernobylsk cloud that stopped at the border, the independent expertise and the caution principle. First, the solution for the high level and long lived radioactive wastes exists and is recognized by the international scientific community, beyond, the research pursues in order to reduce the ultimate wastes still further. About the second point the French Authorities have not said that the Chernobylsk cloud stopped at the border, but the difference of position between French and German information bear on the sanitary impact of this fallout. Concerning the third claim, it underestimates the dialectic character of the scientific results construction but it represent an opposite power in the French opinion. Then, the caution principle does not ask to stop an activity whom risk is not completely measured but we take any measure to anticipate and reduce this risk. Beyond these points it is known that nuclear energy does not produce greenhouse gases and this only characteristic should allow to inflect the public preference towards nuclear energy. (N.C.)

  8. Source estimation for propagation processes on complex networks with an application to delays in public transportation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manitz, J. (Juliane); Harbering, J. (Jonas); M.E. Schmidt (Marie); T. Kneib (Thomas); A. Schöbel (Anita)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe correct identification of the source of a propagation process is crucial in many research fields. As a specific application, we consider source estimation of delays in public transportation networks. We propose two approaches: an effective distance median and a backtracking method.

  9. 77 FR 485 - Wind Plant Performance-Public Meeting on Modeling and Testing Needs for Complex Air Flow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind Plant Performance--Public Meeting on Modeling and... may lead to significant improvements in wind plant efficiency and performance, leading to a reduced... provide comment on information needs for the following topics: 1. Wind Turbine Scale Modeling and...

  10. Evaluation and mechanism for outcomes exploration of providing public health care in contract service in rural China: a multiple-case study with complex adaptive systems design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huixuan; Zhang, Shengfa; Zhang, Weijun; Wang, Fugang; Zhong, You; Gu, Linni; Qu, Zhiyong; Tian, Donghua

    2015-02-27

    The Chinese government has increased the funding for public health in 2009 and experimentally applied a contract service policy (could be seen as a counterpart to family medicine) in 15 counties to promote public health services in the rural areas in 2013. The contract service aimed to convert village doctors, who had privately practiced for decades, into general practitioners under the government management, and better control the rampant chronic diseases. This study made a rare attempt to assess the effectiveness of public health services delivered under the contract service policy, explore the influencing mechanism and draw the implications for the policy extension in the future. Three pilot counties and a non-pilot one with heterogeneity in economic and health development from east to west of China were selected by a purposive sampling method. The case study methods by document collection, non-participant observation and interviews (including key informant interview and focus group interview) with 84 health providers and 20 demanders in multiple level were applied in this study. A thematic approach was used to compare diverse outcomes and analyze mechanism in the complex adaptive systems framework. Without sufficient incentives, the public health services were not conducted effectively, regardless of the implementation of the contract policy. To appropriately increase the funding for public health by local finance and properly allocate subsidy to village doctors was one of the most effective approaches to stimulate health providers and demanders' positivity and promote the policy implementation. County health bureaus acted as the most crucial agents among the complex public health systems. Their mental models influenced by the compound and various environments around them led to the diverse outcomes. If they could provide extra incentives and make the contexts of the systems ripe enough for change, the health providers and demanders would be receptive to the

  11. Implementation of a multidisciplinary approach to solve complex nano EHS problems by the UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Malasarn, Davin; Lin, Sijie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Haiyuan; Miller, Robert J; Keller, Arturo A; Nisbet, Roger M; Harthorn, Barbara H; Godwin, Hilary A; Lenihan, Hunter S; Liu, Rong; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge; Cohen, Yoram; Mädler, Lutz; Holden, Patricia A; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre E

    2013-05-27

    UC CEIN was established with funding from the US National Science Foundation and the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2008 with the mission to study the impact of nanotechnology on the environment, including the identification of hazard and exposure scenarios that take into consideration the unique physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Since its inception, the Center has made great progress in assembling a multidisciplinary team to develop the scientific underpinnings, research, knowledge acquisition, education and outreach that is required for assessing the safe implementation of nanotechnology in the environment. In this essay, the development of the infrastructure, protocols, and decision-making tools that are required to effectively integrate complementary scientific disciplines allowing knowledge gathering in a complex study area that goes beyond the traditional safety and risk assessment protocols of the 20th century is outlined. UC CEIN's streamlined approach, premised on predictive hazard and exposure assessment methods, high-throughput discovery platforms and environmental decision-making tools that consider a wide range of nano/bio interfaces in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, demonstrates the implementation of a 21st-century approach to the safe implementation of nanotechnology in the environment. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Adaptation of a Voice-Centered Relational Framework to Explore the Perspective of Parents Who Have Transitioned to Home with a Child With Complex Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Maria; Connolly, Michael; Larkin, Philip J; Hilliard, Carol; Howlin, Frances; Cawley, Des

    2017-12-01

    Parents of children with complex care needs are generally willing to participate in research studies about their experiences; however, they are often challenged in their capacity to participate as they struggle to find time for family life. In our research with parents to explore their experience of transitioning to home, we deliberately sought an approach that would reduce the imposition on parents, while gaining insightful interpretations of their experiences. This article reflects on our experience of the process of discovering, analyzing, and interpreting parents' perspectives of their journey to home, when interviewed by telephone. Applying the voice-centered relational method of qualitative analysis, accounts from parents were explored by the research team using 4 perspectives: the plot and evaluator responses to the narrative; the voice of the "I"; relationships; and placing people within cultural contexts and social structures. Parents interviewed were very receptive to being interviewed by phone. We found that this enhanced their trust in the interview process and subsequently led to our ability to gather rich data. The use of multiple lenses of analysis gave insightful interpretations of their journey to home.

  13. Germinal Center Kinases SmKIN3 and SmKIN24 Are Associated with the Sordaria macrospora Striatin-Interacting Phosphatase and Kinase (STRIPAK Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Frey

    Full Text Available The striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK complex is composed of striatin, protein phosphatase PP2A and protein kinases that regulate development in animals and fungi. In the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora, it is required for fruiting-body development and cell fusion. Here, we report on the presence and function of STRIPAK-associated kinases in ascomycetes. Using the mammalian germinal center kinases (GCKs MST4, STK24, STK25 and MINK1 as query, we identified the two putative homologs SmKIN3 and SmKIN24 in S. macrospora. A BLASTP search revealed that both kinases are conserved among filamentous ascomycetes. The physical interaction of the striatin homolog PRO11 with SmKIN3 and SmKIN24 were verified by yeast two-hybrid (Y2H interaction studies and for SmKIN3 by co-Immunoprecipitation (co-IP. In vivo localization found that both kinases were present at the septa and deletion of both Smkin3 and Smkin24 led to abnormal septum distribution. While deletion of Smkin3 caused larger distances between adjacent septa and increased aerial hyphae, deletion of Smkin24 led to closer spacing of septa and to sterility. Although phenotypically distinct, both kinases appear to function independently because the double-knockout strain ΔSmkin3/ΔSmkin24 displayed the combined phenotypes of each single-deletion strain.

  14. Characteristics of HIV seroprevalence of visitors to public health centers under the national HIV surveillance system in Korea: cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sung-Soon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Korea, the cumulative number of HIV-infected individuals was smaller than those of other countries. Mandatory HIV tests, dominating method until 1990's, have been gradually changed to voluntary HIV tests. We investigated HIV seroprevalence status and its characteristics of visitors to Public Health Centers (PHCs, which conducted both mandatory test and voluntary test under the national HIV/STI surveillance program. Methods We used HIV-testing data from 246 PHCs in 2005 through the Health Care Information System. The number of test taker was calculated using the code distinguished by the residential identification number. The subjects were classified into four groups by reason for testing; General group, HIV infection suspected group (HIV ISG, HIV test recommended group (HIV TRG, and sexually transmitted infection (STI risk group. Results People living with HIV/AIDS were 149 (124 male and 25 female among 280,456 individuals tested at PHCs. HIV seroprevalence was 5.3 per 10,000 individuals. Overall, the male revealed significantly higher seroprevalence than the female (adjusted Odds Ratio (adj. OR: 6.2; CI 3.8–10.2. Individuals aged 30–39 years (adj. OR: 2.6; CI 1.7–4.0, and 40–49 years (adj. OR: 3.8; CI 2.4–6.0 had higher seroprevalence than 20–29 years. Seroprevalence of HIV ISG (voluntary test takers and cases referred by doctors was significantly higher than those of others. Foreigners showed higher seroprevalence than native Koreans (adj. OR: 3.8; CI 2.2–6.4. HIV ISG (adj. OR: 4.9; CI 3.2–7.5, and HIV TRG (adj. OR: 2.6; CI 1.3–5.4 had higher seroprevalence than General group. Conclusion A question on the efficiency of current mandatory test is raised because the seroprevalence of mandatory test takers was low. However, HIV ISG included voluntary test takers was high in our result. Therefore, we suggest that Korea needs to develop a method encouraging more people to take voluntary tests at PHCs, also to

  15. Electroluminescence characteristics of a new kind of rare-earth complex: TbY(o-MOBA){sub 6}(phen){sub 2} {center_dot}2H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yumeng [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Deng, Zhenbo [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: zbdeng@center.njtu.edu.cn; Xiao, Jing [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Xu, Denghui [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Chen, Zheng [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang, Ruifen [Department of Chemistry, Heibei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050091 (China)

    2007-01-15

    A new rare-earth complex TbY(o-MOBA){sub 6}(phen){sub 2} {center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was synthesized, which was used as an emitting material in electroluminescence device. This was doped into poly(N-vinylcarbazole) and two devices were fabricated having structures of (1) Glass/ITO/PVK:RE complex/LiF/Al, and (2) Glass/ITO/PVK:RE complex/BCP/AlQ/LiF/Al. As compared with a different Terbium complex Tb(o-MOBA){sub 3}phen{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, the photoluminescence and electroluminescence mechanisms were discussed. Bright green emission was obtained from the optimized multi-layer device and the highest brightness reached 124.5 cd/m{sup 2} at the voltage of 23 V.

  16. Characteristics of Public and Bureau of Indian Education Elementary and Secondary School Library Media Centers in the United States: Results From the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey. NCES 2009-322

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Rebecca; Gruber, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    This report presents selected findings from the school library media center data files of the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public, private, and Bureau of Indian Education-funded (BIE) K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The public…

  17. Red meat consumption is associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes in men but not in women: a Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotani, Kayo; Nanri, Akiko; Goto, Atsushi; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Oba, Shino; Kato, Masayuki; Matsushita, Yumi; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between different types of meat intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes remains unclear. We prospectively examined the association between total meat, total red meat, unprocessed red meat, processed meat and poultry intake and the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Subjects were 27 425 men and 36 424 women aged 45–75 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study, and had no history of type 2 diabetes, cancer, stroke, IHD, chronic liver disease or kidney disease. Meat intake was estimated using a validated 147-item FFQ. OR of self-reported, physician-diagnosed type 2 diabetes over 5 years were estimated using a multiple logistic regression. A total of 1178 newly diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes were self-reported. Intakes of total meat and total red meat were associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men but not in women. The multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile of total meat and total red meat intake were 1·36 (95% CI 1·07, 1·73; P for trend=0·006) and 1·48 (95% CI 1·15, 1·90; P for trend=0·003) for men, respectively, and 0·82 (95% CI 0·62, 1·09; P for trend=0·14) and 0·77 (95% CI 0·57, 1·02; P for trend=0·08) for women, respectively. Intakes of processed red meat and poultry were not associated with the increased risk of diabetes in either men or women. In conclusion, elevated intake of red meat is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men but not in women.

  18. Low-carbohydrate diet and type 2 diabetes risk in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kurotani, Kayo; Goto, Atsushi; Oba, Shino; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is sparse and contradictory regarding the association between low-carbohydrate diet score and type 2 diabetes risk, and no prospective study examined the association among Asians, who consume greater amount of carbohydrate. We prospectively investigated the association of low-carbohydrate diet score with type 2 diabetes risk. Participants were 27,799 men and 36,875 women aged 45-75 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study and who had no history of diabetes. Dietary intake was ascertained by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and low-carbohydrate diet score was calculated from total carbohydrate, fat, and protein intake. The scores for high animal protein and fat or for high plant protein and fat were also calculated. Odds ratios of self-reported, physician-diagnosed type 2 diabetes over 5-year were estimated by using logistic regression. During the 5-year period, 1191 new cases of type 2 diabetes were self-reported. Low-carbohydrate diet score for high total protein and fat was significantly associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in women (P for trend women, whereas the score for high plant protein and fat was not associated in both men and women. Low-carbohydrate diet was associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese women and this association may be partly attributable to high intake of white rice. The association for animal-based and plant-based low-carbohydrate diet warrants further investigation.

  19. Dietary patterns and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality in Japanese men and women: The Japan public health center-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Shimazu, Taichi; Ishihara, Junko; Takachi, Ribeka; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Sawada, Norie; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis showed an inverse association of a prudent/healthy dietary pattern with all-cause mortality and no association of a western/unhealthy dietary pattern. However, the association of distinctive dietary patterns of Japanese population with mortality remains unclear. We prospectively investigated the association between dietary patterns and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality among Japanese adults. Participants were 36,737 men and 44,983 women aged 45-74 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (1995-1998) and who had no history of serious disease. Dietary patterns were derived from principal component analysis of the consumption of 134 food and beverage items ascertained by a food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios of death from the second survey to December 2012 were estimated using cox proportional hazard regression analysis. A prudent dietary pattern, which was characterized by high intake of vegetables, fruit, soy products, potatoes, seaweed, mushrooms, and fish, was significantly associated with decreased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality for the highest versus lowest quartile of the prudent dietary pattern score were 0.82 (0.77 to 0.86) and 0.72 (0.64 to 0.79), respectively (P for trend <0.001 in both). A Westernized dietary pattern, characterized by high intake of meat, processed meat, bread, and dairy products, was also inversely associated with risk of all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality. A traditional Japanese dietary pattern was not associated with these risks. The prudent and Westernized dietary patterns were associated with a decreased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in Japanese adults.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from patients attending a public referral center for sexually transmitted diseases in Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Bedeschi Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates obtained from patients attending a public referral center for sexually transmitted diseases and specialized care services (STD/SCS in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Methods Between March 2011 and February 2012, 201 specimens of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were consecutively obtained from men with symptoms of urethritis and women with symptons of cervicitis or were obtained during their initial consultation. The strains were tested using the disk diffusion method, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of azithromycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin, tetracycline and spectinomycin were determined using the E-test. Results The specimens were 100% sensitive to cefixime, ceftriaxone and spectinomycin and exhibited resistances of 4.5% (9/201, 21.4% (43/201, 11.9% (24/201, 22.4% (45/201 and 32.3% (65/201 to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin and tetracycline, respectively. Intermediate sensitivities of 17.9% (36/201, 4% (8/201, 16.9% (34/201, 71.1% (143/201 and 22.9% (46/201 were observed for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin and tetracycline, respectively. The specimens had plasmid-mediated resistance to penicillin PPNG 14.5% (29/201 and tetracycline TRNG 11.5% (23/201. Conclusions The high percentage of detected resistance to penicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin indicates that these antibiotics are not appropriate for gonorrhea treatment at the Health Clinic and possibly in Belo Horizonte. The resistance and intermediate sensitivity of these isolates indicates that caution is recommended in the use of azithromycin and emphasizes the need to establish mechanisms for the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance for the effective control of gonorrhea.

  1. Dietary patterns and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality in Japanese men and women: The Japan public health center-based prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Nanri

    Full Text Available A meta-analysis showed an inverse association of a prudent/healthy dietary pattern with all-cause mortality and no association of a western/unhealthy dietary pattern. However, the association of distinctive dietary patterns of Japanese population with mortality remains unclear. We prospectively investigated the association between dietary patterns and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality among Japanese adults.Participants were 36,737 men and 44,983 women aged 45-74 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (1995-1998 and who had no history of serious disease. Dietary patterns were derived from principal component analysis of the consumption of 134 food and beverage items ascertained by a food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios of death from the second survey to December 2012 were estimated using cox proportional hazard regression analysis.A prudent dietary pattern, which was characterized by high intake of vegetables, fruit, soy products, potatoes, seaweed, mushrooms, and fish, was significantly associated with decreased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality for the highest versus lowest quartile of the prudent dietary pattern score were 0.82 (0.77 to 0.86 and 0.72 (0.64 to 0.79, respectively (P for trend <0.001 in both. A Westernized dietary pattern, characterized by high intake of meat, processed meat, bread, and dairy products, was also inversely associated with risk of all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality. A traditional Japanese dietary pattern was not associated with these risks.The prudent and Westernized dietary patterns were associated with a decreased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in Japanese adults.

  2. Role of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage with Positive CTA spot sign: An institutional experience at a regional and state designated stroke center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmani, Razia; Han, Angela; Hassan, Jawaad; Farkas, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    Our objective is to identify the effect of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) in acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) by evaluating intraparenchymal hematoma expansion between initial and follow-up head CT at 5-24 h, in those with positive CTA spot sign (CTASS). CTASS is an independent predictor of hematoma growth (1). Acute ICH, regardless of etiology, can present with quick mental status decline often resulting in irreversible brain damage. Hematoma expansion appears to be a modifiable predictor of clinical outcome and an appropriate target for medical therapy. PCC is a procoagulant which is the agent of choice in warfarin-related ICH. We explore utility of PCC in all patients regardless of warfarin status. We retrospectively reviewed patients with ICH at our NY State designated Stroke Center from Nov 2013 to Dec 2015. Twenty-three of the 85 patients with ICH received PCC, of which 8 had positive CTASS (E = 8). Four of the 62 patients without PCC, had a positive CTASS (C = 4). Interval change in ICH volume at 5-24 h was measured using ABC/2 formula, which is an accurate predictor of ICH volume (5). Control group (C) showed increase in mean ICH volume of 46% (SD = 37.3%), whereas experimental group (E) showed a decrease of 13% (SD = 29.9%) (p value = 0.012). We found a strong statistical correlation favoring our hypothesis. Use of PCC in active ICH with positive CTASS resulted in overall decrease in the mean hematoma size at 24 h, whereas the control group showed an overall increase.

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of mononitrosyl complexes in heme-nonheme diiron centers within the myoglobin scaffold (FeBMbs): relevance to denitrifying NO reductase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Miner, Kyle D.; Yeung, Natasha; Lin, Ying-Wu; Lu, Yi; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Denitrifying NO reductases are evolutionarily related to the superfamily of heme-copper terminal oxidases. These transmembrane protein complexes utilize a heme-nonheme diiron center to reduce two NO molecules to N2O. To understand this reaction, the diiron site has been modeled using sperm whale myoglobin as a scaffold and mutating distal residues Leu-29 and Phe-43 to histidines, and Val-68 to a glutamic acid to create a nonheme FeB site. The impact of incorporation of metal ions at this engineered site on the reaction of the ferrous heme with one NO was examined by UV-vis absorption, EPR, resonance Raman, and FTIR spectroscopies. UV-vis absorption and resonance Raman spectra demonstrate that the first NO molecule binds to the ferrous heme, but while the apoproteins and CuI- or ZnII-loaded proteins show characteristic EPR signatures of S = 1/2 six-coordinate heme {FeNO}7 species observable at liquid nitrogen temperature, the FeII-loaded proteins are EPR silent at ≥ 30 K. Vibrational modes from the heme [Fe-N-O] unit are identified in the RR and FTIR spectra using 15NO and 15N18O. The apo- and CuI-bound proteins exhibit ν(FeNO) and ν(NO) that are only marginally distinct from those reported for native myoglobin. However, binding of FeII at the FeB site shifts the heme ν(FeNO) by +17 cm-1 and the ν(NO) by -50 cm-1 to 1549 cm-1. This low ν(NO) is without precedent for a six-coordinate heme {FeNO}7 species and suggests that the NO group adopts a strong nitroxyl character stabilized by electrostatic interaction with the nearby nonheme FeII. Detection of a similarly low ν(NO) in the ZnII-loaded protein supports this interpretation. PMID:21634416

  4. Forced migrants involved in setting the agenda and designing research to reduce impacts of complex emergencies: combining Swarm with patient and public involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Julii Suzanne; Al Assaf, Enana; Omasete, Judith; Leach, Steve; Hammer, Charlotte C; Hunter, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    The UK's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Protection Research Unit in Emergency Preparedness and Response was asked to undertake research on how to reduce the impact of complex national/international emergencies on public health. How to focus the research and decide on priority topics was challenging, given the nature of complex events. Using a type of structured brain-storming, the researchers identified the ongoing UK, European and international migration crisis as both complex and worthy of deeper research. To further focus the research, two representatives of forced migrant communities were invited to join the project team as patient and public (PPI) representatives. They attended regular project meetings, insightfully contributed to and advised on practical aspects of potential research areas. The representatives identified cultural obstacles and community needs and helped choose the final research study design, which was to interview forced migrants about their strategies to build emotional resilience and prevent mental illness. The representatives also helped design recruitment documents, and undertake recruitment and interviewer training. Many events with wide-ranging negative health impacts are notable for complexity: lack of predictability, non-linear feedback mechanisms and unexpected consequences. A multi-disciplinary research team was tasked with reducing the public health impacts from complex events, but without a pre-specified topic area or research design. This report describes using patient and public involvement within an adaptable but structured development process to set research objectives and aspects of implementation. An agile adaptive development approach, sometimes described as swarm, was used to identify possible research areas. Swarm is meant to quickly identify strengths and weaknesses of any candidate project, to accelerate early failure before resources are invested. When aspects of the European migration crisis

  5. Department Publications List 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Letnes, Louise; Kill, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    This publication is a list of staff papers, extension publications, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy papers, The Food Industry Center working papers, Economic Development Center papers, Center for Farm Financial Management papers, Minnesota Council on Economic Education publications, journal articles, books, chapters, monographs, speeches,web pages, computer software and theses authored by members of the University of Minnesota Department of Applied Economics in 2005.

  6. Department Publications List 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Letnes, Louise; Kill, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    This publication is a list of staff papers, extension publications, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy papers, The Food Industry Center working papers, Economic Development Center papers, Center for Farm Financial Management papers, Minnesota Council on Economic Education publications, journal articles, books, chapters, monographs, speeches,web pages, computer software and theses authored by members of the University of Minnesota Department of Applied Economics in 2006.

  7. Physical activity and 10-year incidence of self-reported vertebral fractures in Japanese women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Kitamura, K; Inoue, M; Sawada, N; Tsugane, S

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed the effects of physical activity on a 10-year incidence of self-reported vertebral fractures in adult women of a large Japanese cohort. Medium levels of strenuous activity and long-duration sedentary activity were associated with a lower incidence of vertebral fractures; association patterns appear to be different from hip fractures. Physical activity helps prevent hip fracture, but little is known about the longitudinal association between physical activity and vertebral fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of physical activity on the 10-year incidence of symptomatic vertebral fractures using data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. Baseline studies were conducted in 1993-1994, and the follow-up study was conducted 10 years later. We analyzed 23,757 women aged 40-69 years. At baseline, physical activity was assessed as a predictor by using a questionnaire. Subjects were asked to report vertebral fractures that occurred during the 10-year follow-up period. Relative risks (RRs) adjusted for confounders were estimated by multiple logistic regression analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of vertebral fractures was 0.67%. Those who engaged in strenuous physical activity of <1 h/day had a significantly lower incidence of vertebral fractures than those who did not engage in such activity (RR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.28-0.97), while those engaged in such activity ≥1 h/day did not (RR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.58-1.14). Long-duration sedentary activity was associated with a low incidence of vertebral fractures (P for trend = 0.0002), but the frequencies of sports activities and metabolic equivalents were not (P for trend = 0.0729 and 0.4341, respectively). Strenuous activity and sedentary activity are associated with the incidence of vertebral fractures, although the association may not be linear. The pattern of association between physical activity and vertebral fractures appears to be

  8. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Shino; Nanri, Akiko; Kurotani, Kayo; Goto, Atsushi; Kato, Masayuki; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-12-27

    Japanese diets contain a relatively high amount of carbohydrates, and its high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load may raise the risk of diabetes in the Japanese population. The current study evaluated the associations between the dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a population based cohort in Japan. We observed 27,769 men and 36,864 women (45-75 y) who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. The dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were estimated using a food-frequency questionnaire. The development of diabetes was reported in a questionnaire administered five years later, and the associations were analyzed using logistic regression after controlling for age, area, total energy intake, smoking status, family history of diabetes, physical activity, hypertension, BMI, alcohol intake, magnesium, calcium, dietary fiber and coffee intake, and occupation. The dietary glycemic load was positively associated with the risk of diabetes among women: the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio comparing the highest vs. the lowest quartile was 1.52 (95% CI, 1.13-2.04; P-trend = 0.01). The association was implied to be stronger among women with BMI women with BMI ≥ 25. The dietary glycemic index was positively associated with the risk of diabetes among men with a high intake of total fat: the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio comparing the highest vs. the lowest quartile was 1.46 (95% CI, 0.94-2.28; P-trend = 0.04). Among women with a high total fat intake, those in the first and second quartiles of the dietary glycemic index had a significant reduced risk of diabetes, compared with those in the first quartile who had a lower total fat level (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio = 0.59 with 95% CI, 0.37-0.94, and odds ratio = 0.63 with 95% CI, 0.40-0.998 respectively). The population-based cohort study in Japan indicated that diets with a high dietary glycemic

  9. Low-carbohydrate diet and type 2 diabetes risk in Japanese men and women: the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Nanri

    Full Text Available Evidence is sparse and contradictory regarding the association between low-carbohydrate diet score and type 2 diabetes risk, and no prospective study examined the association among Asians, who consume greater amount of carbohydrate. We prospectively investigated the association of low-carbohydrate diet score with type 2 diabetes risk.Participants were 27,799 men and 36,875 women aged 45-75 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study and who had no history of diabetes. Dietary intake was ascertained by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and low-carbohydrate diet score was calculated from total carbohydrate, fat, and protein intake. The scores for high animal protein and fat or for high plant protein and fat were also calculated. Odds ratios of self-reported, physician-diagnosed type 2 diabetes over 5-year were estimated by using logistic regression.During the 5-year period, 1191 new cases of type 2 diabetes were self-reported. Low-carbohydrate diet score for high total protein and fat was significantly associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in women (P for trend <0.001; the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio of type 2 diabetes for the highest quintile of the score were 0.63 (95% confidence interval 0.46-0.84, compared with those for the lowest quintile. Additional adjustment for dietary glycemic load attenuated the association (odds ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.45-1.25. When the score separated for animal and for plant protein and fat, the score for high animal protein and fat was inversely associated with type 2 diabetes in women, whereas the score for high plant protein and fat was not associated in both men and women.Low-carbohydrate diet was associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in Japanese women and this association may be partly attributable to high intake of white rice. The association for animal-based and plant-based low

  10. Bridging the Divide Between Climate and Global Change Science and Education of Public and K-12 Visitors at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Munoz, R.; Eastburn, T.; Ammann, C.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Committee, S.

    2004-12-01

    The study of climate and global change is an important on-going focus for scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Programs overseen by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Education and Outreach (UCAR-EO) help to translate NCAR's scientific programs, methodologies, and technologies and their societal benefits to over 80,000 visitors to the NCAR Mesa Laboratory each year, including about 10,000 K-12 students. This is currently accomplished through the implementation of an increasingly integrated system of exhibits, guided tours, an audiotour, programs for school groups, and a teachers' guide to the exhibits, which is currently in development. The Climate Discovery Exhibit unveiled in July 2003 and expanded in 2004 offers visitors visually engaging and informative text panels, graphics, artifacts, and interactives describing Sun-Earth connections, dynamic processes that contribute to and mediate climate change, and the Earth's climate history. The exhibit seeks to help visitors to understand why scientists model the global climate system and how information about past and current climate is used to validate models and build scenarios for Earth's future climate. Exhibit-viewers are challenged to ask questions and reflect upon decision making challenges while considering the roles various natural and human-induced factors play in shaping these predictions. With support from NASA and NCAR, a K-12 Teacher's Guide has been developed corresponding the Climate Discovery exhibit's sections addressing the Sun-Earth connection and past climates (the Little Ice Age, in particular). This presentation will review efforts to identify the challenges of communicating with the public and school groups about climate change, while also describing several successful strategies for utilizing visitor questionnaires and interviews to learn how to develop and refine educational resources that will target their interests, bolster their

  11. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women: the Japan public health center-based prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Japanese diets contain a relatively high amount of carbohydrates, and its high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load may raise the risk of diabetes in the Japanese population. The current study evaluated the associations between the dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a population based cohort in Japan. Methods We observed 27,769 men and 36,864 women (45–75 y) who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. The dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were estimated using a food-frequency questionnaire. The development of diabetes was reported in a questionnaire administered five years later, and the associations were analyzed using logistic regression after controlling for age, area, total energy intake, smoking status, family history of diabetes, physical activity, hypertension, BMI, alcohol intake, magnesium, calcium, dietary fiber and coffee intake, and occupation. Results The dietary glycemic load was positively associated with the risk of diabetes among women: the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio comparing the highest vs. the lowest quartile was 1.52 (95% CI, 1.13-2.04; P-trend = 0.01). The association was implied to be stronger among women with BMI dietary glycemic index was positively associated with the risk of diabetes among men with a high intake of total fat: the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio comparing the highest vs. the lowest quartile was 1.46 (95% CI, 0.94-2.28; P-trend = 0.04). Among women with a high total fat intake, those in the first and second quartiles of the dietary glycemic index had a significant reduced risk of diabetes, compared with those in the first quartile who had a lower total fat level (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio = 0.59 with 95% CI, 0.37-0.94, and odds ratio = 0.63 with 95% CI, 0.40-0.998 respectively). Conclusions The population-based cohort study in Japan indicated that diets with a high dietary

  12. Validating an Agency-based Tool for Measuring Women's Empowerment in a Complex Public Health Trial in Rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, Lu; Morrison, Joanna; Sharma, Neha; Shrestha, Bhim; Manandhar, Dharma; Costello, Anthony; Saville, Naomi; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2017-01-02

    Despite the rising popularity of indicators of women's empowerment in global development programmes, little work has been done on the validity of existing measures of such a complex concept. We present a mixed methods validation of the use of the Relative Autonomy Index for measuring Amartya Sen's notion of agency freedom in rural Nepal. Analysis of think-aloud interviews (n = 7) indicated adequate respondent understanding of questionnaire items, but multiple problems of interpretation including difficulties with the four-point Likert scale, questionnaire item ambiguity and difficulties with translation. Exploratory Factor Analysis of a calibration sample (n = 511) suggested two positively correlated factors (r = 0.64) loading on internally and externally motivated behaviour. Both factors increased with decreasing education and decision-making power on large expenditures and food preparation. Confirmatory Factor Analysis on a validation sample (n = 509) revealed good fit (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation 0.05-0.08, Comparative Fit Index 0.91-0.99). In conclusion, we caution against uncritical use of agency-based quantification of women's empowerment. While qualitative and quantitative analysis revealed overall satisfactory construct and content validity, the positive correlation between external and internal motivations suggests the existence of adaptive preferences. High scores on internally motivated behaviour may reflect internalized oppression rather than agency freedom.

  13. Sodium-centered dodecanuclear Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes with 2-(phosphonomethylamino)succinic acid: studies of spectroscopic, structural, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudima, Andriy O; Shovkova, Ganna V; Trunova, Olena K; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J; Gerasimchuk, Nikolay

    2013-07-01

    Two new isostructural cobalt(II) and nickel(II) polynuclear complexes with 2-(phosphonomethyl)aminosuccinic acid, H4PMAS, namely, Na[Co12(PMAS)6(H2O)17(OH)]·x2H2O, 1·x2H2O, and Na[Ni12(PMAS)6(H2O)17(OH)]·xH2O, 2·xH2O, have been synthesized for the first time from aqueous solutions and studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy; TG/DTA analysis; and magnetochemistry. Both 1 and 2 crystallize in the rhombohedral crystal system with the R3[overline] space group with 1/6 of the Co12(PMAS)6 or Ni12(PMAS)6 moieties in the asymmetric unit. The X-ray refinements reveal the presence of 18 water sites, but unit cell charge balance requires that one water molecule must be an OH(-) anion, an anion which is disordered over the 18 sites. The PMAS(4-) ligand forms two five-membered and one six-membered chelation ring. Both 1 and 2 contain 24-membered metallacycles as a result of the bridging nature of the PMAS(4-) ligands. The resulting three-dimensional structures have one-dimensional channels with a sodium cation at the center of symmetry. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility reveals the presence of weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling interactions in both 1 and 2. Two exchange coupling constants, J1 = -15.3(7) cm(-1) and J2 = -1.06(2) cm(-1) with S1 = S2 = 3/2 for the Co(1)···Co(1) and Co(1)···Co(2) exchange pathways, respectively, are required for 1, and J1 = -1.17(6) cm(-1) and J2 = -4.00(8) cm(-1) with S1 = S2 = 1 for the Ni(1)···Ni(1) and Ni(1)···Ni(2) exchange pathways, respectively, are required for 2, in order to fit the temperature dependence of the observed magnetic susceptibilities.

  14. Virtual Solar Energy Center: A Case Study of the Use of Advanced Visualization Techniques for the Comprehension of Complex Engineering Products and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Kenneth August, III

    Industry has a continuing need to train its workforce on recent engineering developments, but many engineering products and processes are hard to explain because of limitations of size, visibility, time scale, cost, and safety. The product or process might be difficult to see because it is either very large or very small, because it is enclosed within an opaque container, or because it happens very fast or very slowly. Some engineering products and processes are also costly or unsafe to use for training purposes, and sometimes the domain expert is not physically available at the training location. All these limitations can potentially be addressed using advanced visualization techniques such as virtual reality. This dissertation describes the development of an immersive virtual reality application using the Six Sigma DMADV process to explain the main equipment and processes used in a concentrating solar power plant. The virtual solar energy center (VEC) application was initially developed and tested in a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) during 2013 and 2014. The software programs used for development were SolidWorks, 3ds Max Design, and Unity 3D. Current hardware and software technologies that could complement this research were analyzed. The NVIDA GRID Visual Computing Appliance (VCA) was chosen as the rendering solution for animating complex CAD models in this application. The MiddleVR software toolkit was selected as the toolkit for VR interactions and CAVE display. A non-immersive 3D version of the VEC application was tested and shown to be an effective training tool in late 2015. An immersive networked version of the VEC allows the user to receive live instruction from a trainer being projected via depth camera imagery from a remote location. Four comparative analysis studies were performed. These studies used the average normalized gain from pre-test scores to determine the effectiveness of the various training methods. With the DMADV approach

  15. Electron Transport in a Dioxygenase-Ferredoxin Complex: Long Range Charge Coupling between the Rieske and Non-Heme Iron Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne K Dawson

    Full Text Available Dioxygenase (dOx utilizes stereospecific oxidation on aromatic molecules; consequently, dOx has potential applications in bioremediation and stereospecific oxidation synthesis. The reactive components of dOx comprise a Rieske structure Cys2[2Fe-2S]His2 and a non-heme reactive oxygen center (ROC. Between the Rieske structure and the ROC, a universally conserved Asp residue appears to bridge the two structures forming a Rieske-Asp-ROC triad, where the Asp is known to be essential for electron transfer processes. The Rieske and ROC share hydrogen bonds with Asp through their His ligands; suggesting an ideal network for electron transfer via the carboxyl side chain of Asp. Associated with the dOx is an itinerant charge carrying protein Ferredoxin (Fdx. Depending on the specific cognate, Fdx may also possess either the Rieske structure or a related structure known as 4-Cys-[2Fe-2S] (4-Cys. In this study, we extensively explore, at different levels of theory, the behavior of the individual components (Rieske and ROC and their interaction together via the Asp using a variety of density function methods, basis sets, and a method known as Generalized Ionic Fragment Approach (GIFA that permits setting up spin configurations manually. We also report results on the 4-Cys structure for comparison. The individual optimized structures are compared with observed spectroscopic data from the Rieske, 4-Cys and ROC structures (where information is available. The separate pieces are then combined together into a large Rieske-Asp-ROC (donor/bridge/acceptor complex to estimate the overall coupling between individual components, based on changes to the partial charges. The results suggest that the partial charges are significantly altered when Asp bridges the Rieske and the ROC; hence, long range coupling through hydrogen bonding effects via the intercalated Asp bridge can drastically affect the partial charge distributions compared to the individual isolated

  16. The working out of architectural concept for a new type public building — multi-information and education center by using information technologies and mathematical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Владимирович Боровиков

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Architectural concept of multifunctional information and educational center and its implementation is given in the author's project. Advanced information technology and mathematical models used in the development of the author project.

  17. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  18. Partnership Brings Educational Exhibits, Events, and Resources from Seven National Research Laboratories to the Public in a New Retail Center: The Wonders of Science at Twenty Ninth Street Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R.; Carbone, L.; Vangundy, S.; Adams, L.; Becker, K.; Cobabe-Ammanns, E.; Curtis, L.; Dusenbery, P.; Foy, R.; Himes, C.; Howell, C.; Knight, C.; Morehouse, R.; Koch, L.; O'Brian, T.; Rooney, J.; Schassburger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Federally Funded Research and Development Centers and universities are challenged to disseminate their educational resources to national audiences, let alone to find ways to collaborate with each other while engaging with the schools and public in their local communities. A unique new partnership involving seven world renowned research laboratories and a commercial land developer in the Denver Metropolitan is celebrating the unveiling of exhibits, web kiosk portals, and public science education events in a shopping mall. The October 2006 opening of the Twenty Ninth Street retail sales center (formerly Crossroad Mall) in Boulder, Colorado, has revitalized 60 acres in the heart of the city. It offers outdoor plazas that accommodate science education installations and lab-sponsored public events. The goal of the partnership is to celebrate the long-standing contributions of research laboratories to the community, increase awareness of each institution's mission, and entice visitors of all ages to learn more about science, mathematics, engineering, technology and related educational opportunities and careers. We describe how the public is responding to the Wonders of Science at Twenty Ninth Street, summarize lessons learned about this ambitious science education collaboration, and plans to sustain public and the K-12 community interest into the future. Partners in the Wonders of Science at Twenty Ninth Street include the JILA at the University of Colorado, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, National Institute for Science and Technology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Space Science Institute, and Westcor, the shopping mall's developer.

  19. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  20. VT Designated Growth Center Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Growth centers aim to align public infrastructure and private building investments with a local framework of policies and regulations to ensure that 20 years of...

  1. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructu...

  2. Behind the scenes of the PRIME intervention: designing a complex intervention to improve malaria care at public health centres in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah D. DiLiberto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Uganda, health system challenges limit access to good quality healthcare and contribute to slow progress on malaria control. We developed a complex intervention (PRIME, which was designed to improve quality of care for malaria at public health centres. Objective: Responding to calls for increased transparency, we describe the PRIME intervention's design process, rationale, and final content and reflect on the choices and challenges encountered during the design of this complex intervention. Design: To develop the intervention, we followed a multistep approach, including the following: 1 formative research to identify intervention target areas and objectives; 2 prioritization of intervention components; 3 review of relevant evidence; 4 development of intervention components; 5 piloting and refinement of workshop modules; and 6 consolidation of the PRIME intervention theories of change to articulate why and how the intervention was hypothesized to produce desired outcomes. We aimed to develop an intervention that was evidence-based, grounded in theory, and appropriate for the study context; could be evaluated within a randomized controlled trial; and had the potential to be scaled up sustainably. Results: The process of developing the PRIME intervention package was lengthy and dynamic. The final intervention package consisted of four components: 1 training in fever case management and use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs; 2 workshops in health centre management; 3 workshops in patient-centred services; and 4 provision of mRDTs and antimalarials when stocks ran low. Conclusions: The slow and iterative process of intervention design contrasted with the continually shifting study context. We highlight the considerations and choices made at each design stage, discussing elements we included and why, as well as those that were ultimately excluded. Reflection on and reporting of ‘behind the scenes’ accounts of intervention

  3. The complexity of automation and user: the Human Centered Design as integration of this paradigm; A complexidade da automacao e o usuario: o Human Centered Design como paradigma dessa integracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barateiro, Carlos Eduardo R.B.; Farias Filho, Jose Rodrigues de; Campagnac, Luiz Antonio da Paz [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    If we consider that the growing technological development has a number of benefits to society, we can also observe that there is an increased complexity in the implementation of modern life activities. The increased complexity is unavoidable and is even desirable in certain aspects. What should be avoided is the complication in the execution of any of such activities. The article discusses the concept of project implementation focused on the human being who will operate or use the product of the project, and the control process automation of petrochemical plants as examples of the use of this technique. (author)

  4. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vet Prescriptions Refills Crisis Prevention Mental Health PTSD Public Health Veterans Access, Choice & Accountability Act Benefits General Benefits ... Quitting Smoking Vaccines & Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public ... Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers ...

  6. Significance of fragmented QRS complexes for identifying culprit lesions in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a single-center, retrospective analysis of 183 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragmented QRS (fQRS complexes are novel electrocardiographic signals, which reflect myocardial conduction delays in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. The importance of fQRS complexes in identifying culprit vessels was evaluated in this retrospective study. Methods A 12-lead surface electrocardiogram was obtained in 183 patients who had non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI and subsequently underwent coronary angiography (CAG. On the basis of the frequency of fQRS complexes, indices such as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio were evaluated to determine the ability of fQRS complexes to identify the culprit vessels. Results Among the patients studied, elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years and those with diabetes had a significantly higher frequency of fQRS complexes (p = 0.005, p = 0.003, respectively. The fQRS complexes recorded in the 4 precordial leads had the highest specificity (81.8% for indentifying the culprit vessel (left anterior descending artery. However, the specificity of fQRS complexes to identify lesions in the left circumflex and right coronary arteries was lower for the inferior and lateral leads than for the limb leads (65.5% versus 71.7%; however, the limb leads had higher sensitivity (92.3% versus 89.4%. And the total sensitivity and specificity of fQRS (77.1% and 71.5% were higher than those values for ischemic T-waves. Conclusions The frequency of fQRS complexes was higher in elderly and diabetic patients with NSTEMI. The frequency of fQRS complexes recorded in each of the ECG leads can be used to identify culprit vessels in patients with NSTEMI.

  7. National Health Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you can: Educate the public about health risks Organize successful health promotion events and campaigns Get new ... Centers and Clearinghouses provide free public information and resources. Many offer toll-free numbers and websites. Their ... Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion ...

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON PARTICIPATORY PROCESSES TOWARDS URBAN REGENERATION AT THE HISTORIC CENTER OF PUEBLA. RESEARCH LINE: PUBLIC SPACE, CITIZEN PARTICIPATION AND HISTORIC CENTER. SAN ANTONIO, EL REFUGIO AND SANTA ANITA.

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Hernández; Christian de la Torre; Paloma Morales; Bernanrdo Aco; Maricurz Bautista; César Rojas

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of citizen participation on three old neighborhoods of the city of Puebla, Mexico (San Antonio, El Refugio and Santa Anita), that have been excluded from all architectural and urban transformation plans. Amongst the common problems are the buildings and public areas deterioration, derivate from the lack of state intervention through specific programs and the economic status from landowners. The participation of architecture, urban planning, political scienc...

  9. PYRIDINEDIOLS AS HCL RECEPTORS - FORMATION OF AN UNUSUAL PYRIDINE.HCL COMPLEX IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE PREPARATION OF LEWIS ACIDIC TITANIUM(IV) CENTERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; RIDDER, AM; KELLOGG, RM; VANBOLHUIS, F; KOOIJMAN, H; SPEK, AL; Libbers, Rob

    1993-01-01

    Reaction of pyridinediols 1 with TiCl4 affords in one case an unusual dehydration-HCl complexation; in conjunction with these results, reaction of 1 with HCI indicates a strong affinity of these diols for (Lewis) acids.

  10. Solvent and pH effects on the redox behavior and catecholase activity of a dicopper complex with distant metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sebastián, Lucero; Ugalde-Saldívar, Víctor Manuel; Mijangos, Edgar; Mendoza-Quijano, María Rosa; Ortiz-Frade, Luis; Gasque, Laura

    2010-10-01

    A dicopper complex is described for which significant catecholase activity was found, particularly for a compound in which the two metal ions are more than 7A apart. Variations on the catecholase activity of this complex were explored in a range of pH values from 5.5 to 9.0 in two solvent mixtures, MeCN/H(2)O and MeOH/H(2)O. The catalytic performance of the complex was found to be substantially better in the second, where the maximum activity was achieved at a pH value one unit lower than in the first. Electrochemical studies of the complex in the absence and presence of dioxygen revealed a very different behavior in each of the two solvent mixtures, which may account for the correspondingly distinct catalytic activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA interaction studies of a copper (II) complex containing an antiviral drug, valacyclovir: the effect of metal center on the mode of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Fatahi, Parvin

    2012-07-01

    The water-soluble complex, [Cu(Val)(2)(NO(3))(2)]; in which Val = valacyclovir, an antiviral drug, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, furier transfer-infrared, hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (H NMR), and UV-Vis techniques. The binding of this Cu (II) complex to calf thymus DNA was investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism, and viscosimetry. In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy and entropy of the reaction between the complex and calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) showed that the reaction is endothermic (ΔH = 208.22 kJ mol(-1); ΔS = 851.35 J mol(-1)K(-1)). The complex showed the absorption hyperchromism in its ultra violet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrum with DNA. The calculated binding constant, K(b), obtained from UV-Vis absorption studies was 2 × 10(5) M(-1). Moreover, the complex induced detectable changes in the circular dichroism spectrum of CT-DNA, as well as changes in its viscosity. The results suggest that this copper (II) complex interacts with CT-DNA via a groove-binding mode.

  12. VT Public Libraries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Public Libraries in Vermont. A core set of data listing each public library in Vermont was downloaded from the State of Vermont Department of...

  13. Heifetz on Public Leadership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amelia Newcomb

    2004-01-01

      Newcomb interviews Ron Heifetz, Lecturer on public leadership at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, co-founder of the Center for Public Leadership, author, psychiatrist and cellist, regarding...

  14. Narrative History of the Resistance Screening Center: It’s Origins, Leadership and Partial List of Public Benefits and Scientific Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Young; Ellis Cowling

    2013-01-01

    Forty years ago, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service developed and currently operates the Resistance Screening Center near Asheville, North Carolina, as a service to both industry and university-based tree improvement programs and tree-seed exporting companies in the southern US, Mexico, and Central America. Seed lots from more than 15,000 selections of slash and loblolly pines have been evaluated for genetically-controlled resistance to fusiform rust and other diseases inc...

  15. Narrative History of the Resistance Screening Center: It’s Origins, Leadership and Partial List of Public Benefits and Scientific Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Young

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Forty years ago, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA Forest Service developed and currently operates the Resistance Screening Center near Asheville, North Carolina, as a service to both industry and university-based tree improvement programs and tree-seed exporting companies in the southern US, Mexico, and Central America. Seed lots from more than 15,000 selections of slash and loblolly pines have been evaluated for genetically-controlled resistance to fusiform rust and other diseases including pitch canker, dogwood anthracnose, and brown spot needle blight. The screening system uses a greenhouse-based artificial inoculation system with controlled density of inoculum from geographically diverse sources of the rust pathogen. Results are completed in 6–9 months and are reasonably well-correlated with field-based progeny tests. Operating costs of the Center are shared by both the USDA Forest Service and its clients. The technologically sophisticated methods and professional skills of the Center staff have been applied to facilitate and accelerate progress in region-wide timber production, scientific understanding of the fusiform rust pathosystem, and graduate education of forest geneticists and pathologists in universities.

  16. Not in My Back Yard: A Comparative Analysis of Crime Around Publicly Funded Drug Treatment Centers, Liquor Stores, Convenience Stores, and Corner Stores in One Mid-Atlantic City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr-Holden, C Debra M; Milam, Adam J; Nesoff, Elizabeth D; Johnson, Renee M; Fakunle, David O; Jennings, Jacky M; Thorpe, Roland J

    2016-01-01

    This research examined whether publicly funded drug treatment centers (DTCs) were associated with violent crime in excess of the violence happening around other commercial businesses. Violent crime data and locations of community entities were geocoded and mapped. DTCs and other retail outlets were matched based on a Neighborhood Disadvantage score at the census tract level. Street network buffers ranging from 100 to 1,400 feet were placed around each location. Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate the relationship between the count of violent crimes and the distance from each business type. Compared with the mean count of violent crime around drug treatment centers, the mean count of violent crime (M = 2.87) was significantly higher around liquor stores (M = 3.98; t test; p crime and the distance from drug treatment centers (β = -.069, p crime associated with drug treatment centers is similar to that associated with liquor stores and is less frequent than that associated with convenience stores and corner stores.

  17. Integration of the clinical engineering specialist at a high complexity children's hospital. Our professional experience at a surgical center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas Enriquez, M J; Chazarreta, B; Emilio, D G; Fernandez Sarda, E [Surgical Center-Neurophysiology Division of Medical Tecnology Department, Garrahan Children' s Hospital, Combate de los Pozos 1881, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This document aims to find relating points between the current and future Clinical Engineer professional in order to discuss about the hospital environment, its characteristics and its realities which lead to our professional development. The main aim is to depict our experience through a retrospective analysis based on the underwriting experience and consequently to arrive at conclusions that will support the inclusion and active interaction of the Clinic Engineer Specialist as part of a Hospital's Surgical Center.

  18. Organizational values and Burnout Syndrome: two moments in a public day-care center / Os valores organizacionais e a Síndrome de Burnout: dois momentos em uma maternidade pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia de Oliveira Borges

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the association between the incidence of Burnout Syndrome and organizational values (values attributed by employees to organizations on ideal and real levels. In this context, in 2003, a research at a public day-care center was developed, replicating a previous one accomplished in 2000, with the objective to compare the results. The Inventory of Organizational Values and the Maslasch Burnout Inventory were applied with the samples of 48 health professionals. Interviews were applied too. The results indicate that a reduction of differences between ideal and real levels of organizational values occur, notably in the equalitarian pole. These results associate to changes on organizational management. Levels of burnout were stable among health professionals. The association between organizational values of the day-care center and Burnout Syndrome change, but it is refuted by the tension from issues concerning the increase of workload and wages.

  19. Overview of ligand versus metal centered redox reactions in tetraaza macrocyclic complexes of nickel with a focus on electron paramagnetic resonance studies

    OpenAIRE

    Telser,Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Copper(II) (3d9, S = 1/2) complexes are stable and widely investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In contrast, isoelectronic nickel(I) is much less common and much less investigated. Nickel(I), however, is of biological interest as the active site of methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) contains a tetraaza macrocyclic ligand, F430, which coordinates NiI in its active form, MCRred1. As result, the redox behavior and spectroscopy of tetraaza macrocyclic complexes of nic...

  20. Protocol for disseminating an evidence-based fall prevention program in community senior centers: evaluation of translatability and public health impact via a single group pre-post study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter

    2014-05-26

    Falls are the leading cause of injury death in older adults and present a significant public health problem and a major burden to healthcare. Although there is sufficient evidence from randomized controlled trials to indicate that exercise can prevent falls in older people, few effective, evidence-based fall prevention programs exist in community practice. Thus, there is a pressing need to translate and disseminate evidence-based exercise programs to community providers that serve older adults at increased risk of falling. The current study addresses this public health need by disseminating the evidence-based Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance (TJQMBB) program through community senior centers. The study uses a single-group design in which the TJQMBB program is being delivered to community-dwelling older adults through collaboration with senior centers in selected counties in Oregon, USA, for 48 weeks, followed by a 24-week post-intervention follow-up. Study process and outcome measures will be evaluated in accordance with the components of the RE-AIM framework that focus on Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance. This study will determine whether the evidence-based TJQMBB fall prevention program can be disseminated through a broad spectrum of community-based senior centers that often cater to low-income, underserved community-dwelling older adults at risk of falling. If shown to be both practically implementable and sustainable, the TJQMBB program will provide an effective, potentially low-cost, easy-to-implement intervention that could be used by public health practitioners and community-based organizations to address the problem of falls among older adults. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01854931.

  1. Baseline Description and Analysis of the Operations Related to Warehouse Controlled Documents at the Navy Publications and Forms Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Volume I. Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-06

    those received directly from the general public. 1-3 s. Arranging for contiguous activities for material movement via all modes of transportation to...BranchReceives Shipment and Counts and Inspects Collected Materiall Note Note Problem on Invoice and and pr eNo Provide P vosc Copy to Con acCarrier Complete...Destruction Retail & Bulk Quantities, Pickup Tray. Insure Material is Counted, Packed and Placed in "De- Struction Hold Area" OJbtain Transportation , Assign

  2. Scientific project, Sciences Po | LIEPP laboratoire interdisciplinaire d'evaluation des politiques publiques or in english, interdisciplinary research center for the evaluation of public policies

    OpenAIRE

    Wasmer, Etienne; Woll, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Sciences Po develops an interdisciplinary research program for the evaluation of public policies (in French: Laboratoire interdisciplinaire d’évaluation des politiques publiques, LIEPP), based on four founding units: Department of Economics, Centre de Sociologie des Organisations, Centre d’Etudes Européennes and Observatoire Sociologique du Changement. Its aim is to be (1) independent and non-partisan to ensure its credibility, (2) international to learn from experiences in other countries, a...

  3. Development and pilot testing of HIV screening program integration within public/primary health centers providing antenatal care services in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoria, Suchitra V; Devkar, Ramesh; Gupta, Indrani; Ranebennur, Virupax; Saggurti, Niranjan; Ramesh, Sowmya; Deshmukh, Dilip; Gaikwad, Sanjeevsingh

    2014-03-26

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) to study the feasibility and relative benefits of integrating the prevention of parent-to-child transmission (PPTCT) component of the National AIDS Control Program with the maternal and child health component of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) by offering HIV screening at the primary healthcare level; and (2) to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio to understand whether the costs are commensurate with the benefits. The intervention included advocacy with political, administrative/health heads, and capacity building of health staff in Satara district, Maharashtra, India. The intervention also conducted biannual outreach activities at primary health centers (PHCs)/sub-centers (SCs); initiated facility-based integrated counseling and testing centers (FICTCs) at all round-the-clock PHCs; made the existing FICTCs functional and trained PHC nurses in HIV screening. All "functional" FICTCs were equipped to screen for HIV and trained staff provided counseling and conducted HIV testing as per the national protocol. Data were collected pre- and post- integration on the number of pregnant women screened for HIV, the number of functional FICTCs and intervention costs. Trend analyses on various outcome measures were conducted. Further, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio per pregnant woman screened was calculated. An additional 27% of HIV-infected women were detected during the intervention period as the annual HIV screening increased from pre- to post-intervention (55% to 79%, p < 0.001) among antenatal care (ANC) attendees under the NRHM. A greater increase in HIV screening was observed in PHCs/SCs. The proportions of functional FICTCs increased from 47% to 97% (p < 0.001). Additionally, 93% of HIV-infected pregnant women were linked to anti-retroviral therapy centers; 92% of mother-baby pairs received Nevirapine; and 89% of exposed babies were enrolled for early infant diagnosis. The incremental cost

  4. EPIDEMIOLOGÍA Y ANTROPOLOGÍA: Una propuesta frente a problemas complejos en Salud Pública Epidemiology and Anthropology: a proposal to address complexity in public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Sánchez Vanegas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Los problemas de salud pública son objetos complejos, multifacéticos, concatenados y contradictorios. La epidemiología requiere de un complemento que le permita lidiar con esos objetos. El riesgo visto desde la perspectiva epidemiológica de los modelos multivariados, ofrece un alto potencial, pero es insuficiente para la comprensión integral de los fenómenos de estudio. La propuesta plantea una integración entre la epidemiología y la antropología, a partir del diálogo entre modelos de riesgo y narrativas provenientes de una etnografía abductiva, iterativa y recursiva.Public health problems are complex, multifaceted, concatenated and contradictory; epidemiology is in need of a complement allowing it to deal with such objects. Risk seen from the point of view of multivariate models' epidemiological perspective would seem to offer great potential in this respect but, nevertheless, this is inadequate for an integral understanding of study phenomena. The current proposal suggests integrating epidemiology and anthropology from dialogue between risk and narrative models arising from abductive, iterative and recursive ethnography.

  5. Building on the EGIPPS performance assessment: the multipolar framework as a heuristic to tackle the complexity of performance of public service oriented health care organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno; Hoerée, Tom; da Silveira, Valéria Campos; Van Belle, Sara; Prashanth, Nuggehalli S; Kegels, Guy

    2014-04-17

    Performance of health care systems is a key concern of policy makers and health service managers all over the world. It is also a major challenge, given its multidimensional nature that easily leads to conceptual and methodological confusion. This is reflected by a scarcity of models that comprehensively analyse health system performance. In health, one of the most comprehensive performance frameworks was developed by the team of Leggat and Sicotte. Their framework integrates 4 key organisational functions (goal attainment, production, adaptation to the environment, and values and culture) and the tensions between these functions.We modified this framework to better fit the assessment of the performance of health organisations in the public service domain and propose an analytical strategy that takes it into the social complexity of health organisations. The resulting multipolar performance framework (MPF) is a meta-framework that facilitates the analysis of the relations and interactions between the multiple actors that influence the performance of health organisations. Using the MPF in a dynamic reiterative mode not only helps managers to identify the bottlenecks that hamper performance, but also the unintended effects and feedback loops that emerge. Similarly, it helps policymakers and programme managers at central level to better anticipate the potential results and side effects of and required conditions for health policies and programmes and to steer their implementation accordingly.

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care » PTSD: National Center for PTSD » Public » Videos PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" ( ...

  7. The Right to Health of Persons with Disabilities and the Promotional Role of The Healths Protection Center of the Public Defender's Office in the State of Ceará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Barroso de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to analysis the performance of Healths Protection Center of the Public Defender's Office in the State of Ceará in the years 2013 and 2014, notably with regard to the protection of rights of persons with disabilities. This is a specialized service in the demands of health, whose performance has been excelling in the protection of the right to health of the hypossufficient. Judicialization of public policy as an instrument of implementation of the fundamental  right  to  health  is  a  topic  widely  discussed  at  the  Academy  who  makes increasingly practical importance, due to its impact on reality and the involvement of various social actors, with different ideas and interests. This article intended to talk regarding the right to health of persons with disabilities, approaching the challenges to be overcome for their effectiveness and evoking questions about social inclusion. For the understanding of the object, the study used bibliographical research and documentary, with use of theoretical references of documents kept in files of public institution and statistical data elaborated by specialized institutes. In order to obtain detailed information and reports from experience, the study used too an interview with interactive and unstructured nature and exploratory bias. In the end, it was concluded that the performance of the Healths Protection Center has excelled in the awareness of the rights and in the solution of the request by means of health benefits, judicial or outside a court. However, it is necessary that there should be greater dialogue between public authorities, institutions and society, to empower the citizenship of persons with disabilities.

  8. Analysis of interaction of triple helix in a federal public program: A study of the centers of support for innovation management (NAGIS [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2016015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Carneiro Zen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze interactions among government, universities and enterprises, components of Triple helix model, considering the implementation process of governmental program to foster innovation in Brazil. To do so, we conducted a qualitative exploratory research within five Centers of Support for Innovation Management (Núcleos de Apoio à Gestão de Inovação – Nagis, which are projects financed through support from federal government, in order to encourage innovation in enterprises of the country. We analized trajectory of these Nagis, their methodology and their difficulties during implantation of each center. The source of data was documents and interviews with Nagis’s managers, using a script about the operationalization of project (structure, methodology of innovation management and the experiency with this methodology. Then, we analized the role of the relationship of the component in the Triple Helix model and the development of Nagis. As a main conclusion, we identified that synergy between government, university and industry spheres is limited, which does not allow more relevant advances of this program. The evidences indicate a need to restructure the role of each "helix" aiming at changes in bilateral relations. Companies need to be sensitized more emphatically about the importance of innovation and to adopt a more proactive strategy. We recommend to academy adopts a more entrepreneurial stance and the government should take a position not only as a financier, but coordinatior and facilitator of innovative activities.   Keywords Nagi; Innovation management; Triple Helix.

  9. Evaluation of Epidermal Skin Grafts for the Treatment of Complex Wounds in a Wound Care Center: A 94-Patient Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Katherine; Hyde, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, a new technology for autologous epidermal harvesting has been developed to produce epidermal skin grafts (ESGs) for use over wounds. This technology employs negative pressure and heat to raise the epidermal skin layer, allowing for consistent and reproducible epidermal harvesting. The aim of this case series is to present the authors' experience using an automated, epidermal harvesting system to produce ESGs to treat wounds of patients with multiple comorbidities. This case series was conducted between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014. Patients with wounds (≤ 25 cm2) that failed to heal were treated with ESGs by a group of 3 wound care physicians in 2 outpatient wound care centers in a community health center setting. A total of 94 patients with 102 wounds were identified. Of the 94 patients, 3 were noncompliant and 9 were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 82 patients with 90 wounds were included in the analysis. The majority of wounds demonstrated epithelialization (83/90, 92.2%). Of the 90 wounds, 75 (83.3%) healed following epidermal grafting, 4 (4.4%) wounds displayed improvement, and 11 (12.2%) did not heal. Minimal or no pain at the donor site was reported by the patients, and all donor sites healed without complications. This case series provides additional evidence for the use of ESGs for the treatment of wounds that fail to heal.

  10. The World Trade Center attack. Similarities to the 1988 earthquake in Armenia: time to teach the public life-supporting first aid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, D

    2001-12-01

    On 7 December 1988, a severe earthquake hit in Armenia, a former republic of the Soviet Union (USSR); on 11 September 2001, a manmade attack of similar impact hit New York City. These events share similar implications for the role of the uninjured survivor. With basic training, the uninjured survivors could save lives without tools or resuscitation equipment. This article makes the case for teaching life-supporting first aid to the public in the hope that one day, should another such incident occur, they would be able to preserve injured victims until formal rescue occurs.

  11. The World Trade Center Attack: Similarities to the 1988 earthquake in Armenia: time to teach the public life-supporting first aid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, David

    2001-01-01

    On 7 December 1988, a severe earthquake hit in Armenia, a former republic of the Soviet Union (USSR); on 11 September 2001, a manmade attack of similar impact hit New York City. These events share similar implications for the role of the uninjured survivor. With basic training, the uninjured survivors could save lives without tools or resuscitation equipment. This article makes the case for teaching life-supporting first aid to the public in the hope that one day, should another such incident occur, they would be able to preserve injured victims until formal rescue occurs. PMID:11737915

  12. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.; Ingram, L.

    2007-12-01

    Ocean observatories have already demonstrated their ability to maintain long-term time series, capture episodic events, provide context for improved shipboard sampling, and improve accessibility to a broader range of participants. Communicating Ocean Sciences, an already existing college course from COSEE-California has demonstrated its ability to teach future scientists essential communication skills. The NSF-funded Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) project has leveraged these experiences and others to demonstrate a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. The COSIA effort is one of the pathfinders for ensuring that the new scientific results from the increasing U.S. investments in ocean observatories is effectively communicated to the nation, and will serve as a model for other fields. Our presentation will describe a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. COSIA established partnerships between informal science education institutions and universities nationwide to facilitate quality outreach by scientists and the delivery of rigorous, cutting edge science by informal educators while teaching future scientists (college students) essential communication skills. The COSIA model includes scientist-educator partnerships that develop and deliver a college course that teaches communication skills through the understanding of learning theory specifically related to informal learning environments and the practice of these skills at aquariums and science centers. The goals of COSIA are to: provide a model for establishing substantive, long-term partnerships between scientists and informal science education institutions to meet their respective outreach needs; provide future scientists with experiences delivering outreach and promoting the broader impact of research; and provide diverse role models

  13. Centers for Enhancement of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Ed

    The Center for Enhancement of Education organizes seven specialized centers within the School of Education and Human Services to provide faculty and students with the opportunity for research, development, and public service activities that complement and supplement classroom teaching. Each of the seven centers stresses one of the following…

  14. Public Opinion and Framing Effects of Argentine Foreign Policy Toward Brazil: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in Urban Centers in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Lustig

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies about the relationship between public opinion and foreign policy are rare in Latin America as civic participation in these issues is a recent phenomenon. The following research explores the general perception of Argentine citizens about the orientation of foreign policy towards Brazil. Also, it explores the effects of information and its influence on citizens. In particular, it studies the psychotropic and socio-tropic attitudes of Argentinians about foreign policy toward Brazil. Based on a survey experiment, the research evaluates the impact of economic and political information (framing-effects on the public's opinion of foreign policy (dependent variable. The experimental treatment was designed in an ordinal model by providing different pieces of information. The experiment also introduces 'Citizen Perception' as a covariate generated from a summation index with the scores of two variables (Preference for the actions of Argentina toward Brazil and the Position of Brazil in a charted preference of potential investor countries. The results show that the previous ideological bias is very significant and that the effects of information reinforce it. The work was run as part of a survey conducted by the Instituto PASCAL Universidad Nacional de San Martín, in Argentina´s major urban centres during 2015.

  15. Association of religiousness and sexual disorders: A cross-sectional study on married women of reproductive age referring to public health centers of Shiraz, South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ghodrati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexual health status of married women in the reproductive age, one of the most important community health issues. Recent research has highlighted the effects of religious beliefs with sexual life and sexual problem may be mediated This study aimed to investigate the association of religiousness and .through individual differences in spirituality. sexual disorders in a cross-sectional study in women of reproductive . This cross-sectional study was conducted on women aged 15-45 years old referring to Shiraz health centers in 2015 with a sample size of 210. Cluster sampling was done firstly. Then, purpose ful sampling was conducted in each center. Data collection was done using Religious Attitude Questionnaire and Female Sexual Dysfunction index. Correlation coefficient and Fisher's test The mean age of the study population was 30.67±6.60 . were performed for data analysis in SPSS software. According to the findings, 74.3% had sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, the rate of impaired sexual desire was 72.9 % and 62.4% in sexual arousal . Orgasmic disorder was the highest reported sexual dysfunction. There was a statistically significant correlation between religious thoughts and different dimensions of sexual function such as sexual desire (P= 0.005, psychological stimulation (p= 0.05, lubrication (p= 0.02, orgasm (p=0.013, and satisfaction ( p= 0.001. Religious thoughts with dimensions of sexual function (libido, orgasm, etc. was associated.So, the improvement in families and society ’s sexual health could result from the increase in the individuals' knowledge about sex related issues and religious thoughts in this regard. Therefore, sexual health education, in accordance with religious values, is one of the priorities in community health system.

  16. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PREVENTION AND IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM OF MALNUTRITION IN CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS AT SIAK HULU III PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    winda septiani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and tackling malnutrition is an effort to anticipate potential problem of malnutrition before incident malnutrition and combat cases of malnutrition has happebed. Puskesmas Siak Hulu III has happened malnutrished cases for three years successive. The aim of this research is aware of the problem of malnutrition program of prevention and tacking Puskesmas Siak Hulu III the program implementation so far, and wich has operated community health center. The reseach a qualitative method being used. This research executed in june until july 2015. An analysis of the data done is analysis before in the feald, during analysis in the field, and analysis of after in a fieldwork constisting of an analysis of the domain, taxonomic analysis, componencial analysis and the theme of it’s cultural analysis. Informants in this research is 8 of a person taken based in the principle of sufficiency (Adequasy. The research result obtained important themes of human resources, financing system, as well as advice remains a big problem in achieving the program. Most being considerate in the research is not stead a source of the national budget in the form of vehicle operational cost calculation in the program implementation. While the implementation of the program against the technical level is still experiencing a sumber of problems that could actualy be solved well namely coordination between health workers (midwives cadres parents with toddkers and of health worker was recommended to all community health center head, the program nutrition and holders the village midwives priority heath to be more effort to promote compared with the effort to curative is cases of malnutrition.

  17. Approaches to Climate Change & Health in Cuba: Guillermo Mesa MD MPhil, Director, Disasters & Health, National School of Public Health. Paulo Ortiz MS PhD, Senior Researcher, Climate Center, Cuban Meteorology Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Guillermo; Ortiz, Paulo; Gorry, Conner

    2015-04-01

    The US National Institutes of Health predict climate change will cause an additional 250,000 deaths between 2030 and 2050, with damages to health costing US$2-$4 billion by 2030. Although much debate still surrounds climate change, island ecosystems-such as Cuba's-in the developing world are arguably among the most vulnerable contexts in which to confront climate variability. Beginning in the 1990s, Cuba launched research to develop the evidence base, set policy priorities, and design mitigation and adaptation actions specifically to address climate change and its effects on health. Two researchers at the forefront of this interdisciplinary, intersectoral effort are epidemiologist Dr Guillermo Mesa, who directed design and implementation of the nationwide strategy for disaster risk reduction in the Cuban public health system as founding director of the Latin American Center for Disaster Medicine (CLAMED) and now heads the Disasters and Health department at the National School of Public Health; and Dr Paulo Ortiz, a biostatistician and economist at the Cuban Meteorology Institute's Climate Center (CENCLIM), who leads the research on Cuba's Climate and Health project and is advisor on climate change and health for the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC).

  18. Questionnaire survey about use of an online appointment booking system in one large tertiary public hospital outpatient service center in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, MinMin; Zhang, CongXin; Sun, QinWen; Cai, QuanCai; Yang, Hua; Zhang, YinJuan

    2014-06-09

    As a part of nationwide healthcare reforms, the Chinese government launched web-based appointment systems (WAS) to provide a solution to problems around outpatient appointments and services. These have been in place in all Chinese public tertiary hospitals since 2009. Questionnaires were collected from both patients and doctors in one large tertiary public hospital in Shanghai, China.Data were analyzed to measure their satisfaction and views about the WAS. The 1000 outpatients randomly selected for the survey were least satisfied about the waiting time to see a doctor. Even though the WAS provided a much more convenient booking method, only 17% of patients used it. Of the 197 doctors surveyed, over 90% thought it was necessary to provide alternative forms of appointment booking systems for outpatients. However, about 80% of those doctors who were not associated professors would like to provide an 'on-the-spot' appointment option, which would lead to longer waits for patients. Patients were least satisfied about the waiting times. To effectively reduce appointment-waiting times is therefore an urgent issue. Despite the benefits of using the WAS, most patients still registered via the usual method of queuing, suggesting that hospitals and health service providers should promote and encourage the use of the WAS. Furthermore, Chinese health providers need to help doctors to take others' opinions or feedback into consideration when treating patients to minimize the gap between patients' and doctors' opinions. These findings may provide useful information for both practitioners and regulators, and improve recognition of this efficient and useful booking system, which may have far-reaching and positive implications for China's ongoing reforms.

  19. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean observatories have already demonstrated their ability to maintain long-term time series, capture episodic events, provide context for improved shipboard sampling, and improve accessibility to a broader range of participants. Communicating Ocean Sciences, an already existing college course (http://www.cacosee.net/collegecourse) from COSEE California has demonstrated its ability to teach future scientists essential communication skills. The NSF-funded Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) project will leverage these experiences and others to demonstrate a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. The COSIA effort will be one of the pathfinders for ensuring that the new scientific results from the increasing U.S. investments in ocean observatories is effectively communicated to the nation, and will serve as a model for other fields. Our presentation will describe a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. COSIA established partnerships between informal science education institutions and universities nationwide to facilitate quality outreach by scientists and the delivery of rigorous, cutting edge science by informal educators while teaching future scientists (college students) essential communication skills. The COSIA model includes scientist-educator partnerships that develop and deliver a college course derived from COS that teaches communication skills through the understanding of learning theory specifically related to informal learning environments and the practice of these skills at aquariums and science centers. The goals of COSIA are to: provide a model for establishing substantive, long-term partnerships between scientists and informal science education institutions to meet their respective outreach needs; provide future scientists with experiences delivering outreach to informal

  20. The Center for Optimized Structural Studies (COSS) platform for automation in cloning, expression, and purification of single proteins and protein-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, Georg; Lehner, Anita; Neuhold, Jana; Leeb, Sarah; Kostan, Julius; Charnagalov, Alexej; Stolt-Bergner, Peggy; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Pinotsis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    Expression in Escherichia coli represents the simplest and most cost effective means for the production of recombinant proteins. This is a routine task in structural biology and biochemistry where milligrams of the target protein are required in high purity and monodispersity. To achieve these criteria, the user often needs to screen several constructs in different expression and purification conditions in parallel. We describe a pipeline, implemented in the Center for Optimized Structural Studies, that enables the systematic screening of expression and purification conditions for recombinant proteins and relies on a series of logical decisions. We first use bioinformatics tools to design a series of protein fragments, which we clone in parallel, and subsequently screen in small scale for optimal expression and purification conditions. Based on a scoring system that assesses soluble expression, we then select the top ranking targets for large-scale purification. In the establishment of our pipeline, emphasis was put on streamlining the processes such that it can be easily but not necessarily automatized. In a typical run of about 2 weeks, we are able to prepare and perform small-scale expression screens for 20-100 different constructs followed by large-scale purification of at least 4-6 proteins. The major advantage of our approach is its flexibility, which allows for easy adoption, either partially or entirely, by any average hypothesis driven laboratory in a manual or robot-assisted manner.

  1. Treatment effectiveness of complex casualty amputee patients

    OpenAIRE

    Farrar, Elizabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This study analyzes data from 182 Comprehensive Combat and Complex Casualty Care (C5) amputee patients with the goal to better understand the factors that influence their care. The data was provided from the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery while visiting the Naval Medical Center at San Diego. The analysis examines two response variables, opiate drug usage and duration in the C5 program, as a function of a number of exploratory vari...

  2. Factors influencing the implementation of integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) by healthcare workers at public health centers & dispensaries in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplagat, Augustine; Musto, Richard; Mwizamholya, Damas; Morona, Domenica

    2014-03-25

    Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) was developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations International Children's Fund (UNICEF) and aims at reducing childhood morbidity and mortality in resource-limited settings including Tanzania. It was introduced in 1996 and has been scaled up in all districts in the country. The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing the implementation of IMCI in the health facilities in Mwanza, Tanzania since reports indicates that the guidelines are not full adhered to by the healthcare workers. A cross-sectional study design was used and a sample size of 95 healthcare workers drawn from health centers and dispensaries within Mwanza city were interviewed using self-administered questionnaires. Structured interview was also used to get views from the city IMCI focal person and the 2 facilitators. Data were analyzed using SPSS and presented using figures and tables. Only 51% of healthcare workers interviewed had been trained. 69% of trained Healthcare workers expressed understanding of the IMCI approach. Most of the respondents (77%) had a positive attitude that IMCI approach was a better approach in managing common childhood illnesses especially with the reality of resource constraint in the health facilities. The main challenges identified in the implementation of IMCI are low initial training coverage among health care workers, lack of essential drugs and supplies, lack of onsite mentoring and lack of refresher courses and regular supportive supervision. Supporting the healthcare workers through training, onsite mentoring, supportive supervision and strengthening the healthcare system through increasing access to essential medicines, vaccines, strengthening supply chain management, increasing healthcare financing, improving leadership & management were the major interventions that could assist in IMCI implementation. The healthcare workers can implement better IMCI through the

  3. Association of provider opioid prescribing practices and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hierarchical condition category score: A retrospective examination of correlation between the volume of provider-prescribed opioid medications and provider panel complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick North

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Opioids are being prescribed at increasing rates in primary care practices, and among individual providers there is significant variability in opioid prescribing. Primary care practices also vary significantly in complexity of their patients, ranging from healthy patients to those with multiple comorbidities. Our objective was to examine individual primary care providers for an association between their opioid prescribing and the complexity/risk of their panel of patients (a panel of patients is a group of patients whose medical care is the responsibility of a specific healthcare provider or care team. Methods: We retrospectively examined 12 months of opioid prescription data from a primary care practice. We obtained counts of opioids prescribed by providers in the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota primary care practice. For patients paneled (assigned to family medicine and internal medicine, we used the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hierarchical condition category patient risk score as a measure of patient complexity. After adjusting the opioid counts for panel patient count (to get opioid counts per patient, we used linear regression analysis to determine the correlation between the hierarchical condition category risk and the amount of opioid prescribed by individual providers. Results: Among our combined 103 primary care providers, opioid unit counts prescribed per patient were highly correlated with the providers’ hierarchical condition category panel risk score (r2 = 0.54. After excluding three outliers, r2 was 0.74. With and without the outliers, the correlation was very significant (p  0.45 showed significant correlation with hierarchical condition category (r2 = 0.26; p = 0.001. Conclusion: When examining differences in primary care providers’ opioid prescribing practices, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services endorsed risk score (the hierarchical condition category score can help

  4. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  5. Non-invasive ventilation in complex obstructive sleep apnea – A 15-year experience of a pediatric tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C. Girbal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects approximately 1–3% of pediatric population and is associated with significant morbidity. As adenotonsillar hypertrophy (ATH is its primary cause in children, elective adenotonsillectomy is the first treatment of choice. Noninvasive ventilation (NIV has been increasingly considered as an option, mainly for children with complex diseases, ineligible or waiting for surgeries, or after surgery failure. Objectives: To describe the experience in the management of children with complex OSA, and to evidence the feasibility and advantages of NIV. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of 68 children on NIV, in whom complex OSA was the main indication for ventilation, in a Pediatric Respiratory Unit at a University Hospital between January 1997 and March 2012. Demographic and clinical data were collected on the underlying diagnosis, therapeutic interventions prior to NIV, NIV related issues and outcome. Results: Forty (59% children were male, median age at starting NIV was 6 years and 7 months, with interquartile range (IQR of 15–171 months. Twenty-two (32% were infants and 25 (37% adolescents.The most common diagnosis was congenital malformations and genetic disorders in 34 (50% patients. Nine patients had cerebral palsy, 8 were post treatment for central nervous system tumors and 6 had inborn errors of metabolism. Three children had ATH and three obesity. The majority of patients (76% had exclusively obstructive OSA and started CPAP. Ten patients had minor complications. Twenty-two patients stopped NIV due to clinical improvement, 8 were non-compliant and 8 patients died. NIV median duration was 21.5 months (IQR: 7–72. Conclusions: NIV is feasible and well tolerated by children with OSA associated with complex disorders, and has been shown to have few complications even in infants and toddlers. Resumo: Introdução: A apneia obstrutiva do sono (OSA afeta aproximadamente 1

  6. Publicity and public relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosha, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses approaches to using publicity and public relations to meet the goals of the NASA Space Grant College. Methods universities and colleges can use to publicize space activities are presented.

  7. Using public health detailing and a family-centered ecological approach to promote patient-provider-parent action for reducing childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy, Yvette M; Zarcadoolas, Christina; Dresser, Michelle; Wedemeyer, Laura; Short, Leslie; Silver, Lynn

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the research and development of the Obesity in Children Action Kit, a paper-based chronic disease management tool of the Public Health Detailing Program (PHD) at the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH). It also describes PHD's process for developing the Obesity in Children detailing campaign (targeting healthcare providers working with children aged 2-18) and its results, during which the Action Kit materials were a focal point. The campaign goals were to impact healthcare provider clinical behaviors, improve the health literacy of parents and children, instigate patient-provider-parent dialogue, and change family practices to prevent obesity. Qualitative research methods consisted of healthcare provider in-depth interviews and parent focus groups to aid campaign development. Evaluation of the Obesity in Children campaign included self-reported data on uptake and usage of clinical tools and action steps of matched assessments from 237 healthcare provider initial and follow-up visits, material stock counts, and DOHMH representative qualitative visit excerpts. Key themes identified in parent focus groups were concerns about childhood diabetes and high blood pressure, awareness of cultural pressure and our "supersize" culture, frustration with family communication around overweight and obesity, lack of knowledge about food quality and portion size, economic pressures, and the availability of healthy and nutritious foods. During the Obesity in Children campaign, six representatives reached 161 practices with 1,588 one-on-one interactions, and an additional 461 contacts were made through group presentations. After these interactions, there was a significant increase in the percentage of physicians self-reported use of key recommended practices: Use of BMI percentile-for-age to assess for overweight or obesity at every visit increased from 77% to 88% (p realistic goals increased from 64% to 86% (p goal setting posters

  8. The effect of a behaviour change intervention on the diets and physical activity levels of women attending Sure Start Children's Centres: results from a complex public health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Janis; Jarman, Megan; Lawrence, Wendy; Black, Christina; Davies, Jenny; Tinati, Tannaze; Begum, Rufia; Mortimore, Andrew; Robinson, Sian; Margetts, Barrie; Cooper, Cyrus; Barker, Mary; Inskip, Hazel

    2014-07-15

    The UK government's response to the obesity epidemic calls for action in communities to improve people's health behaviour. This study evaluated the effects of a community intervention on dietary quality and levels of physical activity of women from disadvantaged backgrounds. Non-randomised controlled evaluation of a complex public health intervention. 527 women attending Sure Start Children's Centres (SSCC) in Southampton (intervention) and 495 women attending SSCCs in Gosport and Havant (control). Training SSCC staff in behaviour change skills that would empower women to change their health behaviours. Main outcomes dietary quality and physical activity. Intermediate outcomes self-efficacy and sense of control. 1-year post-training, intervention staff used skills to support behaviour change significantly more than control staff. There were statistically significant reductions of 0.1 SD in the dietary quality of all women between baseline and follow-up and reductions in self-efficacy and sense of control. The decline in self-efficacy and control was significantly smaller in women in the intervention group than in women in the control group (adjusted differences in self-efficacy and control, respectively, 0.26 (95% CI 0.001 to 0.50) and 0.35 (0.05 to 0.65)). A lower decline in control was associated with higher levels of exposure in women in the intervention group. There was a statistically significant improvement in physical activity in the intervention group, with 22.9% of women reporting the highest level of physical activity compared with 12.4% at baseline, and a smaller improvement in the control group. The difference in change in physical activity level between the groups was not statistically significant (adjusted difference 1.02 (0.74 to 1.41)). While the intervention did not improve women's diets and physical activity levels, it had a protective effect on intermediate factors-control and self-efficacy-suggesting that a more prolonged exposure to the

  9. Molecular Identification of Burkholderia Cepacia Complex and Species Distribution Among Cystic Fibrosis Patients Seen at the Reference Center in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Concli Leite

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients are associated with decline in lung function and reduced survival. The potential transmissibility of Bcc among CF patients has been reported, indicating that strict segregation of CF patients with Bcc is crucial. Aims: To standardize the PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay in order to identify Bcc species and to establish the prevalence of Bcc species and their susceptibility profile among CF patients seen at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA. Methods: The classification of the clinical isolates recovered from respiratory tract specimens of CF patients as Bcc was achieved using the API-20NE® phenotypic commercial system. The identification of the Bcc species was performed using PCR-RFLP. The antimicrobial disk diffusion susceptibility testing was performed according to the CLSI (2006. Results: API-20NE® was able to identify Bcc isolates (244 specimens, such as B. cepacia, indicating that it was not able to distinguish among the Bcc species. The PCR-RFLP molecular method discriminated the eight reference Bcc species, thus validating the method for clinical isolates. Bcc prevalence determined by PCR-RFLP was 10.6% (26/244. The molecular analysis identified B. cenocepacia in 53.8% (14/26 of infected patients, B. multivorans in 15.4% (4/26, and B. vietnamiensis and B. ambifaria in 7.7% (2/26. The antibiotic resistance profile was variable among Bcc species. Conclusions: The PCR-RFLP method was validated for the identification of Bcc species. B. cenocepacia proved to be the most prevalent species among the CF patients seen at the HCPA.

  10. How NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is operationally using the Esri ArcGIS Platform to improve data discoverability, accessibility and interoperability to meet the diversifying government, private, public and academic communities' driven requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, M.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is operationally using the Esri ArcGIS Platform to improve data discoverability, accessibility and interoperability to meet the diversifying government, private, public and academic communities' driven requirements. The ASDC is actively working to provide their mission essential datasets as ArcGIS Image Services, Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Services (WMS), OGC Web Coverage Services (WCS) and leveraging the ArcGIS multidimensional mosaic dataset structure. Science teams and ASDC are utilizing these services, developing applications using the Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS and ArcGIS API for Javascript, and evaluating restructuring their data production and access scripts within the ArcGIS Python Toolbox framework and Geoprocessing service environment. These capabilities yield a greater usage and exposure of ASDC data holdings and provide improved geospatial analytical tools for a mission critical understanding in the areas of the earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry.

  11. The Art and Science of Storytelling in Presenting Complex Information to the Public, or, Give 'Em More Than Just the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohus, Anita M.; Wessen, Alice S.

    2004-01-01

    In communicating science to the public, just the facts can leave the public baffled, bewildered, and bored. In communicating science to the public, we need to learn to tell the story, not just the facts. Science and engineering is serious business, requiring precise language and rigorous reporting of "just the facts." Yet, we believe this very code of integrity has contributed to a public image, at best, of scientists as eccentrics and engineers as geeks, and at worst, as elitist snobs who speak in secret codes. The very heart of the science process - open discussion and disagreement - often leaves the public with the impression that scientists don't know which way is up.

  12. Coverage of Adequately Iodized Salt Is Suboptimal and Rice Fortification Using Public Distribution Channels Could Reach Low-Income Households: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Survey of Anganwadi Center Catchment Areas in Telangana, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Wirth

    Full Text Available Food fortification is a cost-effective approach to prevent and control of micronutrient deficiencies in India. A cross-sectional survey of children 0-35 months of age residing in the catchment areas of anganwadi centers in the state of Telangana was conducted to assess the coverage of adequately iodized salt and the potential for rice fortification. Salt samples were collected and tested for iodine concentration using iodometric titration. Information on demographics, household rice consumption, and Telangana's rice sector was collected and interpreted. In households of selected children, 79% of salt samples were found to be adequately iodized. Salt brand and district were significant predictors of inadequately iodized salt. Daily rice consumption among children and women averaged 122 grams and 321 grams per day, respectively. Approximately 28% of households reported consuming rice produced themselves or purchased from a local farmer, 65% purchased rice from a market or shop, 6% got rice from a public distribution system site, and 2% obtained it from a rice mill. In the catchment areas of Telangana's anganwadi centers, there is significant variation in the coverage of adequately iodized salt by district. Future surveys in Telangana should measure the coverage of salt iodization in the general population using quantitative methods. Nonetheless, increasing the adequacy of iodization of smaller salt manufacturers would help achieve universal salt iodization in Telangana. Despite high consumption of rice, our findings suggest that large-scale market-based rice fortification is not feasible in Telangana due to a large proportion of households producing their own rice and highly fragmented rice distribution. Distributing fortified rice via Telangana's public distribution system may be a viable approach to target low-income households, but would only reach a small proportion of the population in Telangana.

  13. Coverage of Adequately Iodized Salt Is Suboptimal and Rice Fortification Using Public Distribution Channels Could Reach Low-Income Households: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Survey of Anganwadi Center Catchment Areas in Telangana, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, James P; Leyvraz, Magali; Sodani, Prahlad R; Aaron, Grant J; Sharma, Narottam D; Woodruff, Bradley A

    2016-01-01

    Food fortification is a cost-effective approach to prevent and control of micronutrient deficiencies in India. A cross-sectional survey of children 0-35 months of age residing in the catchment areas of anganwadi centers in the state of Telangana was conducted to assess the coverage of adequately iodized salt and the potential for rice fortification. Salt samples were collected and tested for iodine concentration using iodometric titration. Information on demographics, household rice consumption, and Telangana's rice sector was collected and interpreted. In households of selected children, 79% of salt samples were found to be adequately iodized. Salt brand and district were significant predictors of inadequately iodized salt. Daily rice consumption among children and women averaged 122 grams and 321 grams per day, respectively. Approximately 28% of households reported consuming rice produced themselves or purchased from a local farmer, 65% purchased rice from a market or shop, 6% got rice from a public distribution system site, and 2% obtained it from a rice mill. In the catchment areas of Telangana's anganwadi centers, there is significant variation in the coverage of adequately iodized salt by district. Future surveys in Telangana should measure the coverage of salt iodization in the general population using quantitative methods. Nonetheless, increasing the adequacy of iodization of smaller salt manufacturers would help achieve universal salt iodization in Telangana. Despite high consumption of rice, our findings suggest that large-scale market-based rice fortification is not feasible in Telangana due to a large proportion of households producing their own rice and highly fragmented rice distribution. Distributing fortified rice via Telangana's public distribution system may be a viable approach to target low-income households, but would only reach a small proportion of the population in Telangana.

  14. Public knowledge and public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    As health care applications derived from human genetics research are likely to move increasingly from 'clinic to community', there is growing interest not just in how patients understand and take up health-related genetic information but also in the views of the wider population, as well as a range of professional groups. In this paper, issues relating public knowledge and public trust are raised and discussed in an attempt to move forward debates about public involvement in genomic research and the role of sociologists within interdisciplinary teams. As the field of public understanding of science has developed, we have seen a shift from a focus on the lack of scientific literacy as problem to a recognition of the range of different knowledges that people have and use as they confront science and technology in their everyday lives. As a mood for dialogue pervades many institutions in their relations with 'publics', attention must now be paid to the way in which knowledge and expertise is expressed, heard and acted upon in dialogic encounters. There is increasing concern about public trust in science and calls to increase public confidence, particularly through more open engagement with a range of publics. However, lack of trust or loss of confidence may be constructed as problems rather than reflecting empirical reality, where more complex relationships and attitudes prevail. Lack of trust is often privatized, deeply rooted in lived experience and routinely managed. Trust relations are generally characterized by ambivalence, uncertainty and risk, and are always provisional. Drawing on selected literature and empirical research to review and illustrate this field, this paper argues that scepticism or ambivalence on the part of publics are not necessarily problems to be overcome in the interest of scientific progress, but rather should be mobilized to enhance open and public debates about the nature and direction of genomics research, medicine, and the related

  15. Early infection and asymptomatic spread of hepatitis A virus in a public child care center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: should attending children under two years of age be vaccinated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane M Morais

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted in order to identify hepatitis A virus (HAV serological markers in 418 individuals (mean age, 16.4 years; range, 1 month-80 years at a public child care center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, as well as to analyze risk factors and determine circulating genotypes. Serum samples were tested using an enzyme immunoassay. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to detect and characterize HAV RNA, and sequencing was performed. Anti-HAV antibodies and IgM anti-HAV antibodies were detected, respectively, in 89.5% (374/418 and 10.5% (44/418 of the individuals tested. Acute HAV infection in children was independently correlated with crawling (p < 0.05. In 56.8% (25/44 of the IgM anti-HAV-positive individuals and in 33.3% (5/15 of the IgM anti-HAV-negative individuals presenting clinical symptoms, HAV RNA was detected. Phylogenetic analysis revealed co-circulation of subgenotypes IA and IB in 93.3% (28/30 of the amplified samples. In present study, we verify that 79% (30/38 of children IgM anti-HAV-positive were asymptomatic. In child care centers, this asymptomatic spread is a more serious problem, promoting the infection of young children, who rarely show signs of infection. Therefore, vaccinating children below the age of two might prevent the asymptomatic spread of hepatitis A.

  16. Early infection and asymptomatic spread of hepatitis A virus in a public child care center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: should attending children under two years of age be vaccinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Liliane M; de Paula, Vanessa S; Arantes, Milton R; Oliveira, Maria L A; Gaspar, Ana Maria C

    2006-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in order to identify hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological markers in 418 individuals (mean age, 16.4 years; range, 1 month-80 years) at a public child care center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, as well as to analyze risk factors and determine circulating genotypes. Serum samples were tested using an enzyme immunoassay. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect and characterize HAV RNA, and sequencing was performed. Anti-HAV antibodies and IgM anti-HAV antibodies were detected, respectively, in 89.5% (374/418) and 10.5% (44/418) of the individuals tested. Acute HAV infection in children was independently correlated with crawling (p children IgM anti-HAV-positive were asymptomatic. In child care centers, this asymptomatic spread is a more serious problem, promoting the infection of young children, who rarely show signs of infection. Therefore, vaccinating children below the age of two might prevent the asymptomatic spread of hepatitis A.

  17. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of the CGLSS and NLDN Systems Based on Two Years of Ground-Truth Data from Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Hill, Jonathan D.; Mata, Angel G.; Cummins, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    From May 2011 through July 2013, the lightning instrumentation at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B) at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, has obtained high-speed video records and field change waveforms (dE/dt and three-axis dH/dt) for 54 negative polarity return strokes whose strike termination locations and times are known with accuracy of the order of 10 m or less and 1 µs, respectively. A total of 18 strokes terminated directly to the LC39B lighting protection system (LPS), which contains three 181 m towers in a triangular configuration, an overhead catenary wire system on insulating masts, and nine down conductors. An additional 9 strokes terminated on the 106 m lightning protection mast of Launch Complex 39A (LC39A), which is located about 2.7 km southeast of LC39B. The remaining 27 return strokes struck either on the ground or attached to low-elevation grounded objects within about 500 m of the LC39B LPS. Leader/return stroke sequences were imaged at 3200 frames/sec by a network of six Phantom V310 high-speed video cameras. Each of the three towers on LC39B had two high-speed cameras installed at the 147 m level with overlapping fields of view of the center of the pad. The locations of the strike points of 54 return strokes have been compared to time-correlated reports of the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and the results of this comparison will be presented and discussed.

  18. The association of Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stent Trial (CREST) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Carotid Guideline Publication on utilization and outcomes of carotid stenting among "high-risk" patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzler, Gregory G; Farber, Alik; Rybin, Denis V; Doros, Gheorghe; Siracuse, Jeffrey J; Eslami, Mohammad H

    2017-07-01

    Since the 2004 approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration of carotid artery stenting (CAS), there have been two seminal publications about CAS reimbursement (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines; 2008) and clinical outcomes (Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stent Trial [CREST]; 2010). We explored the association between these publications and national trends in CAS use among high-risk symptomatic patients. The most recent congruent data sets of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were queried for patients undergoing carotid revascularization. The sample was limited to include only patients who were defined as "high-risk" if they had a Charlson Comorbidity Score of ≥3.0. Subgroup analyses were performed of high-risk patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Utilization proportions of CAS were calculated quarterly from 2005 to 2011 for NIS. Three time intervals related to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines and CREST publication were selected: 2005 to 2008, 2008 to 2010, and after 2010. Logistic regression with piecewise linear trend for time was used to estimate different trends in CAS use for the overall high-risk sample and for neurologically asymptomatic and symptomatic cases. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare odds of postoperative mortality and stroke between these two procedures at different time intervals independent of confounding variables. During the study period, 20,079 carotid endarterectomies (CEAs) and 3447 CAS procedures were performed in high-risk patients in the NIS database. CAS utilization constituted 20.5% of carotid revascularization procedures among high-risk symptomatic patients, with a significant increase from 18.6% to 24.4% during the study period (P carotid revascularization in a high-risk cohort of patients has significantly increased from 2005 to 2011. Compared with CEA, CAS independently increased the odds of perioperative in-hospital stroke in

  19. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    -actor value cocreation, this paper is the first to comprehensively andcoherently conceptualize the notion of a usage center. In doing so, the authorsbuild an important foundation for future theorizing related to the potentialemergence of usage centers as well as the cocreation of individual andcollective...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Data VA App Store National Resource Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention Veterans Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quitting Smoking Vaccines & Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research Research Home About VA Research Services ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service ( ... Close Video Help Problems viewing videos in pop up windows? See our alternate video page. For information ...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Telehealth Womens Health Issues Wellness Programs MyHealtheVet Nutrition Quitting Smoking Vaccines & Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Apply for VA Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research Research Home About VA Research Services Programs News, Events and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers ...

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Awareness About the Website Site Map Content Inventory Accessibility Privacy and Security Updating of Web Site ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays Means Test Health Insurance Make a Payment ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Telehealth Womens Health Issues Wellness Programs MyHealtheVet Nutrition Quitting Smoking Vaccines & Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research ...

  10. Improving Patient Experience and Primary Care Quality for Patients With Complex Chronic Disease Using the Electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes Tool: Adopting Qualitative Methods Into a User-Centered Design Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele Gray, Carolyn; Khan, Anum Irfan; Kuluski, Kerry; McKillop, Ian; Sharpe, Sarah; Bierman, Arlene S; Lyons, Renee F; Cott, Cheryl

    2016-02-18

    Many mHealth technologies do not meet the needs of patients with complex chronic disease and disabilities (CCDDs) who are among the highest users of health systems worldwide. Furthermore, many of the development methodologies used in the creation of mHealth and eHealth technologies lack the ability to embrace users with CCDD in the specification process. This paper describes how we adopted and modified development techniques to create the electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes (ePRO) tool, a patient-centered mHealth solution to help improve primary health care for patients experiencing CCDD. This paper describes the design and development approach, specifically the process of incorporating qualitative research methods into user-centered design approaches to create the ePRO tool. Key lessons learned are offered as a guide for other eHealth and mHealth research and technology developers working with complex patient populations and their primary health care providers. Guided by user-centered design principles, interpretive descriptive qualitative research methods were adopted to capture user experiences through interviews and working groups. Consistent with interpretive descriptive methods, an iterative analysis technique was used to generate findings, which were then organized in relation to the tool design and function to help systematically inform modifications to the tool. User feedback captured and analyzed through this method was used to challenge the design and inform the iterative development of the tool. Interviews with primary health care providers (n=7) and content experts (n=6), and four focus groups with patients and carers (n=14) along with a PICK analysis-Possible, Implementable, (to be) Challenged, (to be) Killed-guided development of the first prototype. The initial prototype was presented in three design working groups with patients/carers (n=5), providers (n=6), and experts (n=5). Working group findings were broken down into categories of what works

  11. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Six New Trinuclear Oxo-Centered Manganese Complexes of General Formula [Mn(3)O(X-benzoato)(6)L(3)] (X = 2-F, 2-Cl, 2-Br, 3-F, 3-Cl, 3-Br; L = Pyridine or Water) and Crystal Structures of the 2-F, 3-Cl, and 3-Br Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Joan; Albela, Belen; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen; Christou, George

    1997-05-21

    The reaction of N-n-Bu(4)MnO(4) or NaMnO(4) with appropriate reagents in ethanol-pyridine leads to the high-yield formation of new mixed-valence trinuclear oxo-centered Mn(III,III,II) complexes of general formulation [Mn(3)O(X-benzoato)(6)L(3)] (1, X = 2-fluoro, L = pyridine; 2, X = 2-chloro, L = pyridine; 3, X = 2-bromo, L = pyridine; 4, X = 3-fluoro, L = 2 pyridine + 1 H(2)O; 5, X = 3-chloro, L = 2 pyridine + 1 H(2)O; 6, X = 3-bromo, L = 2 pyridine + 1 H(2)O). The crystal structures of 1, 5, and 6 were determined. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/c with a = 15.774(2) Å, b = 17.269(2) Å, c = 21.411(2) Å, beta = 91.11(1) degrees, and Z = 4. Complex 5 crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2(1)/n with a = 15.172(2) Å, b = 17.603(2) Å, c = 21.996(3) Å, beta = 106.300(10), and Z = 4. Complex 6 crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2(1)/n with a = 15.533(3) Å, b = 17.884(2) Å, c = 21.997(4) Å, beta = 106.95(1) degrees, and Z = 4. The three complexes are neutral and possess an oxo-centered Mn(3)O unit with peripheral ligands provided by bridging carboxylate and terminal pyridine or H(2)O groups. Each manganese ion is distorted octahedral, and consideration of overall charge necessitates a mixed-valence Mn(II)Mn(III)(2) description. In 1, the presence of a C(2) axis through the central O atom and one of the manganese atoms (Mn(II)) and the absence of imposed symmetry elements in 5 and 6 (they have the two Mn(III) with a terminal pyridine group and the Mn(II) with a H(2)O terminal molecule) suggest a trapped-valence situation in all three cases. The Mn(II) is assigned on the basis of its longer metal-ligand distances. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility studies were performed on 1-6 in the temperature range 2-300 K. Satisfactory fits to the observed susceptibility data were obtained by assuming isotropic magnetic exchange interactions and using the appropriate spin Hamiltonian and susceptibility

  12. Public Water Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This GIS layer consists of the geographic location of active and inactive public (Community, non-transient non-community and transient non-community) water sources...

  13. A Case-Based, Problem-Based Learning Approach to Prepare Master of Public Health Candidates for the Complexities of Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winskell, Kate; McFarland, Deborah A.; del Rio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Global health is a dynamic, emerging, and interdisciplinary field. To address current and emerging global health challenges, we need a public health workforce with adaptable and collaborative problem-solving skills. In the 2013–2014 academic year, the Hubert Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health–Emory University launched an innovative required core course for its first-year Master of Public Health students in the global health track. The course uses a case-based, problem-based learning approach to develop global health competencies. Small teams of students propose solutions to these problems by identifying learning issues and critically analyzing and synthesizing new information. We describe the course structure and logistics used to apply this approach in the context of a large class and share lessons learned. PMID:25706029

  14. Public Water Supply Systems (PWS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset includes boundaries for most public water supply systems (PWS) in Kansas (525 municipalities, 289 rural water districts and 13 public wholesale water...

  15. Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication is archived and available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This publication contains hourly precipitation...

  16. Oxygen-Centered Hexatantalum Tetradecaimido Cluster Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Krinsky, Jamin L.; Anderson, Laura L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    The syntheses and characterization of several octahedral hexatantalum cluster compounds of formula (ArN)14Ta6O are described (Ar = Ph, p-MeC6H4, p-MeOC6H4, p-t-BuC6H4, p-BrC6H4, m-ClC6H4). Treatment of Bn3Ta=N-t-Bu (Bn = CH2C6H5) or pentakis(dimethylamido)tantalum with an excess of the appropriate aniline and stoichiometric water or tantalum oxide afforded varying yields of arylimido clusters. The structures of two species were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the identity of the c...

  17. Center for Quantum Algorithms and Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-12

    Property testing of unitary operators, Physical Review A, (11 2011): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.052328 Dorit Aharonov, Itai Arad, Umesh Vazirani...Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. : , TOTAL: 5 Received Paper TOTAL: Books Number of Manuscripts: Patents Submitted Patents Awarded Awards Graduate Students...Research Administration, Edmond Safra Campus Authority for Research & Development Sub Contractor Numbers (c): Patent Clause Number (d-1): Patent Date (d-2

  18. B Complex Test Control Center (TCC) #4210

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TCC is a dual control room facility for the B-1 and B-2 Test Positions on the B-Stand. The TCC houses continually-updated, state-of-the-art Data Acquisition and...

  19. Once the shovel hits the ground : Evaluating the management of complex implementation processes of public-private partnership infrastructure projects with qualitative comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Verweij (Stefan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Much attention is being paid to the planning of public-private partnership (PPP) infrastructure projects. The subsequent implementation phase – when the contract has been signed and the project ‘starts rolling’ – has received less attention. However, sound agreements

  20. Headway statistics of public transport in Mexican cities 05.65.+b Self-organized systems; 45.70.Vn Granular models of complex systems; traffic flow;

    CERN Document Server

    Krbalek, M

    2003-01-01

    We present a cellular automaton simulating the behaviour of public bus transport in several Mexican cities. The headway statistics obtained from the model is compared to the measured time intervals between subsequent bus arrivals to a given bus stop and to a spacing distribution resulting from a random matrix theory. (letter to the editor)

  1. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public-Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21(st) Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, Lotte M

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public-private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%-80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States.

  2. Energy transfer followed by electron transfer in a porphyrin macrocycle and central acceptor ligand: a model for a photosynthetic composite of the light-harvesting complex and reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Yusuke; Sandanayaka, Atula S D; Satake, Akiharu; Araki, Yasuyuki; Ogawa, Kazuya; Ito, Osamu; Kobuke, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A system that models a photosynthetic composite of the light-harvesting complex and reaction center is reported in which light energy collected by cyclic antenna porphyrins is transferred to a central energy-acceptor porphyrin, followed by photoinduced electron transfer to a fullerene positioned above the ring plane. Pyridyl tripodal ligands appended with bis(phenylethynyl)porphyrinatozinc(II) (ZnP-Tripod) and additional fulleropyrrolidine moieties (C(60)-ZnP-Tripod) were synthesized as the reaction center units. The tripodal ligand was strongly accommodated by the light-harvesting porphyrin macrocycle N-(1-Zn)(3) (1-Zn = trisporphyrinatozinc(II)) by using three-point coordination of pyridyl to uncoordinated porphyrinatozinc sites to afford a stable 1:1 composite. The binding constants for ZnP-Tripod and C(60)-ZnP-Tripod in benzonitrile were estimated from steady-state fluorescence titrations to be 1.4x10(7) and 1.6x10(7) M(-1), respectively. The steady-state fluorescence titration, fluorescence lifetime, and transient absorption studies revealed that in both composites the excitation energy collected by the nine porphyrins of N-(1-Zn)(3) was efficiently transferred to a ZnP moiety by means of a through-space mechanism with a quantum yield of approximately 90%. Furthermore, in the composite with C(60)-ZnP-Tripod, the converged energy at the ZnP moiety induced electron transfer to the C(60) moiety, which afforded the stable charge-separated state (Phi(CS)>90%).

  3. Exploring the complexities of leprosy-related stigma and the potential of a socio-economic intervention in a public health context in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dadun,; Peters, Ruth; Lusli, Mimi; Miranda-Galarza, Beatriz; Van Brakel, Wim; Zweekhorst, Marjolein; Damayanti, Rita; Irwanto, A.; Bunders-Aelen, J.G.F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores the complexities of leprosy-related stigma and the potential effectiveness of a socio-economic intervention in Cirebon District, Indonesia. Methods: A qualitative approach was adopted. 53 people affected by leprosy were interviewed, and 17 focus group discussions were

  4. Associations between self-perception of weight, food choice intentions, and consumer response to calorie information: a retrospective investigation of public health center clients in Los Angeles County before the implementation of menu-labeling regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nianogo, Roch A; Kuo, Tony; Smith, Lisa V; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2016-01-22

    Although obesity continues to rise and remains a great public health concern in the U.S., a number of important levers such as self-perception of weight and calorie postings at point-of-purchase in restaurants are still not well-characterized in the literature, especially for low-income and minority groups in Los Angeles County (LAC). To study this gap, we examined the associations of self-perception of weight (as measured by body weight discrepancy) with food choice intentions and consumer response to calorie information among low-income adults residing in LAC during the pre-menu labeling regulation era. Descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the aforementioned associations utilizing data from the 2007-2008 Calorie and Nutrition Information Survey (CNIS). The CNIS was a local health department study of 639 low-income adults recruited from five large, multi-purpose public health centers in LAC. Survey participants who reported that their desired weight was less than their current weight (versus desired weight the same as current weight) had (i) higher odds of intending to select lower-calorie foods under the scenario that calorie information was available at point-of-purchase (aOR = 2.0; 95 % CI: 1.0-3.9); and (ii) had higher odds of reporting that it is "very important" to have these calorie postings on food items in grocery stores (aOR = 3.1; 95 % CI: 0.90-10.7) and in fast-food restaurants (aOR = 3.4; 95 % CI: 1.0-11.4). Self-perception of weight was found to be associated with the intention to select lower-calorie foods under the scenario that calorie information was available at point-of-purchase. Future public health efforts to support menu labeling implementation should consider these and other findings to inform consumer education and communications strategies that can be tailored to assist restaurant patrons with this forthcoming federal law.

  5. Educação como mercadoria: o público e o privado no caso dos shopping centers Education as a commodity: the public and private spheres in the case of shopping malls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyne Dias Coutinho

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Este texto trata da emergência e do papel dos espaços infantis com funções educativas/pedagógicas em shopping centers, sugerindo que a prática de fazer da educação uma mercadoria está envolvida na produção de um processo de hiperprivatização, caracterizado principalmente por sua independência com relação à regulação estatal. Para tanto, aponta certos deslocamentos por que passaram os conceitos de público e privado, a fim de mostrar algumas formas pelas quais se dá a atual dissolução do modo dicotômico de entender (e de usar esses conceitos. Por fim, sugere que a liquidação da dicotomia público/privado acaba por intensificar a lógica da privatização tão característica do nosso tempo.This paper discusses the emergence and the role of educational places for children in shopping malls. It suggests that making education into a commodity is a form of hyperprivatization, free from state control and regulation. Analyzing the successive displacements of the concepts of public and private sphere, we show the current dissolution of this dichotomy, which ends up intensifying the privatization logics, so typical of our times.

  6. Complex systems approach to scientific publication and peer-review system: development of an agent-based model calibrated with empirical journal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanis, Michail; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe; Trinquart, Ludovic

    Scientific peer-review and publication systems incur a huge burden in terms of costs and time. Innovative alternatives have been proposed to improve the systems, but assessing their impact in experimental studies is not feasible at a systemic level. We developed an agent-based model by adopting a unified view of peer review and publication systems and calibrating it with empirical journal data in the biomedical and life sciences. We modeled researchers, research manuscripts and scientific journals as agents. Researchers were characterized by their scientific level and resources, manuscripts by their scientific value, and journals by their reputation and acceptance or rejection thresholds. These state variables were used in submodels for various processes such as production of articles, submissions to target journals, in-house and external peer review, and resubmissions. We collected data for a sample of biomedical and life sciences journals regarding acceptance rates, resubmission patterns and total number of published articles. We adjusted submodel parameters so that the agent-based model outputs fit these empirical data. We simulated 105 journals, 25,000 researchers and 410,000 manuscripts over 10 years. A mean of 33,600 articles were published per year; 19 % of submitted manuscripts remained unpublished. The mean acceptance rate was 21 % after external peer review and rejection rate 32 % after in-house review; 15 % publications resulted from the first submission, 47 % the second submission and 20 % the third submission. All decisions in the model were mainly driven by the scientific value, whereas journal targeting and persistence in resubmission defined whether a manuscript would be published or abandoned after one or many rejections. This agent-based model may help in better understanding the determinants of the scientific publication and peer-review systems. It may also help in assessing and identifying the most promising alternative systems of peer

  7. Mortalidade de crianças usuárias de creches no Município de São Paulo Mortality among children enrolled in public day care centers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneida S Ramos Vico

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever o comportamento da mortalidade em crianças usuárias de creches. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de estudo descritivo da mortalidade de crianças da faixa etária de zero a seis anos e 11 meses, matriculadas em toda a Rede Pública Municipal de Creches de São Paulo (Br, no período de 1995 a 1999. As variáveis de interesse foram sexo, idade, causa básica de morte, tempo de permanência na creche e sazonalidade. RESULTADOS: O coeficiente médio de mortalidade observado para o período foi de 36,4 por cem mil crianças. Do total das mortes, 32,7% ocorreram em menores de um ano e 78,4% em crianças com até três anos. Quanto ao tempo de permanência, 54,2% não chegaram a completar seis meses, destacando os três meses iniciais que concentraram 36,3% das mortes. A maioria dos óbitos ocorreu nos meses de inverno e outono, respectivamente, 31,8% e 29,6%. As causas de morte mais freqüentes foram de origem infecciosa: pneumonias (29,6%, infecção meningocócica (13,0%, meningites não meningocócicas (8,5%, gastroenterites (7,6%, varicela (5,4%. As causas externas representaram 13,5% devido a quedas, atropelamentos, afogamentos, queimaduras e agressões. CONCLUSÕES: A maior parte das mortes ocorreu em menores de três anos e decorreu de causas evitáveis, algumas delas preveníveis por vacinas.OBJECTIVE: To describe the mortality pattern among children enrolled in public day care centers. METHODS: This was a descriptive study of the mortality pattern among children aged from 0 to 6 years and 11 months who were enrolled in all the public day care centers in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1995 to 1999. The variables of interest were sex, age, underlying cause of death, duration of day care attendance and seasonality. RESULTS: The average mortality rate for the period was 36.4 per 100,000 children. Of the total number of deaths, 32.7% were among children under 1 year old and 78.4% under 3 years old. The deaths of 54.2% of these

  8. Facilities Management Service Delivery in Public and Private High Rise Residential Buildings in Nigeria: A case study of Eko Court Complex and Niger Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrele O. O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed and compared the delivery of Facilities Management (FM services in public and private high rise residential buildings in Lagos, Nigeria. While some facilities or services may not be available in some public estates, the efficiency of the available ones is inadequate in comparison with the adequacy and efficiency of services provided in private estates. The objectives set for the study include identification of services that are provided in the case studies, service delivery method, and an assessment of the residents’ satisfaction of the services. This study adopted questionnaire survey for collection of data. 127 questionnaires were distributed to the residents of the case studies and 93 were returned. Three of which were discarded for incompleteness, thus 90 were analysed. The study found that most but not all of the facilities services expected in high rise buildings are available in the case studies and the services are outsourced under a standard Service Level Agreement. The service delivery in private high rise residential building is better than the public residential high rise buildings as revealed by the study. The study recommends improved standardization of services, customized services and meeting customer’s expectation for improved service delivery.

  9. Public Sector Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Renate; Leixnering, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    New public management-inspired reforms created numerous autonomous units with many different faces and labels. This variety of organizations and organizational forms precludes a straightforward definition of what constitutes a public sector organization and blurs the boundaries between the public...... and private sectors as well as the boundaries of single organizations. In addition, the complexity of the interlocking arrangements and relationships in this public organizational landscape has resulted in considerable governance problems with serious implications for coordination and policy coherence....

  10. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.*

  11. Os valores organizacionais e a Síndrome de Burnout: dois momentos em uma maternidade pública Organizational values and Burnout Syndrome: two moments in a public day-care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia de Oliveira Borges

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudos anteriores têm assinalado a associação da incidência da síndrome de burnout e os valores organizacionais (valores atribuídos às organizações pelos empregados em um nível ideal e real. Em tal contexto, foi desenvolvida pesquisa em uma maternidade pública em 2003, replicando uma pesquisa anterior realizada em 2000, objetivando comparar os resultados. Aplicaram-se o Inventário de Valores Organizacionais e o Inventário de Maslach sobre burnout, numa amostra de 48 profissionais de saúde, e entrevistas, numa sub-amostra. Os resultados indicaram ocorrer uma redução nas diferenças entre níveis de análise ideais e reais dos valores organizacionais, principalmente no pólo de igualitarismo. Esses resultados associam-se às mudanças na gestão organizacional. Os níveis de burnout entre os profissionais de saúde apresentaram-se estáveis. A associação entre os valores organizacionais da maternidade e a síndrome de burnout muda, porém é contraposta pela tensão oriunda no aumento da carga de trabalho e nos salários.Previous studies have shown that the association between the incidence of Burnout Syndrome and organizational values (values attributed by employees to organizations on ideal and real levels. In this context, in 2003, a research at a public day-care center was developed, replicating a previous one accomplished in 2000, with the objective to compare the results. The Inventory of Organizational Values and the Maslasch Burnout Inventory were applied with the samples of 48 health professionals. Interviews were applied too. The results indicate that a reduction of differences between ideal and real levels of organizational values occur, notably in the equalitarian pole. These results associate to changes on organizational management. Levels of burnout were stable among health professionals. The association between organizational values of the day-care center and Burnout Syndrome change, but it is refuted by the

  12. Estado nutricional relativo ao zinco de crianças que frequentam creches do estado da Paraíba Zinc nutritional status in children attending public daycare centers in the state of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixis Figueroa Pedraza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o estado nutricional relativo ao zinco de crianças assistidas em creches do Estado da Paraíba. MÉTODOS: O estado nutricional relativo ao zinco de 235 crianças pré-escolares foi avaliado através de sua concentração no soro, da ingestão dietética de zinco e da estatura para idade, como recomendado pelo International Zinc Consultative Group. As concentrações séricas de zinco foram determinadas por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica de chama, considerando deficiência de zinco valores OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the zinc levels of children attending public daycare centers in the state of Paraíba. Brazil. METHODS: The zinc levels of 235 preschool children were evaluated through serum zinc concentration, dietary zinc intake and height-for-age, as recommended by the International Zinc Nutrition Consultative Group. Baseline zinc levels in the serum were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, considering values <65µmol/L indicative of zinc deficiency. The 24-hour recall method was used to record food consumption, considering the food consumption of the child the day before and in the daycare center. Zinc inadequacy was analyzed according to the estimated average zinc requirement by life stage and diet type recommended by the International Zinc Nutrition Consultative Group. The World Health Organization Growth Reference was used as the reference for the height-for-age indices. Children with indices two z-scores below the median value of the reference population were considered stunted. Statistical analysis was performed by the t-test or analysis of variance by the software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences -16.0. RESULTS: The prevalence of inadequate serum zinc concentration, inadequate zinc intakes and stunting were 16.2%, 16.6% and 7.7%, respectively. Mean serum zinc was lower in children of underweight mothers than in children of normal weight mothers. CONCLUSION: The studied children

  13. <書評> Cockcroft, Eva Sperling and Holly Barnet-Sanchez eds., Signs from the Heart : California Chicano Murals., Social and Public Art Resource Center and University of New Mexico Press. 1990, (サインズ・フロム・ザ・ハート:カリフォルニアのチカーノ壁画)

    OpenAIRE

    熊谷, 高秋

    2006-01-01

    Cockcroft, Eva Sperling and Holly Barnet-Sanchez eds., Signs from the Heart : California Chicano Murals., Social and Public Art Resource Center and University of New Mexico Press. 1990, (サインズ・フロム・ザ・ハート:カリフォルニアのチカーノ壁画)

  14. Open Spaces, Public Spaces, Publics, Open-minded Places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Bravo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 a double issue of the international architectural review (published in Italy “Casabella” was dedicated to “The design of open spaces”. Different positions and scholars and diverse point of views explored this complex theme, trying to explain the reasons, the modes and the possibilities of a new strategy in design research and practice. The starting point was the very term “open space”, which doesn’t belong to the classical vocabulary of architectural theory, with no reference to modern town planning manuals.Nowadays the difference between “open space”, as indicated in regulations of urban city spaces, and “public space” has found new declensions related to public life of groups or individuals, taking place in consolidated environments as well as in peripheral areas or in residual spaces up to edge cities, able to give values and functions to neglected or abandoned places. Next to public meeting spaces, such as large congress hall, fair precincts, political or cultural events, shopping centers, and to waiting spaces, such as offices, public institutions, underground stations, airports, many public spaces do not have an architectural connotation: life can be found at the corner of two suburban roads, where spontaneous conversation or some kind of special event slowly starts to layer, indicating a kind of rituality, or in anonymous suburban places where minority ethnic or immigrant groups gather, becoming places of solidarity and sharing. All these expressions, as already Vittorio Gregotti pointed out in his introductory essay on Casabella, articulate in a new way the demands for public space and for its architectural definition.

  15. Anemia em crianças de uma creche pública e as repercussões sobre o desenvolvimento de linguagem Consequences of anemia on language development of children from a public day care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Nunes Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o desenvolvimento de linguagem de crianças anêmicas e não-anêmicas de uma creche pública de Belo Horizonte. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com avaliação do desenvolvimento de linguagem de crianças anêmicas (casos e não-anêmicas (controles entre dois e seis anos de idade. Todas as crianças realizaram punção digital para detecção da anemia (hemoglobina OBJECTIVE: To compare language development in anemic and non-anemic children from a public day care center in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with evaluation of language development of anemic (cases and non-anemic children (controls between two and six years old. All children had a digital puncture to detect anemia (hemoglobin <11.3g/dL. Cases were 22 anemic children and controls, 44 children selected by randomized paired sampling. The language development of each participant was observed and classified according to two main fields: communicative aspects (reception and emission and cognitive aspects, based on the Child Behavior Observation Guide for children from zero to six years old. Performance rates were created in order to qualify children's answers. RESULTS: The hemoglobin values observed in case and control groups were 10.6 and 12.5g/dL, respectively. The groups did not differ regarding age, gender, breastfeeding and mother's schooling. Significant differences were observed in the language evaluation in all examined fields: levels of reception (p=0,02 and emission (p<0.001 and cognitive aspects (p <0.001, with worse performance of anemic children. CONCLUSIONS: Anemic children presented worse language development when compared to non-anemic ones. In the public health context, childhood anemia should be considered as a relevant problem due to language development alterations with possible consequences on learning abilities and future social and professional performance.

  16. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the qualification...

  17. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... and Services Administration (HRSA) will transfer Health Center Program (Section 330(h) of the Public... Health Center Program Section 330(h) funds to SPHC in order to implement and carry out grant activities...

  18. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) Community Health Center (CHC), Increased Demand for Services (IDS), and Capital Improvement Program (CIP) funds originally awarded to...

  19. Training Public Health Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pamela A; Brusuelas, Kristin M; Baden, Daniel J; Duncan, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management.

  20. Validating an Agency-based Tool for Measuring Women’s Empowerment in a Complex Public Health Trial in Rural Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, Lu; Morrison, Joanna; Sharma, Neha; Shrestha, Bhim; Manandhar, Dharma; Costello, Anthony; Saville, Naomi; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Despite the rising popularity of indicators of women’s empowerment in global development programmes, little work has been done on the validity of existing measures of such a complex concept. We present a mixed methods validation of the use of the Relative Autonomy Index for measuring Amartya Sen’s notion of agency freedom in rural Nepal. Analysis of think-aloud interviews (n = 7) indicated adequate respondent understanding of questionnaire items, but multiple problems of interpretation including difficulties with the four-point Likert scale, questionnaire item ambiguity and difficulties with translation. Exploratory Factor Analysis of a calibration sample (n = 511) suggested two positively correlated factors (r = 0.64) loading on internally and externally motivated behaviour. Both factors increased with decreasing education and decision-making power on large expenditures and food preparation. Confirmatory Factor Analysis on a validation sample (n = 509) revealed good fit (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation 0.05–0.08, Comparative Fit Index 0.91–0.99). In conclusion, we caution against uncritical use of agency-based quantification of women’s empowerment. While qualitative and quantitative analysis revealed overall satisfactory construct and content validity, the positive correlation between external and internal motivations suggests the existence of adaptive preferences. High scores on internally motivated behaviour may reflect internalized oppression rather than agency freedom. PMID:28303173