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Sample records for cenocepacia j2315 genome

  1. Exploring the metabolic network of the epidemic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 via genome-scale reconstruction

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    Panda Gurudutta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is a threatening nosocomial epidemic pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF or a compromised immune system. Its high level of antibiotic resistance is an increasing concern in treatments against its infection. Strain B. cenocepacia J2315 is the most infectious isolate from CF patients. There is a strong demand to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315 to systematically analyze its metabolic capabilities and its virulence traits, and to search for potential clinical therapy targets. Results We reconstructed the genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315. An iterative reconstruction process led to the establishment of a robust model, iKF1028, which accounts for 1,028 genes, 859 internal reactions, and 834 metabolites. The model iKF1028 captures important metabolic capabilities of B. cenocepacia J2315 with a particular focus on the biosyntheses of key metabolic virulence factors to assist in understanding the mechanism of disease infection and identifying potential drug targets. The model was tested through BIOLOG assays. Based on the model, the genome annotation of B. cenocepacia J2315 was refined and 24 genes were properly re-annotated. Gene and enzyme essentiality were analyzed to provide further insights into the genome function and architecture. A total of 45 essential enzymes were identified as potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions As the first genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315, iKF1028 allows a systematic study of the metabolic properties of B. cenocepacia and its key metabolic virulence factors affecting the CF community. The model can be used as a discovery tool to design novel drugs against diseases caused by this notorious pathogen.

  2. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yee-Chin

    2016-08-22

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  3. The genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, an epidemic pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Matthew T G; Seth-Smith, Helena M B; Crossman, Lisa C

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients cause major complications in the treatment of this common genetic disease. Burkholderia cenocepacia infection is particularly problematic since this organism has high levels of antibiotic resistance, making it difficult to eradica...

  4. Protein engineering of a nitrilase from Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 for efficient and enantioselective production of (R)-o-chloromandelic acid.

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    Wang, Hualei; Gao, Wenyuan; Sun, Huihui; Chen, Lifeng; Zhang, Lujia; Wang, Xuedong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2015-12-01

    The nitrilase-mediated pathway has significant advantages in the production of optically pure aromatic α-hydroxy carboxylic acids. However, low enantioselectivity and activity are observed on hydrolyzing o-chloromandelonitrile to produce optically pure (R)-o-chloromandelic acid. In the present study, a protein engineering approach was successfully used to enhance the performance of nitrilase obtained from Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (BCJ2315) in hydrolyzing o-chloromandelonitrile. Four hot spots (T49, I113, Y199, and T310) responsible for the enantioselectivity and activity of BCJ2315 were identified by random mutagenesis. An effective double mutant (I113M/Y199G [encoding the replacement of I with M at position 113 and Y with G at position 199]), which demonstrated remarkably enhanced enantioselectivity (99.1% enantiomeric excess [ee] compared to 89.2% ee for the wild type) and relative activity (360% of the wild type), was created by two rounds of site saturation mutagenesis, first at each of the four hot spots and subsequently at position 199 for combination with the selected beneficial mutation I113M. Notably, this mutant also demonstrated dramatically enhanced enantioselectivity and activity toward other mandelonitrile derivatives and, thus, broadened the substrate scope of this nitrilase. Using an ethyl acetate-water (1:9) biphasic system, o-chloromandelonitrile (500 mM) was completely hydrolyzed in 3 h by this mutant with a small amount of biocatalyst (10 g/liter wet cells), resulting in a high concentration of (R)-o-chloromandelic acid with 98.7% ee, to our knowledge the highest ever reported. This result highlights a promising method for industrial production of optically pure (R)-o-chloromandelic acid. Insight into the source of enantioselectivity and activity was gained by homology modeling and molecular docking experiments. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Discovery and characterization of a highly efficient enantioselective mandelonitrile hydrolase from Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 by phylogeny-based enzymatic substrate specificity prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A nitrilase-mediated pathway has significant advantages in the production of optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid. However, unwanted byproduct, low enantioselectivity, and specific activity reduce its value in practical applications. An ideal nitrilase that can efficiently hydrolyze mandelonitrile to optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid without the unwanted byproduct is needed. Results A novel nitrilase (BCJ2315) was discovered from Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 through phylogeny-based enzymatic substrate specificity prediction (PESSP). This nitrilase is a mandelonitrile hydrolase that could efficiently hydrolyze mandelonitrile to (R)-(−)-mandelic acid, with a high enantiomeric excess of 98.4%. No byproduct was observed in this hydrolysis process. BCJ2315 showed the highest identity of 71% compared with other nitrilases in the amino acid sequence. BCJ2315 possessed the highest activity toward mandelonitrile and took mandelonitrile as the optimal substrate based on the analysis of substrate specificity. The kinetic parameters Vmax, Km, Kcat, and Kcat/Km toward mandelonitrile were 45.4 μmol/min/mg, 0.14 mM, 15.4 s-1, and 1.1×105 M-1s-1, respectively. The recombinant Escherichia coli M15/BCJ2315 had a strong substrate tolerance and could completely hydrolyze mandelonitrile (100 mM) with fewer amounts of wet cells (10 mg/ml) within 1 h. Conclusions PESSP is an efficient method for discovering an ideal mandelonitrile hydrolase. BCJ2315 has high affinity and catalytic efficiency toward mandelonitrile. This nitrilase has great advantages in the production of optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid because of its high activity and enantioselectivity, strong substrate tolerance, and having no unwanted byproduct. Thus, BCJ2315 has great potential in the practical production of optically pure (R)-(−)-mandelic acid in the industry. PMID:23414071

  6. Efflux pump genes of the resistance-nodulation-division family in Burkholderia cenocepacia genome

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    Manina Giulia

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is recognized as opportunistic pathogen that can cause lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A hallmark of B. cenocepacia infections is the inability to eradicate the organism because of multiple intrinsic antibiotic resistance. As Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND efflux systems are responsible for much of the intrinsic multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, this study aims to identify RND genes in the B. cenocepacia genome and start to investigate their involvement into antimicrobial resistance. Results Genome analysis and homology searches revealed 14 open reading frames encoding putative drug efflux pumps belonging to RND family in B. cenocepacia J2315 strain. By reverse transcription (RT-PCR analysis, it was found that orf3, orf9, orf11, and orf13 were expressed at detectable levels, while orf10 appeared to be weakly expressed in B. cenocepacia. Futhermore, orf3 was strongly induced by chloramphenicol. The orf2 conferred resistance to fluoroquinolones, tetraphenylphosphonium, streptomycin, and ethidium bromide when cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli KAM3, a strain lacking the multidrug efflux pump AcrAB. The orf2-overexpressing E. coli also accumulate low concentrations of ethidium bromide, which was restored to wild type level in the presence of CCCP, an energy uncoupler altering the energy of the drug efflux pump. Conclusion The 14 RND pumps gene we have identified in the genome of B. cenocepacia suggest that active efflux could be a major mechanism underlying antimicrobial resistance in this microorganism. We have characterized the ORF2 pump, one of these 14 potential RND efflux systems. Its overexpression in E. coli conferred resistance to several antibiotics and to ethidium bromide but it remains to be determined if this pump play a significant role in the antimicrobial intrinsic resistance of B. cenocepacia. The characterization of antibiotic efflux pumps in B

  7. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

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    Venturi Vittorio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic

  8. Deciphering the role of RND efflux transporters in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

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    Silvia Bazzini

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 is representative of a highly problematic group of cystic fibrosis (CF pathogens. Eradication of B. cenocepacia is very difficult with the antimicrobial therapy being ineffective due to its high resistance to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents and disinfectants. RND (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division efflux pumps are known to be among the mediators of multidrug resistance in gram-negative bacteria. Since the significance of the 16 RND efflux systems present in B. cenocepacia (named RND-1 to -16 has been only partially determined, the aim of this work was to analyze mutants of B. cenocepacia strain J2315 impaired in RND-4 and RND-9 efflux systems, and assess their role in the efflux of toxic compounds. The transcriptomes of mutants deleted individually in RND-4 and RND-9 (named D4 and D9, and a double-mutant in both efflux pumps (named D4-D9, were compared to that of the wild-type B. cenocepacia using microarray analysis. Microarray data were confirmed by qRT-PCR, phenotypic experiments, and by Phenotype MicroArray analysis. The data revealed that RND-4 made a significant contribution to the antibiotic resistance of B. cenocepacia, whereas RND-9 was only marginally involved in this process. Moreover, the double mutant D4-D9 showed a phenotype and an expression profile similar to D4. The microarray data showed that motility and chemotaxis-related genes appeared to be up-regulated in both D4 and D4-D9 strains. In contrast, these gene sets were down-regulated or expressed at levels similar to J2315 in the D9 mutant. Biofilm production was enhanced in all mutants. Overall, these results indicate that in B. cenocepacia RND pumps play a wider role than just in drug resistance, influencing additional phenotypic traits important for pathogenesis.

  9. Comparative analysis of two phenotypically-similar but genomically-distinct Burkholderia cenocepacia-specific bacteriophages

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    Lynch Karlene H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic analysis of bacteriophages infecting the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is an important preliminary step in the development of a phage therapy protocol for these opportunistic pathogens. The objective of this study was to characterize KL1 (vB_BceS_KL1 and AH2 (vB_BceS_AH2, two novel Burkholderia cenocepacia-specific siphoviruses isolated from environmental samples. Results KL1 and AH2 exhibit several unique phenotypic similarities: they infect the same B. cenocepacia strains, they require prolonged incubation at 30°C for the formation of plaques at low titres, and they do not form plaques at similar titres following incubation at 37°C. However, despite these similarities, we have determined using whole-genome pyrosequencing that these phages show minimal relatedness to one another. The KL1 genome is 42,832 base pairs (bp in length and is most closely related to Pseudomonas phage 73 (PA73. In contrast, the AH2 genome is 58,065 bp in length and is most closely related to Burkholderia phage BcepNazgul. Using both BLASTP and HHpred analysis, we have identified and analyzed the putative virion morphogenesis, lysis, DNA binding, and MazG proteins of these two phages. Notably, MazG homologs identified in cyanophages have been predicted to facilitate infection of stationary phase cells and may contribute to the unique plaque phenotype of KL1 and AH2. Conclusions The nearly indistinguishable phenotypes but distinct genomes of KL1 and AH2 provide further evidence of both vast diversity and convergent evolution in the BCC-specific phage population.

  10. Differential roles of RND efflux pumps in antimicrobial drug resistance of sessile and planktonic Burkholderia cenocepacia cells.

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    Buroni, Silvia; Matthijs, Nele; Spadaro, Francesca; Van Acker, Heleen; Scoffone, Viola C; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Coenye, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is notorious for causing respiratory tract infections in people with cystic fibrosis. Infections with this organism are particularly difficult to treat due to its high level of intrinsic resistance to most antibiotics. Multidrug resistance in B. cenocepacia can be ascribed to different mechanisms, including the activity of efflux pumps and biofilm formation. In the present study, the effects of deletion of the 16 operons encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia strain J2315 were investigated by determining the MICs of various antibiotics and by investigating the antibiofilm effect of these antibiotics. Finally, the expression levels of selected RND genes in treated and untreated cultures were investigated using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Our data indicate that the RND-3 and RND-4 efflux pumps are important for resistance to various antimicrobial drugs (including tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) in planktonic B. cenocepacia J2315 populations, while the RND-3, RND-8, and RND-9 efflux systems protect biofilm-grown cells against tobramycin. The RND-8 and RND-9 efflux pumps are not involved in ciprofloxacin resistance. Results from the RT-qPCR experiments on the wild-type strain B. cenocepacia J2315 suggest that there is little regulation at the level of mRNA expression for these efflux pumps under the conditions tested. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Structural basis for mannose recognition by a lectin from opportunistic bacteria Burkholderia cenocepacia.

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    Lameignere, Emilie; Malinovská, Lenka; Sláviková, Margita; Duchaud, Eric; Mitchell, Edward P; Varrot, Annabelle; Sedo, Ondrej; Imberty, Anne; Wimmerová, Michaela

    2008-04-15

    Chronic colonization of the lungs by opportunist bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and members of the Bcc (Burkholderia cepacia complex) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality among CF (cystic fibrosis) patients. PA-IIL (lecB gene), a soluble lectin from Ps. aeruginosa, has been the subject of much interest because of its very strong affinity for fucose. Orthologues have been identified in the opportunist bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum, Chromobacterium violaceum and Burkholderia of Bcc. The genome of the J2315 strain of B. cenocepacia, responsible for epidemia in CF centres, contains three genes that code for proteins with PA-IIL domains. The shortest gene was cloned in Escherichia coli and pure recombinant protein, BclA (B. cenocepacia lectin A), was obtained. The presence of native BclA in B. cenocepacia extracts was checked using a proteomic approach. The specificity of recombinant BclA was characterized using surface plasmon resonance showing a preference for mannosides and supported with glycan array experiments demonstrating a strict specificity for oligomannose-type N-glycan structures. The interaction thermodynamics of BclA with methyl alpha-D-mannoside demonstrates a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 2.75 x 10(-6) M. The X-ray crystal structure of the complex with methyl alpha-D-mannoside was determined at 1.7 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution. The lectin forms homodimers with one binding site per monomer, acting co-operatively with the second dimer site. Each monomer contains two Ca2+ ions and one sugar ligand. Despite strong sequence similarity, the differences between BclA and PA-IIL in their specificity, binding site and oligomerization mode indicate that the proteins should have different roles in the bacteria.

  12. Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-1, a Rhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Potential in Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mart?nez-Ocampo, Fernando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltr?n, Luis Fernando; Hern?ndez-Mendoza, Armando; Rojas-Espinoza, Luis Enrique; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hern?ndez, Mar?a Laura; S?nchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Dant?n-Gonz?lez, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is considered an opportunistic pathogen from humans and may cause disease in plants. A bioprospection from a plaguicide-contaminated agricultural field in Mexico identified several methyl parathion-degrading bacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-1, which gave us clues into ecological biodiversity.

  13. Regulation of Hfq mRNA and protein levels in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the Burkholderia cenocepacia MtvR sRNA.

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    Christian G Ramos

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs are important players of gene expression regulation in bacterial pathogens. MtvR is a 136-nucleotide long sRNA previously identified in the human pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 and with homologues restricted to bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. In this work we have investigated the effects of expressing MtvR in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results are presented showing that MtvR negatively regulates the hfq mRNA levels in both bacterial species. In the case of E. coli, this negative regulation is shown to involve binding of MtvR to the 5'-UTR region of the hfqEc mRNA. Results presented also show that expression of MtvR in E. coli and P. aeruginosa originates multiple phenotypes, including reduced resistance to selected stresses, biofilm formation ability, and increased susceptibility to various antibiotics.

  14. Burkholderia cenocepacia Infections in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Drug Resistance and Therapeutic Approaches

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    Viola C. Scoffone

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen particularly dangerous for cystic fibrosis (CF patients. It can cause a severe decline in CF lung function possibly developing into a life-threatening systemic infection known as cepacia syndrome. Antibiotic resistance and presence of numerous virulence determinants in the genome make B. cenocepacia extremely difficult to treat. Better understanding of its resistance profiles and mechanisms is crucial to improve management of these infections. Here, we present the clinical distribution of B. cenocepacia described in the last 6 years and methods for identification and classification of epidemic strains. We also detail new antibiotics, clinical trials, and alternative approaches reported in the literature in the last 5 years to tackle B. cenocepacia resistance issue. All together these findings point out the urgent need of new and alternative therapies to improve CF patients’ life expectancy.

  15. Biochemical Characterization of Glutamate Racemase-A New Candidate Drug Target against Burkholderia cenocepacia Infections.

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    Aygun Israyilova

    Full Text Available The greatest obstacle for the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients infected with the Burkholderia species is their intrinsic antibiotic resistance. For this reason, there is a need to develop new effective compounds. Glutamate racemase, an essential enzyme for the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall, is an excellent candidate target for the design of new antibacterial drugs. To this aim, we recombinantly produced and characterized glutamate racemase from Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315. From the screening of an in-house library of compounds, two Zn (II and Mn (III 1,3,5-triazapentadienate complexes were found to efficiently inhibit the glutamate racemase activity with IC50 values of 35.3 and 10.0 μM, respectively. Using multiple biochemical approaches, the metal complexes have been shown to affect the enzyme activity by binding to the enzyme-substrate complex and promoting the formation of an inhibited dimeric form of the enzyme. Our results corroborate the value of glutamate racemase as a good target for the development of novel inhibitors against Burkholderia.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Chlorhexidine Tolerance in Burkholderia cenocepacia Biofilms▿†

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    Coenye, Tom; Van Acker, Heleen; Peeters, Elke; Sass, Andrea; Buroni, Silvia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2011-01-01

    The high tolerance of biofilm-grown Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria against antimicrobial agents presents considerable problems for the treatment of infected cystic fibrosis patients and the implementation of infection control guidelines. In the present study, we analyzed the tolerance of planktonic and sessile Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 cultures and examined the transcriptional response of sessile cells to treatment with chlorhexidine. At low (0.0005%) and high (0.05%) concentrations, chlorhexidine had a similar effect on both populations, but at intermediate concentrations (0.015%) the antimicrobial activity was more pronounced in planktonic cultures. The exposure of sessile cells to chlorhexidine resulted in an upregulation of the transcription of 469 (6.56%) and the downregulation of 257 (3.59%) protein-coding genes. A major group of upregulated genes in the treated biofilms encoded membrane-related and regulatory proteins. In addition, several genes coding for drug resistance determinants also were upregulated. The phenotypic analysis of RND (resistance-nodulation-division) efflux pump mutants suggests the presence of lifestyle-specific chlorhexidine tolerance mechanisms; efflux system RND-4 (BCAL2820-BCAL2822) was more responsible for chlorhexidine tolerance in planktonic cells, while other systems (RND-3 [BCAL1672-BCAL1676] and RND-9 [BCAM1945-BCAM1947]) were linked to resistance in sessile cells. After sessile cell exposure, multiple genes encoding chemotaxis and motility-related proteins were upregulated in concert with the downregulation of an adhesin-encoding gene (BCAM2143), suggesting that sessile cells tried to escape the biofilm. We also observed the differential expression of 19 genes carying putative small RNA molecules, indicating a novel role for these regulatory elements in chlorhexidine tolerance. PMID:21357299

  17. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

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    Menard Aymeric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315 genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD, alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS, flagellin biosynthesis (fliA, and heat shock (rpoH factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU. Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2, particular Bcc species (sigI, the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ, certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS, or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes. Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2, recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD, localized (ecfG and large scale deletions (sig

  18. SNaPBcen: a novel and practical tool for genotyping Burkholderia cenocepacia.

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    Eusebio, Nadia; Coutinho, Carla P; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Araujo, Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is the most prevalent and feared member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex in lung infections of cystic fibrosis (CF). Genotyping and monitoring of long-term colonization are critical at clinical units; however, the differentiation of specific lineages performed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is still limited to a small number of isolates due to the high cost and time-consuming procedure. The aim of this study was to optimize a protocol (the SNaPBcen assay) for extensive bacterial population studies. The strategy used for the SNaPBcen assay is based on targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in MLST genes instead of sequencing full MLST sequences. Nonpolymorphic and redundant MLST positions were eliminated, and a set of 24 polymorphisms included in the SNaPBcen assay ensures a high-resolution genomic characterization. These polymorphisms were identified based on the comparative analysis of 137 B. cenocepacia MLST profiles available online (http://pubmlst.org/bcc/). The group of 81 clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia examined in this study using the SNaPBcen assay revealed 51 distinct profiles, and a final discriminatory power of 0.9997 compared with MLST was determined. The SNaPBcen assay was able to reveal isolates with microvariations and the presence of multiple clonal variants in patients chronically colonized with B. cenocepacia. Main phylogenetic subgroups IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC of B. cenocepacia could be separated by the Gl94R polymorphism included in the panel. The SNaPBcen assay proved to be a rapid and robust alternative to the standard MLST for B. cenocepacia, allowing the simultaneous analysis of multiple polymorphisms following amplification and mini-sequencing reactions.

  19. The temperate Burkholderia phage AP3 of the Peduovirinae shows efficient antimicrobial activity against B. cenocepacia of the IIIA lineage.

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    Roszniowski, Bartosz; Latka, Agnieszka; Maciejewska, Barbara; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Olszak, Tomasz; Briers, Yves; Holt, Giles S; Valvano, Miguel A; Lavigne, Rob; Smith, Darren L; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-02-01

    Burkholderia phage AP3 (vB_BceM_AP3) is a temperate virus of the Myoviridae and the Peduovirinae subfamily (P2likevirus genus). This phage specifically infects multidrug-resistant clinical Burkholderia cenocepacia lineage IIIA strains commonly isolated from cystic fibrosis patients. AP3 exhibits high pairwise nucleotide identity (61.7 %) to Burkholderia phage KS5, specific to the same B. cenocepacia host, and has 46.7-49.5 % identity to phages infecting other species of Burkholderia. The lysis cassette of these related phages has a similar organization (putative antiholin, putative holin, endolysin, and spanins) and shows 29-98 % homology between specific lysis genes, in contrast to Enterobacteria phage P2, the hallmark phage of this genus. The AP3 and KS5 lysis genes have conserved locations and high amino acid sequence similarity. The AP3 bacteriophage particles remain infective up to 5 h at pH 4-10 and are stable at 60 °C for 30 min, but are sensitive to chloroform, with no remaining infective particles after 24 h of treatment. AP3 lysogeny can occur by stable genomic integration and by pseudo-lysogeny. The lysogenic bacterial mutants did not exhibit any significant changes in virulence compared to wild-type host strain when tested in the Galleria mellonella moth wax model. Moreover, AP3 treatment of larvae infected with B. cenocepacia revealed a significant increase (P phage is a promising potent agent against bacteria belonging to the most common B. cenocepacia IIIA lineage strains.

  20. Burkholderia cenocepacia ShvR-regulated genes that influence colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence.

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    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nguyen, David T; Sokol, Pamela A

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that primarily infects cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Previously, we reported that ShvR, a LysR regulator, influences colony morphology, virulence, and biofilm formation and regulates the expression of an adjacent 24-kb genomic region encoding 24 genes. In this study, we report the functional characterization of selected genes in this region. A Tn5 mutant with shiny colony morphology was identified with a polar mutation in BCAS0208, predicted to encode an acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase. Mutagenesis of BCAS0208 and complementation analyses revealed that BCAS0208 is required for rough colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence on alfalfa seedlings. It was not possible to complement with BCAS0208 containing a mutation in the catalytic site. BCAS0201, encoding a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidoreductase, and BCAS0207, encoding a putative citrate synthase, do not influence colony morphology but are required for optimum levels of biofilm formation and virulence. Both BCAS0208 and BCAS0201 contribute to pellicle formation, although individual mutations in each of these genes had no appreciable effect on pellicle formation. A mutant with a polar insertion in BCAS0208 was significantly less virulent in a rat model of chronic lung infection as well as in the alfalfa model. Genes in this region were shown to influence utilization of branched-chain fatty acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, l-arabinose, and branched-chain amino acids. Together, our data show that the ShvR-regulated genes BCAS0208 to BCAS0201 are required for the rough colony morphotype, biofilm and pellicle formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia.

  1. Efflux-mediated resistance to a benzothiadiazol derivative effective against Burkholderia cenocepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Camilla eScoffone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is a major concern for people suffering from Cystic Fibrosis as it contributes to serious respiratory tract infections. The lack of drugs effective against this opportunistic pathogen, along with the high level of resistance to multiple antibiotics, render the treatment of these infections particularly difficult.Here a new compound, belonging to the 2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-5-yl family (10126109, with a bactericidal effect and a MIC of 8 µg/ml against B. cenocepacia, is described. The compound is not cytotoxic and effective against B. cenocepacia clinical isolates and members of all the known Burkholderia cepacia complex species.Spontaneous mutants resistant to 10126109 were isolated and mutations in the MerR transcriptional regulator BCAM1948 were identified. In this way, a mechanism of resistance to this new molecule was described, which relies on the overexpression of the RND-9 efflux pump. Indeed, rnd-9 overexpression was confirmed by qRT-PCR, and RND-9 was identified in the membrane fractions of the mutant strains. Moreover, the increase in the MIC values of different drugs in the mutant strains, together with complementation experiments, suggested the involvement of RND-9 in the efflux of 10126109, thus indicating again the central role of efflux transporters in B. cenocepacia drug resistance.

  2. Environmental Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain Enhances Fitness by Serial Passages during Long-Term Chronic Airways Infection in Mice

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    Alessandra Bragonzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, and has also been isolated from natural environments. In previous work, we explored the virulence and pathogenic potential of environmental B. cenocepacia strains and demonstrated that they do not differ from clinical strains in some pathogenic traits. Here, we investigated the ability of the environmental B. cenocepacia Mex1 strain, isolated from the maize rhizosphere, to persist and increase its virulence after serial passages in a mouse model of chronic infection. B. cenocepacia Mex1 strain, belonging to the recA lineage IIIA, was embedded in agar beads and challenged into the lung of C57Bl/6 mice. The mice were sacrificed after 28 days from infection and their lungs were tested for bacterial loads. Agar beads containing the pool of B. cenocepacia colonies from the four sequential passages were used to infect the mice. The environmental B. cenocepacia strain showed a low incidence of chronic infection after the first passage; after the second, third and fourth passages in mice, its ability to establish chronic infection increased significantly and progressively up to 100%. Colonial morphology analysis and genetic profiling of the Mex1-derived clones recovered after the fourth passage from infected mice revealed that they were indistinguishable from the challenged strain both at phenotypic and genetic level. By testing the virulence of single clones in the Galleria mellonella infection model, we found that two Mex1-derived clones significantly increased their pathogenicity compared to the parental Mex1 strain and behaved similarly to the clinical and epidemic B. cenocepacia LMG16656T. Our findings suggest that serial passages of the environmental B. cenocepacia Mex1 strain in mice resulted in an increased ability to determine chronic lung infection and the appearance of clonal variants with increased virulence in non-vertebrate hosts.

  3. Evaluation of combination therapy for Burkholderia cenocepacia lung infection in different in vitro and in vivo models.

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    Freija Van den Driessche

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for life-threatening infections in cystic fibrosis patients. B. cenocepacia is extremely resistant towards antibiotics and therapy is complicated by its ability to form biofilms. We investigated the efficacy of an alternative antimicrobial strategy for B. cenocepacia lung infections using in vitro and in vivo models. A screening of the NIH Clinical Collection 1&2 was performed against B. cenocepacia biofilms formed in 96-well microtiter plates in the presence of tobramycin to identify repurposing candidates with potentiator activity. The efficacy of selected hits was evaluated in a three-dimensional (3D organotypic human lung epithelial cell culture model. The in vivo effect was evaluated in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella and in a murine B. cenocepacia lung infection model. The screening resulted in 60 hits that potentiated the activity of tobramycin against B. cenocepacia biofilms, including four imidazoles of which econazole and miconazole were selected for further investigation. However, a potentiator effect was not observed in the 3D organotypic human lung epithelial cell culture model. Combination treatment was also not able to increase survival of infected G. mellonella. Also in mice, there was no added value for the combination treatment. Although potentiators of tobramycin with activity against biofilms of B. cenocepacia were identified in a repurposing screen, the in vitro activity could not be confirmed nor in a more sophisticated in vitro model, neither in vivo. This stresses the importance of validating hits resulting from in vitro studies in physiologically relevant model systems.

  4. Virulence traits associated with Burkholderia cenocepacia ST856 epidemic strain isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

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    Milka Malešević

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is considered one of the most problematic cystic fibrosis (CF pathogens. Colonization prevalence in the Serbian CF population is high and virtually exclusively limited to a single highly transmissible clone of B. cenocepacia ST856 which is positive for both the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker (BCESM and cable pilin, and is closely related to the epidemic strain CZ1 (ST32. Methods Biofilm formation for 182 isolates, and adhesion to components of the host extracellular matrix, proteolytic activity, mucoidy and motility of selected ST856 representatives, as well as B. cenocepacia ST858 and ST859, and B. stabilis ST857, novel STs isolated from Serbian CF patients, were investigated in this study. The presence of the cepI, cepR, fliG, llpE, wbiI, and bcscV genes was analyzed. Results Biofilm-formation ability of analyzed strains was poor under standard laboratory conditions, but changed in stress conditions (cold stress and conditions that mimic CF milieu (increased CO2. All strains expressed ability to bind to collagen and fibronectin albeit with different intensity. Representatives of ST856 exhibited gelatinase activity. ST858, ST859 and 9/11 of ST856 genotypes were positive for swimming and twitching motility whereas ST857 was non-motile. Mucoidy was demonstrated in all ST856 genotypes, ST857 was semi-mucoid, and ST858 and ST859 were non-mucoid. Molecular analysis for major virulence factors revealed that ST856 and ST857 carried the six analyzed genes, while ST858 and ST859 were negative for the llpE gene. Conclusion Variations in virulence phenotypes in different genotypes of epidemic B. cenocepacia ST856 clone, in vitro, could be a consequence of diversification driven by pathoadaptation. Diversity of epidemic clone genotypes virulence, could be challenging for accurate diagnosis and treatment, as well as for infection control.

  5. Cyanide toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia is modulated by polymicrobial communities and environmental factors

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    Steve P. Bernier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behaviour of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e. culture medium, long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM, that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community.

  6. Novel diagnostic PCR assay for Burkholderia cenocepacia epidemic strain ST32 and its utility in monitoring infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědečková, K.; Kalferstová, L.; Strnad, Hynek; Vávrová, J.; Dřevínek, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 5 (2013), s. 475-481 ISSN 1569-1993 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Burkholderia cenocepacia * diagnostic PCR * B. cenocepacia ST32 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2013

  7. Optimization and characterization of a murine lung infection model for the evaluation of novel therapeutics against Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoutte, Bieke; Cappoen, Davie; Maira, Bidart de Macedo; Cools, Freya; Torfs, Eveline; Coenye, Tom; Martinet, Wim; Caljon, Guy; Maes, Louis; Delputte, Peter; Cos, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Several B. cenocepacia mouse models are available to study the pulmonary infection by this Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) species. However, a characterized B. cenocepacia mouse model to evaluate the efficacy of potential new antibacterial therapies is not yet described. Therefore, we optimized and validated the course of infection (i.e. bacterial proliferation in lung, liver and spleen) and the efficacy of a reference antibiotic, tobramycin (TOB), in a mouse lung infection model. Furthermore, the local immune response and histological changes in lung tissue were studied during infection and treatment. A reproducible lung infection was observed when immunosuppressed BALB/c mice were infected with B. cenocepacia LMG 16656. Approximately 50 to 60% of mice infected with this BCC species demonstrated a dissemination to liver and spleen. TOB treatment resulted in a two log reduction in lung burden, prevented dissemination of B. cenocepacia to liver and spleen and significantly reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines. As this mouse model is characterized by a reproducible course of infection and efficacy of TOB, it can be used as a tool for the in vivo evaluation of new antibacterial therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A sensor kinase recognizing the cell-cell signal BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) regulates virulence in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, Y.; Yang, Liang; Twomey, K.B.

    2010-01-01

    P>Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) as a quorum-sensing signal to control expression of virulence factors. BDSF is a signal molecule of the diffusible signal factor (DSF) family that was first described in the plant pathogen...

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04002-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 (Q9WVL0) RecName: Full=Maleylacetoacetate isomerase; Sh... 35 2.1 CU633750_357( CU633750 |pid:none) Cupriavidus taiwanen...ria cenocepacia J2315 c... 32 3.8 CP000712_1739( CP000712 |pid:none) Pseudomonas putida F1, comple...sis E264... 42 0.022 CP000379_2405( CP000379 |pid:none) Burkholderia cenocepacia...in D... 37 0.55 CP000378_1603( CP000378 |pid:none) Burkholderia cenocepacia...e EF01... 36 1.2 AM747720_2317( AM747720 |pid:none) Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 ... 36 1.2 CP000240_1238( CP000240 |pid

  10. A Burkholderia cenocepacia gene encoding a non-functional tyrosine phosphatase is required for the delayed maturation of the bacteria-containing vacuoles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Angel; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infects patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that B. cenocepacia can survive in macrophages within membrane vacuoles [B. cenocepacia-containing vacuoles (BcCVs)] that preclude fusion with the lysosome. The bacterial factors involved in B. cenocepacia intracellular survival are not fully elucidated. We report here that deletion of BCAM0628, encoding a predicted low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP) that is restricted to B. cenocepacia strains of the transmissible ET-12 clone, accelerates the maturation of the BcCVs. Compared to the parental strain and deletion mutants in other LMW-PTPs that are widely conserved in Burkholderia species, a greater proportion of BcCVs containing the ΔBCAM0628 mutant were targeted to the lysosome. Accelerated BcCV maturation was not due to reduced intracellular viability since ΔBCAM0628 survived and replicated in macrophages similarly to the parental strain. Therefore, BCAM0628 was referred to as dpm (delayed phagosome maturation). We provide evidence that the Dpm protein is secreted during growth in vitro and upon macrophage infection. Dpm secretion requires an N-terminal signal peptide. Heterologous expression of Dpm in Burkholderia multivorans confers to this bacterium a similar phagosomal maturation delay to that found with B. cenocepacia. We demonstrate that Dpm is an inactive phosphatase, suggesting that its contribution to phagosomal maturation arrest must be unrelated to tyrosine phosphatase activity. © 2014 The Authors.

  11. In-Frame and Unmarked Gene Deletions in Burkholderia cenocepacia via an Allelic Exchange System Compatible with Gateway Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazli, Mustafa; Harrison, Joe J.; Gambino, Michela; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an emerging opportunistic pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals and in patients with cystic fibrosis, which are often difficult, if not impossible, to treat. Understanding the genetic basis of virulence in this emerging pathogen is important for the development of novel treatment regimes. Generation of deletion mutations in genes predicted to encode virulence determinants is fundamental to investigating the mechanisms of pathogenesis. However, there is a lack of appropriate selectable and counterselectable markers for use in B. cenocepacia, making its genetic manipulation problematic. Here we describe a Gateway-compatible allelic exchange system based on the counterselectable pheS gene and the I-SceI homing endonuclease. This system provides efficiency in cloning homology regions of target genes and allows the generation of precise and unmarked gene deletions in B. cenocepacia. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate its utility by deleting the Bcam1349 gene, encoding a cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-responsive regulator protein important for biofilm formation. PMID:25795676

  12. Burkholderia cenocepacia type VI secretion system mediates escape of type II secreted proteins into the cytoplasm of infected macrophages.

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    Roberto Rosales-Reyes

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that survives intracellularly in macrophages and causes serious respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that bacterial survival occurs in bacteria-containing membrane vacuoles (BcCVs resembling arrested autophagosomes. Intracellular bacteria stimulate IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1-dependent manner and induce dramatic changes to the actin cytoskeleton and the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex onto the BcCV membrane. A Type 6 secretion system (T6SS is required for these phenotypes but surprisingly it is not required for the maturation arrest of the BcCV. Here, we show that macrophages infected with B. cenocepacia employ the NLRP3 inflammasome to induce IL-1β secretion and pyroptosis. Moreover, IL-1β secretion by B. cenocepacia-infected macrophages is suppressed in deletion mutants unable to produce functional Type VI, Type IV, and Type 2 secretion systems (SS. We provide evidence that the T6SS mediates the disruption of the BcCV membrane, which allows the escape of proteins secreted by the T2SS into the macrophage cytoplasm. This was demonstrated by the activity of fusion derivatives of the T2SS-secreted metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB with adenylcyclase. Supporting this notion, ZmpA and ZmpB are required for efficient IL-1β secretion in a T6SS dependent manner. ZmpA and ZmpB are also required for the maturation arrest of the BcCVs and bacterial intra-macrophage survival in a T6SS-independent fashion. Our results uncover a novel mechanism for inflammasome activation that involves cooperation between two bacterial secretory pathways, and an unanticipated role for T2SS-secreted proteins in intracellular bacterial survival.

  13. Putrescine reduces antibiotic-induced oxidative stress as a mechanism of modulation of antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Communication of antibiotic resistance among bacteria via small molecules is implicated in transient reduction of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics, which could lead to therapeutic failures aggravating the problem of antibiotic resistance. Released putrescine from the extremely antibiotic-resistant bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia protects less-resistant cells from different species against the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB). Exposure of B. cenocepacia to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and expression of the oxidative stress response regulator OxyR. We evaluated whether putrescine alleviates antibiotic-induced oxidative stress. The accumulation of intracellular ROS, such as superoxide ion and hydrogen peroxide, was assessed fluorometrically with dichlorofluorescein diacetate, while the expression of OxyR and putrescine synthesis enzymes was determined in luciferase assays using chromosomal promoter-lux reporter system fusions. We evaluated wild-type and isogenic deletion mutant strains with defects in putrescine biosynthesis after exposure to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics. Exogenous putrescine protected against oxidative stress induced by PmB and other antibiotics, whereas reduced putrescine synthesis resulted in increased ROS generation and a parallel increased sensitivity to PmB. Of the 3 B. cenocepacia putrescine-synthesizing enzymes, PmB induced only BCAL2641, an ornithine decarboxylase. This study reveals BCAL2641 as a critical component of the putrescine-mediated communication of antibiotic resistance and as a plausible target for designing inhibitors that would block the communication of such resistance among different bacteria, ultimately reducing the window of therapeutic failure in treating bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Immunoproteomic analysis of proteins expressed by two related pathogens, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia, during human infection.

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    Minu Shinoy

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes chronic infections in people with cystic fibrosis (CF. It is a highly antibiotic resistant organism and Bcc infections are rarely cleared from patients, once they are colonized. The two most clinically relevant species within Bcc are Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans. The virulence of these pathogens has not been fully elucidated and the virulence proteins expressed during human infection have not been identified to date. Furthermore, given its antibiotic resistance, prevention of infection with a prophylactic vaccine may represent a better alternative than eradication of an existing infection. We have compared the immunoproteome of two strains each from these two species of Bcc, with the aim of identifying immunogenic proteins which are common to both species. Fourteen immunoreactive proteins were exclusive to both B. cenocepacia strains, while 15 were exclusive to B. multivorans. A total of 15 proteins were immunogenic across both species. DNA-directed RNA polymerase, GroEL, 38kDa porin and elongation factor-Tu were immunoreactive proteins expressed by all four strains examined. Many proteins which were immunoreactive in both species, warrant further investigations in order to aid in the elucidation of the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this difficult organism. In addition, identification of some of these could also allow the development of protective vaccines which may prevent colonisation.

  15. Functional expression of Burkholderia cenocepacia xylose isomerase in yeast increases ethanol production from a glucose-xylose blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo Vilela, Leonardo; de Mello, Vinicius Mattos; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; Bon, Elba Pinto da Silva; Gonçalves Torres, Fernando Araripe; Neves, Bianca Cruz; Eleutherio, Elis Cristina Araújo

    2013-01-01

    This study presents results regarding the successful cloning of the bacterial xylose isomerase gene (xylA) of Burkholderia cenocepacia and its functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant yeast showed to be competent to efficiently produce ethanol from both glucose and xylose, which are the main sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The heterologous expression of the gene xylA enabled a laboratorial yeast strain to ferment xylose anaerobically, improving ethanol production from a fermentation medium containing a glucose-xylose blend similar to that found in sugar cane bagasse hydrolysates. The insertion of xylA caused a 5-fold increase in xylose consumption, and over a 1.5-fold increase in ethanol production and yield, in comparison to that showed by the WT strain, in 24h fermentations, where it was not detected accumulation of xylitol. These findings are encouraging for further studies concerning the expression of B. cenocepacia xylA in an industrial yeast strain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biochemical and functional studies on the Burkholderia cepacia complex bceN gene, encoding a GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase.

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    Sílvia A Sousa

    Full Text Available This work reports the biochemical and functional analysis of the Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 bceN gene, encoding a protein with GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase enzyme activity (E.C.4.2.1.47. Data presented indicate that the protein is active when in the tetrameric form, catalyzing the conversion of GDP-D-mannose into GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose. This sugar nucleotide is the intermediary necessary for the biosynthesis of GDP-D-rhamnose, one of the sugar residues of cepacian, the major exopolysaccharide produced by environmental and human, animal and plant pathogenic isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex species. Vmax and Km values of 1.5±0.2 µmol.min(-1.mg(-1 and 1024±123 µM, respectively, were obtained from the kinetic characterization of the B. cenocepacia J2315 BceN protein by NMR spectroscopy, at 25°C and in the presence of 1 mol MgCl2 per mol of protein. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by the substrate, with an estimated Ki of 2913±350 µM. The lack of a functional bceN gene in a mutant derived from B. cepacia IST408 slightly reduced cepacian production. However, in the B. multivorans ATCC17616 with bceN as the single gene in its genome with predicted GMD activity, a bceN mutant did not produce cepacian, indicating that this gene product is required for cepacian biosynthesis.

  17. Trimeric autotransporter adhesins in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex: a multifunctional family of proteins implicated in virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsénio Mendes Fialho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs are multimeric surface proteins, involved in various biological traits of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria including adherence, biofilm formation, invasion, survival within eukaryotic cells, serum resistance and cytotoxicity. TAAs have a modular architecture composed by a conserved membrane-anchored C-terminal domain and a variable number of stalk and head domains. In this study, a bioinformatic approach has been used to analyze the distribution and architecture of TAAs among Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc genomes. Fifteen genomes were probed revealing a total of 74 encoding sequences. Compared with other bacterial species, the Bcc genomes contain a disproportionately large number of TAAs (two genes to up to 8 genes, such as in B.cenocepacia. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the TAAs grouped into at least eight distinct clusters. TAAs with serine-rich repeats are clearly well separated from others, thereby representing a different evolutionary lineage. Comparative gene mapping across Bcc genomes reveals that TAA genes are inserted within conserved synteny blocks. We further focused our analysis on the epidemic strain B. cenocepacia J2315 in which 7 TAAs were annotated. Among these, 3 TAA-encoding genes (BCAM019, BCAM0223 and BCAM0224 are organized into a cluster and are candidates for multifunctional virulence factors. Here we review the current insights into the functional role of BCAM0224 as a model locus.

  18. Macrophages, but not neutrophils, are critical for proliferation of Burkholderia cenocepacia and ensuing host-damaging inflammation.

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    Jennifer Mesureur

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc can cause devastating pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, yet the precise mechanisms underlying inflammation, recurrent exacerbations and transition from chronic stages to acute infection and septicemia are not known. Bcc bacteria are generally believed to have a predominant extracellular biofilm life style in infected CF lungs, similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but this has been challenged by clinical observations which show Bcc bacteria predominantly in macrophages. More recently, Bcc bacteria have emerged in nosocomial infections of patients hospitalized for reasons unrelated to CF. Research has abundantly shown that Bcc bacteria can survive and replicate in mammalian cells in vitro, yet the importance of an intracellular life style during infection in humans is unknown. Here we studied the contribution of innate immune cell types to fatal pro-inflammatory infection caused by B. cenocepacia using zebrafish larvae. In strong contrast to the usual protective role for macrophages against microbes, our results show that these phagocytes significantly worsen disease outcome. We provide new insight that macrophages are critical for multiplication of B. cenocepacia in the host and for development of a fatal, pro-inflammatory response that partially depends on Il1-signalling. In contrast, neutrophils did not significantly contribute to disease outcome. In subcutaneous infections that are dominated by neutrophil-driven phagocytosis, the absence of a functional NADPH oxidase complex resulted in a small but measurably higher increase in bacterial growth suggesting the oxidative burst helps limit bacterial multiplication; however, neutrophils were unable to clear the bacteria. We suggest that paradigm-changing approaches are needed for development of novel antimicrobials to efficiently disarm intracellular bacteria of this group of highly persistent, opportunistic pathogens.

  19. Burkholderia cenocepacia BC2L-C is a super lectin with dual specificity and proinflammatory activity.

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    Ondřej Sulák

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lectins and adhesins are involved in bacterial adhesion to host tissues and mucus during early steps of infection. We report the characterization of BC2L-C, a soluble lectin from the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia, which has two distinct domains with unique specificities and biological activities. The N-terminal domain is a novel TNF-α-like fucose-binding lectin, while the C-terminal part is similar to a superfamily of calcium-dependent bacterial lectins. The C-terminal domain displays specificity for mannose and l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. BC2L-C is therefore a superlectin that binds independently to mannose/heptose glycoconjugates and fucosylated human histo-blood group epitopes. The apo form of the C-terminal domain crystallized as a dimer, and calcium and mannose could be docked in the binding site. The whole lectin is hexameric and the overall structure, determined by electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, reveals a flexible arrangement of three mannose/heptose-specific dimers flanked by two fucose-specific TNF-α-like trimers. We propose that BC2L-C binds to the bacterial surface in a mannose/heptose-dependent manner via the C-terminal domain. The TNF-α-like domain triggers IL-8 production in cultured airway epithelial cells in a carbohydrate-independent manner, and is therefore proposed to play a role in the dysregulated proinflammatory response observed in B. cenocepacia lung infections. The unique architecture of this newly recognized superlectin correlates with multiple functions including bacterial cell cross-linking, adhesion to human epithelia, and stimulation of inflammation.

  20. Genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, T. A. (Terence A.)

    2002-01-01

    ... of genome expression and replication processes, and transcriptomics and proteomics. This text is richly illustrated with clear, easy-to-follow, full color diagrams, which are downloadable from the book's website...

  1. The pobA gene of Burkholderia cenocepacia encodes a group I Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferase required for biosynthesis of the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Atif H; Shastri, Sravanthi; Dave, Emma; Wowk, Irena; Agnoli, Kirsty; Cook, Anne M; Thomas, Mark S

    2011-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia produces the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin under iron-restricted conditions. Biosynthesis of both siderophores requires the involvement of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Using a transposon containing the lacZ reporter gene, two B. cenocepacia mutants were isolated which were deficient in siderophore production. Mutant IW10 was shown to produce normal amounts of ornibactin but only trace amounts of pyochelin, whereas synthesis of both siderophores was abolished in AHA27. Growth of AHA27, but not IW10, was inhibited under iron-restricted conditions. In both mutants, the transposon had integrated into the pobA gene, which encodes a polypeptide exhibiting similarity to the Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferases (PPTases). These enzymes are responsible for activation of NRPSs by the covalent attachment of the 4'-phosphopantetheine (P-pant) moiety of coenzyme A. Previously characterized PPTase genes from other bacteria were shown to efficiently complement both mutants for siderophore production when provided in trans. The B. cenocepacia pobA gene was also able to efficiently complement an Escherichia coli entD mutant for production of the siderophore enterobactin. Using mutant IW10, in which the lacZ gene carried by the transposon is inserted in the same orientation as pobA, it was shown that pobA is not appreciably iron-regulated. Finally, we confirmed that Sfp-type bacterial PPTases can be subdivided into two distinct groups, and we present the amino acid signature sequences which characterize each of these groups.

  2. Regulation of Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation by RpoN and the c-di-GMP effector BerB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; Rybtke, Morten Levin; Steiner, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    -stabilizing exopolysaccharide. Our findings suggest that BerB binds c-di-GMP, and activates RpoN-dependent transcription of the berA gene coding for a c-di-GMP-responsive transcriptional regulator. An increased level of the BerA protein in turn induces the production of biofilm-stabilizing exopolysaccharide in response to high...... c-di-GMP levels. Our findings imply that the production of biofilm exopolysaccharide in B. cenocepacia is regulated through a cascade involving two consecutive transcription events that are both activated by c-di-GMP. This type of regulation may allow tight control of the expenditure of cellular...

  3. Involvement of a plasmid-encoded type IV secretion system in the plant tissue watersoaking phenotype of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engledow, Amanda S; Medrano, Enrique G; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; LiPuma, John J; Gonzalez, Carlos F

    2004-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia strain K56-2, a representative of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, is part of the epidemic and clinically problematic ET12 lineage. The strain produced plant tissue watersoaking (ptw) on onion tissue, which is a plant disease-associated trait. Using plasposon mutagenesis, mutants in the ptw phenotype were generated. The translated sequence of a disrupted gene (ptwD4) from a ptw-negative mutant showed homology to VirD4-like proteins. Analysis of the region proximal to the transfer gene homolog identified a gene cluster located on the 92-kb resident plasmid that showed homology to type IV secretion systems. The role of ptwD4, ptwC, ptwB4, and ptwB10 in the expression of ptw activity was determined by conducting site-directed mutagenesis. The ptw phenotype was not expressed by K56-2 derivatives with a disruption in ptwD4, ptwB4, or ptwB10 but was observed in a derivative with a disruption in ptwC. Complementation of ptw-negative K56-2 derivatives in trans resulted in complete restoration of the ptw phenotype. In addition, analysis of culture supernatants revealed that the putative ptw effector(s) was a secreted, heat-stable protein(s) that caused plasmolysis of plant protoplasts. A second chromosomally encoded type IV secretion system with complete homology to the VirB-VirD system was identified in K56-2. Site-directed mutagenesis of key secretory genes in the VirB-VirD system did not affect expression of the ptw phenotype. Our findings indicate that in strain K56-2, the plasmid-encoded Ptw type IV secretion system is responsible for the secretion of a plant cytotoxic protein(s).

  4. The exopolysaccharide gene cluster Bcam1330-Bcam1341 is involved in Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation, and its expression is regulated by c-di-GMP and Bcam1349

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; McCarthy, Yvonne; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In Burkholderia cenocepacia, the second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has previously been shown to positively regulate biofilm formation and the expression of cellulose and type-I fimbriae genes through binding to the transcriptional regulator Bcam1349. Here, we provide ev...

  5. The AHL- and BDSF-dependent quorum sensing systems control specific and overlapping sets of genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schmid

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 involves two signalling systems that depend on different signal molecules, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs and the diffusible signal factor cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF. Previous studies have shown that AHLs and BDSF control similar phenotypic traits, including biofilm formation, proteolytic activity and pathogenicity. In this study we mapped the BDSF stimulon by RNA-Seq and shotgun proteomics analysis. We demonstrate that a set of the identified BDSF-regulated genes or proteins are also controlled by AHLs, suggesting that the two regulons partially overlap. The detailed analysis of two mutually regulated operons, one encoding three lectins and the other one encoding the large surface protein BapA and its type I secretion machinery, revealed that both AHLs and BDSF are required for full expression, suggesting that the two signalling systems operate in parallel. In accordance with this, we show that both AHLs and BDSF are required for biofilm formation and protease production.

  6. Genomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events and Multimedia Implementation Genetics 101 Family Health History Genomics and Diseases Genetic Counseling Genomic Testing Epidemiology Pathogen Genomics Resources Genomic Testing Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fact Sheet: Identifying Opportunities to ...

  7. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines when...

  8. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines whe...

  9. Prevalence, Host Range, and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Temperate Ochrobactrum Phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Jäckel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ochrobactrum and Brucella are closely related bacteria that populate different habitats and differ in their pathogenic properties. Only little is known about mobile genetic elements in these genera which might be important for survival and virulence. Previous studies on Brucella lysogeny indicated that active phages are rare in this genus. To gain insight into the presence and nature of prophages in Ochrobactrum, temperate phages were isolated from various species and characterized in detail. In silico analyses disclosed numerous prophages in published Ochrobactrum genomes. Induction experiments showed that Ochrobactrum prophages can be induced by various stress factors and that some strains released phage particles even under non-induced conditions. Sixty percent of lysates prepared from 125 strains revealed lytic activity. The host range and DNA similarities of 19 phages belonging to the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, or Podoviridae were determined suggesting that they are highly diverse. Some phages showed relationship to the temperate Brucella inopinata phage BiPB01. The genomic sequences of the myovirus POA1180 (41,655 bp and podovirus POI1126 (60,065 bp were analyzed. Phage POA1180 is very similar to a prophage recently identified in a Brucella strain isolated from an exotic frog. The POA1180 genome contains genes which may confer resistance to chromate and the ability to take up sulfate. Phage POI1126 is related to podoviruses of Sinorhizobium meliloti (PCB5, Erwinia pyrifoliae (Pep14, and Burkholderia cenocepacia (BcepIL02 and almost identical to an unnamed plasmid of the Ochrobactrum intermedium strain LMG 3301. Further experiments revealed that the POI1126 prophage indeed replicates as an extrachromosomal element. The data demonstrate for the first time that active prophages are common in Ochrobactrum and suggest that atypical brucellae also may be a reservoir for temperate phages.

  10. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An important hallmark of biological research is the aspect of 'comparisons'. As the complete genome sequences of numerous organisms have become available, the emphasis in biology has shifted to comparisons at the genome level. Indeed, the last few years have witnessed an exponential rise in the number of ...

  11. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structions of the tree of life, drug discovery programs, func- tion predictions of hypothetical proteins and genes, regula- tory motifs and other non-coding DNA motifs, and genome ... expertise in assembling sequences. Beginning with the complete genome sequence of the bacterial pathogen Haemophilus influenzae that was ...

  12. Cardiovascular genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Shu-Fen; Hickey, Kathleen T; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Gallek, Matthew J

    2013-03-01

    This article provides an update on cardiovascular genomics using three clinically relevant exemplars, including myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, and sudden cardiac death (SCD). ORGANIZATIONAL CONSTRUCT: Recent advances in cardiovascular genomic research, testing, and clinical implications are presented. Genomic nurse experts reviewed and summarized recent salient literature to provide updates on three selected cardiovascular genomic conditions. Research is ongoing to discover comprehensive genetic markers contributing to many common forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including MI and stroke. However, genomic technologies are increasingly being used clinically, particularly in patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS) or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who are at risk for SCD. Currently, there are no clinically recommended genetic tests for many common forms of CVD even though direct-to-consumer genetic tests are being marketed to healthcare providers and the general public. On the other hand, genetic testing for patients with certain single gene conditions, including channelopathies (e.g., LQTS) and cardiomyopathies (e.g., HCM), is recommended clinically. Nurses play a pivotal role in cardiogenetics and are actively engaged in direct clinical care of patients and families with a wide variety of heritable conditions. It is important for nurses to understand current development of cardiovascular genomics and be prepared to translate the new genomic knowledge into practice. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Genomic Imprinting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Genomic Imprinting - Some Interesting Implications for the Evolution of Social Behaviour. Raghavendra Gadagkar. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 58-68 ...

  14. [Nutrition genomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedová, L; Seda, O

    2004-01-01

    The importance of nutrition for human health and its influence on the onset and course of many diseases are nowadays considered as proven. Only the recent development of molecular biology and biochemical methods allows the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of diet constituent actions and their subsequent effect on homeostatic mechanisms in health and disease states. The availability of the draft human genome sequence as well as the genome sequences of model organisms, combined with the functional and integrative genomics approaches of systems biology, bring about the possibility to identify alleles and haplotypes responsible for specific reaction to the dietary challenge in susceptible individuals. Such complex interactions are studied within the newly conceived field, the nutrition genomics (nutrigenomics). Using the tools of highly parallel analyses of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome, the nutrition genomics pursues its ultimate goal, i.e. the individualized diet, respecting not only quantitative and qualitative nutritional needs and the actual health status, but also the genetic predispositions of an individual. This approach should lead to prevention of the onset of such diseases as obesity, hypertension or type 2 diabetes, or enhance the efficiency of their therapy.

  15. Marine genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, Ângela Maria; Foote, Andrew David; Kupczok, Anne

    2017-01-01

    evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics.......Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag......-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from...

  16. Listeria Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  17. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austri...... in this white paper......., Australia, China, Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Spain and the USA) met to address the pressing need for genome sequencing of cephalopod mollusks. This group, drawn from cephalopod biologists, neuroscientists, developmental and evolutionary biologists, materials scientists, bioinformaticians and researchers...

  18. X-ray crystal structures of the pheromone-binding domains of two quorum-hindered transcription factors, YenR of Yersinia enterocolitica and CepR2 of Burkholderia cenocepacia: KIM et al.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngchang [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Chhor, Gekleng [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Tsai, Ching-Sung [Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York 14853; Fox, Gabriel [Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York 14853; Chen, Chia-Sui [Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York 14853; Winans, Nathan J. [Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York 14853; Jedrzejczak, Robert [Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Joachimiak, Andrzej [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Winans, Stephen C. [Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York 14853

    2017-07-24

    The ability of LuxR-type proteins to regulate transcription is controlled by bacterial pheromones, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). Most LuxR-family proteins require their cognate AHLs for activity, and some of them require AHLs for folding and stability, and for protease-resistance. However, a few members of this family are able to fold, dimerize, bind DNA, and regulate transcription in the absence of AHLs; moreover, these proteins are antagonized by their cognate AHLs. One such protein is YenR of Yersinia enterocolitica, which is antagonized by N-3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OHHL). This pheromone is produced by the OHHL synthase, a product of the adjacent yenI gene. Another example is CepR2 of Burkholderia cenocepacia, which is antagonized by N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (OHL), whose synthesis is directed by the cepI gene of the same bacterium. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structures of the AHL binding domains of YenR and CepR2. YenR was crystallized in the presence and absence of OHHL. While this ligand does not cause large scale changes in the YenR structure, it does alter the orientation of several highly conserved YenR residues within and near the pheromone-binding pocket, which in turn caused a significant movement of a surface-exposed loop.

  19. Genome Imprinting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Genome Imprinting - The Silencing of ... General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 49-57 ... M T Tanuja1. Drosophila Stock Centre, Department of Studies in Zoology, University of Mysore Manasagangotri Mysore 570 006, India.

  20. Genome Imprinting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ring pathological condition cystic fibrosis is due to inheritance of both copies of chromosome 7 from the mother. Similarly,. Prader-Willi syndrome in humans is due to the inheritance of both copies of chromosome 15 from the mother. Human Triploids. The triploid (Le. 3 copies of the haploid genome are present instead of the ...

  1. genome editing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-02-11

    Feb 11, 2016 ... What history tells us. XL. The success story of the expression 'genome editing'. MICHEL MORANGE. Centre Cavaillès, République des Savoirs: Lettres, Sciences, Philosophie USR 3608, Ecole. Normale Supérieure, 29 Rue d'Ulm, 75230, Paris Cedex 05, France. (Fax, 33-144-323941; Email, ...

  2. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequen...

  3. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 8. Comparative Genomics - A Powerful New Tool in Biology. Anand K Bachhawat. General Article Volume 11 Issue 8 August 2006 pp 22-40. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Personal genomics services: whose genomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, David; Bregman-Eschet, Yael

    2009-07-01

    New companies offering personal whole-genome information services over the internet are dynamic and highly visible players in the personal genomics field. For fees currently ranging from US$399 to US$2500 and a vial of saliva, individuals can now purchase online access to their individual genetic information regarding susceptibility to a range of chronic diseases and phenotypic traits based on a genome-wide SNP scan. Most of the companies offering such services are based in the United States, but their clients may come from nearly anywhere in the world. Although the scientific validity, clinical utility and potential future implications of such services are being hotly debated, several ethical and regulatory questions related to direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing strategies of genetic tests have not yet received sufficient attention. For example, how can we minimize the risk of unauthorized third parties from submitting other people's DNA for testing? Another pressing question concerns the ownership of (genotypic and phenotypic) information, as well as the unclear legal status of customers regarding their own personal information. Current legislation in the US and Europe falls short of providing clear answers to these questions. Until the regulation of personal genomics services catches up with the technology, we call upon commercial providers to self-regulate and coordinate their activities to minimize potential risks to individual privacy. We also point out some specific steps, along the trustee model, that providers of DTC personal genomics services as well as regulators and policy makers could consider for addressing some of the concerns raised below.

  5. Nutritional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovas, Jose M; Corella, Dolores

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional genomics has tremendous potential to change the future of dietary guidelines and personal recommendations. Nutrigenetics will provide the basis for personalized dietary recommendations based on the individual's genetic make up. This approach has been used for decades for certain monogenic diseases; however, the challenge is to implement a similar concept for common multifactorial disorders and to develop tools to detect genetic predisposition and to prevent common disorders decades before their manifestation. The preliminary results involving gene-diet interactions for cardiovascular diseases and cancer are promising, but mostly inconclusive. Success in this area will require the integration of different disciplines and investigators working on large population studies designed to adequately investigate gene-environment interactions. Despite the current difficulties, preliminary evidence strongly suggests that the concept should work and that we will be able to harness the information contained in our genomes to achieve successful aging using behavioral changes; nutrition will be the cornerstone of this endeavor.

  6. Visualization for genomics: the Microbial Genome Viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, R.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Boekhorst, J.; Molenaar, D; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY: A Web-based visualization tool, the Microbial Genome Viewer, is presented that allows the user to combine complex genomic data in a highly interactive way. This Web tool enables the interactive generation of chromosome wheels and linear genome maps from genome annotation data stored in a

  7. Biocontrol of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria and bacterial phytopathogens by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Damian; Chanyi, Ryan M; Dooley, James S; Moore, John E; Koval, Susan F

    2017-04-01

    Bdellovibrio and like organisms are predatory bacteria that have the unusual property of using the cytoplasmic constituents of other Gram-negative bacteria as nutrients. These predators may thus provide an alternative approach to the biocontrol of human and plant pathogens. Predators were isolated on Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 and J2315 as prey cells, in enrichment cultures with soil and sewage. Three isolates (DM7C, DM8A, and DM11A) were identified as Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on the basis of morphology, a periplasmic life cycle, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The prey range of these isolates was tested on Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria and several phytopathogenic bacteria of agricultural importance. Of 31 strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex tested, only 4 were resistant to predation by strain DM7C. A subset of 9 of the prey tested were also susceptible to strains DM8A and DM11A. Of 12 phytopathogens tested, 4 were resistant to strains DM7C and DM8A, and only 2 were resistant to strain DM11A. Thus, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus strains retrieved from environmental samples on 2 Burkholderia cenocepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients did not distinguish in their prey range between other isolates of that pathogen or phytopathogens. Such strains hold promise as potential wide-spectrum biocontrol agents.

  8. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...... on transcriptional evidence. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggests that they are underrepresented in the reference assembly, reflecting an enrichment of gene-rich regions in the current assembly. Characterization of Lotus natural variation by resequencing of L. japonicus accessions and diploid Lotus species...... is currently ongoing, facilitated by the MG20 reference sequence...

  9. The platypus genome unraveled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-06-13

    The genome of the platypus has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated by an international genomics team. Like the animal itself the platypus genome contains an amalgam of mammal, reptile, and bird-like features.

  10. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Jessica C; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, 'genetic maps' were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in the determination of genome sequences have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. What do we see if we shift our focus from gene content (the 'inventory' of genes contained within a genome) to the composition and organization of a genome? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome as well as the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...... Angiosperm families, 73 of which were from herbarium material with ages up to 146 years old. For 84 specimens, a sufficient number of paired-end reads were generated (in total 9.4 × 1012 nucleotides), yielding successful plastome assemblies for 74 specimens. Those derived from herbarium specimens have lower...... fractions of plastome-derived reads compared with those from fresh and silica-gel-dried specimens, but total herbarium assembly lengths are only slightly shorter. Specimens from wet-tropical conditions appear to have a higher number of contigs per assembly and lower N50 values. We find no significant...

  12. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Director Organization Reports & Publications Español The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds ... genomic literacy among physicians. Funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), The Universal Genomics Instructor Handbook ...

  13. The kangaroo genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Matthew J.; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The kangaroo genome is a rich and unique resource for comparative genomics. Marsupial genetics and cytology have made significant contributions to the understanding of gene function and evolution, and increasing the availability of kangaroo DNA sequence information would provide these benefits on a genomic scale. Here we summarize the contributions from cytogenetic and genetic studies of marsupials, describe the genomic resources currently available and those being developed, and explore the benefits of a kangaroo genome project. PMID:12612602

  14. Genomics With Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhamrit Kaur; Sandeep Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Genomics is study of genome which provides large amount of data for which large storage and computation power is needed. These issues are solved by cloud computing that provides various cloud platforms for genomics. These platforms provides many services to user like easy access to data easy sharing and transfer providing storage in hundreds of terabytes more computational power. Some cloud platforms are Google genomics DNAnexus and Globus genomics. Various features of cloud computin...

  15. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  16. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org.

  17. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  18. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  19. Genomics With Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhamrit Kaur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genomics is study of genome which provides large amount of data for which large storage and computation power is needed. These issues are solved by cloud computing that provides various cloud platforms for genomics. These platforms provides many services to user like easy access to data easy sharing and transfer providing storage in hundreds of terabytes more computational power. Some cloud platforms are Google genomics DNAnexus and Globus genomics. Various features of cloud computing to genomics are like easy access and sharing of data security of data less cost to pay for resources but still there are some demerits like large time needed to transfer data less network bandwidth.

  20. Diet and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Graeme P

    2007-01-01

    Cancer results from a disordered and unstable genome - the degree of abnormality progresses as the process of oncogenesis proceeds. Such genomic instability appears to be subject to control by environmental factors as evidenced by the number of cancers that are either caused by specific environmental agents (lung, skin, cervix) or else regulated by a broader range of agents such as effect of diet on gastric and colorectal cancers. Dietary factors might interact in several ways with the genome to protect against cancer. An agent might interact directly with the genome and regulate expression (as a genetic or epigenetic regulator) or indirectly by influencing DNA 'repair' responses and so improve genomic stability. Research now shows that diet-genomic interactions in cancer go beyond interactions with the normal genome and involve enhancement of normal cellular responses to DNA damage such that genome stability is more effectively maintained. Activation of apoptosis may be a key to protection.

  1. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  2. Exploiting the genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Koonin, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-09-11

    In 1997, JASON conducted a DOE-sponsored study of the human genome project with special emphasis on the areas of technology, quality assurance and quality control, and informatics. The present study has two aims: first, to update the 1997 Report in light of recent developments in genome sequencing technology, and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the ''post-genomic" era, following acquisition of the complete human genome sequence.

  3. Genomic prediction using subsampling

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier, Alencar; Xu, Shizhong; Muir, William; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Genome-wide assisted selection is a critical tool for the?genetic improvement of plants and animals. Whole-genome regression models in Bayesian framework represent the main family of prediction methods. Fitting such models with a large number of observations involves a prohibitive computational burden. We propose the use of subsampling bootstrap Markov chain in genomic prediction. Such method consists of fitting whole-genome regression models by subsampling observations in each rou...

  4. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms...

  5. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Blom, Jochen; Palva, Airi; Siezen, Roland J.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The genus Lactobacillus includes a diverse group of bacteria consisting of many species that are associated with fermentations of plants, meat or milk. In addition, various lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of the intestinal tract of humans and other animals. Finally, several Lactobacillus strains are marketed as probiotics as their consumption can confer a health benefit to host. Presently, 154 Lactobacillus species are known and a growing fraction of these are subject to draft genome sequencing. However, complete genome sequences are needed to provide a platform for detailed genomic comparisons. Therefore, we selected a total of 20 genomes of various Lactobacillus strains for which complete genomic sequences have been reported. These genomes had sizes varying from 1.8 to 3.3 Mb and other characteristic features, such as G+C content that ranged from 33% to 51%. The Lactobacillus pan genome was found to consist of approximately 14 000 protein‐encoding genes while all 20 genomes shared a total of 383 sets of orthologous genes that defined the Lactobacillus core genome (LCG). Based on advanced phylogeny of the proteins encoded by this LCG, we grouped the 20 strains into three main groups and defined core group genes present in all genomes of a single group, signature group genes shared in all genomes of one group but absent in all other Lactobacillus genomes, and Group‐specific ORFans present in core group genes of one group and absent in all other complete genomes. The latter are of specific value in defining the different groups of genomes. The study provides a platform for present individual comparisons as well as future analysis of new Lactobacillus genomes. PMID:21375712

  6. A genome blogger manifesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corpas Manuel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cheap prices for genomic testing have revolutionized consumers’ access to personal genomics. Exploration of personal genomes poses significant challenges for customers wishing to learn beyond provider customer reports. A vibrant community has spontaneously appeared blogging experiences and data as a way to learn about their personal genomes. No set of values has publicly been described to date encapsulating ideals and code of conduct for this community. Here I present a first attempt to address this vacuum based on my own personal experiences as genome blogger.

  7. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...... chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling...

  8. Genomic research in Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poke, Fiona S; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M; Reid, James B

    2005-09-01

    Eucalyptus L'Hérit. is a genus comprised of more than 700 species that is of vital importance ecologically to Australia and to the forestry industry world-wide, being grown in plantations for the production of solid wood products as well as pulp for paper. With the sequencing of the genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa and the recent completion of the first tree genome sequence, Populus trichocarpa, attention has turned to the current status of genomic research in Eucalyptus. For several eucalypt species, large segregating families have been established, high-resolution genetic maps constructed and large EST databases generated. Collaborative efforts have been initiated for the integration of diverse genomic projects and will provide the framework for future research including exploiting the sequence of the entire eucalypt genome which is currently being sequenced. This review summarises the current position of genomic research in Eucalyptus and discusses the direction of future research.

  9. Bioinformatics decoding the genome

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Deutsch, Sam; Michielin, Olivier; Thomas, Arthur; Descombes, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Extracting the fundamental genomic sequence from the DNA From Genome to Sequence : Biology in the early 21st century has been radically transformed by the availability of the full genome sequences of an ever increasing number of life forms, from bacteria to major crop plants and to humans. The lecture will concentrate on the computational challenges associated with the production, storage and analysis of genome sequence data, with an emphasis on mammalian genomes. The quality and usability of genome sequences is increasingly conditioned by the careful integration of strategies for data collection and computational analysis, from the construction of maps and libraries to the assembly of raw data into sequence contigs and chromosome-sized scaffolds. Once the sequence is assembled, a major challenge is the mapping of biologically relevant information onto this sequence: promoters, introns and exons of protein-encoding genes, regulatory elements, functional RNAs, pseudogenes, transposons, etc. The methodological ...

  10. Genome packaging in viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Siyang; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Genome packaging is a fundamental process in a viral life cycle. Many viruses assemble preformed capsids into which the genomic material is subsequently packaged. These viruses use a packaging motor protein that is driven by the hydrolysis of ATP to condense the nucleic acids into a confined space. How these motor proteins package viral genomes had been poorly understood until recently, when a few X-ray crystal structures and cryo-electron microscopy structures became available. Here we discu...

  11. Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  12. Evolutionary genomics of Entamoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedall, Gareth D.; Hall, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a human pathogen that causes amoebic dysentery and leads to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding the genome and evolution of the parasite will help explain how, when and why it causes disease. Here we review current knowledge about the evolutionary genomics of Entamoeba: how differences between the genomes of different species may help explain different phenotypes, and how variation among E. histolytica parasites reveals patterns of population structure. The imminent expansion of the amount genome data will greatly improve our knowledge of the genus and of pathogenic species within it. PMID:21288488

  13. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Computational genomics of hyperthermophiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werken, van de H.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    With the ever increasing number of completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and the subsequent use of functional genomics tools, e.g. DNA microarray and proteomics, computational data analysis and the integration of microbial and molecular data is inevitable. This thesis describes the computational

  15. The Lotus japonicus genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , carbon/nitrogen and secondary metabolism, as well as advances made in high-throughput genomic and genetic approaches. Research focusing on model plants has underpinned the recent growth in plant genomics and genetics and provided a basis for investigations of major crop species. In the legume family...

  16. Phanerochaete chrysosporium genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis F. Larrondo; Rafael Vicuna; Dan Cullen

    2005-01-01

    A high quality draft genome sequence has been generated for the lignocellulose-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Martinez et al. 2004). Analysis of the genome in the context of previously established genetics and physiology is presented. Transposable elements and their potential relationship to genes involved in lignin degradation are systematically...

  17. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical pr...

  18. Safeguarding genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Syljuåsen, Randi G

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms that preserve genome integrity are highly important during the normal life cycle of human cells. Loss of genome protective mechanisms can lead to the development of diseases such as cancer. Checkpoint kinases function in the cellular surveillance pathways that help cells to cope with DNA...

  19. Human genome I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    An international conference, Human Genome I, was held Oct. 2-4, 1989 in San Diego, Calif. Selected speakers discussed: Current Status of the Genome Project; Technique Innovations; Interesting regions; Applications; and Organization - Different Views of Current and Future Science and Procedures. Posters, consisting of 119 presentations, were displayed during the sessions. 119 were indexed for inclusion to the Energy Data Base

  20. Breeding-assisted genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Jesse

    2015-04-01

    The revolution of inexpensive sequencing has ushered in an unprecedented age of genomics. The promise of using this technology to accelerate plant breeding is being realized with a vision of genomics-assisted breeding that will lead to rapid genetic gain for expensive and difficult traits. The reality is now that robust phenotypic data is an increasing limiting resource to complement the current wealth of genomic information. While genomics has been hailed as the discipline to fundamentally change the scope of plant breeding, a more symbiotic relationship is likely to emerge. In the context of developing and evaluating large populations needed for functional genomics, none excel in this area more than plant breeders. While genetic studies have long relied on dedicated, well-structured populations, the resources dedicated to these populations in the context of readily available, inexpensive genotyping is making this philosophy less tractable relative to directly focusing functional genomics on material in breeding programs. Through shifting effort for basic genomic studies from dedicated structured populations, to capturing the entire scope of genetic determinants in breeding lines, we can move towards not only furthering our understanding of functional genomics in plants, but also rapidly improving crops for increased food security, availability and nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Musa sebagai Model Genom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA MEGIA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available During the meeting in Arlington, USA in 2001, the scientists grouped in PROMUSA agreed with the launching of the Global Musa Genomics Consortium. The Consortium aims to apply genomics technologies to the improvement of this important crop. These genome projects put banana as the third model species after Arabidopsis and rice that will be analyzed and sequenced. Comparing to Arabidopsis and rice, banana genome provides a unique and powerful insight into structural and in functional genomics that could not be found in those two species. This paper discussed these subjects-including the importance of banana as the fourth main food in the world, the evolution and biodiversity of this genetic resource and its parasite.

  2. Genomic Prediction in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Cericola, Fabio; Jensen, Jens D

    2015-01-01

    Genomic prediction uses markers (SNPs) across the whole genome to predict individual breeding values at an early growth stage potentially before large scale phenotyping. One of the applications of genomic prediction in plant breeding is to identify the best individual candidate lines to contribute...... to next generation. The main goal of this study was to see the potential of using genomic prediction in a commercial Barley breeding program. The data used in this study was from Nordic Seed company which is located in Denmark. Around 350 advanced lines were genotyped with 9K Barely chip from Illumina....... Traits used in this study were grain yield, plant height and heading date. Heading date is number days it takes after 1st June for plant to head. Heritabilities were 0.33, 0.44 and 0.48 for yield, height and heading, respectively for the average of nine plots. The GBLUP model was used for genomic...

  3. The genome editing revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    -Cas system has become the main tool for genome editing in many laboratories. Currently the targeted genome editing technology has been used in many fields and may be a possible approach for human gene therapy. Furthermore, it can also be used to modifying the genomes of model organisms for studying human......In the last 10 years, we have witnessed a blooming of targeted genome editing systems and applications. The area was revolutionized by the discovery and characterization of the transcription activator-like effector proteins, which are easier to engineer to target new DNA sequences than...... sequence). This ribonucleoprotein complex protects bacteria from invading DNAs, and it was adapted to be used in genome editing. The CRISPR ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule guides to the specific DNA site the Cas9 nuclease to cleave the DNA target. Two years and more than 1000 publications later, the CRISPR...

  4. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  5. Personal genomes, participatory genomics and the anonymity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... gies which have enabled miniaturization, large-scale paral- lelization and improved readout coupled with highly scala- ble data capture and analysis tools, commonly known as. 'next generation' sequencing technologies (Mardis 2008). The cost of whole genome sequencing has been expected to be as ...

  6. The Banana Genome Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droc, Gaëtan; Larivière, Delphine; Guignon, Valentin; Yahiaoui, Nabila; This, Dominique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Dereeper, Alexis; Hamelin, Chantal; Argout, Xavier; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lengelle, Juliette; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Cenci, Alberto; Pitollat, Bertrand; D’Hont, Angélique; Ruiz, Manuel; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the world’s favorite fruits and one of the most important crops for developing countries. The banana reference genome sequence (Musa acuminata) was recently released. Given the taxonomic position of Musa, the completed genomic sequence has particular comparative value to provide fresh insights about the evolution of the monocotyledons. The study of the banana genome has been enhanced by a number of tools and resources that allows harnessing its sequence. First, we set up essential tools such as a Community Annotation System, phylogenomics resources and metabolic pathways. Then, to support post-genomic efforts, we improved banana existing systems (e.g. web front end, query builder), we integrated available Musa data into generic systems (e.g. markers and genetic maps, synteny blocks), we have made interoperable with the banana hub, other existing systems containing Musa data (e.g. transcriptomics, rice reference genome, workflow manager) and finally, we generated new results from sequence analyses (e.g. SNP and polymorphism analysis). Several uses cases illustrate how the Banana Genome Hub can be used to study gene families. Overall, with this collaborative effort, we discuss the importance of the interoperability toward data integration between existing information systems. Database URL: http://banana-genome.cirad.fr/ PMID:23707967

  7. Genomic signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Shmulevich, Ilya

    2007-01-01

    Genomic signal processing (GSP) can be defined as the analysis, processing, and use of genomic signals to gain biological knowledge, and the translation of that knowledge into systems-based applications that can be used to diagnose and treat genetic diseases. Situated at the crossroads of engineering, biology, mathematics, statistics, and computer science, GSP requires the development of both nonlinear dynamical models that adequately represent genomic regulation, and diagnostic and therapeutic tools based on these models. This book facilitates these developments by providing rigorous mathema

  8. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  9. Traditional medicine and genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ′Omics′ developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  10. Traditional medicine and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kalpana; Ghodke, Yogita; Shintre, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    'Omics' developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  11. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  12. What Is a Genome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron David Goldman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The genome is often described as the information repository of an organism. Whether millions or billions of letters of DNA, its transmission across generations confers the principal medium for inheritance of organismal traits. Several emerging areas of research demonstrate that this definition is an oversimplification. Here, we explore ways in which a deeper understanding of genomic diversity and cell physiology is challenging the concepts of physical permanence attached to the genome as well as its role as the sole information source for an organism.

  13. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  14. Genomic insights into tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagan, James E

    2014-05-01

    Prevalent since pre-history, human tuberculosis - caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis - remains a major source of death worldwide. Moreover, increasing drug resistance poses the threat of disease resurgence. However, the expanding application of genomic techniques is providing new avenues for combating this old foe. Whole-genome sequencing, comparative genomics and systems biology are generating new insights into the origins and ongoing evolution of M. tuberculosis, as well as the molecular basis for its pathogenicity. These have important implications for our perspective of the disease, development of new drugs and vaccines, and treatment of patients using existing therapeutics.

  15. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  16. Rice Genomics: Gene discovery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There is a need for discovering candidate genes( a lot of them all over the genome indeed ) and the unlimited allelic variation that can productively take over rice metabolism when cellular water content falls below threshold levels.

  17. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  18. Genomic definition of species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  19. The rise of genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenbach, Jean

    2016-01-01

    A brief history of the development of genomics is provided. Complete sequencing of genomes of uni- and multicellular organisms is based on important progress in sequencing and bioinformatics. Evolution of these methods is ongoing and has triggered an explosion in data production and analysis. Initial analyses focused on the inventory of genes encoding proteins. Completeness and quality of gene prediction remains crucial. Genome analyses profoundly modified our views on evolution, biodiversity and contributed to the detection of new functions, yet to be fully elucidated, such as those fulfilled by non-coding RNAs. Genomics has become the basis for the study of biology and provides the molecular support for a bunch of large-scale studies, the omics. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Annotating individual human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Ali; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A; Topol, Eric J; Schork, Nicholas J

    2011-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ANNOTATING INDIVIDUAL HUMAN GENOMES*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Ali; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A.; Topol, Eric J.; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely to amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants. PMID:21839162

  2. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  3. Genomics and fish adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Antunes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the human genome sequencing in 2003 opened a new perspective into the importance of whole genome sequencing projects, and currently multiple species are having their genomes completed sequenced, from simple organisms, such as bacteria, to more complex taxa, such as mammals. This voluminous sequencing data generated across multiple organisms provides also the framework to better understand the genetic makeup of such species and related ones, allowing to explore the genetic changes underlining the evolution of diverse phenotypic traits. Here, recent results from our group retrieved from comparative evolutionary genomic analyses of varied fish species will be considered to exemplify how gene novelty and gene enhancement by positive selection might have been determinant in the success of adaptive radiations into diverse habitats and lifestyles.

  4. The human genome project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worton, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is a massive international research project, costing 3 to 5 billion dollars and expected to take 15 years, which will identify the all the genes in the human genome - i.e. the complete sequence of bases in human DNA. The prize will be the ability to identify genes causing or predisposing to disease, and in some cases the development of gene therapy, but this new knowledge will raise important ethical issues

  5. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    A vast and rich body of information has grown up as a result of the world's enthusiasm for 'omics technologies. Finding ways to describe and make available this information that maximise its usefulness has become a major effort across the 'omics world. At the heart of this effort is the Genomic S...... and quantity of contextual information about our public collections of genomes, metagenomes, and marker gene sequences....

  6. Decoding the human genome

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Antonerakis, S E

    2002-01-01

    Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges. Ethical and social aspects of genomics.

  7. Human Germline Genome Editing

    OpenAIRE

    Ormond, Kelly E.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Scholes, Derek T.; Bombard, Yvonne; Brody, Lawrence C.; Faucett, W. Andrew; Garrison, Nanibaa’ A.; Hercher, Laura; Isasi, Rosario; Middleton, Anna; Musunuru, Kiran; Shriner, Daniel; Virani, Alice; Young, Caroline E.

    2017-01-01

    With CRISPR/Cas9 and other genome-editing technologies, successful somatic and germline genome editing are becoming feasible. To respond, an American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) workgroup developed this position statement, which was approved by the ASHG Board in March 2017. The workgroup included representatives from the UK Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors, Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and US National Society of Gen...

  8. Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simison, W. Brian; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 20 years there have been dramatic advances in techniques of high-throughput DNA sequencing, most recently accelerated by the Human Genome Project, a program that has determined the three billion base pair code on which we are based. Now this tremendous capability is being directed at other genome targets that are being sampled across the broad range of life. This opens up opportunities as never before for evolutionary and organismal biologists to address questions of both processes and patterns of organismal change. We stand at the dawn of a new 'modern synthesis' period, paralleling that of the early 20th century when the fledgling field of genetics first identified the underlying basis for Darwin's theory. We must now unite the efforts of systematists, paleontologists, mathematicians, computer programmers, molecular biologists, developmental biologists, and others in the pursuit of discovering what genomics can teach us about the diversity of life. Genome-level sampling for mollusks to date has mostly been limited to mitochondrial genomes and it is likely that these will continue to provide the best targets for broad phylogenetic sampling in the near future. However, we are just beginning to see an inroad into complete nuclear genome sequencing, with several mollusks and other eutrochozoans having been selected for work about to begin. Here, we provide an overview of the state of molluscan mitochondrial genomics, highlight a few of the discoveries from this research, outline the promise of broadening this dataset, describe upcoming projects to sequence whole mollusk nuclear genomes, and challenge the community to prepare for making the best use of these data.

  9. Human social genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural "social signal transduction" pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving.

  10. RadGenomics project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi; Harada, Yoshinobu

    2002-01-01

    Human health is determined by a complex interplay of factors, predominantly between genetic susceptibility, environmental conditions and aging. The ultimate aim of the RadGenomics (Radiation Genomics) project is to understand the implications of heterogeneity in responses to ionizing radiation arising from genetic variation between individuals in the human population. The rapid progression of the human genome sequencing and the recent development of new technologies in molecular genetics are providing us with new opportunities to understand the genetic basis of individual differences in susceptibility to natural and/or artificial environmental factors, including radiation exposure. The RadGenomics project will inevitably lead to improved protocols for personalized radiotherapy and reductions in the potential side effects of such treatment. The project will contribute to future research into the molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in humans and will stimulate the development of new high-throughput technologies for a broader application of biological and medical sciences. The staff members are specialists in a variety of fields, including genome science, radiation biology, medical science, molecular biology, and informatics, and have joined the RadGenomics project from various universities, companies, and research institutes. The project started in April 2001. (author)

  11. How the genome folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  12. Comparative Genome Viewer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineris, I.; Sales, G.

    2009-01-01

    The amount of information about genomes, both in the form of complete sequences and annotations, has been exponentially increasing in the last few years. As a result there is the need for tools providing a graphical representation of such information that should be comprehensive and intuitive. Visual representation is especially important in the comparative genomics field since it should provide a combined view of data belonging to different genomes. We believe that existing tools are limited in this respect as they focus on a single genome at a time (conservation histograms) or compress alignment representation to a single dimension. We have therefore developed a web-based tool called Comparative Genome Viewer (Cgv): it integrates a bidimensional representation of alignments between two regions, both at small and big scales, with the richness of annotations present in other genome browsers. We give access to our system through a web-based interface that provides the user with an interactive representation that can be updated in real time using the mouse to move from region to region and to zoom in on interesting details.

  13. Comparative Genomics of Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien J. Mazurie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the apicomplexan parasites, Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, were considered the same species. However, the two parasites, now considered distinct species, exhibit significant differences in host range, infectivity, and pathogenicity, and their sequenced genomes exhibit only 95–97% identity. The availability of the complete genome sequences of these organisms provides the potential to identify the genetic variations that are responsible for the phenotypic differences between the two parasites. We compared the genome organization and structure, gene composition, the metabolic and other pathways, and the local sequence identity between the genes of these two Cryptosporidium species. Our observations show that the phenotypic differences between C. hominis and C. parvum are not due to gross genome rearrangements, structural alterations, gene deletions or insertions, metabolic capabilities, or other obvious genomic alterations. Rather, the results indicate that these genomes exhibit a remarkable structural and compositional conservation and suggest that the phenotypic differences observed are due to subtle variations in the sequences of proteins that act at the interface between the parasite and its host.

  14. Genomic Prediction from Whole Genome Sequence in Livestock: The 1000 Bull Genomes Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Benjamin J; MacLeod, Iona M; Daetwyler, Hans D

    Advantages of using whole genome sequence data to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) include better persistence of accuracy of GEBV across generations and more accurate GEBV across breeds. The 1000 Bull Genomes Project provides a database of whole genome sequenced key ancestor bulls...

  15. A Review on Genomics APIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Swaminathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a Google Genomics, b SMART Genomics, and c 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare.

  16. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  17. Genome Sequences of Oryza Species

    KAUST Repository

    Kumagai, Masahiko

    2018-02-14

    This chapter summarizes recent data obtained from genome sequencing, annotation projects, and studies on the genome diversity of Oryza sativa and related Oryza species. O. sativa, commonly known as Asian rice, is the first monocot species whose complete genome sequence was deciphered based on physical mapping by an international collaborative effort. This genome, along with its accurate and comprehensive annotation, has become an indispensable foundation for crop genomics and breeding. With the development of innovative sequencing technologies, genomic studies of O. sativa have dramatically increased; in particular, a large number of cultivars and wild accessions have been sequenced and compared with the reference rice genome. Since de novo genome sequencing has become cost-effective, the genome of African cultivated rice, O. glaberrima, has also been determined. Comparative genomic studies have highlighted the independent domestication processes of different rice species, but it also turned out that Asian and African rice share a common gene set that has experienced similar artificial selection. An international project aimed at constructing reference genomes and examining the genome diversity of wild Oryza species is currently underway, and the genomes of some species are publicly available. This project provides a platform for investigations such as the evolution, development, polyploidization, and improvement of crops. Studies on the genomic diversity of Oryza species, including wild species, should provide new insights to solve the problem of growing food demands in the face of rapid climatic changes.

  18. Genomics of Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Muglia, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling human birth timing at term, or resulting in preterm birth, have been the focus of considerable investigation, but limited insights have been gained over the past 50 years. In part, these processes have remained elusive because of divergence in reproductive strategies and physiology shown by model organisms, making extrapolation to humans uncertain. Here, we summarize the evolution of progesterone signaling and variation in pregnancy maintenance and termination. We use this comparative physiology to support the hypothesis that selective pressure on genomic loci involved in the timing of parturition have shaped human birth timing, and that these loci can be identified with comparative genomic strategies. Previous limitations imposed by divergence of mechanisms provide an important new opportunity to elucidate fundamental pathways of parturition control through increasing availability of sequenced genomes and associated reproductive physiology characteristics across diverse organisms. PMID:25646385

  19. Genomics of Salmonella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Rocio; McClelland, Michael; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    Progress in the study of Salmonella survival, colonization, and virulence has increased rapidly with the advent of complete genome sequencing and higher capacity assays for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Although many of these techniques have yet to be used to directly assay Salmonella growth on foods, these assays are currently in use to determine Salmonella factors necessary for growth in animal models including livestock animals and in in vitro conditions that mimic many different environments. As sequencing of the Salmonella genome and microarray analysis have revolutionized genomics and transcriptomics of salmonellae over the last decade, so are new high-throughput sequencing technologies currently accelerating the pace of our studies and allowing us to approach complex problems that were not previously experimentally tractable.

  20. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... that the minimum number of genes from each species that need to be compared to produce a reliable phylogeny is about 20. Yeast has also become an attractive model to study speciation in eukaryotes, especially to understand molecular mechanisms behind the establishment of reproductive isolation. Comparison...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  1. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  2. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the chemical ... needed to build the entire human body. A gene traditionally refers to the unit of DNA that ...

  3. Methanococcus jannaschii genome: revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Olsen, G. J.; Klenk, H. P.; White, O.; Woese, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of genomic sequences is necessarily an ongoing process. Initial gene assignments tend (wisely) to be on the conservative side (Venter, 1996). The analysis of the genome then grows in an iterative fashion as additional data and more sophisticated algorithms are brought to bear on the data. The present report is an emendation of the original gene list of Methanococcus jannaschii (Bult et al., 1996). By using a somewhat more updated database and more relaxed (and operator-intensive) pattern matching methods, we were able to add significantly to, and in a few cases amend, the gene identification table originally published by Bult et al. (1996).

  4. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationships using several analyses (16S rRNA, MLSA, fur , amino-acid usage, ANI), which allowed us to identify two misidentified strains. Genome analyses also revealed occurrence of higher and lower GC content clades, correlating with phylogenetic clusters. Pan- and core-genome analysis revealed the conservation of 25% of the genome throughout the genus, with a large and open pan-genome. The major source of genomic diversity could be traced to the smaller chromosome and plasmids. Several of the physiological traits studied in the genus did not correlate with phylogenetic data. Since horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is often suggested as a source of genetic diversity and a potential driver of genomic evolution in bacterial species, we looked into evidence of such in Photobacterium genomes. Genomic islands were the source of genomic differences between strains of the same species. Also, we found transposase genes and CRISPR arrays that suggest multiple encounters with foreign DNA. Presence of genomic exchange traits was widespread and abundant in the genus, suggesting a role in genomic evolution. The high genetic variability and indications of genetic exchange make it difficult to elucidate genome evolutionary paths and raise the awareness of the roles of foreign DNA in the genomic evolution of environmental organisms.

  5. Illuminating the Druggable Genome (IDG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Results from the Human Genome Project revealed that the human genome contains 20,000 to 25,000 genes. A gene contains (encodes) the information that each cell uses...

  6. Chromatin dynamics in genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote ...... of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage.......Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote...... access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance...

  7. The Nostoc punctiforme Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John C. Meeks

    2001-12-31

    Nostoc punctiforme is a filamentous cyanobacterium with extensive phenotypic characteristics and a relatively large genome, approaching 10 Mb. The phenotypic characteristics include a photoautotrophic, diazotrophic mode of growth, but N. punctiforme is also facultatively heterotrophic; its vegetative cells have multiple development alternatives, including terminal differentiation into nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and transient differentiation into spore-like akinetes or motile filaments called hormogonia; and N. punctiforme has broad symbiotic competence with fungi and terrestrial plants, including bryophytes, gymnosperms and an angiosperm. The shotgun-sequencing phase of the N. punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 genome has been completed by the Joint Genome Institute. Annotation of an 8.9 Mb database yielded 7432 open reading frames, 45% of which encode proteins with known or probable known function and 29% of which are unique to N. punctiforme. Comparative analysis of the sequence indicates a genome that is highly plastic and in a state of flux, with numerous insertion sequences and multilocus repeats, as well as genes encoding transposases and DNA modification enzymes. The sequence also reveals the presence of genes encoding putative proteins that collectively define almost all characteristics of cyanobacteria as a group. N. punctiforme has an extensive potential to sense and respond to environmental signals as reflected by the presence of more than 400 genes encoding sensor protein kinases, response regulators and other transcriptional factors. The signal transduction systems and any of the large number of unique genes may play essential roles in the cell differentiation and symbiotic interaction properties of N. punctiforme.

  8. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  9. Genomic prediction using subsampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Alencar; Xu, Shizhong; Muir, William; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2017-03-24

    Genome-wide assisted selection is a critical tool for the genetic improvement of plants and animals. Whole-genome regression models in Bayesian framework represent the main family of prediction methods. Fitting such models with a large number of observations involves a prohibitive computational burden. We propose the use of subsampling bootstrap Markov chain in genomic prediction. Such method consists of fitting whole-genome regression models by subsampling observations in each round of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo. We evaluated the effect of subsampling bootstrap on prediction and computational parameters. Across datasets, we observed an optimal subsampling proportion of observations around 50% with replacement, and around 33% without replacement. Subsampling provided a substantial decrease in computation time, reducing the time to fit the model by half. On average, losses on predictive properties imposed by subsampling were negligible, usually below 1%. For each dataset, an optimal subsampling point that improves prediction properties was observed, but the improvements were also negligible. Combining subsampling with Gibbs sampling is an interesting ensemble algorithm. The investigation indicates that the subsampling bootstrap Markov chain algorithm substantially reduces computational burden associated with model fitting, and it may slightly enhance prediction properties.

  10. The Rhodobacter capsulatus genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haselkorn, R.; Lapidus, A.; Kogan, Y.; Vlček, Čestmír; Pačes, Jan; Pačes, Václav; Ulbrich, P.; Pečenková, Tamara; Rebrekov, D.; Milgram, A.; Mazur, M.; Cox, R.; Kyrpides, N.; Ivanova, N.; Kapatral, V.; Los, T.; Lykidis, A.; Mikhailova, N.; Reznik, G.; Vasieva, O.; Fonstein, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2001), s. 43-52 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : genome * expression * gene Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.739, year: 2001

  11. Functional genomics of tomato

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... very first challenge before scientists working on tomato functional biology is to exploit this high-quality reference sequence for tapping of the ... and exploitation of the genomic diversity present in Solanum genus, in general, and ..... associated with this tool retain its labour-intensive nature, ineffectiveness for ...

  12. Searching for genomic constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lio', P.; Ruffo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have analyzed general properties of very long DNA sequences belonging to simple and complex organisms, by using different correlation methods. They have distinguished those base compositional rules that concern the entire genome which they call 'genomic constraints' from the rules that depend on the 'external natural selection' acting on single genes, i. e. protein-centered constraints. They show that G + C content, purine / pyrimidine distributions and biological complexity of the organism are the most important factors which determine base compositional rules and genome complexity. Three main facts are here reported: bacteria with high G + C content have more restrictions on base composition than those with low G + C content; at constant G + C content more complex organisms, ranging from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes (e.g. human) display an increase of repeats 10-20 nucleotides long, which are also partly responsible for long-range correlations; work selection of length 3 to 10 is stronger in human and in bacteria for two distinct reasons. With respect to previous studies, they have also compared the genomic sequence of the archeon Methanococcus jannaschii with those of bacteria and eukaryotes: it shows sometimes an intermediate statistical behaviour

  13. Better chocolate through genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobroma cacao, the cacao or chocolate tree, is a tropical understory tree whose seeds are used to make chocolate. And like any important crop, cacao is the subject of much research. On September 15, 2010, scientists publicly released a preliminary sequence of the cacao genome--which contains all o...

  14. Genomics of human longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagboom, P. E.; Beekman, M.; Passtoors, W. M.; Deelen, J.; Vaarhorst, A. A.M.; Boer, J. M.; Van Den Akker, E. B.; Van Heemst, D.; De Craen, A. J.M.; Maier, A. B.; Rozing, M.; Mooijaart, S. P.; Heijmans, B. T.; Westendorp, R. G.J.

    2011-01-01

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial

  15. Genome stability in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaften, G.W. van

    2006-01-01

    Genome stability is closely linked to cancer. Most, if not all tumor cells show some form of genome instability, mutations can range from single point mutations to gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy. Genome instability is believed to be the driving force behind tumorigenesis. In order

  16. GenomeGraphs: integrated genomic data visualization with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spellman Paul T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological studies involve a growing number of distinct high-throughput experiments to characterize samples of interest. There is a lack of methods to visualize these different genomic datasets in a versatile manner. In addition, genomic data analysis requires integrated visualization of experimental data along with constantly changing genomic annotation and statistical analyses. Results We developed GenomeGraphs, as an add-on software package for the statistical programming environment R, to facilitate integrated visualization of genomic datasets. GenomeGraphs uses the biomaRt package to perform on-line annotation queries to Ensembl and translates these to gene/transcript structures in viewports of the grid graphics package. This allows genomic annotation to be plotted together with experimental data. GenomeGraphs can also be used to plot custom annotation tracks in combination with different experimental data types together in one plot using the same genomic coordinate system. Conclusion GenomeGraphs is a flexible and extensible software package which can be used to visualize a multitude of genomic datasets within the statistical programming environment R.

  17. GenomeGraphs: integrated genomic data visualization with R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinck, Steffen; Bullard, James; Spellman, Paul T; Dudoit, Sandrine

    2009-01-06

    Biological studies involve a growing number of distinct high-throughput experiments to characterize samples of interest. There is a lack of methods to visualize these different genomic datasets in a versatile manner. In addition, genomic data analysis requires integrated visualization of experimental data along with constantly changing genomic annotation and statistical analyses. We developed GenomeGraphs, as an add-on software package for the statistical programming environment R, to facilitate integrated visualization of genomic datasets. GenomeGraphs uses the biomaRt package to perform on-line annotation queries to Ensembl and translates these to gene/transcript structures in viewports of the grid graphics package. This allows genomic annotation to be plotted together with experimental data. GenomeGraphs can also be used to plot custom annotation tracks in combination with different experimental data types together in one plot using the same genomic coordinate system. GenomeGraphs is a flexible and extensible software package which can be used to visualize a multitude of genomic datasets within the statistical programming environment R.

  18. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Genome Editing Tools in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Mohanta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing tools have the potential to change the genomic architecture of a genome at precise locations, with desired accuracy. These tools have been efficiently used for trait discovery and for the generation of plants with high crop yields and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Due to complex genomic architecture, it is challenging to edit all of the genes/genomes using a particular genome editing tool. Therefore, to overcome this challenging task, several genome editing tools have been developed to facilitate efficient genome editing. Some of the major genome editing tools used to edit plant genomes are: Homologous recombination (HR, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs, the CRISPR/Cas9 system, RNA interference (RNAi, cisgenesis, and intragenesis. In addition, site-directed sequence editing and oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis have the potential to edit the genome at the single-nucleotide level. Recently, adenine base editors (ABEs have been developed to mutate A-T base pairs to G-C base pairs. ABEs use deoxyadeninedeaminase (TadA with catalytically impaired Cas9 nickase to mutate A-T base pairs to G-C base pairs.

  20. Evolution of small prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David José Martínez-Cano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As revealed by genome sequencing, the biology of prokaryotes with reduced genomes is strikingly diverse. These include free-living prokaryotes with ~800 genes as well as endosymbiotic bacteria with as few as ~140 genes. Comparative genomics is revealing the evolutionary mechanisms that led to these small genomes. In the case of free-living prokaryotes, natural selection directly favored genome reduction, while in the case of endosymbiotic prokaryotes neutral processes played a more prominent role. However, new experimental data suggest that selective processes may be at operation as well for endosymbiotic prokaryotes at least during the first stages of genome reduction. Endosymbiotic prokaryotes have evolved diverse strategies for living with reduced gene sets inside a host-defined medium. These include utilization of host-encoded functions (some of them coded by genes acquired by gene transfer from the endosymbiont and/or other bacteria; metabolic complementation between co-symbionts; and forming consortiums with other bacteria within the host. Recent genome sequencing projects of intracellular mutualistic bacteria showed that previously believed universal evolutionary trends like reduced G+C content and conservation of genome synteny are not always present in highly reduced genomes. Finally, the simplified molecular machinery of some of these organisms with small genomes may be used to aid in the design of artificial minimal cells. Here we review recent genomic discoveries of the biology of prokaryotes endowed with small gene sets and discuss the evolutionary mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their peculiar nature.

  1. Toward genome-enabled mycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbett, David S; Stajich, Jason E; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-enabled mycology is a rapidly expanding field that is characterized by the pervasive use of genome-scale data and associated computational tools in all aspects of fungal biology. Genome-enabled mycology is integrative and often requires teams of researchers with diverse skills in organismal mycology, bioinformatics and molecular biology. This issue of Mycologia presents the first complete fungal genomes in the history of the journal, reflecting the ongoing transformation of mycology into a genome-enabled science. Here, we consider the prospects for genome-enabled mycology and the technical and social challenges that will need to be overcome to grow the database of complete fungal genomes and enable all fungal biologists to make use of the new data.

  2. Marine Bacterial Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique

    microorganisms to be used as cell factories for production. Therefore exploitation of new microbial niches and use of different strategies is an opportunity to boost discoveries. Even though scientists have started to explore several habitats other than the terrestrial ones, the marine environment stands out...... as a hitherto under-explored niche. This thesis work uses high-throughput sequencing technologies on a collection of marine bacteria established during the Galathea 3 expedition, with the purpose of unraveling new biodiversity and new bioactivities. Several tools were used for genomic analysis in order...... to better understand the potential harbored in marine bacteria. The work presented makes use of whole genome sequencing of marine bacteria to prove that the genetic repertoire for secondary metabolite production harbored in these bacteria is far larger than anticipated; to identify and develop a new...

  3. Genomic dairy cattle breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Thomas; Sandøe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , unfavourable genetic trends for metabolic, reproductive, claw and leg diseases indicate that these attempts have been insufficient. Today, novel genome-wide sequencing techniques are revolutionising dairy cattle breeding; these enable genetic changes to occur at least twice as rapidly as previously. While......, a number of potential risks are discussed, including detrimental genetic trends for non-measured welfare traits, the increased chance of spreading unfavourable mutations, reduced sharing of information arising from concerns over patents, and an increased monopoly within dairy cattle breeding that may make...... negative effects on animal welfare and to invest in breeding for increased animal welfare. Researchers are encouraged to further investigate the long-term effects of various breeding schemes that rely on genomic breeding values....

  4. Precision genome editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram

    2014-01-01

    of glycobiology, primarily due to their low efficiencies, with resultant failure to impose substantial phenotypic consequences upon the final glycosylation products. Here, we review novel nuclease-based precision genome editing techniques enabling efficient and stable gene editing, including gene disruption......Precise and stable gene editing in mammalian cell lines has until recently been hampered by the lack of efficient targeting methods. While different gene silencing strategies have had tremendous impact on many biological fields, they have generally not been applied with wide success in the field...... by introducing single or double-stranded breaks at a defined genomic sequence. We here compare and contrast the different techniques and summarize their current applications, highlighting cases from the field of glycobiology as well as pointing to future opportunities. The emerging potential of precision gene...

  5. Genomic research perspectives in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur Akilzhanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Technological advancements rapidly propel the field of genome research. Advances in genetics and genomics such as the sequence of the human genome, the human haplotype map, open access databases, cheaper genotyping and chemical genomics, have transformed basic and translational biomedical research. Several projects in the field of genomic and personalized medicine have been conducted at the Center for Life Sciences in Nazarbayev University. The prioritized areas of research include: genomics of multifactorial diseases, cancer genomics, bioinformatics, genetics of infectious diseases and population genomics. At present, DNA-based risk assessment for common complex diseases, application of molecular signatures for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, genome-guided therapy, and dose selection of therapeutic drugs are the important issues in personalized medicine. Results: To further develop genomic and biomedical projects at Center for Life Sciences, the development of bioinformatics research and infrastructure and the establishment of new collaborations in the field are essential. Widespread use of genetic tools will allow the identification of diseases before the onset of clinical symptoms, the individualization of drug treatment, and could induce individual behavioral changes on the basis of calculated disease risk. However, many challenges remain for the successful translation of genomic knowledge and technologies into health advances, such as medicines and diagnostics. It is important to integrate research and education in the fields of genomics, personalized medicine, and bioinformatics, which will be possible with opening of the new Medical Faculty at Nazarbayev University. People in practice and training need to be educated about the key concepts of genomics and engaged so they can effectively apply their knowledge in a matter that will bring the era of genomic medicine to patient care. This requires the development of well

  6. Genomics Portals: integrative web-platform for mining genomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Kaustubh; Phatak, Mukta; Johannes, Freudenberg M; Chen, Jing; Li, Qian; Vineet, Joshi K; Hu, Zhen; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Meller, Jaroslaw; Medvedovic, Mario

    2010-01-13

    A large amount of experimental data generated by modern high-throughput technologies is available through various public repositories. Our knowledge about molecular interaction networks, functional biological pathways and transcriptional regulatory modules is rapidly expanding, and is being organized in lists of functionally related genes. Jointly, these two sources of information hold a tremendous potential for gaining new insights into functioning of living systems. Genomics Portals platform integrates access to an extensive knowledge base and a large database of human, mouse, and rat genomics data with basic analytical visualization tools. It provides the context for analyzing and interpreting new experimental data and the tool for effective mining of a large number of publicly available genomics datasets stored in the back-end databases. The uniqueness of this platform lies in the volume and the diversity of genomics data that can be accessed and analyzed (gene expression, ChIP-chip, ChIP-seq, epigenomics, computationally predicted binding sites, etc), and the integration with an extensive knowledge base that can be used in such analysis. The integrated access to primary genomics data, functional knowledge and analytical tools makes Genomics Portals platform a unique tool for interpreting results of new genomics experiments and for mining the vast amount of data stored in the Genomics Portals backend databases. Genomics Portals can be accessed and used freely at http://GenomicsPortals.org.

  7. eGenomics: Cataloguing Our Complete Genome Collection III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Field

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This meeting report summarizes the proceedings of the “eGenomics: Cataloguing our Complete Genome Collection III” workshop held September 11–13, 2006, at the National Institute for Environmental eScience (NIEeS, Cambridge, United Kingdom. This 3rd workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium was divided into two parts. The first half of the three-day workshop was dedicated to reviewing the genomic diversity of our current and future genome and metagenome collection, and exploring linkages to a series of existing projects through formal presentations. The second half was dedicated to strategic discussions. Outcomes of the workshop include a revised “Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence” (MIGS specification (v1.1, consensus on a variety of features to be added to the Genome Catalogue (GCat, agreement by several researchers to adopt MIGS for imminent genome publications, and an agreement by the EBI and NCBI to input their genome collections into GCat for the purpose of quantifying the amount of optional data already available (e.g., for geographic location coordinates and working towards a single, global list of all public genomes and metagenomes.

  8. Genomics Portals: integrative web-platform for mining genomics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background A large amount of experimental data generated by modern high-throughput technologies is available through various public repositories. Our knowledge about molecular interaction networks, functional biological pathways and transcriptional regulatory modules is rapidly expanding, and is being organized in lists of functionally related genes. Jointly, these two sources of information hold a tremendous potential for gaining new insights into functioning of living systems. Results Genomics Portals platform integrates access to an extensive knowledge base and a large database of human, mouse, and rat genomics data with basic analytical visualization tools. It provides the context for analyzing and interpreting new experimental data and the tool for effective mining of a large number of publicly available genomics datasets stored in the back-end databases. The uniqueness of this platform lies in the volume and the diversity of genomics data that can be accessed and analyzed (gene expression, ChIP-chip, ChIP-seq, epigenomics, computationally predicted binding sites, etc), and the integration with an extensive knowledge base that can be used in such analysis. Conclusion The integrated access to primary genomics data, functional knowledge and analytical tools makes Genomics Portals platform a unique tool for interpreting results of new genomics experiments and for mining the vast amount of data stored in the Genomics Portals backend databases. Genomics Portals can be accessed and used freely at http://GenomicsPortals.org. PMID:20070909

  9. The Genome Atlas Resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azam Qureshi, Matloob; Rotenberg, Eva; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    with scripts and algorithms developed in a variety of programming languages at the Centre for Biological Sequence Analysis in order to create a three-tier software application for genome analysis. The results are made available via a web interface developed in Java, PHP and Perl CGI. User......-configurable and dynamic views of Chromosomal maps are made possible through an updated GeneWiz browser (version 0.94) which uses Java to allow rapid zooming in and out of the atlases....

  10. Malaria Genome Sequencing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    proteins in plastid segregation mutants of Toxoplasma gandii. L. Biot. Parasito . Today 11, 1-4 (1995). Chem. 276, 28436-28442 (2001). 11. Su, X. et al... parasito - gene mapping studies have shown that regions of gene synteny exist phorous vacuole membrane29 . between species of rodent malaria9 and between...Carucci, D. J. Rodent models of malaria in the genomics era. Trends Parasito , 18, selection of karyotype mutants and non-gametocyte producer mutants

  11. National Plant Genome Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    from the soil allow the development of new strategies for fortification of plant foods with nutrients beneficial to human and animal health ( iron and... calcium , for example) and might suggest new approaches for using plants to clean up soils with unsafe levels of heavy metal pollutants such as...involved in uptake of iron , a key nutrient for human health, thus validating the approach. Based upon past studies of genomic and EST sequences, it was

  12. Human Germline Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Kelly E; Mortlock, Douglas P; Scholes, Derek T; Bombard, Yvonne; Brody, Lawrence C; Faucett, W Andrew; Garrison, Nanibaa' A; Hercher, Laura; Isasi, Rosario; Middleton, Anna; Musunuru, Kiran; Shriner, Daniel; Virani, Alice; Young, Caroline E

    2017-08-03

    With CRISPR/Cas9 and other genome-editing technologies, successful somatic and germline genome editing are becoming feasible. To respond, an American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) workgroup developed this position statement, which was approved by the ASHG Board in March 2017. The workgroup included representatives from the UK Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors, Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and US National Society of Genetic Counselors. These groups, as well as the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Asia Pacific Society of Human Genetics, British Society for Genetic Medicine, Human Genetics Society of Australasia, Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia, and Southern African Society for Human Genetics, endorsed the final statement. The statement includes the following positions. (1) At this time, given the nature and number of unanswered scientific, ethical, and policy questions, it is inappropriate to perform germline gene editing that culminates in human pregnancy. (2) Currently, there is no reason to prohibit in vitro germline genome editing on human embryos and gametes, with appropriate oversight and consent from donors, to facilitate research on the possible future clinical applications of gene editing. There should be no prohibition on making public funds available to support this research. (3) Future clinical application of human germline genome editing should not proceed unless, at a minimum, there is (a) a compelling medical rationale, (b) an evidence base that supports its clinical use, (c) an ethical justification, and (d) a transparent public process to solicit and incorporate stakeholder input. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  13. Genomic technologies in neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Chernova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a tremendous trend toward personalized medicine. Advances in the field forced clinicians, including neonatologists, to take a fresh look at prevention, tactics of management and therapy of various diseases. In the center of attention of foreign, and increasingly Russian, researchers and doctors, there are individual genomic data that allow not only to assess the risks of some form of pathology, but also to successfully apply personalized strategies of prediction, prevention and targeted treatment. This article provides a brief review of the latest achievements of genomic technologies in newborns, examines the problems and potential applications of genomics in promoting the concept of personalized medicine in neonatology. The increasing amount of personalized data simply impossible to analyze only by the human mind. In this connection, the need of computers and bioinformatics is obvious. The article reveals the role of translational bioinformatics in the analysis and integration of the results of the accumulated fundamental research into complete clinical decisions. The latest advances in neonatal translational bioinformatics such as clinical decision support systems are considered. It helps to monitor vital parameters of newborns influencing the course of a particular disease, to calculate the increased risks of the development of various pathologies and to select the drugs.

  14. Nutritional genomics: an approach to the genome-environment interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Xacur-Garcia, F.; Castillo-Quan, J. I.; Hernandez-Escalante, V. M.; Laviada-Molina, H.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional genomics forms part of the genomic sciences and addresses the interaction between genes and the human diet, its influence on metabolism and subsequent susceptibility to develop common diseases. It encompasses both nutrigenomics, which explores the effects of nutrients on the genome, proteome and metabolome; and nutrigenetics, that explores the effects of genetic variations on the diet/disease interaction. A number of mechanisms drive the gene/diet interaction: elements in the diet...

  15. Genomic Data Commons and Genomic Cloud Pilots - Google Hangout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Join us for a live, moderated discussion about two NCI efforts to expand access to cancer genomics data: the Genomic Data Commons and Genomic Cloud Pilots. NCI subject matters experts will include Louis M. Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., Director Center for Cancer Genomics, Warren Kibbe, Ph.D., Director, NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology, and moderated by Anthony Kerlavage, Ph.D., Chief, Cancer Informatics Branch, Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology. We welcome your questions before and during the Hangout on Twitter using the hashtag #AskNCI.

  16. Invariants of DNA genomic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Paul Dan A.

    2005-02-01

    For large scale analysis purposes, the conversion of genomic sequences into digital signals opens the possibility to use powerful signal processing methods for handling genomic information. The study of complex genomic signals reveals large scale features, maintained over the scale of whole chromosomes, that would be difficult to find by using only the symbolic representation. Based on genomic signal methods and on statistical techniques, the paper defines parameters of DNA sequences which are invariant to transformations induced by SNPs, splicing or crossover. Re-orienting concatenated coding regions in the same direction, regularities shared by the genomic material in all exons are revealed, pointing towards the hypothesis of a regular ancestral structure from which the current chromosome structures have evolved. This property is not found in non-nuclear genomic material, e.g., plasmids.

  17. Comparative Genomics in Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, Martin; Sammeth, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Genomes can be compared at different levels of divergence, either between species or within species. Within species genomes can be compared between different subpopulations, such as human subpopulations from different continents. Investigating the genomic differences between different human subpopulations is important when studying complex diseases that are affected by many genetic variants, as the variants involved can differ between populations. The 1000 Genomes Project collected genome-scale variation data for 2504 human individuals from 26 different populations, enabling a systematic comparison of variation between human subpopulations. In this chapter, we present step-by-step a basic protocol for the identification of population-specific variants employing the 1000 Genomes data. These variants are subsequently further investigated for those that affect the proteome or RNA splice sites, to investigate potentially biologically relevant differences between the populations.

  18. Genomic selection in plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Mark A; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is a method to predict the genetic value of selection candidates based on the genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) predicted from high-density markers positioned throughout the genome. Unlike marker-assisted selection, the GEBV is based on all markers including both minor and major marker effects. Thus, the GEBV may capture more of the genetic variation for the particular trait under selection.

  19. Advances in editing microalgae genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Daboussi, Fayza

    2017-01-01

    There have been significant advances in microalgal genomics over the last decade. Nevertheless, there are still insufficient tools for the manipulation of microalgae genomes and the development of microalgae as industrial biofactories. Several research groups have recently contributed to progress by demonstrating that particular nucleases can be used for targeted and stable modifications of the genomes of some microalgae species. The nucleases include Meganucleases, Zinc Finger nucleases, TAL...

  20. Comparative RNA genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2018-01-01

    small RNAs is their reliance of conserved secondary structures. Large scale sequencing projects, on the other hand, have profoundly changed our understanding of eukaryotic genomes. Pervasively transcribed, they give rise to a plethora of large and evolutionarily extremely flexible noncoding RNAs...... that exert a vastly diverse array of molecule functions. In this chapter we provide a—necessarily incomplete—overview of the current state of comparative analysis of noncoding RNAs, emphasizing computational approaches as a means to gain a global picture of the modern RNA world....

  1. Genomic rearrangements and diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Loviglio, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are major contributors of genomic imbalances disorders. On the short arm of chromosome 16, CNVs of the distal 220 kb BP2-BP3 region show mirror effect on BMI and head size, and association with autism and schizophrenia, as previously reported for the proximal 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication. These two CNVs-prone regions at 16p11.2 are also reciprocally engaged in complex chromatin looping, successfully confirmed by 4C-seq, FISH, Hi-C and concomitant...

  2. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Cristiane C.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Souza, Rangel C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera) from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety...... > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. CONCLUSION: The combination of different......-based server. This novel approach to microbial systematics will result in a tremendous advance concerning biodiversity discovery, description, and understanding....

  3. Genomic effects of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbesa, Ivana; Hakim, Ofir

    2017-05-01

    Glucocorticoids and their receptor (GR) have been an important area of research because of their pleiotropic physiological functions and extensive use in the clinic. In addition, the association between GR and glucocorticoids, which is highly specific, leads to rapid nuclear translocation where GR associates with chromatin to regulate gene transcription. This simplified model system has been instrumental for studying the complexity of transcription regulation processes occurring at chromatin. In this review we discuss our current understanding of GR action that has been enhanced by recent developments in genome wide measurements of chromatin accessibility, histone marks, chromatin remodeling and 3D chromatin structure in various cell types responding to glucocorticoids.

  4. Genomic Feature Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter; Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Rohde, Palle Duun

    -additive genetic mechanisms. These modeling approaches have proven to be highly useful to determine population genetic parameters as well as prediction of genetic risk or value. We present a series of statistical modelling approaches that use prior biological information for evaluating the collective action......Whole-genome sequences and multiple trait phenotypes from large numbers of individuals will soon be available in many populations. Well established statistical modeling approaches enable the genetic analyses of complex trait phenotypes while accounting for a variety of additive and non...

  5. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  6. Genome Trees from Conservation Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the genome tree depends on the potential evolutionary significance in the clustering of species according to similarities in the gene content of their genomes. In this respect, genome trees have often been identified with species trees. With the rapid expansion of genome sequence data it becomes of increasing importance to develop accurate methods for grasping global trends for the phylogenetic signals that mutually link the various genomes. We therefore derive here the methodological concept of genome trees based on protein conservation profiles in multiple species. The basic idea in this derivation is that the multi-component "presence-absence" protein conservation profiles permit tracking of common evolutionary histories of genes across multiple genomes. We show that a significant reduction in informational redundancy is achieved by considering only the subset of distinct conservation profiles. Beyond these basic ideas, we point out various pitfalls and limitations associated with the data handling, paving the way for further improvements. As an illustration for the methods, we analyze a genome tree based on the above principles, along with a series of other trees derived from the same data and based on pair-wise comparisons (ancestral duplication-conservation and shared orthologs. In all trees we observe a sharp discrimination between the three primary domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. The new genome tree, based on conservation profiles, displays a significant correspondence with classically recognized taxonomical groupings, along with a series of departures from such conventional clusterings.

  7. Genome engineering in Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Skovgaard, Ole; Ducos-Galand, Magaly

    2012-01-01

    Although bacteria with multipartite genomes are prevalent, our knowledge of the mechanisms maintaining their genome is very limited, and much remains to be learned about the structural and functional interrelationships of multiple chromosomes. Owing to its bi-chromosomal genome architecture and its....... This difficulty was surmounted using a unique and powerful strategy based on massive rearrangement of prokaryotic genomes. We developed a site-specific recombination-based engineering tool, which allows targeted, oriented, and reciprocal DNA exchanges. Using this genetic tool, we obtained a panel of V. cholerae...

  8. A REVIEW ON GENOME EDITING

    OpenAIRE

    Akshay Patil, Latesh Patil, H. P. Suryawanshi, S. P. Pawar

    2017-01-01

    The Present Review report contains the information about Genome Editing. In this report genome editing is illustrated at the basic level for better understanding. It contains History of Genome Editing from 1800 to Current day i.e. from concept of DNA till current time. Genome editing is an technique to make every human smarter not our choice, by customizing next generation the way we want it to be like to be look and also the intellectual capacity. In this Concept, the viral Immunity is used ...

  9. Genome Writing: Current Progress and Related Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqiang Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of synthetic biology is to build customized cells or organisms to meet specific industrial or medical needs. The most important part of the customized cell is a synthetic genome. Advanced genomic writing technologies are required to build such an artificial genome. Recently, the partially-completed synthetic yeast genome project represents a milestone in this field. In this mini review, we briefly introduce the techniques for de novo genome synthesis and genome editing. Furthermore, we summarize recent research progresses and highlight several applications in the synthetic genome field. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future prospects. Keywords: Synthetic biology, Genome writing, Genome editing, Bioethics, Biosafety

  10. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus and other LAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    The genomes of 66 LABs, belonging to five different genera, were compared for genome size and gene content. The analyzed genomes included 37 Lactobacillus genomes of 17 species, six Lactococcus lactis genomes, four Leuconostoc genomes of three species, six Streptococcus genomes of two species...... that of the others, with the two Streptococcus species having the shortest genomes. The widest distribution in genome content was observed for Lactobacillus. The number of tRNA and rRNA gene copies varied considerably, with exceptional high numbers observed for Lb. delbrueckii, while these numbers were relatively...

  11. Whole genome analysis of a Vietnamese trio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-04

    Feb 4, 2015 ... 2008), Korean genome (Ahn et al. 2009), Japanese genome. (Fujimoto et al. 2010), Pakistani genome (Azim et al. 2013),. Turkish genome (Dogan et al. 2014) and Russian genome. (Skryabin et al. 2009). Being the 14th largest country by population in the world,. Vietnam has about 90 million people of 54 ...

  12. Genome Update: alignment of bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Jensen, Mette; Poulsen, Tine Rugh

    2004-01-01

    There are four new microbial genomes listed in this month's Genome Update, three belonging to Gram-positive bacteria and one belonging to an archaeon that lives at pH 0; all of these genomes are listed in Table 1⇓. The method of genome comparison this month is that of genome alignment and, as an ...

  13. Genomics and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Lorraine; Johnson, Rolanda L; Sparks, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    To describe genetic knowledge and discovery in the area of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to discuss how these new advances will influence the clinical care of affected people. A selective review of the literature is presented on the disease mechanism of both the Mendelian and multifactorial genetic cardiovascular conditions. A case study approach is used to illustrate how the genetic paradigm affects the healthcare experience of a family affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The current state of CVD treatment remains complex. An understanding of genomic concepts and a genome-based approach is necessary to determine: (a) the risk of CVD susceptibility beyond traditional risk factors; (b) early detection of illness; (c) response to treatment; and (d) molecular taxonomy of the disease. The results of genetic research, education, and teaching will lead to a new understanding of genes and pathways, resulting in powerful new therapeutic approaches to CVD. The challenge is to translate genetic discoveries into clinical practice that ultimately leads to preventing CVD and reducing mortality.

  14. ENCODE whole-genome data in the UCSC Genome Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Pheasant, Michael; Barber, Galt P.; Meyer, Laurence R.; Pohl, Andy; Raney, Brian J.; Wang, Ting; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Zweig, Ann S.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Learned, Katrina; Rhead, Brooke; Smith, Kayla E.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Karolchik, Donna; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2010-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international consortium of investigators funded to analyze the human genome with the goal of producing a comprehensive catalog of functional elements. The ENCODE Data Coordination Center at The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) is the primary repository for experimental results generated by ENCODE investigators. These results are captured in the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics database and download server for visualization and data mining via the UCSC Genome Browser and companion tools (Rhead et al. The UCSC Genome Browser Database: update 2010, in this issue). The ENCODE web portal at UCSC (http://encodeproject.org or http://genome.ucsc.edu/ENCODE) provides information about the ENCODE data and convenient links for access. PMID:19920125

  15. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-06-17

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

  16. Genomic selection: genome-wide prediction in plant improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desta, Zeratsion Abera; Ortiz, Rodomiro

    2014-09-01

    Association analysis is used to measure relations between markers and quantitative trait loci (QTL). Their estimation ignores genes with small effects that trigger underpinning quantitative traits. By contrast, genome-wide selection estimates marker effects across the whole genome on the target population based on a prediction model developed in the training population (TP). Whole-genome prediction models estimate all marker effects in all loci and capture small QTL effects. Here, we review several genomic selection (GS) models with respect to both the prediction accuracy and genetic gain from selection. Phenotypic selection or marker-assisted breeding protocols can be replaced by selection, based on whole-genome predictions in which phenotyping updates the model to build up the prediction accuracy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  18. Genome update: the 1000th genome - a cautionary tale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagesen, Karin; Ussery, David; Wassenaar, Gertrude Maria

    2010-01-01

    There are now more than 1000 sequenced prokaryotic genomes deposited in public databases and available for analysis. Currently, although the sequence databases GenBank, DNA Database of Japan and EMBL are synchronized continually, there are slight differences in content at the genomes level...... for a variety of logistical reasons, including differences in format and loading errors, such as those caused by file transfer protocol interruptions. This means that the 1000th genome will be different in the various databases. Some of the data on the highly accessed web pages are inaccurate, leading to false......, of the 1000 genomes available, not a single protein is conserved across all genomes. Excluding the members of the Archaea, only a total of four genes are conserved in all bacteria: two protein genes and two RNA genes....

  19. Genome graphs and the evolution of genome inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paten, Benedict; Novak, Adam M.; Eizenga, Jordan M.; Garrison, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The human reference genome is part of the foundation of modern human biology and a monumental scientific achievement. However, because it excludes a great deal of common human variation, it introduces a pervasive reference bias into the field of human genomics. To reduce this bias, it makes sense to draw on representative collections of human genomes, brought together into reference cohorts. There are a number of techniques to represent and organize data gleaned from these cohorts, many using ideas implicitly or explicitly borrowed from graph-based models. Here, we survey various projects underway to build and apply these graph-based structures—which we collectively refer to as genome graphs—and discuss the improvements in read mapping, variant calling, and haplotype determination that genome graphs are expected to produce. PMID:28360232

  20. Theory of microbial genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene

    Bacteria and archaea have small genomes tightly packed with protein-coding genes. This compactness is commonly perceived as evidence of adaptive genome streamlining caused by strong purifying selection in large microbial populations. In such populations, even the small cost incurred by nonfunctional DNA because of extra energy and time expenditure is thought to be sufficient for this extra genetic material to be eliminated by selection. However, contrary to the predictions of this model, there exists a consistent, positive correlation between the strength of selection at the protein sequence level, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates, and microbial genome size. By fitting the genome size distributions in multiple groups of prokaryotes to predictions of mathematical models of population evolution, we show that only models in which acquisition of additional genes is, on average, slightly beneficial yield a good fit to genomic data. Thus, the number of genes in prokaryotic genomes seems to reflect the equilibrium between the benefit of additional genes that diminishes as the genome grows and deletion bias. New genes acquired by microbial genomes, on average, appear to be adaptive. Evolution of bacterial and archaeal genomes involves extensive horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Many microbes have open pangenomes, where each newly sequenced genome contains more than 10% `ORFans', genes without detectable homologues in other species. A simple, steady-state evolutionary model reveals two sharply distinct classes of microbial genes, one of which (ORFans) is characterized by effectively instantaneous gene replacement, whereas the other consists of genes with finite, distributed replacement rates. These findings imply a conservative estimate of at least a billion distinct genes in the prokaryotic genomic universe.

  1. OryzaGenome: Genome Diversity Database of Wild Oryza Species

    KAUST Repository

    Ohyanagi, Hajime

    2015-11-18

    The species in the genus Oryza, encompassing nine genome types and 23 species, are a rich genetic resource and may have applications in deeper genomic analyses aiming to understand the evolution of plant genomes. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, a flood of Oryza species reference genomes and genomic variation information has become available in recent years. This genomic information, combined with the comprehensive phenotypic information that we are accumulating in our Oryzabase, can serve as an excellent genotype-phenotype association resource for analyzing rice functional and structural evolution, and the associated diversity of the Oryza genus. Here we integrate our previous and future phenotypic/habitat information and newly determined genotype information into a united repository, named OryzaGenome, providing the variant information with hyperlinks to Oryzabase. The current version of OryzaGenome includes genotype information of 446 O. rufipogon accessions derived by imputation and of 17 accessions derived by imputation-free deep sequencing. Two variant viewers are implemented: SNP Viewer as a conventional genome browser interface and Variant Table as a textbased browser for precise inspection of each variant one by one. Portable VCF (variant call format) file or tabdelimited file download is also available. Following these SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data, reference pseudomolecules/ scaffolds/contigs and genome-wide variation information for almost all of the closely and distantly related wild Oryza species from the NIG Wild Rice Collection will be available in future releases. All of the resources can be accessed through http://viewer.shigen.info/oryzagenome/.

  2. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  3. Comparative genomic hybridization: practical guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuken, J.W.M.; Sprenger, S.H.; Wesseling, P.

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a technique used to identify copy number changes throughout a genome. Until now, hundreds of CGH studies have been published reporting chromosomal imbalances in a large variety of human neoplasms. Additionally, technical improvements of specific steps in a

  4. Cocoa/Cotton Comparative Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    With genome sequence from two members of the Malvaceae family recently made available, we are exploring syntenic relationships, gene content, and evolutionary trajectories between the cacao and cotton genomes. An assembly of cacao (Theobroma cacao) using Illumina and 454 sequence technology yielded ...

  5. Future Health Applications of Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Colleen M.; Bowen, Deborah; Brody, Lawrence C.; Condit, Celeste M.; Croyle, Robert T.; Gwinn, Marta; Khoury, Muin J.; Koehly, Laura M.; Korf, Bruce R.; Marteau, Theresa M.; McLeroy, Kenneth; Patrick, Kevin; Valente, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the quickening momentum of genomic discovery, the communication, behavioral, and social sciences research needed for translating this discovery into public health applications has lagged behind. The National Human Genome Research Institute held a 2-day workshop in October 2008 convening an interdisciplinary group of scientists to recommend forward-looking priorities for translational research. This research agenda would be designed to redress the top three risk factors (tobacco use, poor diet, and physical inactivity) that contribute to the four major chronic diseases (heart disease, type 2 diabetes, lung disease, and many cancers) and account for half of all deaths worldwide. Three priority research areas were identified: (1) improving the public’s genetic literacy in order to enhance consumer skills; (2) gauging whether genomic information improves risk communication and adoption of healthier behaviors more than current approaches; and (3) exploring whether genomic discovery in concert with emerging technologies can elucidate new behavioral intervention targets. Important crosscutting themes also were identified, including the need to: (1) anticipate directions of genomic discovery; (2) take an agnostic scientific perspective in framing research questions asking whether genomic discovery adds value to other health promotion efforts; and (3) consider multiple levels of influence and systems that contribute to important public health problems. The priorities and themes offer a framework for a variety of stakeholders, including those who develop priorities for research funding, interdisciplinary teams engaged in genomics research, and policymakers grappling with how to use the products born of genomics research to address public health challenges. PMID:20409503

  6. Genome editing in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Alanna; Musunuru, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Genome-editing tools, which include zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) systems, have emerged as an invaluable technology to achieve somatic and germline genomic manipulation in cells and model organisms for multiple applications, including the creation of knockout alleles, introducing desired mutations into genomic DNA, and inserting novel transgenes. Genome editing is being rapidly adopted into all fields of biomedical research, including the cardiovascular field, where it has facilitated a greater understanding of lipid metabolism, electrophysiology, cardiomyopathies, and other cardiovascular disorders, has helped to create a wider variety of cellular and animal models, and has opened the door to a new class of therapies. In this Review, we discuss the applications of genome-editing technology throughout cardiovascular disease research and the prospect of in vivo genome-editing therapies in the future. We also describe some of the existing limitations of genome-editing tools that will need to be addressed if cardiovascular genome editing is to achieve its full scientific and therapeutic potential.

  7. The promise of insect genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Insects are the largest animal group in the world and are ecologically and economically extremely important. This importance of insects is reflected by the existence of currently 24 insect genome projects. Our perspective discusses the state-of-the-art of these genome projects and the impacts...

  8. Comparative Genomics of the Cucurbitaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome size for watermelon, melon, cucumber, and pumpkin is 425, 454, 367, and 502 Mbp, respectively, and considered medium size as compared with most other crops. Whole-genome duplication is common in angiosperm plants. Research has revealed a paleohexaploidy (') event in the common ancestor of...

  9. Bioinformatics of genomic association mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaez Barzani, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we present an overview of bioinformatics-based approaches for genomic association mapping, with emphasis on human quantitative traits and their contribution to complex diseases. We aim to provide a comprehensive walk-through of the classic steps of genomic association mapping

  10. International genomic evaluation methods for dairy cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Genomic evaluations are rapidly replacing traditional evaluation systems used for dairy cattle selection. Economies of scale in genomics promote cooperation across country borders. Genomic information can be transferred across countries using simple conversion equations, by modifying mult...

  11. Open chromatin in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Yufeng; Jiang, Jiming

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity to DNase I digestion is an indicator of the accessibility and configuration of chromatin in eukaryotic genomes. Open chromatin exhibits high sensitivity to DNase I cleavage. DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in eukaryotic genomes can be identified through DNase I treatment followed by sequencing (DNase-seq). DHSs are most frequently associated with various cis-regulatory DNA elements, including promoters, enhancers, and silencers in both animal and plant genomes. Genome-wide identification of DHSs provides an efficient method to interpret previously un-annotated regulatory DNA sequences. In this review, we provide an overview of the historical perspective of DHS research in eukaryotes. We summarize the main achievements of DHS research in model animal species and review the recent progress of DHS research in plants. We finally discuss possible future directions of using DHS as a tool in plant genomics research. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. [Trends of angiosperm genome evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet'ev, S N; Gamaleĭ, Iu V; Slemnev, N N

    2011-01-01

    Direction of evolutionary variability of parameters of genome size and structurally functional activity of plants on life forms groups and angiosperms taxa are analyzed. It is shown that, in the Cretaceous-Cenozoic, their nuclear genome tended to increase. Functional genome efficiency (intensity of functions per 1 pg of DNA) decreased from as much as possible high at trees and lianas of rain and monsoonal forests of the Paleogene to minimum at shrubs, perennial and annual grasses of meadow-steppe vegetation which had appeared in the neogene. Important for the vegetation environmental changes in temperature, humidity and CO2 concentration in an adverse direction are discussed as the cause of evolutionary genome size growth and decrease in its functional efficiency. Price for phylogenetic adaptogenesis of angiosperms to the step Cenozoic climate cooling was 4-fold and more genome growth.

  13. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. \\paragraph*{Results:} Theoretical derivations showed that parameter...

  14. Pathophysiology of MDS: genomic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Motoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and their apoptosis, and show a propensity to progress to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Although MDS are recognized as neoplastic diseases caused by genomic aberrations of hematopoietic cells, the details of the genetic abnormalities underlying disease development have not as yet been fully elucidated due to difficulties in analyzing chromosomal abnormalities. Recent advances in comprehensive analyses of disease genomes including whole-genome sequencing technologies have revealed the genomic abnormalities in MDS. Surprisingly, gene mutations were found in approximately 80-90% of cases with MDS, and the novel mutations discovered with these technologies included previously unknown, MDS-specific, mutations such as those of the genes in the RNA-splicing machinery. It is anticipated that these recent studies will shed new light on the pathophysiology of MDS due to genomic aberrations.

  15. Genomic methods take the plunge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cammen, Kristina M.; Andrews, Kimberly R.; Carroll, Emma L.

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the application of genomic techniques to non-model organisms (NMOs) over the past decade has yielded numerous valuable contributions to evolutionary biology and ecology, many of which would not have been possible with traditional genetic markers. We review this recent...... progression with a particular focus on genomic studies of marine mammals, a group of taxa that represent key macroevolutionary transitions from terrestrial to marine environments and for which available genomic resources have recently undergone notable rapid growth. Genomic studies of NMOs utilize...... an expanding range of approaches, including whole genome sequencing, restriction site-associated DNA sequencing, array-based sequencing of single nucleotide polymorphisms and target sequence probes (e.g., exomes), and transcriptome sequencing. These approaches generate different types and quantities of data...

  16. [Preface for genome editing special issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Feng; Gao, Caixia

    2017-10-25

    Genome editing technology, as an innovative biotechnology, has been widely used for editing the genome from model organisms, animals, plants and microbes. CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing technology shows its great value and potential in the dissection of functional genomics, improved breeding and genetic disease treatment. In the present special issue, the principle and application of genome editing techniques has been summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of the current genome editing technology and future prospects would also be highlighted.

  17. Privacy in the Genomic Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAVEED, MUHAMMAD; AYDAY, ERMAN; CLAYTON, ELLEN W.; FELLAY, JACQUES; GUNTER, CARL A.; HUBAUX, JEAN-PIERRE; MALIN, BRADLEY A.; WANG, XIAOFENG

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing technology has advanced at a rapid pace and it is now possible to generate highly-detailed genotypes inexpensively. The collection and analysis of such data has the potential to support various applications, including personalized medical services. While the benefits of the genomics revolution are trumpeted by the biomedical community, the increased availability of such data has major implications for personal privacy; notably because the genome has certain essential features, which include (but are not limited to) (i) an association with traits and certain diseases, (ii) identification capability (e.g., forensics), and (iii) revelation of family relationships. Moreover, direct-to-consumer DNA testing increases the likelihood that genome data will be made available in less regulated environments, such as the Internet and for-profit companies. The problem of genome data privacy thus resides at the crossroads of computer science, medicine, and public policy. While the computer scientists have addressed data privacy for various data types, there has been less attention dedicated to genomic data. Thus, the goal of this paper is to provide a systematization of knowledge for the computer science community. In doing so, we address some of the (sometimes erroneous) beliefs of this field and we report on a survey we conducted about genome data privacy with biomedical specialists. Then, after characterizing the genome privacy problem, we review the state-of-the-art regarding privacy attacks on genomic data and strategies for mitigating such attacks, as well as contextualizing these attacks from the perspective of medicine and public policy. This paper concludes with an enumeration of the challenges for genome data privacy and presents a framework to systematize the analysis of threats and the design of countermeasures as the field moves forward. PMID:26640318

  18. Privacy in the Genomic Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Ayday, Erman; Clayton, Ellen W; Fellay, Jacques; Gunter, Carl A; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre; Malin, Bradley A; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-09-01

    Genome sequencing technology has advanced at a rapid pace and it is now possible to generate highly-detailed genotypes inexpensively. The collection and analysis of such data has the potential to support various applications, including personalized medical services. While the benefits of the genomics revolution are trumpeted by the biomedical community, the increased availability of such data has major implications for personal privacy; notably because the genome has certain essential features, which include (but are not limited to) (i) an association with traits and certain diseases, (ii) identification capability (e.g., forensics), and (iii) revelation of family relationships. Moreover, direct-to-consumer DNA testing increases the likelihood that genome data will be made available in less regulated environments, such as the Internet and for-profit companies. The problem of genome data privacy thus resides at the crossroads of computer science, medicine, and public policy. While the computer scientists have addressed data privacy for various data types, there has been less attention dedicated to genomic data. Thus, the goal of this paper is to provide a systematization of knowledge for the computer science community. In doing so, we address some of the (sometimes erroneous) beliefs of this field and we report on a survey we conducted about genome data privacy with biomedical specialists. Then, after characterizing the genome privacy problem, we review the state-of-the-art regarding privacy attacks on genomic data and strategies for mitigating such attacks, as well as contextualizing these attacks from the perspective of medicine and public policy. This paper concludes with an enumeration of the challenges for genome data privacy and presents a framework to systematize the analysis of threats and the design of countermeasures as the field moves forward.

  19. The South Asian genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Chambers

    Full Text Available The genetic sequence variation of people from the Indian subcontinent who comprise one-quarter of the world's population, is not well described. We carried out whole genome sequencing of 168 South Asians, along with whole-exome sequencing of 147 South Asians to provide deeper characterisation of coding regions. We identify 12,962,155 autosomal sequence variants, including 2,946,861 new SNPs and 312,738 novel indels. This catalogue of SNPs and indels amongst South Asians provides the first comprehensive map of genetic variation in this major human population, and reveals evidence for selective pressures on genes involved in skin biology, metabolism, infection and immunity. Our results will accelerate the search for the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to disorders such as type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease which are highly prevalent amongst South Asians.

  20. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  1. Plantagora: modeling whole genome sequencing and assembly of plant genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Barthelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly

  2. The Perennial Ryegrass GenomeZipper – Targeted Use of Genome Resources for Comparative Grass Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Whole-genome sequences established for model and major crop species constitute a key resource for advanced genomic research. For outbreeding forage and turf grass species like ryegrasses (Lolium spp.), such resources have yet to be developed. Here, we present a model of the perennial ryegrass (Lo...

  3. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand...... the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationships using several analyses (16S rRNA, MLSA, fur, amino-acid usage, ANI), which allowed us to identify two...

  4. Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Cai; Li, Qiye

    2014-01-01

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size...... this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits....

  5. Components of Adenovirus Genome Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are icosahedral viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Genome packaging in AdV is thought to be similar to that seen in dsDNA containing icosahedral bacteriophages and herpesviruses. Specific recognition of the AdV genome is mediated by a packaging domain located close to the left end of the viral genome and is mediated by the viral packaging machinery. Our understanding of the role of various components of the viral packaging machinery in AdV genome packaging has greatly advanced in recent years. Characterization of empty capsids assembled in the absence of one or more components involved in packaging, identification of the unique vertex, and demonstration of the role of IVa2, the putative packaging ATPase, in genome packaging have provided compelling evidence that AdVs follow a sequential assembly pathway. This review provides a detailed discussion on the functions of the various viral and cellular factors involved in AdV genome packaging. We conclude by briefly discussing the roles of the empty capsids, assembly intermediates, scaffolding proteins, portal vertex and DNA encapsidating enzymes in AdV assembly and packaging. PMID:27721809

  6. The genome of Eucalyptus grandis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myburg, Alexander A.; Grattapaglia, Dario; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Hellsten, Uffe; Hayes, Richard D.; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Lindquist, Erika; Tice, Hope; Bauer, Diane; Goodstein, David M.; Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexandre; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Kullan, Anand R. K.; Hussey, Steven G.; Pinard, Desre; van der Merwe, Karen; Singh, Pooja; van Jaarsveld, Ida; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Togawa, Roberto C.; Pappas, Marilia R.; Faria, Danielle A.; Sansaloni, Carolina P.; Petroli, Cesar D.; Yang, Xiaohan; Ranjan, Priya; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Ye, Chu-Yu; Li, Ting; Sterck, Lieven; Vanneste, Kevin; Murat, Florent; Soler, Marçal; Clemente, Hélène San; Saidi, Naijib; Cassan-Wang, Hua; Dunand, Christophe; Hefer, Charles A.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Kersting, Anna R.; Vining, Kelly; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Ranik, Martin; Naithani, Sushma; Elser, Justin; Boyd, Alexander E.; Liston, Aaron; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Dharmwardhana, Palitha; Raja, Rajani; Sullivan, Christopher; Romanel, Elisson; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Külheim, Carsten; Foley, William; Carocha, Victor; Paiva, Jorge; Kudrna, David; Brommonschenkel, Sergio H.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Byrne, Margaret; Rigault, Philippe; Tibbits, Josquin; Spokevicius, Antanas; Jones, Rebecca C.; Steane, Dorothy A.; Vaillancourt, René E.; Potts, Brad M.; Joubert, Fourie; Barry, Kerrie; Pappas, Georgios J.; Strauss, Steven H.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Salse, Jérôme; Van de Peer, Yves; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schmutz, Jeremy

    2014-06-11

    Eucalypts are the world s most widely planted hardwood trees. Their broad adaptability, rich species diversity, fast growth and superior multipurpose wood, have made them a global renewable resource of fiber and energy that mitigates human pressures on natural forests. We sequenced and assembled >94% of the 640 Mbp genome of Eucalyptus grandis into its 11 chromosomes. A set of 36,376 protein coding genes were predicted revealing that 34% occur in tandem duplications, the largest proportion found thus far in any plant genome. Eucalypts also show the highest diversity of genes for plant specialized metabolism that act as chemical defence against biotic agents and provide unique pharmaceutical oils. Resequencing of a set of inbred tree genomes revealed regions of strongly conserved heterozygosity, likely hotspots of inbreeding depression. The resequenced genome of the sister species E. globulus underscored the high inter-specific genome colinearity despite substantial genome size variation in the genus. The genome of E. grandis is the first reference for the early diverging Rosid order Myrtales and is placed here basal to the Eurosids. This resource expands knowledge on the unique biology of large woody perennials and provides a powerful tool to accelerate comparative biology, breeding and biotechnology.

  7. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  8. [Genome editing of industrial microorganism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linjiang; Li, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Genome editing is defined as highly-effective and precise modification of cellular genome in a large scale. In recent years, such genome-editing methods have been rapidly developed in the field of industrial strain improvement. The quickly-updating methods thoroughly change the old mode of inefficient genetic modification, which is "one modification, one selection marker, and one target site". Highly-effective modification mode in genome editing have been developed including simultaneous modification of multiplex genes, highly-effective insertion, replacement, and deletion of target genes in the genome scale, cut-paste of a large DNA fragment. These new tools for microbial genome editing will certainly be applied widely, and increase the efficiency of industrial strain improvement, and promote the revolution of traditional fermentation industry and rapid development of novel industrial biotechnology like production of biofuel and biomaterial. The technological principle of these genome-editing methods and their applications were summarized in this review, which can benefit engineering and construction of industrial microorganism.

  9. Recurring genomic breaks in independent lineages support genomic fragility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannenhalli Sridhar

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings indicate that evolutionary breaks in the genome are not randomly distributed, and that certain regions, so-called fragile regions, are predisposed to breakages. Previous approaches to the study of genomic fragility have examined the distribution of breaks, as well as the coincidence of breaks with segmental duplications and repeats, within a single species. In contrast, we investigate whether this regional fragility is an inherent genomic characteristic and is thus conserved over multiple independent lineages. Results We do this by quantifying the extent to which certain genomic regions are disrupted repeatedly in independent lineages. Our investigation, based on Human, Chimp, Mouse, Rat, Dog and Chicken, suggests that the propensity of a chromosomal region to break is significantly correlated among independent lineages, even when covariates are considered. Furthermore, the fragile regions are enriched for segmental duplications. Conclusion Based on a novel methodology, our work provides additional support for the existence of fragile regions.

  10. Genome Modeling System: A Knowledge Management Platform for Genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malachi Griffith

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the Genome Modeling System (GMS, an analysis information management system capable of executing automated genome analysis pipelines at a massive scale. The GMS framework provides detailed tracking of samples and data coupled with reliable and repeatable analysis pipelines. The GMS also serves as a platform for bioinformatics development, allowing a large team to collaborate on data analysis, or an individual researcher to leverage the work of others effectively within its data management system. Rather than separating ad-hoc analysis from rigorous, reproducible pipelines, the GMS promotes systematic integration between the two. As a demonstration of the GMS, we performed an integrated analysis of whole genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing data from a breast cancer cell line (HCC1395 and matched lymphoblastoid line (HCC1395BL. These data are available for users to test the software, complete tutorials and develop novel GMS pipeline configurations. The GMS is available at https://github.com/genome/gms.

  11. The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüfer, Kay; Munch, Kasper; Hellmann, Ines; Akagi, Keiko; Miller, Jason R.; Walenz, Brian; Koren, Sergey; Sutton, Granger; Kodira, Chinnappa; Winer, Roger; Knight, James R.; Mullikin, James C.; Meader, Stephen J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Lunter, Gerton; Higashino, Saneyuki; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Karakoç, Emre; Alkan, Can; Sajjadian, Saba; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Ventura, Mario; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E.; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Junhold, Jörg; Patterson, Nick; Siebauer, Michael; Good, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Anne; Ptak, Susan E.; Lachmann, Michael; Symer, David E.; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Two African apes are the closest living relatives of humans: the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the bonobo (Pan paniscus). Although they are similar in many respects, bonobos and chimpanzees differ strikingly in key social and sexual behaviours1–4, and for some of these traits they show more similarity with humans than with each other. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the bonobo genome to study its evolutionary relationship with the chimpanzee and human genomes. We find that more than three per cent of the human genome is more closely related to either the bonobo or the chimpanzee genome than these are to each other. These regions allow various aspects of the ancestry of the two ape species to be reconstructed. In addition, many of the regions that overlap genes may eventually help us understand the genetic basis of phenotypes that humans share with one of the two apes to the exclusion of the other. PMID:22722832

  12. Implementing Genome-Driven Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, David M.; Taylor, Barry S.; Baselga, José

    2017-01-01

    Early successes in identifying and targeting individual oncogenic drivers, together with the increasing feasibility of sequencing tumor genomes, have brought forth the promise of genome-driven oncology care. As we expand the breadth and depth of genomic analyses, the biological and clinical complexity of its implementation will be unparalleled. Challenges include target credentialing and validation, implementing drug combinations, clinical trial designs, targeting tumor heterogeneity, and deploying technologies beyond DNA sequencing, among others. We review how contemporary approaches are tackling these challenges and will ultimately serve as an engine for biological discovery and increase our insight into cancer and its treatment. PMID:28187282

  13. Human genome. 1993 Program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

  14. Capturing prokaryotic dark matter genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Ribière, Céline; Parisot, Nicolas; Beugnot, Réjane; Defois, Clémence; Petit-Biderre, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotes are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth. Most of them, identified by indirect molecular approaches, belong to microbial dark matter. The advent of metagenomic and single-cell genomic approaches has highlighted the metabolic capabilities of numerous members of this dark matter through genome reconstruction. Thus, linking functions back to the species has revolutionized our understanding of how ecosystem function is sustained by the microbial world. This review will present discoveries acquired through the illumination of prokaryotic dark matter genomes by these innovative approaches. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Applied Genomics of Foodborne Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book provides a timely and thorough snapshot into the emerging and fast evolving area of applied genomics of foodborne pathogens. Driven by the drastic advance of whole genome shot gun sequencing (WGS) technologies, genomics applications are becoming increasingly valuable and even essential...... in studying, surveying and controlling foodborne microbial pathogens. The vast opportunities brought by this trend are often at odds with the lack of bioinformatics know-how among food safety and public health professionals, since such expertise is not part of a typical food microbiology curriculum and skill...

  16. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  17. Identification of genomic sites for CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing in the Vitis vinifera genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRISPR/Cas9 has been recently demonstrated as an effective and popular genome editing tool for modifying genomes of human, animals, microorganisms, and plants. Success of such genome editing is highly dependent on the availability of suitable target sites in the genomes to be edited. Many specific t...

  18. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  19. The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium: interfacing genomics and cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium (GCGC) is an international collaborative platform that amalgamates cancer biologists, cutting-edge genomics, and high-throughput expertise with medical oncologists and surgical oncologists; they address the most important translational questions that are central to cancer research and treatment. The annual GCGC symposium was held at the Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer, Mumbai, India, from November 9 to 11, 2011. The symposium showcased international next-generation sequencing efforts that explore cancer-specific transcriptomic changes, single-nucleotide polymorphism, and copy number variations in various types of cancers, as well as the structural genomics approach to develop new therapeutic targets and chemical probes. From the spectrum of studies presented at the symposium, it is evident that the translation of emerging cancer genomics knowledge into clinical applications can only be achieved through the integration of multidisciplinary expertise. In summary, the GCGC symposium provided practical knowledge on structural and cancer genomics approaches, as well as an exclusive platform for focused cancer genomics endeavors. ©2012 AACR.

  20. Do echinoderm genomes measure up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R Andrew; Kudtarkar, Parul; Gordon, Susan M; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A

    2015-08-01

    Echinoderm genome sequences are a corpus of useful information about a clade of animals that serve as research models in fields ranging from marine ecology to cell and developmental biology. Genomic information from echinoids has contributed to insights into the gene interactions that drive the developmental process at the molecular level. Such insights often rely heavily on genomic information and the kinds of questions that can be asked thus depend on the quality of the sequence information. Here we describe the history of echinoderm genomic sequence assembly and present details about the quality of the data obtained. All of the sequence information discussed here is posted on the echinoderm information web system, Echinobase.org. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  2. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  3. Genomic Resources for Cancer Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides links to research resources, complied by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, that may be of interest to genetic epidemiologists conducting cancer research, but is not exhaustive.

  4. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  5. Utilizing linkage disequilibrium information from Indian Genome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Utilizing linkage disequilibrium information from Indian Genome. Variation Database for mapping mutations: SCA12 case study. SAMIRA BAHL1, IKHLAK AHMED2, THE INDIAN GENOME VARIATION CONSORTIUM3 and MITALI MUKERJI1. 1Functional Genomics Unit, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (CSIR), ...

  6. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  7. Whole genome analysis of a Vietnamese trio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-04

    Feb 4, 2015 ... The Ti/Tv ratios are 2.063, 2.064 and 2.063 in the child, father and mother genomes, respectively. The number of detected SNPs in each genome is comparable to those re- ported in other individual genome-wide studies such as. 3,132,608 SNPs in the first Japanese individual genome. (Fujimoto et al.

  8. Genomic instability and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian Streffer

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Cancer, genetic mutations and developmental abnormalities are apparently associated with an increased genomic instability. Such phenomena have been frequently shown in human cancer cells in vitro and in situ. It is also well-known that individuals with a genetic predisposition for cancer proneness, such as ataxia telangiectesia, Fanconi anaemia etc. demonstrate a general high genomic instability e.g. in peripheral lymphocytes before a cancer has developed. Analogous data have been found in mice which develop a specific congenital malformation which has a genetic background. Under these aspects it is of high interest that ionising radiation can increase the genomic instability of mammalian cells after exposures in vitro an in vivo. This phenomenon is expressed 20 to 40 cell cycles after the exposure e.g. by de novo chromosomal aberrations. Such effects have been observed with high and low LET radiation, high LET radiation is more efficient. With low LET radiation a good dose response is observed in the dose range 0.2 to 2.0 Gy, Recently it has been reported that senescence and genomic instability was induced in human fibroblasts after 1 mGy carbon ions (1 in 18 cells are hit), apparently bystander effects also occurred under these conditions. The instability has been shown with DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutation and cell death. It is also transferred to the next generation of mice with respect to gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations and congenital malformations. Several mechanisms have been discussed. The involvement of telomeres has gained interest. Genomic instability seems to be induced by a general lesion to the whole genome. The transmission of one chromosome from an irradiated cell to an non-irradiated cell leads to genomic instability in the untreated cells. Genomic instability increases mutation rates in the affected cells in general. As radiation late effects (cancer, gene mutations and congenital

  9. IS4 family goes genomic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahillon Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insertion sequences (ISs are small, mobile DNA entities able to expand in prokaryotic genomes and trigger important rearrangements. To understand their role in evolution, accurate IS taxonomy is essential. The IS4 family is composed of ~70 elements and, like some other families, displays extremely elevated levels of internal divergence impeding its classification. The increasing availability of complete genome sequences provides a valuable source for the discovery of additional IS4 elements. In this study, this genomic database was used to update the structural and functional definition of the IS4 family. Results A total of 227 IS4-related sequences were collected among more than 500 sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes, representing more than a three fold increase of the initial inventory. A clear division into seven coherent subgroups was discovered as well as three emerging families, which displayed distinct structural and functional properties. The IS4 family was sporadically present in 17 % of analyzed genomes, with most of them displaying single or a small number of IS4 elements. Significant expansions were detected only in some pathogens as well as among certain extremophiles, suggesting the probable involvement of some elements in bacterial and archaeal adaptation and/or evolution. Finally, it should be noted that some IS4 subgroups and two emerging families occurred preferentially in specific phyla or exclusively inside a specific genus. Conclusion The present taxonomic update of IS4 and emerging families will facilitate the classification of future elements as they arise from ongoing genome sequencing. Their narrow genomic impact and the existence of both IS-poor and IS-rich thriving prokaryotes suggested that these families, and probably ISs in general, are occasionally used as a tool for genome flexibility and evolution, rather than just representing self sustaining DNA entities.

  10. GOBASE: an organelle genome database

    OpenAIRE

    O?Brien, Emmet A.; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Eric; Marie, Veronique; Badejoko, Wole; Lang, B. Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2008-01-01

    The organelle genome database GOBASE, now in its 21st release (June 2008), contains all published mitochondrion-encoded sequences (?913 000) and chloroplast-encoded sequences (?250 000) from a wide range of eukaryotic taxa. For all sequences, information on related genes, exons, introns, gene products and taxonomy is available, as well as selected genome maps and RNA secondary structures. Recent major enhancements to database functionality include: (i) addition of an interface for RNA editing...

  11. Functional genomics of probiotic Lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaenhammer, Todd R; Altermann, Eric; Pfeiler, Erika; Buck, Brock Logan; Goh, Yong-Jun; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Duong, Tri

    2008-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used in fermentation processes for millennia. Recent applications such as the use of living cultures as probiotics have significantly increased industrial interest. Related bacterial strains can differ significantly in their genotype and phenotype, and features from one bacterial strain or species cannot necessarily be applied to a related one. These strain or family-specific differences often represent unique and applicable traits. Since 2002, the complete genomes of 13 probiotic LABs have been published. The presentation will discuss these genomes and highlight probiotic traits that are predicted, or functionally linked to genetic content. We have conducted a comparative genomic analysis of 4 completely sequenced Lactobacillus strains versus 25 lactic acid bacterial genomes present in the public database at the time of analysis. Using Differential Blast Analysis, each genome is compared with 3 other Lactobacillus and 25 other LAB genomes. Differential Blast Analysis highlighted strain-specific genes that were not represented in any other LAB used in this analysis and also identified group-specific genes shared within lactobacilli. Lactobacillus-specific genes include mucus-binding proteins involved in cell-adhesion and several transport systems for carbohydrates and amino acids. Comparative genomic analysis has identified gene targets in Lactobacillus acidophilus for functional analysis, including adhesion to mucin and intestinal epithelial cells, acid tolerance, bile tolerance, and quorum sensing. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of L. acidophilus, and isogenic mutants thereof, has revealed the impact of varying conditions (pH, bile, carbohydrates) and food matrices on the expression of genes important to probiotic-linked mechanisms.

  12. Population Genomics of Paramecium Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johri, Parul; Krenek, Sascha; Marinov, Georgi K; Doak, Thomas G; Berendonk, Thomas U; Lynch, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Population-genomic analyses are essential to understanding factors shaping genomic variation and lineage-specific sequence constraints. The dearth of such analyses for unicellular eukaryotes prompted us to assess genomic variation in Paramecium, one of the most well-studied ciliate genera. The Paramecium aurelia complex consists of ∼15 morphologically indistinguishable species that diverged subsequent to two rounds of whole-genome duplications (WGDs, as long as 320 MYA) and possess extremely streamlined genomes. We examine patterns of both nuclear and mitochondrial polymorphism, by sequencing whole genomes of 10-13 worldwide isolates of each of three species belonging to the P. aurelia complex: P. tetraurelia, P. biaurelia, P. sexaurelia, as well as two outgroup species that do not share the WGDs: P. caudatum and P. multimicronucleatum. An apparent absence of global geographic population structure suggests continuous or recent dispersal of Paramecium over long distances. Intergenic regions are highly constrained relative to coding sequences, especially in P. caudatum and P. multimicronucleatum that have shorter intergenic distances. Sequence diversity and divergence are reduced up to ∼100-150 bp both upstream and downstream of genes, suggesting strong constraints imposed by the presence of densely packed regulatory modules. In addition, comparison of sequence variation at non-synonymous and synonymous sites suggests similar recent selective pressures on paralogs within and orthologs across the deeply diverging species. This study presents the first genome-wide population-genomic analysis in ciliates and provides a valuable resource for future studies in evolutionary and functional genetics in Paramecium. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Genome Exploitation and Bioinformatics Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    Bioinformatic tools can greatly improve the efficiency of bacteriocin screening efforts by limiting the amount of strains. Different classes of bacteriocins can be detected in genomes by looking at different features. Finding small bacteriocins can be especially challenging due to low homology and because small open reading frames (ORFs) are often omitted from annotations. In this chapter, several bioinformatic tools/strategies to identify bacteriocins in genomes are discussed.

  14. Plague in the genomic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drancourt, M

    2012-03-01

    With plague being not only a subject of interest for historians, but still a disease of public health concern in several countries, mainly in Africa, there were hopes that analyses of the Yersinia pestis genomes would put an end to this deadly epidemic pathogen. Genomics revealed that Y. pestis isolates evolved from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Central Asia some millennia ago, after the acquisition of two Y. pestis-specific plasmids balanced genomic reduction parallel with the expansion of insertion sequences, illustrating the modern concept that, except for the acquisition of plasmid-borne toxin-encoding genes, the increased virulence of Y. pestis resulted from gene loss rather than gene acquisition. The telluric persistence of Y. pestis reminds us of this close relationship, and matters in terms of plague epidemiology. Whereas biotype Orientalis isolates spread worldwide, the Antiqua and Medievalis isolates showed more limited expansion. In addition to animal ectoparasites, human ectoparasites such as the body louse may have participated in this expansion and in devastating historical epidemics. The recent analysis of a Black Death genome indicated that it was more closely related to the Orientalis branch than to the Medievalis branch. Modern Y. pestis isolates grossly exhibit the same gene content, but still undergo micro-evolution in geographically limited areas by differing in the genome architecture, owing to inversions near insertion sequences and the stabilization of the YpfPhi prophage in Orientalis biotype isolates. Genomics have provided several new molecular tools for the genotyping and phylogeographical tracing of isolates and description of plague foci. However, genomics and post-genomics approaches have not yet provided new tools for the prevention, diagnosis and management of plague patients and the plague epidemics still raging in some sub-Saharan countries. © 2012 The Author. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of

  15. The fishes of Genome 10K

    KAUST Repository

    Bernardi, Giacomo

    2012-09-01

    The Genome 10K project aims to sequence the genomes of 10,000 vertebrates, representing approximately one genome for each vertebrate genus. Since fishes (cartilaginous fishes, ray-finned fishes and lobe-finned fishes) represent more than 50% of extant vertebrates, it is planned to target 4,000 fish genomes. At present, nearly 60 fish genomes are being sequenced at various public funded labs, and under a Genome 10K and BGI pilot project. An additional 100 fishes have been identified for sequencing in the next phase of Genome 10K project. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Packaging the fly genome: domains and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rob

    2012-09-01

    Two independent genomic approaches have recently converged to provide insight into the domain organization of the Drosophila genome. Genome-wide mapping of chromosomal proteins and histone modifications has generated detailed maps of the Drosophila chromatin landscape and has led to the identification of a number of different chromatin states and their distribution in domains across the genome. A remarkably similar domain organization is derived from whole genome mapping of chromatin interactions that reveals the segmentation of the genome into structural domains. This review focuses on our current understanding of this domain architecture which provides a foundation for our understanding of the link between chromatin organization and the dynamic activity of the genome.

  17. Mutational Dynamics of Aroid Chloroplast Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J.; Matthews, Peter J.; Collins, Lesley J.; Hendy, Michael D.; Lockhart, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  18. Rat Genome and Model Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R; Bryda, Elizabeth; Kuramoto, Takashi; Saba, Laura; Dwinell, Melinda

    2017-07-01

    Rats remain a major model for studying disease mechanisms and discovery, validation, and testing of new compounds to improve human health. The rat's value continues to grow as indicated by the more than 1.4 million publications (second to human) at PubMed documenting important discoveries using this model. Advanced sequencing technologies, genome modification techniques, and the development of embryonic stem cell protocols ensure the rat remains an important mammalian model for disease studies. The 2004 release of the reference genome has been followed by the production of complete genomes for more than two dozen individual strains utilizing NextGen sequencing technologies; their analyses have identified over 80 million variants. This explosion in genomic data has been accompanied by the ability to selectively edit the rat genome, leading to hundreds of new strains through multiple technologies. A number of resources have been developed to provide investigators with access to precision rat models, comprehensive datasets, and sophisticated software tools necessary for their research. Those profiled here include the Rat Genome Database, PhenoGen, Gene Editing Rat Resource Center, Rat Resource and Research Center, and the National BioResource Project for the Rat in Japan. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Evolutionary genomics of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Chemical toxins have been a persistent source of evolutionary challenges throughout the history of life, and deep within the genomic storehouse of evolutionary history lay ancient adaptations to diverse chemical poisons. However, the rate of change of contemporary environments mediated by human-introduced pollutants is rapidly screening this storehouse and severely testing the adaptive potential of many species. In this chapter, we briefly review the deep history of evolutionary adaptation to environmental toxins, and then proceed to describe the attributes of stressors and populations that may facilitate contemporary adaptation to pollutants introduced by humans. We highlight that phenotypes derived to enable persistence in polluted habitats may be multi-dimensional, requiring global genome-scale tools and approaches to uncover their mechanistic basis, and include examples of recent progress in the field. The modern tools of genomics offer promise for discovering how pollutants interact with genomes on physiological timescales, and also for discovering what genomic attributes of populations may enable resistance to pollutants over evolutionary timescales. Through integration of these sophisticated genomics tools and approaches with an understanding of the deep historical forces that shaped current populations, a more mature understanding of the mechanistic basis of contemporary ecological-evolutionary dynamics should emerge.

  20. The dynamic genome of Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jarrod A; Kirkness, Ewen F; Simakov, Oleg; Hampson, Steven E; Mitros, Therese; Weinmaier, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Balasubramanian, Prakash G; Borman, Jon; Busam, Dana; Disbennett, Kathryn; Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Sumin, Nadezhda; Sutton, Granger G; Viswanathan, Lakshmi Devi; Walenz, Brian; Goodstein, David M; Hellsten, Uffe; Kawashima, Takeshi; Prochnik, Simon E; Putnam, Nicholas H; Shu, Shengquiang; Blumberg, Bruce; Dana, Catherine E; Gee, Lydia; Kibler, Dennis F; Law, Lee; Lindgens, Dirk; Martinez, Daniel E; Peng, Jisong; Wigge, Philip A; Bertulat, Bianca; Guder, Corina; Nakamura, Yukio; Ozbek, Suat; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Khalturin, Konstantin; Hemmrich, Georg; Franke, André; Augustin, René; Fraune, Sebastian; Hayakawa, Eisuke; Hayakawa, Shiho; Hirose, Mamiko; Hwang, Jung Shan; Ikeo, Kazuho; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Ogura, Atshushi; Takahashi, Toshio; Steinmetz, Patrick R H; Zhang, Xiaoming; Aufschnaiter, Roland; Eder, Marie-Kristin; Gorny, Anne-Kathrin; Salvenmoser, Willi; Heimberg, Alysha M; Wheeler, Benjamin M; Peterson, Kevin J; Böttger, Angelika; Tischler, Patrick; Wolf, Alexander; Gojobori, Takashi; Remington, Karin A; Strausberg, Robert L; Venter, J Craig; Technau, Ulrich; Hobmayer, Bert; Bosch, Thomas C G; Holstein, Thomas W; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Bode, Hans R; David, Charles N; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Steele, Robert E

    2010-03-25

    The freshwater cnidarian Hydra was first described in 1702 and has been the object of study for 300 years. Experimental studies of Hydra between 1736 and 1744 culminated in the discovery of asexual reproduction of an animal by budding, the first description of regeneration in an animal, and successful transplantation of tissue between animals. Today, Hydra is an important model for studies of axial patterning, stem cell biology and regeneration. Here we report the genome of Hydra magnipapillata and compare it to the genomes of the anthozoan Nematostella vectensis and other animals. The Hydra genome has been shaped by bursts of transposable element expansion, horizontal gene transfer, trans-splicing, and simplification of gene structure and gene content that parallel simplification of the Hydra life cycle. We also report the sequence of the genome of a novel bacterium stably associated with H. magnipapillata. Comparisons of the Hydra genome to the genomes of other animals shed light on the evolution of epithelia, contractile tissues, developmentally regulated transcription factors, the Spemann-Mangold organizer, pluripotency genes and the neuromuscular junction.

  1. Human genomics: implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasi, P

    1997-01-01

    Human genome research which tries to map and sequence all the 3 billion nucleotides in the entire DNA is progressing rapidly. Completion of the human genome sequencing is expected before the year 2005. Human genes, totalling 50,000-100,000, will be identified, allowing the complete set of proteins--'the proteome' to be known. This together with genomic research in other species will lead to complete understanding of life at the molecular level and also its evolutionary history of 3,500 million years. Genomics will bring about a revolution in biology and health, because it is equivalent to having a 'Biological Periodic Table' which is a foundation for understanding life, health, disease and for deriving of new tools for diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention. Human genomics will give rise to Predictive--Preventive Medicine and Precision Medicine. It will have profound social implications. Preparation for the future is needed for societies to cope with and make proper use of the tremendous changes to be brought about by genomics.

  2. A Genome-Wide Perspective on Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, Alexander; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    number of technologies that can be used to obtain genome-wide insight into how genomes are reprogrammed during development and in response to specific external signals. By applying such technologies, we have begun to reveal the cross-talk between metabolism and the genome, i.e., how genomes...... are reprogrammed in response to metabolites, and how the regulation of metabolic networks is coordinated at the genomic level....

  3. HGVA: the Human Genome Variation Archive

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Javier; Coll, Jacobo; Haimel, Matthias; Kandasamy, Swaathi; Tarraga, Joaquin; Furio-Tari, Pedro; Bari, Wasim; Bleda, Marta; Rueda, Antonio; Gr?f, Stefan; Rendon, Augusto; Dopazo, Joaquin; Medina, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract High-profile genomic variation projects like the 1000 Genomes project or the Exome Aggregation Consortium, are generating a wealth of human genomic variation knowledge which can be used as an essential reference for identifying disease-causing genotypes. However, accessing these data, contrasting the various studies and integrating those data in downstream analyses remains cumbersome. The Human Genome Variation Archive (HGVA) tackles these challenges and facilitates access to genomic...

  4. Genomics of ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gethin P; Brown, Matthew A

    2010-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is the prototypic and most prevalent and debilitating spondyloarthropathy, a group of arthritides where the spine and pelvis are specifically targeted. Unlike many other forms of arthritis in which joint damage is mediated through tissue destruction, in AS uncontrolled bone formation occurs, frequently resulting in joint fusion and consequently significant disability. It is estimated that there are 2.4 million spondyloarthritis sufferers in the U.S., twice as many as rheumatoid arthritis. The pathogenesis of AS is very poorly understood and both genetics and gene expression profiling approaches have been utilized to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and pathways that drive the disease. Using powerful genome-wide association study approaches a number of candidate genes have been found to be associated with AS. However, although such approaches can identify genes that can contribute to the disease process, they do not inform us of the actual changes in gene/cell activity at any point in the disease process. Expression profiling allows us to take a "snapshot" of cellular activity and what gene activity changes are underlying those changes. A number of expression profiling studies have been undertaken in AS, looking at both circulating cells and tissues from affected joints. The results to date have been somewhat disappointing with little consensus on gene activity changes due to the low power of the studies undertaken. Some more recent better powered studies have identified diagnostic expression profiles that do point to a possible role for expression profiling in early AS diagnosis. Future studies will require collaborative approaches to target specific disease stages and sites with larger numbers of samples.

  5. A dictionary based informational genome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellini Alberto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the post-genomic era several methods of computational genomics are emerging to understand how the whole information is structured within genomes. Literature of last five years accounts for several alignment-free methods, arisen as alternative metrics for dissimilarity of biological sequences. Among the others, recent approaches are based on empirical frequencies of DNA k-mers in whole genomes. Results Any set of words (factors occurring in a genome provides a genomic dictionary. About sixty genomes were analyzed by means of informational indexes based on genomic dictionaries, where a systemic view replaces a local sequence analysis. A software prototype applying a methodology here outlined carried out some computations on genomic data. We computed informational indexes, built the genomic dictionaries with different sizes, along with frequency distributions. The software performed three main tasks: computation of informational indexes, storage of these in a database, index analysis and visualization. The validation was done by investigating genomes of various organisms. A systematic analysis of genomic repeats of several lengths, which is of vivid interest in biology (for example to compute excessively represented functional sequences, such as promoters, was discussed, and suggested a method to define synthetic genetic networks. Conclusions We introduced a methodology based on dictionaries, and an efficient motif-finding software application for comparative genomics. This approach could be extended along many investigation lines, namely exported in other contexts of computational genomics, as a basis for discrimination of genomic pathologies.

  6. The Genomic Code: Genome Evolution and Potential Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Bernardi, Giorgio

    2016-01-25

    The genome of metazoans is organized according to a genomic code which comprises three laws: 1) Compositional correlations hold between contiguous coding and non-coding sequences, as well as among the three codon positions of protein-coding genes; these correlations are the consequence of the fact that the genomes under consideration consist of fairly homogeneous, long (≥200Kb) sequences, the isochores; 2) Although isochores are defined on the basis of purely compositional properties, GC levels of isochores are correlated with all tested structural and functional properties of the genome; 3) GC levels of isochores are correlated with chromosome architecture from interphase to metaphase; in the case of interphase the correlation concerns isochores and the three-dimensional “topological associated domains” (TADs); in the case of mitotic chromosomes, the correlation concerns isochores and chromosomal bands. Finally, the genomic code is the fourth and last pillar of molecular biology, the first three pillars being 1) the double helix structure of DNA; 2) the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes; and 3) the genetic code.

  7. Genome sequencing and population genomics in non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies are revolutionizing the life sciences. The past 12 months have seen a burst of genome sequences from non-model organisms, in each case representing a fundamental source of data of significant importance to biological research. This has bearing on several aspects of evolutionary biology, and we are now beginning to see patterns emerging from these studies. These include significant heterogeneity in the rate of recombination that affects adaptive evolution and base composition, the role of population size in adaptive evolution, and the importance of expansion of gene families in lineage-specific adaptation. Moreover, resequencing of population samples (population genomics) has enabled the identification of the genetic basis of critical phenotypes and cast light on the landscape of genomic divergence during speciation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Human Genome Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Myers; Lane Conn

    2000-05-01

    The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field

  9. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  10. Genomic selection in maritime pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Fikret; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Farjat, Alfredo; Chancerel, Emilie; Raffin, Annie; Sanchez, Leopoldo; Plomion, Christophe; Bouffier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    A two-generation maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) breeding population (n=661) was genotyped using 2500 SNP markers. The extent of linkage disequilibrium and utility of genomic selection for growth and stem straightness improvement were investigated. The overall intra-chromosomal linkage disequilibrium was r(2)=0.01. Linkage disequilibrium corrected for genomic relationships derived from markers was smaller (rV(2)=0.006). Genomic BLUP, Bayesian ridge regression and Bayesian LASSO regression statistical models were used to obtain genomic estimated breeding values. Two validation methods (random sampling 50% of the population and 10% of the progeny generation as validation sets) were used with 100 replications. The average predictive ability across statistical models and validation methods was about 0.49 for stem sweep, and 0.47 and 0.43 for total height and tree diameter, respectively. The sensitivity analysis suggested that prior densities (variance explained by markers) had little or no discernible effect on posterior means (residual variance) in Bayesian prediction models. Sampling from the progeny generation for model validation increased the predictive ability of markers for tree diameter and stem sweep but not for total height. The results are promising despite low linkage disequilibrium and low marker coverage of the genome (∼1.39 markers/cM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The genome of Chenopodium quinoa

    KAUST Repository

    Jarvis, David Erwin

    2017-02-08

    Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is a highly nutritious grain identified as an important crop to improve world food security. Unfortunately, few resources are available to facilitate its genetic improvement. Here we report the assembly of a high-quality, chromosome-scale reference genome sequence for quinoa, which was produced using single-molecule real-time sequencing in combination with optical, chromosome-contact and genetic maps. We also report the sequencing of two diploids from the ancestral gene pools of quinoa, which enables the identification of sub-genomes in quinoa, and reduced-coverage genome sequences for 22 other samples of the allotetraploid goosefoot complex. The genome sequence facilitated the identification of the transcription factor likely to control the production of anti-nutritional triterpenoid saponins found in quinoa seeds, including a mutation that appears to cause alternative splicing and a premature stop codon in sweet quinoa strains. These genomic resources are an important first step towards the genetic improvement of quinoa.

  12. Comparative genomics for biodiversity conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Grueber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic approaches are gathering momentum in biology and emerging opportunities lie in the creative use of comparative molecular methods for revealing the processes that influence diversity of wildlife. However, few comparative genomic studies are performed with explicit and specific objectives to aid conservation of wild populations. Here I provide a brief overview of comparative genomic approaches that offer specific benefits to biodiversity conservation. Because conservation examples are few, I draw on research from other areas to demonstrate how comparing genomic data across taxa may be used to inform the characterisation of conservation units and studies of hybridisation, as well as studies that provide conservation outcomes from a better understanding of the drivers of divergence. A comparative approach can also provide valuable insight into the threatening processes that impact rare species, such as emerging diseases and their management in conservation. In addition to these opportunities, I note areas where additional research is warranted. Overall, comparing and contrasting the genomic composition of threatened and other species provide several useful tools for helping to preserve the molecular biodiversity of the global ecosystem.

  13. Genomic disorders on chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shihui; Graf, William D; Shprintzen, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Chromosome 22, the first human chromosome to be completely sequenced, is prone to genomic alterations. Copy-number variants (CNVs) are common because of an enrichment of low-copy repeat sequences that precipitate a high frequency of nonallelic homologous misalignments and unequal recombination during meiosis. Among these is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans and the most common microdeletion syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and DiGeorge syndrome. This review will focus on the recent literature dealing with both the molecular and clinical aspects of chromosome 22 genomic variations. Although the literature covering this area is expansive, the majority is descriptive or analytical of the problems presented by these genomic disorders, and there is little evidence of translational research including treatment outcomes. With the increased use of microarray analysis in both research and clinical practice, variations in CNVs are becoming elucidated. Genomic analysis continues to characterize genes and gene effect. Research on the COMT gene continues to yield interesting findings, including a possible sex-mediated effect because of its regulatory role with estrogen. There is a small amount of treatment outcome data relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders in VCFS, but based on small samples and short-term follow-up. Although hundreds of studies in the past year have focused on genomic disorders of chromosome 22, little progress has been made in the implementation of translational research, even for more common disorders including VCFS.

  14. The genome of Chenopodium quinoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, David E; Ho, Yung Shwen; Lightfoot, Damien J; Schmöckel, Sandra M; Li, Bo; Borm, Theo J A; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Michell, Craig T; Saber, Noha; Kharbatia, Najeh M; Rupper, Ryan R; Sharp, Aaron R; Dally, Nadine; Boughton, Berin A; Woo, Yong H; Gao, Ge; Schijlen, Elio G W M; Guo, Xiujie; Momin, Afaque A; Negrão, Sónia; Al-Babili, Salim; Gehring, Christoph; Roessner, Ute; Jung, Christian; Murphy, Kevin; Arold, Stefan T; Gojobori, Takashi; Linden, C Gerard van der; van Loo, Eibertus N; Jellen, Eric N; Maughan, Peter J; Tester, Mark

    2017-02-16

    Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is a highly nutritious grain identified as an important crop to improve world food security. Unfortunately, few resources are available to facilitate its genetic improvement. Here we report the assembly of a high-quality, chromosome-scale reference genome sequence for quinoa, which was produced using single-molecule real-time sequencing in combination with optical, chromosome-contact and genetic maps. We also report the sequencing of two diploids from the ancestral gene pools of quinoa, which enables the identification of sub-genomes in quinoa, and reduced-coverage genome sequences for 22 other samples of the allotetraploid goosefoot complex. The genome sequence facilitated the identification of the transcription factor likely to control the production of anti-nutritional triterpenoid saponins found in quinoa seeds, including a mutation that appears to cause alternative splicing and a premature stop codon in sweet quinoa strains. These genomic resources are an important first step towards the genetic improvement of quinoa.

  15. Manipulating duckweed through genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vunsh, R; Heinig, U; Malitsky, S; Aharoni, A; Avidov, A; Lerner, A; Edelman, M

    2015-01-01

    Significant inter- and intraspecific genetic variation exists in duckweed, thus the potential for genome plasticity and manipulation is high. Polyploidy is recognised as a major mechanism of adaptation and speciation in plants. We produced several genome-duplicated lines of Landoltia punctata (Spirodela oligorrhiza) from both whole plants and regenerating explants using a colchicine-based cocktail. These lines stably maintained an enlarged frond and root morphology. DNA ploidy levels determined by florescence-activated cell sorting indicated genome duplication. Line A4 was analysed after 75 biomass doublings. Frond area, fresh and dry weights, rhizoid number and length were significantly increased versus wild type, while the growth rate was unchanged. This resulted in accumulation of biomass 17-20% faster in the A4 plants. We sought to determine if specific differences in gene products are found in the genome duplicated lines. Non-targeted ultra performance LC-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry was employed to compare some of the lines and the wild type to seek identification of up-regulated metabolites. We putatively identified differential metabolites in Line A65 as caffeoyl hexoses. The combination of directed genome duplication and metabolic profiling might offer a path for producing stable gene expression, leading to altered production of secondary metabolites. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Genomic composition factors affect codon usage in porcine genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khobondo, J O; Okeno, Tobias O; Kahi, A K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the codon usage bias in the porcine genome and decipher its determinants. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of codon bias, the coding sequence (CDS) from the swine reference sequence (ssc10.2) was extracted using Biomart. An in house built Perl...... script was used to derive various genomic traits and codon indices. Analysis was done using R statistical package, and correlations and multivariate regressions were performed. We report the existence of codon usage bias that might suggest existence of weak translational selection. The codon bias...

  17. A physical map of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, J.D.; Marra, M.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R.H.; Chinwalla, A.; Wallis, J.; Sekhon, M.; Wylie, K.; Mardis, E.R.; Wilson, R.K.; Fulton, R.; Kucaba, T.A.; Wagner-McPherson, C.; Barbazuk, W.B.; Gregory, S.G.; Humphray, S.J.; French, L.; Evans, R.S.; Bethel, G.; Whittaker, A.; Holden, J.L.; McCann, O.T.; Dunham, A.; Soderlund, C.; Scott, C.E.; Bentley, D.R.; Schuler, G.; Chen, H.-C.; Jang, W.; Green, E.D.; Idol, J.R.; Maduro, V.V. Braden; Montgomery, K.T.; Lee, E.; Miller, A.; Emerling, S.; Kucherlapati; Gibbs, R.; Scherer, S.; Gorrell, J.H.; Sodergren, E.; Clerc-Blankenburg, K.; Tabor, P.; Naylor, S.; Garcia, D.; de Jong, P.J.; Catanese, J.J.; Nowak, N.; Osoegawa, K.; Qin, S.; Rowen, L.; Madan, A.; Dors, M.; Hood, L.; Trask, B.; Friedman, C.; Massa, H.; Cheung, V.G.; Kirsch, I.R.; Reid, T.; Yonescu, R.; Weissenbach, J.; Bruls, T.; Heilig, R.; Branscomb, E.; Olsen, A.; Doggett, N.; Cheng, J.F.; Hawkins, T.; Myers, R.M.; Shang, J.; Ramirez, L.; Schmutz, J.; Velasquez, O.; Dixon, K.; Stone, N.E.; Cox, D.R.; Haussler, D.; Kent, W.J.; Furey, T.; Rogic, S.; Kennedy, S.; Jones, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Wen, G.; Schilhabel, M.; Gloeckner, G.; Nyakatura, G.; Siebert, R.; Schlegelberger, B.; Korenberg, J.; Chen, X.N.; Fujiyama, A.; Hattori, M.; Toyoda, A.; Yada, T.; Park, H.S.; Sakaki, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Asakawa, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Sasaki, T.; Shintani, A.; Shimizu, A.; Shibuya, K.; Kudoh, J.; Minoshima, S.; Ramser, J.; Seranski, P.; Hoff, C.; Poustka, A.; Reinhardt, R.; Lehrach, H.

    2001-01-01

    The human genome is by far the largest genome to be sequenced, and its size and complexity present many challenges for sequence assembly. The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium constructed a map of the whole genome to enable the selection of clones for sequencing and for the accurate assembly of the genome sequence. Here we report the construction of the whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) map and its integration with previous landmark maps and information from mapping efforts focused on specific chromosomal regions. We also describe the integration of sequence data with the map.

  18. Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

  19. Explosives, Genomics, and the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran C. O’Doherty

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RDX is an explosive that is also a neurotoxin and implicated in adverse health outcomes. Because of its widespread use in military and civilian operations, there is growing concern about potential environmental and health implications. One promising method of bioremediation involves genomic studies of soil microbes. These health concerns and technological issues intersect with social and political dimensions raising questions about public responses to genomic technologies and the degree of environmental accounting expected from the military. In cases of novel technologies entering into contested social spaces, public engagement can be useful to inform broader policy debates. Building on previous work, in this article, we outline the rationale, methods, and results of a public deliberation on these issues. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on the issues of RDX pollution and microbial genomics, and thus provides an important baseline on public sentiment on these issues.

  20. The genome of Theobroma cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argout, Xavier; Salse, Jerome; Aury, Jean-Marc; Guiltinan, Mark J; Droc, Gaetan; Gouzy, Jerome; Allegre, Mathilde; Chaparro, Cristian; Legavre, Thierry; Maximova, Siela N; Abrouk, Michael; Murat, Florent; Fouet, Olivier; Poulain, Julie; Ruiz, Manuel; Roguet, Yolande; Rodier-Goud, Maguy; Barbosa-Neto, Jose Fernandes; Sabot, Francois; Kudrna, Dave; Ammiraju, Jetty Siva S; Schuster, Stephan C; Carlson, John E; Sallet, Erika; Schiex, Thomas; Dievart, Anne; Kramer, Melissa; Gelley, Laura; Shi, Zi; Bérard, Aurélie; Viot, Christopher; Boccara, Michel; Risterucci, Ange Marie; Guignon, Valentin; Sabau, Xavier; Axtell, Michael J; Ma, Zhaorong; Zhang, Yufan; Brown, Spencer; Bourge, Mickael; Golser, Wolfgang; Song, Xiang; Clement, Didier; Rivallan, Ronan; Tahi, Mathias; Akaza, Joseph Moroh; Pitollat, Bertrand; Gramacho, Karina; D'Hont, Angélique; Brunel, Dominique; Infante, Diogenes; Kebe, Ismael; Costet, Pierre; Wing, Rod; McCombie, W Richard; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Quetier, Francis; Panaud, Olivier; Wincker, Patrick; Bocs, Stephanie; Lanaud, Claire

    2011-02-01

    We sequenced and assembled the draft genome of Theobroma cacao, an economically important tropical-fruit tree crop that is the source of chocolate. This assembly corresponds to 76% of the estimated genome size and contains almost all previously described genes, with 82% of these genes anchored on the 10 T. cacao chromosomes. Analysis of this sequence information highlighted specific expansion of some gene families during evolution, for example, flavonoid-related genes. It also provides a major source of candidate genes for T. cacao improvement. Based on the inferred paleohistory of the T. cacao genome, we propose an evolutionary scenario whereby the ten T. cacao chromosomes were shaped from an ancestor through eleven chromosome fusions.

  1. Genomics, medicine and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Trbovich

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Public health genomics unifies the scientific disciplines of genetics and public health. Public health genomics aims to facilitate the transfer of newly acquired knowledge in genetic and molecular biology into classical medicine, to evaluate the currently available genetic tests, and to educate both the medical community and the general population about advancements in molecular and cell biology of medical interest. Due to various factors, the application of new genetic discoveries in classical medicine and the evaluation of the current genetic clinical tests occur at relatively slow paste. The challenge of public health genomics is to create the most effective modus for coexistence of new molecular and cell biology discoveries and classical medical techniques in applied medicine. The ultimate goal is to accomplish a truly individualized medical therapy.

  2. Genomic imprinting in farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiuchun Cindy

    2014-02-01

    The mouse is the first species in which genomic imprinting was studied. Imprinting research in farm species has lagged behind owing to a lack of sequencing and genetic background information, as well as long generation intervals and high costs in tissue collection. Since the creation of Dolly, the first cloned mammal from an adult sheep, studies on genomic imprinting in domestic species have accelerated because animals from cloning and other assisted reproductive technologies exhibit phenotypes of imprinting disruptions. Although this review focuses on new developments in farm animals, most of the imprinting mechanism information was derived from the mouse.

  3. Genomic Signals of Reoriented ORFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dan Cristea

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex representation of nucleotides is used to convert DNA sequences into complex digital genomic signals. The analysis of the cumulated phase and unwrapped phase of DNA genomic signals reveals large-scale features of eukaryote and prokaryote chromosomes that result from statistical regularities of base and base-pair distributions along DNA strands. By reorienting the chromosome coding regions, a “hidden” linear variation of the cumulated phase has been revealed, along with the conspicuous almost linear variation of the unwrapped phase. A model of chromosome longitudinal structure is inferred on these bases.

  4. Easyfig: a genome comparison visualizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mitchell J; Petty, Nicola K; Beatson, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    Easyfig is a Python application for creating linear comparison figures of multiple genomic loci with an easy-to-use graphical user interface. BLAST comparisons between multiple genomic regions, ranging from single genes to whole prokaryote chromosomes, can be generated, visualized and interactively coloured, enabling a rapid transition between analysis and the preparation of publication quality figures. Easyfig is freely available (under a GPL license) for download (for Mac OS X, Unix and Microsoft Windows) from the SourceForge web site: http://easyfig.sourceforge.net/.

  5. Fungal genomics beyond Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious...... that the application of the existing methods of genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis to other fungi has enormous potential, especially for the production of food and food ingredients. The developments in the past year demonstrate that we have only just started to exploit this potential....

  6. Genome editing comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Genome editing harnesses programmable nucleases to cut and paste genetic information in a targeted manner in living cells and organisms. Here, I review the development of programmable nucleases, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL (transcription-activator-like) effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR (cluster of regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs). I specifically highlight the key advances that set the foundation for the rapid and widespread implementation of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing approaches that has revolutionized the field.

  7. Genomic composition factors affect codon usage in porcine genome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the codon usage bias in the porcine genome and decipher its determinants. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of codon bias, the coding sequence (CDS) from the swine reference sequence (ssc10.2) was extracted using Biomart. An in house built Perl script was used to ...

  8. [Nutritional genomics: an approach to the genome-environment interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xacur-García, Fiona; Castillo-Quan, Jorge I; Hernández-Escalante, Víctor M; Laviada-Molina, Hugo

    2008-11-01

    Nutritional genomics forms part of the genomic sciences and addresses the interaction between genes and the human diet, its influence on metabolism and subsequent susceptibility to develop common diseases. It encompasses both nutrigenomics, which explores the effects of nutrients on the genome, proteome and metabolome; and nutrigenetics, that explores the effects of genetic variations on the diet/disease interaction. A number of mechanisms drive the gene/diet interaction: elements in the diet can act as links for transcription factor receptors and after intermediary concentrations, thereby modifying chromatin and impacting genetic regulation; affect signal pathways, regulating phosphorylation of tyrosine in receptors; decrease signaling through the inositol pathway; and act through epigenetic mechanisms, silencing DNA fragments by methylation of cytosine. The signals generated by polyunsaturated fatty acids are so powerful that they can even bypass insulin mediated lipogenesis, stimulated by carbohydrates. Some fatty acids modify the expression of genes that participate in fatty acid transport by lipoproteins. Nutritional genomics has myriad possible therapeutic and preventive applications: in patients with enzymatic deficiencies; in those with a genetic predisposition to complex diseases such as dyslipidemia, diabetes and cancer; in those that already suffer these diseases; in those with altered mood or memory; during the aging process; in pregnant women; and as a preventive measure in the healthy population.

  9. Genomic composition factors affect codon usage in porcine genome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    j.khobondo

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... expression of target genes in vivo or in vitro and improve the accuracy of gene prediction from genomic sequences thus maximizing ... These biological breakthroughs revealed the importance of studying the degeneracy of ... diversity, gene expression and evolution, and adaptation to micro environment.

  10. Enhancing the genome editing toolbox: genome wide CRISPR arrayed libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Strong, Alex; Iyer, Vivek; Hodgkins, Alex; Tzelepis, Konstantinos; Antunes, Liliana; Friedrich, Mathias J; Kang, Qiaohua; Davidson, Teresa; Lamberth, Jacob; Hoffmann, Christina; Davis, Gregory D; Vassiliou, George S; Skarnes, William C; Bradley, Allan

    2017-05-22

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has accelerated biological research becoming routine for many laboratories. It is rapidly replacing conventional gene editing techniques and has high utility for both genome-wide and gene-focussed applications. Here we present the first individually cloned CRISPR-Cas9 genome wide arrayed sgRNA libraries covering 17,166 human and 20,430 mouse genes at a complexity of 34,332 sgRNAs for human and 40,860 sgRNAs for the mouse genome. For flexibility in generating stable cell lines the sgRNAs have been cloned in a lentivirus backbone containing PiggyBac transposase recognition elements together with fluorescent and drug selection markers. Over 95% of tested sgRNA induced specific DNA cleavage as measured by CEL-1 assays. Furthermore, sgRNA targeting GPI anchor protein pathway genes induced loss of function mutations in human and mouse cell lines measured by FLAER labelling. These arrayed libraries offer the prospect for performing screens on individual genes, combinations as well as larger gene sets. They also facilitate rapid deconvolution of signals from genome-wide screens. This set of vectors provide an organized comprehensive gene editing toolbox of considerable scientific value.

  11. The Phaeodactylum genome reveals the evolutionary history of diatom genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bowler, Ch.; Allen, A. E.; Badger, J. H.; Grimwood, J.; Jabbari, K.; Kuo, A.; Maheswari, U.; Martens, C.; Maumus, F.; Otillar, R. P.; Rayko, E.; Salamov, A.; Vandepoele, K.; Beszteri, B.; Gruber, A.; Heijde, M.; Katinka, M.; Mock, T.; Valentin, K.; Verret, F.; Berges, J. A.; Brownlee, C.; Cadoret, J.-P.; Chiovitti, A.; Choi, Ch. J.; Coesel, S.; De Martino, A.; Detter, J. Ch.; Durkin, C.; Falciatore, A.; Fournet, J.; Haruta, M.; Huysman, M. J. J.; Jenkins, B. D.; Jiroutová, Kateřina; Jorgensen, R. E.; Joubert, Y.; Kaplan, A.; Kröger, N.; Kroth, P. G.; La Roche, J.; Lindquist, E.; Lommer, M.; Martin–Jézéquel, V.; Lopez, P. J.; Lucas, S.; Mangogna, M.; McGinnis, K.; Medlin, L. K.; Montsant, A.; Oudot–Le Secq, M.-P.; Napoli, C.; Oborník, Miroslav; Schnitzler Parker, M.; Petit, J.-L.; Porcel, B. M.; Poulsen, N.; Robison, M.; Rychlewski, L.; Rynearson, T. A.; Schmutz, J.; Shapiro, H.; Siaut, M.; Stanley, M.; Sussman, M. R.; Taylor, A. R.; Vardi, A.; von Dassow, P.; Vyverman, W.; Willis, A.; Wyrwicz, L. S.; Rokhsar, D. S.; Weissenbach, J.; Armbrust, E. V.; Green, B. R.; Van de Peer, Y.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 456, 13-11-2008 (2008), s. 239-244 ISSN 0028-0836 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Phaeodactylum * genome * evolution * diatom Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 31.434, year: 2008

  12. Genome surfing as driver of microbial genomic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Historical changes in population size, such as those caused by demographic range expansions, can produce nonadaptive changes in genomic diversity through mechanisms such as gene surfing. We propose that demographic range expansion of a microbial population capable of horizontal gene exchange can res...

  13. An Exploration into Fern Genome Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Paul G; Sessa, Emily B; Marchant, Daniel Blaine; Li, Fay-Wei; Rothfels, Carl J; Sigel, Erin M; Gitzendanner, Matthew A; Visger, Clayton J; Banks, Jo Ann; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Pryer, Kathleen M; Der, Joshua P

    2015-08-26

    Ferns are one of the few remaining major clades of land plants for which a complete genome sequence is lacking. Knowledge of genome space in ferns will enable broad-scale comparative analyses of land plant genes and genomes, provide insights into genome evolution across green plants, and shed light on genetic and genomic features that characterize ferns, such as their high chromosome numbers and large genome sizes. As part of an initial exploration into fern genome space, we used a whole genome shotgun sequencing approach to obtain low-density coverage (∼0.4X to 2X) for six fern species from the Polypodiales (Ceratopteris, Pteridium, Polypodium, Cystopteris), Cyatheales (Plagiogyria), and Gleicheniales (Dipteris). We explore these data to characterize the proportion of the nuclear genome represented by repetitive sequences (including DNA transposons, retrotransposons, ribosomal DNA, and simple repeats) and protein-coding genes, and to extract chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences. Such initial sweeps of fern genomes can provide information useful for selecting a promising candidate fern species for whole genome sequencing. We also describe variation of genomic traits across our sample and highlight some differences and similarities in repeat structure between ferns and seed plants. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Genome Size Dynamics and Evolution in Monocots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia J. Leitch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocot genomic diversity includes striking variation at many levels. This paper compares various genomic characters (e.g., range of chromosome numbers and ploidy levels, occurrence of endopolyploidy, GC content, chromosome packaging and organization, genome size between monocots and the remaining angiosperms to discern just how distinctive monocot genomes are. One of the most notable features of monocots is their wide range and diversity of genome sizes, including the species with the largest genome so far reported in plants. This genomic character is analysed in greater detail, within a phylogenetic context. By surveying available genome size and chromosome data it is apparent that different monocot orders follow distinctive modes of genome size and chromosome evolution. Further insights into genome size-evolution and dynamics were obtained using statistical modelling approaches to reconstruct the ancestral genome size at key nodes across the monocot phylogenetic tree. Such approaches reveal that while the ancestral genome size of all monocots was small (1C=1.9 pg, there have been several major increases and decreases during monocot evolution. In addition, notable increases in the rates of genome size-evolution were found in Asparagales and Poales compared with other monocot lineages.

  15. Challenges to genome sequence dissection in sweetpotato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Sachiko; Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    The development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has enabled the determination of whole genome sequences in many non-model plant species. However, genome sequencing in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) is still difficult because of the hexaploid genome structure. Previous studies suggested that a diploid wild relative, I. trifida (H.B.K.) Don., is the most possible ancestor of sweetpotato. Therefore, the genetic and genomic features of I. trifida have been studied as a potential reference for sweetpotato. Meanwhile, several research groups have begun the challenging task of directly sequencing the sweetpotato genome. In this manuscript, we review the recent results and activities of large-scale genome and transcriptome analysis related to genome sequence dissection in sweetpotato under the sections as follows: I. trifida genome and transcript sequencing, genome sequences of I. nil (Japanese morning glory), transcript sequences in sweetpotato, chloroplast sequences, transposable elements and transfer DNA. The recent international activities of de novo whole genome sequencing in sweetpotato are also described. The large-scale publically available genome and transcript sequence resources and the international genome sequencing streams are expected to promote the genome sequence dissection in sweetpotato. PMID:28465666

  16. Burkholderia pseudomallei genome plasticity associated with genomic island variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currie Bart J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling saprophyte and the cause of melioidosis. Horizontal gene transfer contributes to the genetic diversity of this pathogen and may be an important determinant of virulence potential. The genome contains genomic island (GI regions that encode a broad array of functions. Although there is some evidence for the variable distribution of genomic islands in B. pseudomallei isolates, little is known about the extent of variation between related strains or their association with disease or environmental survival. Results Five islands from B. pseudomallei strain K96243 were chosen as representatives of different types of genomic islands present in this strain, and their presence investigated in other B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis of 10 B. pseudomallei genome sequences provided evidence for the variable presence of these regions, together with micro-evolutionary changes that generate GI diversity. The diversity of GIs in 186 isolates from NE Thailand (83 environmental and 103 clinical isolates was investigated using multiplex PCR screening. The proportion of all isolates positive by PCR ranged from 12% for a prophage-like island (GI 9, to 76% for a metabolic island (GI 16. The presence of each of the five GIs did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p > 0.05 for all five islands. The cumulative number of GIs per isolate for the 186 isolates ranged from 0 to 5 (median 2, IQR 1 to 3. The distribution of cumulative GI number did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p = 0.27. The presence of GIs was defined for the three largest clones in this collection (each defined as a single sequence type, ST, by multilocus sequence typing; these were ST 70 (n = 15 isolates, ST 54 (n = 11, and ST 167 (n = 9. The rapid loss and/or acquisition of gene islands was observed within individual clones. Comparisons were drawn between isolates obtained

  17. RsaM: a transcriptional regulator of Burkholderia spp. with novel fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalska, Karolina [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Chhor, Gekleng [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Clancy, Shonda [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Jedrzejczak, Robert [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Babnigg, Gyorgy [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Winans, Stephen C. [Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca NY USA; Joachimiak, Andrzej [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Structural Biology Center, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, IL USA

    2014-07-04

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a set of closely related bacterial species that are notorious pathogens of cystic fibrosis patients, responsible for life-threatening lung infections. Expression of several virulence factors of Bcc is controlled by a mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). QS is a means of bacterial communication used to coordinate gene expression in a cell-density-dependent manner. The system involves the production of diffusible signaling molecules (N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones, AHLs), that bind to cognate transcriptional regulators and influence their ability to regulate gene expression. One such system that is highly conserved in Bcc consists of CepI and CepR. CepI is AHL synthase, while CepR is an AHL-dependent transcription factor. In most members of the Bcc group, the cepI and cepR genes are divergently transcribed and separated by additional genes. One of them, bcam1869, encodes the BcRsaM protein, which was recently postulated to modulate the abundance or activity of CepI or CepR. Here we show the crystal structure of BcRsaM from B. cenocepacia J2315. It is a single-domain protein with unique topology and presents a novel fold. The protein is a dimer in the crystal and in solution. This regulator has no known DNA binding motifs and direct binding of BcRsaM to the cepI promoter could not be detected in in vitro assays. Therefore, we propose that the modulatory action of RsaM might result from interactions with other components of the QS machinery rather than from direct association with the DNA promoter.

  18. Advancing Eucalyptus Genomics: Cytogenomics Reveals Conservation of Eucalyptus Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Teresa; Barrela, Ricardo M.; Bergès, Hélène; Marques, Cristina; Loureiro, João; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor; Paiva, Jorge A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Eucalyptus encloses several species with high ecological and economic value, being the subgenus Symphyomyrtus one of the most important. Species such as E. grandis and E. globulus are well characterized at the molecular level but knowledge regarding genome and chromosome organization is very scarce. Here we characterized and compared the karyotypes of three economically important species, E. grandis, E. globulus, and E. calmadulensis, and three with ecological relevance, E. pulverulenta, E. cornuta, and E. occidentalis, through an integrative approach including genome size estimation, fluorochrome banding, rDNA FISH, and BAC landing comprising genes involved in lignin biosynthesis. All karyotypes show a high degree of conservation with pericentromeric 35S and 5S rDNA loci in the first and third pairs, respectively. GC-rich heterochromatin was restricted to the 35S rDNA locus while the AT-rich heterochromatin pattern was species-specific. The slight differences in karyotype formulas and distribution of AT-rich heterochromatin, along with genome sizes estimations, support the idea of Eucalyptus genome evolution by local expansions of heterochromatin clusters. The unusual co-localization of both rDNA with AT-rich heterochromatin was attributed mainly to the presence of silent transposable elements in those loci. The cinnamoyl CoA reductase gene (CCR1) previously assessed to linkage group 10 (LG10) was clearly localized distally at the long arm of chromosome 9 establishing an unexpected correlation between the cytogenetic chromosome 9 and the LG10. Our work is novel and contributes to the understanding of Eucalyptus genome organization which is essential to develop successful advanced breeding strategies for this genus. PMID:27148332

  19. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute’s genomic medicine portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual’s genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of “Genomic Medicine Meetings,” under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and diffficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI’s genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so. PMID:27612677

  20. Genome size variation in the genus Avena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Honghai; Martin, Sara L; Bekele, Wubishet A; Latta, Robert G; Diederichsen, Axel; Peng, Yuanying; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2016-03-01

    Genome size is an indicator of evolutionary distance and a metric for genome characterization. Here, we report accurate estimates of genome size in 99 accessions from 26 species of Avena. We demonstrate that the average genome size of C genome diploid species (2C = 10.26 pg) is 15% larger than that of A genome species (2C = 8.95 pg), and that this difference likely accounts for a progression of size among tetraploid species, where AB Avena have experienced genome downsizing in relation to their diploid progenitors. Genome size measurements could provide additional quality control for species identification in germplasm collections, especially in cases where diploid and polyploid species have similar morphology.

  1. Strategies and tools for whole genome alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couronne, Olivier; Poliakov, Alexander; Bray, Nicolas; Ishkhanov,Tigran; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Rubin, Edward; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna

    2002-11-25

    The availability of the assembled mouse genome makespossible, for the first time, an alignment and comparison of two largevertebrate genomes. We have investigated different strategies ofalignment for the subsequent analysis of conservation of genomes that areeffective for different quality assemblies. These strategies were appliedto the comparison of the working draft of the human genome with the MouseGenome Sequencing Consortium assembly, as well as other intermediatemouse assemblies. Our methods are fast and the resulting alignmentsexhibit a high degree of sensitivity, covering more than 90 percent ofknown coding exons in the human genome. We have obtained such coveragewhile preserving specificity. With a view towards the end user, we havedeveloped a suite of tools and websites for automatically aligning, andsubsequently browsing and working with whole genome comparisons. Wedescribe the use of these tools to identify conserved non-coding regionsbetween the human and mouse genomes, some of which have not beenidentified by other methods.

  2. V-GAP: Viral genome assembly pipeline

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Yoji

    2015-10-22

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed the rapid determination of the complete genomes of many organisms. Although shotgun sequences from large genome organisms are still difficult to reconstruct perfect contigs each of which represents a full chromosome, those from small genomes have been assembled successfully into a very small number of contigs. In this study, we show that shotgun reads from phage genomes can be reconstructed into a single contig by controlling the number of read sequences used in de novo assembly. We have developed a pipeline to assemble small viral genomes with good reliability using a resampling method from shotgun data. This pipeline, named V-GAP (Viral Genome Assembly Pipeline), will contribute to the rapid genome typing of viruses, which are highly divergent, and thus will meet the increasing need for viral genome comparisons in metagenomic studies.

  3. Gramene database: navigating plant comparative genomics resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramene (http://www.gramene.org) is an online, open source, curated resource for plant comparative genomics and pathway analysis designed to support researchers working in plant genomics, breeding, evolutionary biology, system biology, and metabolic engineering. It exploits phylogenetic relationship...

  4. India, Genomic diversity & Disease susceptibility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. India, Genomic diversity & Disease susceptibility · India, a paradise for Genetic Studies · Involved in earlier stages of Immune response protecting us from Diseases, Responsible for kidney and other transplant rejections Inherited from our parents · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7.

  5. The genome of a songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Wesley C.; Clayton, David F.; Ellegren, Hans; Arnold, Arthur P.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Künstner, Axel; Searle, Steve; White, Simon; Vilella, Albert J.; Fairley, Susan; Heger, Andreas; Kong, Lesheng; Ponting, Chris P.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Mello, Claudio V.; Minx, Pat; Lovell, Peter; Velho, Tarciso A. F.; Ferris, Margaret; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Sinha, Saurabh; Blatti, Charles; London, Sarah E.; Li, Yun; Lin, Ya-Chi; George, Julia; Sweedler, Jonathan; Southey, Bruce; Gunaratne, Preethi; Watson, Michael; Nam, Kiwoong; Backström, Niclas; Smeds, Linnea; Nabholz, Benoit; Itoh, Yuichiro; Whitney, Osceola; Pfenning, Andreas R.; Howard, Jason; Völker, Martin; Skinner, Bejamin M.; Griffin, Darren K.; Ye, Liang; McLaren, William M.; Flicek, Paul; Quesada, Victor; Velasco, Gloria; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Puente, Xose S.; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Smit, Arian F. A.; Hubley, Robert; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Batzer, Mark A.; Gu, Wanjun; Pollock, David D.; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Eichler, Evan E.; Stapley, Jessica; Slate, Jon; Ekblom, Robert; Birkhead, Tim; Burke, Terry; Burt, David; Scharff, Constance; Adam, Iris; Richard, Hugues; Sultan, Marc; Soldatov, Alexey; Lehrach, Hans; Edwards, Scott V.; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Li, XiaoChing; Graves, Tina; Fulton, Lucinda; Nelson, Joanne; Chinwalla, Asif; Hou, Shunfeng; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    The zebra finch is an important model organism in several fields1,2 with unique relevance to human neuroscience3,4. Like other songbirds, the zebra finch communicates through learned vocalizations, an ability otherwise documented only in humans and a few other animals and lacking in the chicken5—the only bird with a sequenced genome until now6. Here we present a structural, functional and comparative analysis of the genome sequence of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), which is a songbird belonging to the large avian order Passeriformes7. We find that the overall structures of the genomes are similar in zebra finch and chicken, but they differ in many intrachromosomal rearrangements, lineage-specific gene family expansions, the number of long-terminal-repeat-based retrotransposons, and mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation. We show that song behaviour engages gene regulatory networks in the zebra finch brain, altering the expression of long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, transcription factors and their targets. We also show evidence for rapid molecular evolution in the songbird lineage of genes that are regulated during song experience. These results indicate an active involvement of the genome in neural processes underlying vocal communication and identify potential genetic substrates for the evolution and regulation of this behaviour. PMID:20360741

  6. Genome position and gene amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsová, Pavla; Snijders, A.M.; Kwek, S.; Roydasgupta, R.; Fridlyand, J.; Tokuyasu, T.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2007), r120 ISSN 1474-760X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * array comparative genomic hybridization * oncogene Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.589, year: 2007

  7. Fungal genome resources at NCBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbertse, B.; Tatusova, T.

    2011-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is well known for the nucleotide sequence archive, GenBank and sequence analysis tool BLAST. However, NCBI integrates many types of biomolecular data from variety of sources and makes it available to the scientific community as interactive web resources as well as organized releases of bulk data. These tools are available to explore and compare fungal genomes. Searching all databases with Fungi [organism] at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ is the quickest way to find resources of interest with fungal entries. Some tools though are resources specific and can be indirectly accessed from a particular database in the Entrez system. These include graphical viewers and comparative analysis tools such as TaxPlot, TaxMap and UniGene DDD (found via UniGene Homepage). Gene and BioProject pages also serve as portals to external data such as community annotation websites, BioGrid and UniProt. There are many different ways of accessing genomic data at NCBI. Depending on the focus and goal of research projects or the level of interest, a user would select a particular route for accessing genomic databases and resources. This review article describes methods of accessing fungal genome data and provides examples that illustrate the use of analysis tools. PMID:22737589

  8. Scalable Computing for Evolutionary Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.C.P.; Belhachemi, D.; Möller, S.; Smant, G.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic data analysis in evolutionary biology is becoming so computationally intensive that analysis of multiple hypotheses and scenarios takes too long on a single desktop computer. In this chapter, we discuss techniques for scaling computations through parallelization of calculations, after giving

  9. Ecological Genomics of Marine Picocyanobacteria†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, D. J.; Ostrowski, M.; Mazard, S.; Dufresne, A.; Garczarek, L.; Hess, W. R.; Post, A. F.; Hagemann, M.; Paulsen, I.; Partensky, F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Marine picocyanobacteria of the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus numerically dominate the picophytoplankton of the world ocean, making a key contribution to global primary production. Prochlorococcus was isolated around 20 years ago and is probably the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth. The genus comprises specific ecotypes which are phylogenetically distinct and differ markedly in their photophysiology, allowing growth over a broad range of light and nutrient conditions within the 45°N to 40°S latitudinal belt that they occupy. Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus are closely related, together forming a discrete picophytoplankton clade, but are distinguishable by their possession of dissimilar light-harvesting apparatuses and differences in cell size and elemental composition. Synechococcus strains have a ubiquitous oceanic distribution compared to that of Prochlorococcus strains and are characterized by phylogenetically discrete lineages with a wide range of pigmentation. In this review, we put our current knowledge of marine picocyanobacterial genomics into an environmental context and present previously unpublished genomic information arising from extensive genomic comparisons in order to provide insights into the adaptations of these marine microbes to their environment and how they are reflected at the genomic level. PMID:19487728

  10. Biclustering Sparse Binary Genomic Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Uitert, M.; Meuleman, W.; Wessels, L.F.A.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic datasets often consist of large, binary, sparse data matrices. In such a dataset, one is often interested in finding contiguous blocks that (mostly) contain ones. This is a biclustering problem, and while many algorithms have been proposed to deal with gene expression data, only two

  11. Genomic Heritability: What Is It?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Sorensen, Daniel; Gianola, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome regression methods are being increasingly used for the analysis and prediction of complex traits and diseases. In human genetics, these methods are commonly used for inferences about genetic parameters, such as the amount of genetic variance among individuals or the proportion of phe...

  12. Bioinformatica ten behoeve van genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings JLA; Hoebee B; TOX

    2007-01-01

    Sinds enkele jaren wordt op het RIVM genomicsonderzoek uitgevoerd. Genomics omvat grootschalig onderzoek naar het erfelijk materiaal (DNA) van organismen. Dit onderzoek levert inzicht op in de manier waarop erfelijke eigenschappen zich vertalen naar het functioneren van een cel, en uiteindelijk

  13. Nutritional genomics and personalized diet

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nagwa E.A. Gaboon

    Nutritional genomics. Abstract Nutritional genetics is considered as the combination of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics. Nutrigenomics is establishing the .... on the knowledge of nutritional requirements, nutritional status, and genotype (i.e., person- alized nutrition) can be used to prevent, mitigate, or cure chronic disease. 3.

  14. The genome of Chenopodium quinoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarvis, D.E.; Shwen Ho, Yung; Lightfoot, Damien J.; Schmöckel, Sandra M.; Li, Bo; Borm, T.J.A.; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Mitchell, Craig T.; Saber, Noha; Kharbatia, Najeh M.; Rupper, Ryan R.; Sharp, Aaron R.; Dally, Nadine; Boughton, Berin A.; Woo, Yong H.; Gao, Ge; Schijlen, E.G.W.M.; Guo, Xiujie; Momin, Afaque A.; Negräo, Sónia; Al-Babili, Salim; Gehring, Christoph; Roessner, Ute; Jung, Christian; Murphy, Kevin; Arold, Stefan T.; Gojobori, Takashi; Linden, van der C.G.; Loo, van E.N.; Jellen, Eric N.; Maughan, Peter J.; Tester, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is a highly nutritious grain identified as an important crop to improve world food security. Unfortunately, few resources are available to facilitate its genetic improvement. Here we report the assembly of a high-quality, chromosome-scale reference genome sequence for

  15. Searching and Indexing Genomic Databases via Kernelization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis eGagie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advance of DNA sequencing technologies has yielded databases of thousands of genomes. To search and index these databases effectively, it is important that we take advantage of the similarity between those genomes. Several authors have recently suggested searching or indexing only one reference genome and the parts of the other genomes where they differ. In this paper we survey the twenty-year history of this idea and discuss its relation to kernelization in parameterized complexity.

  16. Searching and Indexing Genomic Databases via Kernelization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagie, Travis; Puglisi, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advance of DNA sequencing technologies has yielded databases of thousands of genomes. To search and index these databases effectively, it is important that we take advantage of the similarity between those genomes. Several authors have recently suggested searching or indexing only one reference genome and the parts of the other genomes where they differ. In this paper, we survey the 20-year history of this idea and discuss its relation to kernelization in parameterized complexity.

  17. Genomics-assisted breeding in fruit trees

    OpenAIRE

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Minamikawa, Mai F.; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Ishimori, Motoyuki; Hayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomic analysis technologies have opened up new avenues to promote the efficiency of plant breeding. Novel genomics-based approaches for plant breeding and genetics research, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and genomic selection (GS), are useful, especially in fruit tree breeding. The breeding of fruit trees is hindered by their long generation time, large plant size, long juvenile phase, and the necessity to wait for the physiological maturity of the pl...

  18. GRAbB : Selective Assembly of Genomic Regions, a New Niche for Genomic Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brankovics, Balázs; Zhang, Hao; van Diepeningen, Anne D; van der Lee, Theo A J; Waalwijk, Cees; de Hoog, G Sybren

    GRAbB (Genomic Region Assembly by Baiting) is a new program that is dedicated to assemble specific genomic regions from NGS data. This approach is especially useful when dealing with multi copy regions, such as mitochondrial genome and the rDNA repeat region, parts of the genome that are often

  19. Genomic Organization of Leishmania Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kazemi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania is a protozoan parasite belonging to the family Trypanosomatidae, which is found among 88 different countries. The parasite lives as an amastigote in vertebrate macro­phages and as a promastigote in the digestive tract of sand fly. It can be cultured in the laboratory us­ing appropriate culture media. Although the sexual cycle of Leishmania has not been observed during the promastigote and amastigote stages, it has been reported by some researchers. Leishma­nia has eukaryotic cell organization. Cell culture is convenient and cost effective, and because posttranslational modifications are common processes in the cultured cells, the cells are used as hosts for preparing eukaryotic recombinant proteins for research. Several transcripts of rDNA in the Leishmania genome are suitable regions for conducting gene transfer. Old World Leishmania spp. has 36 chromosomes, while New World Leishmania spp. has 34 or 35 chromo­somes. The genomic organization and parasitic characteristics have been investigated. Leishmania spp. has a unique genomic organization among eukaryotes; the genes do not have introns, and the chromosomes are smaller with larger numbers of genes confined to a smaller space within the nucleus. Leishmania spp. genes are organized on one or both DNA strands and are transcribed as polycistronic (prokaryotic-like transcripts from undefined promoters. Regulation of gene expres­sion in the members of Trypanosomatidae differs from that in other eukaryotes. The trans-splic­ing phenomenon is a necessary step for mRNA processing in lower eukaryotes and is observed in Leishmania spp. Another particular feature of RNA editing in Leishmania spp. is that mitochon­drial genes encoding respiratory enzymes are edited and transcribed. This review will discuss the chromosomal and mitochondrial (kinetoplast genomes of Leishmania spp. as well as the phenome­non of RNA editing in the kinetoplast genome.

  20. International network of cancer genome projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudson, Thomas J.; Anderson, Warwick; Aretz, Axel; Barker, Anna D.; Bell, Cindy; Bernabé, Rosa R.; Bhan, M. K.; Calvo, Fabien; Eerola, Iiro; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Guttmacher, Alan; Guyer, Mark; Hemsley, Fiona M.; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Kerr, David; Klatt, Peter; Kolar, Patrik; Kusuda, Jun; Lane, David P.; Laplace, Frank; Lu, Youyong; Nettekoven, Gerd; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Rao, T. S.; Remacle, Jacques; Schafer, Alan J.; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Stratton, Michael R.; Vockley, Joseph G.; Watanabe, Koichi; Yang, Huanming; Yuen, Matthew M. F.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Bobrow, Martin; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dressler, Lynn G.; Dyke, Stephanie O. M.; Joly, Yann; Kato, Kazuto; Kennedy, Karen L.; Nicolás, Pilar; Parker, Michael J.; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Wallace, Susan; Wiesner, Georgia L.; Zeps, Nikolajs; Lichter, Peter; Biankin, Andrew V.; Chabannon, Christian; Chin, Lynda; Clément, Bruno; de Alava, Enrique; Degos, Françoise; Ferguson, Martin L.; Geary, Peter; Hayes, D. Neil; Johns, Amber L.; Kasprzyk, Arek; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Penny, Robert; Piris, Miguel A.; Sarin, Rajiv; Scarpa, Aldo; van de Vijver, Marc; Futreal, P. Andrew; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Bayés, Mónica; Bowtell, David D. L.; Campbell, Peter J.; Estivill, Xavier; Grimmond, Sean M.; Gut, Ivo; Hirst, Martin; López-Otín, Carlos; Majumder, Partha; Marra, Marco; McPherson, John D.; Ning, Zemin; Puente, Xose S.; Ruan, Yijun; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Swerdlow, Harold; Velculescu, Victor E.; Wilson, Richard K.; Xue, Hong H.; Yang, Liu; Spellman, Paul T.; Bader, Gary D.; Boutros, Paul C.; Flicek, Paul; Getz, Gad; Guigó, Roderic; Guo, Guangwu; Haussler, David; Heath, Simon; Hubbard, Tim J.; Jiang, Tao; Jones, Steven M.; Li, Qibin; López-Bigas, Nuria; Luo, Ruibang; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Ouellette, B. F. Francis; Pearson, John V.; Quesada, Victor; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Sander, Chris; Speed, Terence P.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Valencia, Alfonso; Wheeler, David A.; Wu, Honglong; Zhao, Shancen; Zhou, Guangyu; Lathrop, Mark; Thomas, Gilles; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Axton, Myles; Gunter, Chris; Miller, Linda J.; Zhang, Junjun; Haider, Syed A.; Wang, Jianxin; Yung, Christina K.; Cross, Anthony; Liang, Yong; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Guberman, Jonathan; Hsu, Jack; Chalmers, Don R. C.; Hasel, Karl W.; Kaan, Terry S. H.; Lowrance, William W.; Masui, Tohru; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Vergely, Catherine; Cloonan, Nicole; Defazio, Anna; Eshleman, James R.; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Gardiner, Brooke A.; Kench, James G.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Waddell, Nicola J.; Wilson, Peter J.; Gallinger, Steve; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; DePinho, Ronald A.; Thayer, Sarah; Shazand, Kamran; Beck, Timothy; Sam, Michelle; Timms, Lee; Ballin, Vanessa; Ji, Jiafu; Zhang, Xiuqing; Chen, Feng; Hu, Xueda; Yang, Qi; Tian, Geng; Zhang, Lianhai; Xing, Xiaofang; Li, Xianghong; Zhu, Zhenggang; Yu, Yingyan; Yu, Jun; Tost, Jörg; Brennan, Paul; Holcatova, Ivana; Zaridze, David; Brazma, Alvis; Egevad, Lars; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Banks, Rosamonde Elizabeth; Uhlén, Mathias; Viksna, Juris; Ponten, Fredrik; Skryabin, Konstantin; Birney, Ewan; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Foekens, John A.; Martin, Sancha; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Sotiriou, Christos; van't Veer, Laura; Birnbaum, Daniel; Blanche, Hélène; Boucher, Pascal; Boyault, Sandrine; Masson-Jacquemier, Jocelyne D.; Pauporté, Iris; Pivot, Xavier; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tabone, Eric; Theillet, Charles; Treilleux, Isabelle; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Decaens, Thomas; Franco, Dominique; Gut, Marta; Samuel, Didier; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Eils, Roland; Brors, Benedikt; Korbel, Jan O.; Korshunov, Andrey; Landgraf, Pablo; Lehrach, Hans; Pfister, Stefan; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Reifenberger, Guido; Taylor, Michael D.; von Kalle, Christof; Majumder, Partha P.; Pederzoli, Paolo; Lawlor, Rita T.; Delledonne, Massimo; Bardelli, Alberto; Gress, Thomas; Klimstra, David; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nakamura, Yusuke; Miyano, Satoru; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Campo, Elias; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Montserrat, Emili; González-Díaz, Marcos; Jares, Pedro; Himmelbaue, Heinz; Bea, Silvia; Aparicio, Samuel; Easton, Douglas F.; Collins, Francis S.; Compton, Carolyn C.; Lander, Eric S.; Burke, Wylie; Green, Anthony R.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kallioniemi, Olli P.; Ley, Timothy J.; Liu, Edison T.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2010-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) was launched to coordinate large-scale cancer genome studies in tumours from 50 different cancer types and/or subtypes that are of clinical and societal importance across the globe. Systematic studies of more than 25,000 cancer genomes at the

  1. Genomic management of animal genetic diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbroek, Kor

    2017-01-01

    Recently developed genomic tools, like SNP-genotyping and whole genome sequencing, and their analysis, offer great opportunities for the conservation and utilisation of animal genetic diversity, both among and within breeds. These genomic tools can be used to detect potentially valuable rare alleles

  2. The UCSC Genome Browser Database: update 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, A S; Karolchik, D; Baertsch, R

    2006-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database (GBD) contains sequence and annotation data for the genomes of about a dozen vertebrate species and several major model organisms. Genome annotations typically include assembly data, sequence composition, genes and gene predictions, ...

  3. Intron size and genome size in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Wendel; R. Cronn; I. Alvarez; B. Liu; R. Small; D. Senchina

    2002-01-01

    It has long been known that genomes vary over a remarkable range of sizes in both plants (Bennett, Cox, and Leitch 1997) and animals (Gregory 2001). It also has become evident that across the broad phylogenetic sweep, genome size may be correlated with intron size (Deutsch and Long 1999; Vinogradov 1999; McLysaght et al. 2000), suggesting that some component of genome...

  4. Leaner and meaner genomes in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David

    2006-01-01

    A 'better' Escherichia coli K-12 genome has recently been engineered in which about 15% of the genome has been removed by planned deletions. Comparison with related bacterial genomes that have undergone a natural reduction in size suggests that there is plenty of scope for yet more deletions....

  5. Accounting for discovery bias in genomic EPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomics has contributed substantially to genetic improvement of beef cattle. The implementation is through computation of genomically enhanced expected progeny differences (GE-EPD), which are predictions of genetic merit of individual animals based on genomic information, pedigree, and data on the ...

  6. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Odontamblyopus rubicundus (Perciformes: Gobiidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis. Tianxing Liu, Xiaoxiao Jin, Rixin Wang and Tianjun Xu. J. Genet. 92, 423–432. Figure 1. Gene map of O. rubicundus mitochondrial genome.

  7. Impact of genomics on microbial food safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abee, T.; Schaik, van W.; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Genome sequences are now available for many of the microbes that cause food-borne diseases. The information contained in pathogen genome sequences, together with the development of themed and whole-genome DNA microarrays and improved proteomics techniques, might provide tools for the rapid detection

  8. Overcoming Barriers to Progress in Exercise Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Claude

    2011-01-01

    This commentary focuses on the issues of statistical power, the usefulness of hypothesis-free approaches such as in genome-wide association explorations, the necessity of expanding the research beyond common DNA variants, the advantage of combining transcriptomics with genomics, and the complexities inherent to the search for links between genotype and phenotype in exercise genomics research. PMID:21697717

  9. Comparative Genome Analysis in the Integrated Microbial Genomes(IMG) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Markowitz, Victor M.

    2006-03-01

    Comparative genome analysis is critical for the effectiveexploration of a rapidly growing number of complete and draft sequencesfor microbial genomes. The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system(img.jgi.doe.gov) has been developed as a community resource thatprovides support for comparative analysis of microbial genomes in anintegrated context. IMG allows users to navigate the multidimensionalmicrobial genome data space and focus their analysis on a subset ofgenes, genomes, and functions of interest. IMG provides graphicalviewers, summaries and occurrence profile tools for comparing genes,pathways and functions (terms) across specific genomes. Genes can befurther examined using gene neighborhoods and compared with sequencealignment tools.

  10. Personal genomes in progress: from the human genome project to the personal genome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunshof, Jeantine E; Bobe, Jason; Aach, John; Angrist, Misha; Thakuria, Joseph V; Vorhaus, Daniel B; Hoehe, Margret R; Church, George M

    2010-01-01

    The cost of a diploid human genome sequence has dropped from about $70M to $2000 since 2007--even as the standards for redundancy have increased from 7x to 40x in order to improve call rates. Coupled with the low return on investment for common single-nucleotide polylmorphisms, this has caused a significant rise in interest in correlating genome sequences with comprehensive environmental and trait data (GET). The cost of electronic health records, imaging, and microbial, immunological, and behavioral data are also dropping quickly. Sharing such integrated GET datasets and their interpretations with a diversity of researchers and research subjects highlights the need for informed-consent models capable of addressing novel privacy and other issues, as well as for flexible data-sharing resources that make materials and data available with minimum restrictions on use. This article examines the Personal Genome Project's effort to develop a GET database as a public genomics resource broadly accessible to both researchers and research participants, while pursuing the highest standards in research ethics.

  11. Public health genomics: origins and basic concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Zimmern

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and technologies arising from the Human Genome Project promise in time to offer new opportunities for the treatment and prevention of disease. The enterprise of public health genomics aims to bridge the gap between advances in basic research and their responsible and effective implementation in clinical services and public health programmes. Public health genomics stresses the importance of understanding how genes and environment act together to influence health; avoiding genetic exceptionalism; appreciating the social and political context of genomic advances; and encouraging critical evaluation of proposed new tests and interventions. New international networks and collaborations are being established to develop public health genomics and further its aims.

  12. Comparison of 61 Sequenced Escherichia coli Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Wassenaar, T. M.; Ussery, David

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important component of the biosphere and is an ideal model for studies of processes involved in bacterial genome evolution. Sixty-one publically available E. coli and Shigella spp. sequenced genomes are compared, using basic methods to produce phylogenetic and proteomics......% of the pan-genome and about 80% of a typical genome; some of these variable genes tend to be co-localized on genomic islands. The diversity within the species E. coli, and the overlap in gene content between this and related species, suggests a continuum rather than sharp species borders in this group...

  13. Prospects for Genomic Research in Forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Krutovsky

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Conifers are keystone species of boreal forests. Their whole genome sequencing, assembly and annotation will allow us to understand the evolution of the complex ancient giant conifer genomes that are 4 times larger in larch and 7–9 times larger in pines than the human genome. Genomic studies will allow also to obtain important whole genome sequence data and develop highly polymorphic and informative genetic markers, such as microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that can be efficiently used in timber origin identification, for genetic variation monitoring, to study local and climate change adaptation and in tree improvement and conservation programs.

  14. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Michael; Huber, Wolfgang; Pagès, Hervé; Aboyoun, Patrick; Carlson, Marc; Gentleman, Robert; Morgan, Martin T; Carey, Vincent J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  15. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  16. The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kültz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2011-02-04

    This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

  17. Genomic alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in ovarian endometriomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Veiga-Castelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a complex and multifactorial disease. Chromosomal imbalance screening in endometriotic tissue can be used to detect hot-spot regions in the search for a possible genetic marker for endometriosis. The objective of the present study was to detect chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH in ectopic tissue samples from ovarian endometriomas and eutopic tissue from the same patients. We evaluated 10 ovarian endometriotic tissues and 10 eutopic endometrial tissues by metaphase CGH. CGH was prepared with normal and test DNA enzymatically digested, ligated to adaptors and amplified by PCR. A second PCR was performed for DNA labeling. Equal amounts of both normal and test-labeled DNA were hybridized in human normal metaphases. The Isis FISH Imaging System V 5.0 software was used for chromosome analysis. In both eutopic and ectopic groups, 4/10 samples presented chromosomal alterations, mainly chromosomal gains. CGH identified 11q12.3-q13.1, 17p11.1-p12, 17q25.3-qter, and 19p as critical regions. Genomic imbalances in 11q, 17p, 17q, and 19p were detected in normal eutopic and/or ectopic endometrium from women with ovarian endometriosis. These regions contain genes such as POLR2G, MXRA7 and UBA52 involved in biological processes that may lead to the establishment and maintenance of endometriotic implants. This genomic imbalance may affect genes in which dysregulation impacts both eutopic and ectopic endometrium.

  18. Fungal Genomics for Energy and Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 200 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  19. Genome Improvement at JGI-HAGSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2012-03-03

    Since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has rapidly expanded its scientific goals in several DOE mission-relevant areas. At the JGI-HAGSC, we have kept pace with this rapid expansion of projects with our focus on assessing, assembling, improving and finishing eukaryotic whole genome shotgun (WGS) projects for which the shotgun sequence is generated at the Production Genomic Facility (JGI-PGF). We follow this by combining the draft WGS with genomic resources generated at JGI-HAGSC or in collaborator laboratories (including BAC end sequences, genetic maps and FLcDNA sequences) to produce an improved draft sequence. For eukaryotic genomes important to the DOE mission, we then add further information from directed experiments to produce reference genomic sequences that are publicly available for any scientific researcher. Also, we have continued our program for producing BAC-based finished sequence, both for adding information to JGI genome projects and for small BAC-based sequencing projects proposed through any of the JGI sequencing programs. We have now built our computational expertise in WGS assembly and analysis and have moved eukaryotic genome assembly from the JGI-PGF to JGI-HAGSC. We have concentrated our assembly development work on large plant genomes and complex fungal and algal genomes.

  20. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  1. Snake Genome Sequencing: Results and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald M. I. Kerkkamp

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Snake genome sequencing is in its infancy—very much behind the progress made in sequencing the genomes of humans, model organisms and pathogens relevant to biomedical research, and agricultural species. We provide here an overview of some of the snake genome projects in progress, and discuss the biological findings, with special emphasis on toxinology, from the small number of draft snake genomes already published. We discuss the future of snake genomics, pointing out that new sequencing technologies will help overcome the problem of repetitive sequences in assembling snake genomes. Genome sequences are also likely to be valuable in examining the clustering of toxin genes on the chromosomes, in designing recombinant antivenoms and in studying the epigenetic regulation of toxin gene expression.

  2. Snake Genome Sequencing: Results and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkkamp, Harald M I; Kini, R Manjunatha; Pospelov, Alexey S; Vonk, Freek J; Henkel, Christiaan V; Richardson, Michael K

    2016-12-01

    Snake genome sequencing is in its infancy-very much behind the progress made in sequencing the genomes of humans, model organisms and pathogens relevant to biomedical research, and agricultural species. We provide here an overview of some of the snake genome projects in progress, and discuss the biological findings, with special emphasis on toxinology, from the small number of draft snake genomes already published. We discuss the future of snake genomics, pointing out that new sequencing technologies will help overcome the problem of repetitive sequences in assembling snake genomes. Genome sequences are also likely to be valuable in examining the clustering of toxin genes on the chromosomes, in designing recombinant antivenoms and in studying the epigenetic regulation of toxin gene expression.

  3. Initiating genomic selection in tetraploid potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Elsa; Janss, Luc; Byrne, Stephen

    , the completion of the genome sequence of potato has enabled the application of genomics-assisted breeding technologies. Genomic selection using genome-wide molecular markers is becoming increasingly applicable to crops as the genotyping costs continue to reduce and it is thus an attractive breeding alternative...... for six agronomical important traits for the entire population. We have generated statistical models for genomic prediction and have obtained relatively high predictive power with absolute accuracies of 74%, 56%, 54%, and 21% for starch content, chipping quality, late blight resistance, and yield...... different from the ones expected to be present in the validation population. We are currently expanding the training set for a better calibration of the prediction model. Taken together, our results suggest that genomic prediction of complex traits, and hence selection of breeding material by genomic...

  4. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. RESULTS: Assemblies...... of the BAC clone derived genome sequence have been annotated using the Pre-Ensembl and Ensembl automated pipelines and made accessible through the Pre-Ensembl/Ensembl browsers. The current annotated genome assembly (Sscrofa9) was released with Ensembl 56 in September 2009. A revised assembly (Sscrofa10......) is under construction and will incorporate whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS) data providing > 30x genome coverage. The WGS sequence, most of which comprise short Illumina/Solexa reads, were generated from DNA from the same single Duroc sow as the source of the BAC library from which clones were...

  5. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  6. Genome Organization Drives Chromosome Fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Andres; Maman, Yaakov; Jung, Seolkyoung; Wong, Nancy; Callen, Elsa; Day, Amanda; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Zhang, Hongliang; Rao, Suhas S P; Huang, Su-Chen; Mckinnon, Peter J; Aplan, Peter D; Pommier, Yves; Aiden, Erez Lieberman; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, André

    2017-07-27

    In this study, we show that evolutionarily conserved chromosome loop anchors bound by CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin are vulnerable to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) mediated by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B). Polymorphisms in the genome that redistribute CTCF/cohesin occupancy rewire DNA cleavage sites to novel loop anchors. While transcription- and replication-coupled genomic rearrangements have been well documented, we demonstrate that DSBs formed at loop anchors are largely transcription-, replication-, and cell-type-independent. DSBs are continuously formed throughout interphase, are enriched on both sides of strong topological domain borders, and frequently occur at breakpoint clusters commonly translocated in cancer. Thus, loop anchors serve as fragile sites that generate DSBs and chromosomal rearrangements. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  8. One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Tighe, Damon; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lapidus, Alla; Wu, Dongying; McCutcheon, John P.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Moran, Nancy A.; Bristow, James; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-04-26

    While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200?900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  9. One bacterial cell, one complete genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Woyke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200-900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA. Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  10. Population Genomics of Human Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping technologies have facilitated genome-wide scans for natural selection. Identification of targets of natural selection will shed light on processes of human adaptation and evolution and could be important for identifying variation that influences both normal human phenotypic variation as well as disease susceptibility. Here we focus on studies of natural selection in modern humans who originated ~200,000 years go in Africa and migrated across the globe ~50,000 – 1...

  11. Microbial genomes: Blueprints for life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Relman, David A.; Strauss, Evelyn

    2000-12-31

    Complete microbial genome sequences hold the promise of profound new insights into microbial pathogenesis, evolution, diagnostics, and therapeutics. From these insights will come a new foundation for understanding the evolution of single-celled life, as well as the evolution of more complex life forms. This report is an in-depth analysis of scientific issues that provides recommendations and will be widely disseminated to the scientific community, federal agencies, industry and the public.

  12. Parallel processing of genomics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapito, Giuseppe; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2016-10-01

    The availability of high-throughput experimental platforms for the analysis of biological samples, such as mass spectrometry, microarrays and Next Generation Sequencing, have made possible to analyze a whole genome in a single experiment. Such platforms produce an enormous volume of data per single experiment, thus the analysis of this enormous flow of data poses several challenges in term of data storage, preprocessing, and analysis. To face those issues, efficient, possibly parallel, bioinformatics software needs to be used to preprocess and analyze data, for instance to highlight genetic variation associated with complex diseases. In this paper we present a parallel algorithm for the parallel preprocessing and statistical analysis of genomics data, able to face high dimension of data and resulting in good response time. The proposed system is able to find statistically significant biological markers able to discriminate classes of patients that respond to drugs in different ways. Experiments performed on real and synthetic genomic datasets show good speed-up and scalability.

  13. Genomic Signatures of Sexual Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimatis, Katja R; Nelson, Thomas C; Phillips, Patrick C

    2017-10-30

    Sexual conflict is a specific class of intergenomic conflict that describes the reciprocal sex-specific fitness costs generated by antagonistic reproductive interactions. The potential for sexual conflict is an inherent property of having a shared genome between the sexes and, therefore, is an extreme form of an environment-dependent fitness effect. In this way, many of the predictions from environment-dependent selection can be used to formulate expected patterns of genome evolution under sexual conflict. However, the pleiotropic and transmission constraints inherent to having alleles move across sex-specific backgrounds from generation to generation further modulate the anticipated signatures of selection. We outline methods for detecting candidate sexual conflict loci both across and within populations. Additionally, we consider the ability of genome scans to identify sexually antagonistic loci by modeling allele frequency changes within males and females due to a single generation of selection. In particular, we highlight the need to integrate genotype, phenotype, and functional information to truly distinguish sexual conflict from other forms of sexual differentiation. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Marine genomics: News and views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ângela M; Foote, Andrew D; Kupczok, Anne; Frazão, Bárbara; Limborg, Morten T; Piñeiro, Rosalía; Abalde, Samuel; Rocha, Sara; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2017-02-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag between observed and estimated diversity is in part due to the elusiveness of most aquatic species and the technical difficulties of exploring extreme environments, as for instance the abyssal plains and polar waters. In the last decade, the rapid development of affordable and flexible high-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Unleashing the Genome of Brassica Rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haibao; Lyons, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The completion and release of the Brassica rapa genome is of great benefit to researchers of the Brassicas, Arabidopsis, and genome evolution. While its lineage is closely related to the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana, the Brassicas experienced a whole genome triplication subsequent to their divergence. This event contemporaneously created three copies of its ancestral genome, which had diploidized through the process of homeologous gene loss known as fractionation. By the fractionation of homeologous gene content and genetic regulatory binding sites, Brassica’s genome is well placed to use comparative genomic techniques to identify syntenic regions, homeologous gene duplications, and putative regulatory sequences. Here, we use the comparative genomics platform CoGe to perform several different genomic analyses with which to study structural changes of its genome and dynamics of various genetic elements. Starting with whole genome comparisons, the Brassica paleohexaploidy is characterized, syntenic regions with A. thaliana are identified, and the TOC1 gene in the circadian rhythm pathway from A. thaliana is used to find duplicated orthologs in B. rapa. These TOC1 genes are further analyzed to identify conserved non-coding sequences that contain cis-acting regulatory elements and promoter sequences previously implicated in circadian rhythmicity. Each “cookbook style” analysis includes a step-by-step walk-through with links to CoGe to quickly reproduce each step of the analytical process. PMID:22866056

  16. Comparative Reannotation of 21 Aspergillus Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Riley, Robert; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-03-08

    We used comparative gene modeling to reannotate 21 Aspergillus genomes. Initial automatic annotation of individual genomes may contain some errors of different nature, e.g. missing genes, incorrect exon-intron structures, 'chimeras', which fuse 2 or more real genes or alternatively splitting some real genes into 2 or more models. The main premise behind the comparative modeling approach is that for closely related genomes most orthologous families have the same conserved gene structure. The algorithm maps all gene models predicted in each individual Aspergillus genome to the other genomes and, for each locus, selects from potentially many competing models, the one which most closely resembles the orthologous genes from other genomes. This procedure is iterated until no further change in gene models is observed. For Aspergillus genomes we predicted in total 4503 new gene models ( ~;;2percent per genome), supported by comparative analysis, additionally correcting ~;;18percent of old gene models. This resulted in a total of 4065 more genes with annotated PFAM domains (~;;3percent increase per genome). Analysis of a few genomes with EST/transcriptomics data shows that the new annotation sets also have a higher number of EST-supported splice sites at exon-intron boundaries.

  17. Correlation between genome reduction and bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Masaomi; Seno, Shigeto; Matsuda, Hideo; Ying, Bei-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Genome reduction by removing dispensable genomic sequences in bacteria is commonly used in both fundamental and applied studies to determine the minimal genetic requirements for a living system or to develop highly efficient bioreactors. Nevertheless, whether and how the accumulative loss of dispensable genomic sequences disturbs bacterial growth remains unclear. To investigate the relationship between genome reduction and growth, a series of Escherichia coli strains carrying genomes reduced in a stepwise manner were used. Intensive growth analyses revealed that the accumulation of multiple genomic deletions caused decreases in the exponential growth rate and the saturated cell density in a deletion-length-dependent manner as well as gradual changes in the patterns of growth dynamics, regardless of the growth media. Accordingly, a perspective growth model linking genome evolution to genome engineering was proposed. This study provides the first demonstration of a quantitative connection between genomic sequence and bacterial growth, indicating that growth rate is potentially associated with dispensable genomic sequences. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  18. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-10-27

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the JGI Fungal Genomic Program. One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts and pathogens) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation and sugar fermentation) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Science Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 400 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics will lead to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such ‘parts’ suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  19. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  20. Genome digging: insight into the mitochondrial genome of Homo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V Ovchinnikov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fraction of the Neanderthal mitochondrial genome sequence has a similarity with a 5,839-bp nuclear DNA sequence of mitochondrial origin (numt on the human chromosome 1. This fact has never been interpreted. Although this phenomenon may be attributed to contamination and mosaic assembly of Neanderthal mtDNA from short sequencing reads, we explain the mysterious similarity by integration of this numt (mtAncestor-1 into the nuclear genome of the common ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans not long before their reproductive split.Exploiting bioinformatics, we uncovered an additional numt (mtAncestor-2 with a high similarity to the Neanderthal mtDNA and indicated that both numts represent almost identical replicas of the mtDNA sequences ancestral to the mitochondrial genomes of Neanderthals and modern humans. In the proteins, encoded by mtDNA, the majority of amino acids distinguishing chimpanzees from humans and Neanderthals were acquired by the ancestral hominins. The overall rate of nonsynonymous evolution in Neanderthal mitochondrial protein-coding genes is not higher than in other lineages. The model incorporating the ancestral hominin mtDNA sequences estimates the average divergence age of the mtDNAs of Neanderthals and modern humans to be 450,000-485,000 years. The mtAncestor-1 and mtAncestor-2 sequences were incorporated into the nuclear genome approximately 620,000 years and 2,885,000 years ago, respectively.This study provides the first insight into the evolution of the mitochondrial DNA in hominins ancestral to Neanderthals and humans. We hypothesize that mtAncestor-1 and mtAncestor-2 are likely to be molecular fossils of the mtDNAs of Homo heidelbergensis and a stem Homo lineage. The d(N/d(S dynamics suggests that the effective population size of extinct hominins was low. However, the hominin lineage ancestral to humans, Neanderthals and H. heidelbergensis, had a larger effective population size and possessed genetic diversity

  1. Genome-wide identification of significant aberrations in cancer genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xiguo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic Copy Number Alterations (CNAs in human genomes are present in almost all human cancers. Systematic efforts to characterize such structural variants must effectively distinguish significant consensus events from random background aberrations. Here we introduce Significant Aberration in Cancer (SAIC, a new method for characterizing and assessing the statistical significance of recurrent CNA units. Three main features of SAIC include: (1 exploiting the intrinsic correlation among consecutive probes to assign a score to each CNA unit instead of single probes; (2 performing permutations on CNA units that preserve correlations inherent in the copy number data; and (3 iteratively detecting Significant Copy Number Aberrations (SCAs and estimating an unbiased null distribution by applying an SCA-exclusive permutation scheme. Results We test and compare the performance of SAIC against four peer methods (GISTIC, STAC, KC-SMART, CMDS on a large number of simulation datasets. Experimental results show that SAIC outperforms peer methods in terms of larger area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics curve and increased detection power. We then apply SAIC to analyze structural genomic aberrations acquired in four real cancer genome-wide copy number data sets (ovarian cancer, metastatic prostate cancer, lung adenocarcinoma, glioblastoma. When compared with previously reported results, SAIC successfully identifies most SCAs known to be of biological significance and associated with oncogenes (e.g., KRAS, CCNE1, and MYC or tumor suppressor genes (e.g., CDKN2A/B. Furthermore, SAIC identifies a number of novel SCAs in these copy number data that encompass tumor related genes and may warrant further studies. Conclusions Supported by a well-grounded theoretical framework, SAIC has been developed and used to identify SCAs in various cancer copy number data sets, providing useful information to study the landscape of cancer genomes

  2. Examination of prokaryotic multipartite genome evolution through experimental genome reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C diCenzo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria carry two or more chromosome-like replicons. This occurs in pathogens such as Vibrio cholerea and Brucella abortis as well as in many N2-fixing plant symbionts including all isolates of the alfalfa root-nodule bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti. Understanding the evolution and role of this multipartite genome organization will provide significant insight into these important organisms; yet this knowledge remains incomplete, in part, because technical challenges of large-scale genome manipulations have limited experimental analyses. The distinct evolutionary histories and characteristics of the three replicons that constitute the S. meliloti genome (the chromosome (3.65 Mb, pSymA megaplasmid (1.35 Mb, and pSymB chromid (1.68 Mb makes this a good model to examine this topic. We transferred essential genes from pSymB into the chromosome, and constructed strains that lack pSymB as well as both pSymA and pSymB. This is the largest reduction (45.4%, 3.04 megabases, 2866 genes of a prokaryotic genome to date and the first removal of an essential chromid. Strikingly, strains lacking pSymA and pSymB (ΔpSymAB lost the ability to utilize 55 of 74 carbon sources and various sources of nitrogen, phosphorous and sulfur, yet the ΔpSymAB strain grew well in minimal salts media and in sterile soil. This suggests that the core chromosome is sufficient for growth in a bulk soil environment and that the pSymA and pSymB replicons carry genes with more specialized functions such as growth in the rhizosphere and interaction with the plant. These experimental data support a generalized evolutionary model, in which non-chromosomal replicons primarily carry genes with more specialized functions. These large secondary replicons increase the organism's niche range, which offsets their metabolic burden on the cell (e.g. pSymA. Subsequent co-evolution with the chromosome then leads to the formation of a chromid through the acquisition of functions core to all

  3. Adopting clinical genomics: a systematic review of genomic literacy among physicians in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vu T Dung; Frizzo-Barker, Julie; Chow-White, Peter

    2018-02-13

    This article investigates the genomic knowledge of oncology care physicians in the adoption of clinical genomics. We apply Rogers' knowledge framework from his diffusion of innovation theory to identify three types of knowledge in the process of translation and adoption: awareness, how-to, and principles knowledge. The objectives of this systematic review are to: (1) examine the level of knowledge among physicians in clinical cancer genomics, and (2) identify potential interventions or strategies for development of genomic education for oncology practice. We follow the PRIMSA statement protocol and conduct a search of five relevant electronic databases. Our review focuses on: (1) genomic knowledge of oncogenomics or genomic services in oncology practices among physicians, and (2) interventions or strategies to provide genomic education of oncogenomics for physicians. We include twenty-one studies in our analysis. Nine focus on interventions to provide genomic education for cancer care. Overall, physicians' knowledge of oncogenomics among the three types is limited. The genomic literacy of physicians vary by their provider specialty, location, years of practice, and the type of genomic services. The three distinctions of knowledge offer a sophisticated and helpful tool to design effective strategies and interventions to provide genomic education for cancer treatment. In the nine educational intervention studies, the main intervention outcomes are changes in awareness, referral rates, genomic confidence, and genomic knowledge. Rogers' diffusion of innovation model allows us to differentiate three types of knowledge in the development and adoption of clinical genomics. This analytical lens can inform potential avenues to design more effective strategies and interventions to provide genomic education for oncology practice. We identified and synthesized a dearth of high quality studies that can inform the most effective educational outcomes of these interventions

  4. Molecular cytogenetic and genomic analyses reveal new insights into the origin of the wheat B genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhu, Xianwen; Cao, Yaping; Sun, Qing; Ma, Guojia; Chao, Shiaoman; Yan, Changhui; Xu, Steven S; Cai, Xiwen

    2018-02-01

    This work pinpointed the goatgrass chromosomal segment in the wheat B genome using modern cytogenetic and genomic technologies, and provided novel insights into the origin of the wheat B genome. Wheat is a typical allopolyploid with three homoeologous subgenomes (A, B, and D). The donors of the subgenomes A and D had been identified, but not for the subgenome B. The goatgrass Aegilops speltoides (genome SS) has been controversially considered a possible candidate for the donor of the wheat B genome. However, the relationship of the Ae. speltoides S genome with the wheat B genome remains largely obscure. The present study assessed the homology of the B and S genomes using an integrative cytogenetic and genomic approach, and revealed the contribution of Ae. speltoides to the origin of the wheat B genome. We discovered noticeable homology between wheat chromosome 1B and Ae. speltoides chromosome 1S, but not between other chromosomes in the B and S genomes. An Ae. speltoides-originated segment spanning a genomic region of approximately 10.46 Mb was detected on the long arm of wheat chromosome 1B (1BL). The Ae. speltoides-originated segment on 1BL was found to co-evolve with the rest of the B genome. Evidently, Ae. speltoides had been involved in the origin of the wheat B genome, but should not be considered an exclusive donor of this genome. The wheat B genome might have a polyphyletic origin with multiple ancestors involved, including Ae. speltoides. These novel findings will facilitate genome studies in wheat and other polyploids.

  5. Genomic databases as global public goods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Ruth; Wilso, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Recent discussions of genomics and international justice have adopted the concept of 'global public goods' to support both the view of genomics as a benefit and the sharing of genomics knowledge across nations. Such discussion relies on a particular interpretation of the global public goods argument, facilitated by the ambiguity of the concept itself. Our aim in this article is to demonstrate this by a close examination of the concept of global public goods with particular reference to its use in the context of genomic databases. We content that the argument for construing genomics as a global public good depends on seeing it as a natural good by focusing on features intrinsic to genomics knowledge. We shall argue that social and political arrangements are relevant and that recognising this opens the door to construing the use of global public goods language as a strategic one.

  6. Big Data Analytics for Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Karen Y; Ge, Dongliang; He, Max M

    2017-02-15

    Genomic medicine attempts to build individualized strategies for diagnostic or therapeutic decision-making by utilizing patients' genomic information. Big Data analytics uncovers hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other insights through examining large-scale various data sets. While integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs) on a Big Data infrastructure exhibit challenges, they also provide a feasible opportunity to develop an efficient and effective approach to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for individualized diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the challenges of manipulating large-scale next-generation sequencing (NGS) data and diverse clinical data derived from the EHRs for genomic medicine. We introduce possible solutions for different challenges in manipulating, managing, and analyzing genomic and clinical data to implement genomic medicine. Additionally, we also present a practical Big Data toolset for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  7. Big Data Analytics for Genomic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Karen Y.; Ge, Dongliang; He, Max M.

    2017-01-01

    Genomic medicine attempts to build individualized strategies for diagnostic or therapeutic decision-making by utilizing patients’ genomic information. Big Data analytics uncovers hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other insights through examining large-scale various data sets. While integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs) on a Big Data infrastructure exhibit challenges, they also provide a feasible opportunity to develop an efficient and effective approach to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for individualized diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the challenges of manipulating large-scale next-generation sequencing (NGS) data and diverse clinical data derived from the EHRs for genomic medicine. We introduce possible solutions for different challenges in manipulating, managing, and analyzing genomic and clinical data to implement genomic medicine. Additionally, we also present a practical Big Data toolset for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs. PMID:28212287

  8. Open Access Data Sharing in Genomic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The current emphasis on broad sharing of human genomic data generated in research in order to maximize utility and public benefit is a significant legacy of the Human Genome Project. Concerns about privacy and discrimination have led to policy responses that restrict access to genomic data as the means for protecting research participants. Our research and experience show, however, that a considerable number of research participants agree to open access sharing of their genomic data when given the choice. General policies that limit access to all genomic data fail to respect the autonomy of these participants and, at the same time, unnecessarily limit the utility of the data. We advocate instead a more balanced approach that allows for individual choice and encourages informed decision making, while protecting against the misuse of genomic data through enhanced legislation.

  9. Body maps on the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Christopher; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2013-12-20

    Chromosomes have territories, or preferred locales, in the cell nucleus. When these sites are taken into account, some large-scale structure of the human genome emerges. The synoptic picture is that genes highly expressed in particular topologically compact tissues are not randomly distributed on the genome. Rather, such tissue-specific genes tend to map somatotopically onto the complete chromosome set. They seem to form a "genome homunculus": a multi-dimensional, genome-wide body representation extending across chromosome territories of the entire spermcell nucleus. The antero-posterior axis of the body significantly corresponds to the head-tail axis of the nucleus, and the dorso-ventral body axis to the central-peripheral nucleus axis. This large-scale genomic structure includes thousands of genes. One rationale for a homuncular genome structure would be to minimize connection costs in genetic networks. Somatotopic maps in cerebral cortex have been reported for over a century.

  10. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser: update 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mary; Craft, Brian; Swatloski, Teresa; Cline, Melissa; Morozova, Olena; Diekhans, Mark; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2015-01-01

    The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer.ucsc.edu/) is a web-based application that integrates relevant data, analysis and visualization, allowing users to easily discover and share their research observations. Users can explore the relationship between genomic alterations and phenotypes by visualizing various -omic data alongside clinical and phenotypic features, such as age, subtype classifications and genomic biomarkers. The Cancer Genomics Browser currently hosts 575 public datasets from genome-wide analyses of over 227,000 samples, including datasets from TCGA, CCLE, Connectivity Map and TARGET. Users can download and upload clinical data, generate Kaplan-Meier plots dynamically, export data directly to Galaxy for analysis, plus generate URL bookmarks of specific views of the data to share with others. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. The characterization of twenty sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Pelak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of twenty human genomes to evaluate the prospects for identifying rare functional variants that contribute to a phenotype of interest. We sequenced at high coverage ten "case" genomes from individuals with severe hemophilia A and ten "control" genomes. We summarize the number of genetic variants emerging from a study of this magnitude, and provide a proof of concept for the identification of rare and highly-penetrant functional variants by confirming that the cause of hemophilia A is easily recognizable in this data set. We also show that the number of novel single nucleotide variants (SNVs discovered per genome seems to stabilize at about 144,000 new variants per genome, after the first 15 individuals have been sequenced. Finally, we find that, on average, each genome carries 165 homozygous protein-truncating or stop loss variants in genes representing a diverse set of pathways.

  12. GTB - an online genome tolerance browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab, Hashem A; Rogers, Mark F; Ferlaino, Michael; Campbell, Colin; Gaunt, Tom R

    2017-01-06

    Accurate methods capable of predicting the impact of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are assuming ever increasing importance. There exists a plethora of in silico algorithms designed to help identify and prioritize SNVs across the human genome for further investigation. However, no tool exists to visualize the predicted tolerance of the genome to mutation, or the similarities between these methods. We present the Genome Tolerance Browser (GTB, http://gtb.biocompute.org.uk ): an online genome browser for visualizing the predicted tolerance of the genome to mutation. The server summarizes several in silico prediction algorithms and conservation scores: including 13 genome-wide prediction algorithms and conservation scores, 12 non-synonymous prediction algorithms and four cancer-specific algorithms. The GTB enables users to visualize the similarities and differences between several prediction algorithms and to upload their own data as additional tracks; thereby facilitating the rapid identification of potential regions of interest.

  13. PigGIS: Pig Genomic Informatics System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruan, Jue; Guo, Yiran; Li, Heng

    2007-01-01

    Pig Genomic Information System (PigGIS) is a web-based depository of pig (Sus scrofa) genomic learning mainly engineered for biomedical research to locate pig genes from their human homologs and position single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different pig populations. It utilizes a variety...... of sequence data, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) reads and expressed sequence tags (ESTs), and achieves a successful mapping solution to the low-coverage genome problem. With the data presently available, we have identified a total of 15 700 pig consensus sequences covering 18.5 Mb of the homologous...... human exons. We have also recovered 18 700 SNPs and 20 800 unique 60mer oligonucleotide probes for future pig genome analyses. PigGIS can be freely accessed via the web at http://www.piggis.org/ and http://pig.genomics.org.cn/ ....

  14. Single-Cell Genomic Analysis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual cells in an organism are variable, which strongly impacts cellular processes. Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled single-cell genomic analysis to become widespread, addressing shortcomings of analyses conducted on populations of bulk cells. While the field of single-cell plant genomics is in its infancy, there is great potential to gain insights into cell lineage and functional cell types to help understand complex cellular interactions in plants. In this review, we discuss current approaches for single-cell plant genomic analysis, with a focus on single-cell isolation, DNA amplification, next-generation sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. We outline the technical challenges of analysing material from a single plant cell, and then examine applications of single-cell genomics and the integration of this approach with genome editing. Finally, we indicate future directions we expect in the rapidly developing field of plant single-cell genomic analysis.

  15. Progress and prospects in plant genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kangquan; Gao, Caixia; Qiu, Jin-Long

    2017-07-31

    The emergence of sequence-specific nucleases that enable genome editing is revolutionizing basic and applied biology. Since the introduction of CRISPR-Cas9, genome editing has become widely used in transformable plants for characterizing gene function and improving traits, mainly by inducing mutations through non-homologous end joining of double-stranded breaks generated by CRISPR-Cas9. However, it would be highly desirable to perform precision gene editing in plants, especially in transformation-recalcitrant species. Recently developed Cas9 variants, novel RNA-guided nucleases and base-editing systems, and DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 delivery methods now provide great opportunities for plant genome engineering. In this Review Article, we describe the current status of plant genome editing, focusing on newly developed genome editing tools and methods and their potential applications in plants. We also discuss the specific challenges facing plant genome editing, and future prospects.

  16. Human Contamination in Public Genome Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Kirill; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Contamination in genome assembly can lead to wrong or confusing results when using such genome as reference in sequence comparison. Although bacterial contamination is well known, the problem of human-originated contamination received little attention. In this study we surveyed 45,735 available genome assemblies for evidence of human contamination. We used lineage specificity to distinguish between contamination and conservation. We found that 154 genome assemblies contain fragments that with high confidence originate as contamination from human DNA. Majority of contaminating human sequences were present in the reference human genome assembly for over a decade. We recommend that existing contaminated genomes should be revised to remove contaminated sequence, and that new assemblies should be thoroughly checked for presence of human DNA before submitting them to public databases.

  17. REGEN: Ancestral Genome Reconstruction for Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C. Setubal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ancestral genome reconstruction can be understood as a phylogenetic study with more details than a traditional phylogenetic tree reconstruction. We present a new computational system called REGEN for ancestral bacterial genome reconstruction at both the gene and replicon levels. REGEN reconstructs gene content, contiguous gene runs, and replicon structure for each ancestral genome. Along each branch of the phylogenetic tree, REGEN infers evolutionary events, including gene creation and deletion and replicon fission and fusion. The reconstruction can be performed by either a maximum parsimony or a maximum likelihood method. Gene content reconstruction is based on the concept of neighboring gene pairs. REGEN was designed to be used with any set of genomes that are sufficiently related, which will usually be the case for bacteria within the same taxonomic order. We evaluated REGEN using simulated genomes and genomes in the Rhizobiales order.

  18. REGEN: Ancestral Genome Reconstruction for Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuan; Heath, Lenwood S; Setubal, João C

    2012-07-18

    Ancestral genome reconstruction can be understood as a phylogenetic study with more details than a traditional phylogenetic tree reconstruction. We present a new computational system called REGEN for ancestral bacterial genome reconstruction at both the gene and replicon levels. REGEN reconstructs gene content, contiguous gene runs, and replicon structure for each ancestral genome. Along each branch of the phylogenetic tree, REGEN infers evolutionary events, including gene creation and deletion and replicon fission and fusion. The reconstruction can be performed by either a maximum parsimony or a maximum likelihood method. Gene content reconstruction is based on the concept of neighboring gene pairs. REGEN was designed to be used with any set of genomes that are sufficiently related, which will usually be the case for bacteria within the same taxonomic order. We evaluated REGEN using simulated genomes and genomes in the Rhizobiales order.

  19. Extreme-Scale De Novo Genome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georganas, Evangelos [Intel Corporation, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Hofmeyr, Steven [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Buluc, Aydin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Oliker, Leonid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Rokhsar, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Yelick, Katherine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.

    2017-09-26

    De novo whole genome assembly reconstructs genomic sequence from short, overlapping, and potentially erroneous DNA segments and is one of the most important computations in modern genomics. This work presents HipMER, a high-quality end-to-end de novo assembler designed for extreme scale analysis, via efficient parallelization of the Meraculous code. Genome assembly software has many components, each of which stresses different components of a computer system. This chapter explains the computational challenges involved in each step of the HipMer pipeline, the key distributed data structures, and communication costs in detail. We present performance results of assembling the human genome and the large hexaploid wheat genome on large supercomputers up to tens of thousands of cores.

  20. Genome Evolution of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Taisei; Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Jones, John T

    2017-08-04

    Plant parasitism has evolved independently on at least four separate occasions in the phylum Nematoda. The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to plant-parasitic nematodes has allowed a wide range of genome- or transcriptome-level comparisons, and these have identified genome adaptations that enable parasitism of plants. Current genome data suggest that horizontal gene transfer, gene family expansions, evolution of new genes that mediate interactions with the host, and parasitism-specific gene regulation are important adaptations that allow nematodes to parasitize plants. Sequencing of a larger number of nematode genomes, including plant parasites that show different modes of parasitism or that have evolved in currently unsampled clades, and using free-living taxa as comparators would allow more detailed analysis and a better understanding of the organization of key genes within the genomes. This would facilitate a more complete understanding of the way in which parasitism has shaped the genomes of plant-parasitic nematodes.

  1. Genomic Characterization of the Taylorella Genus

    OpenAIRE

    H?bert, Laurent; Moumen, Bouziane; Pons, Nicolas; Duquesne, Fabien; Breuil, Marie-France; Goux, Didier; Batto, Jean-Michel; Laugier, Claire; Renault, Pierre; Petry, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    The Taylorella genus comprises two species: Taylorella equigenitalis, which causes contagious equine metritis, and Taylorella asinigenitalis, a closely-related species mainly found in donkeys. We herein report on the first genome sequence of T. asinigenitalis, analyzing and comparing it with the recently-sequenced T. equigenitalis genome. The T. asinigenitalis genome contains a single circular chromosome of 1,638,559 bp with a 38.3% GC content and 1,534 coding sequences (CDS). While 212 CDSs ...

  2. Application of Genomic Tools in Plant Breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-de-Castro, A.M.; Vilanova, S.; Cañizares, J.; Pascual, L.; Blanca, J.M.; Díez, M.J.; Prohens, J.; Picó, B.

    2012-01-01

    Plant breeding has been very successful in developing improved varieties using conventional tools and methodologies. Nowadays, the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the mass sequencing of genomes and transcriptomes, which is producing a vast array of genomic...

  3. Genome-scale neurogenetics: methodology and meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Steven A; Feng, Guoping; Hyman, Steven E

    2014-06-01

    Genetic analysis is currently offering glimpses into molecular mechanisms underlying such neuropsychiatric disorders as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. After years of frustration, success in identifying disease-associated DNA sequence variation has followed from new genomic technologies, new genome data resources, and global collaborations that could achieve the scale necessary to find the genes underlying highly polygenic disorders. Here we describe early results from genome-scale studies of large numbers of subjects and the emerging significance of these results for neurobiology.

  4. A genome editing primer for the hematologist

    OpenAIRE

    Hoban, Megan D.; Bauer, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing enables the site-specific modification of the genome. These technologies have rapidly advanced such that they have entered common use in experimental hematology to investigate genetic function. In addition, genome editing is becoming increasingly plausible as a treatment modality to rectify genetic blood disorders and improve cellular therapies. Genome modification typically ensues from site-specific double-strand breaks and may result in a myriad of outcomes. Even single-strand ...

  5. REGEN: Ancestral Genome Reconstruction for Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kuan; Heath, Lenwood S.; Setubal, João C.

    2012-01-01

    Ancestral genome reconstruction can be understood as a phylogenetic study with more details than a traditional phylogenetic tree reconstruction. We present a new computational system called REGEN for ancestral bacterial genome reconstruction at both the gene and replicon levels. REGEN reconstructs gene content, contiguous gene runs, and replicon structure for each ancestral genome. Along each branch of the phylogenetic tree, REGEN infers evolutionary events, including gene creation and deleti...

  6. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj

    2014-01-01

    and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses...... the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information....

  7. Genomic V exons from whole genome shotgun data in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, D N; von Haeften, B; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Faro, J; Gambón-Deza, F

    2014-08-01

    Reptiles and mammals diverged over 300 million years ago, creating two parallel evolutionary lineages amongst terrestrial vertebrates. In reptiles, two main evolutionary lines emerged: one gave rise to Squamata, while the other gave rise to Testudines, Crocodylia, and Aves. In this study, we determined the genomic variable (V) exons from whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) data in reptiles corresponding to the three main immunoglobulin (IG) loci and the four main T cell receptor (TR) loci. We show that Squamata lack the TRG and TRD genes, and snakes lack the IGKV genes. In representative species of Testudines and Crocodylia, the seven major IG and TR loci are maintained. As in mammals, genes of the IG loci can be grouped into well-defined IMGT clans through a multi-species phylogenetic analysis. We show that the reptilian IGHV and IGLV genes are distributed amongst the established mammalian clans, while their IGKV genes are found within a single clan, nearly exclusive from the mammalian sequences. The reptilian and mammalian TRAV genes cluster into six common evolutionary clades (since IMGT clans have not been defined for TR). In contrast, the reptilian TRBV genes cluster into three clades, which have few mammalian members. In this locus, the V exon sequences from mammals appear to have undergone different evolutionary diversification processes that occurred outside these shared reptilian clans. These sequences can be obtained in a freely available public repository (http://vgenerepertoire.org).

  8. Coronavirus Genomics and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Yung Yuen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The drastic increase in the number of coronaviruses discovered and coronavirus genomes being sequenced have given us an unprecedented opportunity to perform genomics and bioinformatics analysis on this family of viruses. Coronaviruses possess the largest genomes (26.4 to 31.7 kb among all known RNA viruses, with G + C contents varying from 32% to 43%. Variable numbers of small ORFs are present between the various conserved genes (ORF1ab, spike, envelope, membrane and nucleocapsid and downstream to nucleocapsid gene in different coronavirus lineages. Phylogenetically, three genera, Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus and Gammacoronavirus, with Betacoronavirus consisting of subgroups A, B, C and D, exist. A fourth genus, Deltacoronavirus, which includes bulbul coronavirus HKU11, thrush coronavirus HKU12 and munia coronavirus HKU13, is emerging. Molecular clock analysis using various gene loci revealed that the time of most recent common ancestor of human/civet SARS related coronavirus to be 1999-2002, with estimated substitution rate of 4´10-4 to 2´10-2 substitutions per site per year. Recombination in coronaviruses was most notable between different strains of murine hepatitis virus (MHV, between different strains of infectious bronchitis virus, between MHV and bovine coronavirus, between feline coronavirus (FCoV type I and canine coronavirus generating FCoV type II, and between the three genotypes of human coronavirus HKU1 (HCoV-HKU1. Codon usage bias in coronaviruses were observed, with HCoV-HKU1 showing the most extreme bias, and cytosine deamination and selection of CpG suppressed clones are the two major independent biological forces that shape such codon usage bias in coronaviruses.

  9. [Genomic selection and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng-De; Bao, Zhen-Min; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2011-12-01

    Selective breeding is very important in agricultural production and breeding value estimation is the core of selective breeding. With the development of genetic markers, especially high throughput genotyping technology, it becomes available to estimate breeding value at genome level, i.e. genomic selection (GS). In this review, the methods of GS was categorized into two groups: one is to predict genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) based on the allele effect, such as least squares, random regression - best linear unbiased prediction (RR-BLUP), Bayes and principle component analysis, etc; the other is to predict GEBV with genetic relationship matrix, which constructs genetic relationship matrix via high throughput genetic markers and then predicts GEBV through linear mixed model, i.e. GBLUP. The basic principles of these methods were also introduced according to the above two classifications. Factors affecting GS accuracy include markers of type and density, length of haplotype, the size of reference population, the extent between marker-QTL and so on. Among the methods of GS, Bayes and GBLUP are usually more accurate than the others and least squares is the worst. GBLUP is time-efficient and can combine pedigree with genotypic information, hence it is superior to other methods. Although progress was made in GS, there are still some challenges, for examples, united breeding, long-term genetic gain with GS, and disentangling markers with and without contribution to the traits. GS has been applied in animal and plant breeding practice and also has the potential to predict genetic predisposition in humans and study evolutionary dynamics. GS, which is more precise than the traditional method, is a breakthrough at measuring genetic relationship. Therefore, GS will be a revolutionary event in the history of animal and plant breeding.

  10. The genome portal of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute: 2014 updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Henrik [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cantor, Michael [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Dusheyko, Serge [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Hua, Susan [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Poliakov, Alexander [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Shabalov, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Smirnova, Tatyana [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor V. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Dubchak, Inna [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2013-11-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility, serves the diverse scientific community by providing integrated high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis to enable system-based scientific approaches in support of DOE missions related to clean energy generation and environmental characterization. The JGI Genome Portal (http://genome.jgi.doe.gov) provides unified access to all JGI genomic databases and analytical tools. The JGI maintains extensive data management systems and specialized analytical capabilities to manage and interpret complex genomic data. A user can search, download and explore multiple data sets available for all DOE JGI sequencing projects including their status, assemblies and annotations of sequenced genomes. In this paper, we describe major updates of the Genome Portal in the past 2 years with a specific emphasis on efficient handling of the rapidly growing amount of diverse genomic data accumulated in JGI.

  11. What does it mean to be genomically literate?: National Human Genome Research Institute Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurle, Belen; Citrin, Toby; Jenkins, Jean F; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Lamb, Neil; Roseman, Jo Ellen; Bonham, Vence L

    2013-08-01

    Genomic discoveries will increasingly advance the science of medicine. Limited genomic literacy may adversely impact the public's understanding and use of the power of genetics and genomics in health care and public health. In November 2011, a meeting was held by the National Human Genome Research Institute to examine the challenge of achieving genomic literacy for the general public, from kindergarten to grade 12 to adult education. The role of the media in disseminating scientific messages and in perpetuating or reducing misconceptions was also discussed. Workshop participants agreed that genomic literacy will be achieved only through active engagement between genomics experts and the varied constituencies that comprise the public. This report summarizes the background, content, and outcomes from this meeting, including recommendations for a research agenda to inform decisions about how to advance genomic literacy in our society.

  12. What Does it Mean to be Genomically Literate? National Human Genome Research Institute Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurle, Belen; Citrin, Toby; Jenkins, Jean F.; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Lamb, Neil; Roseman, Jo Ellen; Bonham, Vence L.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic discoveries will increasingly advance the science of medicine. Limited genomic literacy may adversely impact the public’s understanding and use of the power of genetics and genomics in health care and public health. In November 2011, a meeting was held by the National Human Genome Research Institute to examine the challenge of achieving genomic literacy for the general public, from K-12 to adult education. The role of the media in disseminating scientific messages and in perpetuating, or reducing, misconceptions was also discussed. Workshop participants agreed that genomic literacy will only be achieved through active engagement between genomics experts and the varied constituencies that comprise the public. This report summarizes the background, content, and outcomes from this meeting, including recommendations for a research agenda to inform decisions about how to advance genomic literacy in our society. PMID:23448722

  13. The life cycle of a genome project: perspectives and guidelines inspired by insect genome projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Alexie

    2016-01-01

    Many research programs on non-model species biology have been empowered by genomics. In turn, genomics is underpinned by a reference sequence and ancillary information created by so-called "genome projects". The most reliable genome projects are the ones created as part of an active research program and designed to address specific questions but their life extends past publication. In this opinion paper I outline four key insights that have facilitated maintaining genomic communities: the key role of computational capability, the iterative process of building genomic resources, the value of community participation and the importance of manual curation. Taken together, these ideas can and do ensure the longevity of genome projects and the growing non-model species community can use them to focus a discussion with regards to its future genomic infrastructure.

  14. Genome Radio Project: Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The process of conducting background research for the programs of the Genome Radio Project is continuing. The most developed of the program ``backgrounders`` have been reviewed by series and program advisors from various fields. Preliminary and background interviews have been conducted with dozens of potential program participants and advisors. Structurally, efforts are being directed toward developing and formalizing the project and series advisor relationships so that the best use can be made of those experts who have offered to assist the project in its presentation of program content. The library of research materials has been expanded considerably, creating a useful resource library for the producers.

  15. Genomic imprinting and assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaillet J Richard

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Imprinted genes exhibit a parent-of-origin specific pattern of expression. Such genes have been shown to be targets of molecular defects in particular genetic syndromes such as Beckwith-Wiedemann and Angelman syndromes. Recent reports have raised concern about the possibility that assisted reproduction techniques, such as in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, might cause genomic imprinting disorders. The number of reported cases of those disorders is still too small to draw firm conclusions and the safety of these widely used assisted reproduction techniques needs to be further evaluated.

  16. Genomic dysregulation in gastric tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjigian, Yelena Y; Kelsen, David P

    2013-03-01

    Gastric cancer is among the most common human malignancies and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. The different epidemiologic and histopathology of subtypes of gastric cancer are associated with different genomic patterns. Data suggests that gene expression patterns of proximal, distal gastric cancers-intestinal type, and diffuse/signet cell are well separated. This review summarizes the genetic and epigenetic changes thought to drive gastric cancer and the emerging paradigm of gastric cancer as three unique disease subtypes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genomic applications in forensic medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1980s, advances in DNA technology have revolutionized the scope and practice of forensic medicine. From the days of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) to short tandem repeats (STRs), the current focus is on the next generation genome sequencing. It has been almost a decade...... sequence information may aid mixture interpretation and will increase the statistical weight of the evidence. In this chapter, we provide an overview on conventional DNA diagnostics and the possible applications of single cell sequencing and NGS in forensic medicine....

  18. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2015 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Armstrong, Joel; Barber, Galt P.; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A.; Heitner, Steve; Hickey, Glenn; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Hubley, Robert; Karolchik, Donna; Learned, Katrina; Lee, Brian T.; Li, Chin H.; Miga, Karen H.; Nguyen, Ngan; Paten, Benedict; Raney, Brian J.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Speir, Matthew L.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2015-01-01

    Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide. Highlights of the past year include the release of a browser for the first new human genome reference assembly in 4 years in December 2013 (GRCh38, UCSC hg38), a watershed comparative genomics annotation (100-species multiple alignment and conservation) and a novel distribution mechanism for the browser (GBiB: Genome Browser in a Box). We created browsers for new species (Chinese hamster, elephant shark, minke whale), ‘mined the web’ for DNA sequences and expanded the browser display with stacked color graphs and region highlighting. As our user community increasingly adopts the UCSC track hub and assembly hub representations for sharing large-scale genomic annotation data sets and genome sequencing projects, our menu of public data hubs has tripled. PMID:25428374

  19. Genome technologies and personalized dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, G; Chen, A; Vess, T; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-04-01

    The addition of genomic information to our understanding of oral disease is driving important changes in oral health care. It is anticipated that genome-derived information will promote a deeper understanding of disease etiology and permit earlier diagnosis, allowing for preventative measures prior to disease onset rather than treatment that attempts to repair the diseased state. Advances in genome technologies have fueled expectations for this proactive healthcare approach. Application of genomic testing is expanding and has already begun to find its way into the practice of clinical dentistry. To take full advantage of the information and technologies currently available, it is vital that dental care providers, consumers, and policymakers be aware of genomic approaches to understanding of oral diseases and the application of genomic testing to disease diagnosis and treatment. Ethical, legal, clinical, and educational initiatives are also required to responsibly incorporate genomic information into the practice of dentistry. This article provides an overview of the application of genomic technologies to oral health care and introduces issues that require consideration if we are to realize the full potential of genomics to enable the practice of personalized dental medicine. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. DEFINING THE CHEMICAL SPACE OF PUBLIC GENOMIC ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current project aims to chemically index the genomics content of public genomic databases to make these data accessible in relation to other publicly available, chemically-indexed toxicological information. By defining the chemical space of public genomic data, it is possible to identify classes of chemicals on which to develop methodologies for the integration of chemogenomic data into predictive toxicology. The chemical space of public genomic data will be presented as well as the methodologies and tools developed to identify this chemical space.

  1. Standards for Clinical Grade Genomic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, Sophia L; Carter, Alexis B; Pfeifer, John D; Crawford, James M; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison; Caughron, Samuel; Leonard, Debra G B

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing performed in a clinical environment must meet clinical standards, which requires reproducibility of all aspects of the testing. Clinical-grade genomic databases (CGGDs) are required to classify a variant and to assist in the professional interpretation of clinical next-generation sequencing. Applying quality laboratory standards to the reference databases used for sequence-variant interpretation presents a new challenge for validation and curation. To define CGGD and the categories of information contained in CGGDs and to frame recommendations for the structure and use of these databases in clinical patient care. Members of the College of American Pathologists Personalized Health Care Committee reviewed the literature and existing state of genomic databases and developed a framework for guiding CGGD development in the future. Clinical-grade genomic databases may provide different types of information. This work group defined 3 layers of information in CGGDs: clinical genomic variant repositories, genomic medical data repositories, and genomic medicine evidence databases. The layers are differentiated by the types of genomic and medical information contained and the utility in assisting with clinical interpretation of genomic variants. Clinical-grade genomic databases must meet specific standards regarding submission, curation, and retrieval of data, as well as the maintenance of privacy and security. These organizing principles for CGGDs should serve as a foundation for future development of specific standards that support the use of such databases for patient care.

  2. Genomic Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael F.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical risk assessment for cancer predisposition includes a three-generation pedigree and physical examination to identify inherited syndromes. Additionally genetic and genomic biomarkers may identify individuals with a constitutional basis for their disease that may not be evident clinically. Genomic biomarker testing may detect molecular variations in single genes, panels of genes, or entire genomes. The strength of evidence for the association of a genomic biomarker with disease risk may be weak or strong. The factors contributing to clinical validity and utility of genomic biomarkers include functional laboratory analyses and genetic epidemiologic evidence. Genomic biomarkers may be further classified as low, moderate or highly penetrant based on the likelihood of disease. Genomic biomarkers for breast cancer are comprised of rare highly penetrant mutations of genes such as BRCA1 or BRCA2, moderately penetrant mutations of genes such as CHEK2, as well as more common genomic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms, associated with modest effect sizes. When applied in the context of appropriate counseling and interpretation, identification of genomic biomarkers of inherited risk for breast cancer may decrease morbidity and mortality, allow for definitive prevention through assisted reproduction, and serve as a guide to targeted therapy. PMID:26987529

  3. Quality Assessment of Domesticated Animal Genome Assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Stefan E; Anthon, Christian; Palasca, Oana

    2015-01-01

    domesticated animal genomes still need to be sequenced deeper in order to produce high-quality assemblies. In the meanwhile, ironically, the extent to which RNAseq and other next-generation data is produced frequently far exceeds that of the genomic sequence. Furthermore, basic comparative analysis is often...... affected by the lack of genomic sequence. Herein, we quantify the quality of the genome assemblies of 20 domesticated animals and related species by assessing a range of measurable parameters, and we show that there is a positive correlation between the fraction of mappable reads from RNAseq data...

  4. Environmental Medicine Genome Bank (EMGB): Current Composition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sonna, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The USARIEM Environmental Medicine Genome Bank (EMGB) project is an ongoing effort to identify and characterize genes relevant to environmental injuries and illnesses and to human physical performance...

  5. Radiation-induced instability of human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.N.; Demina, Eh.A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is dedicated to the phenomenon of radiation-induced genomic instability where the increased level of genomic changes in the offspring of irradiated cells is characteristic. Particular attention is paid to the problems of genomic instability induced by the low-dose radiation, role of the bystander effect in formation of radiation-induced instability, and its relationship with individual radiosensitivity. We believe that in accordance with the paradigm of modern radiobiology the increased human individual radiosensitivity can be formed due to the genome instability onset and is a significant risk factor for radiation-induced cancer

  6. Genome sequence and analysis of Lactobacillus helveticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eCremonesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological characterization of lactobacilli is historically well developed, but the genomic analysis is recent. Because of the widespread use of L. helveticus in cheese technology, information concerning the heterogeneity in this species is accumulating rapidly. Recently, the genome of five L. helveticus strains was sequenced to completion and compared with other genomically characterized lactobacilli. The genomic analysis of the first sequenced strain, L. helveticus DPC 4571, isolated from cheese and selected for its characteristics of rapid lysis and high proteolytic activity, has revealed a plethora of genes with industrial potential including those responsible for key metabolic functions such as proteolysis, lipolysis, and cell lysis. These genes and their derived enzymes can facilitate the production of cheese and cheese derivatives with potential for use as ingredients in consumer foods. In addition, L. helveticus has the potential to produce peptides with a biological function, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity, in fermented dairy products, demonstrating the therapeutic value of this species. A most intriguing feature of the genome of L. helveticus is the remarkable similarity in gene content with many intestinal lactobacilli. Comparative genomics has allowed the identification of key gene sets that facilitate a variety of lifestyles including adaptation to food matrices or the gastrointestinal tract.As genome sequence and functional genomic information continues to explode, key features of the genomes of L. helveticus strains continue to be discovered, answering many questions but also raising many new ones.

  7. Conservation genetics in transition to conservation genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouborg, N. Joop; Pertoldi, Cino; Loeschcke, Volker

    2010-01-01

    in conservation biology. This has allowed assessment of the impact of genetic drift on genetic variation, of the level of inbreeding within populations, and of the amount of gene flow between or within populations. Recent developments in genomic techniques, including next generation sequencing, whole genome scans...... and gene-expression pattern analysis, have made it possible to step up from a limited number of neutral markers to genome-wide estimates of functional genetic variation. Here, we focus on how the transition of conservation genetics to conservation genomics leads to insights into the dynamics of selectively...

  8. Deleterious mutation accumulation in organelle genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M; Blanchard, J L

    1998-01-01

    It is well established on theoretical grounds that the accumulation of mildly deleterious mutations in nonrecombining genomes is a major extinction risk in obligately asexual populations. Sexual populations can also incur mutational deterioration in genomic regions that experience little or no recombination, i.e., autosomal regions near centromeres, Y chromosomes, and organelle genomes. Our results suggest, for a wide array of genes (transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, and proteins) in a diverse collection of species (animals, plants, and fungi), an almost universal increase in the fixation probabilities of mildly deleterious mutations arising in mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes relative to those arising in the recombining nuclear genome. This enhanced width of the selective sieve in organelle genomes does not appear to be a consequence of relaxed selection, but can be explained by the decline in the efficiency of selection that results from the reduction of effective population size induced by uniparental inheritance. Because of the very low mutation rates of organelle genomes (on the order of 10(-4) per genome per year), the reduction in fitness resulting from mutation accumulation in such genomes is a very long-term process, not likely to imperil many species on time scales of less than a million years, but perhaps playing some role in phylogenetic lineage sorting on time scales of 10 to 100 million years.

  9. Goodbye genome paper, hello genome report: the increasing popularity of 'genome announcements' and their impact on science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Roy

    2017-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized genomics and altered the scientific publication landscape. Life-science journals abound with genome papers-peer-reviewed descriptions of newly sequenced chromosomes. Although they once filled the pages of Nature and Science, genome papers are now mostly relegated to journals with low-impact factors. Some have forecast the death of the genome paper and argued that they are using up valuable resources and not advancing science. However, the publication rate of genome papers is on the rise. This increase is largely because some journals have created a new category of manuscript called genome reports, which are short, fast-tracked papers describing a chromosome sequence(s), its GenBank accession number and little else. In 2015, for example, more than 2000 genome reports were published, and 2016 is poised to bring even more. Here, I highlight the growing popularity of genome reports and discuss their merits, drawbacks and impact on science and the academic publication infrastructure. Genome reports can be excellent assets for the research community, but they are also being used as quick and easy routes to a publication, and in some instances they are not peer reviewed. One of the best arguments for genome reports is that they are a citable, user-generated genomic resource providing essential methodological and biological information, which may not be present in the sequence database. But they are expensive and time-consuming avenues for achieving such a goal. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estienne C Swart

    Full Text Available The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction (∼5% of its precursor "silent" germline micronuclear genome by a process of "unscrambling" and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear "nanochromosomes" typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2-8 genes, have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of ∼2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of ∼16,000 complete nanochromosomes (∼50 Mb haploid genome size that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean ∼3.2 kb and encode ∼18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes ∼10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is ∼4.0%, suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing

  11. Potential contribution of genomics and biotechnology in animal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of the book chapter is to define the potential contribution of genomics in livestock production in Latin American countries. A brief description on what is genomics, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection (GS) is provided. Genomics has been rapidly adopte...

  12. Validation of standards suitable for genome size estimation of fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhinhas, Pedro; Tavares, Daniela; Ramos, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Susana; Loureiro, João

    2017-11-01

    Genome size information is fundamental to genome sequencing and may also uncover genomic aspects of evolution. Flow Cytometry, the preferred method for genome size estimation, requires suitable standards. Here we validate Inonotus hispidus, Colletotrichum acutatum and Cenococcum geophilum (41, 68 and 203Mbp), as standards for fungal genome size estimation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Tarenaya hassleriana Genome Provides Insight into Reproductive Trait and Genome Evolution of Crucifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, S.; Bergh, van den E.; Zeng, P.; Zong, X.; Hofberger, J.; Bruijn, de S.A.; Bhide, A.S.; Kuelahoglu, C.; Bian, C.; Chen, J.; Fan, G.; Kaufmann, K.; Hall, J.C.; Becker, A.; Brautigam, A.; Weber, A.P.M.; Shi, C.; Zheng, Z.; Li, W.; Lv, M.; Tao, Y.; Wang, M.; Zou, H.; Quan, Z.; Hibberd, J.M.; Zhang, G.; Zhu, X.; Schranz, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    The Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crops, is unmatched among plants in its wealth of genomic and functional molecular data and has long served as a model for understanding gene, genome, and trait evolution. However, genome information from a phylogenetic outgroup that is

  14. Ensembl Genomes 2013: scaling up access to genome-wide data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species. The project exploits and extends technologies for genome annotation, analysis and dissemination, developed in the context of the vertebrate-focused Ensembl project, and provi...

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of 1,183 Salmonella Strains from the 100K Pathogen Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Nguyet; Davis, Matthew; Arabyan, Narine; Huang, Bihua C; Weis, Allison M; Chen, Poyin; Thao, Kao; Ng, Whitney; Chin, Ning; Foutouhi, Soraya; Foutouhi, Azarene; Kaufman, James; Xie, Yi; Storey, Dylan B; Weimer, Bart C

    2017-07-13

    Salmonella is a common food-associated bacterium that has substantial impact on worldwide human health and the global economy. This is the public release of 1,183 Salmonella draft genome sequences as part of the 100K Pathogen Genome Project. These isolates represent global genomic diversity in the Salmonella genus. Copyright © 2017 Kong et al.

  16. GenomeVIP: a cloud platform for genomic variant discovery and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashl, R Jay; Scott, Adam D; Huang, Kuan-Lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Yoon, Christopher J; Niu, Beifang; DeNardo, Erin; Yellapantula, Venkata D; Handsaker, Robert E; Chen, Ken; Koboldt, Daniel C; Ye, Kai; Fenyö, David; Raphael, Benjamin J; Wendl, Michael C; Ding, Li

    2017-08-01

    Identifying genomic variants is a fundamental first step toward the understanding of the role of inherited and acquired variation in disease. The accelerating growth in the corpus of sequencing data that underpins such analysis is making the data-download bottleneck more evident, placing substantial burdens on the research community to keep pace. As a result, the search for alternative approaches to the traditional "download and analyze" paradigm on local computing resources has led to a rapidly growing demand for cloud-computing solutions for genomics analysis. Here, we introduce the Genome Variant Investigation Platform (GenomeVIP), an open-source framework for performing genomics variant discovery and annotation using cloud- or local high-performance computing infrastructure. GenomeVIP orchestrates the analysis of whole-genome and exome sequence data using a set of robust and popular task-specific tools, including VarScan, GATK, Pindel, BreakDancer, Strelka, and Genome STRiP, through a web interface. GenomeVIP has been used for genomic analysis in large-data projects such as the TCGA PanCanAtlas and in other projects, such as the ICGC Pilots, CPTAC, ICGC-TCGA DREAM Challenges, and the 1000 Genomes SV Project. Here, we demonstrate GenomeVIP's ability to provide high-confidence annotated somatic, germline, and de novo variants of potential biological significance using publicly available data sets. © 2017 Mashl et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Spaces of genomics : exploring the innovation journey of genomics in research on common disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bitsch, L.

    2013-01-01

    Genomics was introduced with big promises and expectations of its future contribution to our society. Medical genomics was introduced as that which would lay the foundation for a revolution in our management of common diseases. Genomics would lead the way towards a future of personalised medicine.

  18. Tolerance of Whole-Genome Doubling Propagates Chromosomal Instability and Accelerates Cancer Genome Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dewhurst, Sally M.; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of whole-genome doubling to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumor evolution is unclear. We use long-term culture of isogenic tetraploid cells from a stable diploid colon cancer progenitor to investigate how a genome-doubling event affects genome stability over time. Rare cells ...

  19. Comparative Genome Analysis Reveals Divergent Genome Size Evolution in a Carnivorous Plant Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T. H. Vu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-value paradox remains incompletely resolved after >40 yr and is exemplified by 2,350-fold variation in genome sizes of flowering plants. The carnivorous Lentibulariaceae genus , displaying a 25-fold range of genome sizes, is a promising subject to study mechanisms and consequences of evolutionary genome size variation. Applying genomic, phylogenetic, and cytogenetic approaches, we uncovered bidirectional genome size evolution within the genus . The Steyerm. genome (86 Mbp has probably shrunk by retroelement silencing and deletion-biased double-strand break (DSB repair, from an ancestral size of 400 to 800 Mbp to become one of the smallest among flowering plants. The Stapf genome has expanded by whole-genome duplication (WGD and retrotransposition to 1550 Mbp. became allotetraploid after the split from the clade ∼29 Ma. A. St.-Hil. (179 Mbp, a close relative of , proved to be a recent (autotetraploid. Our analyses suggest a common ancestor of the genus a with an intermediate 1C value (400–800 Mbp and subsequent rapid genome size evolution in opposite directions. Many abundant repeats of the larger genome are absent in the smaller, casting doubt on their functionality for the organism, while recurrent WGD seems to safeguard against the loss of essential elements in the face of genome shrinkage. We cannot identify any consistent differences in habitat or life strategy that correlate with genome size changes, raising the possibility that these changes may be selectively neutral.

  20. Brain cancer genomics and epigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Tenley C; Sengupta, Soma; Pomeroy, Scott L

    2018-01-01

    Classically, brain cancers have been graded and diagnosed based on histology and risk stratified by clinical criteria. Recent advances in genomics and epigenomics have ushered in an era of defining cancers based on molecular criteria. These advances have increased our precision of identifying oncogenic driving events and, most importantly, increased our precision at predicting clinical outcome. For the first time in its history, the 2016 revision of the WHO Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System included molecular features as tumor classification criteria. Brain tumors can develop in the context of genetic cancer predisposition syndromes, such as Li-Fraumeni or Gorlin syndrome, but by far most commonly arise through the acquisition of somatic mutations and chromosome changes in the malignant cells. By taking a survey across this cancer landscape, certain themes emerge as being common events to drive cancer: DNA damage repair, genomic instability, mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway, sonic hedgehog pathway, hypoxia, and epigenetic dysfunction. Understanding these mechanisms is of paramount importance for improving targeted therapies, and for identifying the right patients for those therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genomic analyses of the Chlamydia trachomatis core genome show an association between chromosomal genome, plasmid type and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, Bart; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; van der Ende, Arie; Harrison, Odile B.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) plasmid has been shown to encode genes essential for infection. We evaluated the population structure of Ct using whole-genome sequence data (WGS). In particular, the relationship between the Ct genome, plasmid and disease was investigated. Results: WGS data

  2. Observing copepods through a genomic lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Stewart C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copepods outnumber every other multicellular animal group. They are critical components of the world's freshwater and marine ecosystems, sensitive indicators of local and global climate change, key ecosystem service providers, parasites and predators of economically important aquatic animals and potential vectors of waterborne disease. Copepods sustain the world fisheries that nourish and support human populations. Although genomic tools have transformed many areas of biological and biomedical research, their power to elucidate aspects of the biology, behavior and ecology of copepods has only recently begun to be exploited. Discussion The extraordinary biological and ecological diversity of the subclass Copepoda provides both unique advantages for addressing key problems in aquatic systems and formidable challenges for developing a focused genomics strategy. This article provides an overview of genomic studies of copepods and discusses strategies for using genomics tools to address key questions at levels extending from individuals to ecosystems. Genomics can, for instance, help to decipher patterns of genome evolution such as those that occur during transitions from free living to symbiotic and parasitic lifestyles and can assist in the identification of genetic mechanisms and accompanying physiological changes associated with adaptation to new or physiologically challenging environments. The adaptive significance of the diversity in genome size and unique mechanisms of genome reorganization during development could similarly be explored. Genome-wide and EST studies of parasitic copepods of salmon and large EST studies of selected free-living copepods have demonstrated the potential utility of modern genomics approaches for the study of copepods and have generated resources such as EST libraries, shotgun genome sequences, BAC libraries, genome maps and inbred lines that will be invaluable in assisting further efforts to

  3. Dynamics of genome rearrangement in bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E Darling

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome structure variation has profound impacts on phenotype in organisms ranging from microbes to humans, yet little is known about how natural selection acts on genome arrangement. Pathogenic bacteria such as Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic and pneumonic plague, often exhibit a high degree of genomic rearrangement. The recent availability of several Yersinia genomes offers an unprecedented opportunity to study the evolution of genome structure and arrangement. We introduce a set of statistical methods to study patterns of rearrangement in circular chromosomes and apply them to the Yersinia. We constructed a multiple alignment of eight Yersinia genomes using Mauve software to identify 78 conserved segments that are internally free from genome rearrangement. Based on the alignment, we applied Bayesian statistical methods to infer the phylogenetic inversion history of Yersinia. The sampling of genome arrangement reconstructions contains seven parsimonious tree topologies, each having different histories of 79 inversions. Topologies with a greater number of inversions also exist, but were sampled less frequently. The inversion phylogenies agree with results suggested by SNP patterns. We then analyzed reconstructed inversion histories to identify patterns of rearrangement. We confirm an over-representation of "symmetric inversions"-inversions with endpoints that are equally distant from the origin of chromosomal replication. Ancestral genome arrangements demonstrate moderate preference for replichore balance in Yersinia. We found that all inversions are shorter than expected under a neutral model, whereas inversions acting within a single replichore are much shorter than expected. We also found evidence for a canonical configuration of the origin and terminus of replication. Finally, breakpoint reuse analysis reveals that inversions with endpoints proximal to the origin of DNA replication are nearly three times more frequent. Our findings

  4. Evolution of genome size and genomic GC content in carnivorous holokinetics (Droseraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veleba, Adam; Šmarda, Petr; Zedek, František; Horová, Lucie; Šmerda, Jakub; Bureš, Petr

    2017-02-01

    Studies in the carnivorous family Lentibulariaceae in the last years resulted in the discovery of the smallest plant genomes and an unusual pattern of genomic GC content evolution. However, scarcity of genomic data in other carnivorous clades still prevents a generalization of the observed patterns. Here the aim was to fill this gap by mapping genome evolution in the second largest carnivorous family, Droseraceae, where this evolution may be affected by chromosomal holokinetism in Drosera METHODS: The genome size and genomic GC content of 71 Droseraceae species were measured by flow cytometry. A dated phylogeny was constructed, and the evolution of both genomic parameters and their relationship to species climatic niches were tested using phylogeny-based statistics. The 2C genome size of Droseraceae varied between 488 and 10 927 Mbp, and the GC content ranged between 37·1 and 44·7 %. The genome sizes and genomic GC content of carnivorous and holocentric species did not differ from those of their non-carnivorous and monocentric relatives. The genomic GC content positively correlated with genome size and annual temperature fluctuations. The genome size and chromosome numbers were inversely correlated in the Australian clade of Drosera CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that neither carnivory (nutrient scarcity) nor the holokinetism have a prominent effect on size and DNA base composition of Droseraceae genomes. However, the holokinetic drive seems to affect karyotype evolution in one of the major clades of Drosera Our survey confirmed that the evolution of GC content is tightly connected with the evolution of genome size and also with environmental conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Identification of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain H111 virulence factors using nonmammalian infection hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwager, Stephan; Agnoli, Kirsty; Köthe, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    or siderophores. Instead, the mutants contained insertions in metabolic and regulatory genes. Mutants attenuated in virulence in the C. elegans infection model were also tested in the Drosophila melanogaster pricking model, and those also attenuated in this model were further tested in Galleria mellonella. Six...... of the 22 mutants were attenuated in D. melanogaster, and five of these were less pathogenic in the G. mellonella model. We show that genes encoding enzymes of the purine, pyrimidine, and shikimate biosynthesis pathways are critical for virulence in multiple host models of infection....

  6. Use of a Burkholderia cenocepacia ABTS Oxidizer in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) often use biological processes to generate electrons from organic material contained in the anode chamber and abiotic processes employing atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. This study investigated the accumulation of an oxidant in bacterial cultures...

  7. Genome-wide identification of direct HBx genomic targets

    KAUST Repository

    Guerrieri, Francesca

    2017-02-17

    Background The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) HBx regulatory protein is required for HBV replication and involved in HBV-related carcinogenesis. HBx interacts with chromatin modifying enzymes and transcription factors to modulate histone post-translational modifications and to regulate viral cccDNA transcription and cellular gene expression. Aiming to identify genes and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) directly targeted by HBx, we performed a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to analyse HBV recruitment on host cell chromatin in cells replicating HBV. Results ChIP-Seq high throughput sequencing of HBx-bound fragments was used to obtain a high-resolution, unbiased, mapping of HBx binding sites across the genome in HBV replicating cells. Protein-coding genes and ncRNAs involved in cell metabolism, chromatin dynamics and cancer were enriched among HBx targets together with genes/ncRNAs known to modulate HBV replication. The direct transcriptional activation of genes/miRNAs that potentiate endocytosis (Ras-related in brain (RAB) GTPase family) and autophagy (autophagy related (ATG) genes, beclin-1, miR-33a) and the transcriptional repression of microRNAs (miR-138, miR-224, miR-576, miR-596) that directly target the HBV pgRNA and would inhibit HBV replication, contribute to HBx-mediated increase of HBV replication. Conclusions Our ChIP-Seq analysis of HBx genome wide chromatin recruitment defined the repertoire of genes and ncRNAs directly targeted by HBx and led to the identification of new mechanisms by which HBx positively regulates cccDNA transcription and HBV replication.

  8. Population genomics of fungal and oomycete pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are entering a new era in plant pathology where whole-genome sequences of many individuals of a pathogen species are becoming readily available. This era of pathogen population genomics will provide new opportunities and challenges, requiring new computational and analytical tools. Population gen...

  9. Genome bioinformatics of tomato and potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datema, E.

    2011-01-01

    In the past two decades genome sequencing has developed from a laborious and costly technology employed by large international consortia to a widely used, automated and affordable tool used worldwide by many individual research groups. Genome sequences of many food animals and crop plants have been

  10. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2014 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolchik, Donna; Barber, Galt P.; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Cline, Melissa S.; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A.; Heitner, Steve; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Learned, Katrina; Lee, Brian T.; Li, Chin H.; Raney, Brian J.; Rhead, Brooke; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Sloan, Cricket A.; Speir, Matthew L.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M.; Kent, W. James

    2014-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) offers online public access to a growing database of genomic sequence and annotations for a large collection of organisms, primarily vertebrates, with an emphasis on the human and mouse genomes. The Browser’s web-based tools provide an integrated environment for visualizing, comparing, analysing and sharing both publicly available and user-generated genomic data sets. As of September 2013, the database contained genomic sequence and a basic set of annotation ‘tracks’ for ∼90 organisms. Significant new annotations include a 60-species multiple alignment conservation track on the mouse, updated UCSC Genes tracks for human and mouse, and several new sets of variation and ENCODE data. New software tools include a Variant Annotation Integrator that returns predicted functional effects of a set of variants uploaded as a custom track, an extension to UCSC Genes that displays haplotype alleles for protein-coding genes and an expansion of data hubs that includes the capability to display remotely hosted user-provided assembly sequence in addition to annotation data. To improve European access, we have added a Genome Browser mirror (http://genome-euro.ucsc.edu) hosted at Bielefeld University in Germany. PMID:24270787

  11. Integrating genomics into undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Dieter, Carla; Quinn Griffin, Mary T

    2011-09-01

    To prepare the next generation of nurses, faculty are now faced with the challenge of incorporating genomics into curricula. Here we discuss how to meet this challenge. Steps to initiate curricular changes to include genomics are presented along with a discussion on creating a genomic curriculum thread versus a standalone course. Ideas for use of print material and technology on genomic topics are also presented. Information is based on review of the literature and curriculum change efforts by the authors. In recognition of advances in genomics, the nursing profession is increasing an emphasis on the integration of genomics into professional practice and educational standards. Incorporating genomics into nurses' practices begins with changes in our undergraduate curricula. Information given in didactic courses should be reinforced in clinical practica, and Internet-based tools such as WebQuest, Second Life, and wikis offer attractive, up-to-date platforms to deliver this now crucial content. To provide information that may assist faculty to prepare the next generation of nurses to practice using genomics. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Genome bioinformatics of tomato and potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datema, E.

    2011-01-01

    In the past two decades genome sequencing has developed from a laborious and costly technology employed by large international consortia to a widely used, automated and affordable tool used worldwide by many individual research groups. Genome sequences of many food animals and crop plants have

  13. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these ...

  14. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  15. How RNA viruses maintain their genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, John N; Fearns, Rachel

    2010-06-01

    RNA genomes are vulnerable to corruption by a range of activities, including inaccurate replication by the error-prone replicase, damage from environmental factors, and attack by nucleases and other RNA-modifying enzymes that comprise the cellular intrinsic or innate immune response. Damage to coding regions and loss of critical cis-acting signals inevitably impair genome fitness; as a consequence, RNA viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to protect their genome integrity. These include mechanisms to promote replicase fidelity, recombination activities that allow exchange of sequences between different RNA templates, and mechanisms to repair the genome termini. In this article, we review examples of these processes from a range of RNA viruses to showcase the diverse approaches that viruses have evolved to maintain their genome sequence integrity, focusing first on mechanisms that viruses use to protect their entire genome, and then concentrating on mechanisms that allow protection of the genome termini, which are especially vulnerable. In addition, we discuss examples in which it might be beneficial for a virus to 'lose' its genomic termini and reduce its replication efficiency.

  16. Comparative genomics using data mining tools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1 | February 2002. Comparative genomics using data mining tools. 17 where L is the length of the concerned protein in amino acids and fi is the average frequency of occurrence of the ith amino acid in the set of proteins that are of high sequence complexity and are predicted to have globular fold within the same genome.

  17. KEGG: kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehisa, M; Goto, S

    2000-01-01

    KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) is a knowledge base for systematic analysis of gene functions, linking genomic information with higher order functional information. The genomic information is stored in the GENES database, which is a collection of gene catalogs for all the completely sequenced genomes and some partial genomes with up-to-date annotation of gene functions. The higher order functional information is stored in the PATHWAY database, which contains graphical representations of cellular processes, such as metabolism, membrane transport, signal transduction and cell cycle. The PATHWAY database is supplemented by a set of ortholog group tables for the information about conserved subpathways (pathway motifs), which are often encoded by positionally coupled genes on the chromosome and which are especially useful in predicting gene functions. A third database in KEGG is LIGAND for the information about chemical compounds, enzyme molecules and enzymatic reactions. KEGG provides Java graphics tools for browsing genome maps, comparing two genome maps and manipulating expression maps, as well as computational tools for sequence comparison, graph comparison and path computation. The KEGG databases are daily updated and made freely available (http://www. genome.ad.jp/kegg/).

  18. The Arab genome: Health and wealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Hatem

    2016-11-05

    The 22 Arab nations have a unique genetic structure, which reflects both conserved and diverse gene pools due to the prevalent endogamous and consanguineous marriage culture and the long history of admixture among different ethnic subcultures descended from the Asian, European, and African continents. Human genome sequencing has enabled large-scale genomic studies of different populations and has become a powerful tool for studying disease predictions and diagnosis. Despite the importance of the Arab genome for better understanding the dynamics of the human genome, discovering rare genetic variations, and studying early human migration out of Africa, it is poorly represented in human genome databases, such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. In this review, I demonstrate the significance of sequencing the Arab genome and setting an Arab genome reference(s) for better understanding the molecular pathogenesis of genetic diseases, discovering novel/rare variants, and identifying a meaningful genotype-phenotype correlation for complex diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Concept based document retrieval for genomics literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trieschnigg, D.; Kraaij, W.; Schuemie, M.

    2006-01-01

    The 2006 TREC Genomics evaluation focuses on document, passage and aspect retrieval in the genomics domain. The Erasmus Medical Center, TNO and University of Twente collaborated on an approach combining concept tagging (named entity recognition) and information retrieval based on statistical

  20. Concept based document retrieval for genomics literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Kraaij, Wessel; Schuemie, Martijn; Voorhees, E.M; Buckland, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2006 TREC Genomics evaluation focuses on document, passage and aspect retrieval in the genomics domain. The Erasmus Medical Center, TNO and University of Twente collaborated on an approach combining concept tagging (named entity recognition) and information retrieval based on language models.

  1. HGVA: the Human Genome Variation Archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Javier; Coll, Jacobo; Haimel, Matthias; Kandasamy, Swaathi; Tarraga, Joaquin; Furio-Tari, Pedro; Bari, Wasim; Bleda, Marta; Rueda, Antonio; Gräf, Stefan; Rendon, Augusto; Dopazo, Joaquin; Medina, Ignacio

    2017-07-03

    High-profile genomic variation projects like the 1000 Genomes project or the Exome Aggregation Consortium, are generating a wealth of human genomic variation knowledge which can be used as an essential reference for identifying disease-causing genotypes. However, accessing these data, contrasting the various studies and integrating those data in downstream analyses remains cumbersome. The Human Genome Variation Archive (HGVA) tackles these challenges and facilitates access to genomic data for key reference projects in a clean, fast and integrated fashion. HGVA provides an efficient and intuitive web-interface for easy data mining, a comprehensive RESTful API and client libraries in Python, Java and JavaScript for fast programmatic access to its knowledge base. HGVA calculates population frequencies for these projects and enriches their data with variant annotation provided by CellBase, a rich and fast annotation solution. HGVA serves as a proof-of-concept of the genome analysis developments being carried out by the University of Cambridge together with UK's 100 000 genomes project and the National Institute for Health Research BioResource Rare-Diseases, in particular, deploying open-source for Computational Biology (OpenCB) software platform for storing and analyzing massive genomic datasets. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Towards a reference pecan genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cost of generating DNA sequence data has declined dramatically over the previous 15 years as a result of the Human Genome Project and the potential applications of genome sequencing for human medicine. This cost reduction has generated renewed interest among crop breeding scientists in applying...

  3. BGD: a database of bat genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Fang

    Full Text Available Bats account for ~20% of mammalian species, and are the only mammals with true powered flight. For the sake of their specialized phenotypic traits, many researches have been devoted to examine the evolution of bats. Until now, some whole genome sequences of bats have been assembled and annotated, however, a uniform resource for the annotated bat genomes is still unavailable. To make the extensive data associated with the bat genomes accessible to the general biological communities, we established a Bat Genome Database (BGD. BGD is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates available data of bat genomes and genes. It hosts data from six bat species, including two megabats and four microbats. Users can query the gene annotations using efficient searching engine, and it offers browsable tracks of bat genomes. Furthermore, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of genes. To the best of our knowledge, BGD is the first database of bat genomes. It will extend our understanding of the bat evolution and be advantageous to the bat sequences analysis. BGD is freely available at: http://donglab.ecnu.edu.cn/databases/BatGenome/.

  4. Accounting for discovery bias in genomic prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate an approach to mitigating discovery bias in genomic prediction. Accuracy may be improved by placing greater emphasis on regions of the genome expected to be more influential on a trait. Methods emphasizing regions result in a phenomenon known as “discovery bias” if info...

  5. Genomic Approaches in Marine Biodiversity and Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A Huete-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have now established the new standard in medical and biotechnological research. The introduction of next-generation sequencing, NGS,has resulted in the generation of thousands of genomes from all domains of life, including the genomes of complex uncultured microbial communities revealed through metagenomics. Although the application of genomics to marine biodiversity remains poorly developed overall, some noteworthy progress has been made in recent years. The genomes of various model marine organisms have been published and a few more are underway. In addition, the recent large-scale analysis of marine microbes, along with transcriptomic and proteomic approaches to the study of teleost fishes, mollusks and crustaceans, to mention a few, has provided a better understanding of phenotypic variability and functional genomics. The past few years have also seen advances in applications relevant to marine aquaculture and fisheries. In this review we introduce several examples of recent discoveries and progress made towards engendering genomic resources aimed at enhancing our understanding of marine biodiversity and promoting the development of aquaculture. Finally, we discuss the need for auspicious science policies to address challenges confronting smaller nations in the appropriate oversight of this growing domain as they strive to guarantee food security and conservation of their natural resources.

  6. CRISPR-Cas: Revolutionising genome engineering | Nicholson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to permanently alter or repair the human genome has been the subject of a number of science fiction films, but with the recent advent of several customisable sequence-specific endonuclease technologies, genome engineering looks set to become a clinical reality in the near future. This article discusses recent ...

  7. Inferences from Genomic Models in Stratified Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc; de los Campos, Gustavo; Sheehan, Nuala

    2012-01-01

    Unaccounted population stratification can lead to spurious associations in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and in this context several methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. An alternative line of research uses whole-genome random regression (WGRR) models that fit all marker...

  8. A comparison of rice chloroplast genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jiabin; Xia, Hong'ai; Cao, Mengliang

    2004-01-01

    Using high quality sequence reads extracted from our whole genome shotgun repository, we assembled two chloroplast genome sequences from two rice (Oryza sativa) varieties, one from 93-11 (a typical indica variety) and the other from PA64S (an indica-like variety with maternal origin of japonica),...

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra genome sequencing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-02-09

    Feb 9, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 2. Commentary: The value of comparative genomics in understanding mycobacterial virulence: Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra genome sequencing – a worthwhile endeavour. Deepak Sharma Jaya Sivaswami Tyagi. Volume 32 Issue 2 March ...

  10. Genomics and the origin of species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seehausen, Ole; Butlin, Roger K.; Keller, Irene; Wagner, Catherine E.; Boughman, Janette W.; Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Saetre, Glenn-Peter; Bank, Claudia; Brännström, Åke; Brelsford, Alan; Clarkson, Chris S.; Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Feder, Jeffrey L.; Fischer, Martin C.; Foote, Andrew D.; Franchini, Paolo; Jiggins, Chris D.; Jones, Felicity C.; Lindholm, Anna K.; Lucek, Kay; Maan, Martine E.; Marques, David A.; Martin, Simon H.; Matthews, Blake; Meier, Joana I.; Möst, Markus; Nachman, Michael W.; Nonaka, Etsuko; Rennison, Diana J.; Schwarzer, Julia; Watson, Eric T.; Westram, Anja M.; Widmer, Alex

    Speciation is a fundamental evolutionary process, the knowledge of which is crucial for understanding the origins of biodiversity. Genomic approaches are an increasingly important aspect of this research field. We review current understanding of genome-wide effects of accumulating reproductive

  11. Bacterial genomes: habitat specificity and uncharted organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Araújo, Welington Luiz; Trevors, Jack T; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-07-01

    The capability and speed in generating genomic data have increased profoundly since the release of the draft human genome in 2000. Additionally, sequencing costs have continued to plummet as the next generation of highly efficient sequencing technologies (next-generation sequencing) became available and commercial facilities promote market competition. However, new challenges have emerged as researchers attempt to efficiently process the massive amounts of sequence data being generated. First, the described genome sequences are unequally distributed among the branches of bacterial life and, second, bacterial pan-genomes are often not considered when setting aims for sequencing projects. Here, we propose that scientists should be concerned with attaining an improved equal representation of most of the bacterial tree of life organisms, at the genomic level. Moreover, they should take into account the natural variation that is often observed within bacterial species and the role of the often changing surrounding environment and natural selection pressures, which is central to bacterial speciation and genome evolution. Not only will such efforts contribute to our overall understanding of the microbial diversity extant in ecosystems as well as the structuring of the extant genomes, but they will also facilitate the development of better methods for (meta)genome annotation.

  12. Bacterial genomes : Habitat specificity and uncharted organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Dini Andreote, Fernando; Araujo, Welington Luiz; Trevors, Jack T.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    The capability and speed in generating genomic data have increased profoundly since the release of the draft human genome in 2000. Additionally, sequencing costs have continued to plummet as the next generation of highly efficient sequencing technologies (next-generation sequencing) became available

  13. Feast and famine in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan F. Wendel; Richard C. Cronn; J. Spencer Jonhston; H. James. Price

    2002-01-01

    Plant genomes vary over several orders of magnitude in size, even among closely related species, yet the origin, genesis and significance of this variation are not clear. Because DNA content varies over a sevenfold range among diploid species in the cotton genus (Gossypium) and its allies, this group offers opportunities for exploring patterns and mechanisms of genome...

  14. Genetical genomics : the added value from segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.; Nap, Jan-Peter

    2001-01-01

    The recent successes of genome-wide expression profiling in biology tend to overlook the power of genetics. We here propose a merger of genomics and genetics into ‘genetical genomics’. This involves expression profiling and marker-based fingerprinting of each individual of a segregating population,

  15. BGD: a database of bat genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jianfei; Wang, Xuan; Mu, Shuo; Zhang, Shuyi; Dong, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Bats account for ~20% of mammalian species, and are the only mammals with true powered flight. For the sake of their specialized phenotypic traits, many researches have been devoted to examine the evolution of bats. Until now, some whole genome sequences of bats have been assembled and annotated, however, a uniform resource for the annotated bat genomes is still unavailable. To make the extensive data associated with the bat genomes accessible to the general biological communities, we established a Bat Genome Database (BGD). BGD is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates available data of bat genomes and genes. It hosts data from six bat species, including two megabats and four microbats. Users can query the gene annotations using efficient searching engine, and it offers browsable tracks of bat genomes. Furthermore, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of genes. To the best of our knowledge, BGD is the first database of bat genomes. It will extend our understanding of the bat evolution and be advantageous to the bat sequences analysis. BGD is freely available at: http://donglab.ecnu.edu.cn/databases/BatGenome/.

  16. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  17. Life insurance: genomic stratification and risk classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Yann; Burton, Hilary; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Feze, Ida Ngueng; Dent, Tom; Pashayan, Nora; Chowdhury, Susmita; Foulkes, William; Hall, Alison; Hamet, Pavel; Kirwan, Nick; Macdonald, Angus; Simard, Jacques; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2014-05-01

    With the development and increasing accessibility of new genomic tools such as next-generation sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genomic stratification models, the debate on genetic discrimination in the context of life insurance became even more complex, requiring a review of current practices and the exploration of new scenarios. In this perspective, a multidisciplinary group of international experts representing different interests revisited the genetics and life insurance debate during a 2-day symposium 'Life insurance: breast cancer research and genetic risk prediction seminar' held in Quebec City, Canada on 24 and 25 September 2012. Having reviewed the current legal, social, and ethical issues on the use of genomic information in the context of life insurance, the Expert Group identified four main questions: (1) Have recent developments in genomics and related sciences changed the contours of the genetics and life insurance debate? (2) Are genomic results obtained in a research context relevant for life insurance underwriting? (3) Should predictive risk assessment and risk stratification models based on genomic data also be used for life insurance underwriting? (4) What positive actions could stakeholders in the debate take to alleviate concerns over the use of genomic information by life insurance underwriters? This paper presents a summary of the discussions and the specific action items recommended by the Expert Group.

  18. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    J. Biosci. 32(1), January 2007. The list of microsatellite rich as well as poor regions in the five mycobacterial genomes. Local GC%. Repeat rich(+)/. Repeat poor(-). Total ORFs. Number of ... Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes. VATTIPALLY .... heat shock protein (grpE) (15839737), heat shock protein (dnaJ) ...

  19. The Post-Genomic Era of Cassava

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomics era revolutionized our efficiency at gathering and disseminating scientific information required for advancing our understanding of plant biology. In the case of cassava, the genomics revolution has not kept pace with other staple food and fiber crops important to global economies. As a...

  20. Pathway and network analysis of cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Reimand, Jueri; Haider, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Genomic information on tumors from 50 cancer types cataloged by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) shows that only a few well-studied driver genes are frequently mutated, in contrast to many infrequently mutated genes that may also contribute to tumor biology. Hence there has been ...

  1. Whole genome analysis of a Vietnamese trio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We here present the first whole genome analysis of an anonymous Kinh Vietnamese (KHV) trio whose genomes were deeply sequenced to 30-fold average ... Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics, Oxford University, Oxford, UK; High Performance Computing Center, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, ...

  2. Efficient marker data utilization in genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid

    Genomic prediction is a novel method to recognize the best animals for breeding. The aim of this PhD is to improve the accuracy of genomic prediction in dairy cattle by effeiently utilizing marker data. The thesis focuses on three aspects for improving the genomc prediction, which are: criteria...

  3. Genomics approaches in the understanding of Entamoeba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... genome provides new insights into the cellular workings and genome evolution of this major human pathogen. Here, we reviewed .... To establish successful host colonization, trophozoites must resist oxidative stress by ... structure, protein synthesis and degradation, energy metabolism, vesicle trafficking ...

  4. Genomics approaches in the understanding of Entamoeba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal protozoan parasite responsible for amebic colitis and liver abscesses, which cause mortality in many developing countries. The sequencing of the parasite genome provides new insights into the cellular workings and genome evolution of this major human pathogen. Here, we reviewed ...

  5. Life insurance: genomic stratification and risk classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Yann; Burton, Hilary; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Feze, Ida Ngueng; Dent, Tom; Pashayan, Nora; Chowdhury, Susmita; Foulkes, William; Hall, Alison; Hamet, Pavel; Kirwan, Nick; Macdonald, Angus; Simard, Jacques; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2014-01-01

    With the development and increasing accessibility of new genomic tools such as next-generation sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genomic stratification models, the debate on genetic discrimination in the context of life insurance became even more complex, requiring a review of current practices and the exploration of new scenarios. In this perspective, a multidisciplinary group of international experts representing different interests revisited the genetics and life insurance debate during a 2-day symposium ‘Life insurance: breast cancer research and genetic risk prediction seminar' held in Quebec City, Canada on 24 and 25 September 2012. Having reviewed the current legal, social, and ethical issues on the use of genomic information in the context of life insurance, the Expert Group identified four main questions: (1) Have recent developments in genomics and related sciences changed the contours of the genetics and life insurance debate? (2) Are genomic results obtained in a research context relevant for life insurance underwriting? (3) Should predictive risk assessment and risk stratification models based on genomic data also be used for life insurance underwriting? (4) What positive actions could stakeholders in the debate take to alleviate concerns over the use of genomic information by life insurance underwriters? This paper presents a summary of the discussions and the specific action items recommended by the Expert Group. PMID:24129434

  6. Microbial minimalism: genome reduction in bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy A

    2002-03-08

    When bacterial lineages make the transition from free-living or facultatively parasitic life cycles to permanent associations with hosts, they undergo a major loss of genes and DNA. Complete genome sequences are providing an understanding of how extreme genome reduction affects evolutionary directions and metabolic capabilities of obligate pathogens and symbionts.

  7. Genomics approaches in the understanding of Entamoeba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... transfer of bacterial genes into the E. histolytica genome was observed, and evidence that these ... The parasite genome also encodes a large number of novel receptor kinases and contains expan- ... studies were performed using RNA isolated from amoeba that have chemotaxed towards TNF (close to the ...

  8. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.; Molenaar, D.; IJcken, W. van; Venema, K.; Korta, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the

  9. Pichia stipitis genomics, transcriptomics, and gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W. Jeffries; Jennifer R. Headman Van Vleet

    2009-01-01

    Genome sequencing and subsequent global gene expression studies have advanced our understanding of the lignocellulose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis. These studies have provided an insight into its central carbon metabolism, and analysis of its genome has revealed numerous functional gene clusters and tandem repeats. Specialized physiological traits are often the...

  10. Fungal biology: compiling genomes and exploiting them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Uehling, Jessie K [ORNL; Payen, Thibaut [INRA; Plett, Jonathan [University of Western Sydney, Australia

    2014-01-01

    The last 10 years have seen the cost of sequencing complete genomes decrease at an incredible speed. This has led to an increase in the number of genomes sequenced in all the fungal tree of life as well as a wide variety of plant genomes. The increase in sequencing has permitted us to study the evolution of organisms on a genomic scale. A number of talks during the conference discussed the importance of transposable elements (TEs) that are present in almost all species of fungi. These TEs represent an especially large percentage of genomic space in fungi that interact with plants. Thierry Rouxel (INRA, Nancy, France) showed the link between speciation in the Leptosphaeria complex and the expansion of TE families. For example in the Leptosphaeria complex, one species associated with oilseed rape has experienced a recent and massive burst of movement by a few TE families. The alterations caused by these TEs took place in discrete regions of the genome leading to shuffling of the genomic landscape and the appearance of genes specific to the species, such as effectors useful for the interactions with a particular plant (Rouxel et al., 2011). Other presentations showed the importance of TEs in affecting genome organization. For example, in Amanita different species appear to have been invaded by different TE families (Veneault-Fourrey & Martin, 2011).

  11. Fungal genomics: forensic evidence of sexual activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Neil A R

    2005-07-12

    The genome sequence of the 'asexual' human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus suggests it has the capability to undergo mating and meiosis. That this organism engages in clandestine sexual activity is also suggested by observations of two equally distributed complementary mating types in nature, the expression of mating type genes and evidence of recent genome recombination events.

  12. Mapping genomic deletions down to the base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunø, Morten; Hove, Hanne; Kirchhoff, Maria

    2004-01-01

    With the recent advances in genomic research, it has become apparent that a substantial part of human malformation and mental retardation is caused by imbalances in genomic content. Thus, there is an increasing need for versatile methods allowing a detailed mapping and cloning of the actual rearr...

  13. Genomic and personalized medicine: foundations and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Willard, Huntington F

    2009-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed a steady embrace of genomic and personalized medicine by senior government officials, industry leadership, health care providers, and the public. Genomic medicine, which is the use of information from genomes and their derivatives (RNA, proteins, and metabolites) to guide medical decision making-is a key component of personalized medicine, which is a rapidly advancing field of health care that is informed by each person's unique clinical, genetic, genomic, and environmental information. As medicine begins to embrace genomic tools that enable more precise prediction and treatment disease, which include "whole genome" interrogation of sequence variation, transcription, proteins, and metabolites, the fundamentals of genomic and personalized medicine will require the development, standardization, and integration of several important tools into health systems and clinical workflows. These tools include health risk assessment, family health history, and clinical decision support for complex risk and predictive information. Together with genomic information, these tools will enable a paradigm shift to a comprehensive approach that will identify individual risks and guide clinical management and decision making, all of which form the basis for a more informed and effective approach to patient care. DNA-based risk assessment for common complex disease, molecular signatures for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, and genome-guided therapy and dose selection are just among the few important examples for which genome information has already enabled personalized health care along the continuum from health to disease. In addition, information from individual genomes, which is a fast-moving area of technological development, is spawning a social and information revolution among consumers that will undoubtedly affect health care decision making. Although these and other scientific findings are making their way from the genome to the clinic, the full

  14. seq-seq-pan: building a computational pan-genome data structure on whole genome alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandrasits, Christine; Dabrowski, Piotr W; Fuchs, Stephan; Renard, Bernhard Y

    2018-01-15

    The increasing application of next generation sequencing technologies has led to the availability of thousands of reference genomes, often providing multiple genomes for the same or closely related species. The current approach to represent a species or a population with a single reference sequence and a set of variations cannot represent their full diversity and introduces bias towards the chosen reference. There is a need for the representation of multiple sequences in a composite way that is compatible with existing data sources for annotation and suitable for established sequence analysis methods. At the same time, this representation needs to be easily accessible and extendable to account for the constant change of available genomes. We introduce seq-seq-pan, a framework that provides methods for adding or removing new genomes from a set of aligned genomes and uses these to construct a whole genome alignment. Throughout the sequential workflow the alignment is optimized for generating a representative linear presentation of the aligned set of genomes, that enables its usage for annotation and in downstream analyses. By providing dynamic updates and optimized processing, our approach enables the usage of whole genome alignment in the field of pan-genomics. In addition, the sequential workflow can be used as a fast alternative to existing whole genome aligners for aligning closely related genomes. seq-seq-pan is freely available at https://gitlab.com/rki_bioinformatics.

  15. Sinbase: an integrated database to study genomics, genetics and comparative genomics in Sesamum indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an ancient and important oilseed crop grown widely in tropical and subtropical areas. It belongs to the gigantic order Lamiales, which includes many well-known or economically important species, such as olive (Olea europaea), leonurus (Leonurus japonicus) and lavender (Lavandula spica), many of which have important pharmacological properties. Despite their importance, genetic and genomic analyses on these species have been insufficient due to a lack of reference genome information. The now available S. indicum genome will provide an unprecedented opportunity for studying both S. indicum genetic traits and comparative genomics. To deliver S. indicum genomic information to the worldwide research community, we designed Sinbase, a web-based database with comprehensive sesame genomic, genetic and comparative genomic information. Sinbase includes sequences of assembled sesame pseudomolecular chromosomes, protein-coding genes (27,148), transposable elements (372,167) and non-coding RNAs (1,748). In particular, Sinbase provides unique and valuable information on colinear regions with various plant genomes, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum. Sinbase also provides a useful search function and data mining tools, including a keyword search and local BLAST service. Sinbase will be updated regularly with new features, improvements to genome annotation and new genomic sequences, and is freely accessible at http://ocri-genomics.org/Sinbase/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Functional genomics and cancer drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Susan E; Boehm, Jesse S; Barbie, David A; Hahn, William C

    2010-06-01

    The recent development of technologies for whole-genome sequencing, copy number analysis and expression profiling enables the generation of comprehensive descriptions of cancer genomes. However, although the structural analysis and expression profiling of tumors and cancer cell lines can allow the identification of candidate molecules that are altered in the malignant state, functional analyses are necessary to confirm such genes as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Moreover, recent research suggests that tumor cells also depend on synthetic lethal targets, which are not mutated or amplified in cancer genomes; functional genomics screening can facilitate the discovery of such targets. This review provides an overview of the tools available for the study of functional genomics, and discusses recent research involving the use of these tools to identify potential novel drug targets in cancer.

  17. Xenopus genomic data and browser resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vize, Peter D; Zorn, Aaron M

    2017-06-15

    The two species of Xenopus most commonly used in biomedical research are the diploid Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis and the tetraploid Xenopus laevis. The X. tropicalis genome sequence has been available since 2010 and this year the X. laevis, genome from two distinct genetic backgrounds has been published. Multiple genome assemblies available for both species and transcriptomic and epigenetic data sets are growing rapidly, all of which are available from a variety of web resources. This review describes the contents of these resources, how to locate and download genomic data, and also how to view and manipulate these data on various public genome browsers, with an emphasis on Xenbase, the Xenopus model organism database. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic definition of species. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1993-03-01

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species- and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called species genome. Our proposal for the definition of a biological species is as follows: A species comprises a group of actual and potential biological organisms built according to a unique genome program that is recorded, and at least in part expressed, in the structures of their genomic nucleic acid molecule(s), having intragroup sequence differences which can be fully interconverted in the process of organismal reproduction.

  19. Radiotaxons and reliability of a genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korogodin, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    Radiosensitivity of cells (D 0 ) is considered with regard to the structural organization of the genome. The following terms are introduced: ''karyotaxon'', organisms with identical structural organization of the genome, and ''specific genome stability'' K=D 0 C, where C is the quantity of DNA in the cell nucleus; K is the amount of energy (eV) the sorption of which in DNA is necessary and sufficient for one elementary damage to occur. It was shown that Ksub(i)=const. within every karyotaxon ''i''. K 1 =100 eV for viruses, and K 4 =61000 eV for the highest level of genome organization (diploid eukaryotes including man). Potential mechanisms of increasing Ksub(i) with increasing level of genome organization and the role of this factor in evolution are discussed [ru

  20. The genomic landscape of retinoblastoma: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, Brigitte L; Dimaras, Helen; Gallie, Brenda L; Corson, Timothy W

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a paediatric ocular tumour that continues to reveal much about the genetic basis of cancer development. Study of genomic aberrations in retinoblastoma tumours has exposed important mechanisms of cancer development, and identified oncogenes and tumour suppressors that offer potential points of therapeutic intervention. The recent development of next-generation genomic technologies has allowed further refinement of the genomic landscape of retinoblastoma at high resolution. In a relatively short period of time, a wealth of genetic and epigenetic data has emerged on a small number of tumour samples. These data highlight the inherent molecular complexity of this cancer, despite the fact that most retinoblastomas are initiated by the inactivation of a single tumour suppressor gene. Here, we review the current understanding of the genomic, genetic and epigenetic changes in retinoblastoma, highlighting recent genome-wide analyses that have identified exciting candidate genes worthy of further validation as potential prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:24433356

  1. The UCSC Genome Browser Database: 2008 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karolchik, D; Kuhn, R M; Baertsch, R

    2007-01-01

    and 21 invertebrate species as of September 2007. For each assembly, the GBD contains a collection of annotation data aligned to the genomic sequence. Highlights of this year's additions include a 28-species human-based vertebrate conservation annotation, an enhanced UCSC Genes set, and more human......The University of California, Santa Cruz, Genome Browser Database (GBD) provides integrated sequence and annotation data for a large collection of vertebrate and model organism genomes. Seventeen new assemblies have been added to the database in the past year, for a total coverage of 19 vertebrate...... variation, MGC, and ENCODE data. The database is optimized for fast interactive performance with a set of web-based tools that may be used to view, manipulate, filter and download the annotation data. New toolset features include the Genome Graphs tool for displaying genome-wide data sets, session saving...

  2. WormBase: Annotating many nematode genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kevin; Davis, Paul; Paulini, Michael; Tuli, Mary Ann; Williams, Gary; Yook, Karen; Durbin, Richard; Kersey, Paul; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    WormBase (www.wormbase.org) has been serving the scientific community for over 11 years as the central repository for genomic and genetic information for the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The resource has evolved from its beginnings as a database housing the genomic sequence and genetic and physical maps of a single species, and now represents the breadth and diversity of nematode research, currently serving genome sequence and annotation for around 20 nematodes. In this article, we focus on WormBase's role of genome sequence annotation, describing how we annotate and integrate data from a growing collection of nematode species and strains. We also review our approaches to sequence curation, and discuss the impact on annotation quality of large functional genomics projects such as modENCODE.

  3. Quantifying Temporal Genomic Erosion in Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Del-Molino, David; Sánchez-Barreiro, Fatima; Barnes, Ian; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Dalén, Love

    2018-03-01

    Many species have undergone dramatic population size declines over the past centuries. Although stochastic genetic processes during and after such declines are thought to elevate the risk of extinction, comparative analyses of genomic data from several endangered species suggest little concordance between genome-wide diversity and current population sizes. This is likely because species-specific life-history traits and ancient bottlenecks overshadow the genetic effect of recent demographic declines. Therefore, we advocate that temporal sampling of genomic data provides a more accurate approach to quantify genetic threats in endangered species. Specifically, genomic data from predecline museum specimens will provide valuable baseline data that enable accurate estimation of recent decreases in genome-wide diversity, increases in inbreeding levels, and accumulation of deleterious genetic variation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. myGenomeBrowser: building and sharing your own genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrere, Sébastien; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2017-04-15

    myGenomeBrowser is a web-based environment that provides biologists with a way to build, query and share their genome browsers. This tool, that builds on JBrowse, is designed to give users more autonomy while simplifying and minimizing intervention from system administrators. We have extended genome browser basic features to allow users to query, analyze and share their data. myGenomeBrowser is freely available at https://bbric-pipelines.toulouse.inra.fr/myGenomeBrowser and includes tutorial screencasts. Source code and installation instructions can be found at https://framagit.org/BBRIC/myGenomeBrowser . myGenomeBrowser is open-source and mainly implemented in Perl, JavaScript, Apache and Docker. sebastien.carrere@inra.fr. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  6. Correction for Measurement Error from Genotyping-by-Sequencing in Genomic Variance and Genomic Prediction Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal; Janss, Luc; Jensen, Just

    sample). The GBSeq data can be used directly in genomic models in the form of individual SNP allele-frequency estimates (e.g., reference reads/total reads per polymorphic site per individual), but is subject to measurement error due to the low sequencing depth per individual. Due to technical reasons....... In the current work we show how the correction for measurement error in GBSeq can also be applied in whole genome genomic variance and genomic prediction models. Bayesian whole-genome random regression models are proposed to allow implementation of large-scale SNP-based models with a per-SNP correction...... for measurement error. We show correct retrieval of genomic explained variance, and improved genomic prediction when accounting for the measurement error in GBSeq data...

  7. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    Full Text Available Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria.

  8. Detection of genomic rearrangements in cucumber using genomecmp software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, Maciej; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena Ewa; Wojcieszek, Michał; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Nowak, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    Comparative genomic by increasing information about the genomes sequences available in the databases is a rapidly evolving science. A simple comparison of the general features of genomes such as genome size, number of genes, and chromosome number presents an entry point into comparative genomic analysis. Here we present the utility of the new tool genomecmp for finding rearrangements across the compared sequences and applications in plant comparative genomics.

  9. Competition between influenza A virus genome segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Widjaja

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV contains a segmented negative-strand RNA genome. How IAV balances the replication and transcription of its multiple genome segments is not understood. We developed a dual competition assay based on the co-transfection of firefly or Gaussia luciferase-encoding genome segments together with plasmids encoding IAV polymerase subunits and nucleoprotein. At limiting amounts of polymerase subunits, expression of the firefly luciferase segment was negatively affected by the presence of its Gaussia luciferase counterpart, indicative of competition between reporter genome segments. This competition could be relieved by increasing or decreasing the relative amounts of firefly or Gaussia reporter segment, respectively. The balance between the luciferase expression levels was also affected by the identity of the untranslated regions (UTRs as well as segment length. In general it appeared that genome segments displaying inherent higher expression levels were more efficient competitors of another segment. When natural genome segments were tested for their ability to suppress reporter gene expression, shorter genome segments generally reduced firefly luciferase expression to a larger extent, with the M and NS segments having the largest effect. The balance between different reporter segments was most dramatically affected by the introduction of UTR panhandle-stabilizing mutations. Furthermore, only reporter genome segments carrying these mutations were able to efficiently compete with the natural genome segments in infected cells. Our data indicate that IAV genome segments compete for available polymerases. Competition is affected by segment length, coding region, and UTRs. This competition is probably most apparent early during infection, when limiting amounts of polymerases are present, and may contribute to the regulation of segment-specific replication and transcription.

  10. Comparative chloroplast genomes of camellia species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Bo Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Camellia, comprising more than 200 species, is a valuable economic commodity due to its enormously popular commercial products: tea leaves, flowers, and high-quality edible oils. It is the largest and most important genus in the family Theaceae. However, phylogenetic resolution of the species has proven to be difficult. Consequently, the interspecies relationships of the genus Camellia are still hotly debated. Phylogenomics is an attractive avenue that can be used to reconstruct the tree of life, especially at low taxonomic levels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven complete chloroplast (cp genomes were sequenced from six species representing different subdivisions of the genus Camellia using Illumina sequencing technology. Four junctions between the single-copy segments and the inverted repeats were confirmed and genome assemblies were validated by PCR-based product sequencing using 123 pairs of primers covering preliminary cp genome assemblies. The length of the Camellia cp genome was found to be about 157kb, which contained 123 unique genes and 23 were duplicated in the IR regions. We determined that the complete Camellia cp genome was relatively well conserved, but contained enough genetic differences to provide useful phylogenetic information. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed using seven complete cp genomes of six Camellia species. We also identified rapidly evolving regions of the cp genome that have the potential to be used for further species identification and phylogenetic resolution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we wanted to determine if analyzing completely sequenced cp genomes could help settle these controversies of interspecies relationships in Camellia. The results demonstrate that cp genome data are beneficial in resolving species definition because they indicate that organelle-based "barcodes", can be established for a species and then used to unmask interspecies phylogenetic relationships. It

  11. Big Data Analysis of Human Genome Variations

    KAUST Repository

    Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-01-25

    Since the human genome draft sequence was in public for the first time in 2000, genomic analyses have been intensively extended to the population level. The following three international projects are good examples for large-scale studies of human genome variations: 1) HapMap Data (1,417 individuals) (http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/downloads/genotypes/2010-08_phaseII+III/forward/), 2) HGDP (Human Genome Diversity Project) Data (940 individuals) (http://www.hagsc.org/hgdp/files.html), 3) 1000 genomes Data (2,504 individuals) http://ftp.1000genomes.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp/release/20130502/ If we can integrate all three data into a single volume of data, we should be able to conduct a more detailed analysis of human genome variations for a total number of 4,861 individuals (= 1,417+940+2,504 individuals). In fact, we successfully integrated these three data sets by use of information on the reference human genome sequence, and we conducted the big data analysis. In particular, we constructed a phylogenetic tree of about 5,000 human individuals at the genome level. As a result, we were able to identify clusters of ethnic groups, with detectable admixture, that were not possible by an analysis of each of the three data sets. Here, we report the outcome of this kind of big data analyses and discuss evolutionary significance of human genomic variations. Note that the present study was conducted in collaboration with Katsuhiko Mineta and Kosuke Goto at KAUST.

  12. Genomic Characteristics of Chinese Borrelia burgdorferi Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Hao

    Full Text Available In China, B. burgdorferi, B.garinii, B. afzelii and B. yangtze sp. nov have been reported; B.garinii and B. afzelii are the main pathogenic genotypes. But until now only one Chinese strain was reported with whole genome sequence. In order to further understand the genomic characteristics and diversity of Chinese Borrelia strains, 5 isolates from China were sequenced and compared with the whole genome sequences of strains in other areas. The results showed a high degree of conservation within the linear chromosome of Chinese strains, whereas plasmid showed a much larger diversity according to the majority genomic information of plasmids. The genome sequences of the five Chinese strains were compared with the corresponding reference strains, respectively, according to the genospecies. Pairwise analysis demonstrates that there are only 70 SNPs between the genomes of CS4 and B31. However, there are many more SNPs between the genomes of QX-S13 and VS116, PD91 and PBi, FP1 and PKo, R9 and Pko, respectively. Gene comparison showed some important different genes. OspA was one of the important different genes. Comparative genomic studies have found that OspA gene sequences of PD91 and R9 had great differences compared with the sequence of B31. OspA gene sequence of R9 had a 96bp deletion; OspA gene of PD91 had two deletions: 9bp and 10 bp. To conclude, we showed the genomic characteristics of four genotype Chinese B. burgdorferi strains. The genomic sequence of B. yangtze sp. nov and differences from B. valaisiana were first reported. Comparative analysis of Chinese strains with the different Borrelia species from other areas will help us to understand evolution and pathogenesis of Chinese Borrelia burgdorferi strains.

  13. Genomic Characteristics of Chinese Borrelia burgdorferi Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qin; Du, Pengcheng; Zhang, Wen; Hou, Xuexia; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Huixin; Liu, Wei; Chen, Chen; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    In China, B. burgdorferi, B.garinii, B. afzelii and B. yangtze sp. nov have been reported; B.garinii and B. afzelii are the main pathogenic genotypes. But until now only one Chinese strain was reported with whole genome sequence. In order to further understand the genomic characteristics and diversity of Chinese Borrelia strains, 5 isolates from China were sequenced and compared with the whole genome sequences of strains in other areas. The results showed a high degree of conservation within the linear chromosome of Chinese strains, whereas plasmid showed a much larger diversity according to the majority genomic information of plasmids. The genome sequences of the five Chinese strains were compared with the corresponding reference strains, respectively, according to the genospecies. Pairwise analysis demonstrates that there are only 70 SNPs between the genomes of CS4 and B31. However, there are many more SNPs between the genomes of QX-S13 and VS116, PD91 and PBi, FP1 and PKo, R9 and Pko, respectively. Gene comparison showed some important different genes. OspA was one of the important different genes. Comparative genomic studies have found that OspA gene sequences of PD91 and R9 had great differences compared with the sequence of B31. OspA gene sequence of R9 had a 96bp deletion; OspA gene of PD91 had two deletions: 9bp and 10 bp. To conclude, we showed the genomic characteristics of four genotype Chinese B. burgdorferi strains. The genomic sequence of B. yangtze sp. nov and differences from B. valaisiana were first reported. Comparative analysis of Chinese strains with the different Borrelia species from other areas will help us to understand evolution and pathogenesis of Chinese Borrelia burgdorferi strains.

  14. Genomics, nutrition, obesity, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rolanda L; Williams, Scott M; Spruill, Ida J

    2006-01-01

    To present evidence of genetic and environmental interactions as they relate to nutrition, diabetes, and obesity. A review of seminal literature related to genetics, obesity, and diabetes. Multifactorial interactions are important in the development of nutrition-related disorders, but the challenge remains to explain how these interactions are expressed. Treating subpopulations of people might be important and useful to some extent at present, but in the future treating people of given genetic predispositions and other personal and environmental factors will have greater effects on quality-of-life indicators and life expectancies. Individualization coupled with multifactorial interactions will lead to new and more effective preventive and treatment modalities of nutrition-related disorders. With obesity and diabetes, genomics will bridge the traditional use of diet, exercise, and weight reduction with other environmental factors, ultimately leading to healthier lives.

  15. Microbial Metagenomics: Beyond the Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Dupont, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics literally means “beyond the genome.” Marine microbial metagenomic databases presently comprise ˜400 billion base pairs of DNA, only ˜3% of that found in 1 ml of seawater. Very soon a trillion-base-pair sequence run will be feasible, so it is time to reflect on what we have learned from metagenomics. We review the impact of metagenomics on our understanding of marine microbial communities. We consider the studies facilitated by data generated through the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, as well as the revolution wrought at the individual laboratory level through next generation sequencing technologies. We review recent studies and discoveries since 2008, provide a discussion of bioinformatic analyses, including conceptual pipelines and sequence annotation and predict the future of metagenomics, with suggestions of collaborative community studies tailored toward answering some of the fundamental questions in marine microbial ecology.

  16. Genomic Characterization of Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, Sabina; Gianfelici, Valentina; Ceglie, Giulia; Foà, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, hematologic malignancies have been extensively evaluated due to the introduction of powerful technologies, such as conventional karyotyping, FISH analysis, gene and microRNA expression profiling, array comparative genomic hybridization and SNP arrays, and next-generation sequencing (including whole-exome sequencing and RNA-seq). These analyses have allowed for the refinement of the mechanisms underlying the leukemic transformation in several oncohematologic disorders and, more importantly, they have permitted the definition of novel prognostic algorithms aimed at stratifying patients at the onset of disease and, consequently, treating them in the most appropriate manner. Furthermore, the identification of specific molecular markers is opening the door to targeted and personalized medicine. The most important findings on novel acquisitions in the context of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both B and T lineage and de novo acute myeloid leukemia are described in this review. PMID:24968698

  17. Obesity: genome and environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bašić, Martina; Butorac, Ana; Landeka Jurčević, Irena; Bačun-Družina, Višnja

    2012-09-01

    Obesity has become one of the major threats for public health in industrialised world among adults, but also among adolescents and children. It is influenced by the interaction of genes, nutrition, environment, and lifestyle. Environmental and lifestyle risk factors include foetal and lifelong environment, nutrient quality, chemical and microbial exposure, and psychical stress, all of which are important contributing influences. Removing or limiting chemical and pharmaceutical obesogens from human environment could make a difference in the growing epidemic of obesity. Additionally, nutrigenomics describes how modifications in individual diets can improve health and prevent chronic diseases, as well as obesity, by understanding the effects of a genetic profile in the interaction between food and increase in body weight. Furthermore, individual genetic variations in genome represent an individual's predisposition for obesity. Therefore, the use of individual genetic information, avoiding obesogens, and a healthy lifestyle could help to improve the management of obesity and maintain a healthy weight.

  18. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Gossypium hirsutum and Evolutionary Analysis of Higher Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Aiguo; Geng, Jianing; Grover, Corrinne E.; Hu, Songnian; Hua, Jinping

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are the main manufacturers of cellular ATP in eukaryotes. The plant mitochondrial genome contains large number of foreign DNA and repeated sequences undergone frequently intramolecular recombination. Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the main natural fiber crops and also an important oil-producing plant in the world. Sequencing of the cotton mitochondrial (mt) genome could be helpful for the evolution research of plant mt genomes. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized 454 technology for sequencing and combined with Fosmid library of the Gossypium hirsutum mt genome screening and positive clones sequencing and conducted a series of evolutionary analysis on Cycas taitungensis and 24 angiosperms mt genomes. After data assembling and contigs joining, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. hirsutum was obtained. The completed G.hirsutum mt genome is 621,884 bp in length, and contained 68 genes, including 35 protein genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. Five gene clusters are found conserved in all plant mt genomes; one and four clusters are specifically conserved in monocots and dicots, respectively. Homologous sequences are distributed along the plant mt genomes and species closely related share the most homologous sequences. For species that have both mt and chloroplast genome sequences available, we checked the location of cp-like migration and found several fragments closely linked with mitochondrial genes. Conclusion The G. hirsutum mt genome possesses most of the common characters of higher plant mt genomes. The existence of syntenic gene clusters, as well as the conservation of some intergenic sequences and genic content among the plant mt genomes suggest that evolution of mt genomes is consistent with plant taxonomy but independent among different species. PMID:23940520

  19. PromBase: a web resource for various genomic features and predicted promoters in prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Manju

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more and more genomes are being sequenced, an overview of their genomic features and annotation of their functional elements, which control the expression of each gene or transcription unit of the genome, is a fundamental challenge in genomics and bioinformatics. Findings Relative stability of DNA sequence has been used to predict promoter regions in 913 microbial genomic sequences with GC-content ranging from 16.6% to 74.9%. Irrespective of the genome GC-content the relative stability based promoter prediction method has already been proven to be robust in terms of recall and precision. The predicted promoter regions for the 913 microbial genomes have been accumulated in a database called PromBase. Promoter search can be carried out in PromBase either by specifying the gene name or the genomic position. Each predicted promoter region has been assigned to a reliability class (low, medium, high, very high and highest based on the difference between its average free energy and the downstream region. The recall and precision values for each class are shown graphically in PromBase. In addition, PromBase provides detailed information about base composition, CDS and CG/TA skews for each genome and various DNA sequence dependent structural properties (average free energy, curvature and bendability in the vicinity of all annotated translation start sites (TLS. Conclusion PromBase is a database, which contains predicted promoter regions and detailed analysis of various genomic features for 913 microbial genomes. PromBase can serve as a valuable resource for comparative genomics study and help the experimentalist to rapidly access detailed information on various genomic features and putative promoter regions in any given genome. This database is freely accessible for academic and non- academic users via the worldwide web http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/prombase/.

  20. PopGenome: an efficient Swiss army knife for population genomic analyses in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Bastian; Wittelsbürger, Ulrich; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastian E; Lercher, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Although many computer programs can perform population genetics calculations, they are typically limited in the analyses and data input formats they offer; few applications can process the large data sets produced by whole-genome resequencing projects. Furthermore, there is no coherent framework for the easy integration of new statistics into existing pipelines, hindering the development and application of new population genetics and genomics approaches. Here, we present PopGenome, a population genomics package for the R software environment (a de facto standard for statistical analyses). PopGenome can efficiently process genome-scale data as well as large sets of individual loci. It reads DNA alignments and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data sets in most common formats, including those used by the HapMap, 1000 human genomes, and 1001 Arabidopsis genomes projects. PopGenome also reads associated annotation files in GFF format, enabling users to easily define regions or classify SNPs based on their annotation; all analyses can also be applied to sliding windows. PopGenome offers a wide range of diverse population genetics analyses, including neutrality tests as well as statistics for population differentiation, linkage disequilibrium, and recombination. PopGenome is linked to Hudson's MS and Ewing's MSMS programs to assess statistical significance based on coalescent simulations. PopGenome's integration in R facilitates effortless and reproducible downstream analyses as well as the production of publication-quality graphics. Developers can easily incorporate new analyses methods into the PopGenome framework. PopGenome and R are freely available from CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/) for all major operating systems under the GNU General Public License. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.