WorldWideScience

Sample records for cementitious repair mortars

  1. Compatibility of repair mortars in restoration projects

    OpenAIRE

    Schueremans, Luc; Van Balen, Koenraad; Cizer, Özlem; Janssens, Elke; Serré, Gerty; Elsen, Jan; Brosens, Kris; Ignoul, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Mortars used for restoration must be highly compatible with historic materials in terms of physical, chemical and mechanical properties in order to assure the durability of masonry on the long term. Compatibility criteria are defined based on the original mortar characteristics but the efficiency and the performance of the repair mortar after application on masonry are not generally evaluated. From this perspective, historic mortars and repair mortars from 3 historic masonry structures were a...

  2. Damage diagnosis and compatible repair mortars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van

    1999-01-01

    Mortars for repair and maintenance of historic masonry have to meet specific requirements. Several authors have made contributions, however many cases of failure show that there still is quite a lack of knowledge on the compatibility of repair mortars for historic masonry. The diagnosis of the cause

  3. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Marie D; Landis, Eric N; Brune, Philip F; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J M; Ingraffea, Anthony R

    2014-12-30

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan's Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime-volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8-0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥ 90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45-0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  4. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale. PMID:25512521

  5. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Marie D; Landis, Eric N; Brune, Philip F; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J M; Ingraffea, Anthony R

    2014-12-30

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan's Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime-volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium-aluminum-silicate-hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.8-0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥ 90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900-y-old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45-0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale. PMID:25512521

  6. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, B., E-mail: bcoppola@unisa.it; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno Via Giovanni Paolo II n. 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers.

  7. MORTAR INCORPORATING SUPPLEMENTARY CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS: STRENGTH, ISOTHERMAL CALORIMETRY AND ACIDS ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Senhadji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs prove to be effective to meet most of the requirements of durable concrete and leads to a significant reduction in CO2 emissions. This research studies the effect different SCMs (natural pozzolan (PN/ limestone fine (FC at various remplacement levels on the physical and mechano-chemical resistance of blended mortar. The paper primarily deals with the characteristics of these materials, including heat of hydration, strength and effects of aggressive chemical environments (using sulphuric acid and nitric acid. Over 6 mixes were made and compared to the control mix. Tests were conducted at different ages up to 360 days. The experimental results in general showed that Algerian mineral admixtures (PN/FC were less vulnerable to nitric and sulphuric acid attack and improved the properties of mortars, but at different rates depending on the quantity of binder.

  8. Rilem TC 203-RHM: Repair mortars for historic masonry. Repair mortars for historic masonry: From problem to intervention: a decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Maurenbrecher, P.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on repair or replacement mortars for historical buildings. Both the decision process and questions arising are dealt with, in order to better define and illustrate technical requirements for mortars to be used for the repair or restoration of monuments and historic buildings (ma

  9. Rilem TC 203-RHM: Repair mortars for historic masonry. Requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives a summary of functional and performance requirements for repointing mortars for historic masonry (design, execution and maintenance). Successful performance of repair and conservation of mortar in historic masonry requires more care with design and execution than with modern masonry

  10. Repair mortars based on lime. Accelerated aging tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour under different accelerated aging tests (freeze/thaw and crystallization cycles of a new lime mortar with biocide properties destinated to monumental repair has been studied. New mortars (which have the biocide impregnated in a clay called sepiolite have a similar behaviour to lime mortars used as a reference. After the aging tests, the biocide properties of the mortars have been tried.

    Se ha estudiado el comportamiento frente a distintos ensayos de envejecimiento acelerado (ciclos de hielo/deshielo y cristalización de sales de un nuevo mortero de cal con propiedades biocidas, destinado a la reparación monumental. Se ha comprobado que los nuevos morteros (que llevan incorporado el biocida impregnado en una arcilla denominada sepiolita tienen un comportamiento muy similar a los morteros de cal utilizados como referencia. Tras los ensayos de envejecimiento se ha visto que las propiedades biocidas de los morteros se mantienen.

  11. POLYMER AND CEMENT MORTARS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR OF BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Pshinko

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article the analysis of polymer-cement mortars for their application in construction and repair of buildings and structures is presented. The main properties of known polymer-cement mortars used for this purpose are described. The advantages of application of polymer-cement mortars as repair materials are shown.

  12. Mechanism and Durability of Repair Systems in Polymer-Modified Cement Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the mechanism and durability of repair systems made of ordinary cement-based repair mortar and three kinds of polymer-modified repair mortars with old concrete, SBR dispersion, SAE dispersion, and SAE powder. By comparing the bonding properties of mortars before and after erosion, it was found that polymers could effectively improve the durability of the repair system and SAE powder had the best improvement. Micromorphology study of the repair mortar and the interface of repair mortar with old concrete through SEM showed that the polymer film formed from SAE powder whatever in the mortar or at the interface was dense and tough, the film formed from SAE dispersion was loose and weak, while the film formed from SBR dispersion was in between them, which explained the difference in the tensile bond strength and the durability of the repair systems.

  13. Detachment analysis of dehumidified repair mortars applied to historical masonry walls

    OpenAIRE

    Bocca, Pietro Giovanni; Valente, Silvio; Grazzini, Alessandro; Alberto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    An innovative laboratory procedure for the pre-qualification of repair mortars is described. The tested mortars are suitable for use with new dehumidified plasters applied to historical masonry walls. Long-term plaster detachment frequently occurs because of the mechanical incompatibility of mortar. The procedure consists of the application of static loads to mixed stone block-mortar specimens with particular characteristics, in terms of geometry and adhesion at the interface. A numerical sim...

  14. Improvement of adhesion performance of mortar-repair interface with inducing crack path into repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The most important performance for repair materials is adhesion to the substrate. The authors experimentally find out that high modulus fine aggregates in repair material enhance strength of it as well as the strength of the interface repaired with it, compared to the ordinary repair without fine aggregates. This paper elaborates the mechanisms for that with fractographic observation and FEM analysis based on the results of experiment. Also the authors discuss the ways for enhancing the strength and ductility of the repaired mortar

  15. Influence of supplementary cementitious materials on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime and cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince, C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is an investigation of the possible role of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs on water transport kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrated lime (CL90 and Portland cement (PC mortars. The properties of hydrated lime are significantly different from those of cement and therefore modifying fresh and hardened properties of these mortars are vital for mortar/substrate optimisation in masonry construction. The parameters investigated in this paper often are the main barriers to the use of hydrated lime in construction practice. The results show that transfer sorptivity and time to dewater freshly-mixed hydrated lime mortars can be modified when binder is partially replaced with SCMs. Compressive strength of CL90 mortars is increased systematically with the increased replacement levels of SCMs and the results are supported with the microstructural images. The ability to modify the water transport kinetics and mechanical properties allows compatibility between the mortar and the substrate unit in masonry construction.El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el papel de los materiales cementantes suplementarios (SCMs en la cinética de transporte del agua y en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cal hidratada (CL90 y cemento Portland. Las propiedades de la cal hidratada son significativamente diferentes a las del cemento y por lo tanto el control de las propiedades de los morteros frescos y endurecidos es fundamental en la optimización mortero/substrato en albañilería. Los parámetros estudiados en este trabajo son a menudo las principales barreras para el uso de la cal hidratada en la práctica de la construcción. Los resultados indican que la absortividad y el tiempo necesario para deshidratar morteros de cal hidratada recién mezclados pueden ser controlados cuando el conglomerante es parcialmente remplazado por SCMs. La resistencia a compresión de los morteros CL90 aumenta sistem

  16. The compatibility of earth-based repair mortars with rammed earth substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, M. Idália; Gonçalves, Teresa D.; Faria, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Earth constructions are susceptible to degradation due to natural or human causes. The degradation of the exterior surface of earth walls is very common, either due to lack of maintenance or to the use of incompatible materials, and often requires the application of a repair mortar. This work analyses experimentally the performance of earth-based repair mortars applied on rammed earth surfaces. The mortars are based on earth collected from rammed earth buildings in south Portugal or on a c...

  17. Rilem TC 203-RHM: repair mortars for historic masonry. Performance requirements for renders and plasters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Hughes, J.J.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Maurenbrecher, P.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on repair or replacement mortars for historical buildings. Both the decision process and questions arising are dealt with, in order to better define and illustrate technical requirements for mortars to be used for the repair or restoration of monuments and historic buildings (ma

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Compatibility of Viscoelastic Mortars for Stone Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Demoulin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the thermal stresses that originate in an acrylic-based repair material used for the reprofiling of natural sandstone is analyzed. This kind of artificial stone was developed in the late 1970s for its peculiar property of reversibility in an organic solvent. However, it displays a high thermal expansion coefficient, which can be a matter of concern for the durability either of the repair or of the underlying original stone. To evaluate this risk we propose an analytical solution that considers the viscoelasticity of the repair layer. The temperature profile used in the numerical evaluation has been measured in a church where artificial stone has been used in a recent restoration campaign. The viscoelasticity of the artificial stone has been characterized by stress relaxation experiments. The numerical analysis shows that the relaxation time of the repair mortar, originating from a low T g , allows relief of most of the thermal stresses. It explains the good durability of this particular repair material, as observed by the practitioners, and provides a solid scientific basis for considering that the problem of thermal expansion mismatch is not an issue for this type of stone under any possible conditions of natural exposure.

  19. Characterization of diffusive transport in cementitious materials: influence of microstructure in mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete durability is a subject of considerable interest, especially with the use of cement based materials on structures increasingly demanding on term of sustainability and resistance to aggressive ions penetration or radionuclide release. Diffusion is considered as one of the main transport phenomena that cause migration of aggressive solutes and radionuclide in a porous media according to most studies. In order to enable more effective prediction of structures service life, the understanding of the link between cement based materials microstructure and transport macro properties needed to be enhanced. In this context, the present study is undertaken to enhance our understanding of the links between microstructure and tritiated water diffusivity in saturated mortars. The effect of aggregates via the ITZ (Interfacial Transition Zone) on transport properties and materials durability is studied. (author)

  20. Colloids in the mortar backfill of a cementitious repository for radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, E; Spieler, P

    2001-01-01

    Colloids are present in groundwater aquifers and water-permeable engineered barrier systems and may facilitate the migration of radionuclides. A highly permeable mortar is foreseen to be used as backfill for the engineered barrier of the Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. The backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation and, due to its high porosity, for colloid mobility. Colloid concentration measurements were carried out using an in-situ liquid particle counting system. The in-house developed counting system with three commercially available sensors allowed the detection of single particles and colloids at low concentrations in the size range 50-5000 nm. The counting system was tested using suspensions prepared from certified size standards. The concentrations of colloids with size range 50-1000 nm were measured in cement pore water, which was collected from a column filled with a highly permeable backfill mortar. The chemical composition of the pore water corresponded to a Ca(OH)2-controlled cement system. Colloid concentrations in the backfill pore water were found to be typically lower than approximately 0.1 ppm. The specific (geometric) surface areas of the colloid populations were in the range 240 m2 g(-1) to 770 m2 g(-1). The low colloid inventories observed in this study can be explained by the high ionic strength and Ca concentrations of the cement pore water. These conditions are favourable for colloid-colloid and colloid-backfill interactions and unfavourable for colloid-enhanced nuclide transport.

  1. Moisture Diffusivity of Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Denarié, E.; Houst, Y. F.

    1995-01-01

    The moisture diffusivity is of considerable importance for quantitative assessments of creep and shrinkage as well as durability of cementitious material. For this reason, the influence of the composition of repair mortars on their effective moisture diffusivity as a function of the relative humidity of the surrounding air has been investigated. Silica fume,

  2. Setup of Extruded Cementitious Hollow Tubes as Containing/Releasing Devices in Self-Healing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Formia; Salvatore Terranova; Paola Antonaci; Nicola Maria Pugno; Jean Marc Tulliani

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to produce self-healing cementitious composites based on the use of cylindrical capsules containing a repairing agent. Cementitious hollow tubes (CHT) having two different internal diameters (of 2 mm and 7.5 mm) were produced by extrusion and used as containers and releasing devices for cement paste/mortar healing agents. Based on the results of preliminary mechanical tests, sodium silicate was selected as the healing agent. The morphological features of several mi...

  3. The effect of fly ash and limestone fillers on the viscosity and compressive strength of self-compacting repair mortars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burak Felekoglu; Kamile Tosun; Bulent Baradan; Akin Altun; Bahadir Uyulgan [Dokuz Eylul University (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2006-09-15

    Today, self-compacting mortars are preferred for repair purposes due to the application easiness and mechanical advantages. However, for self-compatibility, the paste phase must meet some certain criteria at fresh state. The cement as well as the ingredients of the paste, powders with cementitious, pozzolanic or inert nature and plasticizing chemical admixtures should be carefully chosen in order to obtain a suitable paste composition to enrich the granular skeleton of the mix. The physical properties of powders (shape, surface morphology, fineness, particle size distribution, particle packing) and physico-chemical (time-dependent hydration reactions, zeta potentials) interactions between cement powder and plasticizer should be taken into consideration. All these parameters affect the performance of fresh paste in different manners. There is no universally accepted agreement on the effect of these factors due to the complexity of combined action; thus, it is hard to make a generalization. This study deals with the selection of amount and type of powders from the viewpoint of fresh state rheology and mechanical performance. The influence of powder materials on self-compatibility, viscosity and strength were compared with a properly designed set of test methods (the mini-slump, V-funnel tests, viscosity measurements and compressive strength tests). It may be advised that, for each cement-powder-plasticizer mixture, a series of test methods can be used to determine the optimum content and type of materials for a specified workability.

  4. Strength and Density of Geopolymer Mortar Cured at Ambient Temperature for Use as Repair Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warid Wazien, A. Z.; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Abd. Razak, Rafiza; Mohd Remy Rozainy, M. A. Z.; Faheem Mohd Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    Geopolymers produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promised an excellent properties akin to the existing construction material. This study focused on the effect of various binder to sand ratio on geopolymer mortar properties. Mix design of geopolymer mortar was produced using NaOH concentration of 12 molars, ratio of fly ash/alkaline activator and ratio Na2SiO3/NaOH of 2.0 and 2.5 respectively. Samples subsequently ware cured at ambient temperature. The properties of geopolymer mortar were analysed in term of compressive strength and density at different period which are on the 3rd and 7th day of curing. Experimental results revealed that the addition of sand slightly increase the compressive strength of geopolymer. The optimum compressive strength obtained was up to 31.39 MPa on the 7th day. The density of geopolymer mortar was in the range between 2.0 g/cm3 to 2.23 g/cm3. Based on this findings, the special properties promoted by geopolymer mortar display high potential to be implemented in the field of concrete patch repair.

  5. Crushed and River-Origin Sands Used as Aggregates in Repair Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stefanidou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The systematic analysis of mortars from monuments or historic buildings and the simultaneous study of the construction environment show that it was common practice to use naturally occurring sand from local rivers or streams for the production of the mortars. There are cases though, mainly on islands, where sands of natural origin were limited, and marine or crushed sands were used possibly after elaboration. In all cases the particle size analysis of old mortar confirms the presence of even distribution of the granules. As regards the design of the repair mortars, there are criteria that should be taken into consideration in order to produce materials with compatible properties. The main properties concerning sands are the grain distribution and maximum size, the color, the content of fines, and soluble salts. The objective of this research is the study of the physical characteristics of the sands such as the sand equivalent, the gradation, the apparent density, the morphology of the grains, their mineralogical composition and the influence of these properties on the behavior of lime mortars, notably the mechanical and physical properties acquired.

  6. Rilem TC 203-RHM. Repair mortars for historic masonry. The role of mortar in masonry: an introduction to requirements for the design of repair mortars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Groot, C.; Balen, K. van; Bicer-Simsir, B.; Binda, L.; Elsen, J.; Konow, T. von; Lindqvist, J.E.; Maurenbrecher, P.; Papayanni, I.; Subercaseaux, M.; Tedeschi, C.; Toumbakari, E.E.; Thompson, M.

    2012-01-01

    Mortar has been in use for many thousands of years and is integral to most masonry construction. Its use is widespread in every culture where masonry is constructed. It is present in the majority of the global built cultural heritage, and is therefore a major consideration in building conservation.

  7. Effect of the pre-treatment and the aggregate content on the adhesion strength of repair mortars on Miocene porous limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2016-04-01

    The adhesion between porous limestone and newly prepared repair mortars are crucial in the preservation of historic stone structures. Besides mechanical compatibility other matches such as chemical composition and porosity are also essential, but the current research focuses on the adhesion strength of repair mortars that are used in the restoration of Hungarian porous limestone. 8 mortars (4 commercial and 4 specially prepared) were selected for the tests. Mortars with different amount of aggregate were prepared and caste to stone surface. The stone substrate was highly porous Miocene limestone. The strength was tested by standardized pull-out tests which method is commonly used for concrete testing. The limestone surfaces were either used in their natural conditions or were pre-treated (pre-wetting). The strength of the stone/mortar bond was tested. The failure mechanism was documented and various failure modes were identified. Strength test results suggest that especially pre-treatment influences strongly the pull-out strength at mortar/stone interface. Increasing aggregate content also reduces pull out strength of tested repair mortars, but at various rates depending on the mortar type. The financial support of OTKA post-doctoral grant to BSZK (reference number is: PD 112-955) and National Research, Development and Innovation (NKFI) Fund to ÁT (ref. no. K 116532) are appreciated.

  8. Influence of interface and strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC) properties on the performance of concrete repairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the construction industry the demand for repair and maintenance of concrete structures constantly increases. Still, the performance of current concrete repairs is not satisfactory and there is an urgent need for improvement. Understanding the damage development in a repair system, and how to pred

  9. Historic trass - lime mortars with expansive reactions: Characterization and repair strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.; Wijffels, T.J.; Brocken, H.J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The characterisation of two ancient mortars in historic bridges, suffering damage due to thaumasite and other swelling compounds is described. Characterisation was part of the analysis of damage occurring to the brick masonry structure. Expansive reactions were found to have taken place, being the c

  10. Lime-based repair mortars with water-repellent admixtures: laboratory durability assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, C.; Slížková, Z. (Zuzana)

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of architectural structures using lime binders is currently an important research topic aiming compatibility, durability and sustainability. In this study, lime (L) and lime-metakaolin (LM) mortars were prepared with the addition of water-repellent admixtures: linseed oil, stand oil and a silane based water-repellent. Experimental results demonstrate that oil imparts higher hydrophobicity to both L and LM mixtures. Durability was assessed through freeze-thaw and NaCl crystal...

  11. Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ghazy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the mechanical and durability properties of cement-based systems. Thus, there has been a growing interest in the use of nano-modified fiber-reinforced cementitious composites/mortars (NFRM in repair and rehabilitation applications of concrete structures. The current study investigates various mechanical and durability properties of nano-modified mortar containing different types of fibers (steel, basalt, and hybrid (basalt and polypropylene, in terms of compressive and flexural strengths, toughness, drying shrinkage, penetrability, and resistance to salt-frost scaling. The results highlight the overall effectiveness of the NFRM owing to the synergistic effects of nano-silica and fibers.

  12. Behavior of Concrete Columns Repaired with Polymer Mortar and Epoxy Fiber Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungnam Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater structures are not easy to check for the degree of damage or to repair and strengthen damaged regions. Even during repair and strengthening, quality control is very difficult, because the work is done under water. Moreover, underwater structures severely deteriorate, owing to special environmental conditions. If this deterioration continues, the structures face serious structural problems, because of the corrosion of steel rods and the loss of concrete sections. Repairing or strengthening underwater structures requires effective, economic underwater repair and reinforcement techniques that allow the same working conditions as on the ground while maintaining dry condition for the repair sections. However, systematic studies on the repair and strengthening techniques for underwater structures are insufficient. This study proposes a new repair method for underwater structures, which applies epoxy fiber panel forms and shear connectors. To demonstrate the repair effects, this study compared and evaluated the failure modes and repair effects by the surface condition of repair sections, by applying various repair methods, in consideration of the ground and underwater conditions.

  13. Compatibility performance as a fundamental requirement for the repair of concrete structures with Self-Compacting Repair Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Courard, Luc; Bissonnette, Benoît

    2007-01-01

    Durable adhesion of repair material on concrete substrate requires compatibility between the materials to be bonded. There are four main compatibility components to be addressed in any concrete repair scenario: dimensional, permeability, chemical and electrochemical compatibility. Among those, dimensional compatibility is often prevalent: while a cement-base repair material inevitably undergoes shrinkage, the substrate opposes to its free movement, a situation that can lead to cracking and, ...

  14. The effect of limestone powder, fly ash and silica fume on the properties of self-compacting repair mortars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Selçuk Türkel; Yiğit Altuntaş

    2009-04-01

    Self-compacting repair mortars (SCRM) are preferred for the rehabilitation and repair of reinforced concrete structures especially at narrow mould systems. Self compactability and stability are susceptible to ternary effects of chemical and mineral admixture type and their content. In this study, the effect of limestone powder (LP) on the properties of SCRM has been compared with other mineral additives (silica fume (SF) and fly ash (FA) and their combinations) effects. Fresh properties, flexural and compressive strengths and water absorption properties of mortars were determined. The use of SF in mortars significantly increased the dosage of superplasticiser (SP). At the same constant SP dosage (0·8%) and mineral additives content (30%), LP can better improve the workability than that of control and FA mixtures by 19% and 27%. However, the results of this study suggest that certain FA, SF and LP combinations can improve the workability of SCRMs, more than FA, SF and LP alone. LP can have a positive influence on the mechanical performance at early strength development while SF improved aggregate-matrix bond resulting from the formation of a less porous transition zone in mortar. SF can better reducing effect on total water absorption while FA and LP will not have the same effect, at 28 days.

  15. Behavior of Concrete Columns Repaired with Polymer Mortar and Epoxy Fiber Panel

    OpenAIRE

    Sungnam Hong; Sun-Kyu Park

    2013-01-01

    Underwater structures are not easy to check for the degree of damage or to repair and strengthen damaged regions. Even during repair and strengthening, quality control is very difficult, because the work is done under water. Moreover, underwater structures severely deteriorate, owing to special environmental conditions. If this deterioration continues, the structures face serious structural problems, because of the corrosion of steel rods and the loss of concrete sections. Repairing or streng...

  16. Tensile Bond Between Substrate Concrete and Normal Repairing Mortar under Freeze–Thaw Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Ye; Zhang, Dawei; Ueda, Tamon

    2014-01-01

    Concrete patch repair has long been used to repair the damaged concrete structures. In cold regions, freeze– thaw cycle is one of the major damage factors. Not only the material itself is damaged by freeze–thaw cycles, but also the adhesive interface, which is regarded as the weakest part of composite system, degrades under freeze–thaw cycles. Air entraining agent has long been used to increase the freeze–thaw resistance of concrete materials. However, the effect of air entraining agent on th...

  17. 2nd Historic Mortars Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, John; Groot, Caspar; Historic Mortars : Characterisation, Assessment and Repair

    2012-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues connected with mortars on historic structures. The book is divided into four sections: Characterisation of Historic Mortars, Repair Mortars and Design Issues, Experimental Research into Properties of Repair Mortars, and Assessment and Testing. The papers present the latest work of researchers in their field. The individual contributions were selected from the contributions to the 2nd Historic Mortars Conference, which took place in Prague, September, 22-24, 2010. All papers were reviewed and improved as necessary before publication. This peer review process by the editors resulted in the 34 individual contributions included in here. One extra paper reviewing and summarising State-of-the-Art knowledge covered by this publication was added as a starting and navigational point for the reader. The editors believe that having these papers in print is important and they hope that it will stimulate further research into historic mortars and related subjects. 

  18. Penetration of corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Brad J.; Peterova, Adela;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes experimental investigations on corrosion-induced deterioration in reinforced cementitious materials and the subsequent development and implementation of a novel conceptual model. Rejnforced mortar specimens of varying water-to-cement ratios were subjected to current...

  19. 水下快速修补砂浆的性能研究%Study on the properties of underwater rapid repair mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘微旺

    2013-01-01

    基于水工混凝土中的缺陷位置富含水分的特点,研究了在水下具有良好抗分散性、流动性和快速修补特点的水下快速修补砂浆,并研究了灰砂比、水灰比和水下抗分散剂掺量对水下快速修补砂浆的流动性、凝结时间、水下抗分散性和强度的影响.结果表明,水下快速修补砂浆1、3、7和28 d的水陆强度比达到80%以上,且在水下具有良好的自流平、自密实性能.%Based on the feature that the defect locations of hydraulic concrete is rich in water, this paper studied the underwater rapid repair mortar with good underwater anti-dispersion,mobility and rapid repair characteristics,and studied the influence of the cement-sand ratio,water-cement ratio and the dosage of underwater anti-dispersants on the fluidity, setting time, underwater anti-dispersion and strength properties of underwater rapid repair mortar. The results show that the 1,3,7 and 28 d land and water intensity ratio of underwater rapid repair mortar reached more than 80%, and having good underwater self-leveling and self-compacting properties.

  20. Quantitative microstructure analysis of polymer-modified mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, A; Herwegh, M; Zurbriggen, R; Aberle, T; Holzer, L

    2003-11-01

    Digital light, fluorescence and electron microscopy in combination with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy were used to visualize individual polymers, air voids, cement phases and filler minerals in a polymer-modified cementitious tile adhesive. In order to investigate the evolution and processes involved in formation of the mortar microstructure, quantifications of the phase distribution in the mortar were performed including phase-specific imaging and digital image analysis. The required sample preparation techniques and imaging related topics are discussed. As a form of case study, the different techniques were applied to obtain a quantitative characterization of a specific mortar mixture. The results indicate that the mortar fractionates during different stages ranging from the early fresh mortar until the final hardened mortar stage. This induces process-dependent enrichments of the phases at specific locations in the mortar. The approach presented provides important information for a comprehensive understanding of the functionality of polymer-modified mortars.

  1. Chloride diffusion in partially saturated cementitious material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erik Pram; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2003-01-01

    The paper proposes a combined application of composite theory and Powers' model for microstructural development for the estimation of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the moisture content of a defect-free cementitious material. Measurements of chloride diffusion in mortar samples (440 kg....../m(3) rapid-hardening Portland cement, w/c = 0.5, maturity minimum 6 months) stored at 65% and 85% RH, as well as in vacuum-saturated mortar samples, illustrate the applicability of the method. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Setup of Extruded Cementitious Hollow Tubes as Containing/Releasing Devices in Self-Healing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Formia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to produce self-healing cementitious composites based on the use of cylindrical capsules containing a repairing agent. Cementitious hollow tubes (CHT having two different internal diameters (of 2 mm and 7.5 mm were produced by extrusion and used as containers and releasing devices for cement paste/mortar healing agents. Based on the results of preliminary mechanical tests, sodium silicate was selected as the healing agent. The morphological features of several mix designs used to manufacture the extruded hollow tubes, as well as the coatings applied to increase the durability of both core and shell materials are discussed. Three-point bending tests were performed on samples produced with the addition of the above-mentioned cementitious hollow tubes to verify the self-healing effectiveness of the proposed solution. Promising results were achieved, in particular when tubes with a bigger diameter were used. In this case, a substantial strength and stiffness recovery was observed, even in specimens presenting large cracks (>1 mm. The method is inexpensive and simple to scale up; however, further research is needed in view of a final optimization.

  3. Carbonatation Influence on Fly Ash and Portland Cement Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    P.L. Valdez–Tamez; A. Durán–Herrera; G. Fajardo–San Miguel; C.A. Juárez–Alvarado

    2009-01-01

    The influence of carbonation on mortars containing 25% of fly ash instead of the cementitious materials was studied. Mortar cylinder specimens were fabricated for 4 different W/C ratios: 0.35, 0.45, 0.55 and 0.65. Mortars with and without fly ash were subjected to an accelerated carbonation process. Volumetric weight, water absorption, compressive strength, water permeability, pH and mercury intrusion porosimetry of the mortar specimens were determined. Due to the fly ash pozzolanic potential...

  4. Microfibres and hydrogels to promote autogenous healing in cementitious materials

    OpenAIRE

    Snoeck, Didier; Dubruel, Peter; De Belie, Nele

    2013-01-01

    Cementitious materials are sensitive to crack formation and it would be beneficial if the material could stop the crack propagation, repair the damage and reach again the original liquid-tightness and/or strength. Therefore, a cementitious material with synthetic microfibres and superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) is proposed. Upon crack formation, the microfibres will become active and due to the bridging action, they will stop the opening of a crack, forcing the cementitious material to crack so...

  5. Bending performance of concrete beams strengthened with textile reinforced mortar TRM

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Espert, Lluís; Escrig Pérez, Christian; Bernat Masó, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a method of strengthening concrete structures based on textiles of high strength and mortars. The combination of textiles and mortars produces a new composite material with cementitious matrix. This material can be used for the reinforcement of concrete beams under bending loads. We tested several combinations of fibers: glass, Poliparafenil Benzobisoxazol (PBO), steel and carbon fibers with mortar and we used them to reinforce precast concrete beams. All the specimens were...

  6. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  7. Early age monitoring of cement mortar using embedded piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Arun; Subramaniam, Kolluru V. L.

    2016-04-01

    A piezoceramic based sensor consisting of embedded Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) patch is developed for assessing the progression of hydration and evolution of properties of cement mortar. A method for continuous assessment of cement mortar with different water to cement ratios after casting is presented. The method relies on monitoring changes in the electromechanical (EM) conductance of a PZT patch embedded in mortar. Changes in conductance are shown to sensitively reflect the changes in the mechanical impedance of the cementitious material as it transforms from fluid to solid state.

  8. The Influence of Calcium Chloride Salt Solution on the Transport Properties of Cementitious Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghoob Farnam; Taylor Washington; Jason Weiss

    2015-01-01

    The chemical interaction between calcium chloride (CaCl2) and cementitious binder may alter the transport properties of concrete which are important in predicting the service life of infrastructure elements. This paper presents a series of fluid and gas transport measurements made on cementitious mortars before and after exposure to various solutions with concentrations ranging from 0% to 29.8% CaCl2 by mass. Fluid absorption, oxygen diffusivity, and oxygen permeability were measured on morta...

  9. Cementitious artificial aggregate particles for high-skid resistance pavements

    OpenAIRE

    De Larrard, François; MARTINEZ CASTILLO, Rafael; Sedran, Thierry; HAUZA, Philippe; Poirier, Jean Eric

    2012-01-01

    For some critical road sections, a high skid resistance of wearing course is required to minimise the risk of traffic accidents. Nowadays this skid resistance is mainly brought by the use of special aggregates as calcined bauxite, a scarce and expensive material. The paper presents a patented technology, where a special high-performance mortar is produced and crushed at early age. These cementitious artificial aggregates (CAA) can display aggregate properties close to those of calcined bauxit...

  10. Carbonatation Influence on Fly Ash and Portland Cement Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. Valdez–Tamez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of carbonation on mortars containing 25% of fly ash instead of the cementitious materials was studied. Mortar cylinder specimens were fabricated for 4 different W/C ratios: 0.35, 0.45, 0.55 and 0.65. Mortars with and without fly ash were subjected to an accelerated carbonation process. Volumetric weight, water absorption, compressive strength, water permeability, pH and mercury intrusion porosimetry of the mortar specimens were determined. Due to the fly ash pozzolanic potential, for all W/C ratios, results of the compressive strength tests at 28 days of the mortars with and without fly ash were similar. Mortars with fly ash presented similar water permeability as mortars without fly ash. PH results showed that alkalinity reduction is lower in mortars with fly ash compared to those containing cement only. In all the mortars, the porosimetric analysis indicated that porosity is reduced due to carbonation. Further more, it is showed the predominance of the macro and mesopores.

  11. Rendering mortars in Medina Azahara, Part I: Material characterization and alteration process

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.; Puertas, F.; Palomo, A.

    1997-01-01

    Rendering mortars, which are still exposed to the open air on some of the walls of Medina Azahara, are studied and characterized in this work. Some repairing mortars used in different previous restorations are also characterized. Those rendering mortars are of different make considering the composition of their binder: lime, gypsum and mixed lime/ gypsum. Repairing mortars used in previous interventions are made of lime, excepting for a portland cement used by Félix Hernández in the rest...

  12. Micro-mechanical Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites using Cohesive Crack Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2006-01-01

    are implemented. It is shown that the cohesive law for a unidirectional fiber reinforced cementitious composite can be found through superposition of the cohesive law for mortar and the fiber bridging curve. A comparison between the numerical and an analytical model for fiber pull-out is performed....

  13. Effect of Water-repellent Admixtures on Repair Mortars Made of Lime and Metakaolin%防水剂对石灰偏高岭土修补砂浆性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭小芹; 曹春鹏; 季晓丽; 曾路

    2016-01-01

    以石灰和偏高岭土为主要材料,制备一种适用于岩土类建筑的修补砂浆.用桐油和硬脂酸钙两种防水剂来改善砂浆的耐水性,研究桐油和硬脂酸钙对砂浆强度、反应过程、吸水率和软化系数、干燥收缩的影响,并通过XRD和SEM 对砂浆进行物相分析和微观形貌观测.结果表明:桐油和硬脂酸钙可以显著提高石灰偏高岭土砂浆的耐水性,可使吸水率下降至2.5%以下;桐油和硬脂酸都会阻碍偏高岭土的火山灰反应,在一定程度上降低砂浆的强度,但28 d的抗压强度仍在5 M Pa以上,达到天然水硬性石灰N HL5的强度等级;桐油和硬脂酸钙会影响石灰偏高岭土砂浆的微观形态和结构,桐油使产物的颗粒更细小、更致密,硬脂酸钙则会使产物结构比较疏松.综合考虑砂浆强度、耐水性等因素,得出桐油和硬脂酸钙的最佳掺量分别为5%和1.5%.%A kind of repair mortar for geotechnical building was prepared with lime and metakaolin as major materials .Two kinds of water‐repellent admixtures (tung oil and calcium stearate) were used to im‐prove the water resistance of the mortars .Different properties of the mortars were evaluated ,such as strength ,the process of reaction ,water absorption ,softening coefficient and shrinkage .Phase and micro‐structure analysis of the mortars were carried out through XRD and SEM .The results show that tung oil and calcium stearate can improve water resistance of the mortars significantly .Water absorption of the mortars with tung oil or calcium stearate can be below 2 .5% .Tung oil and calcium stearate hinder the poz‐zolanic reaction of metakaolin ,which as a result decrease the mortars’ strength .But 28 d compressive strength of the mortars are all above 5 MPa .Also ,tung oil and calcium stearate can regulate the growth of products and affect the micromorphology and structure of mortars .Tung oil make the

  14. Performance of Polymer Modified Mortar with Different Dosage of Polymeric Modifier

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan Shankar; Othuman Mydin Md Azree; Sani Norazmawati Md.; Che Ani Adi Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Polymer modified mortar system is defined as hydraulic cement combined at the time of mixing with organic polymers that are dispersed or re-dispersed in water, with or without aggregates. The compressive strength and flexural strength of polymer modified mortar obtained at early age are low and it required prolong curing period for the strength enhancement. In order to enhance the mechanical properties of cementitious mixture as well as its durability, hybridization of polymeric modifiers are...

  15. Lime-based mortars with linseed oil: sodium chloride resistance assessment and characterization of the degraded material

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, C.; Slížková, Z. (Zuzana); Janotová, D. (Dana)

    2013-01-01

    Lime mortar is often used to repair historic buildings but is prone to salt crystallization with deleterious consequences. Lime mortar is a very susceptible material due to its high porosity and low mechanical resistance. Recent findings concerning mortar additives that impart hydrophobic properties to mortar show that by limiting water penetration, damage from frost and salt can be decreased. Linseed oil was commonly used in former times as an additive for mortar in order to grant hydrophobi...

  16. A review: Self-healing in cementitious materials and engineered cementitious composite as a self-healing material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette

    2012-01-01

    .e. the use of hollow fibers, microencapsulation, expansive agents and mineral admixtures, bacteria and shape memory materials, are reviewed and summarized. A comparison study is conducted subsequently on different strategies to self-healing and on different healing agents used as well. Engineered......Cementitious materials are the most widely used building materials all over the word. However, deterioration is inevitable even since the very beginning of the service life, then maintenance and repair work, which are often labor- and capital-intensive, would be followed. Thus, self......-healing of the affected cementitious materials is of great importance. Self-healing phenomenon in cementitious materials has been noticed and been studying for a long time. The possible mechanisms for self-healing phenomenon in cementitious materials, which are summarized based on substantial experimental studies...

  17. Cementitious binder from fly ash and other industrial wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M.; Garg, M. [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, investigations were undertaken to formulate cementitious binder by judicious blending of fly ash with Portland cement as well as by admixing fly ash with calcined phosphogypsum, fluorogypsum, lime sludge, and chemical activators of different finenesses. The effect of addition of calcined clay in these types of binders was studied. Data showed that cementitious binders of high compressive strength and water retentivity can be produced. The strength of masonry mortars increased with the addition of chemical activators. The strength development of binders takes place through formation of ettringite. C-S-H, and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. The binders are eminently suitable for partial replacement (up to 25%) of the cement in concrete without any detrimental affect on the strength. The results showed that fly ash can be used in the range from 45% to 70% in formulating these binders along with other industrial wastes to help in mitigating environmental pollution.

  18. Standard Test Method for Autogenous Strain of Cement Paste and Mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Lura, Pietro; Goodwin, Fred;

    This test method measures the bulk strain of a sealed cement paste or mortar specimen, including those containing admixtures, various supplementary cementitious materials (SCM), and other fine materials, at constant temperature and not subjected to external forces, from the time of final setting...

  19. Properties of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortars for masonry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shiqin; Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2012-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the use of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortar systems for manufacturing construction products. The investigation was driven by the increasing demand for reuse options in paper-recycling industry. Both fresh and hardened geopolymer mortar properties are evaluated for samples incorporating dry wastepaper sludge, and the results indicate potential end-use benefits in building product manufacture. Addition of wastepaper sludge to geopolymer mortar reduces flow properties, primarily due to dry sludge absorbing water from the binder mix. The average 91-day compressive strength of mortar samples incorporating 2.5 wt% and 10 wt% wastepaper sludge respectively retained 92% and 52% of the reference mortar strength. However, contrary to the normal trend of increasing drying shrinkage with increasing paper sludge addition to Portland cement matrices, the corresponding geopolymer drying shrinkage decreased by 34% and 64%. Equally important, the water absorption of hardened geopolymer mortar decreased with increasing paper sludge content at ambient temperatures, providing good prospects of overall potential for wastepaper sludge incorporation in the production of building and masonry elements. The results indicate that, despite its high moisture absorbance due to the organic matter and residual cellulose fibre content, wastepaper sludge appears compatible with geopolymer chemistry, and hence serves as a potential supplementary additive to geopolymer cementitious masonry products.

  20. Recycled sand in lime-based mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidou, M; Anastasiou, E; Georgiadis Filikas, K

    2014-12-01

    The increasing awareness of the society about safe guarding heritage buildings and at the same time protecting the environment promotes strategies of combining principles of restoration with environmentally friendly materials and techniques. Along these lines, an experimental program was carried out in order to investigate the possibility of producing repair, lime-based mortars used in historic buildings incorporating secondary materials. The alternative material tested was recycled fine aggregates originating from mixed construction and demolition waste. Extensive tests on the raw materials have been performed and mortar mixtures were produced using different binding systems with natural, standard and recycled sand in order to compare their mechanical, physical and microstructure properties. The study reveals the improved behavior of lime mortars, even at early ages, due to the reaction of lime with the Al and Si constituents of the fine recycled sand. The role of the recycled sand was more beneficial in lime mortars rather than the lime-pozzolan or lime-pozzolan-cement mortars as a decrease in their performance was recorded in the latter cases due to the mortars' structure.

  1. Innovative mix design of cementitious materials for enhancing strength and ductility

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Cement based composites i.e. paste, mortar and concrete are the most utilized materials in the construction industry all over the world. Cement composites are quasi-brittle in nature and possess extremely low tensile strength as compared to their compressive strength. Due to their low tensile strength capacity, cracks develop in cementitious composites due to the drying shrinkage, plastic settlements and/or stress concentrations (due to external restrains and/or applied stresses) etc. These c...

  2. Study on the alteration of hydrogeological and mechanical properties of the cementitious Material. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally investigated the influence of several phenomena at the disposal environment, to evaluate the long-term alteration of cementitious material. The results are shown below. 1. Hardened cement paste specimens were altered and characterized after artificial seawater permeation. The calcium dissolution was accelerated, and secondary minerals containing magnesium were deposited. The permeability became one to three orders of magnitude smaller than data from specimens altered by deionized water permeation. It was estimated that secondary mineral formations reduced the permeability. These results meant that seawater and pure water differ remarkably from each other in influence to alteration of cementitious material. 2. Two type mixture proportions concrete, two type mixture proportions mortar and a cement paste under same W/C ratio 55% were characterized, to apply the accumulated data of paste to concrete or mortar. Compressive strength of paste was lower than that of concrete and mortar. It was contrary to the previous report. The behavior of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio could be explained well using amount of aggregate. The data of permeability meant that boundary between aggregate and cement paste didn't become path of water flow, and that aggregate disturbed permeation. 3. Self-sealing property of cracked specimen of cementitious material were investigated by the water permeation test using sodium bicarbonate solution. The permeability decreased in two orders of magnitude, and possibility of sealing was suggested. By the morphology, the deposits in the cracks might be portlandite and C-S-H, and be not calcium carbonate. 4. Alteration of characteristics of cementitious material in sodium-nitrate and ammonia solution was evaluated by the water permeation test. Alteration degree of the nitrate and ammonia solution case showed similar trend to that of the sodium nitrate solution case. This result meant that ammonia solution would not influence the

  3. Iron ore tailings used for the preparation of cementitious material by compound thermal activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-lai Yi; Heng-hu Sun; Xiu-quan Wei; Chao Li

    2009-01-01

    In the background of little reuse and large stockpile for iron ore railings, iron ore tailing from Chinese Tonghua were used as raw material to prepare cementitious materials. Cementitious properties of the iron ore tailings activated by compound thermal ac-tivation were studied. Testing methods, such as XRD, TG-DTA, and IR were used for researching the phase and structure variety of the iron ore tailings in the process of compound thermal activation. The results reveal that a new cementitious material that contains 30wt% of the iron ore tailings can be obtained by compounded thermal activation, whose mortar strength can come up to the stan-dard of 42.5 cement of China.

  4. Study of sticky rice-lime mortar technology for the restoration of historical masonry construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Bingjian; Ma, Qinglin

    2010-06-15

    Replacing or repairing masonry mortar is usually necessary in the restoration of historical constructions, but the selection of a proper mortar is often problematic. An inappropriate choice can lead to failure of the restoration work, and perhaps even further damage. Thus, a thorough understanding of the original mortar technology and the fabrication of appropriate replacement materials are important research goals. Many kinds of materials have been used over the years in masonry mortars, and the technology has gradually evolved from the single-component mortar of ancient times to hybrid versions containing several ingredients. Beginning in 2450 BCE, lime was used as masonry mortar in Europe. In the Roman era, ground volcanic ash, brick powder, and ceramic chip were added to lime mortar, greatly improving performance. Because of its superior properties, the use of this hydraulic (that is, capable of setting underwater) mortar spread, and it was adopted throughout Europe and western Asia. Perhaps because of the absence of natural materials such as volcanic ash, hydraulic mortar technology was not developed in ancient China. However, a special inorganic-organic composite building material, sticky rice-lime mortar, was developed. This technology was extensively used in important buildings, such as tombs, in urban constructions, and even in water conservancy facilities. It may be the first widespread inorganic-organic composite mortar technology in China, or even in the world. In this Account, we discuss the origins, analysis, performance, and utility in historic preservation of sticky rice-lime mortar. Mortar samples from ancient constructions were analyzed by both chemical methods (including the iodine starch test and the acid attack experiment) and instrumental methods (including thermogravimetric differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy). These analytical results show that the ancient masonry

  5. Cementitious Composites Engineered with Embedded Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Enhanced Sensing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2015-07-01

    Cementitious composites such as concrete pavements are susceptible to different damage modes, which are primarily caused by repeated loading and long-term deterioration. There is even greater concern that damage could worsen and occur more frequently with the use of heavier vehicles or new aircraft carrying greater payloads. Thus, the objective of this research is to engineer cementitious composites with capabilities of self-sensing or detecting damage. The approach was to enhance the damage sensitivity of cementitious composites by incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) as part of the mix design and during casting. However, as opposed to directly dispersing MWNTs in the cement matrix, which is the current state-of-art, MWNT-based thin films were airbrushed and coated onto sand particles. The film-coated sand was then used as part of the mix design for casting mortar specimens. Mortar specimens were subjected to compressive cyclic loading tests while their electrical properties were recorded simultaneously. The results showed that the electrical properties of these cementitious composites designed with film-coated sand exhibited extremely high strain sensitivities. The electrical response was also stable and consistent between specimens.

  6. Influence of Chloride-Ion Adsorption Agent on Chloride Ions in Concrete and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Fei Peng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of a chloride-ion adsorption agent (Cl agent in short, composed of zeolite, calcium aluminate hydrate and calcium nitrite, on the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and mortar has been experimentally studied. The permeability of concrete was measured, and the chloride ion content in mortar was tested. The experimental results reveal that the Cl agent could adsorb chloride ions effectively, which had penetrated into concrete and mortar. When the Cl agent was used at a dosage of 6% by mass of cementitious materials in mortar, the resistance to the penetration of chloride ions could be improved greatly, which was more pronounced when a combination of the Cl agent and fly ash or slag was employed. Such an effect is not the result of the low permeability of the mortar, but might be a result of the interaction between the Cl agent and the chloride ions penetrated into the mortar. There are two possible mechanisms for the interaction between the Cl agent and chloride ion ingress. One is the reaction between calcium aluminate hydrate in the Cl agent and chloride ions to form Friedel’s salt, and the other one is that calcium aluminate hydrate reacts with calcium nitrite to form AFm during the early-age hydration of mortar and later the NO2− in AFm is replaced by chloride ions, which then penetrate into the mortar, also forming Friedel’s salt. More research is needed to confirm the mechanisms.

  7. 3D morphological and micromechanical modeling of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this thesis is to develop morphological models of cementitious materials and use these models to study their local and effective response. To this aim, 3D images of cementitious materials (mortar and concrete), obtained by micro-tomography, are studied. First, the mortar image is segmented in order to obtain an image of a real microstructure, to be used for linear elasticity computations. The image of concrete is used, after being processed, to determine various morphological characteristics of the material. A random model of concrete is then developed and validated by means of morphological data. This model is made up of three phases, corresponding to the matrix, aggregates and voids. The aggregates phase is modelled by implantation of Poisson polyhedra without overlap. For this purpose, an algorithm suited to the vector generation of Poisson polyhedra is introduced and validated with morphological measurements. Finally, the effective linear elastic properties of the mortar and other simulated microstructures are estimated with the FFT (Fast-Fourier Transform) method, for various contrasts between the aggregates and matrix' Young moduli. To complete this work, focused on effective properties, an analysis of the local elastic response in the matrix phase is undertaken, in order to determine the spatial arrangement between stress concentration zones in the matrix and the phases of the microstructure (aggregates and voids). Moreover, a statistical fields characterization, in the matrix, is achieved, including the determination of the Representative Volume Element (RVE) size. Furthermore, a comparison between effective and local elastic properties obtained from microstructures containing polyhedra and spheres is carried out. (author)

  8. Monitoring early age cementitious materials using ultrasonic guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerson, Jacob L.

    The evaluation of early age concrete is critical for reducing construction times and ensuring quality. In this study, the use of ultrasonic guided waves for monitoring the development of early age cementitious materials is investigated. A torsional wave is transmitted and received through a waveguide that is embedded in early age mortar or concrete. As the cementitious material sets and hardens, the received wave(s) change, indicating the transition from a semifluid to a solid state. This thesis proposes two systems. The first system is a through-transmission system; a wave is transmitted on one end of an embedded waveguide using a sensor arrangement and then it is received on the opposite end of the rod with another sensor. This approach monitors the attenuation of the fundamental torsional wave mode, resulting from the leakage of energy from the cylindrical steel rod to the surrounding cementitious material. The evolution of the material's properties is related to the energy leakage or attenuation of the guided wave. The second system is a pulse-echo system; a wave is transmitted on one end of a partially embedded waveguide via a sensor arrangement that also receives the reflected signals. This approach monitors both the reflection from the end of the rod and the reflection from the point where the waveguide enters the material. The development of the cementitious material's mechanical properties is related to both the energy leaked into the surrounding material and the energy reflected at the point of entry. The ability of this method to only require access to one side of the specimen makes it attractive for monitoring early age cementitious materials in the field. Experiments were performed on mixtures with varying water-cement ratios (w/c = 0.40, 0.50, and 0.60), chemical admixtures (accelerant and retardant), mineral admixtures (silica fume and fly ash), and coarse aggregate (pea gravel). The time of setting and compressive strength of the various mixtures

  9. Influence of curing conditions on lime and lime-metakaolin mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Paulina; Martins, A

    2011-01-01

    Comunicação apresentada ao XII DBMC - International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components, Porto, April 12th-15th, 2011 Air-lime mortars with or without pozzolanic components were largely used in historic buildings. Due to natural or accidental degradation it is often necessary the application of repair mortars, durable and compatible with the masonries of historic buildings. Within this context and associating the improvement of mortars characteristics to the ne...

  10. Improvements of nano-SiO2 on sludge/fly ash mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D F; Lin, K L; Chang, W C; Luo, H L; Cai, M Q

    2008-01-01

    Sewage sludge ash has been widely applied to cementitious materials. In this study, in order to determine effects of nano-SiO(2) additives on properties of sludge/fly ash mortar, different amounts of nano-SiO(2) were added to sludge/fly ash mortar specimens to investigate their physical properties and micro-structures. A water-binding ratio of 0.7 was assigned to the mix. Substitution amounts of 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% of sludge/fly ash (1:1 ratio) were proposed. Moreover, 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3% of nano-SiO(2) was added to the mix. Tests, including SEM and compressive strength, were carried out on mortar specimens cured at 3, 7, and 28 days. Results showed that sludge/fly ash can make the crystals of cement hydration product finer. Moreover, crystals increased after nano-SiO(2) was added. Hence, nano-SiO(2) can improve the effects of sludge/fly ash on the hydration of mortar. Further, due to the low pozzolanic reaction active index of sludge ash, early compressive strengths of sludge/fly ash mortar were decreased. Yet, nano-SiO(2) could help produce hydration crystals, which implies that the addition of nano-SiO(2) to mortar can improve the influence of sludge/fly ash on the development of the early strength of the mortar.

  11. Reuse of de-inking sludge from wastepaper recycling in cement mortar products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shiqin; Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi; Shapiro, Gretta

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation into the use of de-inking sludge from a paper recycling mill as feedstock material in the manufacture of cement mortar products, including masonry blocks and mortar renders. Both physical and mechanical properties of mortar specimens containing various amounts of de-inking sludge were investigated. It was observed that the addition of de-inking sludge to cement mortar at a fixed water-to-cement ratio significantly reduced flow properties and increased setting time. Water absorption and volume of permeable voids of cement mortar increased with increased dosage of de-inking sludge, with a corresponding reduction of bulk density. The 91-day compressive strength of mortar samples with 2.5 wt% and 20 wt% de-inking sludge loadings retained 83% and 62% respectively of the reference mortar strength. The corresponding drying shrinkage increased by up to 160% compared to reference samples. However, a de-inking sludge loading of up to 2.5 wt% did not significantly alter measured physical and mechanical properties. The results demonstrate that despite the high moisture absorbance of de-inking sludge due to its organic matter and residual cellulose fibre content, it serves as a potential supplementary additive and its cellulosic content proving to be an active set retardant to cementitious masonry products.

  12. Influence of Temperature on Sulfate Attack of Limestone Filler Cement Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Mortar prisms were made with three different cementitious materials (with or without mineral admixture) plus 30% mass of limestone filler. After 28 days of curing in water at room temperature, the mortars were submerged in 2% magnesium sulfate solution at different temperatures (5 ℃, 20 ℃ and alternate temperature between 5 ℃ and 20 ℃) for a year. The appearance and strength development were measured on these immersed prisms at intervals, and samples selected from the surface of prisms were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results show that the influence of temperature on the resistance to sulfate attack of mortar is related to the binder compositions. A higher temperature leads to a quicker strength loss and appearance deterioration of the mortar without mineral admixture. For blended cements, a higher temperature is favorable for the pozzolanic reaction of mineral admixture and the overall deterioration of mortar is reduced with the increasing temperature. When the mineral admixture has a lower reactivity, such influence of temperature on the resistance to sulfate attack of mortar containing admixtures becomes greater. At the three different solution temperatures, two blended cements show significantly improved resistances to sulfate attack. After 1 year of exposure to magnesium sulfate solutions, the formation of thaumasite was checked in the OPC mortars at both 5 ℃ and 20 ℃. It is concluded that the thaumasite formation is not limited to structures at low temperature (less than 15 ℃).

  13. Experimental Analysis of Repaired Masonry Elements with Flax-FRCM and PBO-FRCM Composites Subjected to Axial Bending Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A. Cevallos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the construction industry, the use of natural fabrics as a reinforcement for cement-based composites has shown great potential. The use of these sustainable composites to provide strengthening or repair old masonry structures that exhibit structural problems mainly due to a poor tensile strength of the mortar/brick joints is revealed to be a promising area of research. One of the most significant load conditions affecting the mechanical response of masonry structures occurs when axial bending loads are applied on the resistant cross-section. In this study, three different types of masonry elements were built using clay bricks and a lime-based mortar. After 28 days, the samples were subjected to concentric and eccentric compressive loads. In order to produce significant bending effects, the compressive loads were applied with large eccentricity, and a sudden failure characterized the behavior of the unreinforced masonry (URM elements. The tested masonry specimens were repaired using fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM composites produced using bi-directional flax and polyparaphenylene benzobisoxazole (PBO fabrics. The mechanical behavior of the URM and repaired samples was compared in terms of load-displacement and moment-curvature responses. Furthermore, the results achieved using flax-FRCM composites were compared with those of using PBO-FRCM composites.

  14. Electrohydraulic shock wave generation as a means to increase intrinsic permeability of mortar

    OpenAIRE

    MAUREL, O.; REESS, T.; MATALLAH, M.; FERRON, A.; Chen, W.; C. La Borderie; G. Pijaudier-Cabot; JACQUESE, A.; REY-BETHBEDER, F.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the influence of compressive shock waves on the permeability of cementitious materials. Shock waves are generated in water by Pulsed Arc Electrohydraulic Discharges (PAED). The practical aim is to increase the intrinsic permeability of the specimens. The maximum pressure amplitude of the shock wave is 250 MPa. It generates damage in the specimens and the evolution of damage is correlated with the intrinsic permeability of the mortar. A threshold of pressure is observed....

  15. Comparing the Environmental Impacts of Alkali Activated Mortar and Traditional Portland Cement Mortar using Life Cycle Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheu, P. S.; Ellis, K.; Varela, B.

    2015-11-01

    Since the year 1908 there has been research into the use alkali activated materials (AAM) in order to develop cementitious materials with similar properties to Ordinary Portland Cement. AAMs are considered green materials since their production and synthesis is not energy intensive. Even though AAMs have a high compressive strength, the average cost of production among other issues limits its feasibility. Previous research by the authors yielded a low cost AAM that uses mine tailings, wollastonite and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This mortar has an average compressive strength of 50MPa after 28 days of curing. In this paper the software SimaPro was used to create a product base cradle to gate Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). This compared the environmental impact of the AAM mortar to an Ordinary Portland Cement mortar (PCHM) with similar compressive strength. The main motivation for this research is the environmental impact of producing Ordinary Portland Cement as compared to alkali activated slag materials. The results of this LCA show that the Alkali Activated Material has a lower environmental impact than traditional Portland cement hydraulic mortar, in 10 out of 12 categories including Global Warming Potential, Ecotoxicity, and Smog. Areas of improvement and possible future work were also discovered with this analysis.

  16. Glass cullet as a new supplementary cementitious material (SCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahosseini, Mohammadreza

    Finely ground glass has the potential for pozzolanic reactivity and can serve as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). Glass reaction kinetics depends on both temperature and glass composition. Uniform composition, amorphous nature, and high silica content of glass make ground glass an ideal material for studying the effects of glass type and particle size on reactivity at different temperature. This study focuses on how three narrow size ranges of clear and green glass cullet, 63--75 mum, 25--38 mum, and smaller than 25 mum, as well as combination of glass types and particle sizes affects the microstructure and performance properties of cementitious systems containing glass cullet as a SCM. Isothermal calorimetry, chemical shrinkage, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and analysis of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images in backscattered (BS) mode were used to quantify the cement reaction kinetics and microstructure. Additionally, compressive strength and water sorptivity experiments were performed on mortar samples to correlate reactivity of cementitious materials containing glass to the performance of cementitious mixtures. A recently-developed modeling platform called "muic the model" was used to simulated pozzolanic reactivity of single type and fraction size and combined types and particle sizes of finely ground glass. Results showed that ground glass exhibits pozzolanic properties, especially when particles of clear and green glass below 25 mum and their combination were used at elevated temperatures, reflecting that glass cullet is a temperature-sensitive SCM. Moreover, glass composition was seen to have a large impact on reactivity. In this study, green glass showed higher reactivity than clear glass. Results also revealed that the simultaneous effect of sizes and types of glass cullet (surface area) on the degree of hydration of glass particles can be accounted for through a linear addition

  17. Sequestration of phosphorus from wastewater by cement-based or alternative cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jiding; Kong, Yaping; Shi, Xianming

    2014-10-01

    Cement-based and alternative cementitious materials were tested in the laboratory for their capability of removing phosphate from wastewater. The results demonstrated that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were suitable for describing the adsorption characteristics of these materials. Among the four types of filter media tested, the cement-based mortar A has the highest value of maximum adsorption (30.96 mg g(-1)). The P-bonding energy (KL) and adsorption capacity (K) exhibited a positive correlation with the total content of Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in each mortar. The maximum amount of P adsorbed (Qm) and adsorption intensity (1/n) exhibited a positive correlation with the CaO content in each mortar. For three of them, the P-removal rates were in excess of 94 percent for phosphorus concentrations ranging from 20 to 1000 mg L(-1). The underlying mechanisms were examined using field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM), coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results reveal that the removal of phosphate predominantly followed a precipitation mechanism in addition to weak physical interactions between the surface of adsorbent filter media and the metallic salts of phosphate. The use of cement-based or alternative cementitious materials in the form of ground powder shows great promise for developing a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable technology for P-sequestration and for wastewater treatment.

  18. The Influence of Calcium Chloride Salt Solution on the Transport Properties of Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoob Farnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical interaction between calcium chloride (CaCl2 and cementitious binder may alter the transport properties of concrete which are important in predicting the service life of infrastructure elements. This paper presents a series of fluid and gas transport measurements made on cementitious mortars before and after exposure to various solutions with concentrations ranging from 0% to 29.8% CaCl2 by mass. Fluid absorption, oxygen diffusivity, and oxygen permeability were measured on mortar samples prepared using Type I and Type V cements. Three primary factors influence the transport properties of mortar exposed to CaCl2: (1 changes in the degree of saturation, (2 calcium hydroxide leaching, and (3 formation of chemical reaction products (i.e., Friedel’s salt, Kuzel’s salt, and calcium oxychloride. It is shown that an increase in the degree of saturation decreases oxygen permeability. At lower concentrations (~12%, the formation of chemical reaction products (mainly calcium oxychloride is a dominant factor decreasing the fluid and gas transport in concrete.

  19. Rapid Repair of Earthquake Damaged RC Interior Beam-wide Column Joints and Beam-wall Joints Using FRP Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bing; LIM Chee Leong

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the seismic performance of FRP-strengthened RC interior non-seismically detailed beam-wide columns and beam-wall joints after limited seismic damage. Four eccentric and concentric beam-wide column joints and two beam-wall joints, initially damaged in a previous study, were repaired and tested under constant axial loads (0. \\fc'Ag and 0. 35 fc'Ag ) and lateral cyclic loading. The rapid repair technique developed, aimed to restore the original strength and to provide minimum drift capacity. The repair schemes were characterized by the use of; (a) epoxy injections and polymer modified cementitious mortar to seal the cracks and replace spalled concrete; and (b) glass (GFRP) and carbon (CFRP) sheets to enhance the joint performance. The FRP sheets were effectively prevented against possible debonding through the use of fiber anchors. Comparison between responses of specimens before and after repair clearly indicated reasonable restoration in strength, drift capacity, stiffness and cumulative energy dissipation capacity. All specimens failed with delamination of FRP sheets at beam-column joint interfaces. The rapid repair technique developed in this study is recommended for mass upgrading or repair of earthquake damaged beam-column joints.

  20. Experimental Study on Cementitious Composites Embedded with Organic Microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Qian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The recovery behavior for strength and impermeability of cementitious composites embedded with organic microcapsules was investigated in this study. Mortar specimens were formed by mixing the organic microcapsules and a catalyst with cement and sand. The mechanical behaviors of flexural and compression strength were tested. The results showed that strength could increase by up to nine percent with the addition of a small amount of microcapsules and then decrease with an increasing amount of microcapsules. An orthogonal test for investigating the strength recovery rate was designed and implemented for bending and compression using the factors of water/cement ratio, amount of microcapsules, and preloading rate. It is shown that the amount of microcapsules plays a key role in the strength recovery rate. Chloride ion permeability tests were also carried out to investigate the recovery rate and healing effect. The initial damage was obtained by subjecting the specimens to compression. Both the recovery rate and the healing effect were nearly proportional to the amount of microcapsules. The obtained cementitious composites can be seen as self-healing owing to their recovery behavior for both strength and permeability.

  1. Performance of Polymer Modified Mortar with Different Dosage of Polymeric Modifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer modified mortar system is defined as hydraulic cement combined at the time of mixing with organic polymers that are dispersed or re-dispersed in water, with or without aggregates. The compressive strength and flexural strength of polymer modified mortar obtained at early age are low and it required prolong curing period for the strength enhancement. In order to enhance the mechanical properties of cementitious mixture as well as its durability, hybridization of polymeric modifiers are applied into cementitious mixture specimens. Thus, this study is intended to examine the mechanical properties of hybrid polymer modified mortar system at various levels of polymeric modifier dosage; styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR latex and epoxy resin. Laboratory tests for density, compressive strength and flexural strength were carried out to determine the strength of hybrid polymer modified mortar. In this study, the hybrid polymer of SBR latex with epoxy resin gives discontented results compared to unmodified cement system. The results of density, compressive strength and flexural strength of hybrid polymer modified cement system had shown negative outcomes and did not make any improvement to cement system.

  2. Strength and shrinkage properties of mortar containing a nonstandard high-calcium fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengiz Duran Atis; Alaettin Kilic; Umur Korkut Sevim [Cukurova University, Balcali-Adana (Turkey). Engineering and Architecture Faculty

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to assess the compressive and flexural tensile strength and drying shrinkage properties of mortar mixtures containing high-calcium nonstandard Afsin-Elbistan fly ash (FA). Possibility of using Afsin-Elbistan FA in cement-based materials as shrinkage-reducing or compensation agent was also discussed. Five mortar mixtures including control Portland cement (PC) and FA mortar mixtures were prepared. FA replaced the cement on mass basis at the replacement ratios of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Water-cementitious materials ratio was 0.4 for all mixtures. The mixtures were cured at 65% relative humidity and 20{+-}2{sup o}C. The compressive and flexural tensile strength and drying shrinkage values of the mortar mixtures were measured. The results show that Afsin-Elbistan FA reduced drying shrinkage of the mortar by 40%. Therefore, it was concluded that Afsin-Elbistan FA can be used as a shrinkage-reducing agent. The mortar containing 40% FA expanded. This indicates that Afsin-Elbistan FA may be utilized to compensate drying shrinkage of cement-based materials.

  3. Bioreceptivity evaluation of cementitious materials designed to stimulate biological growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Sandra; De Muynck, Willem; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio; Steppe, Kathy; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2014-05-15

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), the most used binder in construction, presents some disadvantages in terms of pollution (CO2 emissions) and visual impact. For this reason, green roofs and façades have gain considerable attention in the last decade as a way to integrate nature in cities. These systems, however, suffer from high initial and maintenance costs. An alternative strategy to obtain green facades is the direct natural colonisation of the cementitious construction materials constituting the wall, a phenomenon governed by the bioreceptivity of such material. This work aims at assessing the suitability of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) materials to allow a rapid natural colonisation taking carbonated OPC samples as a reference material. For that, the aggregate size, the w/c ratio and the amount of cement paste of mortars made of both binders were modified. The assessment of the different bioreceptivities was conducted by means of an accelerated algal fouling test. MPC samples exhibited a faster fouling compared to OPC samples, which could be mainly attributed to the lower pH of the MPC binder. In addition to the binder, the fouling rate was governed by the roughness and the porosity of the material. MPC mortar with moderate porosity and roughness appears to be the most feasible material to be used for the development of green concrete walls.

  4. Bioreceptivity evaluation of cementitious materials designed to stimulate biological growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Sandra; De Muynck, Willem; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio; Steppe, Kathy; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2014-05-15

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), the most used binder in construction, presents some disadvantages in terms of pollution (CO2 emissions) and visual impact. For this reason, green roofs and façades have gain considerable attention in the last decade as a way to integrate nature in cities. These systems, however, suffer from high initial and maintenance costs. An alternative strategy to obtain green facades is the direct natural colonisation of the cementitious construction materials constituting the wall, a phenomenon governed by the bioreceptivity of such material. This work aims at assessing the suitability of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) materials to allow a rapid natural colonisation taking carbonated OPC samples as a reference material. For that, the aggregate size, the w/c ratio and the amount of cement paste of mortars made of both binders were modified. The assessment of the different bioreceptivities was conducted by means of an accelerated algal fouling test. MPC samples exhibited a faster fouling compared to OPC samples, which could be mainly attributed to the lower pH of the MPC binder. In addition to the binder, the fouling rate was governed by the roughness and the porosity of the material. MPC mortar with moderate porosity and roughness appears to be the most feasible material to be used for the development of green concrete walls. PMID:24602907

  5. Simple Mechanical Beneficiation Method of Coarse Fly Ash with High LOI for Making HVFA Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni ,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focusses on the effect of milling of fly ash obtained from four different sources on the properties of high volume fly ash (HVFA mortar. Two fly ash samples with low loss-on-ignition (LOI were taken from a coal-fired power plant, while the other two with high LOIs were obtained from a textile factory and from a paper mill, respectively. Milling was performed using a rod mill at a certain period of time. The workability of HVFA mortar with constant water to cementitious ratio was controlled by adjusting the superplasticizer content. The results show that the specific gravity of fly ash increases after milling. Utilizing milled fly ash ends up with significant strength increase of HVFA mortar, especially those utilizing high LOI fly ash. This shows that milling is an excellent fly ash beneficiation technique, especially on the one with high LOI value.

  6. Quantifying moisture transport in cementitious materials using neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Catherine L.

    A portion of the concrete pavements in the US have recently been observed to have premature joint deterioration. This damage is caused in part by the ingress of fluids, like water, salt water, or deicing salts. The ingress of these fluids can damage concrete when they freeze and expand or can react with the cementitious matrix causing damage. To determine the quality of concrete for assessing potential service life it is often necessary to measure the rate of fluid ingress, or sorptivity. Neutron imaging is a powerful method for quantifying fluid penetration since it can describe where water has penetrated, how quickly it has penetrated and the volume of water in the concrete or mortar. Neutrons are sensitive to light atoms such as hydrogen and thus clearly detect water at high spatial and temporal resolution. It can be used to detect small changes in moisture content and is ideal for monitoring wetting and drying in mortar exposed to various fluids. This study aimed at developing a method to accurately estimate moisture content in mortar. The common practice is to image the material dry as a reference before exposing to fluid and normalizing subsequent images to the reference. The volume of water can then be computed using the Beer-Lambert law. This method can be limiting because it requires exact image alignment between the reference image and all subsequent images. A model of neutron attenuation in a multi-phase cementitious composite was developed to be used in cases where a reference image is not available. The attenuation coefficients for water, un-hydrated cement, and sand were directly calculated from the neutron images. The attenuation coefficient for the hydration products was then back-calculated. The model can estimate the degree of saturation in a mortar with known mixture proportions without using a reference image for calculation. Absorption in mortars exposed to various fluids (i.e., deionized water and calcium chloride solutions) were investigated

  7. Using Converter Dust to Produce Low Cost Cementitious Composites by in situ Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Ludvig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers (CNFs were synthesized on clinker and silica fume particles in order to create a low cost cementitious nanostructured material. The synthesis was carried out by an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD process using converter dust, an industrial byproduct, as iron precursor. The use of these materials reduces the cost, with the objective of application in large-scale nanostructured cement production. The resulting products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and were found to be polydisperse in size and to have defective microstructure. Some enhancement in the mechanical behavior of cement mortars was observed due to the addition of these nano-size materials. The contribution of these CNTs/CNFs to the mechanical strength of mortar specimens is similar to that of high quality CNTs incorporated in mortars by physical mixture.

  8. TECHNOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CONCRETES AND MORTARS FOR UNDERWATER CONCRETING

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Anufrieva; B. H. Klochko

    2009-01-01

    The article is about the results of experimental-and-theoretical research of usefulness of mortar and concrete mixes for underwater repair works. It is shown that the developed compositions of hydraulic engineering concretes are characterized by high effectiveness in the corrosive medium.

  9. TECHNOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CONCRETES AND MORTARS FOR UNDERWATER CONCRETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Anufrieva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the results of experimental-and-theoretical research of usefulness of mortar and concrete mixes for underwater repair works. It is shown that the developed compositions of hydraulic engineering concretes are characterized by high effectiveness in the corrosive medium.

  10. Shrinkage and Cracking Sensitivity of Cement Mortar Containing Fly Ash, Granulated Blast-furnace Slag and Silica Fume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to investigate drying shrinkage and cracking sensitivity subjected to restrained shrinkage of mortar containing fly ash (FA), granulated blast-furnace slag (GBFS) and silica fume (SF). Six mortar mixtures including control Portland cement (PC) and FA,GBFS and SF mortar mixtures were prepared. FA replaced the cement on mass basis at the replacement ratios of 20% and 35%, GBFS replaced the cement at the replacement ratios of 40%, SF replaced the cement at the replacement ratios of 8% and the blended mixtures with 20% FA, 20% GBFS and 8% SF. Water-cementitious materials ratio and sand-cementitious materials ratio were 0.4 and 2.0 for all mixtures, respectively. The mixtures were cured at 65% relative humidity and 20℃. The drying shrinkage value, initial cracking time and cracking width of the mortar samples were measured. The results show that all the mortar mixture containing FA exhibited the decrease of drying shrinkage.Moreover, initial cracking time was markedly delayed, and the crack width of the initial crack was reduced. However, the incorporations of various ratios of GBFS and SF led to an increase of drying shrinkage, initial cracking time and cracking width as compared to control mixture.

  11. Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Mortars Incorporating Nano-Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Ghazy; Mohamed T. Bassuoni; Eugene Maguire; Mark O’Loan

    2016-01-01

    Repair and rehabilitation of deteriorating concrete elements are of significant concern in many infrastructural facilities and remain a challenging task. Concerted research efforts are needed to develop repair materials that are sustainable, durable, and cost-effective. Research data show that fiber-reinforced mortars/concretes have superior performance in terms of volume stability and toughness. In addition, it has been recently reported that nano-silica particles can generally improve the m...

  12. Multiscale characterization of chemical–mechanical interactions between polymer fibers and cementitious matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Hargis, Craig W.; Bae, Sungchul; Itty, Pierre A.; Meral, Cagla; Dominowski, Jolee; Radler, Michael J.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Together with a series of mechanical tests, the interactions and potential bonding between polymeric fibers and cementitious materials were studied using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and microtomography (lCT). Experimental results showed that these techniques have great potential to characterize the polymer fiber-hydrated cement-paste matrix interface, as well as differentiating the chemistry of the two components of a bi-polymer (hybrid) fiber the polypropylene core and the ethylene acrylic acid copolymer sheath. Similarly, chemical interactions between the hybrid fiber and the cement hydration products were observed, indicating the chemical bonding between the sheath and the hardened cement paste matrix. Microtomography allowed visualization of the performance of the samples, and the distribution and orientation of the two types of fiber in mortar. Beam flexure tests confirmed improved tensile strength of mixes containing hybrid fibers, and expansion bar tests showed similar reductions in expansion for the polypropylene and hybrid fiber mortar bars.

  13. Effects of Carbon Nanotubes on Mechanical and 2D-3D Microstructure Properties of Cement Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiaoling; SUN Wei; JIANG Hao; WANG Caihui

    2014-01-01

    To study the influence of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the mechanical and microstructural properties of cementitious composites, 0.00, 0.02, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.20 wt% of multi-wall carbon nanotubes were added into cement mortar, in which the cement-sand ratio was 1:1.5. The flexural and compressive strengths of cement mortar at the age of 3, 7, 28 and 90 d and the fracture performance at the age of 28 d were determined, its 2D micrograph was tested by means of SEM, and the 3D defects distribution was firstly determined with or without CNTs by means of XCT (X-ray computerized tomography). The results showed that 0.08 wt% of CNTs improved the compressive strength and flexural strength by 18% and 19%, respectively, and a significant improvement of its fracture property was observed. Moreover lower addition of carbon nanotubes to cement mortars can improve its microstructure and decrease the defects significantly compared to the cement mortar without CNTs. With the increase of the content of CNTs, the mechanical properties of cement mortars presented to be declined largely due to the agglomeration of CNTs.

  14. PREPARATION OF MORTARS FOR RESTORATION OF ARCHITECTURAL MONUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEREZA TRIBULOVÁ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mortar mixtures were prepared considering the microscopic observation, granulometric analysis, mercury porosimetry, XRD analysis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis of the original plaster. Two series of lime mortar samples containing identical mixture of aggregates and admixtures but varying in the kind of a lime binder were prepared. In addition, the sample series varied in the ratio between mixing aggregate and binder. Prepared test bodies were subjected to accelerated carbonation process. Carbonated samples were characterized by the measurement of compressive strength, open porosity, water absorption and resistance to salt crystallization. The samples were also again compared with the original plaster by optical microscopy and XRD analysis. Based on the results of analyses of the original plasters and prepared samples of repair mortar the sample containing lime slurry with the mixture of aggregates in the mixing ratio of 1 : 2 was recommended for the restoration procedure.

  15. Studies of ancient concrete as analogs of cementitious sealing materials for a repository in tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1989-03-01

    The durability of ancient cementitious materials has been investigated to provide data applicable to determining the resistance to weathering of concrete materials for sealing a repository for storage of high-level radioactive waste. Because tuff and volcanic ash are used in the concretes in the vicinity of Rome, the results are especially applicable to a waste repository in tuff. Ancient mortars, plasters, and concretes collected from Rome, Ostia, and Cosa dating to the third century BC show remarkable durability. The aggregates used in the mortars, plasters, and concretes included basic volcanic and pyroclastic rocks (including tuff), terra-cotta, carbonates, sands, and volcanic ash. The matrices of ancient cementitious materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated lime cements, (2) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated lime cements ({plus_minus} siliceous components), (3) pozzolana/hydrated lime cements, and (4) gypsum cements. Most of the materials investigated are in category (3). The materials were characterized to elucidate aspects of the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical, mineralogical, and microstructural factors. Their durability was found to be affected by the matrix mineralogy, particle size, and porosity; aggregate type, grading and proportioning; and the methodology of placement. 30 refs.

  16. Electro-decontamination of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The end of operations in nuclear facilities is followed by various decontamination and decommissioning operations. Similar to other electrochemical techniques such as re-alkalinisation and chloride extraction, an electrokinetic remediation process is being developed as a specific method for deeply contaminated concrete structures. Two cements, an ordinary Portland and a 30% slag cement, have been chosen for the conducted work.Mortars and concretes are contaminated by adding non-radioactive cesium in the batch water, cesium being a representative specie of deep encountered contaminants. The conducted experimental and numerical work have focused on three main aspects: characterizing and understanding the cesium transport mechanisms, assessing the electro-remediation process at lab-scale and evaluating the real scale constraints. Using existing knowledge of chloride transport mechanisms, experiments have been conducted to characterize the cesium interactions with cementitious phase and ionic transport in saturated materials. A numerical model have then been developed to describe the cesium transport, taking into account the ionic activity coefficients and interactions with solid phases. Indeed, lab-scale experiments have demonstrated that electro-remediation reduced to 20-50% the initially contained cesium after a three weeks treatment. Treated samples analysis confirmed that deeply diffused cesium is migrating to the surface. Moreover, conducted experiments showed the consistency between the different materials properties, applied currents and decontamination efficiency. A comparative analysis of experiments carried on samples with different shapes, formulations and contamination modes helped assessing and optimizing the process efficiency for various continuous and variable applied currents. Finally, electro-remediation experiments have also been carried on 1m2 concrete slabs. Liquid catholyte and anolyte solutions are replaced by alumina gels and cellulose pastes

  17. Sand/cement ratio evaluation on mortar using neural networks and ultrasonic transmission inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, M; Segura, I; Izquierdo, M A G; Fuente, J V; Anaya, J J

    2009-02-01

    The quality and degradation state of building materials can be determined by nondestructive testing (NDT). These materials are composed of a cementitious matrix and particles or fragments of aggregates. Sand/cement ratio (s/c) provides the final material quality; however, the sand content can mask the matrix properties in a nondestructive measurement. Therefore, s/c ratio estimation is needed in nondestructive characterization of cementitious materials. In this study, a methodology to classify the sand content in mortar is presented. The methodology is based on ultrasonic transmission inspection, data reduction, and features extraction by principal components analysis (PCA), and neural network classification. This evaluation is carried out with several mortar samples, which were made while taking into account different cement types and s/c ratios. The estimated s/c ratio is determined by ultrasonic spectral attenuation with three different broadband transducers (0.5, 1, and 2 MHz). Statistical PCA to reduce the dimension of the captured traces has been applied. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) are trained using principal components (PCs) and their outputs are used to display the estimated s/c ratios in false color images, showing the s/c ratio distribution of the mortar samples.

  18. Cement Pastes and Mortars Containing Nitrogen-Doped and Oxygen-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Martínez-Alanis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement pastes and mortars based on ordinary Portland cement containing nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Nx or oxygen-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-Ox are investigated. To incorporate MWCNTs into the cementitious matrix, the as-produced carpets are dispersed over periods of 1 and 2 hours in distilled water at pH levels of 1 and 7. The cement pastes are prepared by adding 0.1 wt% of MWCNTs to cement powder, followed by characterization with SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD at an early age (first hours of hydration. The mortars are mechanically characterized during the hydration process for a period of 28 days. SEM characterization of cement pastes revealed that the carbon nanotubes are well incorporated in the cementitious matrix, with the hydrated cement grains interconnected by long carbon nanotubes. XRD characterizations demonstrated that, during the hydration of cement pastes, different peaks emerged that were associated with ettringite, hydrated calcium silicate, and calcium hydroxide, among other structures. Results of the compressive strength measurements for mortars simultaneously mixed with MWCNT-Nx and MWCNT-Ox reached an increment of approximately 30% in compressive strength. In addition, density functional theory calculations were performed in nitrogen-doped and oxygen-functionalized carbon nanotubes interacting with a cement grain.

  19. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  20. Impact of cementitious materials decalcification on transfer properties: application to radioactive waste deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious materials have been selected to compose the engineering barrier system (EBS) of the French radioactive waste deep repository, because of concrete physico-chemical properties: the hydrates of the cementitious matrix and the pH of the pore solution contribute to radionuclides retention; furthermore the compactness of these materials limits elements transport. The confinement capacity of the system has to be assessed while a period at least equivalent to waste activity (up to 100.000 years). His durability was sustained by the evolution of transfer properties in accordance with cementitious materials decalcification, alteration that expresses structure long-term behavior. Then, two degradation modes were carried out, taking into account the different physical and chemical solicitations imposed by the host formation. The first mode, a static one, was an accelerated decalcification test using nitrate ammonium solution. It replicates the EBS alteration dues to underground water. Degradation kinetic was estimated by the amount of calcium leached and the measurement of the calcium hydroxide dissolution front. To evaluate the decalcification impact, samples were characterized before and after degradation in term of microstructure (porosity, pores size distribution) and of transfer properties (diffusivity, gas and water permeability). The influence of cement nature (ordinary Portland cement, blended cement) and aggregates type (lime or siliceous) was observed: experiments were repeated on different mortars mixes. On this occasion, an essential reflection on this test metrology was led. The second mode, a dynamical degradation, was performed with an environmental permeameter. It recreates the EBS solicitations ensured during the re-saturation period, distinguished by the hydraulic pressure imposed by the geologic layer and the waste exothermicity. This apparatus, based on triaxial cell functioning, allows applying on samples pressure drop between 2 and 10 MPa and

  1. Effect of graphene on mechanical properties of cement mortars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹明莉; 张会霞; 张聪

    2016-01-01

    Functionalized graphene nano-sheets (FGN) of 0.01%−0.05% (mass fraction) were added to produce FGN-cement composites in the form of mortars. Flow properties, mechanical properties and microstructure of the cementitious material were then investigated. The results indicate that the addition of FGN decreases the fluidity slightly and improves mechanical properties of cement-based composites significantly. The highest strength is obtained with FGN content of 0.02% where the flexural strength and compressive strength at 28 days are 12.917 MPa and 52.42 MPa, respectively. Besides, scanning electron micrographs show that FGN can regulate formation of massive compact cross-linking structures and thermo gravimetric analysis indicates that FGN can accelerate the hydration reaction to increase the function of the composite effectively.

  2. Properties of Cement Mortar by Use of Hot-Melt Polyamides as Substitute for Fine Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongzhou Yuan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on use of hot-melt polyamide (HMP to prepare mortar specimens with improved crack healing and engineering properties. The role of HMP in the crack repairing of cement mortar subjected to several rounds of heat treatment was investigated. Compatibility between HMP and hydraulic cement was investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR technology. Mortar specimens were prepared using standard cement mortar mixes with HMP at 1%, 3% and 5% (by volume for fine aggregate substitute. After curing for 28 days, HMP specimens were subjected to heating at temperature of 160 °C for one, two, and three days and then natural cooling down to ambient temperature. Mechanical and durability properties of the heated HMP mortars were evaluated and compared with those of the corresponding mortars without heating. The microscopic observation of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ of HMP mortar was conducted through environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Results reveal that incorporation of HMP improves the workability of the HMP/cement binder while leading to decrease in compressive strength and durability. The heated HMP mortars after exposure to heating for one, two, and three days exhibit no obvious change in compressive strength while presenting notable increase in flexural strength and durability compared with the corresponding mortars without heating. The XRD, FTIR and ESEM analyses indicate that no obvious chemical reaction occurs between HMP and hydraulic cement, and thus the self-repairing for interfacial micro-crack in HMP/cement composite system is ascribed to the physical adhesion of HMP to cement matrix rather than the chemical bonding between them.

  3. Preparation of Self-compacting Ultra-high Toughness Cementitious Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiufang; XU Shilang; TIAN Yanhua

    2011-01-01

    A self-compacting ultra-high toughness cementitious composite(UHTCC)reinforced by discontinuous short polyvinyl alcohol(PVA)fibers,which exhibits self-compacting performance in the fresh state and strain-hardening and multiple cracking behavior in the hardened state,was developed through controlling flow properties of fresh mortar matrix at constant ingredients concentrations determined by micromechanical design and ensuring uniform fibers dispersion.The superplasticizer was utilized to adjust its flow properties in the fresh state.A series of flow tests,including deformability test,flow rate test,and self-placing test,were conducted to characterize and quantify the fluidity performance of fresh mortar matrix and self-compactability of fresh UHTCC.It is revealed that the utilization of superplasticizer is efficient in producing the fresh mortar matrix with desirable fluidity and the resulting self-compacting UHTCC.In addition,results of four point bending tests on the developed self-compacting UHTCC confirm the insensitivity of mechanical performance of self-compacting UHTCC to the presence of external vibrations as well as the flexural characteristics of deformation hardening and multiple cracking.

  4. Behaviour of cementitious materials: sulfates and temperature actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research work presented in this Ph.D. thesis is related to the nuclear waste underground repository concept. Concrete could be used in such a repository, and would be subjected to variations of temperature in presence of sulfate, a situation that could induce expansion of concrete. The research was lead in three parts: an experimental study of the possibility of an internal sulfate attack on mortars; an experimental study and modeling of the chemical equilibriums of the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-SO3-H2O system; and a modeling of the mechanisms of internal and external sulfate attacks, and the effect of temperature. The results show that mortars can develop expansions after a steam-cure during hydration, but also when a long steam-cure is applied to one-year-old mortars, which is a new point. Ettringite precipitation can be considered as responsible for these expansions. The experimental study of the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-SO3-H2O system clarified the role of Calcium Silicate Hydrates (C-S-H) on chemical equilibriums of cementitious materials. Sulfate sorption on C-S-H has been studied in detail. The quantity of sulfate bound to the C-S-H mainly depends on the sulfate concentration in solution, on the Ca/Si ratio of the C-S-H and is not significantly influenced by temperature. Aluminium inclusion in the C-S-H seems to be a significant phenomenon. Temperature increases the calcium sulfo-aluminate solubilities and thus increases sulfates concentration in solution. A modeling of the chemical system is proposed. Simulations of external sulfate attack (15 mmol/L of Na2SO4) predict ettringite precipitation at 20 and 85±C. Simulation of internal sulfate attack was performed at a local scale (a hydrated cement grain). An initial inhomogeneity can lead, after a thermal curing at 85±C, to ettringite precipitation in zones originally free from ettringite. This new-formed ettringite could be the origin of the expansions. (author)

  5. Effect of metakaolinite on strength and chemical resistance of cement mortars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malolepszy, J.; Pytel, Z. [Mining and Metallurgy Univ., Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Cracow (Poland)

    2000-07-01

    The effect of the percentage of metakaolinite admixture and calcium aluminate content in portland cement, used as the main cementitious components, on the chemical resistance of a series of prepared standard mortars was investigated. Chemical resistance was evaluated by measuring strength, shrinkage and expansion on the samples stored in water and chemical solutions. Results showed minimal change in the standard properties of mortars by the metakaolinite. However, there was marked improvement in chemical resistance. Interest in the study of this material is related to the urgency of finding a useful application for it, in view of the fact that it is produced in large quantities as a waste-product of power generation. It is widely believed that there is a potential application for this product in improving the durability of concrete. 20 refs., 10 tabs., 9 figs.

  6. Application of Image Analysis Based on SEM and Chemical Mapping on PC Mortars under Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Cheng; SUN Wei; Scrivener Karen

    2014-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of cementitious materials exposed to sulfate solutions have been controversial, despite considerable research. In this paper, two methodologies of image analysis based on scanning electron microscope and chemical mapping are used to analyse Portland cement mortars exposed to sodium sulfate solution. The effects of sulfate concentration in solution and water to cement ratio of mortar, which are considered as the most sensitive factors to sulfate attack, are investigated respectively by comparing the macro expansion with microstructure analysis. It is found that the sulfate concentration in pore solution, expressed as sulfate content in C-S-H, plays a critical role on the supersaturation with respect to ettringite and so on the expansion force generated.

  7. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erzar, B., E-mail: benjamin.erzar@cea.fr; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y. [CEA, DAM, GRAMAT, F-46500 Gramat (France)

    2013-12-28

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10{sup 4} to 4 × 10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  8. Traditional mortar represented by sticky rice lime mortar——One of the great inventions in ancient China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG FuWei; ZHANG BingJian; PAN ChangChu; ZENG YuYao

    2009-01-01

    The development of traditional lime-based bond in ancient times was reviewed in this paper. It was proved by a lot of historical data that the application of organic materials in inorganic mortar was a sharp-cut characteristic during the developing process of construction gelled materials in ancient China. The important role sticky rice mortar ever played and the historical significance were revealed. Due to the excellent performance, such as high adhesive strength, good toughness, water-proof and so on, traditional mortar represented by sticky rice mortar should be one of the greatest technological contributions of the day in the world. Modern technology was employed in the study of the sticky rice lime mortar and the researching results of our laboratory and some researchers, including the compo-sition and the mechanism of solidification, were also presented. It was found that the sticky rice acted as a matrix of bio-mineralization which affected the microstructure of the calcium carbonate crystal and there was cooperation between sticky rice and calcite produced during the solidifying of the sticky rice mortar, which maybe lead to the excellent performance of the mortar. Because of excellent performance and importance in science, sticky rice mortar can be regarded as one of the greatest inventions in construction history of China. Relative research of sticky mortar will be of importance for the exploring of ancient momentous invention and the repairing of ancient construction.

  9. Traditional mortar represented by sticky rice lime mortar——One of the great inventions in ancient China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The development of traditional lime-based bond in ancient times was reviewed in this paper.It was proved by a lot of historical data that the application of organic materials in inorganic mortar was a sharp-cut characteristic during the developing process of construction gelled materials in ancient China.The important role sticky rice mortar ever played and the historical significance were revealed.Due to the excellent performance,such as high adhesive strength,good toughness,water-proof and so on,traditional mortar represented by sticky rice mortar should be one of the greatest technological contributions of the day in the world.Modern technology was employed in the study of the sticky rice lime mortar and the researching results of our laboratory and some researchers,including the compo-sition and the mechanism of solidification,were also presented.It was found that the sticky rice acted as a matrix of bio-mineralization which affected the microstructure of the calcium carbonate crystal and there was cooperation between sticky rice and calcite produced during the solidifying of the sticky rice mortar,which maybe lead to the excellent performance of the mortar.Because of excellent performance and importance in science,sticky rice mortar can be regarded as one of the greatest inventions in construction history of China.Relative research of sticky mortar will be of importance for the exploring of ancient momentous invention and the repairing of ancient construction.

  10. Service life prediction and cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoklund Larsen, E.

    The present Ph.D.thesis describes and discusses the applicability of a systematic methodology recommended by CIB W80/RILEM-PSL for sevice life prediction. The report describes the most important inherent and environmental factors affecting the service life of structures of cementitious composites....... On the basis of this discription of factors and experience from a test programme described in SBI Report 222, Service life prediction and fibre reinforced cementitious composites, the applicabillity of the CIB/RILEM methodology is discussed....

  11. Pozzolanic Activity Assessment of LUSI (LUmpur SIdoarjo Mud in Semi High Volume Pozzolanic Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Christianto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available LUSI mud obtained from the mud volcano in Sidoarjo, Indonesia, is a viable aluminosilicate material to be utilized as pozzolanic material. LUSI is an abbreviation of the local name of the mud, i.e., Lumpur Sidoarjo, meaning Sidoarjo mud. This paper reports the results of an investigation to assess the pozzolanic activity of LUSI mud, especially in semi high volume pozzolanic mortar. In this case, the amount of mud incorporated is between 30% to 40% of total cementitious material, by mass. The content of SiO2 in the mud is about 30%, whilst the total content of SiO2, Fe2O3 and Al2O3 is more than 70%. Particle size and degree of partial cement replacement by treated LUSI mud affect the compressive strength, the strength activity index (SAI, the rate of pozzolanic activity development, and the workability of mortar incorporating LUSI mud. Manufacturing semi high volume LUSI mud mortar, up to at least 40% cement replacement, is a possibility, especially with a smaller particle size of LUSI mud, less than 63 μm. The use of a larger percentage of cement replacement by LUSI mud does not show any adverse effect on the water demand, as the flow of the fresh mortar increased with the increase of percentage of LUSI mud usage.

  12. Properties of Calcium Acetate Manufactured with Etching Waste Solution and Limestone Sludge as a Cementitious High-Early-Strength Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deuck-Mo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials. There are several methods available to improve its performance, with one of them being the use of high-early-strength admixtures (HESAs. Typical HESAs include calcium nitrate, calcium chloride, and calcium formate (CF. Industrial by-products, such as acetic acid and lime stone sludge (LSS, can be used together to produce calcium acetate (CA, which can subsequently be used as a cementitious HESA. In this study, calcium carbonate and LSS were mixed with cement in weight ratios of 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, and 1 : 2, and the properties of the as-produced CA were evaluated. CA and CF were mixed with cement in different weight ratios (0, 1, 2, and 3 wt% to obtain CA- and CF-mortars, respectively. The flow behavior, setting time, pH, and compressive strength of these mortars were evaluated, and their X-ray diffraction patterns were also analyzed. It was found that as the CF content in the CF-mortar increased, the initial strength of the mortar also increased. However, it impaired its long-term strength. On the other hand, when 1% CA was mixed with cement, satisfactory early and long-term strengths were achieved. Thus, CA, which is obtained from industrial by-products, can be an effective HESA.

  13. Electrokinetic decontamination of porous media. Experimental study and modeling of the cesium transport through cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to study the nuclear decontamination of cementitious materials by an electrokinetic method. Special attention is given to the understanding of the mechanisms leading to the removal of radioelements from the material. First, a bibliographic research allowed us to reduce the study to a normalized mortar and to cesium ions. This choice was confirmed by the experimental study of interactions between the contaminant and the material. Next, the efficiency of the electrokinetic decontamination was experimentally shown in laboratory conditions and electromigration was identified as the main transport phenomenon. Then, a numerical model was implemented in order to describe the ionic transport by electromigration. The results obtained were compared to experiments. Finally, some applications and developments of the electrokinetic process were proposed. (author)

  14. Service life prediction and fibre reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoklund Larsen, E.

    The present Ph.D.thesis addresses the service life concept on the fibre reinforced cementitious composites. The advantages and problems of adding fibre to a cementitious matrix and the influence on service life are described. In SBI Report 221, Service life prediction and cementitious somposites...

  15. Physical and mechanical properties of mortars containing PET and PC waste aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannawi, Kinda; Kamali-Bernard, Siham; Prince, William

    2010-11-01

    Non-biodegradable plastic aggregates made of polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste are used as partial replacement of natural aggregates in mortar. Various volume fractions of sand 3%, 10%, 20% and 50% are replaced by the same volume of plastic. This paper investigates the physical and mechanical properties of the obtained composites. The main results of this study show the feasibility of the reuse of PC and PET waste aggregates materials as partial volume substitutes for natural aggregates in cementitious materials. Despite of some drawbacks like a decrease in compressive strength, the use of PC and PET waste aggregates presents various advantages. A reduction of the specific weight of the cementitious materials and a significant improvement of their post-peak flexural behaviour are observed. The calculated flexural toughness factors increase significantly with increasing volume fraction of PET and PC-aggregates. Thus, addition of PC and PET plastic aggregates in cementitious materials seems to give good energy absorbing materials which is very interesting for several civil engineering applications like structures subjected to dynamic or impact efforts. The present study has shown quite encouraging results and opened new way for the recycling of PC waste aggregate in cement and concrete composites.

  16. Electrical percolation threshold of cementitious composites possessing self-sensing functionality incorporating different carbon-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dahawi, Ali; Haroon Sarwary, Mohammad; Öztürk, Oğuzhan; Yıldırım, Gürkan; Akın, Arife; Şahmaran, Mustafa; Lachemi, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study was carried out to understand the electrical percolation thresholds of different carbon-based nano- and micro-scale materials in cementitious composites. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) and carbon black (CB) were selected as the nano-scale materials, while 6 and 12 mm long carbon fibers (CF6 and CF12) were used as the micro-scale carbon-based materials. After determining the percolation thresholds of different electrical conductive materials, mechanical properties and piezoresistive properties of specimens produced with the abovementioned conductive materials at percolation threshold were investigated under uniaxial compressive loading. Results demonstrate that regardless of initial curing age, the percolation thresholds of CNT, GNP, CB and CFs in ECC mortar specimens were around 0.55%, 2.00%, 2.00% and 1.00%, respectively. Including different carbon-based conductive materials did not harm compressive strength results; on the contrary, it improved overall values. All cementitious composites produced with carbon-based materials, with the exception of the control mixtures, exhibited piezoresistive behavior under compression, which is crucial for sensing capability. It is believed that incorporating the sensing attribute into cementitious composites will enhance benefits for sustainable civil infrastructures.

  17. The shrinkage in lime mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez, J. A.

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the methodology existing to measure the shrinkage in air, developed for paste and cement mortars, has serious problems to be applied to lime mortars, due to its different mechanism of hardening several modifications in Norms UNE 80-113-86 y 80-112-89 make possible the determination of the shrinkage in these traditional mortars.

    La metodología existente en la actualidad para la medida de la retracción de secado, desarrollada para las pastas y los morteros de cemento, presenta serios problemas a la hora de su aplicación a los morteros de cal debido a su distinto mecanismo de endurecimiento. Algunas modificaciones de las normas UNE 80-113-86 y 80-112-89 hacen posible la determinación de la retracción en estos morteros tradicionales.

  18. Characterization and modeling of major constituent equilibrium chemistry of a blended cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeussen J.C.L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cementitious materials containing ground granulated iron blast furnace slag and coal combustion fly ash as admixtures are being used extensively for nuclear waste containment applications. Whereas the solid phases of ordinary Portland cement (OPC have been studied in great detail, the chemistry of cement, fly ash and slag blends has received relatively less study. Given that OPC is generally more reactive than slag and fly ash, the mineralogy of OPC provides a logical starting point for describing the major constituent chemistry of blended cement mortars. To this end, a blended cement mortar containing Portland cement, granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash and quartz sand was modeled using a set of solid phases known to form in hydrated OPC with the geochemical speciation solver LeachXS/ORCHESTRA. Comparison of modeling results to the experimentally determined pH-dependent batch leaching concentrations (USEPA Method 1313 indicates that major constituent concentrations are described reasonably well with the Portland cement mineral set; however, modeled and measured aluminum concentrations differ greatly. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the mortar reveals the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicate minerals heretofore unreported in similar cementitious blends: kaolinite and potassic phyllosilicates similar in composition to illite and muscovite. Whereas the potassic phyllosilicates are present in the quartz sand aggregate, the formation of kaolinite appears to be authigenic. The inclusion of kaolinite in speciation modeling provides a substantially improved description of the release of Al and therefore, suggests that the behavior of phyllosilicate phases may be important for predicting long-term physico-chemical behavior of such systems.

  19. Effect of Cement Asphalt Mortar Debonding on Dynamic Properties of CRTS II Slab Ballastless Track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The debonding of cement emulsified asphalt mortar (CA mortar is one of the main damage types in China railway track system II slab ballastless track. In order to analyze the influence of mortar debonding on the dynamic properties of CRTS II slab ballastless track, a vertical coupling vibration model for a vehicle-track-subgrade system was established on the base of wheel/rail coupling dynamics theory. The effects of different debonding lengths on dynamic response of vehicle and track system were analyzed by using the finite element software. The results show that the debonding of CA mortar layer will increase the dynamic response of track. If the length of debonding exceeds 1.95 m, the inflection point will appear on the vertical displacement curve of track. The vertical vibration acceleration of slab increases 4.95 times and the vertical dynamic compressive stress of CA mortar near the debonding region increases 15 times when the debonding length reaches 3.9 m. Considering the durability of ballastless track, once the length of debonding reaches 1.95 m, the mortar debonding should be repaired.

  20. Cross-contamination in Porcelain Mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Brandl, A; Falck, A; Ingebrigtsen, L; Nilson, C

    2001-01-01

    Porcelain mortars and pestles are frequently used to comminute drug substances on a small scale and (in some cases) in the production of liquid and semisolid suspensions. Although it is generally accepted that removal of a drug substance from a rough surface by rinsing may be difficult and may lead to cross-contamination, no hard data support that theory. In this study, the amount of salicylic acid remaining on a porcelain mortar after different washing procedures was quantified and compared with the amount remaining on a plastic mortar. Drug residues in the "mg" range on the porcelain mortars made common rinsing procedures appear inappropriate, but no traces of drug were detected on plastic mortars. In addition, the quality of suspension ointments with respect to particle size and homogeneity produced by the two types of mortars was compared. Porcelain and plastic mortars appeared equally suitable for use in the production of semisolid suspensions.

  1. Using Neutron Radiography to Quantify Water Transport and the Degree of Saturation in Entrained Air Cement Based Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Catherine L.; Bentz, Dale P.; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.; Weiss, W. Jason

    Air entrainment is commonly added to concrete to help in reducing the potential for freeze thaw damage. It is hypothesized that the entrained air voids remain unsaturated or partially saturated long after the smaller pores fill with water. Small gel and capillary pores in the cement matrix fill quickly on exposure to water, but larger pores (entrapped and entrained air voids) require longer times or other methods to achieve saturation. As such, it is important to quantitatively determine the water content and degree of saturation in air entrained cementitious materials. In order to further investigate properties of cement-based mortar, a model based on Beer's Law has been developed to interpret neutron radiographs. This model is a powerful tool for analyzing images acquired from neutron radiography. A mortar with a known volume of aggregate, water to cement ratio and degree of hydration can be imaged and the degree of saturation can be estimated.

  2. Permeability and mechanical properties of cement mortars colored by nano-mineral additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamali Bernard S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns a preliminary study on issues that relate primarily to the permeability of cementitious materials under the influence of some specific inexpensive additions that can play an important role in preserving the environment. We studied the addition of dyes in the presence of TiO2 on the Portland cement mortar. The used dyes are a yellow powder containing iron oxyhydroxide (FeO (OH, a blue-based powder tellurate manganese (MnTe2O5 and red powder containing iron oxide (Fe2O3. We measure the setting time, permeability and mechanical properties of Portland cement mortars colored with nano-mineral oxides mentioned previously. Test results indicate that the addition of nano-particles has a little influence on the setting time, improves penetration resistance that is due the affinity of the pore structure of mortar and slightly improves the resistance to compression for low levels of nanoparticles of TiO2.

  3. Characterization and selection of mortars in the restoration of the Kings Portal (Benavente, Zamora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luxan, M. P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available In the selection of materials required by any work on Architectural Heritage, a series of special requirements must be borne in mind which are essential to guarantee the application of the repairs. In this work the guidelines and basic criteria for the selection of repair mortars that have led to the design of mortars to restore the Kings Portal of the church of San Juan del Mercado (Benavente, Zamora, carved in stone in the Romanesque style and later polychromed are shown. The study is based on the characteristics of the ancient historical mortars, the compatibility of the restoration mortars with the mortars already existing in the monument, and the application needs of the specific work. Finally, the characteristics and properties of the specific repair mortar chosen are shown

    En la selección de materiales que toda intervención en el Patrimonio requiere, hay que tener presente una serie de requisitos esenciales para garantizar la aplicación de la reparación. En este trabajo se presentan las pautas junto con los criterios básicos de selección de los morteros de reparación que han conducido al diseño de los morteros para la restauración de la Portada de los Reyes de la Iglesia de San Juan del Mercado (Benavente, Zamora, tallada en piedra en estilo románico y, posteriormente, policromada. El estudio se fundamenta en las características de los morteros antiguos históricos, en la compatibilidad de los morteros de restauración con los morteros ya existentes en el monumento y en las necesidades de aplicación en la obra concreta. Finalmente se presentan las características y propiedades del mortero tipo de reparación seleccionado.

  4. The Effectiveness of High Quality Supplementary Cementitious Materials for Mitigating ASR Expansion in Concrete with High Alkali Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Prasetia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alkali silica reaction (ASR is influenced by external factors such as the surrounding environment of high alkalinity. Countries with cold climate have a high probability to be exposed to high concentrations of NaCl solution by the deicing salt. This condition will lead to serious ASR problems in concrete, if the aggregates contain reactive silica. The main research work in this paper is to investigate the effect of 15% replacement ratio of high quality fine fly ash (FA15% and 42% replacement ratio of blast furnace slag (BFS42% on the ASR mitigation in concrete with different alkali amount inside the pore solution. The experiments were conducted according to the accelerated mortar bars experiment following the JIS A1146 mortar bar test method. In addition, post-analysis such as observation of ASR gel formation by the Uranyl Acetate Fluorescence Method and observation of thin sections using a Polarizing Microscope were also conducted. The mortar bar tests show a very good mitigation effect of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs. The results show that only small ASR expansions, which can be categorized as “innocuous”, occurred for specimens with 1.2% Na2Oeq using FA15% and BFS42%. However, larger alkali amount inside the system will require more SCMs amount.

  5. COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH TESTING OF EARTH MORTARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Givanildo Alves Azeredo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the compressive strength of earth mortars. The goal is to use these mortars for masonry construction. Although it is necessary to study the whole masonry behaviour, the scope of this paper refers to the mortar only, without taking into account the blocks. As with other masonry units, compressive strength is a basic measure of quality for masonry mortars. However, there is a great variety of methodology for determining their parameters and properties, such as different samples geometry, the way strains are measured and also the platen restraint effect adopted. The present paper outlines certain experimental devices used to determine compressive strength of earth mortars and tries to show their influence on the properties determined. Proposals for the future development of testing earth mortars are outlined.

  6. Method for characterization of the redox condition of cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2015-12-22

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize an in situ redox indicator that is present in the cementitious materials as formed. The in situ redox indicator leaches from cementitious material and, when the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions can be utilized to determine the redox condition of the material. The in situ redox indicator can exhibit distinct characteristics in the leachate depending upon the redox condition of the indicator.

  7. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Canova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  8. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Canova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  9. Durability of expanded polystyrene mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrándiz Mas, Verónica; García Alcocel, Eva María

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the addition of various types and various concentrations of expanded polystyrene foam (both commercial and recycled) on the durability of Portland cement mortars is studied. In particular, the microstructure is studied utilizing the following methods: capillary absorption of water, mercury intrusion porosimetry, impedance spectroscopy and open porosity. In addition, the effects of heat cycles and freeze–thaw cycles on compressive strength are examined. Scanning electron micro...

  10. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  11. Rendering mortars in Medina Azahara, Part I: Material characterization and alteration process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Rendering mortars, which are still exposed to the open air on some of the walls of Medina Azahara, are studied and characterized in this work. Some repairing mortars used in different previous restorations are also characterized. Those rendering mortars are of different make considering the composition of their binder: lime, gypsum and mixed lime/ gypsum. Repairing mortars used in previous interventions are made of lime, excepting for a portland cement used by Félix Hernández in the restoration of one of the rooms back in the 50's. Biological colonization is the main cause of decay in lime mortars, while in mortars made of gypsum, decay is a result of the solubilizating action of rain water.

    En este trabajo se analizan y caracterizan los revocos que, todavía hoy, permanecen sobre algunos paramentos de los muros de la ciudad de Medina Azahara, expuestos a la intemperie. También se caracterizan algunos de los molleros de reparación aplicados en las distintas restauraciones de los revocos. Los revocos están formados por tres clase de morteros, atendiendo a la composición de su ligante: de cal, de yeso y bastardos de cal y yeso. Los morteros de reparación que se han utilizado son de cal, a excepción del utilizado en la restauración de Félix Hernández (década de 1950, en una de las salas, que es de cemento portland. La colonización biológica es la principal causa de deterioro de los morteros de cal, en tanto que la solubilización por las aguas de lluvia lo es en los morteros que contienen yeso.

  12. Ancient gypsum mortars from Cyprus: characterization and reinvention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, M.; Ioannou, I.

    2012-04-01

    confirms the phenomena of crystallisation and recrystallisation closed to the exposed surfaces due to long-term weathering. As anticipated, the results of this study have proven useful in reinventing gypsum-based materials based on the production technology of the past and the use of local raw materials. It is worth noting that gypsum is a widely available mineral in Cyprus due to the extensive evaporite deposits on the island. In the mortars designed and produced in the laboratory, ratios of binder to aggregates were based on the results of the analysed ancient samples. Gypsum and lime based materials were used in different proportions both as binder and aggregates. The new mixtures were tested in fresh and dry conditions at 7, 28, 56 and 90 days after their production. The results indicated higher mechanical strengths (7.6-9.6 MPa) when only gypsum based materials were used both as binder and aggregates. Porosity and average pore diameter tended to increase as the percentage of calcite increased in the mixtures. The variability of the results enhances the possibility of selecting the appropriate repair mortar depending on the nature of the material which may demand a conservation treatment.

  13. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  14. Influence of the activators’ type and content on the properties of no cement mortars%激发剂种类及掺量对无水泥砂浆性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海龙; 裴长春

    2015-01-01

    为了优化工业垃圾粉煤灰、高炉矿渣及生石灰作为胶凝材料的无水泥砂浆配合比设计,提高无水泥砂浆的基础性能,试验通过改变碱性激发剂的种类及掺量,研究了无水泥砂浆的表观密度及力学性能,得出了一些有价值的结论。%In order to optimize the mix design of no cement mortars with fly ash, blast furnace slag and lime as cementitious materials and to im-prove the performance of no cement mortars, the test studied the apparent density and mechanical properties of no cement mortars by changing the type and dosage of alkaline activator, some valuable conclusions are obtained.

  15. Non-cementitious compositions comprising vaterite and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Fernandez, Miguel; Morgan, Samuel O.

    2015-09-15

    Non-cementitious compositions and products are provided. The compositions of the invention include a carbonate additive comprising vaterite such as reactive vaterite. Additional aspects of the invention include methods of making and using the non-cementitious compositions and products.

  16. 丙烯酸酯共聚乳砂浆在修补水电站混凝土压力管道中的应用%Application of Acrylate Copolymer Emulsion Mortar in Repairing Concrete Pressure Pipeline in Hydropower Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王巧玲

    2014-01-01

    丙烯酸酯共聚乳砂浆是一种优良的水泥砂浆及混凝土改性剂,它具有环氧砂浆所无法比拟的低成本及耐老化、抗裂、抗收缩等性能。本文结合丙烯酸酯共聚乳砂浆在新总干二级水电站的使用情况,与常规采用的水泥砂浆和环氧砂浆进行了对比分析。%Acrylate copolymer emulsion mortar belongs to excellent cement mortar and concrete modifier. It is characterized by low cost,anti-aging,cracking resistance,anti-shrinkage and other properties which is more excellent compared with epoxy mortar.Acrylic copolymer emulsion mortar is used in secondary hydropower station of new trunk,the usage condition of which is analyzed and compared with that of conventional cement mortar and epoxy mortar in the paper.

  17. Review of durability of cementitious engineered barriers in repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with the durability of cementitious engineered barriers in a repository for low and intermediate level nuclear waste. Following the introduction the second section of the review identifies the environmental conditions associated with a deep, hard rock repository for ILW and LLW that are relevant to the durability of cementitious barriers. Section three examines the microstructure and macrostructure of cementitious materials and considers the physical and chemical processes of radionuclide immobilization. Potential repository applications and compositions of cementitious materials are reviewed in Section four. The main analysis of durability is dealt with in Section five. The different types of cementitious barrier are considered separately and their most probable modes of degradation are analysed. Concluding remarks that highlight critical technical matters are given in Section six. (author)

  18. The Behaviours of Cementitious Materials in Long Term Storage and Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste with widely varying characteristics is generated from the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, research laboratories and medical facilities. This waste must be treated and conditioned, as necessary, to provide waste forms acceptable for safe storage and disposal. Many countries use cementitious materials (concrete, mortar, etc.) as a containment matrix for immobilization, as well as for engineered structures of disposal facilities. Radionuclide release is dependent on the physicochemical properties of the waste forms and packages, and on environmental conditions. In the use of cement, the diffusion process and metallic corrosion can induce radionuclide release. The advantage of cementitious materials is the added stability and mechanical support during storage and disposal of waste. Long interim storage is becoming an important issue in countries where it is difficult to implement low level waste and intermediate level waste disposal facilities, and in countries where cement is used in the packaging of waste that is not suitable for shallow land disposal. This coordinated research project (CRP), involving 24 research organizations from 21 Member States, investigated the behaviour and performance of cementitious materials used in an overall waste conditioning system based on the use of cement - including waste packaging (containers), waste immobilization (waste form) and waste backfilling - during long term storage and disposal. It also considered the interactions and interdependencies of these individual elements (containers, waste, form, backfill) to understand the processes that may result in degradation of their physical and chemical properties. The main research outcomes of the CRP are summarized in this report under four topical sections: (i) conventional cementitious systems; (ii) novel cementitious materials and technologies; (iii) testing and waste acceptance criteria; and (iv) modelling long

  19. Self-degradable Cementitious Sealing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T.; Butcher, T., Lance Brothers, Bour, D.

    2010-10-01

    A self-degradable alkali-activated cementitious material consisting of a sodium silicate activator, slag, Class C fly ash, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) additive was formulated as one dry mix component, and we evaluated its potential in laboratory for use as a temporary sealing material for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells. The self-degradation of alkali-activated cementitious material (AACM) occurred, when AACM heated at temperatures of {ge}200 C came in contact with water. We interpreted the mechanism of this water-initiated self-degradation as resulting from the in-situ exothermic reactions between the reactants yielded from the dissolution of the non-reacted or partially reacted sodium silicate activator and the thermal degradation of the CMC. The magnitude of self-degradation depended on the CMC content; its effective content in promoting degradation was {ge}0.7%. In contrast, no self-degradation was observed from CMC-modified Class G well cement. For 200 C-autoclaved AACMs without CMC, followed by heating at temperatures up to 300 C, they had a compressive strength ranging from 5982 to 4945 psi, which is {approx}3.5-fold higher than that of the commercial Class G well cement; the initial- and final-setting times of this AACM slurry at 85 C were {approx}60 and {approx}90 min. Two well-formed crystalline hydration phases, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrate (I), were responsible for developing this excellent high compressive strength. Although CMC is an attractive, as a degradation-promoting additive, its addition to both the AACM and the Class G well cement altered some properties of original cementitious materials; among those were an extending their setting times, an increasing their porosity, and lowering their compressive strength. Nevertheless, a 0.7% CMC-modified AACM as self-degradable cementitious material displayed the following properties before its breakdown by water; {approx}120 min initial- and {approx}180 min final

  20. Application of Bacillus subtilis 168 as a multifunctional agent for improvement of the durability of cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Jong-Myong; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-11-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar. However, very few strains have been applied to crack remediation and strengthening of cementitious materials. In this study, we report the biodeposition of Bacillus subtilis 168 and its ability to enhance the durability of cement material. B. subtilis 168 was applied to the surface of cement specimens. The results showed a new layer of deposited organic-inorganic composites on the surface of the cement paste. In addition, the water permeability of the cement paste treated with B. subtilis 168 was lower than that of non-treated specimens. Furthermore, artificial cracks in the cement paste were completely remediated by the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168. The compressive strength of cement mortar treated with B. subtilis 168 increased by about 19.5% when compared with samples completed with only B4 medium. Taken together, these findings suggest that the biodeposition of B. subtilis 168 could be used as a sealing and coating agent to improve the strength and water resistance of concrete. This is the first paper to report the application of Bacillus subtilis 168 for its ability to improve the durability of cement mortar through calcium carbonate precipitation.

  1. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruszka Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1 and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  2. Analysis of Graphite-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Strategically embedding graphite meshes in a compliant cementitious matrix produces a composite material with relatively high tension and compressive properties as compared to steel-reinforced structures fabricated from a standard concrete mix. Although these composite systems are somewhat similar, the methods used to analyze steel-reinforced composites often fail to characterize the behavior of their more advanced graphite-reinforced counterparts. This Technical Memorandum describes some of the analytical methods being developed to determine the deflections and stresses in graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is initially demonstrated that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic moduli ratio exceeds 20. An alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach. When the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subjected to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed using the laminated composite plate theory with material properties established from tensile tests. Then, finite element modeling is used to verify the results. Considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  3. Leaky Rayleigh wave investigation on mortar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, J; Schmidt, Th; Lüthi, Th; Romer, M

    2006-12-01

    Aggressive mineralized ground water may harm the concrete cover of tunnels and other underground constructions. Within a current research project mortar samples are used to study the effects of sulfate interaction in accelerated laboratory experiments. A nondestructive test method based on ultrasonic surface waves was developed to investigate the topmost layer of mortar samples. A pitch and catch arrangement is introduced for the generation and reception of leaky Rayleigh waves in an immersion technique allowing the measurement of their propagation velocity. The technique has been successfully verified for the reference materials aluminium, copper, and stainless steel. First measurements performed on mortar specimens demonstrate the applicability of this new diagnostic tool.

  4. Reliability estimates for flawed mortar projectile bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, J.A. [US Army ARDEC, AMSRD-AAR-MEF-E, Analysis and Evaluation Division, Fuze and Precision Armaments Technology Directorate, US Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806-5000 (United States)], E-mail: jennifer.cordes@us.army.mil; Thomas, J.; Wong, R.S.; Carlucci, D. [US Army ARDEC, AMSRD-AAR-MEF-E, Analysis and Evaluation Division, Fuze and Precision Armaments Technology Directorate, US Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806-5000 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The Army routinely screens mortar projectiles for defects in safety-critical parts. In 2003, several lots of mortar projectiles had a relatively high defect rate, 0.24%. Before releasing the projectiles, the Army reevaluated the chance of a safety-critical failure. Limit state functions and Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate reliability. Measured distributions of wall thickness, defect rate, material strength, and applied loads were used with calculated stresses to estimate the probability of failure. The results predicted less than one failure in one million firings. As of 2008, the mortar projectiles have been used without any safety-critical incident.

  5. Detrimental effects of cement mortar and fly ash mortar on asthma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ara; Jang, Hong-Seok; Roh, Yoon Seok; Park, Hee Jin; Talha, A F S M; So, Seung-Young; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2013-11-01

    Currently, concrete additive materials are used worldwide to improve properties of concrete production and to reduce the total cost of the materials used in the concrete. However, the effects of exposure to various gases emitted from mortar mixed with additive materials are poorly understood. To evaluate the pattern of gas emission from cement mortar and additives, the emission levels of gas including ammonia (NH3) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured from two different mortar types, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), and OPC with fly ash on various time points after manufacture. On days 1, 3, 10 and 30 after manufacture, moderate concentrations of NH3 (4, 9, 12 and 5 ppm) were measured in OPC mortar (24h, 150 mm × 150 mm × 50 mm), whereas higher concentrations of NH3 (73, 55, 20 and 5 ppm) were measured in OPC mortar with fly ash (24h, 150 mm × 150 mm × 50 mm). Furthermore, the concentration of VOCs was more than 10 ppm on 1, 3, and 10 days of age in OPC and OPC with fly ash mortars. To examine the mortars' allergic effects on the respiratory system, mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and divided into four groups: normal, asthma control, OPC mortar and OPC mortar with fly ash. The mice were housed in corresponding group cage for 10 days with OVA challenges to induce asthma. Histopathologically, increased infiltration of lymphocytes was observed in the lung perivascular area of mice housed in OPC mortar and OPC mortar with fly ash cages compared to lungs of asthma control mice. Moreover, severe bronchial lumen obstruction and increased hypertrophy of bronchial epithelial cells (pmortar with fly ash group compared to OPC mortar or asthma control groups. Lungs of the two mortar groups generally expressed higher levels of genes related with asthma, including IL-4, eotaxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) compared to lungs of asthma control mice. Additionally, the OPC mortar with fly ash group showed higher expression of IL-5, 13 and monocyte

  6. Physico-chemical characterization of mortars as a tool in studying specific hydraulic components: application to the study of ancient Naxos aqueduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, P.; Galanos, A.; Doganis, I.; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.

    2011-07-01

    Mortars and plasters from the ancient aqueduct on the island of Naxos, Greece, were studied with regard to mineralogical and chemical composition, grain size distribution, raw materials and hydraulic properties, in order to assess their characteristics and design compatible repair mortars. The authentic materials contained lime, crushed-brick, siliceous and calcitic aggregates, in different proportions according to mortar type. Crushed-bricks fired at low temperatures and lightweight volcanic aggregates contained amorphous phases, which upon reaction with lime yielded hydraulic components capable of protecting the construction from the continuous presence of water. Hydraulic calcium silicate/aluminate hydrates, the proportions and the perfect packing of the raw materials, along with the diligent application justify the longevity and durability of the studied samples. The hydraulic properties of samples were pointed out through (a) the well-established CO2/H2O ratio derived from the thermogravimetric analysis and (b) by introducing two powerful indices issued from the chemical analysis, namely CaOhydr and soluble SiO2 hydr. These indices improved the clustering of hydraulic mortars and provided better correlation between mortars, plasters and their binders. By comparing grain size distribution and hydraulicity indices it was possible to distinguish among the construction phases. Based on this study, repair mortars were formulated by hydraulic lime, siliceous sand, calcareous and crushed-brick aggregates, with the optimal water content, ensuring optimum workability and compatible appearance with the authentic ones.

  7. Damage development, phase changes, transport properties, and freeze-thaw performance of cementitious materials exposed to chloride based salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnam, Yaghoob

    Recently, there has been a dramatic increase in premature deterioration in concrete pavements and flat works that are exposed to chloride based salts. Chloride based salts can cause damage and deterioration in concrete due to the combination of factors which include: increased saturation, ice formation, salt crystallization, osmotic pressure, corrosion in steel reinforcement, and/or deleterious chemical reactions. This thesis discusses how chloride based salts interact with cementitious materials to (1) develop damage in concrete, (2) create new chemical phases in concrete, (3) alter transport properties of concrete, and (4) change the concrete freeze-thaw performance. A longitudinal guarded comparative calorimeter (LGCC) was developed to simultaneously measure heat flow, damage development, and phase changes in mortar samples exposed to sodium chloride (NaCl), calcium chloride (CaCl 2), and magnesium chloride (MgCl2) under thermal cycling. Acoustic emission and electrical resistivity measurements were used in conjunction with the LGCC to assess damage development and electrical response of mortar samples during cooling and heating. A low-temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC) was used to evaluate the chemical interaction that occurs between the constituents of cementitious materials (i.e., pore solution, calcium hydroxide, and hydrated cement paste) and salts. Salts were observed to alter the classical phase diagram for a salt-water system which has been conventionally used to interpret the freeze-thaw behavior in concrete. An additional chemical phase change was observed for a concrete-salt-water system resulting in severe damage in cementitious materials. In a cementitious system exposed to NaCl, the chemical phase change occurs at a temperature range between -6 °C and 8 °C due to the presence of calcium sulfoaluminate phases in concrete. As a result, concrete exposed to NaCl can experience additional freeze-thaw cycles due to the chemical

  8. ASSESSMENT OF FINE RECYCLED AGGREGATES IN MORTAR

    OpenAIRE

    Feys, Charles; Joseph, Miquel; Boehme, Luc; Zhang, Yunlian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the influence of fine recycled concrete aggregates as replacement for sand in mortar and the use as cement replacement and filler is investigated. Mortar with fine recycled aggregates is examined on its mechanical and physical properties. The samples are also examined on a microscopic scale. The fine recycled concrete aggregates are made with one-year old concrete made in the laboratory. Fine recycled aggregates (FRCA) are added as a cement replacement (0 %, 10 %...

  9. Modeling of Degradation Processes in Historical Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Sýkora, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of presented paper is modeling of degradation processes in historical mortars exposed to moisture impact during freezing. Internal damage caused by ice crystallization in pores is one of the most important factors limiting the service life of historical structures. Coupling the transport processes with the mechanical part will allow us to address the impact of moisture on the durability, strength and stiffness of mortars. This should be accomplished with the help of a complex thermo-h...

  10. Development of leachate test for delayed ettringite formation potential in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    France-Mensah, Jojo

    Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) has been known to be the cause of expansion and cracking at latter ages in concrete that has been heat cured at temperatures around 70 degree Celsius or above. Currently, the only method available for measuring DEF-related physical expansion in concrete can sometimes take over a year to yield relevant results. A leachate method was proposed as a means of taking advantage of the release and solubility of the adsorbed ions (e.g., calcium, sulfates and aluminates) and alkali ions (e.g., sodium and potassium) in the pore solution after heat curing of the cement paste matrix. These ions, known to contribute to DEF, were leached out of concrete into the leaching solution. The results of the leachate test were correlated to physical expansion data of similar samples from an earlier study. The aim of this research is to apply this knowledge to develop an accelerated leachate test method for identifying the potential for DEF in cementitious materials in a shorter time than the existing method. The objectives of this research are: (1) to identify the ion(s) through leaching that is/are the controlling factors in predicting the rate of expansion and overall expansion of mortar; (2) to identify the ion(s) that is/are responsible for the lag time or age of deleterious expansion through DEF; and (3) to investigate the effect of heat curing on the overall, rate of, and age (time) of expansion.

  11. Microstructural changes in a cementitious membrane due to the application of a DC electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelo, Alba; Diaz, Belen; Freire, Lorena; Novoa, X Ramon; Perez, M Consuelo

    2008-07-01

    The use of electromigration techniques to accelerate chloride ions motion is commonly employed to characterise the permeability of cementitious samples to chlorides, a relevant parameter in reinforced concrete corrosion. This paper is devoted to the study of microstructure's changes occurring in mortar samples when submitted to natural diffusion and migration experiments. The application of an electric field reduces testing time in about one order of magnitude with respect to natural diffusion experiments. Nevertheless, the final sample's microstructure differs in both tests. Impedance Spectroscopy is employed for real time monitoring of microstructural changes. During migration experiments the global impedance undergoes important increase in shorter period of time compared to natural diffusion tests. So, the forced motion of ions through the concrete membrane induces significant variations in the porous structure, as confirmed by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry. After migration experiments, an important increase in the capillary pore size (10-100 nm) was detected. Conversely, no relevant variations are found after natural diffusion tests. Results presented in this work cast doubt on the significance of diffusion coefficient values obtained under accelerated conditions. PMID:18569312

  12. Cementitious binders from activated stainless steel refining slag and the effect of alkali solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Muhammad; Cizer, Özlem; Pontikes, Yiannis; Snellings, Ruben; Vandewalle, Lucie; Blanpain, Bart; Van Balen, Koen

    2015-04-01

    With an aim of producing high value cementitious binder, stainless steel refining slag containing a high amount of CaO in γ-dicalcium silicate form was activated with NaOH and Na-silicate as well as KOH and K-silicate solutions, followed by steam curing at 80 °C. Higher levels of alkali-silicate in the activating solution resulted in higher cumulative heat suggesting accelerated reaction kinetics. With respect to compressive strength, higher levels of alkali silicate resulted in higher strength and the mortars with Na activator were found to have higher early strength than the ones with K activator. The long term strength was found to be similar, regardless of the alkali metal. Thermogravimetric, QXRD and FTIR analyses showed an increase in the amount of reaction products (C-S-H type) over time, further confirming the reactivity of the crystalline slag. Batch leaching results showed lower leaching of heavy metals and metalloids with K activator compared to the Na activator. These results demonstrate that the alkali type and the ratio of hydroxide to silicates have a significant impact on the hydration and mechanical strength development of the stainless steel slag. The above findings can aid in the recycling and valorization of these type of slags which otherwise end up landfilled. PMID:25577317

  13. On the application of cohesive crack modeling in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe;

    2007-01-01

    typically for multi scale problems such as crack propagation in fiber reinforced composites. Mortar and concrete, however, are multi-scale materials and the question naturally arises, if bridged crack models in fact are more suitable for concrete and mortar as well? In trying to answer this question a model...

  14. Analysis of Graphite Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Robert E.; Gilbert, John A.; Spanyer, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes analytical methods that can be used to determine the deflections and stresses in highly compliant graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is demonstrated that the standard transform section fails to provide accurate results when the elastic modulus ratio exceeds 20. So an alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach; and, when the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subject to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is also investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed by incorporating material properties established from tensile tests. Finite element modeling is used to verity the results and, considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  15. Architecture for gas transport through cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thai Hoa; Frizon, Fabien; Lorente, Sylvie

    2009-05-01

    This paper documents the transport of gaseous species through porous media, with application to cementitious materials. An artificial pore network was created based on mercury intrusion porometry results obtained with samples of cement paste. The flow architecture model consists of parallel channels made of assemblies of truncated cones. Gas diffusion is described as a function of the saturation degree of the material. The model accounts for the effects of the liquid curtains, and the impact of tortuosity on gas diffusion. The results show that constructing an artificial architecture based on Hg porometry allows us to describe with a good accuracy the material porous network. The liquid curtains operate as an obstacle to H2 diffusion. They are determined as a function of the water saturation level and the pore channels geometry. Furthermore, the role of tortuosity as an indicator of gas diffusion accessibility is captured. The sudden drop in the effective diffusion coefficient around a saturation degree of 70% is predicted accurately.

  16. Shrinkage Reducing Measures for Engineering Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yingzi; YAO Yan; GAO Xiaojian; DENG Hongwei; YU Pengzhan

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition measurement of shrinkage of engineering cementitious composites(ECC) was investigated due to typical ECC with higher free drying shrinkage.The effects of expanded admixture (EA),shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA),coarse sand+stone powder (CS+SP)and superabsorbent polymer (SAP) on drying shrinkage and mechanical properties were studied.The experimental results show that ECC incorporating EA,SRA and coarse sand can retain around 60% of the typical ECC's free drying shrinkage.Superabsorbent polymerl(SAP) can delay the development of free drying shrinkage of ECC at different ages,and the effect of SAP is not distinct like the actions of EA,superabsorbent polymer(SRA) and coarse sand.Significantly,SAP may act as artificial flaw to form a more homogeneous defect system that increases the potential of saturated multiple cracking,hence the ductility of ECC will be improved greatly.

  17. Challenges and Benefits of Utilizing Carbon Nanofilaments in Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers/tubes (CNF/Ts are very strong and stiff and as a result, are expected to be capable of enhancing the mechanical properties of cementitious materials significantly. Yet there are practical issues concerning the utilization of CNF/Ts in cementitious materials. This study summarizes some of the past efforts made by different investigators for utilizing carbon nanofilaments in cementitious materials and also reports recent experimental research performed by the authors on the mechanical properties of CNF-reinforced hardened cement paste. The major difficulties concerning the utilization of CNF/Ts in cementitious materials are introduced and discussed. Most of these difficulties are related to the poor dispersibility of CNF/Ts. However, the findings from the research presented in this work indicate that, despite these difficulties, carbon nanofilaments can significantly improve the mechanical properties of cementitious materials. The results show that CNFs, even when poorly dispersed within the cementitious matrix, can remarkably increase the flexural strength and cracking resistance of concrete subjected to drying conditions.

  18. Entombment Using Cementitious Materials: Design Considerations and International Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious materials have physical and chemical properties that are well suited for the requirements of radioactive waste management. Namely, the materials have low permeability and durability that is consistent with the time frame required for short-lived radionuclides to decay. Furthermore, cementitious materials can provide a long-term chemical environment that substantially reduces the mobility of some long-lived radionuclides of concern for decommissioning (e.g., C-14, Ni-63, Ni-59). Because of these properties, cementitious materials are common in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities throughout the world and are an attractive option for entombment of nuclear facilities. This paper describes design considerations for cementitious barriers in the context of performance over time frames of a few hundreds of years (directed toward short-lived radionuclides) and time frames of thousands of years (directed towards longer-lived radionuclides). The emphasis is on providing a n overview of concepts for entombment that take advantage of the properties of cementitious materials and experience from the design of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A few examples of the previous use of cementitious materials for entombment of decommissioned nuclear facilities and proposals for the use in future decommissioning of nuclear reactors in a few countries are also included to provide global perspective

  19. Nano-modified cement composites and its applicability as concrete repair material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, Tanvir

    optimum mix proportion to produce CNT reinforced cement composites. In this study, an extensive parametric study has been conducted using different types of treated and untreated multi walled nanotubes (MWNT) as reinforcement of cementitious composites having different mix proportions. It is found that mixing of nanotubes within cement matrix is the key to develop composites having desirable properties. A mixing technique has been proposed to address the issues related to dispersion of nanotubes within cement matrix. Polycarboxylate based super plasticizer has been proposed to use as surfactant. It is evident that there exists an optimum concentration of MWNT and mix proportion to achieve proper reinforcement behavior and strength properties. The affect of size of MWNT on strengths (both compressive and flexure) of composites has also been investigated. Based on the parametric study and statistical analysis, a tentative optimum mix proportion has been proposed. Composites made by the proposed mixing technique and design mix obtained 26, 27 and 16% higher compressive strength as compared to control samples at the age of 3, 7 and 28 day, respectively. Flexural strengths of those composites at 3, 7 and 28 day were about 24, 24.5 and 20% higher than that of control samples, respectively. It has also been suggested that application of MWNT reinforced cement mortar as concrete repair material has excellent potential since composites exhibited desirable behavior in setting time, bleeding and slant shear.

  20. Characterization of historical mortars in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Heras, M.; Arce, I.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the petrographic and mineralogical characterization of mortars from different archaeological sites in Jordan which encompass Nabatean, Late-Antique and Early Islamic (Umayyad) sites, in some cases offering a sequence of different period mortars from the same building. These sites include the Nabataean city of Petra, the Late Antique town of Umm al Jimal and the castle of Qasr Al Hallabat. These mortars were produced with different raw materials and manufacturing technologies, which are reflected on distinctive variations of mineralogy, texture and crystal size and aggregates composition (including volcanic ashes, ceramic fragments, burnt organic material) size and their puzzolanic properties. As a consequence these mortars present different physical properties and reveal nowadays very different states of conservation. There is a dramatic change in mortar properties between those manufactured in pre-Islamic period and those from early Islamic - Ummayad times with a general trend in which these last ones present coarser crystal and aggregate sizes with less puzzolanic aggregates that result in less durable mortars. All of this reflects changes in the different stages of production of the mortar, from the use of either hydraulic, lime putty or slaked lime and the selection of aggregates to the application techniques (polishing). This reflects the evolution of building technology that took place in this area during early Islamic period and how petrological information can shed light on historical interpretation of building technologies. Research funded by AECID (PCI A/032184/10), GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-16) and MCU (Analisis y Documentación de tipología arquitectónica y técnicas constructivas en el periodo de transición Bizantino-Omeya en Jordania)

  1. Compressive strength of brick masonry made with weak mortars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Steen; Hansen, Klavs Feilberg

    2013-01-01

    The use of weak mortar has a number of advantages (e.g. prevention of expansion joints, environmental issues). However, according to EC6, the strength of masonry vanishes when the compressive strength of the mortar approaches zero. In reality the presence of even unhardened mortar kept in place...... in the joint will ensure a certain level of load-carrying capacity. This is due to the interaction between compression in the weak mortar and tension in the adjacent bricks. This paper proposes an expression for the compressive strength of masonry made with weak lime mortars (fm... of masonry depends only on the strength of the bricks. A compression failure in masonry made with weak mortars occurs as a tension failure in the bricks, as they seek to prevent the mortar from being pressed out of the joints. The expression is derived by assuming hydrostatic pressure in the mortar joints...

  2. High-Performance Grouting Mortar Based on Mineral Admixtures

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A study on high-performance grouting mortar is reported. The common mortar was modified by mineral admixtures such as gypsum, bauxite, and alunite. The effects of mineral admixtures on the fluidity, setting time, expansion, strength, and other properties of mortar were evaluated experimentally. The microstructure of the modified mortar was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Moreover, the expansive performance and strength of th...

  3. Pengaruh Perendaman Air Laut Terhadap Kualitas Mortar Semen

    OpenAIRE

    Damayanti, Mentari C.; Rauf, Nurlaela; Juarlin, Eko

    2015-01-01

    This research of fabrication cement with adding sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA) as pozzolan. Then chemical composition of cement sample is measured by XRF, setting time of cement and mortar compressive strength is examined with and without immersion. The result showed sea water gives influence for mortar compressive strength. Mortar compressive strength without immersion increases with 6% persentage composition of SBA. While mortar compressive strength with immersion of sea water decreases along ...

  4. The aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Massana Guitart, Jordi; Guerrero Bustos, Ana; Antón Fuentes, Rebeca; Garcimartin Molina, Miguel Angel; Sanchez Espinosa, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to measure the behaviour of various mortars employed in livestock media in central Spain and to analyse the aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement blended with fly ash mortars. To achieve this, mortar specimens were immersed in ponds storing pig slurry. Mortar specimens, of 40 ? 40 ? 160 mm, were made from four types of cement commonly used and recommended for rural areas. The types were a sulphate-resistant Portland cement and three cements blended in different proportions with ...

  5. MORTAR FINITE VOLUME METHOD WITH ADINI ELEMENT FOR BIHARMONIC PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-jia Bi; Li-kang Li

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we construct and analyse a mortar finite volume method for the dis-cretization for the biharmonic problem in R2. This method is based on the mortar-type Adini nonconforming finite element spaces. The optimal order H2-seminorm error estimate between the exact solution and the mortar Adini finite volume solution of the biharmonic equation is established.

  6. Temporary Cementitious Sealers in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Butcher, T.; Brothers, L.; Bour, D.

    2011-12-31

    Unlike conventional hydrothennal geothermal technology that utilizes hot water as the energy conversion resources tapped from natural hydrothermal reservoir located at {approx}10 km below the ground surface, Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) must create a hydrothermal reservoir in a hot rock stratum at temperatures {ge}200 C, present in {approx}5 km deep underground by employing hydraulic fracturing. This is the process of initiating and propagating a fracture as well as opening pre-existing fractures in a rock layer. In this operation, a considerable attention is paid to the pre-existing fractures and pressure-generated ones made in the underground foundation during drilling and logging. These fractures in terms of lost circulation zones often cause the wastage of a substantial amount of the circulated water-based drilling fluid or mud. Thus, such lost circulation zones must be plugged by sealing materials, so that the drilling operation can resume and continue. Next, one important consideration is the fact that the sealers must be disintegrated by highly pressured water to reopen the plugged fractures and to promote the propagation of reopened fractures. In response to this need, the objective of this phase I project in FYs 2009-2011 was to develop temporary cementitious fracture sealing materials possessing self-degradable properties generating when {ge} 200 C-heated scalers came in contact with water. At BNL, we formulated two types of non-Portland cementitious systems using inexpensive industrial by-products with pozzolanic properties, such as granulated blast-furnace slag from the steel industries, and fly ashes from coal-combustion power plants. These byproducts were activated by sodium silicate to initiate their pozzolanic reactions, and to create a cemetitious structure. One developed system was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class C fly ash (AASC); the other was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class F fly ash (AASF) as the binder of temper

  7. Evaluation of Lime for Use in Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naktode P.L.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lime has been used in India as material of construction from very ancient days. The manner in which lime structures about 2000 years old have withstood the ravages of time bear irrefutable evidence to the durability of lime mortars. Lime mortars were the mortars of very recent years – used until the twentieth century. Although they are almost forgotten today, they still remain a viable and important construction method [1]. There is something about this material that remains just as valuable today as it was 150 years ago [2]. The lime belt of Vidarbha area is not of industrial grade. To use for construction purpose it needs some improvement and alteration in the ingredients. This calls the development of an alternative approach to make it suitable for construction in large extent. Keywords:

  8. Study on cementitious properties of steel slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The converter steel slag chemical and mineral components in China’s main steel plants have been analysed in the present paper. The electronic microscope, energy spectrum analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the main mineral compositions in the converter slag. Converter slag of different components were grounded to obtain a powder with specific surface area over 400m2/kg, making them to take place some part of the cement in the concrete as the admixture and carry out the standard tests. The results indicate that the converter slag can be used as cementitious materials for construction. Furthermore, physical mechanic and durability tests on the concrete that certain amount of cement be substituted by converter steel slag powder from different steel plants are carried out, the results show that the concrete with partial substitution of steel slag powder has the advantages of higher later period strength, better frost resistance, good wear resistance and lower hydration heat, etc. This study can be used as the technical basis for “Steel Slag Powder Used For Cement And Concrete”, “Steel Slag Portland Cement”, “Low Heat Portland Steel Slag Cement”, “Steel Slag Road Cement” in China, as well as a driving force to the works of steel slag utilization with high-value addition, circular economy, energy conservation and discharge reduction in the iron and steel industry.

  9. Concrete mixture characterization. Cementitious barriers partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Protiere, Yannick [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  10. Cementitious waste option scoping study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.E.; Taylor, D.D.

    1998-02-01

    A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period.

  11. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Cementitious Wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is presented of the potential of non-destructive acoustic emission (AE) method to be applied for structures immobilising nuclear wastes. The use and limitations of the method are discussed with given examples of experimental configurations and results obtained from AE monitoring and data analysis of two different processes addressing particular issues related to the nuclear waste immobilisation. These are (a) corrosion of aluminium, classified as intermediate level waste (ILW) in the UK, encapsulated in cementitious structures and (b) partial melting and solidification during cooling of granite at a pressure of 0.15 GPa which simulates the conditions in a deep borehole disposal of canisters of vitrified high level waste (HLW). Methodology for analysis of the collected data and characterisation of the potential AE sources is performed at different steps including simple signals count and more complex signal parameter-based approach and advanced signal processing. The AE method has been shown as a potential tool for monitoring and inspection of structures immobilising nuclear wastes in relation to the time progress of different interactions of the waste with the encapsulating matrix or the wasteform with the hosting environment for permanent disposal. (author)

  12. Cementitious barriers partnership concrete mixture characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Protiere, Yannick [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  13. Cementitious waste option scoping study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that all high-level radioactive waste (HLW) now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will be treated so that it is ready to be moved out of Idaho for disposal by a target date of 2035. This study investigates the nonseparations Cementitious Waste Option (CWO) as a means to achieve this goal. Under this option all liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and existing HLW calcine would be recalcined with sucrose, grouted, canisterized, and interim stored as a mixed-HLW for eventual preparation and shipment off-Site for disposal. The CWO waste would be transported to a Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF) located in the southwestern desert of the US on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All transport preparation, shipment, and disposal facility activities are beyond the scope of this study. CWO waste processing, packaging, and interim storage would occur over a 5-year period between 2013 and 2017. Waste transport and disposal would occur during the same time period

  14. Expansive mortar-induced ocular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanya, Ramamurthy; Rani, Alka; Sangwan, Virender S

    2006-12-01

    We describe here a case of bilateral chemical injury (with an expansive mortar which is being used in recent times to cut the rocks). On examination limbal ischemia was more in the left eye (9 clock hours) than the right eye (2 clock hours). The case was managed by bilateral removal of foreign bodies, along with conjunctival resection and amniotic membrane transplantation in the left eye. At six-month follow-up, patient had best corrected visual acuity of 20/30 and 20/60 in the right and left eyes respectively. Since this being an occupational hazard, proper eye protection gear should be used by persons using this expansive mortar.

  15. Drug contamination of mortars and pestles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinyard, E A; Woodhead, J H

    1978-12-01

    Evidence is presented suggesting that potent water-insoluble antipentylenetetrazol agents triturated in porcelain mortars and pestles are not removed from this mixing device by the usual laboratory washing procedure. Moreover, amounts sufficient to contaminate the next substance triturated in this vessel can be demonstrated by the subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol seizure threshold test. The data show that a rigorous washing routine must be followed to achieve a "clean" mortar and pestle. Attention is also directed to the importance of using disposable hypodermic syringes, test tubes, etc., whenever possible and of designing an internal control test to determine when implements that must be reused are "clean."

  16. Stress-strain behavior of cementitious materials with different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jikai; Qian, Pingping; Chen, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    The size dependence of flexural properties of cement mortar and concrete beams is investigated. Bazant's size effect law and modified size effect law by Kim and Eo give a very good fit to the flexural strength of both cement mortar and concrete. As observed in the test results, a strong size effect in flexural strength is found in cement mortar than in concrete. A modification has been suggested to Li's equation for describing the stress-strain curve of cement mortar and concrete by incorporating two different correction factors, the factors contained in the modified equation being established empirically as a function of specimen size. A comparison of the predictions of this equation with test data generated in this study shows good agreement.

  17. Tailoring of fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC) for flexural strength and reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obla, Karthikeyan Hariya

    models. In Part II of the thesis an investigation on the use of fibers for reduction of MOR variability of cementitious materials is reported. Specifically, the concept of lowering the sensitivity of MOR to flaw size based on fiber bridging is confirmed with experimental studies of flexural strength of mesh reinforced mortar beams. Variability of composite properties due to variability introduced by fiber itself was identified, and techniques in controlling such variability were introduced. In this connection, the influence of viscosity of the fresh mix on fiber dispersion uniformity was investigated.

  18. Chemical path of ettringite formation in heat-cured mortar and its relationship to expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yukie

    Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) refers to a deterioration process of cementitious materials that have been exposed to high temperatures and subsequent moist conditions, often resulting in damaging expansion. The occurrence of DEF-related damage may lead to severe economic consequences. While concerns of related industries continue to raise the need for reliable and practical test methods for DEF assessment, the mechanism(s) involved in DEF remains controversial. In order to provide a better understanding of the DEF phenomenon, the present study investigated mortar systems made with various mixing and curing parameters for detailed changes in pore solution chemistry and solid phase development, while corresponding changes in physical properties were also closely monitored. This approach enabled the development of a correlation between the chemical and physical changes and provided the opportunity for a holistic analysis. The present study revealed that there exist relationships between the physical properties and expansive behavior. The normal aging process of the cementitious systems involves dissolution of ettringite crystals finely distributed within the hardened cement paste and subsequent recrystallization as innocuous crystals in the largest accessible spaces. This process, known as Ostwald ripening, facilitates relaxation of any expansive pressure developed within the paste. The rate of Ostwald ripening is rather slow in a well-compacted, dense microstructure containing few flaws. Thus, an increase in mechanical strength accompanied by a reduction in diffusion rate by altering the mortar parameters increases the risk of DEF-related expansion and vice versa. Introduction of the Ostwald ripening process as a stress relief mechanism to the previously proposed paste expansion hypothesis provides a comprehensive description of the observed expansive behavior. Chemical analyses provided semi-quantitative information on the stability of ettringite during high

  19. [The Analysis of Traditional Lime Mortars from Zhejiang Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-bin; Cui, Biao; Zhang, Bing-jian

    2016-01-01

    The components of ancient mortars have always been an important research field in historic building conservation. It has been well known that using traditional mortars in conservation projects have many advantages, such as compatibility and stability. So, developing new binding materials based on traditional mortar has become an international study hotspot. With China's economic development, the protection of ancient buildings also began to put on the agenda, but the understanding on Chinese traditional mortar is limited, and rare literatures are reported. In the present work, the authors investigate seven ancient city wall sites in Zhejiang Province in situ, and subsequently laboratory analysis were carried out on collected mortar samples. The characterizations of mortar samples were made by multi-density gauge, XRD, FTIR, TG-DSC and wet chemical analysis. The experimental results showed that: the main component of masonry mortars is calcium carbonate, the content between 75% - 90%, and they should be made from relatively pure lime mortar. The raw materials of mortar samples were mainly calcareous quick lime, and sample from Taizhou city also contained magnesium quick lime. There are four city walls were built by sticky-rice mortars. It suggests that the technology of adding the sticky rice soup into mortar was universal in the Ming Dynasties. These mortars have lower density between 1.2 and 1.9 g x cm(-3); this outcome should be the result of long-term natural erosion. We have also analyzed other chemical and physical characteristics of these masonry mortars. The results can afford the basic data for the future repairmen programs, development of new protective materials, and comparative study of mortars.

  20. Photovoltaic's silica-rich waste sludge as supplementary cementitious material (SCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quercia, G., E-mail: g.quercia@tue.nl [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, P.O. Box 5008, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Putten, J.J.G. van der [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hüsken, G. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Brouwers, H.J.H. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of the Built Environment, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Waste sludge, a solid recovered from wastewater of photovoltaic-industries, composes of agglomerates of nano-particles like SiO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. This sludge deflocculates in aqueous solutions into nano-particles smaller than 1 μm. Thus, this sludge constitutes a potentially hazardous waste when it is improperly disposed. Due to its high content of amorphous SiO{sub 2}, this sludge has a potential use as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) in concrete. In this study the main properties of three different samples of photovoltaic's silica-rich waste sludge (nSS) were physically and chemically characterized. The characterization techniques included: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen physical adsorption isotherm (BET method), density by Helium pycnometry, particle size distribution determined by laser light scattering (LLS) and zeta-potential measurements by dynamic light scattering (DLS). In addition, a dispersability study was performed to design stable slurries to be used as liquid additives for the concrete production on site. The effects on the hydration kinetics of cement pastes by the incorporation of nSS in the designed slurries were determined using an isothermal calorimeter. A compressive strength test of standard mortars with 7% of cement replacement was performed to determine the pozzolanic activity of the waste nano-silica sludge. Finally, the hardened system was fully characterized to determine the phase composition. The results demonstrate that the nSS can be utilized as SCM to replace portion of cement in mortars, thereby decreasing the CO{sub 2} footprint and the environmental impact of concrete. -- Highlights: •Three different samples of PV nano-silica sludge (nSS) were fully characterized. •nSS is composed of agglomerates of nano-particles like SiO{sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. •Dispersability studies demonstrated that nSS agglomerates are broken to nano

  1. EFFECT OF NANOMATERIALS IN CEMENT MORTAR CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAIL N. AL-RIFAIE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is considered as brittle materials and widely used due to high compressive strength but unfortunately having and has low tensile strength that has a numerous negative impacts on the lifespan of concrete made structures. Therefore, mechanical properties of cement mortar have been investigated experimentally using different types and ratios of nano material to improve the properties. Since the strength of the concrete is of high importance, different materials have been used to enhance the compressive and the tensile characteristics of the cement mortar compressive and tensile strength. Mainly, this objective has been implemented through using micro cement, micro sand, nano silica, and nano clay in developing a nano-cement mortar which can to improve the concrete for the constructional applications. The samples were prepared and tested under tensile and compressive mode according to ASTM-2011 regulations for concrete. The parameters that are taken consideration during the investigation were micro sand, micro cement, nano silica, developed nano clay, and naphthalene sulphonate as super- plasticizers. In general, it has been observed that the results showed a significant increase in both compressive and tensile strength of the mortar at early stages of hardening, where a maximum increase of 22% in the compressive strength was achieved , whereas 3.7 time increase in the compressive strength was recorded over the tradition levels of the concrete strength.

  2. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.;

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  3. The immobilisation of clinoptilolite within cementitious systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zeolitic ion exchanger clinoptilolite was encapsulated within various cementitious systems in order to assess their suitability for the retention of the radioelements, Cs and Sr. The pozzolanic reaction of clinoptilolite is reduced in composites containing BFS and PFA and appears not to continue after 7 days of hydration. Ca(OH)2 persists up to 360 days of hydration in a 9:1BFS:OPC system with 10% clinoptilolite added, despite the presence of unreacted pozzolana. This may be due to low pH of the pore solution, if Na and K act as counter cations in the aluminous C-S-H, a product of pozzolanic hydration or are exchanged onto the clinoptilolite. Saturation of the pore solution with Ca may prevent further dissolution of Ca(OH)2. Cs leaching occurs in all samples during accelerated tests due to breakdown of the clinoptilolite structure. The alternative cement system calcium sulfo-aluminate cement (CSA) has a different hydration chemistry and properties to OPC and OPC composites with a lower pore solution pH. Clinoptilolite appears to react in a hydrating CSA system with significant reaction continuing between 28 and 90 days of hydration. Leaching of Cs from CSA is higher than from an OPC system, in which almost all of the clinoptilolite crystallinity is lost. The major product of CSA hydration is ettringite. Cs may be adsorbed within cation sites of the C-S-H in an OPC system but not by ettringite which does not retain Cs so Cs has high mobility and leachability through the CSA matrix. (authors)

  4. A new and superior ultrafine cementitious grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sealing fractures in nuclear waste repositories concerns all programs investigating deep burial as a means of disposal. Because the most likely mechanism for contaminant migration is by dissolution and movement through groundwater, sealing programs are seeking low-viscosity sealants that are chemically, mineralogically, and physically compatible with the host rock. This paper presents the results of collaborative work directed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and supported by Whiteshell Laboratories, operated by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The work was undertaken in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), an underground nuclear waste repository located in a salt formation east of Carlsbad, NM. This effort addresses the technology associated with long-term isolation of nuclear waste in a natural salt medium. The work presented is part of the WIPP plugging and sealing program, specifically the development and optimization of an ultrafine cementitious grout that can be injected to lower excessive, strain-induced hydraulic conductivity in the fractured rock termed the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ) surrounding underground excavations. Innovative equipment and procedures employed in the laboratory produced a usable cement-based grout; 90% of the particles were smaller than 8 microns and the average particle size was 4 microns. The process involved simultaneous wet pulverization and mixing. The grout was used for a successful in situ test underground at the WIPP. Injection of grout sealed microfractures as small as 6 microns (and in one rare instance, 3 microns) and lowered the gas transmissivity of the DRZ by up to three orders of magnitude. Following the WIPP test, additional work produced an improved version of the grout containing particles 90% smaller than 5 microns and averaging 2 microns. This grout will be produced in dry form, ready for the mixer

  5. Obtaining cementitious material from municipal solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macías, A.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of the present study was to determine the viability of using incinerator ash and slag from municipal solid waste as a secondary source of cementitious materials. The combustion products used were taken from two types of Spanish MSW incinerators, one located at Valdemingómez, in Madrid, and the other in Melilla, with different incineration systems: one with fluidised bed combustion and other with mass burn waterwall. The effect of temperature (from 800 to 1,200 ºC on washed and unwashed incinerator residue was studied, in particular with regard to phase formation in washed products with a high NaCl and KCl content. The solid phases obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction and BET-N2 specific surface procedures.El principal objetivo del trabajo ha sido determinar la viabilidad del uso de las cenizas y escorias procedentes de la incineración de residuos sólidos urbanos, como materia prima secundaria para la obtención de fases cementantes. Para ello se han empleado los residuos generados en dos tipos de incineradoras españolas de residuos sólidos urbanos: la incineradora de Valdemingómez y la incineradora de Melilla. Se ha estudiado la transformación de los residuos, sin tratamiento previo, en función de la temperatura de calentamiento (desde 800 ºC hasta 1.200 ºC, así como la influencia del lavado de los residuos con alto contenido en NaCl y KCl en la formación de fases obtenidas a las diferentes temperaturas de calcinación. Las fases obtenidas fueron caracterizadas por difracción de rayos X y área superficial por el método BET-N2.

  6. Impact of cementitious materials decalcification on transfer properties: application to radioactive waste deep repository; Influence de la decalcification de materiaux cimentaires sur les proprietes de transfert: application au stockage profond de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlot, C

    2005-09-15

    Cementitious materials have been selected to compose the engineering barrier system (EBS) of the French radioactive waste deep repository, because of concrete physico-chemical properties: the hydrates of the cementitious matrix and the pH of the pore solution contribute to radionuclides retention; furthermore the compactness of these materials limits elements transport. The confinement capacity of the system has to be assessed while a period at least equivalent to waste activity (up to 100.000 years). His durability was sustained by the evolution of transfer properties in accordance with cementitious materials decalcification, alteration that expresses structure long-term behavior. Then, two degradation modes were carried out, taking into account the different physical and chemical solicitations imposed by the host formation. The first mode, a static one, was an accelerated decalcification test using nitrate ammonium solution. It replicates the EBS alteration dues to underground water. Degradation kinetic was estimated by the amount of calcium leached and the measurement of the calcium hydroxide dissolution front. To evaluate the decalcification impact, samples were characterized before and after degradation in term of microstructure (porosity, pores size distribution) and of transfer properties (diffusivity, gas and water permeability). The influence of cement nature (ordinary Portland cement, blended cement) and aggregates type (lime or siliceous) was observed: experiments were repeated on different mortars mixes. On this occasion, an essential reflection on this test metrology was led. The second mode, a dynamical degradation, was performed with an environmental permeameter. It recreates the EBS solicitations ensured during the re-saturation period, distinguished by the hydraulic pressure imposed by the geologic layer and the waste exothermicity. This apparatus, based on triaxial cell functioning, allows applying on samples pressure drop between 2 and 10 MPa and

  7. Synthesis of a Cementitious Material Nanocement Using Bottom-Up Nanotechnology Concept: An Alternative Approach to Avoid CO2 Emission during Production of Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Wan Jo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The world’s increasing need is to develop smart and sustainable construction material, which will generate minimal climate changing gas during their production. The bottom-up nanotechnology has established itself as a promising alternative technique for the production of the cementitious material. The present investigation deals with the chemical synthesis of cementitious material using nanosilica, sodium aluminate, sodium hydroxide, and calcium nitrate as reacting phases. The characteristic properties of the chemically synthesized nanocement were verified by the chemical composition analysis, setting time measurement, particle size distribution, fineness analysis, and SEM and XRD analyses. Finally, the performance of the nanocement was ensured by the fabrication and characterization of the nanocement based mortar. Comparing the results with the commercially available cement product, it is demonstrated that the chemically synthesized nanocement not only shows better physical and mechanical performance, but also brings several encouraging impacts to the society, including the reduction of CO2 emission and the development of sustainable construction material. A plausible reaction scheme has been proposed to explain the synthesis and the overall performances of the nanocement.

  8. 碱-激发再生胶凝材料的研究%Study on of Alkali-activated Recycled Cementitious Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琦

    2015-01-01

    The waste cement paste in concrete crushing,sieving separated,then cement paste powder obtained after ball milling,sieving,and then the cement paste powder after 800 ℃ calcined to ob-tain Recycled Cementitious Material.According to the properties of Recycled Cementitious Mate-rial choice Na2 SO4、CaSO4、Ca (HCO3 )2 and Na2 SiO4 as the object of study of activator,the stand-ard of cement mortar strength test.The test results show that,the dosage of 2•5% Na2 SO4 has good effect on the of the excitation of Recycled Cementitious Material.%将废弃混凝土中的水泥浆经过破碎、筛分分离出来,再经过球磨、筛分得到水泥浆体粉末,再将水泥浆体粉末经过800℃煅烧得到再生胶凝材料。根据再生胶凝材料的性质选择了Na2 SO4、CaSO4、Ca(HCO3)2和Na2 SiO4为激发剂的研究对象,进行标准水泥胶砂强度试验。试验结果表明,掺量为2•5%的Na2 SO4对再生胶凝材料具有良好的激发效果。

  9. DEMONSTRATION OF LEACHXS/ORCHESTRA CAPABILITIES BY SIMULATING CONSTITUENT RELEASE FROM A CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORM IN A REINFORCED CONCRETE VAULT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Meeussen, J.; Sloot, H.

    2010-03-31

    The objective of the work described in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of the current version of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for simulating chemical behavior and constituent release processes in a range of applications that are relevant to the CBP. This report illustrates the use of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for the following applications: (1) Comparing model and experimental results for leaching tests for a range of cementitious materials including cement mortars, grout, stabilized waste, and concrete. The leaching test data includes liquid-solid partitioning as a function of pH and release rates based on laboratory column, monolith, and field testing. (2) Modeling chemical speciation of constituents in cementitious materials, including liquid-solid partitioning and release rates. (3) Evaluating uncertainty in model predictions based on uncertainty in underlying composition, thermodynamic, and transport characteristics. (4) Generating predominance diagrams to evaluate predicted chemical changes as a result of material aging using the example of exposure to atmospheric conditions. (5) Modeling coupled geochemical speciation and diffusion in a three layer system consisting of a layer of Saltstone, a concrete barrier, and a layer of soil in contact with air. The simulations show developing concentration fronts over a time period of 1000 years. (6) Modeling sulfate attack and cracking due to ettringite formation. A detailed example for this case is provided in a separate article by the authors (Sarkar et al. 2010). Finally, based on the computed results, the sensitive input parameters for this type of modeling are identified and discussed. The chemical speciation behavior of substances is calculated for a batch system and also in combination with transport and within a three layer system. This includes release from a barrier to the surrounding soil as a function of time. As input for the simulations, the physical and chemical properties of the

  10. Compressive Strength Development and Microstrueture of Cement.asphalt Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; YAN Peiyu; KONG Xiangming; YANG Jinbo

    2011-01-01

    The compressive strength developing process and the microstructure of cement-asphalt mortar (CA mortar) were investigated.The fluidity of CA mortar has a great influence on its strength.The optimum value of spread diameter of slump flow test is in the range of 300 to 400 mm.The compressive strength of CA mortar keeps a relatively high growth rate in 56 days and grows slowly afterwards.The residual water of hydration in CA mortar freezes under minus environmental temperature which can lead to a significant reduction of the strength of CA mortar.Increasing A/C retards asphalt emulsion splitting and thus prolongs the setting process of CA mortar.The hydration products of cement form the major structural framework of hardened CA mortar and asphalt is a weak phase in the framework but improves the viscoelastic behavior of CA mortar.Therefore,asphalt emulsion should be used as much as possible on the condition that essential performance criterions of CA mortar are satisfied.

  11. Mineralogical, textural and physical-mechanical study of hydraulic lime mortars cured under different moisture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizzi, A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the chemical-mineralogical, textural and physical-mechanical properties of hydraulic lime mortars made with siliceous and calcareous aggregate. Mortars were cured at 60% and 90% of relative humidity, so as to assess the variability of mortar petrophysical properties in the hardened state due to the moisture conditions. The final aim was to determine the most adequate moisture conditions to be maintained during application and hardening of hydraulic mortars intended for repair interventions. We found out that using a calcareous aggregate and curing mortar at 90% of relative humidity give place to better textural and mechanical properties. However, these characteristics mostly depend on the maximum size of the aggregate grains, which should be smaller than 6 mm, in order to avoid the occurrence of mechanical discontinuities in the mortar.En este trabajo se han estudiado las propiedades químico-mineralógicas, texturales y físico-mecánicas de morteros de cal hidráulica elaborados con áridos silíceo y calcítico. Estos morteros se han curado al 60% y 90% de humedad relativa, con el fin de evaluar las eventuales diferencias en las propiedades petrofísicas de los morteros una vez endurecidos y así establecer cuál de los dos ambientes es recomendable durante la aplicación y fraguado de morteros de cal hidráulica destinados a obras de restauración. Se ha encontrado que el uso de un árido de composición calcítica y el curado al 90% de humedad relativa dan lugar a morteros hidráulicos con mejores características texturales y propiedades mecánicas. De todas formas, estas características dependen principalmente del tamaño máximo del árido empleado, que debería ser inferior a 6 mm para evitar discontinuidades mecánicas en el mortero.

  12. Improved cement mortars by addition of carbonated fly ash from solid waste incinerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Zaldívar, O.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a research developing high performance cement mortars with the addition of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWIFA stabilized as insoluble carbonates. The encapsulation of hazardous wastes in mortar matrixes has also been achieved. The ashes present high concentrations of chlorides, Zn and Pb. A stabilization process with NaHCO3 has been developed reducing 99% the content of chlorides. Developed mortars replace 10% per weight of the aggregates by treated MSWIFA. Physical/mechanical properties of these mortars have been studied. Presence of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd has been also analyzed confirming that leaching of these heavy metal ions is mitigated. Conclusions prove better behavior of CAC and CSA mortars than those of CEM-I and CEM-II cement. Results are remarkable for the CAC mortars, improving reference strengths in more than 25%, which make them a fast-curing product suitable for the repair of structures or industrial pavements.Este artículo presenta los resultados del desarrollo de morteros mejorados con la incorporación de cenizas volantes de residuos sólidos urbanos inertizadas en forma de carbonatos. Además se consigue la encapsulación de un residuo peligroso. Las cenizas presentan una alta concentración de cloruros, Zn y Pb. Se ha desarrollado un proceso de estabilización con NaHCO3 reduciendo en un 99% el contenido de cloruros. Los morteros reemplazan un 10% en peso del árido por cenizas tratadas. Se han analizado sus propiedades físico/mecánicas y la presencia de Zn, Pb, Cu y Cd. Se demuestra un mejor comportamiento de los morteros de CAC y CSA que los de CEM-I y CEM-II y se mitiga el lixiviado de metales pesados. Los resultados son significativos en los morteros CAC al mejorar las resistencias de los de referencia en un 25%. Los morteros desarrollados son de curado rápido adecuados para la reparación de estructuras o soleras industriales.

  13. Thermodynamics of Autogenous Self-healing in Cementitious Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is a brittle composite cementitious material that easily fractures under tensile loading. Microcracks can appear throughout the concrete prior to application of any load because of temperature-induced strain and autogenous and drying shrinkage. There is no doubt that these cracks provide pr

  14. Engineered cementitious composites for strengthening masonry infilled reinforced concrete frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghani, Ayoub; Nateghi-Alahi, Fariborz; Fischer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The results of the second part of a comprehensive experimental program, aimed at investigating the behavior of masonry infilled reinforced concrete (RC) frames strengthened with fiber reinforced engineered cementitious composites (ECC) used as an overlay on the masonry wall, are presented in this...

  15. REFERENCE CASES FOR USE IN THE CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2009-01-06

    The Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) is a multidisciplinary cross cutting project initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a reasonable and credible set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. The period of performance is >100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management. The CBP has defined a set of reference cases to provide the following functions: (1) a common set of system configurations to illustrate the methods and tools developed by the CBP, (2) a common basis for evaluating methodology for uncertainty characterization, (3) a common set of cases to develop a complete set of parameter and changes in parameters as a function of time and changing conditions, and (4) a basis for experiments and model validation, and (5) a basis for improving conceptual models and reducing model uncertainties. These reference cases include the following two reference disposal units and a reference storage unit: (1) a cementitious low activity waste form in a reinforced concrete disposal vault, (2) a concrete vault containing a steel high-level waste tank filled with grout (closed high-level waste tank), and (3) a spent nuclear fuel basin during operation. Each case provides a different set of desired performance characteristics and interfaces between materials and with the environment. Examples of concretes, grout fills and a cementitious waste form are identified for the relevant reference case configurations.

  16. REFERENCE CASES FOR USE IN THE CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) is a multidisciplinary cross cutting project initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a reasonable and credible set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. The period of performance is >100 years for operating facilities and > 1000 years for waste management. The CBP has defined a set of reference cases to provide the following functions: (1) a common set of system configurations to illustrate the methods and tools developed by the CBP, (2) a common basis for evaluating methodology for uncertainty characterization, (3) a common set of cases to develop a complete set of parameter and changes in parameters as a function of time and changing conditions, and (4) a basis for experiments and model validation, and (5) a basis for improving conceptual models and reducing model uncertainties. These reference cases include the following two reference disposal units and a reference storage unit: (1) a cementitious low activity waste form in a reinforced concrete disposal vault, (2) a concrete vault containing a steel high-level waste tank filled with grout (closed high-level waste tank), and (3) a spent nuclear fuel basin during operation. Each case provides a different set of desired performance characteristics and interfaces between materials and with the environment. Examples of concretes, grout fills and a cementitious waste form are identified for the relevant reference case configurations

  17. Ancient analogues concerning stability and durability of cementitious wasteform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of cementitious materials goes back to ancient times. The Greeks and Romans used calcined limestone and later developed pozzolanic cement by grinding together lime and volcanic ash called open-quotes pozzolanclose quotes which was first found near Port Pozzuoli, Italy. The ancient Chinese used lime-pozzolanic mixes to build the Great Wall. The ancient Egyptians used calcined impure gypsum to build the Great Pyramid of Cheops. The extraordinary stability and durability of these materials has impressed us, when so much dramatically damaged infrastructure restored by using modern portland cement now requires rebuilding. Stability and durability of cementitious materials have attracted intensive research interest and contractors' concerns, as does immobilization of radioactive and hazardous industrial waste in cementitious materials. Nuclear waste pollution of the environment and an acceptable solution for waste management and disposal constitute among the most important public concerns. The analogy of ancient cementitious materials to modern Portland cement could give us some clues to study their stability and durability. This present study examines selected results of studies of ancient building materials from France, Italy, China, and Egypt, combined with knowledge obtained from the behavior of modern portland cement to evaluate the potential for stability and durability of such materials in nuclear waste forms

  18. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe;

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides...

  19. Optimization of SO3 Content in Blended Cementitious Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Mei-zhu; LIANG Wen-quan; HE Zhen; LI Bei-xing

    2003-01-01

    Experimental investigation was conducted on the effects of gypsum types and SO3 content on the fluidity and strengths of different cementitious systems.The experimental results show that influences of gypsum in various cementitious materials are different.For cementitious materials blended with various proportions of slag-fly ash and 5% gypsum content,influences of gypsum and calcined gypsum on the fluidity and flexural/compressive strength are similar.It is revealed that "combination effect" and "synergistic effect" of slag and fly ash play an important role during hydration.For cementitious materials with 45% clinkers,30%slag,20%fly ash and 5%limestone,the optimized SO3 contents in gypsum and calcined gypsum are 3.13% and 3.51% respectively and the optimized gypsum content is 6.5%.While both of them are blended,the optimum ratio of gypsum to calcined gypsum is 40%∶60%(total gypsum content 6.5%),correspondingly the optimum ratio of SO3 is 19.3%∶32.4%.

  20. Hybrid fiber reinforcement and crack formation in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    The use of different types of fibers simultaneously for reinforcing cementitious matrices is motivated by the concept of a multi-scale nature of the crack propagation process. Fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties are used to bridge cracks of different sizes from the micro- ...

  1. Combined meso-scale modeling and experimental investigation of the effect of mechanical damage on the transport properties of cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Balaji; Niknezhad, Davood; Bernard, Fabrice; Kamali-Bernard, Siham

    2016-09-01

    The transport properties of cementitious composites such as concrete are important indicators of their durability, and are known to be heavily influenced by mechanical loading. In the current work, we use meso-scale hygro-mechanical modeling with a morphological 3D two phase mortar-aggregate model, in conjunction with experimentally obtained properties, to investigate the coupling between mechanical loading and damage and the permeability of the composite. The increase in permeability of a cylindrical test specimen at 28% aggregate fraction during a uniaxial displacement-controlled compression test at 85% of the peak load was measured using a gas permeameter. The mortar's mechanical behavior is assumed to follow the well-known compression damaged plasticity (CDP) model with isotropic damage, at varying thresholds, and obtained from different envelope curves. The damaged intrinsic permeability of the mortar evolves according to a logarithmic matching law with progressive loading. We fit the matching law parameters to the experimental result for the test specimen by inverse identification using our meso-scale model. We then subject a series of virtual composite specimens to quasi-static uniaxial compressive loading with varying boundary conditions to obtain the simulated damage and strain evolutions, and use the damage data and the previously identified parameters to determine the evolution of the macroscopic permeability tensor for the specimens, using a network model. We conduct a full parameter study by varying aggregate volume fraction, granulometric distribution, loading/boundary conditions and "matching law" parameters, as well as for different strain-damage thresholds and uniaxial loading envelope curves. Based on this study, we propose Avrami equation-based upper and lower bounds for the evolution of the damaged permeability of the composite.

  2. Properties of Rice Husk Ash (RHA and MIRHA Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Sambu Potty

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice husk Ash (produced by traditional burning called RHA and by using microwave incinerator called MIRHA has shown promise as a cement replacement material. This study investigated the properties of RHA and MIRHA mortar used for brick manufacture at binder sand proportions of 1:3 and 1:4. RHA and MIRHA were intermediate in particle size to cement and sand particles. Percentages of replacement were 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%, respectively. Strength at w/c ratios (0.5, 0.55, 0.6 and 0.65, respectively was investigated to identify optimum w/c ratios as well as optimum percent replacement of RHA and MIRHA. Variations of IRS, density and water absorption were investigated. Generally 1:3 RHA and 1:3 MIRHA mortars strength showed decreasing trend with increasing percentage replacement with RHA and MIRHA. Whereas 1:4 RHA and 1:4 MIRHA mortars showed increase in strength at 5% replacement and decrease thereafter. IRS values for RHA mortars are generally within limits (0.25-1.5 kg/m2.min recommended. Water absorption values of RHA mortars are generally higher than control mortar. IRS values for MIRHA mortars with w/c 0.5 and 0.55 ranged between 1.4-2.0 kg/m2 .min; indicating the need for wetting the bricks before use. IRS values for 1:3 MIRHA mortars with w/c 0.6 and 0.65 were below 1.0 kg/m2.min indicating low suction values. For 1:4 MIRHA mortars, IRS values were very low in all cases. Water absorption values of MIRHA mortars are generally higher than the control mortar. MIRHA mortars with w/c 0.6 and 0.65 showed low percentages of water absorption.

  3. Low Carbon Footprint Mortar from Pozzolanic Waste Material

    OpenAIRE

    Taha Mehmannavaz; Salihuddin Radin Sumadi; Muhammad Aamer Rafique Bhutta; Mostafa Samadi; Seyed Mahdi Sajjadi

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, Portland cement clinker leads to emission of CO2 into the atmosphere and therefore causes greenhouse effect. Incorporating of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) and Pulverized Fuel Ash (PFA) as partial cement replacement materials into mix of low carbon mortar decreases the amount of cement use and reduces high dependence on cements compared to ordinary mortar. The result of this research supported use of the new concept in preparing low carbon mortar for industrial constructions. Strength of...

  4. Flexural reinforcement of concrete with textile reinforced mortar TRM

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Espert, Lluís; Escrig Pérez, Christian; Bernat Masó, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a method of strengthening concrete structures based on textiles of high strength and mortars. The combination of textiles and mortars produces a new composite material of cementitic matrix. This material can be used for the reinforcement of concrete beams under bending loads. We tested several combinations of fibers: glass, PBO, steel and carbon fibers with mortar and we used them to reinforce precast concrete beams. All the specimens were tested with a four-point load test...

  5. Effect of gypsum content on sulfoaluminate mortars stability

    OpenAIRE

    DESBOIS, Tiffany; Le Roy, Robert; PAVOINE, Alexandre; PLATRET, Gérard; FERAILLE-FRESNET, Adélaïde; ALAOUI, Amina

    2010-01-01

    Calcium sulfoaluminate clinker is one of the most promising cements that would lower the greenhouse gas effect accompanying cement production. This article examines the effect of gypsum content on the dimensional stability of sulfoaluminate mortars. Mechanical properties as chemical evolution are studied. Our results show that the mortar with the greatest gypsum content expands without a decrease of its mechanical properties when it is cured in water. Two hypotheses about the mortars hydratio...

  6. Effect of kaolin treatment temperature on mortar chloride permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Puertas, F.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, R.; J. Torres

    2007-01-01

    The present paper discusses the results of chloride resistance tests conducted on ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars containing a Colombian kaolin pre-treated at temperatures of from 600 to 800 ºC. The resulting metakaolin (MK) was added to OPC mortar mixes in proportions of 10 and 20% by cement weight. The mortars were compared for physical and chemical properties, including capillary absorption, chloride permeability and pore microstructure as assessed by mercury porosimetry....

  7. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Haitao Zhao; Qi Xiao; Donghui Huang; Shiping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement r...

  8. Alkaline cement mortars. Chemical resistance to sulfate and seawater attack

    OpenAIRE

    Puertas, F.; Gutiérrez, R.; Fernández-Jiménez, A.; Delvasto, S.; Maldonado, J.

    2002-01-01

    The durability and chemical resistance of alkali activated slag and fly ash/slag mortars in contact with sulfates and seawater media have been studied. Two methods were used in the evaluation of such durability: Kock-Steinegger and ASTM C1012. A mineralogical and a microstructural characterization of mortars were done at different ages of their conservation in aggressive media through XRD, SEM/ EDX and mercury porosimetry. Results showed a high durability of activated cement mortars in s...

  9. Comparative evaluation of aerial lime mortars for architectural conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Paulina; Henriques, Fernando M.A.; Rato, Vasco

    2008-01-01

    Journal of Cultural Heritage 9 (2008) 338-346 International bibliography on conservation usually refers that mortars made with lime putty with long extinction periods behave better than others made with the current dry hydrated limes. In order to evaluate this assess, an experimental study of lime mortars was carried out, using dry hydrated lime and two lime putties. It becomes clear that the use of lime putties with long extinction periods in mortars allow better performances, pa...

  10. Role of different superplasticizers on hydrated lime pastes and mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, J. I.; Fernandez, J M; Sirera, R. (Rafael); Perez-Nicolas, M. (María); Navarro-Blasco, I. (Íñigo); Duran, A

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of different superplasticizers admixtures was assessed for hydrated lime pastes and mortars. Sometimes, air lime pastes and mortars were modified with two supplementary cementing materials (SCMs), namely nanosilica (NS) and metakaolin (MK). Two different polycarboxylate ethers, a lignosulfonate and a naphthalene condensed sulfonate superplasticizer were added to lime pastes and mortars and their effects on fresh-state properties as well as on the mechanical strengths were evalua...

  11. Estimating compressive strength of concrete by mortar testing

    OpenAIRE

    Camões, Aires; Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de; Jalali, Said

    2005-01-01

    Concrete mix design laboratory tests which time consuming and entails considerable effort. This study presents a method of reducing mix design testing costs by testing mortar instead of concrete specimens. The experimental programme consisted of defining mortar mixes equivalent to concrete mixes, moulding specimens of both mortar and concrete mixes studied and finally evaluating the compressive strength of specimens cured at different curing time. Results obtained indicate that a goo...

  12. Durability of Lightweight Concrete and Mortar Exposed under Some Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi, SAKURAI; Koichi, AYUTA; Noboru, SAEKI; Yoshio, Fujita; Seiji, Kaneko; Mikito, IKEDA

    1991-01-01

    In this experiment, identically composed specimens of lightweight concrete and of a mortar material were exposed to a cold (coastal) environment (Monbetsu), warm sea environment (Izu) and used in the roof of a building in a warm-climate city (Yokohama) for 3years. The physical and chemical properties of the lightweight concrete specimens and those of the mortar specimens were examined. The results are as follows : (1) The lightweight concrete specimen contained more salt than the same mortar ...

  13. Mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, A.; Darwin, D.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of the mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression was studied and a simple analytic model was developed to represent its cyclic behavior. Experimental work consisted of monotonic and cyclic compressive loading of mortar. Two mixes were used, with proportions corresponding to concretes having water cement ratios of 0.5 and 0.6. Forty-four groups of specimens were tested at ages ranging from 5 to 70 days. complete monotonic and cyclic stress strain envelopes were obtained. A number of loading regimes were investigated, including cycles to a constant maximum strain. Major emphasis was placed on tests using relatively high stress cycles. Degradation was shown to be a continuous process and a function of both total strain and load history. No stability or fatigue limit was apparent.

  14. Significance of steel electrical resistance method in the evaluation of reinforcement corrosion in cementitious systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajci, L.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The suitable detection system of steel reinforcement corrosion in concrete structures contributes to the reduction of their maintenance costs. Method of steel electrical resistance represents non-destructive monitoring of steel in cementitious systems. Specially prepared and arranged test specimen of steel as a corrosion sensor is embedded in mortar specimen. Verification tests of this method based on chloride corrosion of steel in mortars as well as its visual inspection are introduced. Significance of steel electrical resistance method lies in the expression of steel corrosion by these quantitative parameters: reduction of cross-section of steel, thickness of corroded layer and loss of weight of steel material. This method is an integral method that allows the indirect determination of mentioned corrosion characteristics. The comparison of verified method with gravimetric evaluation of steel corrosion gives a good correspondence. Test results on mortars with calcium chloride dosages between 0.5% and 4.0% by weight of cement prove high sensitiveness and reliability of steel electrical resistance method.

    La utilización de un sistema de detección de la corrosión de las armaduras en estructuras de hormigón puede contribuir a la reducción de sus costes de mantenimiento. El método de la resistencia eléctrica del acero consiste en la monitorización no-destructiva realizada sobre el acero en sistemas cementantes. Dentro de la muestra de mortero se coloca el sistema de detección, especialmente preparado y fijado, actuando como un sensor de la corrosión. En este trabajo se presentan ensayos de verificación de este método, junto con inspecciones visuales, en morteros sometidos a corrosión de armaduras por efecto de los cloruros. La efectividad de este método de la resistencia eléctrica del acero se expresa, en la corrosión de armaduras, de acuerdo a los siguientes parámetros cuantitativos: reducción de la sección transversal del

  15. The Aesthetical quality of SSA-containing mortar and concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Annemette; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2014-01-01

    that gives a characteristic red colour. The process of grinding SSA has shown to improve the compressive strength of SSA- containing mortar (Donatello et al. 2010). Thus, in this study SSA was grinded in 6 different intervals ranging from 0 – 10 min, and then added to the mortar mix replacing 20% of cement....... The experiment revealed that the colour of the SSA-containing mortar intensified as the time interval of the grinding process increased. Each of the 6 steps within the time interval provided an additional colour tone and generated a colour scale consisting of mortar samples ranging from greyish to a more...

  16. High-Performance Grouting Mortar Based on Mineral Admixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on high-performance grouting mortar is reported. The common mortar was modified by mineral admixtures such as gypsum, bauxite, and alunite. The effects of mineral admixtures on the fluidity, setting time, expansion, strength, and other properties of mortar were evaluated experimentally. The microstructure of the modified mortar was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Moreover, the expansive performance and strength of the grouting mortar were verified by anchor pullout test. The results show that the best conditions for gypsum-bauxite grouting mortar are as follows: a water-to-binder ratio of 0.3, a mineral admixture content of ~15%, and a molar ratio K of 2. The ultimate bearing capacity of the gypsum-bauxite grouting mortar anchor increased by 39.6% compared to the common mortar anchor. The gypsum-bauxite grouting mortar has good fluidity, quick-setting, microexpansion, early strength, and high strength performances.

  17. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  18. Alkali-activated slag mortars reinforced with ar glassfibre. Performance and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amat, T.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In light of the practical problem posed by the high drying shrinkage rate exhibited by alkali-activated slag (AAS,due to these materials exhibited a high drying shrinkage the present study analyzes the behaviour of alkali-activated slag mortars reinforced with alkali-resistant (AR glass fiber especially designed to reduce drying shrink aging cementitious systems. To this end, both alkali-activated slag and reference Portland cement mortars were prepared, with and without AR fiber (in dosages ranging from 0 to 1.1% by weight of the binder. These mortars were subjected to the following tests: drying shrinkage,mechanical strength after 2, 7 and 28 days, toughness,and high temperature. The microstructure of the materials was also studied by SEM/EDX techniques. At a percentage of 0.22%, AR fiber was found to induce a significant reduction (over 20% in drying shrinkage, without detracting from the fine resistance strength, of alkali activated slag mortar. Moreover, plain activated slag mortars recovered 20% of their initial mechanical strength after exposure to high temperatures, and ins specimens reinforced with glass fiber at a rate of 0.22%,recovery climbed to 50%.El principal problema tecnológico de los cementos de escoria activada alcalinamente (AAS es su elevada retracción al secado. Por ello, en el presente trabajo se estudia el comportamiento de morteros de escoria activada alcalinamente reforzados con fibras de vidrio alcali-resistentes (AR, especialmente diseñadas para reducir la retracción al secado en sistema cementantes. Para ello se prepararon morteros de escoria activada alcalinamente y de cemento Portland como material de referencia. El porcentaje de fibra AR en los morteros varió entre 0-1,1% en peso de ligante. Los morteros preparados fueron sometidos a los siguientes ensayos:retracción al secado, resistencias mecánicas a 2, 7 y 28 días,ensayos de tenacidad, resistencia al impacto y comportamiento resistente frente a altas

  19. Cementitious Barriers Partnership FY2013 End-Year Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Burns, H. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, F. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Kosson, D. S. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Brown, K. G. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada); Meeussen, J. C.L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (The Netherlands); van der Sloot, H. A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy, Langedijk (The Netherlands); Garboczi, E. J. [Materials & Construction Research Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2013-11-01

    In FY2013, the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) demonstrated continued tangible progress toward fulfilling the objective of developing a set of software tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. In November 2012, the CBP released “Version 1.0” of the CBP Software Toolbox, a suite of software for simulating reactive transport in cementitious materials and important degradation phenomena. In addition, the CBP completed development of new software for the “Version 2.0” Toolbox to be released in early FY2014 and demonstrated use of the Version 1.0 Toolbox on DOE applications. The current primary software components in both Versions 1.0 and 2.0 are LeachXS/ORCHESTRA, STADIUM, and a GoldSim interface for probabilistic analysis of selected degradation scenarios. The CBP Software Toolbox Version 1.0 supports analysis of external sulfate attack (including damage mechanics), carbonation, and primary constituent leaching. Version 2.0 includes the additional analysis of chloride attack and dual regime flow and contaminant migration in fractured and non-fractured cementitious material. The LeachXS component embodies an extensive material property measurements database along with chemical speciation and reactive mass transport simulation cases with emphasis on leaching of major, trace and radionuclide constituents from cementitious materials used in DOE facilities, such as Saltstone (Savannah River) and Cast Stone (Hanford), tank closure grouts, and barrier concretes. STADIUM focuses on the physical and structural service life of materials and components based on chemical speciation and reactive mass transport of major cement constituents and aggressive species (e.g., chloride, sulfate, etc.). THAMES is a planned future CBP Toolbox component focused on simulation of the microstructure of cementitious materials and calculation of resultant

  20. Experimental studies on the inventory of cement-derived colloids in the pore water of a cementitious backfill material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E

    2001-06-01

    The potential role of near-field colloids for the colloid-facilitated migration of radionuclides has stimulated investigations concerning the generation and presence of colloids in the near-field of a repository for low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW). The highly gas permeable mortar (Nagra designation: mortar M1) is currently favoured as backfill material for the engineered barrier of the planned Swiss L/ILW repository. The cementitious backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation. In a series of batch-style laboratory experiments the physico-chemical processes controlling the inventory of colloids in cement pore water of the backfill were assessed for chemical conditions prevailing in the initial stage of the cement degradation. In these experiments, backfill mortar M1 or quartz, respectively, which may be used as aggregate material for the backfill, were immersed in artificial cement pore water (a NaOH/KOH rich cement fluid). Colloid concentrations in the cement pore water were recorded as a function of time for different experimental settings. The results indicate that a colloid-colloid interaction process (coagulation) controlled the colloid inventory. The mass concentration of dispersed colloids was found to be typically lower than 0.02 ppm in undisturbed batch systems. An upper-bound value was estimated to be 0.1 ppm taking into account uncertainties on the measurements. To assess the potential for colloid generation in a dynamic system, colloid concentrations were determined in the pore water of a column filled with backfill mortar. The chemical conditions established in the mortar column corresponded to conditions observed in the second stage of the cement degradation (a Ca(OH){sub 2{sup -}} controlled cement system). In this dynamic system, the upper-bound value for the colloid mass concentration was estimated to be 0.1 ppm. Implications for radionuclide mobility were deduced taking into account the

  1. Experimental studies on the inventory of cement-derived colloids in the pore water of a cementitious backfill material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential role of near-field colloids for the colloid-facilitated migration of radionuclides has stimulated investigations concerning the generation and presence of colloids in the near-field of a repository for low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW). The highly gas permeable mortar (Nagra designation: mortar M1) is currently favoured as backfill material for the engineered barrier of the planned Swiss L/ILW repository. The cementitious backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation. In a series of batch-style laboratory experiments the physico-chemical processes controlling the inventory of colloids in cement pore water of the backfill were assessed for chemical conditions prevailing in the initial stage of the cement degradation. In these experiments, backfill mortar M1 or quartz, respectively, which may be used as aggregate material for the backfill, were immersed in artificial cement pore water (a NaOH/KOH rich cement fluid). Colloid concentrations in the cement pore water were recorded as a function of time for different experimental settings. The results indicate that a colloid-colloid interaction process (coagulation) controlled the colloid inventory. The mass concentration of dispersed colloids was found to be typically lower than 0.02 ppm in undisturbed batch systems. An upper-bound value was estimated to be 0.1 ppm taking into account uncertainties on the measurements. To assess the potential for colloid generation in a dynamic system, colloid concentrations were determined in the pore water of a column filled with backfill mortar. The chemical conditions established in the mortar column corresponded to conditions observed in the second stage of the cement degradation (a Ca(OH)2- controlled cement system). In this dynamic system, the upper-bound value for the colloid mass concentration was estimated to be 0.1 ppm. Implications for radionuclide mobility were deduced taking into account the experimental

  2. Water absorption of superabsorbent polymers in a cementitious environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the water absorption of superabsorbent polymers in a cementitious environment. The paper discusses different techniques to measure the water absorption capacity, and in particular it describes a technique which enables a simple and quick estimation of the water absorption...... simple, but a closer examination of the topic discloses many, significant difficulties. However, given proper cautiousness it is possible both to quickly estimate the water absorption capacity through a simple measurement as well as to examine how it will be influenced by different factors....... capacity in a cementitious environment. The challenges met in defining the concept of water absorption capacity are treated, and the appropriateness of different types of superabsorbent polymers is also briefly dealt with. The concept “water absorption capacity” and its measurement seem straightforwardly...

  3. Progress in Research on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one-dimensional (1D nanofiber, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely used to improve the performance of nanocomposites due to their high strength, small dimensions, and remarkable physical properties. Progress in the field of CNTs presents a potential opportunity to enhance cementitious composites at the nanoscale. In this review, current research activities and key advances on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced cementitious composites are summarized, including the effect of MWCNTs on modulus of elasticity, porosity, fracture, and mechanical and microstructure properties of cement-based composites. The issues about the improvement mechanisms, MWCNTs dispersion methods, and the major factors affecting the mechanical properties of composites are discussed. In addition, large-scale production methods of MWCNTs and the effects of CNTs on environment and health are also summarized.

  4. Salt resistant mortars: present knowledge and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.

    2013-01-01

    Salt crystallization damage is one of the most common causes of decay for bedding, pointing and plastering mortar. Attempts to tackle the problem have been mainly focused on increasing the mechanical strength of the mortar, by the replacement of lime with (PTL) cement, or on reducing the moisture tr

  5. Mørtelegenskaber og billedbehandling (Mortar properties and image processing)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    1998-01-01

    The properties of lime mortars can be essentially improved by adding fillers to the mortars in an intelligent way. This is shown in the thesis of Thorborg von Konow (1997).The changes in the pore structure and the following changes in properties can be treated by means of the rules in materials...

  6. Thaumasite swelling in historic mortars: field observations and laboratory research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Wijffels, T.J.; Klugt, L.J.A.R. van der

    2003-01-01

    The formation of thaumasite in historic mortars was found to be a recurrent problem in cases of conservation of historic masonry in the Netherlands. Several case studies in which mortar swelling occurred were performed. In this paper two case studies concerning thaumasite formation are briefly descr

  7. Salt resistant mortars: present knowledge and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Salt crystallization damage is one of the most common causes of decay for bedding, pointing and plastering mortar. Attempts to tackle the problem have been mainly focused on increasing the mechanical strength of the mortar by the replacement of lime with (PTL) cement, or on reducing the moisture tra

  8. Shape optimization of small span textile reinforced cementitious composite shells

    OpenAIRE

    TYSMANS, Tine; ADRIAENSSENS, Sigrid; Wastiels, Jan

    2009-01-01

    p. 1755-1766 The property of concrete to be poured into any shape and harden at ambient temperatures makes it the most widely-used material for shells. Using this traditionally brittle material in shells restricts their forms to mostly compression shapes. Often steel reinforcement is still necessary to carry tensile forces occurring under different load combinations and to limit crack formation. A new composite material, textile reinforced cementitious composite (TRC), eliminates this rest...

  9. Rheology and Reactivity of Cementitious Binders with Plasticizers

    OpenAIRE

    Vikan, Hedda Vestøl

    2005-01-01

    The rheological behaviour of cementitious pastes has been studied by various means. Six different cements have been studied in main parts of the work and all of them have been characterized according to the Rietveld method in order to determine the exact content of minerals. Easily soluble alkalis were measured by plasma-emission- spectroscopy of the fluid filtered from paste. Three types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulfonate formaldehyde condensate (SNF), lignosulphonate and polyacryl...

  10. Meso-mechanical analysis of steel fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    OpenAIRE

    Caggiano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    2010 - 2011 The mechanical behavior of cement-based materials is greatly affected by crack propagation under general stress states. The presence of one or more dominant cracks in structural members modifies its response, possibly leading to brittle failure modes. The random dispersion of short steel fibers in cement materials is a new methodology used for enhancing the response in the post-cracking regime. The behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composite (FRCC), compared...

  11. Effect of Limestone Powder on Microstructure of Ternary Cementitious System

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    The pressure to reach sustainability favours the development of ternary composite cement. The synergistic effect on mechanical behaviour at 28 days between limestone powder (LP) and pozzolanic additives, i.e. fly ash (FA) and blast furnace slag (BFS), has been documented. In order to better understand the synergistic effect, this article investigated the effect of LP on the microstructure of PC-FA and PC-BFS cementitious system. The mineralogy and pore structure were determined after 28 days ...

  12. Thermodynamics of Autogenous Self-healing in Cementitious Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, H

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is a brittle composite cementitious material that easily fractures under tensile loading. Microcracks can appear throughout the concrete prior to application of any load because of temperature-induced strain and autogenous and drying shrinkage. There is no doubt that these cracks provide preferential access for aggressive agents to penetrate into the concrete, probably causing corrosion of reinforcement steel and degradation of concrete. As a result, the service life of reinforced co...

  13. Mechanical properties of structures 3D printed with cementitious powders

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Peng; Meng, Xinmiao; Chen, Jian Fei; Ye, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    The three dimensional (3D) printing technology has undergone rapid development in the last few years and it is now possible to print engineering structures. This paper presents a study of the mechanical behavior of 3D printed structures using cementitious powder. Microscopic observation reveals that the 3D printed products have a layered orthotropic microstructure, in which each layer consists of parallel strips. Compression and flexural tests were conducted to determine the mechanical proper...

  14. Strengthening masonry infill panels using engineered cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghani, Ayoub; Fischer, Gregor; Nateghi Alahi, Fariborz

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive experimental study aims at investigating the behavior of masonry infill panels strengthened by fiber reinforced engineered cementitious composites (ECC). The experimental program included testing of materials, masonry elements and panels. Material tests were carried out first...... on masonry elements. Finally, a total of 10 brick panels including two control specimens and eight specimens with different ECC-strengthening configuration were selected. The specimens were subjected to diagonal compression loading under displacement control to evaluate their in-plane deformation...

  15. Porosity estimation of aged mortar using a micromechanical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M G; Anaya, J J; Sanchez, T; Segura, I

    2006-12-22

    Degradation of concrete structures located in high humidity atmospheres or under flowing water is a very important problem. In this study, a method for ultrasonic non-destructive characterization in aged mortar is presented. The proposed method makes a prediction of the behaviour of aged mortar accomplished with a three phase micromechanical model using ultrasonic measurements. Aging mortar was accelerated by immersing the probes in ammonium nitrate solution. Both destructive and non-destructive characterization of mortar was performed. Destructive tests of porosity were performed using a vacuum saturation method and non-destructive characterization was carried out using ultrasonic velocities. Aging experiments show that mortar degradation not only involves a porosity increase, but also microstructural changes in the cement matrix. Experimental results show that the estimated porosity using the proposed non-destructive methodology had a comparable performance to classical destructive techniques.

  16. Optimization of Blended Mortars Using Steel Slag Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new kind of mortar made of ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBFS), gypsum,clinker and steel slag sand (<4.75 mm) was developed. The ratio of steel slag sand to GGBFS was 1:1 and the amount of gypsum was 4% by weight while the dosage of clinker ranged from 0% to 24%. The optimization formulation of such mortar was studied. The content of steel slag sand should be less than 50% according to the volume stability of blended mortar, and the dosage of clinker is about 10% based on the strength development.Besides strength, the hydration heat, pore structure and micro pattern of blended mortar were also determined.The experimental results show the application of steel slag sand may reduce the dosage of cement clinker and increase the content of industrial waste product such as GGBFS, and the clinker is also a better admixture for blended mortar using steel slag sand.

  17. Luminescence quartz dating of lime mortars. A first research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, N; Mauz, B; Michael, C T

    2002-01-01

    Lime mortars mixed with sand are well suited for connecting structural materials, like stones and bricks, due to the mechanical properties this material exhibits. Their extensive use in architectural and decorative works during the last 4000 years motivated the introduction of the 'Luminescence clock' for age determination of mortars. The same principles as for quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sediments were applied for age estimation of a mortar fragment removed from a Byzantine church monument dated by archaeological means to 1050-1100 years ago (the first half of the 10th century). The OSL from the quartz was monitored under blue light stimulation and UV detection, using a single-aliquot-regenerative-dose protocol. The quartz-OSL dating of the mortar resulted in 870 +/- 230 a. TL polymineral fine grain dating was also performed on a brick fragment which was connected to the mortar, resulting in a TL age of 1095 +/- 190 a.

  18. The performance of mortar containing added metakaolin regarding sulfate action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneth Torres Agredo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the performance of adding Colombian metakaolin (MK to mortar when these are submitted to sulphate action. Four proportions of MK were used as cement replacement in this study: 10%, 20%, 35% and 50% by weight of cement; cement having 11% tricalcium aluminate was used. Mortar specimens were immersed in 5% sodium sulphate solution for a total period of 280 days after the specified initial moist curing period, The degree of sulphate attack was evaluated by measuring the mortar’s cylindrical expansion, mortar cubes’ compressive strength reduction and visual inspection of mortar specimens. An additional study using X-ray diffraction was conducted to determine the products formed in the cement pastes due to the sulphate attack. The results showed that MK mortar sulphate resistance increased when increasing MK replacement level. An MK proportion greater than 20% is re-commended for obtaining better performance against sulphate attack.

  19. EQUIVALENT MODEL OF EXPANSION OF CEMENT MORTAR UNDER SULPHATE EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jue Zhu; Minqiang Jiaug; Jiankang Chen

    2008-01-01

    The expansion property of cement mortar under the attack of sulfate ions is studied by experimental and theoretical methods.First,cement mortars are fabricated with the ratio of water to cement of 0.4,0.6,and 0.8.Secondly,the expansion of specimen immerged in sulphate solution is measured at different times.Thirdly,a theoretical model of expansion of cement mortar under sulphate erosion is suggested by virtue of represent volume element method.In this model, the damage evolution due to the interaction between delayed ettringite and cement mortar is taken into account.Finally,the numerical calculation is performed.The numerical and experimental results indicate that the model perfectly describes the expansion of the cement mortar.

  20. Mechanical properties of gangue-containing aluminosilicate based cementitious materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High performance aluminosilicate based cementitious materials were produced using calcined gangue as one of the major raw materials.The gangue was calcined at 500℃.The main constituent was calcined gangue, fly ash and slag, while alkali-silicate solutions were used as the diagenetic agent.The structure of gangue-containing aluminosilicate based cementitious materials was studied by the methods of IR, NMR and SEM.The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by the mass ratio between the gangue, slag and fly ash, the kind of activator and additional salt.For 28-day curing time, the compressive strength of the sample with a mass proportion of 2:1:1 (gangue: slag: fly ash) is 58.9 MPa, while the compressive strength of the sample containing 80wt%gangue can still be up to 52.3 MPa.The larger K+ favors the formation of large silicate oligomers with which Al(OH)4- prefers to bind.Therefore, in Na-K compounding activator solutions more oligomers exist which result in a stronger compressive strength of aluminosilicate-based cementitious materials than in the case of Na-containing activator.The reasons for this were found through IR and NMR analysis.Glauber's salt reduces the 3-day compressive strength of the paste, but increases its 7-day and 28-day compressive strengths.

  1. Dating mortars: three medieval Spanish architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirós Castillo, Juan Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues in building archaeology is finding the age of elements and structures discovered. Mortars represent a class of material basically constituted by a mixture of different phases (i.e. binder, aggregates, water and are widely used for constructive uses and artworks. Current scientific literature regarding the possibility of accurate radiocarbon dating for mortars reports different and still contradictory results. In this study, a new protocol for radiocarbon dating of mortar developed at the Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE is used to perform 14C measurements on archaeological mortars coming from three medieval architectures of northern Spain (two churches and the walls of a castle. Results observed will be discussed and compared with independent age estimations (i.e. radiocarbon dating performed on organic materials found in the same study site, archaeological analyses in order to frame experimental observations in the actual site knowledge by means of a multidisciplinary approach.Una de las principales problemáticas a las que se enfrenta la arqueología de la arquitectura es datar los elementos y las estructuras. Las argamasas son un tipo de material constituido por una mezcla de diferentes elementos (agregados, agua y empleadas en muchos tipos de construcciones. Los estudios realizados hasta la actualidad en torno a la posibilidad de realizar dataciones radiocarbónicas precisas han proporcionado resultados contradictorios. El objetivo de este artículo es el de presentar un nuevo protocolo para datar la arquitectura histórica desarrollado por el Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Enviromental Heritage (CIRCE, basado en la realización de dataciones radiocarbónicas de argamasas a partir del análisis de tres arquitecturas medievales del norte del España, dos iglesias y la muralla de un castillo. Los resultados obtenidos han sido confrontados y comparados con otros

  2. Temperature effect on the poro-mechanical or hydraulic behaviour of a carbonated rock and a mortar: experimental studies; Influence de la temperature sur le comportement poromecanique ou hydraulique d'une roche carbonatee et d'un mortier: etudes experimentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lion, M

    2004-07-15

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the temperature effect on the hydraulic and poro-mechanical behaviour of a limestone. Many experimental tests (porosity and permeability measurements, uniaxial and hydrostatic compressions tests) were carried out in order to study the thermal treatments effect and so the thermal microcracking effect on rock behaviour. Moreover, an experimental device for permeability measurements under high temperatures (until 200 C) was realized. This experimental device permitted to study the permeability variation of the limestone under thermal stresses. Finally, the behaviour of cementitious materials was studied; the temperature effect on the permeability of a mortar was examined. (author)

  3. Composition of mortar as a function of distance to the brick-mortar interface : A study on the formation of cured mortar structure in masonry using NMR, PFM and XRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Larbi, J.A.; Pel, L.; Pers, N.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    The formation of cured mortar structure in masonry was studied using multiple experimental techniques. Starting with fresh mortar, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the water extraction during brick laying. After curing, the composition of cured mortar was investigated with polari

  4. Composition of mortar as a function of distance to the brick-mortar interface: A study on the formation of cured mortar structure in masonry using NMR, PFM and XRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Larbi, J.A.; Pel, L.; Van der Pers, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of cured mortar structure in masonry was studied using multiple experimental techniques. Starting with fresh mortar, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the water extraction during brick laying. After curing, the composition of cured mortar was investigated with polari

  5. Self-Healing of Microcracks in Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC Under a Natural Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor C. Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper builds on previous self-healing engineered cementitious composites (ECC research by allowing ECC to heal outdoors, in the natural environment, under random and sometimes extreme environmental conditions. Development of an ECC material that can heal itself in the natural environment could lower infrastructure maintenance costs and allow for more sustainable development in the future by increasing service life and decreasing the amount of resources and energy needed for repairs. Determining to what extent current ECC materials self-heal in the natural environment is the first step in the development of an ECC that can completely heal itself when exposed to everyday environmental conditions. This study monitored outdoor ECC specimens for one year using resonant frequency (RF and mechanical reloading to determine the rate and extent of self-healing in the natural environment. It was found that the level of RF, stiffness, and first cracking strength recovery increased as the duration of natural environment exposure increased. For specimens that underwent multiple damage cycles, it was found that the level of recovery was highly dependent on the average temperature and amount of precipitation between each damage event. However, RF, stiffness, and first cracking strength recovery data for specimens that underwent multiple loading cycles suggest that self-healing functionality can be maintained under multiple damage events.

  6. Comparative investigation of mortars from Roman Colosseum and cistern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, D.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 725 Davis Hall 94720-1710, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)]. E-mail: denise@ecv.ufsc.br; Wenk, H.R. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, 497 McCone 94720-4767, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Monteiro, P.J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 725 Davis Hall 94720-1710, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Mortar from the Roman Colosseum and a Roman cistern from Albano Laziale were characterized with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)). The different techniques provided consistent results that the mortar of the Colosseum is mainly calcareous lime, while the mortar of the cistern is pozzolanic siliceous material. The study highlights the capabilities of the different methods for the analysis of cement. For routine analysis XRD is adequate but for characterization of poorly crystalline phases FT-IR and TGA have definite advantages.

  7. A Mortar Condition for Mortar Finite Element Methods%Mortar型有限元方法的一类Mortar条件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜亚琴

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we study the approximation of mortar finite element methods and establish a criterion for the optimal mortar condition. Based on the criterion, two mortar conditions are presented. Using the two mortar condition, we construct mortar rotated Q1 element and mortar P1 nonconforming element. By the mortar condition satisfying the criterion, we obtain optimal error estimates for elliptic problems.%研究了mortar型有限元方法的逼近性,建立了一种mortar条件具备最优误差的标准,在满足该标准的基础上介绍了两个mortar条件.利用这两个mortar条件分别构建mortar型旋转Q1元与mortar型P1非协调元.通过检验mortar条件符合标准,证明了这两种mortar有限元方法对于椭圆问题有最优的误差估计.

  8. Flexural strengthening of masonry members using advanced cementitious materials

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Joaquim A. O.; Esmaeeli, Esmaeel; Manning, Elizabeth; Häßler, D.

    2011-01-01

    Two different cement based fiber reinforced composites for the flexural strengthening of masonry beams under monotonic loading are studied. Steel Fiber Reinforced Self- Compacting Concrete (SFRSCC) with tensile strain-softening behavior, and PVA fiber reinforced cement based mortar (SHCC) with tensile Strain-Hardening were the developed composites. Both composites were applied on the tensile surface of masonry beams and the effectiveness of this technique for the flexural stren...

  9. Cementitious Barriers Partnership - FY2015 End-Year Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kosson, D. S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). School of Engineering; Brown, K. G. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). School of Engineering; Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., QC (Canada); Meeussen, J. C. L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG); Seignette, Paul [Energy Research Center of the Netherlands; van der Sloot, H. A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy

    2015-09-17

    The DOE-EM Office of Tank Waste Management Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. Therefore, the CBP ultimate purpose is to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex. This status report highlights the CBP 2015 Software and Experimental Program efforts and accomplishments that support DOE needs in environmental cleanup and waste disposal. DOE needs in this area include: Long-term performance predictions to provide credibility (i.e., a defensible technical basis) for regulator and DOE review and approvals, Facility flow sheet development/enhancements, and Conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. In 2015, the CBP developed a beta release of the CBP Software Toolbox – “Version 3.0”, which includes new STADIUM carbonation and damage models, a new SRNL module for estimating hydraulic properties and flow in fractured and intact cementitious materials, and a new LeachXS/ORCHESTRA (LXO) oxidation module. In addition, the STADIUM sulfate attack and chloride models have been improved as well as the LXO modules for sulfate attack, carbonation, constituent leaching, and percolation with radial diffusion (for leaching and transport in cracked cementitious materials). These STADIUM and LXO models are applicable to and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) end-users for service life prediction and long-term leaching evaluations of radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex.

  10. Engineering Properties and Correlation Analysis of Fiber Cementitious Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Ting Lin; Yuan-Chieh Wu; An Cheng; Sao-Jeng Chao; Hui-Mi Hsu

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of the amount of silica fume addition and volume fraction of steel fiber on the engineering properties of cementitious materials. Test variables include dosage of silica fume (5% and 10%), water/cement ratio (0.35 and 0.55) and steel fiber dosage (0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0%). The experimental results included: compressive strength, direct tensile strength, splitting tensile strength, surface abrasion and drop-weight test, which were collected to carry out the analysi...

  11. Impact of carbonation on water transport properties of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonation is a very well-known cementitious materials pathology. It is the major cause of reinforced concrete structures degradation. It leads to rebar corrosion and consequent concrete cover cracking. In the framework of radioactive waste management, cement-based materials used as building materials for structures or containers would be simultaneously submitted to drying and atmospheric carbonation. Although scientific literature regarding carbonating is vast, it is clearly lacking information about the influence of carbonation on water transport properties. This work then aimed at studying and understanding the change in water transport properties induced by carbonation. Simultaneously, the representativeness of accelerated carbonation (in the laboratory) was also studied. (author)

  12. Cementitious barriers partnership transport properties of damaged materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure do not necessarily creates additional pore space in

  13. Shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behavior of beams consisting of steel reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). Based on the strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior of ECC, this study investigates the extent to which ECC can improve the shear...... a high contrast speckle pattern to the beams surface. The multiple micro cracking resulting from the strain-hardening response of ECC in tension develop in a di-agonal between the load and support point. The formation of multiple micro cracks is highly dependent on the tensile stress-strain behavior...

  14. Monitoring the self-healing process of biomimetic mortar using coda wave interferometry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shukui; Basaran, Zeynep; Zhu, Jinying; Ferron, Raissa

    2014-02-01

    Internal stresses might induce microscopic cracks in concrete, which can provide pathways for ingress of harmful chemicals and can lead to loss of strength. Recent research in concrete materials suggests that it might be possible to develop a smart cement-based material that is capable of self-healing by leveraging the metabolic activity of microorganisms to provide biomineralization. Limited research on biomineralization in cement-based systems has shown promising results that healing of cracks can occur on the surface of concrete and reduce permeability. This paper presents the results from an investigation regarding the potential for a cement-based material to repair itself internally through biomineralization. Compressive strength test and coda wave interferometry (CWI) analyses were conducted on mortar samples that were loaded to 70% of their compressive strength and cured in different conditions. Experimental results indicate that the damaged mortar samples with microorganisms showed significantly higher strength development and higher increase of ultrasonic wave velocity compared to samples without microorganisms at 7 and 28 days.

  15. Strength and Drying Shrinkage of Alkali-Activated Slag Paste and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-chieh Chi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the strengths and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar. Compressive strength, tensile strength, and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar were measured with various liquid/slag ratios, sand/slag ratios, curing ages, and curing temperatures. Experimental results show that the higher compressive strength and tensile strength have been observed in the higher curing temperature. At the age of 56 days, AAS mortars show higher compressive strength than Portland cement mortars and AAS mortars with liquid/slag ratio of 0.54 have the highest tensile strength in all AAS mortars. In addition, AAS pastes of the drying shrinkage are higher than AAS mortars. Meanwhile, higher drying shrinkage was observed in AAS mortars than that observed comparable Portland cement mortars.

  16. The colour potentials of SSA-containing mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Annemette; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie;

    2015-01-01

    is with a few exceptions landfilled and thus, wasted.The purpose of the experiments was to examine the influence of SSA and how it affected the colour of mortar samples. SSA was ground in 6 different intervals and added to mortar mixes by replacing 20% of the cement. An additional focus was to examine......This paper reports an experimental study of aesthetical qualities of mortar containing sewage sludgeash (SSA). SSA is the residue produced at water treatment plants where incineration of the sludge is applied in order to decrease volume and to prevent pathogens from spreading. Today SSA...... the possibilities to accentuate the colours of the hardened mortar by using paper cuttings in the production of the samples. The result of the experiments showed that a colour scale can be developed from ground SSA, and that paper may have the potential of providing divers textural qualities when it is used...

  17. Influences of Carboxyl Methyl Cellulose on Performances of Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuli; ZHOU Mingkai; SHAN Junhong; XU Fang; YANG Yuhui

    2007-01-01

    Carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) was mixed into mortar to improve the waterretention performance of mortar, the quality of floated coat of aerated concrete became better. The consistency and compression strength of mortar with CMC were studied. The water absorption was studied with the method of filter paper. The micro mechanism was researched with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy(SEM). The experimental results show the water-holding performance of mortar with CMC is largely improved and it is better when the mixed amount is about 1.5%; the compression strength had a descending trend with the increase of CMC; CMC reacted with calcium hydroxide(CH) into the deposition of calcium carboxyl methyl cellulose.

  18. Fireclay Refractory Mortars GB/T 14982-2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaohui; Chai Junlan

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the classification, techni-cal requirements, test methods, quality appraisal pro-cedure, packing, marking, transportation, storage and quality certificate of fireclay refractory mortars.

  19. High Alumina Refractory Mortars GB/T 2994-2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Chai Junlan

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the classification, techni-cal requirements, test methods, quality appraisal pro-cedure, packing, marking, transportation, storage and quality certificate of high alumina refractory mortars.

  20. Tangential adhesion strength of cement mortars in masonry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derkach V.N.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The initial shear strength (tangential adhesion and the angle of internal friction in the horizontal plane of mortar joints are among important characteristics, determining the masonry strength and stiffness qualities in case of share. These characteristics influence largely over the limit state approach of buildings and facilities during seismic activity and over wind, crane and other load, causing the panel frame distortion in frame buildings with masonry infill.In the paper the experimental studies results of tangential adhesion strength of cement mortars with solid and hollow ceramic bricks, porous stones, calcium silicate bricks and cellular concrete blocks are presented. This research gives experimental dependences of mortar adhesive strength with mentioned types of masonry units on compressive strength of cement mortar. There is also the comparison of the obtained results with Russian and foreign standards in this paper.

  1. Optimization Problem of Mortar Barrel and Bomb Clearances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Sirpal

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimum mortar windage to achieve maximum accuracy and required velocity for impacting the firing stud under two conditions of constraint is considered. These control constraints are considered to be bounded and the extremals have been studied.

  2. Aired-time and chamotte hydraulic mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Cortina, M.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research project has been to obtain aired-li me based hydraulic mortars with the addition of chamotte or burnt clay powder obtained from the ceramic industry waste. By doing this, hydraulic properties have been included into lime and hydraulic mortars with a great improvement in mechanical properties. In order to achieve this, different types of chamotte obtained from clay burnt at different temperatures have been tested, changing, at the same time, the proportions of lime, sand, chamotte and water. All the tests have been performed preparing a double set of test pieces to be kept at room temperature or to be immersed in water, determining the Shore C hardness and the mechanical compressive and tensile strengths. Further on, X-ray diffraction analysis have been developed to determine the qualitative composition of the crystalline structure, as well as micro structural analysis, using stereomicroscope and electric microscope scanning, with X-ray microanalysis have been used. As a conclusion, several types of mortars have been created with different proportions, which can be used, due to its characteristics, as keying mortars in brickwork, for restoration works as well as for new constructions.

    El objetivo de éste trabajo es el conseguir morteros hidráulicos, a partir de la cal aérea, con adición de chamota o polvo de arcilla cocida, obtenida de los residuos-desechos de la industria cerámica. De este modo se pretende infundir propiedades hidráulicas a la cal y obtener morteros hidráulicos, con una mejora sustancial de sus propiedades mecánicas. Para ello, se ha experimentado con diversos tipos de chamotas, obtenidas a partir de arcillas cocidas a diferentes temperaturas, y con diversas granulometrías, y se han realizado morteros con distintas dosificaciones, variando las proporciones de cal, arena, chamota y agua. En todos los casos se ha preparado una doble serie de probetas, para conservarlas al aire o

  3. Characteristics of Bamboo Leaf Ash Blended Cement Paste and Mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Umoh A.A.; Odesola I.

    2015-01-01

    The use of bamboo leaf ash as cement supplement can contribute to reduction in cost and environmental hazard associated with cement production as well as waste pollution caused by the littered bamboo leaves. Therefore, the characteristics of cement paste and mortar incorporating bamboo leaf ash were investigated. The results of the physical properties of the pastes were within the requirements stipulated by relevant standards while that of the mortar cubes indicated that the compressive stren...

  4. Thaumasite formation in hydraulic mortars by atmospheric SO^ deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Varela, María Teresa; Martínez-Ramírez, S.; Sabbioni, C.; Zappia, G.; Toumbakari, E. E.; Aguilera, J.; Palomo, Ángel; Riontino, C.; Van Valen, K.

    2001-01-01

    [EN]Sulphation of mortars and concretes is a function of diverse environmental factors (SO^ aerosol, temperature, etc) as well as some material characteristics. One of the phases that could be formed as consequence of the sulphation of the hydraulic binder is thaumasite. In this paper different hydraulic mortars have been exposed to laboratory exposure chambers in order to reproduce thaumasite formation due to atmospheric SO^. Under the laboratory exposure conditions, ...

  5. Effect of Modified Polymer on Crack Resistance of Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    At present, the basic technical principle in China is to adopt polymers to modifying the properties of mortar so as to improve the crack-resistance of construction structures and to strengthen their water-resisting and climate-resisting properties as well. However, how polymer acts on anti-crack mortar is short of systematic research. Theoretical exposition of polymer mortar is basically explained by Ohama Model, which is cement slaking and polymer coating are carried on together and mutually-cross web structure interweaved with liquid and polymer coating. But anti-crack mortar has its own special characteristics because of fewer polymers mixed in it and its high viscosity. So this paper is to showing how different polymers affect its crack-resistance cannot be reflected from this theory. Vinyl-acetate ethylene (VAC/E) has been selected as representation of polymerization, whose property is modified by compounding it from some inorganic components, such as talc, CaCO3 and so on. And then the mechanics property and shrinkage of anti-crack polymer mortar is tested when different amount of polymers is added as admixture of mortar. The result indicates that, the working performance and mechanics property of the polymer mortar are worse mixed VAC/E only. It basically meets the demands for mechanics strength and working performance when mixed both VAC/E and CaCO3. While it achieves much better mechanical property and working performance than the two former when mixed VAC/E,talc and CaCO3; the result of corresponding scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of sample indicates that the internal result of the polymer mortar, compared with classical Ohama Model, has a particularity that its structure is formed by polymer coating instead of filling up the intervals among cement grains.

  6. The Mortar Element Method with Lagrange Multipliers for Stokes Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaqin Jiang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a mortar element method with Lagrange multiplier for incompressible Stokes problem, i.e., the matching constraints of velocity on mortar edges are expressed in terms of Lagrange multipliers. We also present P1 nonconforming element attached to the subdomains. By proving inf-sup condition, we derive optimal error estimates for velocity and pressure. Moreover, we obtain satisfactory approximation for normal derivatives of the velocity across the interfaces.

  7. Neutron radiography of heated high-performance mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Weber B; Wyrzykowski M.; Griffa M.; Carl S.; Lehmann E.; Lura P.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron radiography was applied to investigate the water distribution in mortar samples heated from one side to 600 °C. In mortar, aggregates and anhydrous cement are almost transparent to neutrons, while hydration products and water-filled capillary pores bear the largest attenuation. The evolution of the moisture profile shows a sharp dehydration front and accumulation of water due to condensation of water vapor behind this front.

  8. Neutron radiography of heated high-performance mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber B.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutron radiography was applied to investigate the water distribution in mortar samples heated from one side to 600 °C. In mortar, aggregates and anhydrous cement are almost transparent to neutrons, while hydration products and water-filled capillary pores bear the largest attenuation. The evolution of the moisture profile shows a sharp dehydration front and accumulation of water due to condensation of water vapor behind this front.

  9. Physical and mechanical characterisation of historic mortars. Application to the evaluation of the state of conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalhães, A.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the physical and mechanical characteristics of historic mortars is of vital importance in the selection of repair mortars for historic buildings. As a result, a need has arisen for test methods that can be used to assess those characteristics in irregular, friable samples.The present paper discusses the results of the experimental characterization of historic Portuguese mortars. The test methods used to evaluate water resistance and compressive strength are described. The compressive strength values found for new mortars using the method proposed and the method specified in European standards are compared and the results used to draw conclusions on the potential of the new technique.The correlation between the initial degree of deterioration determined by visual inspection and the experimental data is discussed.El conocimiento de las características físicas y mecánicas de los morteros antiguos es muy importante a la hora de seleccionar morteros de reparación y de planear adecuadamente cualquier intervención de reparación. Así, se hace necesario definir los métodos de ensayo de caracterización aplicables a las muestras irregulares y friables para evaluar dichas características. En el presente trabajo se presentan y analizan algunos resultados de caracterización experimental de morteros antiguos portugueses, y se describen los métodos de ensayo utilizados para evaluar el comportamiento al agua y la resistencia a la compresión. Mediante la comparación con los resultados obtenidos en los ensayos con morteros nuevos, usando dichos métodos y también los métodos recomendados por la norma europea, se sacan conclusiones sobre el potencial de los métodos.Por último, se establece una correlación entre los resultados experimentales y el nivel de deterioro inicial atribuido a los morteros antiguos mediante inspección visual.

  10. Applicability of Carbonated Electric Arc Furnace Slag to Mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have been studying the absorption of CO2 in the steelmaking slag. In this study, an application of the electric arc furnace slag after the carbonation to admixture of mortar was investigated with the JIS (A6206-1997) method for ground granulated blast-furnace slag for concrete. The percent flows for the test mortar were smaller than that for the standard mortar. The percent flow of the carbonated slag whose average particle size of more than approximately 4 μm increased with an increase in the average size of the particles. Because the compressive strengths of the test mortar cured for 91 days were almost the same as those cured 28 days, the slag after the carbonation was thought not to have self-hardening property for a medium and long term. The compressive strength for the test mortar was almost unchanged within a range of approximately 2 to 7 μm of the average particle size, and it in this range was highest. The activity indexes for the test mortar prepared with the slag after the carbonation ranged from approximately 40 to 60%.

  11. Applicability of Carbonated Electric Arc Furnace Slag to Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, S.; Arisawa, R.; Hisyamudin, M. N. N.; Murakami, K.; Maegawa, A.; Izaki, M.

    2012-03-01

    Authors have been studying the absorption of CO2 in the steelmaking slag. In this study, an application of the electric arc furnace slag after the carbonation to admixture of mortar was investigated with the JIS (A6206-1997) method for ground granulated blast-furnace slag for concrete. The percent flows for the test mortar were smaller than that for the standard mortar. The percent flow of the carbonated slag whose average particle size of more than approximately 4 μm increased with an increase in the average size of the particles. Because the compressive strengths of the test mortar cured for 91 days were almost the same as those cured 28 days, the slag after the carbonation was thought not to have self-hardening property for a medium and long term. The compressive strength for the test mortar was almost unchanged within a range of approximately 2 to 7 μm of the average particle size, and it in this range was highest. The activity indexes for the test mortar prepared with the slag after the carbonation ranged from approximately 40 to 60 %.

  12. High performance superplasticized silica fume mortars for ferrocement works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathish Kumar P.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferrocement works demand cement mortars of good workability and high strength. Reduction in water-cement ratio combined with a refined pore structure increases the compressive strength in addition to the enhancement of durability characteristics, but the workability decreases. Workability becomes important, as the mortar has to easily penetrate between the layers of the mesh wires. A reasonably workable high strength cement mortar can be obtained by using a high cement content coupled with the use of superplasticizers. These were also found to retain the cohesiveness and check undesirable bleeding and segregation. An experimental program was conducted to study the functional efficacy of an SNF condensate used as a water reducing superplasticizer. The compressive strength and flow characteristics of the mortars were determined to decide their suitability for ferrocement works. The parameters included the mix proportions, the grade of cement, age of curing and the dosage of superplasticizer. It was concluded from the study that the addition of an optimum dosage of superplasticizer improved the workability and strength characteristics of silica fume mortars. There was a late gain in the compressive strength of silica fume mortars.

  13. Reuse of ground waste glass as aggregate for mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, V; Gnappi, G; Moriconi, G; Montenero, A

    2005-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying the possibility of reusing waste glass from crushed containers and building demolition as aggregate for preparing mortars and concrete. At present, this kind of reuse is still not common due to the risk of alkali-silica reaction between the alkalis of cement and silica of the waste glass. This expansive reaction can cause great problems of cracking and, consequently, it can be extremely deleterious for the durability of mortar and concrete. However, data reported in the literature show that if the waste glass is finely ground, under 75mum, this effect does not occur and mortar durability is guaranteed. Therefore, in this work the possible reactivity of waste glass with the cement paste in mortars was verified, by varying the particle size of the finely ground waste glass. No reaction has been detected with particle size up to 100mum thus indicating the feasibility of the waste glass reuse as fine aggregate in mortars and concrete. In addition, waste glass seems to positively contribute to the mortar micro-structural properties resulting in an evident improvement of its mechanical performance.

  14. Electrodialytically treated MSWI APC residue as substitute for cement in mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Geiker, Mette Rica; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    /or electrodialytic remediation, were used in Portland cement mortar. Mortar bars with 15 % weight replacement of cement by APC residues showed compressive strengths up to 40 MPa after 28/32 days. Heavy metal and salt leaching from both crushed and monolithic mortars with APC residues was generally similar...... and comparable to both the reference mortar and mortar with coal fly ash. These results indicate that electrodialytic remediation could be used a pre-treatment method for MSWI APC residues prior to reuse in mortar....

  15. Effect of silicate solutions on metakaolinite based cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xue-jun; LI Hua-jian; SUN Heng-hu

    2006-01-01

    High performance metakaolinite based cementitious materials were prepared with metakaolinite as main component, and the different modules of Na and Na-K silicate solutions as diagenetic agent. The results show that the mechanical properties are affected by different silicate solutions, compressive strengths of pastes hydrated for 3 d and 28 d with Na-K silicate solution (The modulus is 1) are about 43.68 and 78.52 MPa respectively. By analyzing the mechanical properties of Metakaolinite based cementitious materials, the diagenetic effect of lower module is better than higher module, and Na-K silicate solution is better than Na silicate solution. The structure of the Na and Na-K silicate solutions is studied with IR and 29Si NMR, the reason of the lower module and Na-K silicate solution improving the mechanical properties is that the low module silicate solution has lower polymeric degree of silicon dioxide, and the higher polymeric degree of silicon oxide tetrahedron(Q4) in Na-K silicate solution is less than Na silicate solution.

  16. Investigations on cementitious composites based on rubber particle waste additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Laun Nacif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The amount of waste rubber has gradually increased over recent years because of over-growing use of rubber products. The disposal of waste rubber has caused serious environmental problems. The incorporation of recycled materials into cementitious composites is a feasible alternative that has gained ground in civil construction. The performance of such materials is much affected not only by the rubber addition, but also the particle size which has been controversially reported in the literature. In order to investigate the single effect of rubber particles into cement based materials, rubber cementitious composites were prepared with no silica particle additions. A full factorial design has been conducted to assess the influence of the rubber particle size (0.84/0.58 mm and 0.28/0.18 mm; mass fraction used (5, 15 and 30%; and water/cement ratio (0.35 and 0.50 on the physic-mechanical properties of the composites. The materials were characterized through apparent density, porosity, compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity and microstructural analysis. The interactions of rubber particle size, rubber fraction and water/cement ratio affected significantly the density and compressive strength of the composites. The apparent porosity was influenced mainly by the rubber particle size. The flexural strength was affected by the main factors and the modulus of elasticity was affected by the interaction factors rubber particle size and fraction, and rubber fraction and w/c ratio.

  17. VARIABILITY OF KD VALUES IN CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS AND SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.; Shine, E.

    2012-02-02

    Measured distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) for environmental contaminants provide input data for performance assessments (PA) that evaluate physical and chemical phenomena for release of radionuclides from wasteforms, degradation of engineered components and subsequent transport of radionuclides through environmental media. Research efforts at SRNL to study the effects of formulation and curing variability on the physiochemical properties of the saltstone wasteform produced at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) are ongoing and provide information for the PA and Saltstone Operations. Furthermore, the range and distribution of plutonium K{sub d} values in soils is not known. Knowledge of these parameters is needed to provide guidance for stochastic modeling in the PA. Under the current SRS liquid waste processing system, supernate from F & H Tank Farm tanks is processed to remove actinides and fission products, resulting in a low-curie Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS). At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), DSS is mixed with premix, comprised of blast furnace slag (BFS), Class F fly ash (FA), and portland cement (OPC) to form a grout mixture. The fresh grout is subsequently placed in SDF vaults where it cures through hydration reactions to produce saltstone, a hardened monolithic waste form. Variation in saltstone composition and cure conditions of grout can affect the saltstone's physiochemical properties. Variations in properties may originate from variables in DSS, premix, and water to premix ratio, grout mixing, placing, and curing conditions including time and temperature (Harbour et al. 2007; Harbour et al. 2009). There are no previous studies reported in the literature regarding the range and distribution of K{sub d} values in cementitious materials. Presently, the Savannah River Site (SRS) estimate ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values based on measurements of K{sub d} values made in sandy SRS sediments (Kaplan 2010). The actual

  18. Variability Of KD Values In Cementitious Materials And Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measured distribution coefficients (Kd values) for environmental contaminants provide input data for performance assessments (PA) that evaluate physical and chemical phenomena for release of radionuclides from wasteforms, degradation of engineered components and subsequent transport of radionuclides through environmental media. Research efforts at SRNL to study the effects of formulation and curing variability on the physiochemical properties of the saltstone wasteform produced at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) are ongoing and provide information for the PA and Saltstone Operations. Furthermore, the range and distribution of plutonium Kd values in soils is not known. Knowledge of these parameters is needed to provide guidance for stochastic modeling in the PA. Under the current SRS liquid waste processing system, supernate from F and H Tank Farm tanks is processed to remove actinides and fission products, resulting in a low-curie Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS). At the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF), DSS is mixed with premix, comprised of blast furnace slag (BFS), Class F fly ash (FA), and portland cement (OPC) to form a grout mixture. The fresh grout is subsequently placed in SDF vaults where it cures through hydration reactions to produce saltstone, a hardened monolithic waste form. Variation in saltstone composition and cure conditions of grout can affect the saltstone's physiochemical properties. Variations in properties may originate from variables in DSS, premix, and water to premix ratio, grout mixing, placing, and curing conditions including time and temperature (Harbour et al. 2007; Harbour et al. 2009). There are no previous studies reported in the literature regarding the range and distribution of Kd values in cementitious materials. Presently, the Savannah River Site (SRS) estimate ranges and distributions of Kd values based on measurements of Kd values made in sandy SRS sediments (Kaplan 2010). The actual cementitious material Kd values

  19. Degradation Of Cementitious Materials Associated With Saltstone Disposal Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P; Smith, F. G. III

    2013-03-19

    The Saltstone facilities at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) stabilize and dispose of low-level radioactive salt solution originating from liquid waste storage tanks at the site. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives treated salt solution and mixes the aqueous waste with dry cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash to form a grout slurry which is mechanically pumped into concrete disposal cells that compose the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The solidified grout is termed “saltstone”. Cementitious materials play a prominent role in the design and long-term performance of the SDF. The saltstone grout exhibits low permeability and diffusivity, and thus represents a physical barrier to waste release. The waste form is also reducing, which creates a chemical barrier to waste release for certain key radionuclides, notably Tc-99. Similarly, the concrete shell of an SDF disposal unit (SDU) represents an additional physical and chemical barrier to radionuclide release to the environment. Together the waste form and the SDU compose a robust containment structure at the time of facility closure. However, the physical and chemical state of cementitious materials will evolve over time through a variety of phenomena, leading to degraded barrier performance over Performance Assessment (PA) timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. Previous studies of cementitious material degradation in the context of low-level waste disposal have identified sulfate attack, carbonation influenced steel corrosion, and decalcification (primary constituent leaching) as the primary chemical degradation phenomena of most relevance to SRS exposure conditions. In this study, degradation time scales for each of these three degradation phenomena are estimated for saltstone and concrete associated with each SDU type under conservative, nominal, and best estimate assumptions. The nominal value (NV) is an intermediate result that is more probable than the conservative

  20. IVO develops a new repair technique for underwater sites. Viscous doughlike substance underwater cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingstedt, G.; Leisio, C. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    A viscous sealant is revolutionizing repair of the stone and concrete masonry of underwater dams, bridges and canals. There is now no need for expensive and time-consuming cofferdams, since a diver can extrude quick-setting mortar into underwater structures needing repair. This technique has worked well in recent years in various parts of Finland even in strongly flowing water. IVO experts are now starting to look more beyond the borders of Finland

  1. Monitoring of self-healing phenomena towards enhanced sustainability of historic mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, M.; Karatasios, I.; Maravelaki, P.; Kilikoglou, V.

    2016-05-01

    Mortars are known for their ability to heal their defects in an autogenic way. This phenomenon is expressed by the filling of microcracks by secondary products, restoring or enhancing the material's performance. Parameterization of self-healing phenomenon could be a key factor for the enhanced sustainability of these materials in terms of reduced repair cost and consumption of natural raw materials and thus reduced environmental fingerprint. The fact that this phenomenon takes place autogenously suggests that the material can self-repair its defects, without external intervention, thus leading to a prolonged life cycle. In the present study, the autogenic self-healing phenomenon was studied in natural hydraulic lime mortars, considering aspects of curing time before initial cracking, duration and conditions of the healing period. Furthermore, strength recovery due to autogenic self-healing was measured under high humidity conditions, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (DTA/TG) was performed in all specimens in order to quantitatively assess the available unreacted components in the binder at all ages. Regarding the microstructure of the healing phases, the main products formed during healing consist of calcite and various C-S-H/C-A-H phases. Depending on the parameters mentioned above, there is a wide diversity in the intensity, typology and topography of the secondary phases inside the cracks. The main differences discussed were observed between specimens cracked at very early age and those damaged after 30 days of curing. Similarly, the mechanical properties of the crack-healed specimens were associated with the above findings and especially with the available each-time amount of lime, determined by thermo-gravimetric analysis.

  2. Development of Ecoefficient Engineered Cementitious Composites Using Supplementary Cementitious Materials as a Binder and Bottom Ash Aggregate as Fine Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wook Bang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop ecoefficient engineered cementitious composites (ECC using supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs, including fly ash (FA and blast furnace slag (SL as a binder material. The cement content of the ECC mixtures was replaced by FA and SL with a replacement rate of 25%. In addition, the fine aggregate of the ECC was replaced by bottom ash aggregate (BA with a substitution rate of 10%, 20%, and 30%. The influences of ecofriendly aggregates on fresh concrete properties and on mechanical properties were experimentally investigated. The test results revealed that the substitution of SCMs has an advantageous effect on fresh concrete’s properties; however, the increased water absorption and the irregular shape of the BA can potentially affect the fresh concrete’s properties. The substitution of FA and SL in ECC led to an increase in frictional bond at the interface between PVA fibers and matrix, improved the fiber dispersion, and showed a tensile strain capacity ranging from 3.3% to 3.5%. It is suggested that the combination of SCMs (12.5% FA and 12.5% SL and the BA aggregate with the substitution rate of 10% can be effectively used in ECC preparation.

  3. Neutron Radiography Based Visualization and Profiling of Water Uptake in (Uncracked and Autonomously Healed Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Van den Heede

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Given their low tensile strength, cement-based materials are very susceptible to cracking. These cracks serve as preferential pathways for corrosion inducing substances. For large concrete infrastructure works, currently available time-consuming manual repair techniques are not always an option. Often, one simply cannot reach the damaged areas and when making those areas accessible anyway (e.g., by redirecting traffic, the economic impacts involved would be enormous. Under those circumstances, it might be useful to have concrete with an embedded autonomous healing mechanism. In this paper, the effectiveness of incorporating encapsulated high and low viscosity polyurethane-based healing agents to ensure (multiple crack healing has been investigated by means of capillary absorption tests on mortar while monitoring the time-dependent water ingress with neutron radiography. Overall visual interpretation and water front/sample cross-section area ratios as well as water profiles representing the area around the crack and their integrals do not show a preference for the high or low viscosity healing agent. Another observation is that in presence of two cracks, only one is properly healed, especially when using the latter healing agent. Exposure to water immediately after release of the healing agent stimulates the foaming reaction of the polyurethane and ensures a better crack closure.

  4. Properties of microcement mortar with nano particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimeneti, Narasimha Reddy

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Carbon nanofibers (CNF) are one of the toughest and stiffest materials in the world presently with extreme properties yet to be discovered in terms of elastic modulus and tensile strength. Due to the advanced properties of these materials they are being used in almost all fields of science at nanolevel and are being used in construction industry recently for improvement of material properties. Microcement is fine ground cement which as half the particle size of ordinary Portland cement. In this research the behavior of cement mortar of micro cement with the addition of nanoparticles is studied. Due to high aspect ratio and strong van der Waal forces between the particles of CNT and CNF, they agglomerate and form bundles when mixed with water, sonication method is used to mix nanoparticles with few drops of surfactant and super plasticizer. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and flexural strength with CNT and CNF composites are examined and compared with control samples. 0.1% and 0.05 % of nanoparticles (both CNT and CNF) by the weight of cement are used in this research and 0.8% of super plasticizer by weight of cement was also used along with 0.4, 0.45 and 0.50 water cement ratios for making specimens for compression test. The compressive strength results are not satisfactory as there was no constant increase in strength with all the composites, however strength of few nanocomposites increased by a good percentage. 0.5 water cement ratio cement mortar had compressive strength of 7.15 ksi (49.3 MPa), whereas sample with 0.1% CNT showed 8.38 ksi (57.8 MPa) with 17% increase in strength after 28 days. Same trend was followed by 0.4 water cement ratio as the compressive strength of control sample was 8.89 ksi (61.3 MPa), with 0.05% of CNT strength increased to 10.90 ksi (75.2 MPa) with 23% increase in strength. 0.4 water cement ratio was used for flexural tests including 0.1%, 0.05% of CNT and 0.1%, 0.05% of CNF with 0

  5. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  6. Preparation and Thermal Insulation Properties of External Wall Insulation Mortar System Using Solid Waste%基于废弃物利用的自保温墙体配套砂浆制备及性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙林柱; 杨芳; 谢子令; 赵善宇; 徐海珣

    2012-01-01

    采用淤泥陶砂、废弃加气混凝土结合传热系数小的玻化微珠为砂浆骨料,基于“复合化”思想,制备自保温墙体配套砂浆.采用正交实验探讨混掺砂浆的合理配比,控制4项参数:胶凝材料用量、陶砂(或废料)与玻化微珠体积比、硅灰取代量和胶粉掺量,以干容重、抗压强度、导热系数为考核指标,制备综合利废效果最佳的新型混掺复合保温砂浆.结果表明,陶砂玻化微珠复合砂浆导热系数0.16~0.29 W/(m·K),随着陶玻比增大而增大,因此陶砂体积含量增加有利于提高保温性能,加气废料玻化微珠复合砂浆的导热系数0.10~1.14 W/(m·K),与陶砂复合保温砂浆相比,有较大的降低.%Combining with vitrified micro bubbles(VB) , sludge ceramic sand(SC) and abandon aerated concrete(AC) were chosen in the paper as aggregate. Together with cementitious materials, novel external wall insulation mortar was prepared. Based on orthogonal method, the experiment was designed with four parameters: cementing materials dosage, SC/VB or AC/VB ratio, silica fume replacement ratio and rubber replacement ratio, and three key performance indicators: dry bulk density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity were test to check the performance of mortar samples. After synthetical design of the test, hybrid insulation mortar with optimal parameters and performances were produced, the thermal conductivity of sludge ceramic sand mortar is 0. 16~0. 29 W/(m · K), and increasing with improvement of the SC/VB ratio, while thermal conductivity of abandon aerated concrete mortar is 0. 10~0. 14 W/(m · K), it is lower than sludge ceramic sand mortar. They are expected to be promising insulation materials for building thermal insulation use.

  7. Considerations about the use of lime-cement mortars for render conservation purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Faria, Joana; Shasavandi, Arman; Jalali, Said

    2011-01-01

    Some investigations about conservation renders points out that Portland cement based mortars should be avoided and should be replaced by lime-pozzolan mortars. However, this type of mortar is still under investigation and the majority of Portuguese construction enterprises operating in the field of building conservation do not possess enough know-how about them. Besides the absolute rejection of the use of Portland cement based mortars even with just a minimum amount appears to be a dogmat...

  8. A fully general and adaptive inverse analysis method for cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Michael S.; Damkilde, Lars; Lövgren, Ingemar

    2016-01-01

    are applied when modeling the fracture mechanisms in cementitious materials, but the vast development of pseudo-strain hardening, fiber reinforced cementitious materials require inverse methods, capable of treating multi-linear σ - w functions. The proposed method is fully general in the sense that it relies......The paper presents an adaptive method for inverse determination of the tensile σ - w relationship, direct tensile strength and Young’s modulus of cementitious materials. The method facilitates an inverse analysis with a multi-linear σ - w function. Usually, simple bi- or tri-linear functions...... number of variables describing the σ - w relationship constitutes the basis for obtaining detailed information of crack propagation in any cementitious material....

  9. Dynamic fracture behaviour in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rena C.; Cifuentes, Héctor; Rivero, Ignacio; Ruiz, Gonzalo; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-08-01

    The object of this work is to simulate the dynamic fracture propagation in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites, in particular, in steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC). Beams loaded in a three-point bend configuration through a drop-weight impact device are considered. A single cohesive crack is assumed to propagate at the middle section; the opening of this crack is governed by a rate-dependent cohesive law; the fibres around the fracture plane are explicitly represented through truss elements. The fibre pull-out behaviour is depicted by an equivalent constitutive law, which is obtained from an analytical load-slip curve. The obtained load-displacement curves and crack propagation velocities are compared with their experimental counterparts. The good agreement with experimental data testifies to the feasibility of the proposed methodology and paves the way to its application in a multi-scale framework.

  10. Talc-based cementitious products: Effect of talc calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J. Ngally Sabouang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the use of calcined talc for cementitious products making. The calcination is used to enhance the availability of magnesium from talc to react with phosphate for cement phase formation. It is shown that previous calcination of talc leads to products having enhanced mechanical performance due to the formation of more cement phase than in products based on raw talc. Talc fired at 900 °C was found to be the one in which magnesium release was maximal. Firing at temperature higher than 900 °C leads to the stabilization of enstatite, which decreased the magnesium availability. The cement phase is struvite, which was better detected on the X-ray patterns of the products involving fired talc. All the products have very rapid setting time and low shrinkage.

  11. Cementitious Stabilization of Mixed Wastes with High Salt Loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Burgess, M.W.; Fedorov, V.V.; Downing, D.J.

    1999-04-01

    Salt loadings approaching 50 wt % were tolerated in cementitious waste forms that still met leach and strength criteria, addressing a Technology Deficiency of low salt loadings previously identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area. A statistical design quantified the effect of different stabilizing ingredients and salt loading on performance at lower loadings, allowing selection of the more effective ingredients for studying the higher salt loadings. In general, the final waste form needed to consist of 25 wt % of the dry stabilizing ingredients to meet the criteria used and 25 wt % water to form a workable paste, leaving 50 wt % for waste solids. The salt loading depends on the salt content of the waste solids but could be as high as 50 wt % if all the waste solids are salt.

  12. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES FOR ROUGHNESS AND TORTUOSITY IN CEMENTITIOUS COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet Stroeven

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Relatively weak interfaces between aggregate grains and the cementitious matrix initiate the damage evolution process leading to fracture. Coalescence between nearby interface cracks is promoted by the small nearest neighbour distances in a dense random packing of the aggregate. The fracture surface is therefore modelled as a dividing plane from which particles protrude. Assuming spherical aggregate, roughness is obtained as the global geometrical-statistical expression for the increase in fracture surface area due to a multitude of dome-like caps of various sizes. Transport phenomena in concrete are equally influenced by the aggregate, because traversing water-born molecules or ions have to go around the dense grains. This route is additionally promoted by the relatively high porosity in the interfacial transition zone. The planar and linear concepts of tortuosity in the transport path are analogous to those of roughness.

  13. Cementitious composite materials with improved self-healing potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia BAERA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement-based composites have proved, over the time, certain abilities of self-healing the damages (cracks and especially microcracs that occur within their structure. Depending on the level of damage and of the composite type in which this occurs, the self - healing process (SH can range from crack closing or crack sealing to the stage of partial or even complete recovery of material physical - mechanical properties. The aim of this paper is to present the general concept of Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECCs with their unique properties including their self-healing (SH capacity, as an innovative direction for a global sustainable infrastructure. The experimental steps initiated for the development in Romania of this unique category of materials, using materials available on the local market, are also presented.

  14. Shear crack formation and propagation in reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behaviour of beams consisting of steel reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). Based on the strain hardening and multiple cracking behaviour of ECC, this study investigates the extent to which ECC influences the shear...... capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short randomly distributed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber beams with different stirrup arrangements and conventional reinforced concrete (R/C) counterparts for comparison. The shear crack formation mechanism of ECC...... is investigated in detail and can be characterized by an opening and sliding of the crack. Photogrammetry was utilized to monitor the shear deformations of the specimens. Multiple shear cracking and strain hardening of ECC was observed under shear loading and based upon photogrammetric results fundamental...

  15. The newly applied mortars in mosaic restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Moro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available L’intervention de restauration sur la mosaïque de Dionysos à Cologne a permis, dans le cadre du travail de fin d’étude, une recherche sur les problématiques liées au choix du lit de pose des mosaïques detachées et replacées sur de nouveaux supports. Elle a contribué à l’étude des facteurs qui influencent la conservation des mosaïques qui ont précédemment fait l’objet d’interventions de détachement du site originel.The restoration of the Dionysos mosaic in Cologne gave us the opportunity for analysing the process involved in the choice of interstitial mortars in mosaics that were detached from their original site and re-layed on new supports, thus losing their original setting bed. This intervention lead us to investigate the relationships between restoration and a philological perspective and the damages following the stripping of mosaics.

  16. Oyster shell as substitute for aggregate in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyunsuk; Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Kiho; Park, Junboum

    2004-06-01

    Enormous amounts of oyster shell waste have been illegally disposed of at oyster farm sites along the southern coast of Korea. In this study to evaluate the possibility of recycling this waste for use as a construction material, the mechanical characteristics of pulverized oyster shell were investigated in terms of its potential utilization as a substitute for the aggregates used in mortar. The unconfined compressive strengths of various soil mortar specimens, with varying blending ratios of cement, water and oyster shell, were evaluated by performing unconfined compression tests, and the results were compared with the strengths of normal cement mortar made with sand. In addition, the effect of organic chemicals on the hardening of concrete was evaluated by preparing ethyl-benzene-mixed mortar specimens. The long-term strength improvement resulting from the addition of fly ash was also examined by performing unconfined compression tests on specimens with fly-ash content. There was no significant reduction in the compressive strength of the mortars containing small oyster shell particles instead of sand. From these test data, the possible application of oyster shells in construction materials could be verified, and the change in the strength parameters according to the presence of organic compounds was also evaluated.

  17. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  18. The colour potentials of SSA-containing mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Annemette; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie;

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study of aesthetical qualities of mortar containing sewage sludgeash (SSA). SSA is the residue produced at water treatment plants where incineration of the sludge is applied in order to decrease volume and to prevent pathogens from spreading. Today SSA is with a......This paper reports an experimental study of aesthetical qualities of mortar containing sewage sludgeash (SSA). SSA is the residue produced at water treatment plants where incineration of the sludge is applied in order to decrease volume and to prevent pathogens from spreading. Today SSA...... is with a few exceptions landfilled and thus, wasted.The purpose of the experiments was to examine the influence of SSA and how it affected the colour of mortar samples. SSA was ground in 6 different intervals and added to mortar mixes by replacing 20% of the cement. An additional focus was to examine...... the possibilities to accentuate the colours of the hardened mortar by using paper cuttings in the production of the samples. The result of the experiments showed that a colour scale can be developed from ground SSA, and that paper may have the potential of providing divers textural qualities when it is used...

  19. Use of rubble from building demolition in mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, V; Giuggiolini, M; Moriconi, G

    2002-01-01

    Because of increasing waste production and public concerns about the environment, it is desirable to recycle materials from building demolition. If suitably selected, ground, cleaned and sieved in appropriate industrial crushing plants, these materials can be profitably used in concrete. Nevertheless, the presence of masonry instead of concrete rubble is particularly detrimental to the mechanical performance and durability of recycled-aggregate concrete and the same negative effect is detectable when natural sand is replaced by fine recycled aggregate fraction. An alternative use of both masonry rubble and fine recycled material fraction could be in mortars. These could contain either recycled instead of natural sand or powder obtained by bricks crushing as partial cement substitution. In particular, attention is focused on the modification that takes place when either polypropylene or stainless steel fibers are added to these mortars. Polypropylene fibers are added in order to reduce shrinkage of mortars, stainless steel fibers for improving their flexural strength. The combined use of polypropylene fibers and fine recycled material from building demolition could allow the preparation of mortars showing good performance, in particular when coupled with bricks. Furthermore, the combined use of stainless steel fibers and mortars containing brick powder seems to be an effective way to guarantee a high flexural strength.

  20. Mortar radiocarbon dating: preliminary accuracy evaluation of a novel methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Lubritto, Carmine; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Terrasi, Filippo

    2011-03-15

    Mortars represent a class of building and art materials that are widespread at archeological sites from the Neolithic period on. After about 50 years of experimentation, the possibility to evaluate their absolute chronology by means of radiocarbon ((14)C) remains still uncertain. With the use of a simplified mortar production process in the laboratory environment, this study shows the overall feasibility of a novel physical pretreatment for the isolation of the atmospheric (14)CO(2) (i.e., binder) signal absorbed by the mortars during their setting. This methodology is based on the assumption that an ultrasonic attack in liquid phase isolates a suspension of binder carbonates from bulk mortars. Isotopic ((13)C and (14)C), % C, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to characterize the proposed methodology. The applied protocol allows suppression of the fossil carbon (C) contamination originating from the incomplete burning of the limestone during the quick lime production, providing unbiased dating for "laboratory" mortars produced operating at historically adopted burning temperatures.

  1. A multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-02-03

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method for second order elliptic problems. The equations in the coarse elements (or subdomains) are discretized on a fine grid scale by a multipoint flux mixed finite element method that reduces to cell-centered finite differences on irregular grids. The subdomain grids do not have to match across the interfaces. Continuity of flux between coarse elements is imposed via a mortar finite element space on a coarse grid scale. With an appropriate choice of polynomial degree of the mortar space, we derive optimal order convergence on the fine scale for both the multiscale pressure and velocity, as well as the coarse scale mortar pressure. Some superconvergence results are also derived. The algebraic system is reduced via a non-overlapping domain decomposition to a coarse scale mortar interface problem that is solved using a multiscale flux basis. Numerical experiments are presented to confirm the theory and illustrate the efficiency and flexibility of the method. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  2. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder and the second one is to attach ...

  3. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadif, A; Hunkeler, D; Käuper, P

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocell, Alcell and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin.

  4. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadif, A.; Hunkeler, D.; Kauper, P. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Chimie

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocells, Aicello and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin. (author)

  5. Evaluation of natural colonisation of cementitious materials: Effect of bioreceptivity and environmental conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Manso Blanco, Sandra; Calvo-Torrás, María Angeles; De Belie, Nele; Segura Pérez, Ignacio; Aguado de Cea, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of living organisms, such as photosynthetic organisms, on the structure envelope has become a priority in the area of architecture and construction due to aesthetical, economic and ecological advantages. Important research efforts are made to achieve further improvements, such as for the development of cementitious materials with an enhanced bioreceptivity to stimulate biological growth. Previously, the study of the bioreceptivity of cementitious materials has been carried out m...

  6. Predicting the Probability of Failure of Cementitious Sewer Pipes Using Stochastic Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Alani, Amir M.; Asaad Faramarzi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a stochastic finite element method (SFEM) is employed to investigate the probability of failure of cementitious buried sewer pipes subjected to combined effect of corrosion and stresses. A non-linear time-dependant model is used to determine the extent of concrete corrosion. Using the SFEM, the effects of different random variables, including loads, pipe material, and corrosion on the remaining safe life of the cementitious sewer pipes are explored. A numerical example is prese...

  7. Water extraction out of mortar during brick laying. An NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The water extraction out of mortar during brick laying was studied by nuclear magnetic resonance. The water extraction is an important parameter that determines, e.g., the stiffness of the mortar due to compaction of the cement particles and the bond strength of the cured-mortar interfaces but allo

  8. Self healing phenomena in concretes and masonry mortars: A microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Lubelli, B.A.; Rooij, M.R. de

    2007-01-01

    A microscopic survey of over 1000 of samples of concrete and masonry mortars from structures in the Netherlands shows that, in practice, self healing occurs in historic lime and lime – puzzolana mortars, in contrast to modern cement bound concretes and mortars. Self healing may be effected by the fo

  9. Study on utilization of industrial waste residue for production of microporous cementitious materials%利用工业废渣生产多微孔胶凝材料的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周君生; 徐伟; 陈益兰; 潘荣伟

    2012-01-01

    A new inorganic cementitious material with microporous structure was prepared by single low-temperature sintering process with fly ash,carbide slag,and desulfurization gypsum as raw materials and with adding a small amount of mineralizer,adhesive agent,and pore-forming agent and the material's performances were also studied.Taking the optimized formula and under the conditions of pre-heat temperature 400 ℃, roasting temperature 1 220 ℃, and holding time 25 min, water absorption, apparent density, and 3 d compressive strength of the prepared microporous cementitious material were 2.10% ,1.32 g/cm3,and 8.56 MPa,respectively.XRD analysis showed the main phases of synthesized material were calcium silicate and gehlenite.Using industrial waste slag as raw material as well as the combination of porosity and cementitious character made the microporous cementitious material can partially replace cement and lightweight aggregates (haydite) to prepare insulating mortar so that the purpose of environmental protection and energy saving could be realized.%以粉煤灰、电石渣和脱硫石膏为主要原料,掺加少量矿化剂、黏结剂和造孔剂,采用一次低温烧成工艺,制备出具有多微孔结构的新型无机胶凝材料,并对产品性能进行了研究.采用优化配方,在预热温度为400℃、焙烧温度为1 220℃、保温时间为25 min条件下制备的多微孔胶凝材料,其吸水率为2.10%、表观密度为1.32 g/cm3,3d抗压强度为8.56 MPa.通过XRD分析可知,合成材料的主要矿物相为硅酸钙和钙铝黄长石.材料采用工业废渣制备,集多孔性和胶凝性,可部分代替水泥和陶粒制成保温砂浆,达到环保节能的目的.

  10. Potential of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Composites as Concrete Repair Material

    OpenAIRE

    Tanvir Manzur; Nur Yazdani; Md. Abul Bashar Emon

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a virtually ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. It is evident from contemporary research that utilization of CNT in producing new cement-based composite materials has a great potential. Consequently, possible practical application of CNT reinforced cementitious composites has immense prospect in the field of applied nanotechnology within construction industry. Several repair, retrofit, and strengthening techniques a...

  11. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure.

  12. Properties of Cement Mortar with Phosphogpysum under Steam Curing Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoungju Mun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to utilize waste PG as an admixture for concrete products cured by steam. For the study, waste PG was classified into 4 forms (dehydrate, β-hemihydrate, III-anhydrite, and II-anhydrite, which were calcined at various temperatures. Also, various admixtures were prepared with PG, fly-ash (FA, and granulated blast-furnace slag (BFS. The basic properties of cement mortars containing these admixtures were analyzed and examined through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, compressive strength, and acid corrosion resistance. According to the results, cement mortars made with III-anhydrite of waste PG and BFS exhibited strength similar to that of cement mortars made with II-anhydrite. Therefore, III-anhydrite PG calcined at lower temperature can be used as a steam curing admixture for concrete second production.

  13. Effects of moisture on ultrasound propagation in cement mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Taeho; Li, Shuaili; Achenbach, Jan; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    In concrete structures, moisture is often a major cause of chemically related degradations such as alkaline-silica reaction. To develop ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques for monitoring such chemical degradations, it is necessary to understand how moisture affects the propagation of ultrasound in concrete. To this end, the objective of this paper is to experimentally determine the correlation between the moisture content in cement mortar and ultrasonic wave propagation. Specifically, effects of moisture on the ultrasonic phase velocity and attenuation are examined. It is found that, for the cement mortar samples considered in this study, moisture has negligible effect on the ultrasonic phase velocity. However, moisture can significantly increase the attenuation of ultrasound in cement mortar even in the sub-MHz frequency range.

  14. Concentration Boundary Layer Model of Mortar Corrosion by Sulfuric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhigang; ZHANG Xuesong; MIN Hongguang

    2011-01-01

    A long time immersion experiment of mortar specimens is carried out to investigate their degradation mechanism by sulfuric acid. Water-cement ratios of mortar are ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and the pH value of sulfuric acid is 3.5 and 4.0 respectively. The pH meter is used to monitor the soak solution and the titration sulfuric acid with given concentration is added to maintain original pH value, through which the acid consumption of mortar is recorded. A theoretical reaction rate model is also proposed based on concentration boundary layer model. The results show that theoretical model fits the experimental results well and the corrosion mechanism can be modeled by a diffusion process accompanied with an irreversible chemical reaction when pH value of soak solution is no less than 3.5.

  15. Estimation of masonry mortars strength during stone buildings investigation (rus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derkach V.N.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article the analysis of estimation methods of the masonry mortars strength applied in Russia and other countries during stone buildings and constructions investigation was carried out. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are considered.The new technique of masonry mortars strength estimation is offered. It is based on trials of bored from a masonry body cylindrical samples. It is pointed, that this method is the most universal and informative from all methods considered in this article. The offered testing procedure allows to gain not only a compression strength, but also a shearing strength along horizontal masonry seams. Results of experimental researches of masonry mortars compression strength executed on various techniques are presented.

  16. Use of red mud as addition for portland cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present research work was to investigate the possibility of adding red mud, an alkaline leaching waste that is obtained from bauxite during the Bayer process for alumina production, in the raw meal of Portland cement mortars. The red mud is classified as dangerous, according to NBR 10004/2004, and world while generation reached over 117 million tons/year. This huge production requires high consuming products to be used as incorporation matrix and we studied the influence of red mud addition on the characteristics of cement mortars and concrete. In this paper the properties of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of red mud was evaluated: pH variation, fresh (setting time, workability or normal consistency and water retention), and hardened state (mechanical strength, capillary water absorption, density and apparent porosity). Results seem promising for red mud additions up to 20 wt%. (author)

  17. Thermal conductivity of foam mortar; Waermeleitfaehigkeit von Porenbeton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippe, K.F.; Schwab, H. [Ytong AG, Entwicklungszentrum Schrobenhausen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Foam mortar in its present-day form was developed during the 20s in Sweden. It consists of porosified calcium silicate hydrates. Porosification is achieved by adding aluminium powder. Optimization of the micro and macro structure of foam mortar resulted in a construction material of low apparent density, high consistency and dimension stability as well as low thermal conductivity. Foam mortar has the lowest thermal conductivity of all massive wall construction materials. (orig.) [German] Porenbeton in der heutigen Form wurde in den 20iger Jahren in Schweden entwickelt. Er besteht aus porosierten Calciumsilicathydraten. Die Porosierung erfolgt durch Zusatz von Aluminiumpulver. Durch die Optimierung der Mikro- und Makrostruktur des Porenbetons, ist ein Baustoff mit niedriger Rohdichte, hoher Festigkeit und Dimensionsstabilitaet sowie niedriger Waermeleitfaehigkeit entstanden. Porenbeton ist der wandbildende Massivbaustoff mit der niedrigsten Waermeleitfaehigkeit. (orig.)

  18. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  19. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure.

  20. Application of micromechanics to the characterization of mortar by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M G; Anaya, J J; Izquierdo, M A G; Ullate, L G

    2002-05-01

    Mechanical properties of concrete and mortar structures can be estimated by ultrasonic non-destructive testing. When the ultrasonic velocity is known, there are standardized methods based on considering the concrete a homogeneous material. Cement composites, however, are heterogeneous and porous, and have a negative effect on the mechanical properties of structures. This work studies the impact of porosity on mechanical properties by considering concrete a multiphase material. A micromechanical model is applied in which the material is considered to consist of two phases: a solid matrix and pores. From this method, a set of expressions is obtained that relates the acoustic velocity and Young's modulus of mortar. Experimental work is based on non-destructive and destructive procedures over mortar samples whose porosity is varied. A comparison is drawn between micromechanical and standard methods, showing positive results for the method here proposed.

  1. Characteristics of Bamboo Leaf Ash Blended Cement Paste and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umoh A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of bamboo leaf ash as cement supplement can contribute to reduction in cost and environmental hazard associated with cement production as well as waste pollution caused by the littered bamboo leaves. Therefore, the characteristics of cement paste and mortar incorporating bamboo leaf ash were investigated. The results of the physical properties of the pastes were within the requirements stipulated by relevant standards while that of the mortar cubes indicated that the compressive strength generally increased with curing age, and that the mix containing 15% Bamboo Leaf Ash (BLA by mass competes favorably with that of the reference mix at 28days and above. The water absorption and apparent porosity were observed to increase with increase in BLA content, while the bulk density decreases as the percentage of BLA increases from 5% to 25% by mass. The study concluded that 15% BLA replacing cement is adequate for the production of masonry mortar.

  2. THE MORTAR ELEMENT METHOD FOR A NONLINEAR BIHARMONIC EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-ci Shi; Xue-jun Xu

    2005-01-01

    The mortar element method is a new domain decomposition method(DDM) with nonoverlapping subdomains. It can handle the situation where the mesh on different subdomains need not align across interfaces, and the matching of discretizations on adjacent subdomains is only enforced weakly. But until now there has been very little work for nonlinear PDEs. In this paper, we will present a mortar-type Morley element method for a nonlinear biharmonic equation which is related to the well-known Navier-Stokes equation. Optimal energy and H1-norm estimates are obtained under a reasonable elliptic regularity assumption.

  3. Various mortars for anti-fouling purposes in marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tomoka [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Miura, Yoko; Kuroda, Daisuke [Department of General Education, The Company, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Hirai, Nobumitsu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Suzuka National College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, Mie 510-0294 (Japan); Yokoyama, Seiji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibarigaoka, Tenpaku, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    The antifouling properties for some mortars with steel making slags were investigated by real marine immersion tests and a unique laboratory acceleration tests with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactors. Mortars mixed with steel making slags containing abundant iron elements tended to form biofilm and also bifouling. The two kinds of biofilm formation tests were used in this study. Real immersion in marine environments and laboratory test with a specially devised biofilm acceleration reactor. The former evaluated the biofouling characteristics more properly, while the latter did the biofilm formation characteristics more effectively.

  4. Traditional methods of mortar preparation: the hot lime mix

    OpenAIRE

    Margalha, Goreti; Veiga, Rosário; Santos Silva, António; Brito, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of maturation on mortars prepared according to a traditional method of slaking quicklime mixed with sand and kept wet until used (hot lime mix). Two lime/aggregate weight proportions were considered, a rich one (1:5) and a normal one (1:13). The quicklime was used as pieces of crushed calcined limestone and as micronized quicklime, both from industrial production. The mortars prepared with hot lime were kept wet for periods of 1, 7, 45 and 90 days, before mouldin...

  5. Effect of Binder’s Type on Physico-Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Mortars with a Basis of Coir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanas Konin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to study the effect of type of binder on properties of mortars with coir. Two types of binders were used for the manufacturing of mortars containing coir: lime is used as binder for mortar nº1 (Mortar 1 and cement is used for mortar nº2 (Mortar 2. The measurements of the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the specimens show that Mortar 1 has higher water absorption values than those of Mortar 2 and consequently has the lowest values of thermal conductivity. The results also indicate that dry density of the specimens has more important role than the type of binder on mechanical properties. Relationships were established between mechanical properties and dry density of these mortars. These relationships are independent to the type of binder. The mortars also satisfied most recommended thermal insulation standards.

  6. REVIEW OF MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING AND MODELING AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS METHODS FOR PREDICTING CEMENTITIOUS BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Kosson, D.

    2009-11-30

    Cementitious barriers for nuclear applications are one of the primary controls for preventing or limiting radionuclide release into the environment. At the present time, performance and risk assessments do not fully incorporate the effectiveness of engineered barriers because the processes that influence performance are coupled and complicated. Better understanding the behavior of cementitious barriers is necessary to evaluate and improve the design of materials and structures used for radioactive waste containment, life extension of current nuclear facilities, and design of future nuclear facilities, including those needed for nuclear fuel storage and processing, nuclear power production and waste management. The focus of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) literature review is to document the current level of knowledge with respect to: (1) mechanisms and processes that directly influence the performance of cementitious materials (2) methodologies for modeling the performance of these mechanisms and processes and (3) approaches to addressing and quantifying uncertainties associated with performance predictions. This will serve as an important reference document for the professional community responsible for the design and performance assessment of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This review also provides a multi-disciplinary foundation for identification, research, development and demonstration of improvements in conceptual understanding, measurements and performance modeling that would be lead to significant reductions in the uncertainties and improved confidence in the estimating the long-term performance of cementitious materials in nuclear applications. This report identifies: (1) technology gaps that may be filled by the CBP project and also (2) information and computational methods that are in currently being applied in related fields but have not yet been incorporated into performance assessments of cementitious barriers. The various

  7. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  8. 研磨对生物质灰粒度和胶凝活性的影响%Effect of Milling on Fineness and Cementitious Activity of Biomass Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 薛永杰; 石占斌

    2014-01-01

    首先通过机械研磨方式对生物质电厂焚烧飞灰(以下简称生物质灰)进行改性;其次研究了不同生物质灰的化学成分、微观形貌、粒度分布特性,开展了不同掺量替代水泥胶砂强度试验,最后考察了生物质灰的潜在胶凝活性.结果表明,研磨处理明显改善了生物质灰的粒度分布及微观形态;宏观上反应为高硅型生物质灰用于水泥掺合料表现出了较高的火山灰活性.经过研磨处理的低硅灰在胶砂试件中等量替代水平下,改性低硅型生物质灰与Ⅱ级粉煤灰强度贡献水平相当,粒度分布、SEM图像观察结果与其胶砂试件的强度发展规律基本一致.就强度试验结果而言,高硅型和低硅型生物质灰分别可替代SF85微硅粉、Ⅱ级粉煤灰在水泥制品中得到应用.%The biomass power plant fly ash (mark as biomass ash) was modified by mechanical milling method.The chemical compositions,microstructure and particle size distribution of different biomass ashes were studied.Cement mortar tests adding different biomass contents were conducted to evaluate the potential cementitious activity.The experimental results showed that the milling treatment obviously influenced the particle size distribution and microstructure of biomass ash; the high-silica type biomass ash showed the better pozzolanic activity in cement mortar.After being milled,the low-silica type biomass ash showed the comparable strength contribution level to the grade Ⅱ coal fly ash in cement mortar.The particle size distribution and microstructure from SEM analysis were coincident to strength development rules in the all cement mortar samples.The strength test results also stated clearly that high-silica type and low-silica type biomass ash could be used to replace SF85 grade micro silica powder and grade Ⅱ coal fly ash in cement product system respectively.

  9. Building a Better Clicks-and-Mortar Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesey, Ken

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important roles for school libraries in the digital age is to provide students with a context for processing Internet information. It has been suggested that the school library should strive for a more pronounced clicks-and-mortar identity combining the best of the web and the traditional library collection.

  10. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  11. Chloride ion transport performance in slag mortar under fatigue loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG CaiHui; SUN Wei; JIANG JinYang; HAN JianDe; YE BangTu

    2012-01-01

    The transport performance of chloride ion in slag cement mortar was investigated experimentally.In the self-designed experiment,fatigue loading was coupled simultaneously with ion transportation process,the diffusion law of chloride ion was obtained by titration and the AE (acoustic emission) technique was employed to detect the real-time damage distribution in the mortar specimen.The results for fatigue stress levels of 0.3,0.4 and 0.5 and slag contents of 0,10%,30% and 50% showed that fatigue loading accelerated the diffusion of chloride ion in mortar and the acceleration effect increased with the increase in stress levels.Slag addition was found to improve anti-chloride ion erosion performance effectively with the best substitution level at 30%,because the inhibition effect of slag on chloride ion diffusion diminished when the slag content exceeded 30%.The comparative experiments indicated that dynamic load has a significant effect on the transport performance of chloride ion in slag cement mortar.

  12. Mortar and concrete based on calcium sulphate binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.J.F.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this study both hemi-hydrate and anhydrite are tested as calcium sulphate binders for structural mortar and concrete. The advantage of using calcium sulphates instead of cement as a binder is the fact that the production of calcium sulphate is more environmental friendly than that of cement. For

  13. Simulation of self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2011-01-01

    In the present research a test procedure was set up to reproduce self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens in laboratory. After few months testing, during which the specimens were subjected to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared an

  14. Characterization and Degradation of Masonry Mortar in Historic Brick Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis A. Brosnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized mortars from a masonry fortification in Charleston, South Carolina (USA, harbor where construction was during the period 1839–1860. This location for analysis was interesting because of the sea water impingement on the structure. The study was included as part of an overall structural assessment with restoration as an objective. The mortars were found to be cement, lime, and sand mixtures in proportions similar to ones expected from the historic literature, that is, one part binder to two parts of sand. The binder was found to be American natural cement, a substance analogous to the European Roman cement. The results suggest that the thermal history of the cement during manufacturing affected setting rate explaining why the cements were considered as variable during the mid-to-late 1800s. Fine pores were found in mortars exposed to sea water resulting from corrosion. Contemporary natural cement was shown to release calcium in aqueous solution. While this release of calcium is necessary for setting in natural and Portland cements, excessive calcium solution, as exacerbated by sea water contact and repointing with Portland cement mortars, was shown to result in brick scaling or decay through cryptoflorescence.

  15. Simulation of the self-healing of dolomitic lime mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    A test procedure was set up to reproduce laboratory self-healing on lime-based (both pure calcium and magnesium-calcium) mortar specimens. After a few months of testing, during which time the specimens were submitted to wet-dry cycles, thin sections of the specimens were prepared and observed using

  16. Do Schools Still Need Brick-and-Mortar Libraries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug; Mastrion, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Do all schools need brick-and-mortar libraries? In this article, Johnson and Mastrion share their contradictory thoughts to the question. Johnson says some schools don't need library facilities or programs or librarians. These schools' teachers and administrators: (1) feel no need for a collaborative learning space; (2) feel the ability to process…

  17. MULTIGRID FOR THE MORTAR FINITE ELEMENT FOR PARABOLIC PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-jun Xu; Jin-ru Chen

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a mortar finite element method for parabolic problem is presented. Multigrid method is used for solving the resulting discrete system. It is shown that the multigrid method is optimal, I.e, the convergence rate is independent of the mesh size L and the time step parameter т.

  18. Salt-resistant mortars: present knowledge and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Salt crystallization damage is one of the most common causes of decay for bedding, pointing and plastering mortar. Attempts to tackle the problem showed to often a limited durability to salt decay and a low compatibility with historical buildings. Recent research has shown new possibilities for impr

  19. Low Carbon Footprint Mortar from Pozzolanic Waste Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Mehmannavaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Portland cement clinker leads to emission of CO2 into the atmosphere and therefore causes greenhouse effect. Incorporating of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA and Pulverized Fuel Ash (PFA as partial cement replacement materials into mix of low carbon mortar decreases the amount of cement use and reduces high dependence on cements compared to ordinary mortar. The result of this research supported use of the new concept in preparing low carbon mortar for industrial constructions. Strength of low carbon mortar with POFA and PFA replacement in cement was affected and changed by replacing percent finesse, physical and chemical properties and pozzolanic activity of these wastes. Waste material replacement instead of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC was used in this study. This in turn was useful for promoting better quality of construction and innovative systems in construction industry, especially in Malaysia. This study was surely a step forward to achieving quality products which were affordable, durable and environmentally friendly. Disposing ash contributes to shortage of landfill space in Malaysia. Besides, hazard of ash might be another serious issue for human health. The ash disposal area also might create a new problem, which is the area's sedimentation and erosion.

  20. Modeling the thermal characteristics of masonry mortar containing recycled materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Morgan Gretchen

    As the building industry in the United States rapidly expands, the reuse of recycled demolition waste aggregates is becoming increasingly more important. Currently, the building industry is the largest consumer of natural resources. The constant use of raw virgin aggregate is resulting in depleting resources, lack of space for landfills, increasing costs, and heightened levels of pollution. The use of these recycled aggregates in building envelopes and the study of thermal properties are becoming a popular area of research in order to improve building energy usage. The construction of Zero Energy Buildings (ZEB) is encouraged by the United States government as a result of the unresolved finite resources and environmental pollution. The focus of this research is on the impact of using recycled demolition waste aggregates on thermal properties, including specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity, in masonry mortar applications. The new forms of aggregate were analyzed for efficiency and practical utilization in construction in seven locations across the United States by embedding the new material into the building envelope of a strip mall mercantile build model from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program (BESP). It was determined that the recycled aggregate mortar mixtures performed as well as or better than the traditional mortar mix. Opportunities for future research in recycled aggregate mortar mixtures exist in a regional analysis, a regional recycled aggregate cost analysis, and a life cycled cost analysis (LCCA).

  1. Alkali-activated cementitious materials: Mechanisms, microstructure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weimin

    The goal of this study was to examine the activation reaction, microstructure, properties, identify the mechanisms of activation, and achieve an enhanced understanding of activation processes occurring during the synthesis of alkali activated cementitious materials (AAC). The discussions classify the following categories. (1) alkali activated slag cement; (2) alkali activated portland-slag cement; (3) alkali activated fly ash-slag cement; (4) alkali activated pozzolana-lime cement; (5) alkali activated pozzolana cement. The activators involved are NaOH, KOH; Nasb2SOsb4;\\ Nasb2COsb3;\\ CaSOsb4, and soluble silicate of sodium and potassium. The effect of alkali activation on the microstructure of these materials were analyzed at the micro-nanometer scale by SEM, EDS, ESEM, and TEM. Also sp{29}Si and sp{27}Al MAS-NMR, IR, Raman, TGA, and DTA were performed to characterize the phase in these systems. Slag, fly ash, silica fume, as well as blended cements containing mixtures of these and other components were characterized. A set of ordinary portland cement paste samples served as a control. This study confirmed that AAC materials have great potential because they could generate very early high strength, greater durability and high performance. Among the benefits to be derived from this research is a better understanding of the factors that control concrete properties when using AAC materials, and by controlling the chemistry and processing to produce desired microstructures and properties, as well as their durability.

  2. Chemical modeling of cementitious grout materials alteration in HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on an investigation initiated into the nature of the chemical alteration of cementitious grout in HLW repository seals, and the implications for long-term seal performance. The equilibrium chemical reaction of two simplified portland cement-based grout models with natural Canadian Shield groundwater compositions was modeled with the computer codes PHREEQE and EQ3NR/EQ6. Increases in porosity and permeability of the grout resulting from dissolution of grout phases and precipitation of secondary phases were estimated. Two bounding hydrologic scenarios were evaluated, one approximating a high gradient, high flow regime, the other a low-gradient, sluggish flow regime. Seal longevity depends in part upon the amount of groundwater coming into intimate contact with, and dissolving, the grout per unit time. Results of the analyses indicate that, given the assumptions and simplifications inherent in the models, acceptable seal performance (i.e., acceptable increases in hydraulic conductivity of the seals) may be expected for at least thousands of years in the worst cases analyzed, and possibly much longer

  3. Nano-modification to improve the ductility of cementitious composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeşilmen, Seda [Department of Civil Engineering, Çankaya University, Ankara (Turkey); Al-Najjar, Yazin [Department of Civil Engineering, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey); Balav, Mohammad Hatam [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Şahmaran, Mustafa, E-mail: sahmaran@gazi.edu.tr [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Yıldırım, Gürkan [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Lachemi, Mohamed [Department of Civil Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Effect of nano-sized mineral additions on ductility of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) containing high volumes of fly ash was investigated at different hydration degrees. Various properties of ECC mixtures with different mineral additions were compared in terms of microstructural properties of matrix, fiber-matrix interface, and fiber surface to assess improvements in ductility. Microstructural characterization was made by measuring pore size distributions through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Hydration characteristics were assessed using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and fiber-matrix interface and fiber surface characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) through a period of 90 days. Moreover, compressive and flexural strength developments were monitored for the same period. Test results confirmed that mineral additions could significantly improve both flexural strength and ductility of ECC, especially at early ages. Cheaper Nano-CaCO{sub 3} was more effective compared to nano-silica. However, the crystal structure of CaCO{sub 3} played a very important role in the range of expected improvements.

  4. Uniaxial Compressive Properties of Ultra High Toughness Cementitious Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiangrong; XU Shilang

    2011-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were conducted to characterize the main compressive performance of ultra high toughness cementitious composite(UHTCC)in terms of strength and toughness and to obtain its stress-strain relationships.The compressive strength investigated ranges from 30 MPa to 60 MPa.Complete stress-strain curves were directly obtained,and the strength indexes,including uniaxial compressive strength,compressive strain at peak stress,elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio,were calculated.The comparisons between UHTCC and matrix were also carried out to understand the fiber effect on the compressive strength indexes.Three dimensionless toughness indexes were calculated,which either represent its relative improvement in energy absorption capacity because of fiber addition or provide an indication of its behavior relative to a rigid-plastic material.Moreover,two new toughness indexes,which were named as post-crack deformation energy and equivalent compressive strength,were proposed and calculated with the aim at linking up the compressive toughness of UHTCC with the existing design concept of concrete.The failure mode was also given.The study production provides material characteristics for the practical engineering application of UHTCC.

  5. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchek, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.volchek@ec.gc.ca [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Miah, Muhammed Yusuf [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Noakhali Science and Technology University (Bangladesh); Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack [Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0H3 (Canada); Tezel, F. Handan [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar was investigated in a range of temperatures and cesium concentrations. {yields} The pseudo-second order kinetic model produced a good fit with the experimental kinetic data. {yields} Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. {yields} The interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar was dominated by chemical adsorption. - Abstract: The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L{sup -1} and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive {sup 137}Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L{sup -1} while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol{sup -1} suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  6. The adherence in the union stone-mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez García, María Reyes

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Stones placates present a wide of problems that result in the fall of plates. One of the causes is the lack of adherence stone-mortar. We considered a study to determine the adherence between several cement mortars (1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 1:9 and a especial mortar prepared with latex and stones (white granite, pink granites, black granites, white marble and cream limestones. The results obtained suggest that only adequate adherence rates (higher than 3 kgf/cm2 achieved with cement mortar 1:3 and especial mortar. Besides it is observed that in the stones studied there is no relation between adherence and the absorption values.

    Los aplacados de piedra presentan una extensa patología que se traduce en la caída de las placas colocadas. Una de las causas es la falta de adherencia mortero-piedra. El estudio se realiza para determinar la tensión de adherencia entre diversos morteros de cemento (1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 1:9 y otro compuesto por mortero y látex y piedras (granito blanco, granitos rosa, granitos negros, mármol blanco y calizas crema. De los resultados obtenidos se deduce que los únicos morteros que permiten valores de adherencia aceptables (superiores a 3 kp/cm2 son el mortero de cemento 1:3 y el especial. Igualmente se comprueba que, en las piedras estudiadas, no existe relación alguna entre la adherencia y la absorción de agua.

  7. Craniosynostosis repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will be asleep and will not feel pain. Traditional surgery is called open repair. It includes these ... helps keep the swelling down. Talking, singing, playing music, and telling stories may help soothe your child. ...

  8. Inhibition of Cracks on the Surface of Cement Mortar Using Estabragh Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Soleimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of adding Estabragh fibers into the cement composites of mortar on surface cracks and mechanical properties of mortar has been studied at various fiber proportions of 0.25%, 0.5%, and 0.75%. The mortar shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of mortar specimens. Although the Estabragh fibers loss their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, the ability of Estabragh fibers to bridge on the microcracks in the mortar matrix causes a decrease in the number of cracks and in their width on the surface of the mortar samples in comparison with the plain mortar. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and compressive strength, among all fiber proportions, only the specimens with 0.25% of Estabragh fiber performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of mortar. Consequently, by adding 0.25% of Estabragh fibers to the cement mortar, a remarkable inhibition in crack generation on fiber-containing cement composite of mortar is achieved.

  9. Influence of Superplasticizers on Strength and Shrinkage Cracking of Cement Mortar under Drying Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Baoguo; WANG Xin'gang; LI Xiangguo; YANG Lei

    2007-01-01

    The effects of polynaphthalene series superplasticizers(PNS) with a low content of sodium sulfate (H-UNF),with a high content of sodium sulfate(C-UNF) and polycarboxylate type superplasticizer (PC) on strength and shrinkage cracking of cement mortar under drying conditions were investigated by means of multi-channel ellipse ring shrinkage cracking test, free shrinkage and strength test. The general effect of PNS and PC is to increase the initial cracking time of mortars, and decrease the cracking sensitivity of mortars. As for decreasing the cracking sensitivity of mortars, PC>H-UNF>C-UNF. To incorporate superplasticizers is apparently to increase the free shrinkage of mortars when keeping the constant w/b ratio and the content of cement pastes. As for the effect of controlling the volume stability of mortars, PC>C-UNF>H-UNF. Maximum crack width of mortars containing PC is lower, but the development rate of maximum crack width of mortars containing H-UNF is faster in comparison with control mortars. The flexural and compressive strengths of mortars at 28-day increase with increasing superplasticizer dosages under drying conditions. PC was superior to PNS in the aspect of increasing strength.

  10. Influence Of Volcanic Scoria On Mechanical Strength, Chemical Resistance And Drying Shrinkage Of Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Swaidani A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the study, three types of cement have been prepared; one CEM I type (the control sample and two blended cements: CEM II/A-P and CEM II/B-P (EN 197-1, each of them with three replacement levels of volcanic scoria: (10 %, 15 %, 20 % wt. and (25 %, 30 %, 35 % wt., respectively. Strength development of mortars has been investigated at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days curing. Evaluation of chemical resistance of mortars containing scoria-based cements has been investigated through exposure to 5 % sulphate and 5 % sulphuric acid solutions in accordance with ASTM C1012 & ASTM 267, respectively. Drying shrinkage has been evaluated in accordance with ASTM C596. Test results showed that at early ages, the mortars containing CEM II/B-P binders had strengths much lower than that of the control mortar. However, at 90 days curing, the strengths were comparable to the control mortar. In addition, the increase of scoria significantly improved the sulphate resistance of mortars. Further, an increase in scoria addition improved the sulphuric acid resistance of mortar, especially at the early days of exposure. The results of drying shrinkage revealed that the CEM II/B-P mortar bars exhibited a greater contraction when compared to the control mortar, especially at early ages. However, drying shrinkage of mortars was not influenced much at longer times.

  11. Effects of PCA on Sulfate Attack Resistance of Mortar with Low w/c%PCA对低水灰比砂浆抗硫酸盐侵蚀的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡飞龙; 蒋亚清; 顾越; 陈龙

    2013-01-01

    Different kinds of superplasticizers and cement with different content of C3A and CaCO3 and are used as raw materials. The compressive strength and flexural strength of cement mortar with low water-cement ratio are measured. And the influence of acrylic acid-type polycarboxylate admixture ( PCA- Ⅰ ) and maleic acid-type polycarboxylate admixture ( PCA- Ⅱ ) on sulfate resistance of cement mortar under different cementitious content were studied. The results show that optical polycarboxylate admixture should be chosen according to the mineral compostion and the C3A content of cement, thus low water-cement ratio cement mortar with polycarboxylate admixture added in showed better sulfate resistance.%以不同含量C3A和CaCO3的水泥以及不同的高效减水剂为原材料,对低水胶比水泥砂浆在硫酸盐环境下的抗压和抗折抗蚀系数等进行测试,研究了不同水泥成分条件下,丙烯酸类聚羧酸PCA-Ⅰ减水剂和马来酸类聚羧酸PCA-Ⅱ减水剂对低水灰比砂浆抗硫酸盐侵蚀性能的影响.结果表明,根据水泥矿物组成和C3A含量,合理确定聚羧酸减水剂品种,掺聚羧酸减水剂的低水灰比水泥砂浆具有良好的抗硫酸盐侵蚀性能.

  12. A new pozzolan for high performance cementitious materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Gutiérrez, R. M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results on the physical and chemical properties of metakaolinite, MK which is prepared by dehydroxylation of high quality kaolinite. The properties of Portland cement mortars blended with MK additions up to 50% are investigated. These properties are compressive strength, pore size distribution, resistance to the penetration of water and chloride ions and corrosion performance of steels embedded in the mortar. The optimum replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC with MK to obtain high strength concrete is about 20%, but it is possible to use a higher percent in order to achieve the best durability properties and strength similar to the control mixture. There is a significant decrease in average pore size with an increase in MK replacement. Metakaolinite is able to bind chloride ions to produce Friedel's salt (SF, which can be considered as the main cause of the lower chloride penetration in portland cement mortars blended with MK addition. This chemical binding capacity was proved by XRD. In general, the test results indicate that the MK is a highly pozzolanic material and can be used as a supplementary cementing material in order to produce a high-performance concrete especially for use in aggressive environments. Such as, thawing salts and dew of the sea.

    Este artículo reporta los resultados de las propiedades físicas y químicas de un producto denominado metacaolín, MK; que fue preparado a partir del tratamiento térmico controlado de una caolinita de alta pureza. Se discuten las propiedades de morteros de cemento adicionados con MK en porcentajes hasta del 50%. Las propiedades investigadas corresponden a la resistencia a la compresión, la distribución del tamaño de poros, la resistencia a la penetración del agua y los iones cloruro y el comportamiento a la corrosión de barras de acero de refuerzo embebidas en este material. Se concluye que para alcanzar un hormigón de alta resistencia se requiere un

  13. Effect of hybrid fiber reinforcement on the cracking process in fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous use of different types of fibers as reinforcement in cementitious matrix composites is typically motivated by the underlying principle of a multi-scale nature of the cracking processes in fiber reinforced cementitious composites. It has been hypothesized that while undergoing...... tensile deformations in the composite, the fibers with different geometrical and mechanical properties restrain the propagation and further development of cracking at different scales from the micro- to the macro-scale. The optimized design of the fiber reinforcing systems requires the objective...... assessment of the contribution of each type of fiber to the overall tensile response. Possible synergistic effects resulting from particular combinations of fibers need to be clearly identified. In the present study, the evaluation of the response of different fiber reinforced cementitious composite...

  14. Cracks and pores - Their roles in the transmission of water confined in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordallo, H. N.; Aldridge, L. P.; Wuttke, J.; Fernando, K.; Bertram, W. K.; Pardo, L. C.

    2010-10-01

    Cement paste is formed through a process called hydration by combining water with a cementitious material. Concrete, the worlds most versatile and most widely used material, can then be obtained when aggregates (sand, gravel, crushed stone) are added to the paste. The quality of hardened concrete is greatly influenced by the water confined in the cementitious materials and how it is transmitted through cracks and pores. Here we demonstrate that the water transport in cracks and capillary pores of hardened cement pastes can be approximately modeled by simple equations. Our findings highlight the significance of arresting the development of cracks in cementitious materials used in repository barriers. We also show that neutron scattering is an advantageous technique for understanding how water transmission is effected by gel pore structures. Defining measurable differences in gel pores may hold a key to prediction of the reduction of water transport through cement barriers.

  15. Pectus excavatum repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnel chest repair; Chest deformity repair; Sunken chest repair; Cobbler's chest repair; Nuss repair; Ravitch repair ... There are two types of surgery to repair this condition -- open surgery ... surgery is done while the child is in a deep sleep and pain- ...

  16. Evaluation of electric properties of cement mortars containing pozzolans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz, J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the evolution of the microstructure of Portland cement mortar is analyzed, by using electrical impedance measurements. Cement mortars are compared without and with two pozzolanic substitutions: spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC and metakaolin (MK. The measurement method is described and the model for analyzing the electrical impedance spectra is developed. Three electrical parameters are defined: electrical resistivity, capacitance exponent, and capacitive factor. The results show a significant increase in resistivity of the mortars with pozzolans after 7 days of curing, especially in mortars with MK. This increase is correlated with lime-fixing by the pozzolans. The capacitive properties evolve differently at early age, but reach the same values after 148 days. The electrical and mineralogical data show that the evolution of the microstructure in the mortar with MK starts before it does in the mortars with FCC and that the final microstructure becomes different.

    En este trabajo se analiza la microestructura de morteros de cemento Portland, mediante medidas de impedancia eléctrica. Se comparan morteros de cemento sin y con dos sustituciones puzolánicas: residuo de catalizador de craqueo catalítico (FCC y metacaolín (MK. Se describe el método de medida y se desarrolla el modelo de análisis de los espectros de impedancia eléctrica. Se definen tres parámetros eléctricos: resistividad eléctrica, exponente capacitivo, y factor capacitivo. Se observa un aumento importante de la resistividad de los morteros con puzolana a partir de los 7 días de curado, sobre todo en morteros con MK. Este aumento está correlacionado con la fijación de cal de las puzolanas. Las propiedades capacitivas son diferentes a edad temprana, pero se igualan a los 148 días. Los resultados eléctricos y mineralógicos muestran que la evolución microestructural comienza antes en los morteros con MK que con FCC y que la microestructura

  17. SCM Paste Samples Exposed To Aggressive Solutions. Cementitious Barriers Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed by SIMCO Technologies Inc. (SIMCO) as part of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project. The test series followed an experimental program dedicated to the study of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydrated cement pastes exposed to aggressive solutions. In the present study, the scope is extended to hydrated cement pastes incorporating supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) such as fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). Also, the range of aggressive contact solutions was expanded. The experimental program aimed at testing aggressive contact solutions that more closely mimic the chemical composition of saltstone pore solution. Five different solutions, some of which incorporated high levels of carbonate and nitrate, were placed in contact with four different hydrated cement paste mixes. In all solutions, 150 mmol/L of SO42– (14 400 ppm) were present. The solutions included different pH conditions and different sodium content. Two paste mixes were equivalent to Vault 1/4 and Vault 2 concrete mixes used at SRS in storage structures. Two additional paste mixes, cast at the same water-to-cement ratio and using the same cements but without SCMs, were also tested. The damage evolution in samples was monitored using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and mass measurements. After three and twelve months of exposure conditions, samples were taken out of solution containers and analyzed to perform migration tests and porosity measurements. Globally, results were in line with the previous study and confirmed that high pH may limit the formation of some deleterious phases like gypsum. In this case, ettringite may form but is not necessarily associated with damage. However, the high concentration of sodium may be associated with the formation of an AFm-like mineral called U-phase. The most significant evidences of damage were all associated with the Vault 2 paste analog. This

  18. Weathering Effect on 99Tc Leachability from Cementitious Waste Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass transfer of contaminants from the solid phase to the waste form pore water, and subsequently out of the solid waste form, is directly related to the number and size distribution of pores as well as the microstructure of the waste form. Because permeability and porosity are controlled by pore aperture size, pore volume, and pore distribution, it is important to have some indication of how these characteristics change in the waste form during weathering. Knowledge of changes in these key parameters can be used to develop predictive models that estimate diffusivity or permeability of radioactive contaminants can be used to develop predictive models that estimate diffusivity or permeability of radioactive contaminants from waste forms for long-term performance assessment. It is known that dissolution or precipitation of amorphous/crystalline phases within waste forms alters their pore structure and controls the transport of contaminants our of waste forms. One very important precipitate is calcite, which is formed as a result of carbonation reactions in cement and other high-alkalinity waste forms. Enhanced oxidation can also increase Tc leachability from the waste form. To account for these changes, weathering experiments were conducted in advance to increase our understating of the long-term Tc leachability, especially out of the cementitious waste form. Pore structure analysis was characterized using both N2 absorption analysis and XMT techniques, and the results show that cementitious waste form is a relatively highly-porous material compared to other waste forms studied in this task, Detailed characterization of Cast Stone chunks and monolith specimens indicate that carbonation reactions can change the Cast Stone pore structure, which in turn may correlate with Tc leachability. Short carbonation reaction times for the Cast Stone causes pore volume and surface area increases, while the average pore diameter decreases. Based on the changes in pore volumes

  19. Method for characterization of the rate of movement of an oxidation front in cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2016-03-01

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize a redox active transition metal indicator that is present in the cementitious material and exhibits variable solubility depending upon the oxidation state of the indicator. When the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions, the presence or absence of the indicator in the leachate can be utilized to determine the redox condition of and location of the oxidation front in the material that has been subjected to the leaching process.

  20. Homogeneity and Strength of Mortar Joints in Pearl-Chain Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Arvidsson, Michael; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2015-01-01

    The load carrying mortar joints in Pearl-Chain Bridges are cast vertically which means that they have a placing depth of up to 2.40 m. In the present paper, the feasibility of casting 2.40 m high homogeneous vertical mortar joints is examined. Three high-strength, expansive, self-compacting, ready......-to-mix mortar products are tested. To the authors’ knowledge, no previous published work has documented the homogeneity and properties of mortar joints of such a height. Hence, the present study documents a practical test procedure where the homogeneity of three mortar joints measuring 20 x 220 x 2400 mm has...... been tested and compared by measuring compressive strength, variation in rebound value, variation in density, and separation. In addition, the appearance of the surface texture has been visually assessed. The measurements indicate that, for all three mortars tested, it is possible to cast homogeneous 2...

  1. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz, E-mail: mateusz.wyrzykowski@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lodz University of Technology, Department of Building Physics and Building Materials, Lodz (Poland); Trtik, Pavel [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Münch, Beat [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Weiss, Jason [Purdue University, School of Civil Engineering, West Lafayette (United States); Vontobel, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Lura, Pietro [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  2. Utilization of ground waste seashells in cement mortars for masonry and plastering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertwattanaruk, Pusit; Makul, Natt; Siripattarapravat, Chalothorn

    2012-11-30

    In this research, four types of waste seashells, including short-necked clam, green mussel, oyster, and cockle, were investigated experimentally to develop a cement product for masonry and plastering. The parameters studied included water demand, setting time, compressive strength, drying shrinkage and thermal conductivity of the mortars. These properties were compared with those of a control mortar that was made of a conventional Portland cement. The main parameter of this study was the proportion of ground seashells used as cement replacement (5%, 10%, 15%, or 20% by weight). Incorporation of ground seashells resulted in reduced water demand and extended setting times of the mortars, which are advantages for rendering and plastering in hot climates. All mortars containing ground seashells yielded adequate strength, less shrinkage with drying and lower thermal conductivity compared to the conventional cement. The results indicate that ground seashells can be applied as a cement replacement in mortar mixes and may improve the workability of rendering and plastering mortar.

  3. Strength, porosity, and chloride resistance of mortar using the combination of two kinds of pozzolanic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukzon, Sumrerng; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2013-08-01

    This article presents a study on the resistance to chloride penetration, corrosion, porosity, and strength of mortar containing fine fly ash (FA), ground rice husk-bark ash (RB), and ground bagasse ash (BA). Ordinary Portland cement (CT) was blended with a single pozzolan and two pozzolans. Strength, porosity, rapid chloride penetration, immersion, and corrosion tests were performed to characterize the mortar. Test results showed that the use of ternary blends of CT, FA, and RB or BA decreased the porosity of the mortar, as compared with binary blended mortar containing CT and RB or BA. The resistance to chloride penetration of the mortar improved substantially with partial replacement of CT with FA, RB, and BA. The use of ternary blends of CT, FA and RB or BA produced the mortar with good strength and resistance to chloride penetration. The resistance to chloride penetration was higher with an increase in the replacement level due to the reduced calcium hydroxide.

  4. Filler effect of fine particle sand on the compressive strength of mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Tangpagasit, Jatuphon; Songmue, Sawang; Kiattikomol, Kraiwood

    2011-04-01

    The river sand, which is a non-pozzolanic material, was ground into 3 different particle sizes. Portland cement type I was replaced by the ground river sands at 10wt%-40wt% of binder to cast mortar. Compressive strengths of mortar were investigated and the filler effect of different fine particles of sand on the compressive strength of mortar was evaluated. The results show that the compressive strength of mortar contributed from the filler effect of smaller particles is higher than that of the coarser ones. The difference in compressive strength of mortar tends to be greater as the difference in ground river sand fineness increases. The results also suggest that ASTM C618 specification is not practically suitable for specifying pozzolan in concrete since the strength activity index of mortar containing ground river sand (high crystalline phase) with 33.8wt% of particles retained on a 45-μm sieve can pass the strength requirement.

  5. Timing of Getter Material Addition in Cementitious Wasteforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawter, A.; Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental immobilization technology for the Hanford sites's low activity waste (LAW), which contains radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. Cast Stone is made of a dry blend 47% blast furnace slag, 45% fly ash, and 8% ordinary Portland cement, mixed with a low-activity waste (LAW). To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to provide a stable domain for the radionuclides of concern. Previous testing conducted with a variety of getters has identified Tin(II)-Apatite and Silver Exchanged Zeolite as promising candidates for Tc and I, respectively. Investigation into the sequence in which getters are added to Cast Stone was performed following two methods: 1) adding getters to the Cast Stone dry blend, and then mixing with liquid waste, and 2) adding getters to the liquid waste first, followed by addition of the Cast Stone dry blend. Cast Stone monolith samples were prepared with each method and leach tests, following EPA method 1315, were conducted in either distilled water or simulated vadose zone porewater for a period of up to 63 days. The leachate was analyzed for Tc, I, Na, NO3-, NO2- and Cr with ICP-MS, ICP-OES and ion chromatography and the results indicated that the Cast Stone with getter addition in the dry blend mix (method 1) has lower rates of Tc and I leaching. The mechanisms of radionuclide release from the Cast Stone were also investigated with a variety of solid phase characterization techniques of the monoliths before and after leaching, such as XRD, SEM/EDS, TEM/SAED and other spectroscopic techniques.

  6. Mechanisms of cementitious material deterioration in biogas digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegel, C; Bertron, A; Erable, B

    2016-11-15

    Digesters produce biogas from organic wastes through anaerobic digestion processes. These digesters, often made of concrete, suffer severe premature deterioration caused mainly by the presence of fermentative microorganisms producing metabolites that are aggressive towards cementitious materials. To clarify the degradation mechanisms in an anaerobic digestion medium, ordinary Portland cement paste specimens were immersed in the liquid fraction of a running, lab-scale digester for 4weeks. The anaerobic digestion medium was a mixture of a biowaste substrate and sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant used as a source of anaerobic bacteria. The chemical characteristics of the anaerobic digestion liquid phase were monitored over time using a pH metre, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion chromatography (HPIC). An initial critical period of low pH in the bioreactors was observed before the pH stabilized around 8. Acetic, propionic and butyric acids were produced during the digestion with a maximum total organic acid concentration of 50mmolL(-1). The maximum ammonium content of the liquid phase was 40mmolL(-1), which was about seven times the upper limit of the highly aggressive chemical environment class (XA3) as defined by the European standard for the specification of concrete design in chemically aggressive environments (EN 206). The changes in the mineralogical, microstructural and chemical characteristics of the cement pastes exposed to the solid and liquid phase of the digesters were analysed at the end of the immersion period by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron-probe micro-analysis (EPMA). A 700-μm thick altered layer was identified in the cement paste specimens. The main biodeterioration patterns in the bioreactors' solid/liquid phase were calcium leaching and carbonation of the cement matrix.

  7. Mechanisms of cementitious material deterioration in biogas digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegel, C; Bertron, A; Erable, B

    2016-11-15

    Digesters produce biogas from organic wastes through anaerobic digestion processes. These digesters, often made of concrete, suffer severe premature deterioration caused mainly by the presence of fermentative microorganisms producing metabolites that are aggressive towards cementitious materials. To clarify the degradation mechanisms in an anaerobic digestion medium, ordinary Portland cement paste specimens were immersed in the liquid fraction of a running, lab-scale digester for 4weeks. The anaerobic digestion medium was a mixture of a biowaste substrate and sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant used as a source of anaerobic bacteria. The chemical characteristics of the anaerobic digestion liquid phase were monitored over time using a pH metre, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion chromatography (HPIC). An initial critical period of low pH in the bioreactors was observed before the pH stabilized around 8. Acetic, propionic and butyric acids were produced during the digestion with a maximum total organic acid concentration of 50mmolL(-1). The maximum ammonium content of the liquid phase was 40mmolL(-1), which was about seven times the upper limit of the highly aggressive chemical environment class (XA3) as defined by the European standard for the specification of concrete design in chemically aggressive environments (EN 206). The changes in the mineralogical, microstructural and chemical characteristics of the cement pastes exposed to the solid and liquid phase of the digesters were analysed at the end of the immersion period by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron-probe micro-analysis (EPMA). A 700-μm thick altered layer was identified in the cement paste specimens. The main biodeterioration patterns in the bioreactors' solid/liquid phase were calcium leaching and carbonation of the cement matrix. PMID:27432729

  8. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  9. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young's modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs

  10. LONG-TERM TECHNETIUM INTERACTIONS WITH REDUCING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Lilley, M.; Almond, P.; Powell, B.

    2011-03-15

    Technetium is among the key risk drivers at the Saltstone Facility. The way that it is immobilized in this cementitious waste form is by converting its highly mobile Tc(VII) form to a much less mobile Tc(IV) form through reduction by the cement's blast furnace slag. This report includes a review of published data and experimental results dealing with Tc leaching from Portland cement waste forms. The objectives for the literature study were to document previous reports of Tc interactions with slag-containing cementitious materials. The objectives for the laboratory study were to measure Tc-saltstone Kd values under reducing conditions. From the literature it was concluded: (1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that when Tc(IV) in a slag-cement was exposed to an oxidizing environment, it will convert to the more mobile Tc(VII) species within a short time frame, 2.5 years. (2) SRS saltstone will reduce Tc(VII) in the absence of NaS or sodium dithionite in a reducing atmosphere. (3) Only trace concentrations of atmospheric oxygen (30 to 60 ppm O{sub 2}; Eh 120 mV) at the high pH levels of cementitious systems is required to maintain Tc as Tc(VII). (4) Experimental conditions must be responsible for wide variability of measured K{sub d} values, such that they are either very low, {approx}1 mL/g, or they are very high {approx}1000 mL/g, suggesting that Tc(VII) or Tc(IV) dominate the systems. Much of this variability appears to be the result of experimental conditions, especially direct controls of oxygen contact with the sample. (5) A field study conducted at SRS in the 1980s indicated that a slag-saltstone immobilized Tc for 2.5 years. Below background concentrations of Tc leached out of the slag-containing saltstone, whereas Tc leached out of the slag-free saltstone at the rate of nitrate loss. One possible explanation for the immobilization of Tc in this study was that the slag-saltstone maintained reducing conditions within the core of the 55-gallon sample, whereas

  11. Cementitious Grout for Closing SRS High Level Waste Tanks - 12315

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. Ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks will also be filled to the extent practical. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and to be chemically reducing with a reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400. Grouts with this chemistry stabilize potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  12. LONG-TERM TECHNETIUM INTERACTIONS WITH REDUCING CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Lilley, M.; Almond, P.; Powell, B.

    2011-03-15

    Technetium is among the key risk drivers at the Saltstone Facility. The way that it is immobilized in this cementitious waste form is by converting its highly mobile Tc(VII) form to a much less mobile Tc(IV) form through reduction by the cement's blast furnace slag. This report includes a review of published data and experimental results dealing with Tc leaching from Portland cement waste forms. The objectives for the literature study were to document previous reports of Tc interactions with slag-containing cementitious materials. The objectives for the laboratory study were to measure Tc-saltstone Kd values under reducing conditions. From the literature it was concluded: (1) Spectroscopic evidence showed that when Tc(IV) in a slag-cement was exposed to an oxidizing environment, it will convert to the more mobile Tc(VII) species within a short time frame, 2.5 years. (2) SRS saltstone will reduce Tc(VII) in the absence of NaS or sodium dithionite in a reducing atmosphere. (3) Only trace concentrations of atmospheric oxygen (30 to 60 ppm O{sub 2}; Eh 120 mV) at the high pH levels of cementitious systems is required to maintain Tc as Tc(VII). (4) Experimental conditions must be responsible for wide variability of measured K{sub d} values, such that they are either very low, {approx}1 mL/g, or they are very high {approx}1000 mL/g, suggesting that Tc(VII) or Tc(IV) dominate the systems. Much of this variability appears to be the result of experimental conditions, especially direct controls of oxygen contact with the sample. (5) A field study conducted at SRS in the 1980s indicated that a slag-saltstone immobilized Tc for 2.5 years. Below background concentrations of Tc leached out of the slag-containing saltstone, whereas Tc leached out of the slag-free saltstone at the rate of nitrate loss. One possible explanation for the immobilization of Tc in this study was that the slag-saltstone maintained reducing conditions within the core of the 55-gallon sample, whereas

  13. Femoral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  14. Undescended testicle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair ... first year of life without treatment. Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do ...

  15. Dry and wet "deposition" studies of the degradation of cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.; Thompson, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    The reaction of portland cement mortars with SO2 gaseous pollutant and artificial 'acid rain' solution has been examined using laboratory exposure chambers, with realistic presentation rates of pollutants. The mortar were previously carbonated to produce superficial carbonation. Two mortars with different w/c ratio and hence specific surface were prepared and exposed into the chambers. For dry deposition of SO2 pollutant gas, the important ro...

  16. CASCADIC MULTIGRID METHODS FOR MORTAR WILSON FINITE ELEMENT METHODS ON PLANAR LINEAR ELASTICITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文斌; 汪艳秋

    2003-01-01

    Cascadic multigrid technique for mortar Wilson finite element method ofhomogeneous boundary value planar linear elasticity is described and analyzed. Firstthe mortar Wilson finite element method for planar linear elasticity will be analyzed,and the error estimate under L2 and H1 norm is optimal. Then a cascadic multigridmethod for the mortar finite element discrete problem is described. Suitable grid trans-fer operator and smoother are developed which lead to an optimal cascadic multigridmethod. Finally, the computational results are presented.

  17. Improved cement mortars by addition of carbonated fly ash from solid waste incinerators

    OpenAIRE

    López-Zaldívar, O.; Mayor-Lobo, P. L.; Fernández-Martínez, F.; Hernández-Olivares, F.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a research developing high performance cement mortars with the addition of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWIFA) stabilized as insoluble carbonates. The encapsulation of hazardous wastes in mortar matrixes has also been achieved. The ashes present high concentrations of chlorides, Zn and Pb. A stabilization process with NaHCO3 has been developed reducing 99% the content of chlorides. Developed mortars replace 10% per weight of the aggregates ...

  18. Repointing Mortars for Conservation of a Historic Stone Building in Trinity College, Dublin

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Aidan; Cooper, Tim P.; Perry, Simon H.

    1993-01-01

    With atmospheric pollution causing building stone to decay at accelerated rates, conservation of historic stone monuments is becoming an increasingly important issue. Mortar joints have a marked effect on how moisture moves in a wall and, hence, on how the wall weathers. Not only does mortar bind stones together, but also a good mortar will prevent the ingress of moisture (and pollutants), enable the buildings to dry out, accommodate movement and will not act as a source of harmful chemicals ...

  19. Repointing Mortars for Conservation of a Historic Stone Building in Trinity College, Dublin

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Simon H.; Duffy, Aidan

    1997-01-01

    With atmospheric pollution causing building stone to decay at accelerated rates, conservation of historic stone monuments is becoming an increasingly important issue. Mortar joints have a marked effect on how moisture moves in a wall and, hence, on how the wall weathers. Not only does mortar bind stones together, but also a good mortar will prevent the ingress of moisture (and pollutants), enable the buildings to dry out, accommodate movement and will not act as a source of harmful chemicals ...

  20. Effect of water-repellent admixtures on the behaviour of aerial lime-based mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Izaguirre, A.; Lanas, J.; Alvarez, J I

    2009-01-01

    Two different anionic surfactants, sodium oleate and calcium stearate, commercialized as water repellents for cement-based mortars, were added to lime-based mortars in order to check whether they were improved by these admixtures. Different properties of lime-based mortars were evaluated: fresh state behaviour through water retention, air content and setting time, hardened state properties such as density, water absorption through capillarity, water vapour permeability, long-term compressive ...

  1. Influence of Chloride-Ion Adsorption Agent on Chloride Ions in Concrete and Mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Gai-Fei Peng; Nai-Qian Feng; Qi-Ming Song

    2014-01-01

    The influence of a chloride-ion adsorption agent (Cl agent in short), composed of zeolite, calcium aluminate hydrate and calcium nitrite, on the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and mortar has been experimentally studied. The permeability of concrete was measured, and the chloride ion content in mortar was tested. The experimental results reveal that the Cl agent could adsorb chloride ions effectively, which had penetrated into concrete and mortar. When the Cl agent was used at a dosage...

  2. Effects of slag fineness on durability of mortars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the usages of by-products and wastes in industry have become more important. The importance of the sustainable development is also of increasing. The utilizations of wastes, as mineral admixture or fine aggregate, reduce the consumption of the natural resources and improve the durability of concrete. In this study, the effect of the fineness on the high temperature and sulphate resistances of concrete mortar specimens, produced with ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GBFS)replacing cement, is investigated. The compressive and flexural strength test results for all series related to durability effects,exposing temperature and solutions, exposure times for these durability effects, slag content and fineness are discussed. Consequently, the optimum slag contents are determined for producing the sulphate and high temperature resistant mortars.

  3. Fracture mechanics of polymer mortar made with recycled raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Godoy Jurumenha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to show that industrial residues could be used in construction applications so that production costs as well as environmental protection can be improved. The fracture properties of polymer mortar manufactured with recycled materials are investigated to evaluate the materials behaviour to crack propagation. The residues used in this work were spent sand from foundry industry as aggregate, unsaturated polyester resin from polyethylene terephthalate (PET as matrix and polyester textile fibres from garment industry, producing an unique composite material fully from recycled components with low cost. The substitution of fresh by used foundry sand and the insertions of textile fibres contribute to a less brittle behaviour of polymer mortar.

  4. Nonconforming mortar element methods: Application to spectral discretizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maday, Yvon; Mavriplis, Cathy; Patera, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Spectral element methods are p-type weighted residual techniques for partial differential equations that combine the generality of finite element methods with the accuracy of spectral methods. Presented here is a new nonconforming discretization which greatly improves the flexibility of the spectral element approach as regards automatic mesh generation and non-propagating local mesh refinement. The method is based on the introduction of an auxiliary mortar trace space, and constitutes a new approach to discretization-driven domain decomposition characterized by a clean decoupling of the local, structure-preserving residual evaluations and the transmission of boundary and continuity conditions. The flexibility of the mortar method is illustrated by several nonconforming adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations in complex geometry.

  5. Interfacial (Fiber-matrix) Properties of High-strength Mortar (150 MPa) from Fiber Pullout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannag, M.J.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Will

    1996-01-01

     The steel fiber-matrix properties of high-strength mortar (150 MPa), such as DSP (densified small particle), are obtained and compared to an ordinary strength mortar (40 MPa) using a specially designed fiber pullout apparatus. A new method for estimating the debonding energy of the interfacial......-strength DSP mortar has significantly improved interfacial properties compared to ordinary strength mortar. These results are important in the understanding of the role of steel fibers in improving the tensile properties of high-strength, brittle, cement-matrix composites....

  6. Analysis of main parameters affecting substrate/mortar contact area through tridimensional laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Carina M; Masuero, Angela B

    2015-10-01

    This study assesses the influence of the granulometric composition of sand, application energy and the superficial tension of substrates on the contact area of rendering mortars. Three substrates with distinct wetting behaviors were selected and mortars were prepared with different sand compositions. Characterization tests were performed on fresh and hardened mortars, as well as the rheological characterization. Mortars were applied to substrates with two different energies. The interfacial area was then digitized with 3D scanner. Results show that variables are all of influence on the interfacial contact in the development area. Furthermore, 3D laser scanning proved to be a good method to contact area measurement.

  7. Evaluation of Salt Removal from Azulejo Tiles and Mortars using Electrodesalination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren;

    2011-01-01

    loss of historic value. In this work preliminary studies with single tiles presenting an underlying layer of mortar have been conducted to assess the amount of salts that can be removed from the building material using a new technique called “electrodesalination”, in which the salt’s ions...... and underlying mortar are no longer at risk of salt induced decay. The main conclusions are that the technique is successful in extracting salts from mortars (removals efficiencies between 88% and 92%) but not as good for the tile (removals between 10% and 80%). The risk of salt damage to the mortar and tile...

  8. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-07-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl(2) accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores.

  9. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl2 accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  10. Analysis of main parameters affecting substrate/mortar contact area through tridimensional laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Carina M; Masuero, Angela B

    2015-10-01

    This study assesses the influence of the granulometric composition of sand, application energy and the superficial tension of substrates on the contact area of rendering mortars. Three substrates with distinct wetting behaviors were selected and mortars were prepared with different sand compositions. Characterization tests were performed on fresh and hardened mortars, as well as the rheological characterization. Mortars were applied to substrates with two different energies. The interfacial area was then digitized with 3D scanner. Results show that variables are all of influence on the interfacial contact in the development area. Furthermore, 3D laser scanning proved to be a good method to contact area measurement. PMID:26046982

  11. Mortars and treatments in the restoration of the Altarpiece of the High Altar of the Pilar Basilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luxán, M. P.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The altarpiece of the Assumption of Mary is located in the High Altar of the Pilar Basilica in Zaragoza and is one of the most important works of the Spanish Artistic Heritage. The work, sculptured in alabaster, was carried out between 1509 and 1518 by Damián Forment. The present paper covers the guidelines for the design of repair mortars used to restore the altarpiece. They are based on compatibility criteria with the existing materials and treatments in the altarpiece, according to research carried out during the recent works of cleaning and restoration. During the previous research, the composition of the original mortars was tested, the aggregate granulometry, and the composition of the organic additives used. The patina of the altarpiece was also analyzed and identified. The original mortars were made up of a mixture of gypsum and lime with the addition of oil or fats. In many cases various types of fibre were detected in the mortar, used to improve its mechanical characteristics. The repair mortars were designed with a composition similar to the originals, with a mixture of gypsum and lime, and their compatibility with the alabaster was studied, while also optimizing the granulometry of the aggregates used.

    El retablo de la Asunción de María está situado en el Altar Mayor de la Basílica del Pilar en Zaragoza y es una de las grandes obras del Patrimonio artístico español. La obra, esculpida en alabastro, fue realizada entre 1509 y ¡518 por Damián Forment. En este trabajo se recogen las directrices para el diseño de los morteros de reparación utilizados en la restauración del retablo. Se basaron en criterios de compatibilidad de los materiales y tratamientos existentes en el retablo, según la investigación realizada durante las obras de la última actuación realizada para la limpieza y restauración. En la investigación realizada se comprobó la composición de los morteros originales, la granulometría de los

  12. Clay content of argillites: Influence on cement based mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Habert, Guillaume; CHOUPAY, Nathalie; Escadeillas, Gilles; MONTEL, Jean Marc; Guillaume, D

    2009-01-01

    The pozzolanic activity of four heated powders containing different clays has been tested. Mineral transformations during calcination from 20 to 900 °C have been followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Compressive strength tests were performed at 1, 7 and 28 days on cement-clay mortars using 30% of pozzolanic material as a replacement by mass for cement. Calcination temperatures corresponded to the stages of potentially high reactivity identified by XR...

  13. Mortar and concrete based on calcium sulphate binders

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, J.J.F.; Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2006-01-01

    In this study both hemi-hydrate and anhydrite are tested as calcium sulphate binders for structural mortar and concrete. The advantage of using calcium sulphates instead of cement as a binder is the fact that the production of calcium sulphate is more environmental friendly than that of cement. For the calcinations of Portland cement, temperatures up to 1480 oC are needed, while the calcination of for instance hemihydrate requires a temperature of 170 oC

  14. Modelling anisotropic damage and permeability of mortar under dynamic loads

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, W.; MAUREL, O.; REESS, T.; MATALLAH, M.; FERRON, A.; C. La Borderie; G. Pijaudier-Cabot

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of a model for concrete subjected to dynamic loads. Shock waves are generated by Pulsed Arc Electro-hydraulic Discharges (PAED) in water and applied to mortar samples. A diphasic model (liquid water and vapour) is implemented in order to describe the electrical discharge and the propagation of shock waves in water. An anisotropic damage model is devised, which takes account of the strain rate effect and the crack closure effect. Coupling between anisotrop...

  15. Alkaline cement mortars. Chemical resistance to sulfate and seawater attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The durability and chemical resistance of alkali activated slag and fly ash/slag mortars in contact with sulfates and seawater media have been studied. Two methods were used in the evaluation of such durability: Kock-Steinegger and ASTM C1012. A mineralogical and a microstructural characterization of mortars were done at different ages of their conservation in aggressive media through XRD, SEM/ EDX and mercury porosimetry. Results showed a high durability of activated cement mortars in sulfates and seawater media. NaOH activated mortars are the most sensitive to environment attack with formation of expansive products as gypsum and ettringite, although in very low proportion.

    Se ha estudiado la estabilidad química en medios sulfáticos y de agua de mar de morteros de escorias activadas alcalinamente y morteros de mezclas de escoria y cenizas volantes activadas alcalinamente. Se han empleado dos métodos para evaluar dicha estabilidad: Kock-Steinegger y la norma ASTM C1012. Se ha realizado una caracterización mineralógica y micro estructural de los morteros (a diferentes edades de permanencia en los medios agresivos a través de DRX, SEM/EDX y porosimetría de mercurio. Los resultados obtenidos han demostrado la elevada durabilidad de todos los morteros de cementos activados estudiados frente a la agresividad de los sulfatos y del agua de mar Los morteros de escoria activada con NaOH son los más susceptibles al ataque por esos medios, conformación de productos expansivos como el yeso y la etringita, aunque en proporciones muy bajas.

  16. Recycling of copper tailings as an additive in cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Onuaguluchi, Obinna; EREN, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Increasing demands for copper and copper allied products have made the processing of low grade ores with high volume waste output unavoidable. Presently, billions of tons of copper tailings can be found in major copper producing countries. The impact of copper tailings at 0%, 5% and 10% addition level by mass of cement on the fresh and hardened properties of mortars were determined. Results showed that dry copper tailings affect mixture consistency negatively. However, the use of pre-wetted t...

  17. Isotopic analysis for degradation diagnosis of calcite matrix in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsika, E; Psomiadis, D; Poutoukis, D; Raco, B; Gamaletsos, P

    2009-12-01

    Mortar that was used in building as well as in conservation and restoration works of wall paintings have been analysed isotopically (delta(13)C and delta(18)O) in order to evaluate the setting environments and secondary processes, to distinguish the structural components used and to determine the exact causes that incurred the degradation phenomena. The material undergoes weathering and decay on a large proportion of its surface and in depth, due to the infiltration of water through the structural blocks. Mineralogical analysis indicated signs of sulphation and dissolution/recrystallisation processes taking place on the material, whereas stable isotopes provided information relative to the origin of the CO(2) and water during calcite formation and degradation processes. Isotopic change of the initial delta(13)C and delta(18)O in carbonate matrix was caused by alteration of the primary source of CO(2) and H(2)O in mortar over time, particularly by recrystallisation of calcite with porewater, evaporated or re-condensed water, and CO(2) from various sources of atmospheric and biogenic origin. Human influence (surface treatment) and biological growth (e.g. fungus) are major exogenic processes which may alter delta(18)O and delta(13)C in lime mortar.

  18. Calcite-forming bacteria for compressive strength improvement in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Yu-Mi; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2010-04-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar. However, very few studies have been conducted on the use of calcite-forming bacteria (CFB) to improve compressive strength. In this study, we discovered new bacterial genera that are capable of improving the compressive strength of concrete mortar. We isolated 4 CFB from 7 environmental concrete structures. Using sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes, the CFB could be partially identified as Sporosarcina soli KNUC401, Bacillus massiliensis KNUC402, Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis KNUC404. Crystal aggregates were apparent in the bacterial colonies grown on an agar medium. Stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analyses illustrated both the crystal growth and the crystalline structure of the CaCO3 crystals. We used the isolates to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar cubes and found that KNUC403 offered the best improvement in compressive strength.

  19. Adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchek, Konstantin; Miah, Muhammed Yusuf; Kuang, Wenxing; DeMaleki, Zack; Tezel, F Handan

    2011-10-30

    The adsorption of cesium on cement mortar from aqueous solutions was studied in series of bench-scale tests. The effects of cesium concentration, temperature and contact time on process kinetics and equilibrium were evaluated. Experiments were carried out in a range of initial cesium concentrations from 0.0103 to 10.88 mg L(-1) and temperatures from 278 to 313 K using coupons of cement mortar immersed in the solutions. Non-radioactive cesium chloride was used as a surrogate of the radioactive (137)Cs. Solution samples were taken after set periods of time and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Depending on the initial cesium concentration, its equilibrium concentration in solution ranged from 0.0069 to 8.837 mg L(-1) while the respective surface concentration on coupons varied from 0.0395 to 22.34 μg cm(-2). Equilibrium test results correlated well with the Freundlich isotherm model for the entire test duration. Test results revealed that an increase in temperature resulted in an increase in adsorption rate and a decrease in equilibrium cesium surface concentration. Among several kinetic models considered, the pseudo-second order reaction model was found to be the best to describe the kinetic test results in the studied range of concentrations. The adsorption activation energy determined from Arrhenius equation was found to be approximately 55.9 kJ mol(-1) suggesting that chemisorption was the prevalent mechanism of interaction between cesium ions and cement mortar.

  20. Alkali Aggregate Reaction in Alkali Slag Cement Mortars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By means of "Mortar Bar Method",the ratio of cement to aggregate was kept as a constant 1∶2.25,the water-cement ratio of the mixture was 0.40,and six prism specimens were prepared for each batch of mixing proportions with dimensions of 10×10×60mm3 at 38±2℃ and RH≥95%, the influences of content and particle size of active aggregate, sort and content of alkali component and type of slag on the expansion ratios of alkali-activated slag cement(ASC) mortars due to alkali aggregate reaction(AAR) were studied. According to atomic absorption spectrometry,the amount of free alkali was measured in ASC mortars at 90d.The results show above factors affect AAR remarkably,but no dangerous AAR will occur in ASC system when the amount of active aggregate is below 15% and the mass fraction of alkali is not more than 5% (Na2O).Alkali participated in reaction as an independent component, and some hydrates containing alkali cations were produced, free alkalis in ASC system can be reduced enormously.Moreover,slag is an effective inhibitor, the possibility of generating dangerous AAR in ASC system is much lower at same conditions than that in ordinary Portland cement system.

  1. Link between microstructure and tritiated water diffusivity in mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dangla P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ions and radionuclide diffusivity in concrete is one of the most important factors that determine service life and safety assessment of cement based structures in nuclear power plants and radioactive-waste repositories. Apart from the influence of cement paste microstructure, the presence of aggregates may have an impact on transport properties of the material. The well-known interfacial transition zone, denoted by ITZ, is created near the aggregates and characterized by a greater porosity. The goal of this study is to investigate the competition between the more diffusing ITZ zone and the less diffusing aggregates. To this end, several series of tritiated water diffusion tests are conducted on mortars characterized by different water-to-cement ratios and sand volume fractions. In parallel, microstructure of these materials is explored by mercury and water porosimetry. It was observed that at low sand content (0% – 50%, diffusion properties of mortars are dominated by aggregates dilution effect. At 60% sand, diffusion increases significantly suggesting that percolation’s pores threshold has been reached. Results indicate also that sand particle size distribution has a great impact on the diffusivity of mortars.

  2. Link between microstructure and tritiated water diffusivity in mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, B.; Dridi, W.; Le Bescop, P.; Dangla, P.; Petit, L.

    2013-07-01

    Ions and radionuclide diffusivity in concrete is one of the most important factors that determine service life and safety assessment of cement based structures in nuclear power plants and radioactive-waste repositories. Apart from the influence of cement paste microstructure, the presence of aggregates may have an impact on transport properties of the material. The well-known interfacial transition zone, denoted by ITZ, is created near the aggregates and characterized by a greater porosity. The goal of this study is to investigate the competition between the more diffusing ITZ zone and the less diffusing aggregates. To this end, several series of tritiated water diffusion tests are conducted on mortars characterized by different water-to-cement ratios and sand volume fractions. In parallel, microstructure of these materials is explored by mercury and water porosimetry. It was observed that at low sand content (0% - 50%), diffusion properties of mortars are dominated by aggregates dilution effect. At 60% sand, diffusion increases significantly suggesting that percolation's pores threshold has been reached. Results indicate also that sand particle size distribution has a great impact on the diffusivity of mortars.

  3. Some masonary mortar from Hellenistic and Roman period Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, H.H.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Mineral Resources Research Center at the University of Minnesota has been engaged for the past six years in projects to synthesize various hydraulic cements by plasma fusion. An analytical scheme was developed to examine the plasma products. The techniques used to examine these cements were applied to five masonary mortar samples of Hellenistic and Roman periods from three sites in Greece (Olympia, Larissa, and Trikkala). These were examined by chemical, microscopical (polarized light and scanning electron), x-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis methods. These samples are typical sand-lime mortars: The aggregates consist of quartz with small amounts of microcline or orthoclase and, in several of the samples, rock and chert fragments. The matrix is largely fine grained calcite and a small amount of calcium silicate hydrate, a typical phase found in hydraulic cements. The sample from the Altis in Olympia (160 to 170 A.D.) is a pink, dense mortar with medium to fine grained aggregate and shows excellent workmanship. This specimen contains reddish fragments which are probably pieces of ceramics which either are used as fill or are poorly crushed material added as a pozzolana. The samples were probably emplaced as a sand and slaked-lime mixture. The limes are impure and thus have feebly hydraulic properties.

  4. Development and Performance Evaluation of Very High Early Strength Geopolymer for Rapid Road Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Pichai Taneerananon; Woraphot Prachasaree; Danupon Tonnayopas; Abideng Hawa

    2013-01-01

    High early strength is the most important property of pavement repair materials to allow quick reopening to traffic. With this in mind, we have experimentally investigated geopolymers using low cost raw materials available in Thailand. The geopolymer mortar was metakaolin (MK), mixed with parawood ash (PWA, rubberwood ash) or oil palm ash (OPA) as binder agent. Rubberwood is often used as raw material for biomass power plants in Thailand, especially at latex glove factories and seafood factor...

  5. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  6. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... Endovascular aortic repair is done because your aneurysm is very large, growing quickly, or is leaking or bleeding. You may have ...

  7. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  8. Hydrocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small surgical cut in the fold of the groin, and then drains the fluid. The sac (hydrocele) holding the fluid may be removed. The surgeon strengthens the muscle wall with stitches. This is called a hernia repair. Sometimes the surgeon uses a laparoscope to do ...

  9. Analysis on Factors Affecting the Self-Repair Capability of SMA Wire Concrete Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack expansion of concrete is the initial damage stage of structures, which may cause greater damage to structures subject to long-term loads or under extreme conditions. In recent years, the application of intelligent materials to crack self-repair has become a hotspot among researchers. In order to study the influence of factors on the self-repair capability of shape memory alloy (SMA wire concrete beam, both theoretical and experimental methods were employed for analysis. For the convenience of experiment, composite materials (epoxy cement mortar and silicone polymer clay instead of concrete were used. The SMA wires were externally installed on and internally embedded in epoxy resin cement mortar beams and silicone polymer clay beams. Comparison of crack repair situation between two installation methods turns out that both methods possess their own advantages and disadvantages and should be employed according to the actual situation. The influence of unbonded length on the self-repair capability of embedded type SMA wire beams and the necessary minimum unbonded length to achieve self-repair function were studied. The results state clearly that the longer the unbonded length is, the better the crack repair situation is.

  10. Characterization of historic mortars and earthen building materials in Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Benjamin L.

    2012-07-01

    The Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage (ADACH) is responsible for the conservation and management of historic buildings and archaeological sites in the Emirate. Laboratory analysis has been critical for understanding the composition of historic materials and establishing appropriate conservation treatments across a wide variety of building types, ranging from Iron Age earthen archaeological sites to late-Islamic stone buildings. Analysis was carried out on historic sites in Al Ain, Delma Island and Liwa Oasis using techniques such as micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF), scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Testing was conducted through consultant laboratories and in collaboration with local universities. The initial aim of the analysis was to understand historic earthen materials and to confirm the suitability of locally sourced clays for the production of mud bricks and plasters. Another important goal was to characterize materials used in historic stone buildings in order to develop repair mortars, renders and grouts.

  11. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  12. THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS. PROGRESS REPORT BY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

    1998-11-01

    Research commenced in FY 97 to determine the suitability of superplasticized cement-sand grouts for backfilling vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. The overall objectives were to develop, evaluate and demonstrate cementitious grouts that could reduce the required bore length and improve the performance of GHPs. This report summarizes the accomplishments in FY 98.

  13. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete

  14. Predicting the Probability of Failure of Cementitious Sewer Pipes Using Stochastic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M. Alani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a stochastic finite element method (SFEM is employed to investigate the probability of failure of cementitious buried sewer pipes subjected to combined effect of corrosion and stresses. A non-linear time-dependant model is used to determine the extent of concrete corrosion. Using the SFEM, the effects of different random variables, including loads, pipe material, and corrosion on the remaining safe life of the cementitious sewer pipes are explored. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the merit of the proposed SFEM in evaluating the effects of the contributing parameters upon the probability of failure of cementitious sewer pipes. The developed SFEM offers many advantages over traditional probabilistic techniques since it does not use any empirical equations in order to determine failure of pipes. The results of the SFEM can help the concerning industry (e.g., water companies to better plan their resources by providing accurate prediction for the remaining safe life of cementitious sewer pipes.

  15. Predicting the Probability of Failure of Cementitious Sewer Pipes Using Stochastic Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Amir M; Faramarzi, Asaad

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a stochastic finite element method (SFEM) is employed to investigate the probability of failure of cementitious buried sewer pipes subjected to combined effect of corrosion and stresses. A non-linear time-dependant model is used to determine the extent of concrete corrosion. Using the SFEM, the effects of different random variables, including loads, pipe material, and corrosion on the remaining safe life of the cementitious sewer pipes are explored. A numerical example is presented to demonstrate the merit of the proposed SFEM in evaluating the effects of the contributing parameters upon the probability of failure of cementitious sewer pipes. The developed SFEM offers many advantages over traditional probabilistic techniques since it does not use any empirical equations in order to determine failure of pipes. The results of the SFEM can help the concerning industry (e.g., water companies) to better plan their resources by providing accurate prediction for the remaining safe life of cementitious sewer pipes. PMID:26068092

  16. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete.

  17. Interaction between microcapsules and cementitious matrix after cracking in a self-healing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Xing, F.; Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Qian, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of self-healing cementitious composites by using organic microcapsules is designed in Guangdong Key Laboratory of Durability for Coastal Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University. For the organic microcapsules, the shell material is urea formoldehyde (UF), and the core healing agent is Epoxy

  18. Design of microcapsule system used for self-healing cementitious material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Xing, F.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    For a microcapsule based self-healing system in the cementitious material, a fundamental issue is to find and facilitate a suitable microcapsule system, concerning either the material selection or design and manufacture process. In this study, urea formaldehyde resin is used for the shell of microca

  19. Self-healing behavior of strain hardening cementitious composites incorporating local waste materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, S.; Zhou, J.; Rooij, M.R. de; Schlangen, E.; Ye, G.; Breugel, K. van

    2009-01-01

    The self-healing behavior of a series of pre-cracked fiber reinforced strain hardening cementitious composites incorporating blast furnace slag (BFS) and limestone powder (LP) with relatively high water/binder ratio is investigated in this paper, focusing on the recovery of its deflection capacity.

  20. Evolution of 99Tc Species in Cementitious Nuclear Waste Form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium (Tc) is produced in large quantities as a fission product during the irradiation of 235U-enriched fuel for commercial power production and plutonium genesis for nuclear weapons. The most abundant isotope of Tc present in the wastes is 99Tc because of its high fission yield (∼6%) and long half-life (2.13x105 years). During the Cold War era, generation of fissile 239Pu for use in America's atomic weapons arsenal yielded nearly 1900 kg of 99Tc at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Most of this 99Tc is present in fuel reprocessing wastes temporarily stored in underground tanks awaiting retrieval and permanent disposal. After the wastes are retrieved from the storage tanks, the bulk of the high-level waste (HLW) and lowactivity waste (LAW) stream is scheduled to be converted into a borosilicate glass waste form that will be disposed of in a shallow burial facility called the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. Even with careful engineering controls, volatilization of a fraction of Tc during the vitrification of both radioactive waste streams is expected. Although this volatilized Tc can be captured in melter off-gas scrubbers and returned to the melter, some of the Tc is expected to become part of the secondary waste stream from the vitrification process. The off-gas scrubbers downstream from the melters will generate a high pH, sodium-ammonium carbonate solution containing the volatilized Tc and other fugitive species. Effective and cost-efficient disposal of Tc found in the off-gas scrubber solution remains difficult. A cementitious waste form (Cast Stone) is one of the nuclear waste form candidates being considered to solidify the secondary radioactive liquid waste that will be generated by the operation of the waste treatment plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site. Because Tc leachability from the waste form is closely related with Tc speciation or oxidation state in both the simulant and

  1. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  2. Optimization of Mix Proportion of High Performance Mortar for Structural Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah C. Ban

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Mortar mix is a major construction material in fabrication of ferrocement structural elements. However, there have been scarce amount of technical data available on suitable mix proportion to achieve structural grade mortar with specific strength requirement and adequate level of workability for proper placement into construction formwork. Moreover, current practice in ferrocement construction work which uses mortar mix with cement: sand ratio ranging between 1:1.5 to 1:2 incurs high requirement of cement yet producing mix with suboptimum level of compressive strength. Approach: An experimental investigation was carried out to evaluate workability and compressive strength properties of structural grade mortar mixes with various cement: sand ratios ranging from 1:2.0-1:2.75 and varying water/binder ratio between 0.35 and 0.50. Throughout the laboratory investigation, a total of 28 batches of mortar mixes with various mix proportion were designed, cast and tested in accordance to relevant standards of practice prescribed by British Standard Institute (BSI and American Society of Testing Material (ASTM. Results: At the end of the laboratory investigation program, high performance mortar mix with compressive strength exceeding 55 MPa and slump level within 50-90 mm which is suitable for heavy duty ferrocement construction work was successfully developed. Moreover, data on mix proportion for several other grades of mortar mixes ranging from grade 35 to grade 55 were also derived. Conclusion: It was found that optimum cement: Sand ratio of structural mortar is 1:2.25. With the use of this cement: Sand ratio in the production of structural grade mortar mix in fabrication of ferrocement structural elements, consumption of cement binder will be economized hence resulting in potential savings in term of material and production cost of mortar mix in the construction industry. Besides, it was also observed that strengths

  3. Prepackaged polymer - modified mortar proves effective construction material - field and laboratory observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hi-Bond - prepackaged polymer - modified mortar described in this paper is a revolutionary, multifunctional, high-tech, high performance, sustainable, durability improving group of construction materials with a high cost - benefit ratio. Hi-Bond has been developed by Dadabhoy Construction Technologies (Pvt) Ltd., (DCTL), Karachi, after extensive studies and research both locally and abroad. It can be used in floorings and pavings, integral waterproofing, adhesive applications, protective and decorative coatings, repairs, renovation, rehabilitation, anti corrosive linings, deck coverings, durability and efficiency improvement of canal linings and other hydraulic structures. Hi-Bond has been applied in various projects of national importance with great success for their repairs, renovation and rehabilitation and has also been tested and evaluated at various laboratories with highly encouraging results. Some examples include: (i) earthquake damaged bridge at Lora Nallah on Brewery Road, Quetta, (ii) fire damaged building of the daily Business Recorder House, Karachi, (iii) 200 - year old main dome of the tomb of Hazrat Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai, Bhitshah, Hyderabad, (iv) RCC shell roofs of Mehtab Biscuit and Wafers Factory, Sahiwal, (v) repair of newly built concrete floor on structural slab in a factory building at Karachi, (vi) Mohatta Palace, Clifton, Karachi, (vii) swimming pool at Okara Cantt, and (viii) numerous leaking basements, underground and overhead water reservoirs at and around Karachi including those of new vegetable market on super highway. Building Research Station, Government of the Punjab, Lahore also recommended the use of Hi-Bond in the applications mentioned above after testing and evaluation. The product was found easy in application and offered numerous technical and economical advantages, over conventional products, in variety of applications. It is important to note that shortly after the repairs and renovation of the building of the daily

  4. On the Application of Inertial Microfluidics for the Size-Based Separation of Polydisperse Cementitious Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Lewis, Peter; Balonis, Magdalena; Di Carlo, Dino; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-06-01

    The early-age performance of concrete is determined by the properties of the cementitious binder and the evolution of its chemical reactions. The chemical reactivity, and to some extent, the composition of cementitious particles can depend on particle size. Therefore, it is valuable to physically separate cementing minerals into well-defined size classes so that the influences of both particle size and composition on reaction progress can be studied without the confounding effects of a broad particle size distribution. However, conventional particle separation methods (e.g., density fractionation, wet sieving, field-flow extraction, ultrasonification-sedimentation) are time-consuming and cumbersome and result in poor particle yields and size-selectivity, thus, making them unsuitable for processing larger volumes of cementitious powders (on the order of grams). This study applies a novel inertial microfluidics (IMF) based procedure to separate cementitious powders on the basis of their size. Special attention is paid to optimizing operating variables to ensure that particles in a fluid streamline achieve unique equilibrium positions within the device. From such positions, particles can be retrieved as per their size using symmetrical outlet configurations with tuned fluidic resistances. The approach is critically assessed in terms of: (1) its ability to separate cementitious powders into narrow size bins, and therefore its feasibility as a fractionation procedure, and (2) quantitatively relating the operating parameters to the particle yield and size selectivity. The study establishes metrics for assessing the ability of IMF methods to classify minerals and other polydisperse particles on the basis of their size.

  5. Self-Healing in Cementitious Materials—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele De Belie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is very sensitive to crack formation. As wide cracks endanger the durability, repair may be required. However, these repair works raise the life-cycle cost of concrete as they are labor intensive and because the structure becomes in disuse during repair. In 1994, C. Dry was the first who proposed the intentional introduction of self-healing properties in concrete. In the following years, several researchers started to investigate this topic. The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth comparison of the different self-healing approaches which are available today. Among these approaches, some are aimed at improving the natural mechanism of autogenous crack healing, while others are aimed at modifying concrete by embedding capsules with suitable healing agents so that cracks heal in a completely autonomous way after they appear. In this review, special attention is paid to the types of healing agents and capsules used. In addition, the various methodologies have been evaluated based on the trigger mechanism used and attention has been paid to the properties regained due to self-healing.

  6. The Evolution of Click-n-Mortar E-tailing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøge Sørensen, Lars; Holst, Lisa L.

    2003-01-01

    The paper at hand presents an extension and application of Kotzab & Madlbergers (Kotzab &Madlberger, 2001) original clicks-and-mortar web-scan framework, which is here used to reexaminethe click-and-mortar activities of the top 100 Danish retailers and compare with resultsfrom the identical study...

  7. Influence of recycled fine aggregates on the resistance of mortars to magnesium sulfate attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Tae

    2009-08-01

    The influence of recycled fine aggregates, which had been reclaimed from field-demolished concretes, on the resistance of mortar specimens to magnesium sulfate attack was investigated. Mortar specimens were prepared with recycled fine aggregates at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of natural fine aggregate by mass). The mortar specimens were exposed to 4.24% magnesium sulfate solution for about 1 year at ambient temperature, and regularly monitored for visual appearance, compressive strength loss and expansion. Additionally, in order to identify products of magnesium sulfate attack, mortar samples incorporating 0%, 25% and 100% replacement levels of the recycled fine aggregates were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Experimental results confirmed that the use of recycled fine aggregates up to a maximum 50% replacement level is effective under severe magnesium sulfate environment, irrespective of type of recycled fine aggregates. However, the worse performance was observed in mortar specimens incorporating 100% replacement level. It was found that the water absorption of recycled fine aggregates affected deterioration of mortar specimens, especially at a higher replacement level. XRD results indicated that the main cause of deterioration of the mortar specimens was primarily due to the formation of gypsum and thaumasite by magnesium sulfate attack. In addition, it appeared that the conversion of C-S-H into M-S-H by the attack probably influenced mechanical deterioration of mortar specimens with recycled fine aggregates. PMID:19467853

  8. Water extraction out of mortar during brick laying: A NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Spiekman, M.E.; Pel, L.; Kopinga, K.; Larbi, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The water extraction out of mortar during brick laying was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance. The experiments show that using a fired-clay brick, the water is extracted out of the mortar within 3 minutes, whereas in the case of a sand-lime brick this takes about 10 minutes. Prewetting a fired

  9. Steel corrosion resistance in model solutions and reinforced mortar containing wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the corrosion resistance of steel in alkaline model solutions and in cement-based materials (mortar). The model solutions and the mortar specimens were Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) based. Further, hereby discussed is the implementation of an eco-friendly approach of waste util

  10. Influence of recycled fine aggregates on the resistance of mortars to magnesium sulfate attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Tae

    2009-08-01

    The influence of recycled fine aggregates, which had been reclaimed from field-demolished concretes, on the resistance of mortar specimens to magnesium sulfate attack was investigated. Mortar specimens were prepared with recycled fine aggregates at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of natural fine aggregate by mass). The mortar specimens were exposed to 4.24% magnesium sulfate solution for about 1 year at ambient temperature, and regularly monitored for visual appearance, compressive strength loss and expansion. Additionally, in order to identify products of magnesium sulfate attack, mortar samples incorporating 0%, 25% and 100% replacement levels of the recycled fine aggregates were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Experimental results confirmed that the use of recycled fine aggregates up to a maximum 50% replacement level is effective under severe magnesium sulfate environment, irrespective of type of recycled fine aggregates. However, the worse performance was observed in mortar specimens incorporating 100% replacement level. It was found that the water absorption of recycled fine aggregates affected deterioration of mortar specimens, especially at a higher replacement level. XRD results indicated that the main cause of deterioration of the mortar specimens was primarily due to the formation of gypsum and thaumasite by magnesium sulfate attack. In addition, it appeared that the conversion of C-S-H into M-S-H by the attack probably influenced mechanical deterioration of mortar specimens with recycled fine aggregates.

  11. Mortar Upwind Finite Volume Element Method with Crouzeix-Raviart Element for Parabolic Convection Diffusion Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element method with the Crouzeix-Raviart element for the parabolic convection diffusion problems.It is proved that the semi-discrete mortar upwind finite volume element approximations derived are convergent in the H1- and L2-norms.

  12. Self-healing of lime based mortars: Microscopy observations on case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Lime mortars have, up to a certain extent, a self-healing capacity which may contribute to their durability. Self-healing in lime mortars consists of a process of dissolution, transport and re-precipitation of calcium compounds to heal cracks and fissures. The spontaneous occurrence of self-healing

  13. Self-healing of lime based mortars: microscopy observations on case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Lime mortars have, up to a certain extent, a self-healing capacity which may contribute to their durability. Self-healing in lime mortars consists of a process of dissolution, transport and re-precipitation of calcium compounds to heal cracks and fissures. The spontaneous occurrence of self-healing

  14. Chloride Ion Transport in Fly Ash Mortar under Action of Fatigue Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Caihui; SUN Wei; JIANG Jinyang

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the chloride ion transport performance in fly ash addition mortar,a new method,in which the fatigue loading and chloride diffusion are undertaken simultaneously,was developed.This method realizes coupling the fatigue damage process and the process of chloride transporting of fly ash mortar.The transport performance of chloride in fly ash mortar specimens was studied under different stress levels.Moreover,the effect of fly ash content on transport performance of chloride ion in mortar was investigated.AE (Acoustic Emission) and SEM were used to acquire the damage distribution of mortar specimens under action of fatigue load.The results show that the diffusion coefficient of chloride in mortar specimens increases with stress level of fatigue loading.The addition of fly ash can mitigate the penetration of chloride ion.The results of microcrack 3D location acquired by AE,accompanied with crack characterizing from SEM,indicate that the damage degree of mortar specimen increases with stress level of fatigue loading.Furthermore,higher damage degree of mortar leads to more the chloride ion content in the sample.

  15. Properties of Foamed Mortar Prepared with Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foamed mortar with a density of 1300 kg/m3 was prepared. In the initial laboratory trials, water-to-cement (w/c ratios ranging from 0.54 to 0.64 were tested to determine the optimal value for foamed mortar corresponding to the highest compressive strength without compromising its fresh state properties. With the obtained optimal w/c ratio of 0.56, two types of foamed mortar were prepared, namely cement-foamed mortar (CFM and slag-foamed mortar (SFM, 50% cement was replaced by slag weight. Four different curing conditions were adopted for both types of foamed mortar to assess their compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV and thermal insulation performance. The test results indicated that utilizing 50% of slag as cement replacement in the production of foamed mortar improved the compressive strength, UPV and thermal insulation properties. Additionally, the initial water curing of seven days gained higher compressive strength and increased UPV values as compared to the air cured and natural weather curing samples. However, this positive effect was more pronounced in the case of compressive strength than in the UPV and thermal conductivity of foamed mortar.

  16. Limiting salt crystallization damage in lime mortar by using crystallization modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Shahidzadeh, N.; Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a recurrent cause of damage in porous building materials. Lime-based mortars, which were widely used in construction of ancient masonry, are especially prone to salt damage, due to their low mechanical strength. Existing solutions to tackle salt damage in mortars have been ma

  17. Corrosion sensor for monitoring the service condition of chloride-contaminated cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuang; Ba, Heng-Jing

    2010-01-01

    A corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of cover mortar was developed. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with and without the addition of chloride to simulate the adverse effects of chloride-contaminated environmental conditions on concrete structures. In brief, a linear polarization resistance method combined with an embeddable reference electrode was utilized to measure the polarization resistance (Rp) using built-in sensor electrodes. Subsequently, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 50 kHz was used to obtain the cement mortar resistance (Rs). The results show that the polarization resistance is related to the chloride content and Rs; ln (Rp) is linearly related to the Rs values in mortar without added chloride. The relationships observed between the Rp of the steel anodes and the resistance of the surrounding cement mortar measured by the corrosion sensor confirms that Rs can indicate the corrosion state of concrete structures.

  18. [Study on the traditional lime mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Feng; Sun, Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Xing; Zhang, Bing-Jian; Chen, Xi-Min

    2013-07-01

    The traditional lime mortar was investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results show that the mortar from the memorial archway in the southern Anhui province was the organic-inorganic composite materials composed of lime with tung oil or sticky rice. It was found that the excellent performance of the tung oil-lime mortar can be explained by the compact lamellar organic-inorganic composite structure that was produced by carbonization reaction of lime, cross-linking reactions of tung oil and oxygen and complexing reaction of Ca2+ and -COO-. The compact micro-structure of sticky rice-lime mortar, which was produced due to carbonation process of lime controlled by amylopectin, should be the cause of the good performance of this kind of organic-inorganic mortar.

  19. Effect of surfactants on pressure-sensitivity of CNT filled cement mortar composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baoguo; Yu, Xun

    2014-11-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) were used as surfactants to disperse multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) in cement mortar and fabricate pressure-sensitive carbon nanotubes filled cement mortar composites. The pressure-sensitivity of cement mortar composites with different concentrations of MWNT and different surfactants was explored under repeated loading and impulsive loading, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the response of the electrical resistance of composites with NaDDBS to external force is more stable and sensitive than that of composites with SDS. Therefore, NaDDBS has higher efficiency than SDS for the dispersion of MWNT in cement mortar, and it is an effective surfactant for fabricating MWNT filled cement mortar composites with superior pressure-sensitivity.

  20. HEAT INSULATING LIME DRY MORTARS FOR FINISHING OF WALLS MADE OF FOAM CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loganina Valentina Ivanovna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different aerated mortars are used for pargeting of walls made of aerated concrete. Though the regulatory documents don’t specify the dependence of plaster density from the density grade of gas-concrete blocks. In case of facing of gas-concrete blocks with the grade D500 using plaster mortars with the density 1400…1600 km/m3 there occurs a dismatch in the values of thermal insulation and vapor permeability of the plaster and base. The authors suggest using dry mortars for finishing of gas-concrete block of the grades D500 и D600, which allow obtaining facing thermal insulating coatings. The efficiency of using four different high-porous additives in the lime dry mortar was compared. They were: hollow glass microspheres, aluminosilicate ash microspheres, expanded vermiculite sand, expanded pearlitic sand. The high efficiency of hollow glass microspheres in heat insulating finishing mortars compared to other fillers is proved.

  1. Mechanical properties of cement mortar in sodium sulfate and sodium chloride solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊良宵; 虞利军

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the mechanical properties of cement mortar in sodium sulfate and sodium chloride solutions, uniaxial compression test and ultrasonic test were performed. Test results show that the relative dynamic elastic modulus, the mass variation, and the compressive strength of cement mortar increase first, and then decrease with increasing erosion time in sodium sulfate and sodium chloride solutions. The relative dynamic elastic moduli and the compressive strengths of cement mortars with water/cement ratios of 0.55 and 0.65 in sodium sulfate solution are lower than those in sodium chloride solution with the same concentration at the 420th day of immersion. The compressive strength of cement mortar with water/cement ratio of 0.65 is more sensitive to strain rate than that with water/cement ratio of 0.55. In addition, the strain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength of cement mortar will increase under attacks of sodium sulfate or sodium chloride solution.

  2. A study of the application of residue from burned biomass in mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enori Gemelli

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study the viability of burnt biomass residue from a pulp and paper plant applied as a raw material for mortar used in the construction industry. The waste - bottom ash - was incorporated into the mortar as a mineral addition to the Portland cement. The effect of the waste's grain size on the properties of mortars containing 10% in volume of waste was investigated, as well as the effect of the concentration of waste with grain size under 0.15 mm. The samples were evaluated after 28 days of aging by uniaxial compression, leaching test and scanning electron microscopy. These characterization techniques indicated that the properties of the mortars depend on the concentration, granulation and size distribution of the waste in the mortar's structure. Furthermore, some chemical elements may be present in stabilized and/or encapsulated form in the cement matrix.

  3. An electrochemical and microstructural characterization of steel-mortar admixed with corrosion inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuan; Anh; Nguyen; Recep; AVCI

    2009-01-01

    The present research brings new insights on the role of admixed corrosion inhibitors in the processes of cement hydration and rebar corrosion. The admixing of NaCl and the corrosion inhibitors in fresh mortar was found to alter the morphology and microstructure of the hardened mortar at the steel-mortar interfacial region. The admixing of the inhibitors increased the risk of carbonation of cement hydrates at the steel-mortar interfacial region, but partially displaced chloride ions. Chloride and the admixed inhibitors facilitated the formation of different cement hydrates and affected chloride binding at the steel-mortar interfacial region. The admixing of all three inhibitors was found to increase the polarization resistance of steel, indicating reduced corrosion rate of the steel over 48-day exposures to salt ponding.

  4. Microstructure and mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres is studied following various processing conditions. Hemp fibres combined with carbon nanotubes (CNT) are introduced in mortar and their effect is studied as function of curing time. The cement phase is replaced by different percentages of dry or wet hemp fibres ranging from 1.1. wt% up to 3.1. wt% whereas carbon nanotubes are dispersed in the aqueous solution. Our experimental results show that compressive and flexural strengths of wet fibres modified mortar are higher than those for dry hemp-mortar material. The achieved optimal percentage of wet hemp fibres is 2.1. wt% allowing a flexural strength higher than that of reference mortar. The addition of an optimal CNT concentration (0.01. wt%) combined with wet hemp has a reinforcing effect which turns to be related to an improvement of compressive and flexural strengths by 10% and 24%, respectively, in comparison with reference condition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Carbon fibre-reinforced, alkali-activated slag mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcés, P.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the effect of carbon fibre on alkaliactivated slag mortar (AAS mechanical strength, volume stability and reinforcing steel corrosion, compared to its effect on the same properties in Portland cement (PC properties. Mechanical strength and volume stability tests were performed as set out in the respective Spanish UNE standards. The corrosion rate of steel embedded in the specimens studied was determined from polarization resistance analysis. One of the findings of the study performed was that carbon fibre failed to improve AAS or CP mortar strength. As far as volume stability is concerned, the inclusion of carbon fibres in AAS with a liquid/solid ratio of 0.5 reduced drying shrinkage by about 50%. The effect of carbon fibre on PC mortars differed from its effect on AAS mortars. Studies showed that in the presence of carbonation, steel corrosion reached higher levels in carbon-fibre reinforced AAS mortars; the inclusion of 1% carbon fibre improved corrosion resistance perceptibly in these same mortars, however, when exposed to chloride attack.Se ha estudiado el efecto de la incorporación de fibras de carbón en el comportamiento mecánico, estabilidad de volumen y nivel de corrosión de la armadura en morteros de escorias activadas alcalinamente (AAS. Se evalúa la influencia de las fibras de carbón en el comportamiento de morteros alcalinos en comparación con el efecto que producen en morteros de Portland (CP. Los ensayos mecánicos y de estabilidad de volumen se han realizado según lo establecido en la norma UNE que los regula. Se ha utilizado la técnica de la Resistencia a la Polarización para determinar la velocidad de corrosión del acero embebido en las muestras estudiadas. Como consecuencia del estudio realizado, se ha podido concluir que la adición de fibras de carbón a morteros de AAS y CP no mejora las características resistentes de los mismos. En relación con la estabilidad de volumen, la incorporación de

  6. Preparation of Cementitious Material Using Smelting Slag and Tailings and the Solidification and Leaching of Pb2+

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Zhang; Shiliu Shi; Chengbiao Wang; Xiaocong Yang; Lijie Guo; Shanshan Xue

    2015-01-01

    The composite cementitious materials were prepared with lead-zinc tailings, lead-zinc smelting slag, and cement clinker. The effect of material ratio on the mechanical properties, the phase analysis, and microstructures were investigated. The effect of the pH and stripping time on the leaching amount of lead ion was discussed. The results show that the additive amount of the tailings should be minimized for the cementitious materials meeting the strength requirements, controlled within 10%. T...

  7. Steel passive state stability in activated fly ash mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Jiménez, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores the behaviour of structural steel embedded in Portland cement (OPC mortars and NaOH- and NaOH-waterglass-activated fly ash, in the presence and absence of 2 % Cl- (CaCl2. Variations were determined in the corrosion potential (Ecorr, linear polarization resistance (Rp and corrosion current density (icorr under different environmental conditions (90 days at 95 % relative humidity (RH, 30 days at ≈ 30 % RH, 760 days at ≈ 95 % RH. In the absence of Cl-, fly ash mortars were able to passivate steel reinforcement, although the stability of the passive state in changing environmental conditions was found to depend heavily on the activating solution used. Steel corrosion in the presence of 2 % Cl- was observed to be similar to the corrosion reported for the material in OPC mortars.

    En el presente trabajo se estudia el comportamiento del acero estructural embebido en morteros de cemento Pórtland (OPC y de cenizas volantes activadas con NaOH y una mezcla de NaOH y waterglass, en ausencia y en presencia de un 2% de Cl- (CaCl2. Se determino la evolución del potencial de corrosión (Ecorr, la resistencia de polarización lineal (Rp y la intensidad de corrosión (icorr, variando las condiciones ambientales (90 días al 95% de humedad relativa (HR-30 días a ≈ 30% HR- 760 días a ≈ 95% HR. En ausencia de Cl- los morteros de cenizas volantes activadas pueden pasivar los refuerzos de acero, si bien la estabilidad del estado pasivo ante cambios en las condiciones ambientales parece mostrar una fuerte dependencia de la solución activadora empleada. En presencia de un 2% de Cl- los aceros se corroen mostrando en comportamiento similar al observado en morteros en base OPC.

  8. Effect of kaolin treatment temperature on mortar chloride permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the results of chloride resistance tests conducted on ordinary Portland cement (OPC mortars containing a Colombian kaolin pre-treated at temperatures of from 600 to 800 ºC. The resulting metakaolin (MK was added to OPC mortar mixes in proportions of 10 and 20% by cement weight. The mortars were compared for physical and chemical properties, including capillary absorption, chloride permeability and pore microstructure as assessed by mercury porosimetry. The best performance was recorded for the samples containing 20% of the material treated at 800 ºC.En el presente trabajo se incluyen los resultados de la resistencia a la penetración de cloruros de morteros de Cemento Portland Ordinario (OPC adicionados con un caolín colombiano sometido a tratamiento térmico en un rango de temperaturas entre 600 y 800 °C. Los productos del tratamiento térmico, metacaolín (MK, son incorporados en mezclas de morteros de OPC en proporciones del 10 y 20% en relación al peso del cemento. Se comparan sus características físico-químicas, entre las cuales se incluye la microestructura de poros evaluada por la técnica de porosimetría de mercurio, con la absorción capilar y la permeabilidad a cloruros. Se concluye que las muestras adicionadas con un 20% del material tratado térmicamente a 800 °C presentan el mejor desempeño en sus propiedades finales.

  9. Study of mortars with industrial residual plastic scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magariños, O. E.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes the utilization of industrial residues of PET (Polyethylene Terephtalate as a partial substitute of arids (sand in mortar making for construction components. Therefore, the environmental impact of large volumes of plastic of urban residues could be decreased. When PET scales were added to mortars in partial replacement of sand, lower unitary weight, acceptable absorption and resistances according to international specifications were achieved. Mortars with 66% of sand replacement by scales and without any additive, showed optimal characteristics to be used in concret block manufacturing.

    Este trabajo de investigación se desarrolla a partir de la hipótesis de utilizar los desechos post-industriales de PET (Tereftalato de Polietileno como sustituto de áridos (arena, ingrediente de morteros, en la fabricación de componentes constructivos. En dicho trabajo se estudian las propiedades físico-químicas de distintos morteros en los que se reemplazó el contenido de árido por escamas de plástico en distintas proporciones. Se compararon y evaluaron las propiedades físico-mecánicas de los morteros en estudio con los convencionales mediante ensayos de resistencia a la flexión, compresión, absorción, durabilidad y microfotografías por barrido electrónico. Estos estudios determinaron que el agregado de PET en morteros puede ser usado como un posible sustituto de áridos, ya que se obtuvieron morteros con 66% de reemplazo de arena por escamas que presentaron menor peso unitario, absorción aceptable y resistencias acordes a las exigidas por normas.

  10. Performance of fly ash-based geopolymer mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahnejad, Zahra; Félix, T.; Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de

    2015-01-01

    This study has investigated the joint effect of several mix parameters on the properties of foam geopolymers. The mix parameters analysed through a laboratory experiment of 54 different mortar mixes were, sodium silicate/sodium hydroxide mass ratio (2.5, 3.5, 4.5), activator/binder mass ratio (0.6, 0.8, 1.0), chemical foaming agent type (hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sodium perborate (NaBO3)) and foaming agent mass ratio content (1%, 2%, 3%). Properties, SEM and FTIR analysis and c...

  11. Measurement of mortar permittivity during setting using a coplanar waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensor based on a coplanar waveguide structure was designed to perform non-destructive tests for material characterization in which the measurement can be done only on one side of the sample. The measurements were compared with the impedance of a capacitor filled with the same material. The permittivity and insertion loss of the sensor showed valuable information about the setting process of a mortar slab during the first 28 days of the hardening process, and a good correlation between both measurements was obtained, so the proposed setup can be useful for structural surveillance and moisture detection in civil structures

  12. Development and Demonstration of Material Properties Database and Software for the Simulation of Flow Properties in Cementitious Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-30

    This report describes work performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in fiscal year 2014 to develop a new Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) software module designated as FLOExcel. FLOExcel incorporates a uniform database to capture material characterization data and a GoldSim model to define flow properties for both intact and fractured cementitious materials and estimate Darcy velocity based on specified hydraulic head gradient and matric tension. The software module includes hydraulic parameters for intact cementitious and granular materials in the database and a standalone GoldSim framework to manipulate the data. The database will be updated with new data as it comes available. The software module will later be integrated into the next release of the CBP Toolbox, Version 3.0. This report documents the development efforts for this software module. The FY14 activities described in this report focused on the following two items that form the FLOExcel package; 1) Development of a uniform database to capture CBP data for cementitious materials. In particular, the inclusion and use of hydraulic properties of the materials are emphasized; and 2) Development of algorithms and a GoldSim User Interface to calculate hydraulic flow properties of degraded and fractured cementitious materials. Hydraulic properties are required in a simulation of flow through cementitious materials such as Saltstone, waste tank fill grout, and concrete barriers. At SRNL these simulations have been performed using the PORFLOW code as part of Performance Assessments for salt waste disposal and waste tank closure.

  13. Reuse of sewage sludge ashes (SSA) in cement mixtures: the effect of SSA on the workability of cement mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzó, J; Payá, J; Borrachero, M V; Girbés, I

    2003-01-01

    The influence of sewage sludge ash (SSA) on workability of cement mortars has been studied. The irregular morphology of SSA particles produced a decrease of mortar workability. A nonlinear reduction of workability in mortars containing SSA was observed, but when SSA content in mortars was increased the workability reduction was less significant. A superplasticizer is used in order to compensate the decrease of workability produced by SSA. When SSA sized fractions were used, only significant differences in workability for mortars prepared with high water volumes or with the presence of superplasticizer were observed.

  14. uv photobiology: excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: steps in nucleotide excision; damage to DNA by uv-endonuclease; use of complementation to study DNA repair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells; role of BUDR photolysis in excision repair, relation between DNA repair defect and human disease; base excision repair; and excision repair by removal of damaged region of a base in DNA without excision

  15. Effect of copolymer latexes on physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume fly ash as a replacement material of cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Gulzhakhan, Yeligbayeva; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA) as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC) was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA) and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA). Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final) were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes.

  16. Effect of Copolymer Latexes on Physicomechanical Properties of Mortar Containing High Volume Fly Ash as a Replacement Material of Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed Negim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA. Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes.

  17. Characterization of mudejar mortars from St. Gil Abbot church (Zaragoza, Spain: Investigation of the manufacturing technology of ancient gypsum mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igea, J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been focused on the investigation of the technological procedure of Mudejar mortars applied to the characterization of a group of unaltered samples from an example church of Mudejar architecture of Aragon. The research was carried out using multi-analytical techniques including petrographic study, chemistry and mineralogical analysis. All mortars present a homogeneous composition. The binder is made up of a mixture of gypsum and a very low proportion of lime, while the main components of the aggregate are gypsum and carbonate rock fragments, both in a different thermal state of decomposition. The results have proved that both, binder and aggregates display the same composition in these mortars. These aggregates are the by-product of a grinding process of the previously burnt raw materials which have had a positive influence on the properties of the mortars in improving their quality.

    Este trabajo se ha centrado en la investigación de la tecnología de fabricación de morteros mudéjares mediante la caracterización de un conjunto de muestras inalteradas procedentes de una iglesia representativa de la arquitectura Mudéjar aragonesa. La investigación se llevó a cabo mediante el uso combinado de técnicas analíticas incluyendo el estudio petrográfico y el análisis químico y mineralógico. Todos los morteros presentan una composición constante formada por una mezcla de yeso y cal, en muy baja proporción, como ligante, mientras que el árido está formado por fragmentos de rocas yesíferas y carbonatadas en distinto estado de descomposición térmica. Los resultados confirman que en la fabricación de los morteros, ligante y áridos presentan la misma composición, siendo éstos últimos el subproducto de la misma materia prima calcinada, incorporados para elaborar el mortero, tras un proceso de molienda. Esta característica ha influido positivamente en las propiedades de los morteros, mejorando su calidad.

  18. Effect of phase separation structure on cementitious reactivity of blast furnace slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu; SUN HengHu; LIU XiaoMing; CUI ZengDi

    2009-01-01

    Blast furnace slag samples with phase separation structure were prepared by re-melting and then water quenching process. By use of XRD, DTA and SEM technologies in combination with mechanical prop-erty experiment, the structure characteristics of samples were determined and their effects on cemen-titious reactivity were investigated. The results show that the samples with phase separation have better cementitious reactivity than sample with homogenous glass and sample with crystalline phases, which mainly contributes to its grass structure with coexistence of Ca-O rich phase and Si-O rich phase. Moreover, the amorphous samples possess hydrability which is affected by their formation process, since phase separation extends the range of possible Ca-rich crystalline phases.

  19. Properties and Microstructure of Polymer Emulsions Modified Fibers Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ying; SUN Qianyao; KONG Lian; FANG He

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new class of cementitious composites filled with polymer emulsions were investigated, and their superior mechanical strength and durability properties compared to composites devoid of fillers were reported. Polymer emulsions were utilized to mechanically reinforce the composite and bridge the cement, fly ash, aggregate and fibers. The results reveal that the epoxy emulsion and poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) emulsion markedly enhance the mechanical and durability properties of cemetitious composites. The fibers can be pulled out in the form of slip-hardening and the abrasion phenomenon can be observed clearly on the surface of the fibers. The hydration extent of cement is higher than that of the pristine composites. The polymer modified cementitious composites designed on micromechanics, have flexibility and plasticity which could be applied for a novel form of multifunctional materials with a range of pipeline coatings applications.

  20. Transition from Multiple Macro-Cracking to Multiple Micro-Cracking in Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; LENG Bing

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the possibility of transition from multiple macro-cracking to multiple micro-cracking in cementitious composites.Conventional polyvinyl alcohol fiber reinforced cementitious composites normally exhibit macroscopic strain-hardening and multiple cracking after the first cracks appear.However,the individual crack width at the saturated stage is normally 60 to 80 μm.In the current study,the effect of fine aggregate size on the cracking performance,especially the individual crack width in the strain-hardening stage was studied by bending tests.The results show that the individual crack widths can be reduced from 60-80 μm to 10-30 μm by modifying the particle size of the fine aggregates used in the composites.

  1. Setting and Strength Characteristics of Alkali-activated Carbonatite Cementitious Materials with Ground Slag Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBFS) addition, the modulus n (mole ratio of SiO2 to Na2 O ) and the concentration of sodium silicate solution on the compressive strength of the ma terial, i e alkali-activated carbonatite cementitious material (AACCMfor short ) was investigated.In addition, it is found that barium chloride has a satisfactory retarding effect on the setting of AACCM in which more than 20% ( by mass ) groud carbonatite was replaced by GGBFS.As a result, a cementitious material, inwhich ground carbona tite rock served as dominative starting material, with 3-day and 28-da y compressive strength greater than 30 MPa and 60 MPa and with continuous strength gain beyond 90 days was obtained.

  2. Effect of phase separation structure on cementitious reactivity of blast furnace slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Blast furnace slag samples with phase separation structure were prepared by re-melting and then water quenching process. By use of XRD,DTA and SEM technologies in combination with mechanical property experiment,the structure characteristics of samples were determined and their effects on cementitious reactivity were investigated. The results show that the samples with phase separation have better cementitious reactivity than sample with homogenous glass and sample with crystalline phases,which mainly contributes to its glass structure with coexistence of Ca-O rich phase and Si-O rich phase. Moreover,the amorphous samples possess hydrability which is affected by their formation process,since phase separation extends the range of possible Ca-rich crystalline phases.

  3. Ion Transport and Microstructure of Sandwich Cementitious Materials Exposed to Chloride Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xingang; WANG Kai; WANG Rui; XIE Tao; HUANG Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of sandwich cementitious materials (SCM) exposed to chloride environment was investigated by accelerated diffusion method and natural diffusion method. Pore structure and micromorphology of SCM were investigated by MIP and SEM-EDS. In comparison with the monolayer structural high performance concrete (HPC), conductive charge for 6 hours, chloride diffusion coefficient, and apparent chloride diffusion coefifcient of SCM were decreased by 30%-40%, two orders of magnitude and 40%-50%, respectively. Pore structure of ultra low ion permeability cementitious materials (ULIPCM) prepared for the facesheet is superior to that of HPC prepared for the core. As for porosity, the most probable pore radius, the content of pores with radius 50 nm and the surface area of pores, the order is ULIPCM

  4. Influence of Bed Ash and Fly Ash Replacement in Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Summoogum-Utchanah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates the influence of fly ash and bottom ash as partial cement substitutes in mortars by studying the particle size distribution, consistency, flow, fresh density, air content, compressive strength and flexural strength characteristics. The results revealed that fly ash and cement had relatively the same particle size distribution unlike bottom ash. In the fresh state, as the amount of pozzolans increased in the mixtures, the mortars showed an enhancement in workability, were susceptible to water loss by bleeding, and exhibited a decline in fresh density. The early strength gains of the fly ash samples were low but reached higher than the control after 28 days of curing. The flexural strength increased as the fly ash content rose to reach a maximum at 20 % replacement. However, the 2-day compressive strength of bottom ash samples was higher than the control but decreased after 28 days of curing while the flexural strength declined with addition of bottom ash except at 5 % substitution.

  5. Coupling nonlinear Stokes and Darcy flow using mortar finite elements

    KAUST Repository

    Ervin, Vincent J.

    2011-11-01

    We study a system composed of a nonlinear Stokes flow in one subdomain coupled with a nonlinear porous medium flow in another subdomain. Special attention is paid to the mathematical consequence of the shear-dependent fluid viscosity for the Stokes flow and the velocity-dependent effective viscosity for the Darcy flow. Motivated by the physical setting, we consider the case where only flow rates are specified on the inflow and outflow boundaries in both subdomains. We recast the coupled Stokes-Darcy system as a reduced matching problem on the interface using a mortar space approach. We prove a number of properties of the nonlinear interface operator associated with the reduced problem, which directly yield the existence, uniqueness and regularity of a variational solution to the system. We further propose and analyze a numerical algorithm based on mortar finite elements for the interface problem and conforming finite elements for the subdomain problems. Optimal a priori error estimates are established for the interface and subdomain problems, and a number of compatibility conditions for the finite element spaces used are discussed. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the algorithm and to compare two treatments of the defective boundary conditions. © 2010 Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of IMACS.

  6. Microstructure Formation and Degradation Mechanism of Cementitious Plugging Agent Slurries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Peiyu; ZHOU Yongxiang; YANG Zhenjie; QIN Jian

    2007-01-01

    The hydration products and microstructure of class G oil well cement and a newly developed plugging agent (YLD) slurries cured in the simulated temperature and pressure environment, which was of similar temperature and pressure with those at the bottom of oil well in a normal depth, were investigated using XRD, TG and SEM. Severe leakage is confirmed at the interface between hardened slurries and steel tube during the dynamically curing process, which induces the quick loss of cementing property of slurries. This should be the dominating cause of degradation of class G oil well cement slurry. A secondary hydration process can take place at the eroded interface of hardened YLD plugging agent slurry. Newly formed C-S-H gel has a self-healing effect to repair the damaged interface, which unceasingly maintains the cementing property of the YLD plugging agent slurry. Therefore, the effective using period of YLD plugging agent can be prolonged.

  7. Evaluation of natural colonisation of cementitious materials: effect of bioreceptivity and environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Sandra; Calvo-Torras, María Ángeles; De Belie, Nele; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    Incorporation of living organisms, such as photosynthetic organisms, on the structure envelope has become a priority in the area of architecture and construction due to aesthetical, economic and ecological advantages. Important research efforts are made to achieve further improvements, such as for the development of cementitious materials with an enhanced bioreceptivity to stimulate biological growth. Previously, the study of the bioreceptivity of cementitious materials has been carried out mainly under laboratory conditions although field-scale experiments may present different results. This work aims at analysing the colonisation of cementitious materials with different levels of bioreceptivity by placing them in three different environmental conditions. Specimens did not present visual colonisation, which indicates that environmental conditions have a greater impact than intrinsic properties of the material at this stage. Therefore, it appears that in addition to an optimized bioreceptivity of the concrete (i.e., composition, porosity and roughness), extra measures are indispensable for a rapid development of biological growth on concrete surfaces. An analysis of the colonisation in terms of genus and quantity of the most representative microorganisms found on the specimens for each location was carried out and related to weather conditions, such as monthly average temperature and total precipitation, and air quality in terms of NOx, SO2, CO and O3. OPC-based specimens presented a higher colonisation regarding both biodiversity and quantity. However, results obtained in a previous experimental programme under laboratory conditions suggested a higher suitability of Magnesium Phosphate Cement-based (MPC-based) specimens for algal growth. Consequently, carefully considering the environment and the relationships between the different organisms present in an environment is vital for successfully using a cementitious material as a substrate for biological growth. PMID

  8. Numerical framework for modeling of cementitious composites at the meso-scale

    OpenAIRE

    Jerábek, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    The application of composite materials as a building material has been constantly growing in popularity during the last decades. Composite materials combine several material components to allow for an optimal utilization of their favorable properties. The focus of this work is the modeling of the cementitious composites at the extit{meso-scale}. In particular, the motivation of the thesis is to model textile reinforced concrete, a new composite material combining a high-strength textile reinf...

  9. Direct assessment of tensile stress-crack opening behavior of Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC)

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, E. N. B.; Fischer, G.; Barros, Joaquim A. O.

    2012-01-01

    The process of designing Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC) is driven by the need to achieve certain performance parameters in tension. These are typically the pseudo-strain hardening behavior and the ability to develop multiple cracks. The assessment of the tensile load-deformation of these materials is therefore of great importance and is frequently carried out by characterizing the material tensile stress-strain behavior. In this paper an alternative approach...

  10. Characterization of cracking in strain hardening cementitious composites using the compact tension test

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, E. N. B.; Fischer, G.; Barros, Joaquim A. O.

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of the tensile behavior of strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) is of significant importance to the material design. In a previous work the tensile stress-crack opening response of different types of SHCC was characterized using notched specimens tested in direct tension, where a single crack was obtained and mechanically characterized by performing Single Crack Tension Test (SCTT). In this study the tensile behavior of SHCC materials is charact...

  11. Quantitative methods used to characterize the impregnation of a glass multifilament yarn by a cementitious matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Aljewifi, Hana; Fiorio, Bruno; Gallias, Jean-Louis.

    2009-01-01

    International audience This paper presents two experimental methods that allow to quantify the impregnation level of the yarn / matrix interface, in the case of Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC). These methods have been tested on three different glass yarns laid in a cementitious matrix, with three different impregnation levels resulting from the manufacturing process. The first method (comparative mercury intrusion porosity test) is based on the evaluation by mercury intrusion porosity of...

  12. Quantitative methods to characterize the impregnation of a glass multifilament yarn by a cementitious matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Aljewifi, Hana; Fiorio, Bruno; Gallias, Jean-Louis.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on two experimental methods that give indicators linked to the impregnation level of the yarn / matrix interface, in the case of Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC). These methods have been tested on three different glass yarns laid in a cementitious matrix, with three different impregnation levels resulting from the manufacturing process. The first method (comparative mercury intrusion porosity test) is based on the evaluation by mercury intrusion porosity of the pores volum...

  13. Various durability aspects of cement pastes and concretes with supplementary cementitious materials

    OpenAIRE

    SAILLIO, Mickael; BAROGHEL BOUNY, Véronique; PRADELLE, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The use of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) as a constituent for concrete receives considerable attention, due to the lower CO2 emission of these materials compared to the production of classic Portland cement. Furthermore, concretes incorporating SCMs show some improved durability properties. SCMs are mainly pozzolanic materials (Fly Ash or Metakaolin) or alkali-activated materials such as ground granulated blast slag (GGBS). In this paper, the durability of concretes and cement p...

  14. Evaluation of test methods used to characterize fiber reinforced cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of fiber reinforced cementitious composites in terms of their behavior under tensile and flexural loading. Flexural testing and subsequent derivation of the tensile stress-deformation response from the flexural test data are preferred in the assessment of the...... and crack development has been quantitatively documented using a digital image correlation (DIC) system to investigate the validity of the commonly made assumptions....

  15. Interaction between microcapsules and cementitious matrix after cracking in a self-healing system

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Xing, F.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom); Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Qian, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of self-healing cementitious composites by using organic microcapsules is designed in Guangdong Key Laboratory of Durability for Coastal Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University. For the organic microcapsules, the shell material is urea formoldehyde (UF), and the core healing agent is Epoxy. The effect of organic microcapsules on mechanical behaviors of the composite specimens and the interaction between an organic microcapsule and an approaching crack is investigated in this study. ...

  16. Design of microcapsule system used for self-healing cementitious material

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, M.; Han, N.; Xing, F.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom); Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    For a microcapsule based self-healing system in the cementitious material, a fundamental issue is to find and facilitate a suitable microcapsule system, concerning either the material selection or design and manufacture process. In this study, urea formaldehyde resin is used for the shell of microcapsule, and bisphenol – an epoxy resin E-51 diluted by n-butyl glycidy ether (BGE) is adopted as the heal-agent inside the microcapsule. The production process mainly includes pre-polymerization pre...

  17. Phenomenological interpretation of the shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composite beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behavior of beams consisting of steel Reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). This study investigates and quantifies the effect of ECC's strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior on the shear capacity of beams...... in a diagonal arrangement between the load and support points due to the strain-hardening response of ECC in tension. The strain-hardening response strongly influenced the shear response of the beam specimen....

  18. Studies on the reuse of waste printed circuit board as an additive for cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Bong-Chan; Song, Jong-Yoon; Lim, Joong-Yeon; Wang, Soo-Kyoon; An, Kwang-Guk; Kim, Dong-Su

    2005-01-01

    The recent development in electronic industries has generated a drastic increase in production of printed circuit boards (PCB). Accordingly, the amount of waste PCB from electronic productions and waste electronics and its environmental impact such as soil and groundwater contamination have become a great concern. This study aims to propose a method for reuse of waste PCB as an additive for cement mortar. Although the expansibility of waste PCB powder finer than 0.08 mm in water was observed to be greater than 2.0%, the maximum expansion rates in water for 0.08 to approximately 0.15 and 0.15 to approximately 0.30 mm sized PCB powders were less than 2.0%, which satisfied the necessary condition as an alternative additive for cement mortar in place of sand. The difference in the compressive strength of standard mortar and waste PCB added mortar was observed to be less than 10% and their difference was expected to be smaller after prolonged aging. The durability of waste PCB added cement mortar was also examined through dry/wet conditioning cyclic tests and acidic/alkaline conditioning tests. From the tests, both weight and compressive strength of cement mortar were observed to be recovered with aging. The leaching test for heavy metals from waste PCB added mortar showed that no heavy metal ions such as copper, lead, or cadmium were detected in the leachate, which resulted from fixation effect of the cement hydrates.

  19. Combined Effects of Non-Conforming Fly Ash and Recycled Masonry Aggregates on Mortar Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Torres-Gómez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates the effects of using non-conforming fly ash (Nc-FA generated in a thermoelectric power plant as filler material for mortars made with natural sand (NA and recycled sand from masonry waste (FRMA. The incorporation of powdered recycled masonry filler (R-MF is also tested as an alternative to siliceous filler (Si-F. Three families of mortars were designed to study: the effect of replacing Si-F with Nc-FA on mortars made with NA; the effect of replacing Si-F with Nc-FA on mortars made with 50% of NA and 50% of FRMA; and the effect of replacing Si-F with R-MF on mortars made with NA and FRMA. Replacing Si-F with Nc-FA is a viable alternative that increases the mechanical strength, the workability and durability properties and decreases the shrinkage. The use of FRMA and Nc-FA improved the mechanical strength of mortars, and it slightly increased the shrinkage. The replacement of Si-F with R-MF on mortars made with FRMA is not a good alternative, because it has a negative impact on all of the properties tested. This work can help both to reduce cement and natural resources’ consumption and to increase the recycling rate of Nc-FA and FRMA.

  20. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  1. Mechanism of Expansion of Mortars with Limestone Filler due to External Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of expansion of mortars and pastes with limestone filler due to external sulfate attack was studied.Mortars and pastes made at water to solid ratios of 0.45, 0.5, 0.6 from Portland Cement (OPC) with 0%, 20% or 30% (w/w) limestone filler (LF) were cured in a 95±1% RH moist room at 20±1 ℃ for 14 or 28 days. They subsequently were immersed in 5% Na2SO4(0.35 M) solution at ambient temperature (1~35 ℃). The expansion of the specimens was measured every month, and selected samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that mortars with 20% LF show larger expansion than that of OPC mortars at up to 9 months of exposure,and the amount of gypsum in both mortars and pastes with LF is much more than that in mortars and pastes without LF. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that the formation of massive gypsum leads to the lager expansion of the mortars and pastes containing 20% LF. These behaviors may be explained by the changes in hydration products due to the addition of LF.

  2. Compression Sensibility of Magnetic-concentrated Fly Ash Mortar under Uniaxial Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xingwen; ZHANG Yajie; QIAN Jueshi

    2012-01-01

    The electrical conductivity,compression sensibility,workability and cost are factors that affect the application of conductive smart materials in civil structures.Consequently,the resistance and compression sensibility of magnetic-concentrated fly ash (MCFA) mortar were investigated using two electrode method,and the difference of compression sensibility between MCFA mortar and carbon fiber reinforced cement (CFRC)under uniaxial loading was studied.Factors affecting the compression sensibility of MCFA mortar,such as MCFA content,loading rate and stress cycles,were analyzed.Results show that fly ash with high content of Fe3O4 can be used to prepare conductive mortar since Fe3O4 is a kind of nonstoichiometric oxide and usually acts as semiconductor.MCFA mortar exhibits the same electrical conductivity to that of CFRC when the content of MCFA is more than 40% by weight of sample.The compression sensibility of mortar is improved with the increase of MCFA content and loading rate.The compression sensibility of MCFA mortar is reversible with the circling of loading.Results show that the application of MCFA in concrete not only provides excellent performances of electrical-functionality and workability,but also reduces the cost of conductive concrete.

  3. ALKALI-ACTIVATED CEMENT MORTARS CONTAINING RECYCLED CLAY-BASED CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Puertas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of clay-based waste as an aggregate for concrete production is an amply studied procedure. Nonetheless, research on the use of this recycled aggregate to prepare alkaline cement mortars and concretes has yet to be forthcoming. The present study aimed to determine: the behaviour of this waste as a pozzolan in OPC systems, the mechanical strength in OPC, alkali-activated slag (AAS and fly ash (AAFA mortars and the effect of partial replacement of the slag and ash themselves with ground fractions of the waste. The pozzolanic behaviour of clay-based waste was confirmed. Replacing up to 20 % of siliceous aggregate with waste aggregate in OPC mortars induced a decline in 7 day strength (around 23 wt. %. The behaviour of waste aggregate in AAMs mortars, in turn, was observed to depend on the nature of the aluminosilicate and the replacement ratio used. When 20 % of siliceous aggregate was replaced by waste aggregate in AAS mortars, the 7 day strength values remained the same (40 MPa. In AAFA mortars, waste was found to effectively replace both the fly ash and the aggregate. The highest strength for AAFA mortars was observed when they were prepared with both a 50 % replacement ratio for the ash and a 20 % ratio for the aggregate.

  4. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  5. Bond Characteristics of Macro Polypropylene Fiber in Cementitious Composites Containing Nanosilica and Styrene Butadiene Latex Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Woong Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the bond properties of polypropylene (PP fiber in plain cementitious composites (PCCs and styrene butadiene latex polymer cementitious composites (LCCs at different nanosilica contents. The bond tests were evaluated according to JCI SF-8, in which the contents of nanosilica in the cement were 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt%, based on cement weight. The addition of nanosilica significantly affected the bond properties between macro PP fiber and cementitious composites. For PCCs, the addition of 0–2 wt% nanosilica enhanced bond strength and interface toughness, whereas the addition of 4 wt% or more reduced bond strength and interface toughness. The bond strength and interfacial toughness of LCCs also increased with the addition of up to 6% nanosilica. The analysis of the relative bond strength showed that the addition of nanosilica affects the bond properties of both PCC and LCC. This result was confirmed via microstructural analysis of the macro PP fiber surface after the bond tests, which revealed an increase in scratches due to frictional forces and fiber tearing.

  6. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities. PMID:26691955

  7. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Zhao, Yazhao; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al2O3 from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C-A-S-H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH)2 with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl2Si2O8·4H2O and Na2Al2Si2O8·H2O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C-A-S-H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities.

  8. Low-alkaline cementitious grout for high-level nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stratum disposal system for high-level nuclear waste mainly involves the use of natural bedrock, called the natural barrier, and over pack and the buffer, those are designated as the artificial barrier. Grouting technology is indispensable for the environment that the crack and the underground water flow of the bedrock bring about mass transport, also ratio active component. However, typical cementitious grout material is strongly alkaline and the alkalinity that it imparts to the barrier material, especially to mineral substances in the bedrock or buffer, is suspected to compromise the performance of the barrier system over the long term. In order to avoid this undesirable alkaline influence, we have developed a procedure for reducing the alkaline state in cementitious materials by employing high volumes of additives such as pozzolanic materials. In this paper, we discuss the basic properties of low-alkaline cementitious grout, and explain how to select and mix appropriate proportions of grout to accomplish the end-objective, i.e., develop an efficient stratum disposal system. We also elaborate on progress achieved in research on this topic over the last two years. (author)

  9. AMS radiocarbon dating of mortar: The case study of the medieval UNESCO site of Modena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmine, Lubritto; Caroselli, Marta; Lugli, Stefano; Marzaioli, Fabio; Nonni, Sara; Marchetti Dori, S.; Terrasi, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    The carbon dioxide contributing to binder formation during the set of a lime mortar reflects the atmospheric 14C content at the time of construction of a building. For this reason, the 14C dating of mortars is used with increasing frequencies in archaeological and architectural research. Mortars, however, may also contain carbonaceous contaminants potentially affecting radiocarbon dating. The Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) of the Second University of Naples (SUN) has recently obtained some promising results in mortar radiocarbon dating thanks to the development of a procedure (i.e. CryoSoniC/Cryo2SoniC) aiming to eliminate exogenous C contamination that may occur in a mortar. The construction history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Modena (Italy) is still controversial and represents a challenging case study for the application of absolute dating methodologies for different reasons. From the point of view of 14C dating, for example, given the high percentage of carbonate aggregates composing these samples, Modena mortars represent an experimental test particularly indicative of exogenous carbon sources suppression ensuring methodology accuracy. In this paper several AMS Radiocarbon dates were carried out on lime lumps with the aim to: (i) verify procedure accuracy by a comparison of the results obtainable from lime lumps dated after different treatments (i.e. bulk lime lumps vs. CryoSoniC purified lime lumps); (ii) compare different building phases absolute chronology for the medieval UNESCO site of Modena, with that assumed by historical sources in order to assess preliminary the 14C dating feasibility for of the site. Historical temporal constraints and mortar clustering, based on petrography, have been applied to define a temporal framework of the analyzed structure. Moreover, a detailed petrographic characterization of mortars was used both as a preliminary tool for the choice of samples and to infer about the

  10. Patch repair: compatibility issues

    OpenAIRE

    Garbacz, Andrzej; Courard, Luc; Bissonnette, Benoît; Głodkowska, W.

    2014-01-01

    Repair of any concrete structure results in formation of complex, at least two-component repair systems. Compatibility approach is treated as a basic requirement during selection of repair material. Recently, the understanding for compatibility requirements in repair systems approach is demonstrated in many papers. The aim of this paper is analyzing the compatibility between repair materials and concrete substrate in the case of patch repair. The compatibility issues were discussed in light o...

  11. INFLUENCE OF FLY ASH REPLACEMENT ON STRENGTH PROPERTIES OF CEMENT MORTAR

    OpenAIRE

    AMARNATH YERRAMALA; BHASKAR DESAI V; RAMA CHANDURDU C

    2012-01-01

    Strength properties of fly ash mortars were evaluated through laboratory investigations. OPC of 53 grade replaced with class F fly ash with 5 - 25 % in the increments of 5 %. The results shown that at early age at all fly ash replacements the strength decreased with respect to normal mortar. However, after 28 days and above themortars made with fly ash replacement up to 15% resulted higher strength than normal OPC mortar. Fly ash replacement of 20 and 25% always had lower strength than normal...

  12. Research on flue gas desulphurization gypsum based inorganic thermal insulation mortar%以脱硫石膏为复合胶凝材料基料配制无机保温砂浆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙振平; 郑金飚; 蒋正武; 王君若; 洪辉; 黄晖皓; 杨正宏

    2011-01-01

    The primary properties and changing law of a kind of inorganic thermal insulation mortar taking Flue Gas Desulphurization gypsum (FCD gypsum) as raw material and small expanded and vitrified balls as lightweight aggregate were studied. The cementitious material made up with FCD gypsum,slag powder,and small amount of cement and activator owned excellent hydration and hardening function,and the 28 d compressive strength can be reached above 25 MPa. The results show that the primary properties of such prepared thermal insulation mortar can meet with the requirements of rlated standards. Moreover,the utilization ability of industrial waste brings them good environmental benefit and social benefit,so the market prospects are broad.%研究了一种以脱硫石膏为复合胶凝材料的基料,以玻化微珠为轻质集料配制而成的保温砂浆的性能及其变化规律.复合胶凝材料由脱硫石膏、矿渣粉、少量水泥和激发剂组成,具备优良的水化硬化特性,其28 d抗压强度能达25 MPa以上.结果表明,以这种复合胶凝材料和玻化微珠共同配制的保温砂浆,其各项性能指标均达到相关标准的要求.同时,因原材料中采用了大量工业废弃物,这种保温砂浆产品的环境效益和社会效益极佳,市场前景广阔.

  13. A new alkali-activated steel slag-based cementitious material for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant from waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yao Jun, E-mail: yaojzhang@yahoo.com.cn [College of Material Science and Engineering, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China); Liu, Li Cai; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ya Chao; Xu, De Long [College of Material Science and Engineering, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel Ni,Ca-cementitious material is synthesized by a two-step reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni,Ca-geopolymer is firstly used for the photocatalytic degradation of MB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption bands in the UV and NIR regions are reported for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reaction mechanism of photocatalytic degradation was proposed. - Abstract: A new type of Ni,Ca-cementitious material was firstly synthesized via a two-step reaction of alkali-activated steel slag polymerization and ion exchange. The XRF results showed that almost all the Na{sup +} ions in the matrix of Na,Ca-cementitious material were replaced by Ni{sup 2+} ions at room temperature. The new hydrated products of metahalloysite (Si{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) and calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) were formed in the Na,Ca-cementitious material. The diffuse reflectance UV-vis near infrared ray spectrum was blue-shifted due to the strong interaction between Ni{sup 2+} and negative charge of [AlO{sub 4}]{sup 5-} tetrahedron in the framework of cementitious material. The Ni,Ca-cementitious material was used as a catalyst for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye and showed a degradation rate of 94.39% under UV irradiation. The high photocatalytic degradation activity was suggested to be the synergistic effect of the cementitious matrix, Ni{sup 2+} ions and the iron oxides of wustite (FeO) and calcium iron oxide (Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5}) from the steel slag. A probable mechanism of photocatalytic oxidative degradation was proposed.

  14. Water transfer properties and shrinkage in lime-based rendering mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizzi, A.; Cultrone, G.

    2012-04-01

    Rendering is the practice of covering a wall or a building façade with one or more layers of mortar, with the main aim to protect the masonry structure against weathering. The render applied must show high flexibility, good adhesion and compatibility with the support (i.e. stone, brick) and, overall, it should be characterised by low water absorption and high water vapour permeability. Water (in the solid, liquid and vapour state) is one of the main factors that drive construction materials to deterioration. Therefore, to evaluate the quality and durability of a rendering mortar, thus ensuring its protective function in the masonry structure, it is fundamental to assess the behaviour of this mortar towards water. Mortars were elaborated with a calcitic dry hydrated lime, a calcareous aggregate, a pozzolan, a lightweight aggregate, a water-retaining agent and a plasticiser. Four types of lime mortars were prepared, in which the binder-to-aggregate ratios were 1:3, 1:4, 1:6 and 1:9 by weight, whilst the pozzolan was kept at 10% of the lime (by mass) and the total admixtures proportion was less than 2% of the total mass. The influence of the characteristics of mortars pore system on the amount of water absorbed and the kinetics of absorption was investigated by means of: free water absorption and drying; capillary uptake; water permeability; water vapour permeability. Interesting deductions can be made from the values of water and water vapour permeability found for mortars: the former increases exponentially with the sand volume of the mortar, whilst the latter increases almost exponentially with the initial water content added to the mortar mixes during their elaboration. However, the relationship obtained between porosity of mortars and permeability values is not really clear. This finding suggests that the permeability of a material cannot be estimated on the basis of its porosity as it can be made for the capillary uptake and free water absorption. Another

  15. Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP): Training and Release of CBP Toolbox Software, Version 1.0 - 13480

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the Office of Tank Waste Management within the Office of Environmental Management of U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). The CBP program has developed a set of integrated tools (based on state-of-the-art models and leaching test methods) that improve understanding and predictions of the long-term hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. Tools selected for and developed under this program are intended to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near-surface engineered waste disposal systems for periods of performance up to or longer than 100 years for operating facilities and longer than 1,000 years for waste management purposes. CBP software tools were made available to selected DOE Office of Environmental Management and field site users for training and evaluation based on a set of important degradation scenarios, including sulfate ingress/attack and carbonation of cementitious materials. The tools were presented at two-day training workshops held at U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Savannah River, and Hanford included LeachXSTM/ORCHESTRA, STADIUMR, and a CBP-developed GoldSim Dashboard interface. Collectively, these components form the CBP Software Toolbox. The new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency leaching test methods based on the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) were also presented. The CBP Dashboard uses a custom Dynamic-link library developed by CBP to couple to the LeachXSTM/ORCHESTRA and STADIUMR codes to simulate reactive transport and degradation in cementitious materials for selected performance assessment scenarios. The first day of the workshop introduced participants to the software components via presentation materials, and the second day included hands-on tutorial exercises followed by discussions of

  16. Carbonation kinetics in roman-like lime mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Moral, S.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic parameterisation of lime mortar carbonation is a useful technique for understanding ancient building methods and the long-lived physical-chemical stability of roman monuments. Portlandite (Ca(OH2 binders harden in the air on contact with atmospheric CO2, producing CaCO3. Water evaporation and the presence of silicate aggregates have a three-fold effect: prompting the development of a pore system that permits CO2, self-diffusion, reducing shrinkage and cracking during drying and (possibly giving rise to subsequent pozzolanic reactions. The present survey involved air-hardening a series of roman-like lime mortars which differed in terms of: (i type of aggregate, volcanic tephra and arkose; (ii aggregate/binder ratio, 1:2 as used in the catacombs and 1:4 as found in standard roman construction and (iii temperature, the 17 ºC prevailing in underground environments and the 30 ºC typical of warm Mediterranean areas. The analyses that provided the most useful information were performed in a classic X-ray diffractometer adapted to accommodate an author-designed chamber in which temperature control was achieved by an internal refrigerant and a PID-governed electrical heater Additional data were obtained with DTA and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. The tests conducted on the Roman-like lime mortars manufactured for the experiment showed that the hardening temperature is a critical factor in the initial phases of carbonation. Calcite precipitation rates and total mineral precipitation increased with temperature, but fell very quickly as calcite precipitated. In theoretical calculations assuming an open reactor with continuous CO2, input, total calcitisation time was found to be 156 m in. at 30 ºC and 175 min. at 17 ºC, whilst in the mortars actually hardened in the experimental part of the study, calcitisation gradually blocked the flow or CO2, gas into the

  17. Mineralogical and microstructural studies of mortars from the bath complex of the Roman villa rustica near Mosnje (Slovenia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.kramar@rescen.si [Institute for the Protection of the Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, Conservation Centre, Restoration Centre, Poljanska 40, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zalar, Vesna [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Geology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Urosevic, Maja [University of Granada, Faculty of Science, Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, Avda. Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Koerner, Wilfried [University of Vienna, Department of Environmental Geosciences, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Mauko, Alenka [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Dimiceva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mirtic, Breda [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Geology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lux, Judita [Institute for the Protection of the Cultural Heritage of Slovenia, Conservation Centre, Preventive Archaeology Department, Tomsiceva 7, 4000 Kranj (Slovenia); Mladenovic, Ana [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Dimiceva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-11-15

    This study deals with the characterization of mortars collected from bath complex of the Roman villa rustica from an archeological site near Mosnje (Slovenia). The mortar layers of the mosaics, wall paintings and mortar floors were investigated. A special aggregate consisting of brick fragments was present in the mortars studied. The mineralogical and petrographic compositions of the mortars were determined by means of optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Analysis of aggregate-binder interfaces using SEM-EDS revealed various types of reactivity rims. In order to assess the hydraulic characteristics of the mortars, the acid-soluble fractions were determined by ICP-OES. Furthermore, the results of Hg-porosimetry and gas sorption isotherms showed that mortars with a higher content of brick fragments particles exhibited a higher porosity and a greater BET surface area but a lower average pore diameter compared to mortars lacking this special aggregate. - Highlights: {yields} Mineral and microstructural characterizations of brick-lime mortars. {yields} Hydraulic character of mortars in Roman baths complex. {yields} Reaction rims were observed around brick fragments and dolomitic grains. {yields} Higher content of brick particles yielded a higher BET surface area. {yields} Addition of brick particles increased porosity and diminished pore size diameter.

  18. Effects of surfactants on the properties of mortar containing styrene/methacrylate superplasticizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negim, El-Sayed; Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Khatib, Jamal; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of mortar containing synthetic cosurfactants as air entraining agent are investigated. The cosurfactants consist of a combination of 2% dodecyl benzene sodium sulfonate (DBSS) and either 1.5% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or 1.5% polyoxyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (POE). Also these cosurfactants were used to prepare copolymers latex: styrene/butyl methacrylate (St/BuMA), styrene/methyl methacrylate (St/MMA), and styrene/glycidyl methacrylate (St/GMA), in order to study their effects on the properties of mortar. The properties of mortar examined included flow table, W/C ratio, setting time, water absorption, compressive strength, and combined water. The results indicate that the latex causes improvement in mortar properties compared with cosurfactants. Also polymer latex containing DBSS/POE is more effective than that containing DBSS/PVA.

  19. Field and laboratory determination of a poly(vinyl/vinylidene chloride) additive in brick mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, S L; Newman, J H; Ptak, F L

    1990-02-01

    A polymerized vinyl/vinylidene chloride additive, used in brick mortar during the 60s and 70s, is detected at the building site by the field method, which employs a commercially available chloride test strip. The field test results can then be verified by the laboratory methods. In one method, total chlorine in the mortar is determined by an oxygen-bomb method and the additive chloride is determined by difference after water-soluble chlorides have been determined on a separate sample. In the second method, the polymerized additive is extracted directly from the mortar with tetrahydrofuran (THF). The difference in weight before and after extraction of the additive gives the weight of additive in the mortar. Evaporation of the THF from the extract leaves a thin film of the polymer, which gives an infrared "fingerprint" spectrum characteristic of the additive polymer.

  20. Study of the fracture behavior of mortar and concretes with crushed rock or pebble aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare the fracture energy of mortar and concretes produced with crushed rock and pebble aggregates using zero, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of aggregates mixed with standard mortar and applying the wedge splitting method to achieve stable crack propagation. The samples were cast in a special mold and cured for 28 days, after which they were subjected to crack propagation tests by the wedge splitting method to determine the fracture energies of the mortar and concrete. The concretes showed higher fracture energy than the mortar, and the concretes containing crushed rock showed higher resistance to crack propagation than all the compositions containing pebbles. The fracture energy varied from 38 to 55 J.m-2. A comparison of the number of aggregates that separated from the two concrete matrices with the highest fracture energies indicated that the concrete containing pebbles crumbled more easily and was therefore less resistant to crack propagation.