WorldWideScience

Sample records for cementation process project

  1. Cementation process study

    Park, H.H.; Han, K.W.; Ahn, S.J.; Choi, K.S.; Lee, M.W.; Ryu, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the cementation process study, in 1984, design of the waste treatment simulator was finished for the first step. We can experience not only the operation of solidification system but the design and construction of comming large scale plant through the design of cementation process. (Author)

  2. ALARA Design Review for the Resumption of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Cementation Process Project Activities

    Dayley, L

    2000-01-01

    The requirements for the performance of radiological design reviews are codified in 10CFR835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The basic requirements for the performance of ALARA design reviews are presented in the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM). The HSRCM has established trigger levels requiring radiological reviews of non-routine or complex work activities. These requirements are implemented in site procedures HNF-PRO-1622 and 1623. HNF-PRO-1622 Radiological Design Review Process requires that ''radiological design reviews [be performed] of new facilities and equipment and modifications of existing facilities and equipment''. In addition, HNF-PRO-1623 Radiological Work Planning Process requires a formal ALARA Review for planned activities that are estimated to exceed 1 person-rem total Dose Equivalent (DE). The purpose of this review is to validate that the original design for the PFP Cementation Process ensures that the principles of ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) were included...

  3. Process of preparing hydraulic cement

    1919-12-11

    A process of preparing hydraulic cement from oil shale or shale coke is characterized in that the oil shale or shale coke after the distillation is burned long and hot to liberate the usual amount of carbonic acid and then is fine ground to obtain a slow hardening hydraulic cement.

  4. Quantitative modelling of the degradation processes of cement grout. Project CEMMOD

    Grandia, Fidel; Galindez, Juan-Manuel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge (Amphos21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-05-15

    Grout cement is planned to be used in the sealing of water-conducting fractures in the deep geological storage of spent nuclear fuel waste. The integrity of such cementitious materials should be ensured in a time framework of decades to a hundred of years as mimum. However, their durability must be quantified since grout degradation may jeopardize the stability of other components in the repository due to the potential release of hyperalkaline plumes. The model prediction of the cement alteration has been challenging in the last years mainly due to the difficulty to reproduce the progressive change in composition of the Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) compounds as the alteration proceeds. In general, the data obtained from laboratory experiments show a rather similar dependence between the pH of pore water and the Ca-Si ratio of the CSH phases. The Ca-Si ratio decreases as the CSH is progressively replaced by Si-enriched phases. An elegant and reasonable approach is the use of solid solution models even keeping in mind that CSH phases are not crystalline solids but gels. An additional obstacle is the uncertainty in the initial composition of the grout to be considered in the calculations because only the recipe of low-pH clinker is commonly provided by the manufacturer. The hydration process leads to the formation of new phases and, importantly, creates porosity. A number of solid solution models have been reported in literature. Most of them assumed a strong non-ideal binary solid solution series to account for the observed changes in the Ca-Si ratios in CSH. However, it results very difficult to reproduce the degradation of the CSH in the whole Ca-Si range of compositions (commonly Ca/Si=0.5-2.5) by considering only two end-members and fixed nonideality parameters. Models with multiple non-ideal end-members with interaction parameters as a function of the solid composition can solve the problem but these can not be managed in the existing codes of reactive

  5. Quantitative modelling of the degradation processes of cement grout. Project CEMMOD

    Grandia, Fidel; Galindez, Juan-Manuel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Grout cement is planned to be used in the sealing of water-conducting fractures in the deep geological storage of spent nuclear fuel waste. The integrity of such cementitious materials should be ensured in a time framework of decades to a hundred of years as mimum. However, their durability must be quantified since grout degradation may jeopardize the stability of other components in the repository due to the potential release of hyperalkaline plumes. The model prediction of the cement alteration has been challenging in the last years mainly due to the difficulty to reproduce the progressive change in composition of the Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) compounds as the alteration proceeds. In general, the data obtained from laboratory experiments show a rather similar dependence between the pH of pore water and the Ca-Si ratio of the CSH phases. The Ca-Si ratio decreases as the CSH is progressively replaced by Si-enriched phases. An elegant and reasonable approach is the use of solid solution models even keeping in mind that CSH phases are not crystalline solids but gels. An additional obstacle is the uncertainty in the initial composition of the grout to be considered in the calculations because only the recipe of low-pH clinker is commonly provided by the manufacturer. The hydration process leads to the formation of new phases and, importantly, creates porosity. A number of solid solution models have been reported in literature. Most of them assumed a strong non-ideal binary solid solution series to account for the observed changes in the Ca-Si ratios in CSH. However, it results very difficult to reproduce the degradation of the CSH in the whole Ca-Si range of compositions (commonly Ca/Si=0.5-2.5) by considering only two end-members and fixed nonideality parameters. Models with multiple non-ideal end-members with interaction parameters as a function of the solid composition can solve the problem but these can not be managed in the existing codes of reactive

  6. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; ; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  7. Development and design of a cementation process

    Vicente, R.

    1986-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for the immobilization of intermediate level liquid waste in cement is presented. The cementation process adopted a vibration assisted mixing process. The solidified waste is packed in 200 litres drum with barite concrete lining. The waste package is classified as Type A package for transport. (Author) [pt

  8. Development and design of a cementation process

    Vicente, R.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for the immobilization of intermediate-level liquid wastes in cement is presented. The cementation process adopted a vibration assisted mixing process. The solidified waste is packed in 200 litres drum with barite concrete lining. The waste package is classified as Type A package for transport. (Author) [pt

  9. Westinghouse integrated cementation facility. Smart process automation minimizing secondary waste

    Fehrmann, H.; Jacobs, T.; Aign, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Westinghouse Cementation Facility described in this paper is an example for a typical standardized turnkey project in the area of waste management. The facility is able to handle NPP waste such as evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The facility scope covers all equipment required for a fully integrated system including all required auxiliary equipment for hydraulic, pneumatic and electric control system. The control system is based on actual PLC technology and the process is highly automated. The equipment is designed to be remotely operated, under radiation exposure conditions. 4 cementation facilities have been built for new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in China

  10. Compressive strength test for cemented waste forms: validation process

    Haucz, Maria Judite A.; Candido, Francisco Donizete; Seles, Sandro Rogerio

    2007-01-01

    In the Cementation Laboratory (LABCIM), of the Development Centre of the Nuclear Technology (CNEN/CDTN-MG), hazardous/radioactive wastes are incorporated in cement, to transform them into monolithic products, preventing or minimizing the contaminant release to the environment. The compressive strength test is important to evaluate the cemented product quality, in which it is determined the compression load necessary to rupture the cemented waste form. In LABCIM a specific procedure was developed to determine the compressive strength of cement waste forms based on the Brazilian Standard NBR 7215. The accreditation of this procedure is essential to assure reproductive and accurate results in the evaluation of these products. To achieve this goal the Laboratory personal implemented technical and administrative improvements in accordance with the NBR ISO/IEC 17025 standard 'General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories'. As the developed procedure was not a standard one the norm ISO/IEC 17025 requests its validation. There are some methodologies to do that. In this paper it is described the current status of the accreditation project, especially the validation process of the referred procedure and its results. (author)

  11. Sulphur cement pre-composition and process for preparing such sulphur cement pre-composition

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides a process for the preparation of a sulphur cement pre-composition comprising reacting sulphur modifier with polysulphide-containing organosilane to obtain in the presence of sulphur the sulphur cement pre-composition, wherein the organosilane has the general molecular formula:

  12. Use of residual wood in the cement manufacturing process

    Gue, R.

    2005-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed the use of wood residuals in the cement manufacturing process. An outline of the cement manufacturing process was presented. Raw materials are combined in exact proportions to create a chemically correct mix, which is then pulverized in a mill. The mix is then burned in a kiln. The end product is cooled to form the pellet sized material known as clinker, which is then milled to form cement. The combustion and destruction characteristics of a cement kiln were presented. Modern cement kilns require approximately 3.2 Gj of energy to produce one tonne of cement. It was noted that wood residuals do not contain halogens, sulfur or other materials detrimental to the cement manufacturing process. Possible injection points for kilns were presented. Various studies have shown that wood residuals can be safely used as a fuel in the manufacture of cement. Environmental benefits derived from using wood included the complete destruction of organic portions, and the fact that residual ash becomes an indistinguishable part of the final product. It was concluded that wood residual materials are a satisfactory alternative fuel for the cement industry. tabs., figs

  13. The improved heat integration of cement production under limited process conditions: A case study for Croatia

    Boldyryev, Stanislav; Mikulčić, Hrvoje; Mohorović, Zoran; Vujanović, Milan; Krajačić, Goran; Duić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Given that cement is the most widely used material for housing and modern infrastructure needs, this paper analyses the energy efficiency of the cement manufacturing processes for a particular cement plant. The cement industry is one of the largest consumers of carbon-containing primary energy sources and one of the primary polluters of the environment, emitting approximately 5% of global pollution. Energy consumption represents the largest part of the production cost for cement factories and has a significant influence on product prices. Given that it is realised in modern society that infrastructural projects lead to a higher level of economy and sustainability for countries, reducing the production cost in the cement industry is a very important problem. The authors analysed the energy consumption of a particular cement factory in Croatia to determine the minimum energy targets of production and proposed pathways to improve energy efficiency. The Process Integration approach was used in this study. Nevertheless, the features of the cement factory forced the research to update its methodological steps to propose real pathways for a retrofit project with the aim of achieving the optimal minimum temperature difference between process streams. There are various streams, including those that contain solid particles, gas and air streams, and streams, that should be cooled down rapidly; these facts become more complicated by the special construction of the process equipment, which causes heat transfer between some streams to be impossible. The main objective of this paper is to determine the potential of real energy savings and propose a solution for a new concept of heat exchanger network (HEN) that avoids the process traps and provides a feasible retrofit. The maximum heat recovery of that production of a particular type of cement was determined and improved when a HEN was built. The authors conclude that the energy consumption of the cement factory can be reduced by

  14. Halting of the calcium aluminate cement hydration process

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium aluminate cement reactions with water lead to the anhydrous phases dissolution resulting a saturated solution, followed by nucleation and crystal growth of the hydrate compounds. This is a dynamic process, therefore, it is necessary to use suitable methods to halt the hydration in order to study the phase transformations kinetics of such materials. In this work two methods are evaluated: use of acetone and microwave drying, aiming to withdraw the free water and inhibit further reactions. X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were used to quantify the phases generated in the cement samples which were kept at 37 deg C for 1 to 15 days. The advantages and disadvantages of those procedures are presented and discussed. The use of microwave to halt the hydration process seems to be effective to withdraw the cement free water, and it can further be used in researches of the refractory castables area, endodontic cements, etc. (author)

  15. Processing method for cleaning water waste from cement kneader

    Soda, Kenzo; Fujita, Hisao; Nakajima, Tadashi.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of processing cleaning water wastes from a cement kneader in a case of processing liquid wastes containing radioactive wastes or deleterious materials such as heavy metals by means of cement solidification. Cleaning waste wastes from the kneader are sent to a cleaning water waste tank, in which gentle stirring is applied near the bottom and sludges are retained so as not to be coagulated. Sludges retained at the bottom of the cleaning water waste tank are sent after elapse of a predetermined time and then kneaded with cements. Thus, since the sludges in the cleaning water are solidified with cement, inhomogenous solidification products consisting only of cleaning sludges with low strength are not formed. The resultant solidification product is homogenous and the compression strength thereof reaches such a level as capable of satisfying marine disposal standards required for the solidification products of radioactive wastes. (I.N.)

  16. Technical benefit and risk analysis on cement clinkering process with compact internal burning of carbon

    Chen, Hanmin

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates the potential technical benefit and risk for cement clinkering process with compact internal burning of carbon, a laboratory-phase developing technique, from 9 aspects, including the heat consumption of clinkering and exhaust heat utilization, clinker quality, adaptability to alternative fuels, the disposal ability of industrial offal and civil garbage, adaptability to the raw materials and fuels with high content of chlorine, sulphur and alkali, the feasibility of process scale up, the briquetting process of the coal-containing cement raw meal pellet, NO x emission and the capital cost and benefit of conversion project. It is concluded that it will be able to replace the modern precalciner rotary kiln process and to become the main stream technique of cement clinkering process in low carbon economy times. - Highlights: • Compact internal burning of carbon enables cement shaft kiln to run stably. • Compact internal burning of carbon enables cement shaft kiln to scale up. • New process triples energy efficiency with excellent environmental performance. • It will be able to compete with and replace the existing precalciner kiln process. • It will become the mainstream clinkering process in low carbon economy

  17. The effects of large scale processing on caesium leaching from cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste

    Lee, D.J.; Brown, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of large scale processing on the properties of cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste have been investigated. Leach tests have been performed on full-size drums, cores and laboratory samples of cement formulations containing Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement (SRPC) and a blended cement (90% ground granulated blast furnace slag/10% OPC). In addition, development of the cement hydration exotherms with time and the temperature distribution in 220 dm 3 samples have been followed. (author)

  18. Influence of relationship water/cement upon the processing of cements with pozzolana in standard mortar

    Gener Rizo, M.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The processing of standard mortar is completed following different methods in accordance with the country, but they exist two fundamental tendecies, the ISO and the ASTM. The cuban norm for mechanic-physic tests is based in ISO, and so they use a constant relationship water/cement in the processing of standard mortar a great problem concerning the cement users when they tested those mixed with puzzolanes, because they don't take care of the bigger water needs of those materials. In this work we present an study of the behaviour of Pozzolanic Portland cements (PP-250 elaborates with a fix and changeable relationship water/cement, obtained starting from the fluidity of the pure Portland cement. (P-350 The results obtained shows that the mechanical resistance decreased in cement mortars PP-250 realised with changeable relationship water/cement. So we recommend the adoption of an optional procedure to elaborate a quality mortar with pozzolana cements.

    La elaboración del mortero normalizado se realiza internacionalmente por diferentes métodos, pero existen dos tendencias fundamentales, la enunciada por ISO y por ASTM. La norma cubana de ensayos físico-mecánicos de cemento se basa en la norma ISO, por lo que para la elaboración del mortero normalizado se utiliza una relación agua/cemento constante. Esto ha provocado discrepancias con los usuarios del cemento, especialmente cuando se ensayan los cementos que contienen puzolanas, ya que se plantea que no se tiene en cuenta la mayor demanda de agua de estos materiales. En el presente trabajo se presenta un estudio del comportamiento de cementos Portland Puzolánicos (PP-250 elaborados con una relación agua/ cemento fija y variable, lograda a partir de la fluidez de la pasta de cemento Portland puro (P-350. Los resultados obtenidos indican que se producen disminuciones en la resistencia mecánica en los morteros de cemento PP-250 elaborados con agua/ cemento variable y recomienda la

  19. Reactive transport modeling of interaction processes between clay stone and cement

    Windt, L. de; van der Lee, J.; Pellegrini, D.

    2001-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in clayey formations may require the use of large amounts of concrete and cement. The chemical interactions between these industrial materials and the host rock are modeled with the reactive transport code HYTEC for time scales and a geometry representative of disposal projects. The pH evolution, a key parameter in element mobility, is studied more specifically. It depends on several interdependent processes: i) diffusion of highly alkaline cement pore solution, ii) strong buffering related to important mineral transformations both in the cement and in the clay, and iii) cation exchange processes, beyond the zone of intense mineral transformations. In addition, precipitation of secondary minerals may lead to a partial or complete clogging of the pore space, almost stopping the propagation of the high pH plume. In a second step, preliminary results on the migration of strontium and uranium in these strongly coupled systems are presented as an example of transport parameter derivation. (authors)

  20. Air Pollutant Emissions Projections for the Cement and Steel Industry in China and the Impact of Emissions Control Technologies

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Khanna, Nina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    China’s cement and steel industry accounts for approximately half of the world’s total cement and steel production. These two industries are two of the most energy-intensive and highest carbon dioxide (CO2)-emitting industries and two of the key industrial contributors to air pollution in China. For example, the cement industry is the largest source of particulate matter (PM) emissions in China, accounting for 40 percent of its industrial PM emissions and 27 percent of its total national PM emissions. The Chinese steel industry contributed to approximately 20 percent of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions and 27 percent of PM emissions for all key manufacturing industries in China in 2013. In this study, we analyzed and projected the total PM and SO2 emissions from the Chinese cement and steel industry from 2010–2050 under three different scenarios: a Base Case scenario, an Advanced scenario, and an Advanced EOP (end-of-pipe) scenario. We used bottom-up emissions control technologies data and assumptions to project the emissions. In addition, we conducted an economic analysis to estimate the cost for PM emissions reductions in the Chinese cement industry using EOP control technologies, energy efficiency measures, and product change measures. The results of the emissions projection showed that there is not a substantial difference in PM emissions between the Base Case and Advanced scenarios, for both the cement and steel industries. This is mainly because PM emissions in the cement industry caused mainly by production process and not the fuel use. Since our forecast for the cement production in the Base Case and Advanced scenarios are not too different from each other, this results in only a slight difference in PM emissions forecast for these two scenarios. Also, we assumed a similar share and penetration rate of control technologies from 2010 up to 2050 for these two scenarios for the cement and steel industry. However, the Advanced EOP

  1. Project management process.

    2007-03-01

    This course provides INDOT staff with foundational knowledge and skills in project management principles and methodologies. INDOTs project management processes provide the tools for interdisciplinary teams to efficiently and effectively deliver pr...

  2. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT PROCESS

    Yana Derenskaya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to define the essence of project scope management process, its components, as well as to develop an algorithm of project scope management in terms of pharmaceutical production. Methodology. To carry out the study, available information sources on standards of project management in whole and elements of project scope management in particular are analysed. Methods of system and structural analysis, logical generalization are used to study the totality of subprocesses of project scope management, input and output documents, and to provide each of them. Methods of network planning are used to construct a precedence diagram of project scope management process. Results of the research showed that components of the project scope management are managing the scope of the project product and managing the content of project work. It is the second component is investigated in the presented work as a subject of research. Accordingly, it is defined that project scope management process is to substantiate and bring to the realization the necessary amount of work that ensures the successful implementation of the project (achievement of its goal and objectives of individual project participants. It is also determined that the process of managing the project scope takes into account the planning, definition of the project scope, creation of the structure of project work, confirmation of the scope and management of the project scope. Participants of these subprocesses are: customer, investor, and other project participants – external organizations (contractors of the project; project review committee; project manager and project team. It is revealed that the key element of planning the project scope is the formation of the structure of design work, the justification of the number of works, and the sequence of their implementation. It is recommended to use the following sequence of stages for creating the structure of project work

  3. NEURO-FUZZY MODELLING OF BLENDING PROCESS IN CEMENT PLANT

    Dauda Olarotimi Araromi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The profitability of a cement plant depends largely on the efficient operation of the blending stage, therefore, there is a need to control the process at the blending stage in order to maintain the chemical composition of the raw mix near or at the desired value with minimum variance despite variation in the raw material composition. In this work, neuro-fuzzy model is developed for a dynamic behaviour of the system to predict the total carbonate content in the raw mix at different clay feed rates. The data used for parameter estimation and model validation was obtained from one of the cement plants in Nigeria. The data was pre-processed to remove outliers and filtered using smoothening technique in order to reveal its dynamic nature. Autoregressive exogenous (ARX model was developed for comparison purpose. ARX model gave high root mean square error (RMSE of 5.408 and 4.0199 for training and validation respectively. Poor fit resulting from ARX model is an indication of nonlinear nature of the process. However, both visual and statistical analyses on neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS model gave a far better result. RMSE of training and validation are 0.28167 and 0.7436 respectively, and the sum of square error (SSE and R-square are 39.6692 and 0.9969 respectively. All these are an indication of good performance of ANFIS model. This model can be used for control design of the process.

  4. Fiscal 1999 technical survey report. Model project implementation feasibility study in India on cement calcination facilities waste heat recovery; 1999 nendo Indo ni okeru cement shosei setsubi hainetsu kaishu model jigyo jisshi kanosei chosa hokokusho

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    India produces 96-million tons/year of cement, ranking fourth in the world, and 55% of the yield comes from 1-million tons/year plants. Some of the waste heat from the manufacturing process is used to dry materials, etc., but much is discharged into the atmosphere. Estimation is made of the energy conservation effect expected to be brought about in case the waste heat power generation technology which is in use to good effect in Japan is introduced into Indian cement plants whose clinker production exceeds 3,000 tons/day. As the result, it is concluded that the model project may be implemented at any of the four plants for which power generation capability and CO2 reduction effect are tentatively calculated below. There will be power generation of 7,300kW and CO2 reduction of 43,125 tons for the Guijarat Ambuja Cement Ltd./Ambuja Cement Eastern plant; power generation of 7,700kW and CO2 reduction of 901,960 tons for the India Cement Ltd./Rassi Cement plant; power generation of 45,098kW and CO2 reduction of 1,140,220 tons for the Larsen and Toubro Ltd./Hirmi plant; and power generation of 5,450kW and CO2 reduction of 32,230 tons for the J. K. Corp Ltd./Lakshmi Cement Sirohi plant. (NEDO)

  5. Fiscal 1999 technical survey report. Model project implementation feasibility study in China on effective utilization of cement waste heat; 1999 nendo Chugoku ni okeru cement hainetsu yuko riyo model jigyo jisshi kanosei chosa hokokusho

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Although China ranks first in the world in the manufacture of cement, yet the energy consumption rate is high and there remains room for improvement. Effective utilization of energy at cement making plants will not only profit the industry but also contribute to the stabilization of energy supply for China. The model project on power generation using cement waste heat implemented at Ningguo Cement Plant was concluded successfully. For the purpose of enabling China to domestically manufacture the equipment, the installation of such equipment at Zhujiang Cement Plant and Liuzhou Cement Plant in Guangxi Zhuangzu Zizhiqu was assumed, and their locations and plant operating conditions were studied. In addition, surveys were conducted of manufacturers of important components of the power generation equipment such as boilers, steam turbines, generators, and breaker boards. Two manufacturers were visited for each of the components, and they were checked for records of manufacturing similar equipment, quality assurance and process management capabilities, and for ability to satisfy required specifications. Among the visited manufacturers were Nanjing Turbine and Electric Machinery Co., Jinan Power Equipment Factory, and Hangzhou Boiler Works. Based on the results of the surveys, it was concluded that the model project may be implemented. (NEDO)

  6. IT Project Prioritization Process

    Shollo, Arisa; Constantiou, Ioanna

    2013-01-01

    In most of the large companies IT project prioritization process is designed based on principles of evidencebased management. We investigate a case of IT project prioritization in a financial institution, and in particular, how managers practice evidence-based management during this process. We use...... a rich dataset built from a longitudinal study of the prioritization process for the IT projects. Our findings indicate that managers reach a decision not only by using evidence but from the interplay between the evidence and the judgment devices that managers employ. The interplay between evidence...

  7. Exergetic life cycle assessment of cement production process with waste heat power generation

    Sui, Xiuwen; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Shuai; Zhang, Shushen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Exergetic life cycle assessment was performed for the cement production process. • Each system’s efficiency before and after waste heat power generation was analyzed. • The waste heat power generation improved the efficiency of each production system. • It provided technical support for the implementation of energy-saving schemes. - Abstract: The cement industry is an industry that consumes a considerable quantity of resources and energy and has a very large influence on the efficient use of global resources and energy. In this study, exergetic life cycle assessment is performed for the cement production process, and the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of each system before and after waste heat power generation is investigated. The study indicates that, before carrying out a waste heat power generation project, the objective energy efficiencies of the raw material preparation system, pulverized coal preparation system and rotary kiln system are 39.4%, 10.8% and 50.2%, respectively, and the objective exergy efficiencies are 4.5%, 1.4% and 33.7%, respectively; after carrying out a waste heat power generation project, the objective energy efficiencies are 45.8%, 15.5% and 55.1%, respectively, and the objective exergy efficiencies are 7.8%, 2.8% and 38.1%, respectively. The waste heat power generation project can recover 3.7% of the total input exergy of a rotary kiln system and improve the objective exergy efficiencies of the above three systems. The study can identify degree of resource and energy utilization and the energy-saving effect of a waste heat power generation project on each system, and provide technical support for managers in the implementation of energy-saving schemes

  8. Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process

    Blount, Gerald C [North Augusta, SC; Falta, Ronald W [Seneca, SC; Siddall, Alvin A [Aiken, SC

    2011-07-12

    A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

  9. Cement-based processes for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste

    Brown, D.J.; Lee, D.J.; Price, M.S.T.; Smith, D.L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the use of cement-based materials for the immobilisation of intermediate level wastes. Various cementitious materials are surveyed and the use of blast furnace slag is shown to be advantageous. The properties of cemented wastes are surveyed both during processing and as solid products. The application of Winfrith Cementation Laboratory technology to plant and flowsheet development for Winfrith Reactor sludge immobilisation is described. (author)

  10. HYDRATION PROCESS AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CEMENT PASTE WITH RECYCLED CONCRETE POWDER AND SILICA SAND POWDER

    Jaroslav Topič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete powder (RCP mostly consisting of cement paste could be reused as partial cement replacement. The aim of this paper is to compare hydration and mechanical properties of RCP and two types of silica sand powder (SSP. Comparison of those materials combined with cement can highlight the binder properties of recycled concrete powder. Using of two types of SSP also show an influence of their fines on hydration process and mechanical properties. Particle size analysis and calorimetric measurement were carried out and mechanical properties such as bulk density, dynamic Young’s modulus and compression strength were examine. Calorimetric measurement proves the presence of exposed non-hydrated particles in RCP that can react again. However lower density of old cement paste in RCP overweight the mentioned potential of RCP and mechanical properties are decreasing compared with reference cement paste and cement paste SSP.

  11. Solidification of low-level radioactive liquid waste using a cement-silicate process

    Grandlund, R.W.; Hayes, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Extensive use has been made of silicate and Portland cement for the solidification of industrial waste and recently this method has been successfully used to solidify a variety of low level radioactive wastes. The types of wastes processed to date include fuel fabrication sludges, power reactor waste, decontamination solution, and university laboratory waste. The cement-silicate process produces a stable solid with a minimal increase in volume and the chemicals are relatively inexpensive and readily available. The method is adaptable to either batch or continuous processing and the equipment is simple. The solid has leaching characteristics similar to or better than plain Portland cement mixtures and the leaching can be further reduced by the use of ion-exchange additives. The cement-silicate process has been used to solidify waste containing high levels of boric acid, oils, and organic solvents. The experience of handling the various types of liquid waste with a cement-silicate system is described

  12. Microwave processing of cement and concrete materials – towards an industrial reality?

    Buttress, Adam; Jones, Aled; Kingman, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Each year a substantial body of literature is published on the use of microwave to process cement and concrete materials. Yet to date, very few if any have lead the realisation of a commercial scale industrial system and is the context under which this review has been undertaken. The state-of the–art is evaluated for opportunities, and the key barriers to the development of new microwave-based processing techniques to enhance production, processing and recycling of cement and concrete materials. Applications reviewed include pyro-processing of cement clinker; accelerated curing, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E), and end-of-life processing including radionuclide decontamination

  13. Influence of the processed sunflower oil on the cement properties

    Fleysher, A. U.; Tokarchuk, V. V.; Sviderskiy, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Used oils (vegetable oil, animal oil, engine oil, etc.), which are essentially industrial wastes, have found application as secondary raw materials in some braches of industry. In particular, the only well-known and commonly-used way of utilizing wastes of vegetable oils is to apply them as raw materials in the production of biodiesel. The goal of the present study is to develop a conceptually new way of vegetable oil wastes utilization in the building industry. The test admixture D-148 was obtained from the processing of wastes of sunflower oil and it mainly consists of fatty acid diethanolamide. The test admixture was added to the cement system for the purpose of studying its influence on water demand, flowability, setting times, compressive strength and moisture adsorption. The test admixture D-148 at the optimal content 0. 2 weight % causes 10% decrease in water demand, 1.7 time increase in flowability (namely spread diameter), 23% increase in grade strength and 34% decrease in moisture adsorption. The results of the present investigation make it possible to consider the final product of the waste sunflower oil processing as multifunctional plasticizing-waterproofing admixture.

  14. Sustainability of cement kiln co-processing of wastes in India: a pilot study.

    Baidya, Rahul; Ghosh, Sadhan Kumar; Parlikar, Ulhas V

    2017-07-01

    Co-processing in cement kiln achieves effective utilization of the material and energy value present in the wastes, thereby conserving the natural resources by reducing the use of virgin material. In India, a number of multifolded initiatives have been taken that take into account the potential and volume of waste generation. This paper studies the factors which might influence the sustainability of co-processing of waste in cement kilns as a business model, considering the issues and challenges in the supply chain framework in India in view of the four canonical pillars of sustainability. A pilot study on co-processing was carried out in one of the cement plant in India to evaluate the environmental performance, economical performance, operational performance and social performance. The findings will help India and other developing countries to introduce effective supply chain management for co-processing while addressing the issues and challenges during co-processing of different waste streams in the cement kilns.

  15. Effect of process variables on the preparation of artificial bone cements

    Santos Junior, J.G.F.; Melo, P.A.; Pinto, J.C., E-mail: pinto@peq.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: jjunior@peq.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: melo@peq.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Quimica; Pita, V.J.R.R., E-mail: vjpita@ima.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Macromoleculas; Nele, M., E-mail: nele@eq.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2013-10-15

    The present work concerns the preparation of bone cements based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), used mainly for prosthesis fixation and cavity filling for correction of human bone failures. A typical bone cement recipe contains methyl methacrylate, which polymerizes in situ during cement application. An inherent problem of this reaction is the large amount of heat released during the cement preparation, which may lead to irreparable damage of living tissues. Optimization of PMMA-based bone cement recipes is thus an important step towards safe and reliable clinical usage of these materials. Important process variables related to the reaction temperature profile and the mixing of the recipe constituents were studied in order to allow for the adequate production of bone cements. It is shown that the average molar mass and size of the PMMA particles used in the production of the bone cement, as well as incorporation of radiopaque contrast, co-monomers and fillers into the bone recipe play fundamental roles in the course of the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, the injection vessel geometry may interfere dramatically with the temperature profile and the time for its occurrence. Finally, it has been observed that the morphology of the PMMA particles strongly affects the mixing of the bone cement components. (author)

  16. Effect of process variables on the preparation of artificial bone cements

    J. G. F. Santos Jr.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns the preparation of bone cements based on poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA, used mainly for prosthesis fixation and cavity filling for correction of human bone failures. A typical bone cement recipe contains methyl methacrylate, which polymerizes in situ during cement application. An inherent problem of this reaction is the large amount of heat released during the cement preparation, which may lead to irreparable damage of living tissues. Optimization of PMMA-based bone cement recipes is thus an important step towards safe and reliable clinical usage of these materials. Important process variables related to the reaction temperature profile and the mixing of the recipe constituents were studied in order to allow for the adequate production of bone cements. It is shown that the average molar mass and size of the PMMA particles used in the production of the bone cement, as well as incorporation of radiopaque contrast, co-monomers and fillers into the bone recipe play fundamental roles in the course of the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, the injection vessel geometry may interfere dramatically with the temperature profile and the time for its occurrence. Finally, it has been observed that the morphology of the PMMA particles strongly affects the mixing of the bone cement components.

  17. Processes and Equipment for the Cementation of Radioactive Waste

    Schaefer, S.; Studenski, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this article a short selection of different cement mixer types provided by NUKEM Technologies is given. The variety stems on one hand from historical development, but more especially from specific customer demands to meet their local and technical requirements. The Slant Batch Mixer is successfully installed in several Waste Treatment Centers (WTC). NUKEM Technologies set up these mixers with necessary auxiliary systems to facilitate all the cementation tasks of a WTC. By the slant design of the mixer a homogeneous intermixing and a rapid and comprehensive emptying is achieved. The High Shear Mixer is a batch mixer producing a thixotropic, fast flowing colloidal cement slurry. NUKEM Technologies uses this cement slurry to bubble-free/ empty space-free grouting of pre-packed solid waste items in container. The High Throughput Continuous Mixer is a continuously operating screw mixer that provides a high throughput. One or more dry components are continuously fed to the mixer where liquid waste or water is added. The High Performance In-Drum Mixer is a combination of planetary mixer with double helical mixer. NUKEM Technologies recently has developed a new High Capacity Mixer (HCM) based on a well proven conventional concrete mixer. The HCM is the successor of the slant mixer and will expend NUKEM Technologies' portfolio of cementation units. (A.C.)

  18. INVESTIGATION OF DENTURE REMOVAL PROCESS BY MEANS OF DESTRUCTION OF FIXING CEMENT BY ULTRASOUND ACTION

    M. G. Kiselev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains results of experimental investigations in respect of denture removal processes using as models so natural teeth as well and this removal process presupposes destruction of fixing cement by ultrasound action. It has been established that the best conditions for separation of a denture from a tooth body are ensured while ultrasound is acting on non-removable denture structure in liquid phase (water. At the expense of sound-capillary effect water fills in porous structure of fixing cement at high speed and a cavitation that appears in it leads to intensive cement destruction (dispersion.

  19. Methods and Production of Cementation Materials for Immobilisation into Waste Form. Research of Cementation Processes for Specific Liquid Radioactive Waste Streams of Radiochemical Plants

    Sukhanov, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    In the near future Russian Federation is planning to use industrial cementation facilities at two radiochemical combines - PA 'Mayak' and Mountain Chemical Combine. Scope of the research within the IAEA CRP contact No. 14176 included the development of cementation processes for specfic liquid radioactive waste streams that are present in these enterprisers. The research on cementation of liquid waste from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing at PA 'Mayak' allowed obtaining experimental data characterizing the technological process and basic characteristics of the produced cement compounds (e.g. mechanical strength, water resistance, frost resistance, flowability, etc.) immobilizing different streams of waste (e.g. hydrated-salt sludges, filter material pulps, mixture of hydrated salt slurries and filter material pulps, tritium liquid waste). Determined optimum technological parameters will allow industrial scale production of cement compound with required quality and higher flowability that is necessary for providing uniform filling of compartments of storage facilities at these sites. The research has been also carried out for the development of cementation technology for immobilization of pulps from storage tanks of Mountain Chemical Combine radiochemical plant. Cementation of such pulps is a difficult technological task because pulps are of complex chemical composition (e.g. hydroxides of manganese, iron, nickel, etc., as well as silicon oxide) and a relatively high activity. The research of cementation process selection for these pulps included studies of the impact of sorbing additive type and content on cement compounds leachability, flowability, impact of cement compound age to its mechanical strength, heat generation of cement compounds and others. The research results obtained allowed testing of cementation facility with a pulse type mixer on the full-scale. Use of such mixer for pulp cementation makes possible to prepare a homogeneous cement compound with the

  20. Modeling and simulation of cement clinkering process with compact internal burning of carbon

    Chen, Hanmin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a mathematical model of the thermodynamic process for Cement Clinkering Process with Compact Internal Burning of Carbon. Using simplifying assumptions, results of calculations are presented based on relevant computerized numerical simulation for a set of typical process parameters obtained from the existing cement shaft kiln operation and the electrical furnace test on the mechanical and chemical performance of the compact coal containing cement raw meal pellets. It is revealed that, the carbon internal burning mode, combining fuel combustion and gas solid heat transfer together as well as preheating, calcining, clinkering and cooling of the raw pellets together, is the origin of the process superiority in respect of equipment simplicity, process enhancement, high energy efficiency and low pollution. Important process details are determined, e.g. the features and lengths of the process zones, the material residence time and the burning mode of carbon in each zone, the clinkering reaction course and the maximum burning temperature. It is concluded that numerical simulations could be useful tool for understanding the new process ideas, as well as conducting the technical development and optimizing the process design. - Highlights: • Twin subsystem model is used to simulate a new type of cement shaft kiln process. • Grain-particle structural model is used to describe the pellet solid gas reactions. • The process superiority resulted from the carbon internal burning mode is revealed. • A series of important process details are determined. • An unprecedented comprehensive picture for cement clinkering process is depicted

  1. A comprehensive model to describe radiolytic processes in cement medium

    Bouniol, P.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    2008-01-01

    Basic mechanisms controlling the radiolysis in cementitious matrices are reviewed in the specific context of the gamma irradiation, in closed system without upper vapour space, at 25 degrees C, with a pore solution representative of a Portland cement paste. A general survey of data corresponding...

  2. FY 2000 report on the plan to carry out a model project for recovery of waste heat from the cement sintering equipment in India and the survey of the feasibility; 2000 nendo Indo ni okeru cement shosei setsubi hainetsu kaishu model jigyo jisshi keikaku oyobi fukyu kanosei chosa hokokusho

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of conserving energy and reducing greenhouse effect gas emission, survey was conducted on a project for recovering waste heat from the cement production process and using it for power generation in India. In India, the production amount of cement has steadily been increasing in and after the complete liberalization of the cement industry in 1989, and now the production amount is second in the world. Duties of approximately 25% are imposed on the import of the cement waste heat equipment, which is still a high-rate tariff. The India Cement Co., which is a candidate local company for this project, is a typical cement company in an excellent financial state in India. As to the economical efficiency of the project, economical effects are very good as seen in the internal earning rate of more than 30% and the period of ROI of less than 4 years, even if high-rate duties of India are imposed. There seems to be a great possibility of the spread of the related technology in the light of the following reasons: the situation of electric power in India is not good, reduction in production cost is being urgently requested due to the drop in cement price, and the equipment in this project is clean equipment using waste heat and therefore meets with the policy of the Indian government in which emphasis is placed on the environment. (NEDO)

  3. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by solidification with cement

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To subject radioactive liquid wastes to a cement solidification treatment after heating and drying it by a thin film scrape-off drier to render it into the form of power, and then molding it into pellets for the treatment. Structure: Radioactive liquid wastes discharged from a nuclear power plant or nuclear reactor are supplied through a storage tank into a thin film scrape-off drier. In the drier, the radioactive liquid wastes are heated to separate the liquid, and the residue is taken out as dry powder from the scrape-off apparatus. The powder obtained in this way is molded into pellets of a desired form. These pellets are then packed in a drum can or similar container, into which cement paste is then poured for solidification. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Application of experiment planning during investigation of cementation process in solid carburizers

    Lisenkov, A.N.; Denisov, V.M.; Prigozhina, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model of cementation process in solid carburizirs is obtained, the most effective contents of carburizers are chosen. Specimens are produced out of St20, 12KhN3A, 40Kh13, KhVG steels. It is shown that specimens of St20 and 12KhN3A steels have the higher depth of cementated layer, specimens made of 40Kh13 and KhVG steels-the lower depth. It is shown that the quality of cementated layer structure at recommended regimes improved, cementated layer depth for low-carbon steels changed a little and for tool steels increased infficiently: for KhVG steel in 2-3 times for 40Kh13 steel in 1.5-2.5 times

  5. Basic survey project for joint implementation. Feasibility study for the diffusion of fluidized bed cement kiln system in China; 1998 nendo kyodo jisshi nado suishin kiso chosa. Chugoku ni okeru ryudosho cement kirun fukyu chosa

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Discussions were given on conversion of shaft kilns mainly used at Tianjin Cement and Huaxin Cement to the fluidized bed cement kiln of the most advanced type. Possibility of energy conservation in China, that is reduction of carbon dioxide emission, was evaluated. This system has been developed by the Center for Coal Utilization, Japan. The system is characterized by reduction of greenhouse effect gas emission, elimination of the problem of dust scattering from sintering facilities, stabilized production of high-quality clinker, capability of using low-grade coal and anthracite, and reduction of cement production cost. As a result of the discussions, the reduction rate of greenhouse effect gases was found about 17 to 33%. The cost effect may be calculated as 2 to 5 thousand yen per ton of CO2 reduction amount assuming the system life of 20 years. If this process has been diffused into China, the quantity of CO2 to be reduced will reach about four million tons annually assuming a diffusion rate of 10%. This project shows as high profitability as about 20% at IRR, and the system is more advantageous economically than the shaft kiln. (NEDO)

  6. Influence of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions on the hydration process of portland cement and blended cements

    Živanović, B. M.

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the influence of the concentration of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in mortar batch waters upon the hydration process of various Portland and additive cements. An increase in the mechanical resistence of said cements is observed, after 28 days, when the concentration of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions in the mortar batch waters increases. This suggests a possible microstructural explanation of said phenomenon.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la concentración de los iones Sr2+ y Ba2+ en las aguas de amasado sobre el proceso de hidratación de varios cementos portland y de adición. Se comprueba un incremento de las resistencias mecánicas de dichos cementos, a los 28 días, cuando aumenta la concentración de los iones Ba2+ y Sr2+ en las aguas de amasado, lo cual sugiere una posible explicación microestructural a dicho fenómeno.

  7. Feasibility of large volume casting cementation process for intermediate level radioactive waste

    Chen Zhuying; Chen Baisong; Zeng Jishu; Yu Chengze

    1988-01-01

    The recent tendency of radioactive waste treatment and disposal both in China and abroad is reviewed. The feasibility of the large volume casting cementation process for treating and disposing the intermediate level radioactive waste from spent fuel reprocessing plant in shallow land is assessed on the basis of the analyses of the experimental results (such as formulation study, solidified radioactive waste properties measurement ect.). It can be concluded large volume casting cementation process is a promising, safe and economic process. It is feasible to dispose the intermediate level radioactive waste from reprocessing plant it the disposal site chosen has resonable geological and geographical conditions and some additional effective protection means are taken

  8. Proposal of Solidification/Stabilisation Process of Chosen Hazardous Waste by Cementation

    Bozena Dohnalkova

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a part of the project solving which is dedicated to the identification of the hazardous waste with the most critical production within the Czech Republic with the aim to study and find the optimal composition of the cement matrix that will ensure maximum content disposal of chosen hazardous waste. In the first stage of project solving – which represents this paper – a specific hazardous waste was chosen, its properties were identified and suitable soli...

  9. INVESTIGATION OF CEMENT CONCRETE CONGLOMERATE SOLIDIFICATION PROCESS BY IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY METHOD

    S. N. Bandarenka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most prospective directions in preservation  and increase of service live of  road pavements is a construction of  automobile roads with cement concrete surface. Modern tendencies for provision of road construction quality presuppose a necessity to control processes of solidification and subsequent destruction of the material while forming and using cement concrete conglomerate being considered as a basic element of the road surface.  Multiyear practical experience of  automobile road operation using cement concrete pavements reveals an importance for monitoring  such processes as formation and destruction of cement concrete materials. An impedance spectroscopy method has been tried out and proposed as a tool for solution of the given problem.Experimental samples of cement concrete have been prepared for execution of tests, graded silica sand and granite chippings with particle size from 0.63 to 2.5 mm have been used as a fine aggregate in the samples. Dependencies of resistance (impedance on AC-current frequency  have been studied for samples of various nature and granulometric composition. The Gamry  G300 potentiostat has been used for measurement of complex impedance value. A spectrum analysis and calculation of equivalent circuit parameters calculation have been carried out while using EIS Spectrum Analyzer program.Comparison of impedance spectra for the prepared cement concrete samples have made it possible to reveal tendencies in changing spectrum parameters during solidification and subsequent contact with moisture in respect of every type of the sample. An equivalent electrical circuit has been developed that  characterizes physical and chemical processes which are accompanied by charge transfer in cement concrete conglomerate. The paper demonstrates a possibility to use an impedance spectroscopy for solution of a number of actual problems in the field of cement concrete technology problems. Particularly, the problems

  10. Hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement within EVA emulsion by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction method

    Kotera, Masaru; Matsuda, Ikuyo; Miyashita, Keiko; Adachi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hisayuki

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-modified mortars which consist of a polymer emulsion and cement materials have been widely developed in the construction materials fields. Forming process of the polymer-modified cement membrane simultaneously involves evaporation of water within the polymer emulsion and hydration of cement. It is important for the polymer-modified cement paste that the hydrate crystal of cement is generating by the hydration during the setting process under existence of the polymer emulsion. In this study, hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement under existence of poly (ethylene-vinyl acetate) (EVA) emulsion (polymer-cement ratio=100%) was investigated by X-ray diffraction method using synchrotron radiation (SPring-8). The diffraction peaks of calcium aluminate (CA) disappeared after the hardening, on the other hand, the peaks of hydrate crystals of calcium-aluminate cement (C 2 AH 8 and C 3 AH 6 ) could be observed. This polymer-modified cement paste hydrated using the water within the polymer emulsion. The hydration of C 2 AH 8 from CA started at around 300 min, and then C 3 AH 6 hydrate crystal increased after 700 min at ambient temperature. This implies that the conversion from C 2 AH 8 to C 3 AH 6 occurred to be more stable phase. The setting temperature affected the reaction rate. In case of hydration at 35degC, the start time of the hydration for calcium-aluminate cement was quicker than that in the ambient temperature four or more times. (author)

  11. Investigation of a Gas-Solid Separation Process for Cement Raw Meal

    Maarup, Claus; Hjuler, Klaus; Clement, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The gas/solid heat exchanger (2D-HX), developed to replace the cyclone preheaters in cement plants is presented. This design aims at reducing construction height and operation costs. The separation process in the 2D-HX is experimentally investigated, and the results show that separation efficienc......The gas/solid heat exchanger (2D-HX), developed to replace the cyclone preheaters in cement plants is presented. This design aims at reducing construction height and operation costs. The separation process in the 2D-HX is experimentally investigated, and the results show that separation...

  12. Solidification process for toxic and hazardous wastes. Second part: Cement solidification matrices

    Donato, A.; Arcuri, L.; Dotti, M.; Pace, A.; Pietrelli, L.; Ricci, G.; Basta, M.; Cali, V.; Pagliai, V.

    1989-05-01

    This paper reports the second part of a general study carried out at the Nuclear Fuel Division aiming at verifying the possible application of the radioactive waste solidification processes to industrial hazardous wastes (RTN). The cement solidification of several RTN types has been taken into consideration, both from the technical and from the economic point of view. After a short examination of the Italian juridical and economical situation in the field, which demonstrates the need of the RTN solidification, the origin and characteristics of the RTN considered in the study and directly provided by the producing industries are reviewed. The laboratory experimental results of the cementation of RTN produced by gold manufacturing industries and by galvanic industries are reported. The cementation process can be considered a very effective mean for reducing both the RTN management costs and the environmental impact of RTN disposal. (author)

  13. Energetic and exergetic assessment of a trass mill process in a cement plant

    Sogut, M.Z.; Oktay, Z.; Hepbasli, A.

    2009-01-01

    Cement production has become one of the most intensive energy industries in the world. For producing it, addition materials have been widely used in cement factories. The main objective of this study is to assess the performance of a trass mill in a cement plant based on the actual operational data using energy and exergy analysis method. In this regard, the values for energy consumption and losses throughout the production process are described. In the process, the overall exergy efficiencies are found to be slightly less than the corresponding energy efficiencies; e.g. 74% and 10.68% for energy and exergy efficiency, respectively. Using energy recovery systems, waste heat energy may be captured, while energy and exergy efficiency values can be improved to 84% and 48%, respectively. It may also be concluded that the analyses reported here will provide the investigators with knowledge about how effectively and efficiently a sector uses its energy resources.

  14. Front line of cement technolgy and control. Part 5. ; Baking process and chemical reactions. Cement saisentan sono gijutsu to kanri 5. ; Shosei katei to kagaku hanno

    Hirai, M. (Ube Industries, Ltd., Yamaguchi (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    The baking process in cement production means the process that the raw materials which were mixed and pulverized in the raw material preparation process are charged into a reaction furnace which is called kiln, and clinders (intermediate product of cement) are generated. It is the process which affects quality as well as production cost of cement more significantly than anything else. In this article, an outline of the above baking facilities, how the raw materials change and clinkers are generated therein, and how they are controlled are introduced. Clinkers are composed of such products as alite, belite, aluminate and ferrite, etc. which were generated after decomposition reactions of such raw materials as lime stone, clay, silica rock and iron oxide in the above kiln. The essential ponts of the process control which makes the generation reactions of clinker compounds efficiently are such two points as well balanced raw materials to be charged into the baking facilities and stable operation of such facilities. The quality of cement which is required as finished goods is achieved by the quality control at each intermediate process and the quality tests of cement. 5 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Characterization of waste products prepared from radioactive contaminated clayey soil cemented according to the GEODUR process

    Brodersen, K.; Vinther, A.

    1990-11-01

    Radioactive contaminated soil may arise due to accidents of various types or may be detected during decommisioning of nuclear installations. Ordinary surface soil cannot normally be conditioned using conventional cementation processes since the content of humic materials retards or prevents the solidification. An additive available from the Danish firm Geodur A/S makes it possible to circumvent this difficulty and to produce a monolithic, nondusting waste type using rather small amounts of cement. The report describes work on characterization of such a cemented waste product prepared on basis of clayey top soil from the Risoe area. The claimed advantages of the process was verified, and data for the compression strength (low), hydraulic conductivity (satisfactory) and other pore structure-related properties are given for the obtained products. Unfortunately the behaviour of cesium and strontium, representing two of the most relevant radionuclides, was not too promising. The retention of cesium is satisfactory, but less good than for the untreated soil. Greatly improved cesium retention after drying of the materials was noticed. Good retention of strontium is only obtained after reaction of the material with carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The behaviour of the two isotopes in other types of cemented waste is somewhat similar, but the decrease in retention compared with untreated soil makes the process less interesting as a possibility for remedial actions after accidents, etc. Some further studies of the cemented soil waste are beeing made within the frame of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Studies. Elements forming low solublity components in the high pH environment in the cemented soil will probably be retained quite efficiently. This was demonstrated in case of Zn. (author) 11 tabs., 22 ills., 8 refs

  16. The Specification of Cement Powders for Waste Encapsulation Processes at Sellafield site

    Angus, M.; Borwick, J.; Cann, G.; Hayes, M.; McLuckie, B.; Jowsey, J.

    2012-01-01

    Requirements are described for Portland Cement (CEM I), Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS) and Fly Ash (FA) powders used for the encapsulation of Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (ILW) in UK, with particular reference to Sellafield site encapsulation processes. Differences between the powders used by the UK nuclear industry and the equivalent British and European cement standards are explained. Research over the last 20 years to respond to changes in the performance of these powders is summarised and options for dealing with potential future changes are discussed. These include the use of special blends of GGBS to achieve the desired flow properties or alternatively poly-carboxylate super-plasticizers to produce grouts with consistent performance using cement powders with a wide range of composition. (authors)

  17. Effect of the sterilization process on physical and mechanical properties of the bonacryl bone cement

    Morejon, L.; Delgado, J.A.; Aguero, L.; Rapado, M.; Ginebra, M.P.; Gil, F.J.; Mendizabal, E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of bone cements of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to fix artificial prosthesis to the human body is a habitual method in orthopedic surgery. The hip and the knee joints have a very complex biomechanics and support high loads, for these reasons, acrylic bone cements have to comply with international standards in order to secure the biofuncionality and durability of the implant. In this work we report the effect of sterilization by ethylene oxide or gamma radiation on the BONACRYL Cuban cement. We determined how sterilization methods affect the molecular weight of the polymer as well as its quasi-static mechanical properties. The results demonstrated that the gamma radiation modifies the molecular weight of the PMMA although the compression and bending strength were not affected by the sterilization process applied. (authors)

  18. Cemented carbide cutting tool: Laser processing and thermal stress analysis

    Yilbas, B.S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, KFUPM, Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa; Arif, A.F.M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, KFUPM, Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Karatas, C. [Engineering Faculty, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Ahsan, M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, KFUPM, Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2007-04-15

    Laser treatment of cemented carbide tool surface consisting of W, C, TiC, TaC is examined and thermal stress developed due to temperature gradients in the laser treated region is predicted numerically. Temperature rise in the substrate material is computed numerically using the Fourier heating model. Experiment is carried out to treat the tool surfaces using a CO{sub 2} laser while SEM, XRD and EDS are carried out for morphological and structural characterization of the treated surface. Laser parameters were selected include the laser output power, duty cycle, assisting gas pressure, scanning speed, and nominal focus setting of the focusing lens. It is found that temperature gradient attains significantly high values below the surface particularly for titanium and tantalum carbides, which in turn, results in high thermal stress generation in this region. SEM examination of laser treated surface and its cross section reveals that crack initiation below the surface occurs and crack extends over the depth of the laser treated region.

  19. Sealing properties of cement-based grout materials used in the rock sealing project

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.N.; Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Karnland, O.; Shenton, B.; Walker, B.

    1993-12-01

    The Task Force on Sealing Materials and Techniques of the Stripa Project recommended that work be undertaken to study the sealing properties of cement-based grout materials. A new class of cement-based grouts (high-performance grouts) with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures in granite was investigated. The materials were selected for their small mean particle size and the ability to be made fluid by a superplasticizer at low water/cementitious-materials ratios. The fundamental physical and chemical properties (such as the particle size and chemical composition) of the materials were evaluated. The rheological properties of freshly mixed grouts, which control the workability of the grouts, were determined together with the properties of hardened materials, which largely control the long-term performance (longevity) of the materials in repository settings. The materials selected were shown to remain gel-like during the setting period, and so the grouts may be expected to remain largely homogenous during and after injection into the rock without separating into solid and liquid phases. The hydraulic conductivity and strength of hardened grouts were determined. The microstructure of the bulk grouts was characterized by a high degree of homogeneity with extremely fine porosity. The low hydraulic conductivity and good mechanical properties are consistent with the extremely fine porosity. The ability of the fractured grouts to self-seal was also observed in tests in which the hydraulic conductivity of recompacted granulated grouts was determined. The laboratory tests were carried out in parallel with investigations of the in situ performance of the materials and with the development of geochemical and theoretical models for cement-based grout longevity. (author). 56 refs., 15 tabs., 98 figs

  20. Sealing properties of cement-based grout materials used in the rock sealing project

    Onofrei, M; Gray, M N; Pusch, R; Boergesson, L; Karnland, O; Shenton, B; Walker, B

    1993-12-01

    The Task Force on Sealing Materials and Techniques of the Stripa Project recommended that work be undertaken to study the sealing properties of cement-based grout materials. A new class of cement-based grouts (high-performance grouts) with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures in granite was investigated. The materials were selected for their small mean particle size and the ability to be made fluid by a superplasticizer at low water/cementitious-materials ratios. The fundamental physical and chemical properties (such as the particle size and chemical composition) of the materials were evaluated. The rheological properties of freshly mixed grouts, which control the workability of the grouts, were determined together with the properties of hardened materials, which largely control the long-term performance (longevity) of the materials in repository settings. The materials selected were shown to remain gel-like during the setting period, and so the grouts may be expected to remain largely homogenous during and after injection into the rock without separating into solid and liquid phases. The hydraulic conductivity and strength of hardened grouts were determined. The microstructure of the bulk grouts was characterized by a high degree of homogeneity with extremely fine porosity. The low hydraulic conductivity and good mechanical properties are consistent with the extremely fine porosity. The ability of the fractured grouts to self-seal was also observed in tests in which the hydraulic conductivity of recompacted granulated grouts was determined. The laboratory tests were carried out in parallel with investigations of the in situ performance of the materials and with the development of geochemical and theoretical models for cement-based grout longevity. (author). 56 refs., 15 tabs., 98 figs.

  1. Nanotechnological applied tasks of the increase in the efficiency of the hardening processes of cement concrete

    Chernishov Evgeny Mihalovich

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The scientific basis of the solution to the applied tasks of concrete technology through the use of «nano» tools, which provide the organization of the heterogeneous process of cement hydration and hardening, has been characterized. It is shown that the introduction of nanoadditives enables the direct regulation of the processes of structure formation in cement systems at the nanolevel. The effectiveness of the use of «nano» tools has been proposed to evaluate by means of complex criteria characterizing quantitatively the change in the activation energy, the rate of the process and time of its completion τ, the size and power consumption of the technology E while ensuring quality levels specified by R. According to the criteria, the monitoring of the results of the research has been made. Moreover, the most effective nanomodifying admixtures of two types have been identified. Type I is a compound nanoadditive based on nanoparticles SiO2 in combination with a superplasticizer, which mechanism of action is associated and also characterized by the increase in specific strength per unit measure the degree of cement hydration by 1.25–1.35 times. Engineering problems have been formulated. Moreover, the solutions are indicated for increasing the energy efficiency of the factory production of reinforced concrete products and structures. These solutions predetermine the reduction in the value of the maximum temperature for the curing of concrete, the reduction of the duration of the achievement of the required degree of cement hydration while concrete hardens, the reduction of time of cement concrete hardening to reach the regulated values of its strength, the increase in concrete strength per unit of cement consumption per m3 and energy efficiency of concrete hardening process in the preparation of reinforced concrete products. with the catalytic role in the processes of phase formation of nanoparticles of hydrated compounds. Type II is a

  2. Video processing project

    Globisch, R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Video processing source code for algorithms and tools used in software media pipelines (e.g. image scalers, colour converters, etc.) The currently available source code is written in C++ with their associated libraries and DirectShow- Filters....

  3. Reengineering the Project Design Process

    Casani, E.; Metzger, R.

    1994-01-01

    In response to NASA's goal of working faster, better and cheaper, JPL has developed extensive plans to minimize cost, maximize customer and employee satisfaction, and implement small- and moderate-size missions. These plans include improved management structures and processes, enhanced technical design processes, the incorporation of new technology, and the development of more economical space- and ground-system designs. The Laboratory's new Flight Projects Implementation Office has been chartered to oversee these innovations and the reengineering of JPL's project design process, including establishment of the Project Design Center and the Flight System Testbed. Reengineering at JPL implies a cultural change whereby the character of its design process will change from sequential to concurrent and from hierarchical to parallel. The Project Design Center will support missions offering high science return, design to cost, demonstrations of new technology, and rapid development. Its computer-supported environment will foster high-fidelity project life-cycle development and cost estimating.

  4. EPRI waste processing projects

    Shaw, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) manages research for its sponsoring electric utilities in the United States. Research in the area of low level radioactive waste (LLRW) from light water reactors focuses primarily on waste processing within the nuclear power plants, monitoring of the waste packages, and assessments of disposal technologies. Accompanying these areas and complimentary to them is the determination and evaluation of the sources of nuclear power plants radioactive waste. This paper focuses on source characterization of nuclear power plant waste, LLRW processing within nuclear power plants, and the monitoring of these wastes. EPRI's work in waste disposal technology is described in another paper in this proceeding by the same author. 1 reference, 5 figures

  5. Cement Formation

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  6. Stella project - Cementation of concentrates of Saclay. Study of the coating formula robustness with respect to the surface stockpiling agreement requirements

    Brunel, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Stella project deals with the packaging of vapour concentrates by means of a cementation process. A new reference coating formula has been defined while taking into account the chemical composition of these high salt and sulphate content concentrates. After a presentation of the concentrate chemical characteristics, and of the cementation process, this document reports the investigation on the formula robustness with respect to the concentration chemical composition variations. The influence of varying concentrations of boron, chlorides, sulphates, and phosphates on the coating quality has been studied. Empirical models have been developed. A test has been performed with concentrates displaying an extreme composition, and a validation test has been performed with the actual concentrates

  7. Method for qualification of cementation processes and its application to a vibration mixer

    Vicente, R.; Rzyski, B.M.; Suarez, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the definition of homogeneneity is discussed and methods to measure the 'degree of heterogeneity' of waste forms are proposed. These measurements are important as aids for mixing process qualification, and as tools in quality assurance procedures and in the development of waste management standards. Homogeneity is a basic quality requirement for waste forms to be accepted in final sites. It do not depend on the matrix immmobilization, rather it is one mean for qualification of the immobilization process. The proposed methods were applied to a vibration assisted mixing process and has proved to an useful mean to judge process improvements. There are many conceivable methods to evaluate homogeneity of waste forms. Some were selected as screening tests aiming at quickly reaching a promising set of process variables. Others were selected to evaluate the degree of excellence of the process in respect to product quality. These envisaged methods were: visual inspection, the use of cement dye as tracer, scanning of radioactive tracers, and measurements of variations of density, water absorption, porosity and mechanical strength across the waste form sample. The process variables were: waste-cement and water-cement ratios, mixer geometry, mixing time and vibration intensity. Some of the apparatus details were change during the experimental work in order to improve product quality. Experimental methods and results statistically analysed and compared with data obtained from samples prepared with a planetary paddle mixer, which were adopted as the homogeneity standard. (Author) [pt

  8. Influence of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions on the hydration process of portland cement and blended cements

    Živanović, B. M.; Petrašinović, Lj.; Milovanović, T.; Karanović, Lj.; Krstanović, I.

    1987-01-01

    This study concerns the influence of the concentration of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in mortar batch waters upon the hydration process of various Portland and additive cements. An increase in the mechanical resistence of said cements is observed, after 28 days, when the concentration of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions in the mortar batch waters increases. This suggests a possible microstructural explanation of said phenomenon.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la concentración de los iones Sr2+ y...

  9. Chemical processes causing cementation in heat-affected smectite - the Kinnekulle bentonite

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Takase, Hiroyasu; Benbow, S. [Quantisci Ltd., Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    Numerical calculation of silica migration and precipitation that can cause cementation of smectite buffer clay has been made using the Grindrod/Takase chemical model. It is used here to investigate whether the silicification of the bentonite and surrounding sediments at Kinnekulle, southwestern Sweden, can be explained by the heat pulse caused by the diabase intrusion that took place in Permian time. Compilation of data concerning silica cementation and associated microstructural and rheological changes showed that significant silica precipitation should have occurred in the Kinnekulle case and this is also documented. Thus, precipitation of quartz has taken place to an extent that can be explained by the chemical model, which also showed conversion of smectite to illite by neoformation of the latter mineral but only for the 3000 years long heating period. Introduction of a criterion for non-reversible illitization is hence a necessary improvement of the model for explaining the actual presence of neoformed illite, which may in fact be wholly or partly responsible for the cementation. (The report is made up of two articles: `Cementation processes in smectite clay associated with conversion of smectite to illite as exemplified by the Kinnekulle bentonites` and `Nonisothermal modelling of geochemical evolution in the Kinnekulle bentonite layer. Mathematical modelling and simulation`) 33 refs, 40 figs.

  10. Chemical processes causing cementation in heat-affected smectite - the Kinnekulle bentonite

    Pusch, R.; Takase, Hiroyasu; Benbow, S.

    1998-12-01

    Numerical calculation of silica migration and precipitation that can cause cementation of smectite buffer clay has been made using the Grindrod/Takase chemical model. It is used here to investigate whether the silicification of the bentonite and surrounding sediments at Kinnekulle, southwestern Sweden, can be explained by the heat pulse caused by the diabase intrusion that took place in Permian time. Compilation of data concerning silica cementation and associated microstructural and rheological changes showed that significant silica precipitation should have occurred in the Kinnekulle case and this is also documented. Thus, precipitation of quartz has taken place to an extent that can be explained by the chemical model, which also showed conversion of smectite to illite by neoformation of the latter mineral but only for the 3000 years long heating period. Introduction of a criterion for non-reversible illitization is hence a necessary improvement of the model for explaining the actual presence of neoformed illite, which may in fact be wholly or partly responsible for the cementation. (The report is made up of two articles: 'Cementation processes in smectite clay associated with conversion of smectite to illite as exemplified by the Kinnekulle bentonites' and 'Nonisothermal modelling of geochemical evolution in the Kinnekulle bentonite layer. Mathematical modelling and simulation')

  11. Cement waste form qualification report: WVDP [West Valley Demonstration Project] PUREX decontaminated supernatant

    McVay, C.W.; Stimmel, J.R.; Marchetti, S.

    1988-08-01

    This report provides a summary of work performed to develop a cement-based, low-level waste formulation suitable for the solidification of decontaminated high-level waste liquid produced as a by-product of PUREX spent fuel reprocessing. The resultant waste form is suitable for interim storage and is intended for ultimate disposal as low-level Class C waste; it also meets the stability requirements of the NRC Branch Technical Position on Waste Form Qualification, May 1983 and the requirements of 10 CFR 61. A recipe was developed utilizing only Portland Type I cement based on an inorganic salts simulant of the PUREX supernatant. The qualified recipe was tested full scale in the production facility and was observed to produce a product with entrained air, low density, and lower-than-expected compressive strength. Further laboratory scale testing with actual decontaminated supernatant revealed that set retarders were present in the supernatant, precluding setting of the product and allowing the production of ''bleed water.'' Calcium nitrate and sodium silicate were added to overcome the set retarding effect and produced a final product with improved performance when compared to the original formulation. This report describes the qualification process and qualification test results for the final product formulation. 7 refs., 38 figs., 21 tabs

  12. Licensing Process for International Projects

    Raetzke, Christan

    2014-01-01

    Christan Raetzke, lawyer, then outlined why nuclear constructions were always international projects and in which cases it would make sense to also make the licensing process be international. His law consulting firm CONLAR focuses specifically on design review so he could adequately present why an international process would make a lot of sense without being a loss of sovereignty

  13. Cement solidification method for miscellaneous radioactive solid, processing device and processing tool therefor

    Mihara, Shigeru; Suzuki, Kazunori; Hasegawa, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    A basket made of a metal net and a lid with a spacer constituting a processing tool for processing miscellaneous radioactive solid wastes is formed as a mesh which scarcely passes the miscellaneous solids but pass mortars. The size of the mesh is usually from about 10 to 30mm. Since this mesh allows fine solids approximate to powders such as burning ashes and heat insulation materials, they fall to the bottom of a dram can, to cause corrosion. Then, the corners of the bottom and the bottom of the dram can are coated with cement. The miscellaneous solid wastes are contained, and the lid of a metal net having a spacer at the upper portion thereof is set, a provisional lid is put on, and it is evacuated, and mortars are injected. Since there is a possibility that light and fine radioactive powders are exposed on the surface of the mortars coagulated and hardened by curing, conditioning for further adding mortars is applied for securing the mortars in order to prevent scattering of the radioactive powders. With such procedures, a satisfactory safe solidified products can be formed. (T.M.)

  14. Matrix model of the grinding process of cement clinker in the ball mill

    Sharapov, Rashid R.

    2018-02-01

    In the article attention is paid to improving the efficiency of production of fine powders, in particular Portland cement clinker. The questions of Portland cement clinker grinding in closed circuit ball mills. Noted that the main task of modeling the grinding process is predicting the granulometric composition of the finished product taking into account constructive and technological parameters used ball mill and separator. It is shown that the most complete and informative characterization of the grinding process in a ball mill is a grinding matrix taking into account the transformation of grain composition inside the mill drum. Shows how the relative mass fraction of the particles of crushed material, get to corresponding fraction. Noted, that the actual task of reconstruction of the matrix of grinding on the experimental data obtained in the real operating installations. On the basis of experimental data obtained on industrial installations, using matrix method to determine the kinetics of the grinding process in closed circuit ball mills. The calculation method of the conversion of the grain composition of the crushed material along the mill drum developed. Taking into account the proposed approach can be optimized processing methods to improve the manufacturing process of Portland cement clinker.

  15. Reengineering the project design process

    Kane Casani, E.; Metzger, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    In response to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's goal of working faster, better, and cheaper, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed extensive plans to minimize cost, maximize customer and employee satisfaction, and implement small- and moderate-size missions. These plans include improved management structures and processes, enhanced technical design processes, the incorporation of new technology, and the development of more economical space- and ground-system designs. The Laboratory's new Flight Projects Implementation Development Office has been chartered to oversee these innovations and the reengineering of JPL's project design process, including establishment of the Project Design Center (PDC) and the Flight System Testbed (FST). Reengineering at JPL implies a cultural change whereby the character of the Laboratory's design process will change from sequential to concurrent and from hierarchical to parallel. The Project Design Center will support missions offering high science return, design to cost, demonstrations of new technology, and rapid development. Its computer-supported environment will foster high-fidelity project life-cycle development and more accurate cost estimating. These improvements signal JPL's commitment to meeting the challenges of space exploration in the next century.

  16. Innovative process routes for a high-quality concrete recycling in the aggregates and cement industries

    Bru , Kathy; Menard , Yannick; Touzé , Solène; Le Moign , Alain; Poirier , Jean Eric; Ruffié , Gilles; Bonnaudin , Fabrice; Von Der Weid , Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Hardened concrete is a composite material that contains two main phases: the matrix (hardened cement paste, 20 %) and aggregates (gravels and sand, 80 %). The liberation and the recycling of these constituents can provide an answer to i) the exploration of new aggregates supply sources imposed by the depletion of natural deposit and the faced difficulties when trying to open new quarries and ii) the reduction of CO2 emissions in the clinker manufacturing process throug...

  17. Waste Management Process Improvement Project

    Atwood, J.; Borden, G.; Rangel, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    The Bechtel Hanford-led Environmental Restoration Contractor team's Waste Management Process Improvement Project is working diligently with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office to improve the waste management process to meet DOE's need for an efficient, cost-effective program for the management of dangerous, low-level and mixed-low-level waste. Additionally the program must meet all applicable regulatory requirements. The need for improvement was highlighted when a change in the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project's waste management practices resulted in a larger amount of waste being generated than the waste management organization had been set up to handle

  18. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of

  19. Effect of rheology on flow displacement during cementing process in oil wells

    Braghini, Andre; Naccache, Monica F.; Fonseca, Marcos I. [Dept. Mechanical Engineering. Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUR-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: mnaccache@puc-rio.br; Miranda, Cristiane R. de; Martins, Andre L.; Aranha, Pedro E. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: crisrichard@petrobras.com.br, aleibsohn@petrobras.com.br, pearanha@petrobras.com.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes a set of numerical simulations of the displacement flow of three non-Newtonian fluids through annular eccentric wells. The main application of this work is the studying of drilling and completion processes of oil wells where a cement slurry pushes the drilling mud, used in the drilling process to lubricate the drill and to remove the produced drilling cuts. To avoid contamination, a spacer fluid is usually inserted between them. Both drilling mud and cement slurry behave as non-Newtonian fluids, and the spacer fluid can be Newtonian or non-Newtonian. The analysis of flow and interface configuration between these fluids helps to determine contamination, and is an important tool for the process optimization. The numerical solution of the governing conservation equations of mass and momentum is obtained with the Fluent software, using the finite volume technique and the volume of fluid method. The effects of rheological parameters, density ratios and pumped volume of the spacer fluid are investigated. The results obtained show that the displacement is better when a more viscous spacer fluid is used. The results also show that using lower amounts of the spacer fluid can lead to contamination, which is worse in the smaller gap region of the annular space, in the case of non-rectilinear well. It was also observed that the density ratios play a major role in the cementing operation. (author)

  20. Influence of HAp on the polymerization processes of a possible radioactive bone cement

    Montaño, Carlos J.; Campos, Tarcísio P.R., E-mail: carlmont@ucm.es, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Lab. de Radiações Ionizantes; Silva, Adolfo H.M.; Araujo, Maria H., E-mail: adolfohmoraes@ufmg.br, E-mail: mharaujo1993@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (RMN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Dept. de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate PMMA is an acrylic that has been already proposed as a composite to adhere together the fractured bone structures. Subsequently, augmentation bone cements have incorporated Calcium Biophosphonates as vital part of its components to increase the biocompatibility with osseous tissues. Minimally invasive percutaneous techniques such as Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty have been developed to reduce surgical impact on patients, but in turn have been reported undesirable effects as extravasation of the cement outside of the planning target volume due to the compression of the internal bone fluids or other tissues. An in situ variable that helps favoring of the PMMA polymerization process is the temperature; however, it may bring deleterious effects. On the methodology, an assay was addressed varying the Hydroxyapatite HAp concentration. Also the cement processing was modified by setting water as a vehicle for particle dispersion. The ratios of HAp/PMMA concentrations were: 0.00000, 0.02167, 0.09062, 0.16619 and 0.50000 mixed in PMMA and liquid catalyst and monomer. The thermal profiles were measured during polymerization and analyzed. Nuclear magnetic resonance NMR analysis was carried out on the polymerization process in an aqueous state to monitor the H-H{sub 2}O proton signal. As results, an increasing in the cement hardness time was found in the proportion of the HAp concentration. The highest τ polymerization time was found for the x{sub 5} concentration and the signal from the water trapped in the HAp amorphous lattice was determined around ∼5 ppm in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra. (author)

  1. Influence of HAp on the polymerization processes of a possible radioactive bone cement

    Montaño, Carlos J.; Campos, Tarcísio P.R.; Silva, Adolfo H.M.; Araujo, Maria H.

    2017-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate PMMA is an acrylic that has been already proposed as a composite to adhere together the fractured bone structures. Subsequently, augmentation bone cements have incorporated Calcium Biophosphonates as vital part of its components to increase the biocompatibility with osseous tissues. Minimally invasive percutaneous techniques such as Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty have been developed to reduce surgical impact on patients, but in turn have been reported undesirable effects as extravasation of the cement outside of the planning target volume due to the compression of the internal bone fluids or other tissues. An in situ variable that helps favoring of the PMMA polymerization process is the temperature; however, it may bring deleterious effects. On the methodology, an assay was addressed varying the Hydroxyapatite HAp concentration. Also the cement processing was modified by setting water as a vehicle for particle dispersion. The ratios of HAp/PMMA concentrations were: 0.00000, 0.02167, 0.09062, 0.16619 and 0.50000 mixed in PMMA and liquid catalyst and monomer. The thermal profiles were measured during polymerization and analyzed. Nuclear magnetic resonance NMR analysis was carried out on the polymerization process in an aqueous state to monitor the H-H 2 O proton signal. As results, an increasing in the cement hardness time was found in the proportion of the HAp concentration. The highest τ polymerization time was found for the x 5 concentration and the signal from the water trapped in the HAp amorphous lattice was determined around ∼5 ppm in the 1 H NMR spectra. (author)

  2. Model project for reduction of electric power consumption in cement plant. Report for fiscal 1999 on achievements of commissioned operation; Cement shosei plant denryoku shohi sakugen model jigyo 1999 nendo itaku gyomu seika hokokusho

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With objectives of utilizing energies efficiently and serving for environmental improvements, a model project was implemented for reduction of electric power consumption in cement plant in Vietnam. This paper reports the achievements in fiscal 1999. This project is intended to install waste heat boilers in waste gas lines in the preheating process in the cement plant, whose waste heat is recovered by steam to generate electric power by using steam turbines. The current fiscal year has executed the following activities: design of turbines, condensers, and oil units; discussions on the arrangement drawings thereof obtained from the Vietnam side; design of piping and provision of the detailed drawings thereof to the Vietnam side; planning of the electric cable routes; planning of instrumentation wiring routes; and grounding and interlocks. Results of the discussions on the proposed plant operation methods were reflected to the system design of the monitoring devices. Furthermore, the turbines were fabricated, and the associated facilities, valves, and piping materials were procured based on the detailed design. The piping materials were given pre-shipment inspections before having been transported to the site. (NEDO)

  3. Heat treatment of processing sludge of ornamental rocks: application as pozzolan in cement matrices

    J.G. Uliana

    Full Text Available The sector of ornamental rocks produces significant volume of waste during the sawing of the blocks and demand to find ways to recycle, given its environmental impact. Considering the possibilities of use of industrial by-products as mineral admixtures, aiming at sustainable development in the construction industry, this paper aims to study the performance of the processing sludge of ornamental rocks and grinding after heat treatment, based on their potential application as partial substitute for cement. The residue was characterized, cast and milled to produce glassy material. Was analyzed the mechanical performance and pozzolanic activity with partial replacement of cement by waste in natural condition and after heat treatment in mortars for comparison. The results were promising, so it was possible to verify that after heat treatment, the treated waste is presented as a material with pozzolanic characteristics.

  4. Cement conditioning of waste materials and polluted soil using the GEODUR process

    Brocdersen, K.; Hjelmar, O.; Mortonsen, S.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper two areas of application of the GEODUR additive in cement stabilization of waste materials have been investigated: stabilization of radioactive contaminated soil and stabilization of municipal solid waste incinerator ash. Preliminary experimental work on a clayey soil contaminated with radioactive cesium and strontium has indicated that the GEODUR process is a technically feasible method for soil solidification. The retarding effects of humic materials in the soil are eliminated by the additive even at low cement contents. The solidified soil is not particularly strong, but that satisfactory water permeability. Retention of cesium is reasonably good, but not as good as for the untreated soil. Retention of strontium is not good but is considerably improved by carbonation. The volume stability during permanent immersion of the solidified products in water is satisfactory, but crack formation during dryout cannot be excluded

  5. Energy audit and conservation opportunities for pyroprocessing unit of a typical dry process cement plant

    Kabir, G.; Abubakar, A.I.; El-Nafaty, U.A.

    2010-01-01

    Cement production process has been highly energy and cost intensive. The cement plant requires 8784 h per year of the total operating hours to produce 640,809 tonnes of clinker. To achieve effective and efficient energy management scheme, thermal energy audit analysis was employed on the pyroprocessing unit of the cement plant. Fuel combustion generates the bulk of the thermal energy for the process, amounting to 95.48% (4164.02 kJ/kg cl ) of the total thermal energy input. Thermal efficiency of the unit stands at 41%, below 50-54% achieved in modern plants. The exhaust gases and kiln shell heat energy losses are in significant quantity, amounting to 27.9% and 11.97% of the total heat input respectively. To enhance the energy performance of the unit, heat losses conservation systems are considered. Waste heat recovery steam generator (WHRSG) and Secondary kiln shell were studied. Power and thermal energy savings of 42.88 MWh/year and 5.30 MW can be achieved respectively. Financial benefits for use of the conservation methods are substantial. Environmental benefit of 14.10% reduction in Greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions could be achieved.

  6. Towards optimization of the silanization process of hydroxyapatite for its use in bone cement formulations

    Cisneros-Pineda, Olga G.; Herrera Kao, Wilberth; Loría-Bastarrachea, María I.; Veranes-Pantoja, Yaymarilis; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V.; Cervantes-Uc, José M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to provide some fundamental information for optimization of silanization of hydroxyapatite intended for bone cement formulations. The effect of 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS) concentration and solvent system (acetone/water or methanol/water mixtures) during HA silanization was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR spectroscopy and EDX analysis. The effect of silanized HA on the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cements is also reported. It was found that the silanization process rendered hydroxyapatite with lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. Through EDX, it was observed that the silicon concentration in the HA particles was higher for acetone–water than that obtained for methanol–water system, although the mechanical performance of cements prepared with these particles exhibited the opposite behavior. Taking all these results together, it is concluded that methanol–water system containing MPS at 3 wt.% provides the better results during silanization process of HA. - Highlights: • Effect of MPS concentration and solvents during HA silanization was studied. • Silanization rendered HA has lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. • Silicon concentration was higher for acetone than that obtained using methanol. • Methanol–water system containing MPS at 3 wt.% provides the better results

  7. Energy audit and conservation opportunities for pyroprocessing unit of a typical dry process cement plant

    Kabir, G.; Abubakar, A.I.; El-Nafaty, U.A. [Chemical Engineering Programme, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, P. M. B. 0248, Bauchi (Nigeria)

    2010-03-15

    Cement production process has been highly energy and cost intensive. The cement plant requires 8784 h per year of the total operating hours to produce 640,809 tonnes of clinker. To achieve effective and efficient energy management scheme, thermal energy audit analysis was employed on the pyroprocessing unit of the cement plant. Fuel combustion generates the bulk of the thermal energy for the process, amounting to 95.48% (4164.02 kJ/kg{sub cl}) of the total thermal energy input. Thermal efficiency of the unit stands at 41%, below 50-54% achieved in modern plants. The exhaust gases and kiln shell heat energy losses are in significant quantity, amounting to 27.9% and 11.97% of the total heat input respectively. To enhance the energy performance of the unit, heat losses conservation systems are considered. Waste heat recovery steam generator (WHRSG) and Secondary kiln shell were studied. Power and thermal energy savings of 42.88 MWh/year and 5.30 MW can be achieved respectively. Financial benefits for use of the conservation methods are substantial. Environmental benefit of 14.10% reduction in Greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions could be achieved. (author)

  8. Towards optimization of the silanization process of hydroxyapatite for its use in bone cement formulations

    Cisneros-Pineda, Olga G.; Herrera Kao, Wilberth; Loría-Bastarrachea, María I. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Veranes-Pantoja, Yaymarilis [Centro de Biomateriales, Universidad de la Habana, Avenida Universidad, s/n, e/G y Ronda, C.P. 10600 C. de La Habana (Cuba); Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Cervantes-Uc, José M., E-mail: manceruc@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work was to provide some fundamental information for optimization of silanization of hydroxyapatite intended for bone cement formulations. The effect of 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS) concentration and solvent system (acetone/water or methanol/water mixtures) during HA silanization was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR spectroscopy and EDX analysis. The effect of silanized HA on the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cements is also reported. It was found that the silanization process rendered hydroxyapatite with lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. Through EDX, it was observed that the silicon concentration in the HA particles was higher for acetone–water than that obtained for methanol–water system, although the mechanical performance of cements prepared with these particles exhibited the opposite behavior. Taking all these results together, it is concluded that methanol–water system containing MPS at 3 wt.% provides the better results during silanization process of HA. - Highlights: • Effect of MPS concentration and solvents during HA silanization was studied. • Silanization rendered HA has lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. • Silicon concentration was higher for acetone than that obtained using methanol. • Methanol–water system containing MPS at 3 wt.% provides the better results.

  9. Assessment of hydration process and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill by electrical resistivity measurement

    Xu, Wenbin; Tian, Xichun; Cao, Peiwang

    2018-04-01

    Cemented paste backfill (CPB) is an emerging mine backfill technique that allows environmentally hazardous tailings to return to the underground openings or stopes, thereby maximising the safety, efficiency and productivity of operation. Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) is one of the most commonly used parameters for evaluating the mechanical performance of CPB; the prediction of the UCS of CPB structures from early to advanced ages is of great practical importance. This study aims to investigate the predictability of the UCS of CPB during the hydration process based on electrical resistivity (ER) measurement. For this purpose, the samples prepared at different cement-to-tailing ratios and solid contents were subjected to the ER test during the whole hydration process and UCS tests at 3, 7, 28 days of curing periods. The effect of cement-to-tailing ratio and solid content on the ER and UCS of CPB samples was obtained; the UCS values were correlated with the corresponding ER data. Microstructural analysis was also performed on CPB samples to understand the effect of microstructure on the ER data. The result shows that the ER of CPB decreases first and then increases with the speed which is faster in the previous part than the latter. The ER and UCS of CPB samples increased with increasing cement-to-tailing ratio and solid content and curing periods. A logarithmic relationship is established for each mixture in order to predict the UCS of CPB based on ER. Scanning electron microscope analyses have revealed that the microstructure of the CPB changes with the age from the initial floc to honeycomb, and eventually to the compact clumps. The ER properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties. The major output of this study is that ER test is effectively capable for a preliminary prediction of the UCS of CPB.

  10. Sealing properties of cement-based grout materials. Final report on the Rock sealing project

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, Malcolm; Shenton, B.; Walker, Brad; Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Karnland, O.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory studies of material properties. A number of different high performance grouts were investigated. The laboratory studies focused on mixtures of sulphate resistant portland cement, silica fume, superplasticizer and water. The ability of the thin films to self seal was confirmed. The surface reactions were studied in specimens of hardened grouts. The leach rates were found to vary with grout and water composition and with temperature. The short-term hydraulic and strength or properties of the hardened grout were determined. These properties were determined for the grouts both in-bulk and as thin-films. The hydraulic conductivities of the bulk, hardened material were found to be less than 10 -14 m/s. The hydraulic conductivities of thin films were found to be less than 10 -11 m/s. Broken, the hydraulic conductivity of the thin films could be increased to 10 -7 m/s. Examination of the leached grout specimens revealed a trend for the pore sizes to decrease with time. The propensity for fractured grouts to self seal was also observed in tests in which the hydraulic conductivity of recompacted mechanically disrupted, granulated grouts was determined. These tests showed that the hydraulic conductivity decreased rapidly with time. The decreases were associated with decreases in mean pore size. In view of the very low hydraulic conductivity it is likely that surface leaching at the grout/groundwater interface will be that major process by which bulk high-performance grouts may degrade. With the completion of the laboratory, in situ and modelling studies it appears that high-performance cement based grouts can be considered as viable materials for some repository sealing applications. Some of the uncertainties that remain are identified in this report. (54 refs.)

  11. CQI project improves discharge process.

    1998-08-01

    At Gibson Rehab Center in Williamsport, PA, a continuous quality improvement project to bolster the institution's discharge planning process has resulted in increased satisfaction and an award for quality. The 15-month project was spearheaded by a multidisciplinary team charged with identifying areas that had a significant impact on customer service and suggesting better ways of delivering that service. Among the changes the group suggested were establishing a weekly discharge planning group for new neuro patients, assigning a discharge coordinator for each treatment team, and creating an interdisciplinary communication sheet for the home health therapy staff.

  12. Plasma hearth process demonstration project

    Geimer, R.M.; Gillins, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) demonstration project is one of the key technology projects in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development Mixed Waste Focus Area. The PHP is a high temperature thermal treatment process using a plasma arc torch in a stationary, refractory lined chamber that destroys organics and stabilizes the residuals in a nonleaching, vitrified waste form, greatly improving the disposability of the waste. This paper describes the PHP system and summarizes test results to date, including volume reduction, destruction and removal efficiencies for organic wastes, and emission characteristics. Tests performed so far demonstrate that the PHP adresses DOE mixed waste final waste form requirements and US Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure requirements

  13. Feasibility study on effective use of energy in the cement manufacturing process

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted of a project for energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas reduction by introducing the steam injection gas turbine generator to production facilities of the Siam Cement Industry Corporation (SCI) in Thailand. In the project, studies were made on the following: no purchases of electric power by introduction of the steam injection gas turbine generator; additional heating by gas turbine exhaust gas by introduction of the kiln combustion air heater; remodeling of the preheater of raw materials, and the partial calcination before kiln sintering by introduction of the calcination furnace. As a result of the study, the energy conservation amount was 1,200 toe/y, and the greenhouse effect gas reduction amount was approximately 8,000 t-CO2/y, which led to the reserve power for increased production of clinker by about 18%. The size of investment was 314.5 million Baht in total. As to the evaluation of economical efficiency of the investment, the actual period of ROI was a little less than 5 years, and the internal earning rate was 17.7%, which substantially met with SCI's standards for equipment investment. However, there are problems on the gas supply infrastructure, recovery of the white cement demand, etc. (NEDO)

  14. Feasibility study on effective use of energy in the cement manufacturing process

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted of a project for energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas reduction by introducing the steam injection gas turbine generator to production facilities of the Siam Cement Industry Corporation (SCI) in Thailand. In the project, studies were made on the following: no purchases of electric power by introduction of the steam injection gas turbine generator; additional heating by gas turbine exhaust gas by introduction of the kiln combustion air heater; remodeling of the preheater of raw materials, and the partial calcination before kiln sintering by introduction of the calcination furnace. As a result of the study, the energy conservation amount was 1,200 toe/y, and the greenhouse effect gas reduction amount was approximately 8,000 t-CO2/y, which led to the reserve power for increased production of clinker by about 18%. The size of investment was 314.5 million Baht in total. As to the evaluation of economical efficiency of the investment, the actual period of ROI was a little less than 5 years, and the internal earning rate was 17.7%, which substantially met with SCI's standards for equipment investment. However, there are problems on the gas supply infrastructure, recovery of the white cement demand, etc. (NEDO)

  15. 0-6717 : investigation of alternative supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) : [project summary].

    2014-08-01

    In Texas, Class F fly ash is extensively used as a : supplementary cementing material (SCM) : because of its ability to control thermal cracking : in mass concrete and to mitigate deleterious : expansions in concrete from alkali-silica reaction : (AS...

  16. Process development for utilizing asbestos cement waste in rotary kilns for the cement industry. Final report; Erarbeitung eines Verfahrens zur stofflichen Verwertung von zementgebundenen Asbestprodukten in Drehrohroefen fuer die Zementindustrie. Abschlussbericht

    Schlegel, R.; Kieser, J.; Kraehner, A.

    1999-11-01

    The law for recycling and waste demands the utilization also for waste of asbestos cement (ac). The procedure of thermal utilization of ac in the flame of a rotary cement kiln was developed and patented by the research institute IBU-tec Weimar, Germany. The ac-material has to be pre-pulverized and grinded to a degree of fineness of R{sub 90}<15%. Considerations of safety engineering lead to the idea of common fine grinding of old oil (oo) and ac. This new procedure was searched in FuE-project in 1998/99 (financial support by BMBF). A mash of ac and oo was generated as a utilization product ready for firing which was injected into the flame of the rotary cement kiln. This particles of ac smelt to spherical shaped particles at a temperature above 1500 C. They were utilized by clinker formation. The material and gas stream leaving the kiln does not contain fibres of asbestos. This was demonstrated in a small equipment burning test. The industrial realization concerning cement plant Ruedersdorf, near Berlin, was searched, technologically described and safety engineeringly and financially assessed by a project study. Process-technical and financial advantages were seen for the dry fine grinding. The wet fine grinding with old oil could be used in cement plants using old oil as fuel. (orig.) [German] Das Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetz (1994) fordert u.a. die stoffliche Verwertung auch fuer Asbestzementabfaelle (AZ). Das vom Institut fuer Baustoff- und Umweltschutz-Technologie Weimar 1995 entwickelte und patentierte Verfahren zur thermischen Verwertung von AZ in der Flamme eines Zementdrehrohrofens erfuellt diese Forderung. Das AZ-Material muss vorzerkleinert und bis zur Rohmehlfeinheit (R{sub 90}<15%) feingemahlen werden. Sicherheitstechnische Ueberlegungen fuehrten zu der Idee, die Feinmahlung zusammen mit Altoel (AOe) zu erproben. Diese Verfahrensvariante wurde im Rahmen eines FuE-Projektes 1998/99 untersucht (finanzielle Foerderung durch das BMBF). Als

  17. Analysis of the influence of two different milling processes in the properties of precursor powder and [Beta]-TCP cement

    Cardoso, H.A.I.; Pereira, C.H.R.; Zavaglia, C.A.C.; Motisuke, M.

    2011-01-01

    There are several characteristics that put calcium phosphate cements in evidence, like its bioactivity and in vivo resorption. The influence of two milling processes in the morphological properties of the [beta]-tricalcium phosphate powder, [beta]-TCP, and in the mechanical properties of the cement were analyzed. The powder was obtained by solid state reaction of CaCO_3 and CaHPO_4 at 1050 ° C. It showed high phase purity and absence of toxic elements. The powder was processed in ball mill (A) and high-energy vibratory mill (B), with posterior analyze by SEM and particle size distribution. The powders showed different average and distribution of grain size. Finally, the cement obtained by the process (B) showed values of axial tensile strength significantly greater than that obtained by the process (A). The milling process (B) is much more efficient than the process (A). (author)

  18. Supplier selection in supply chain management using analytical network process for Indonesian cement industry

    Ismail, A. H.; Mahardika, R. Z. Z.

    2017-12-01

    Supply chain management has increased more significance with the impact of globalization. In the present worldwide market, well-managed supply chain is a standout amongst the most vital requirement to be more competitive in the market. For any organization incorporate cement industry, the most critical decision in initial process of supply chain management is to buy products, materials or services from suppliers. So the role of suppliers is irrefutable important in the global aggressive markets. Appropriate decision of supplier selection can lead to reducing cost in supply chain management. However, it is becoming more complex because of existing various criteria and involving the suitable experts in the company to make valid decision in accordance with its criteria. In this study, the supplier selection of an Indonesia’s leading cement company is analyzed by using one of the popular multi-criteria decision making method, Saaty’s analytical network process (ANP). It is employed for the selection of the best alternative among three suppliers of pasted bag. Supplier with the highest rank comes from several major steps from building the relationship between various criteria to rating the alternatives with the help of experts from the company. The results show that, Communication capability, Flexible payment terms, Ability to meet delivery quantities are the most important criteria in the pasted bag supplier selection in Indonesian cement industry with 0.155, 0.110 and 0.1 ANP coefficient respectively. And based on the ANP coefficient values in limit supermatrix, the A2 or supplier 2 had the highest score with 64.7% or 0.13 ANP coefficient.

  19. Processing of concentrated radioactive wastes into cement and bitumens following calcination

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Ditl, P.; Prikryl, P.

    1985-01-01

    A brief characteristic is presented of the most frequently used processes of solidification of liquid radioactive wastes, viz., bituminization, cementation and their combination with calcination. The effect of individual parameters is assessed on the choice of the type of solidification process as is their importance in the actual process, in temporary storage, during transportation and under conditions of long-term storage. It has been found that a combination of the procedures could lead to a modular system of methods and equipment. This would allow to approach optimal solidification of wastes in the present period and to establish a research reserve for the development of more modern, economically advantageous and safer procedures. A rough estimate is made of the costs of the solidification of 1 m 3 of radioactive concentrate from the V-1 power plant at a production of 380 m 3 /year, this for the cementation-calcination and bituminization-calcination procedures. The said rough economic analysis only serves to identify the major operating components which have the greatest effect on the economic evaluation of the solidification procedures. (Z.M.)

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter

  1. Review of technologies for mercury removal from flue gas from cement production processes

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    sources of mercury in the cement kiln flue gas. Cement plants are quite different from power plants and waste incinerators regarding the flue gas composition, temperature, residence time, and material circulation. Cement kiln systems have some inherent ability to retain mercury in the solid materials due...... to the adsorption of mercury on the solids in the cold zone. However, recirculation of the kiln dust to the kiln will cause release of the captured mercury. The mercury chemistry in cement kiln systems is complicated and knowledge obtained from power plants and incinerators cannot be directly applied in cement...

  2. Microstructural and bulk property changes in hardened cement paste during the first drying process

    Maruyama, Ippei, E-mail: ippei@dali.nuac.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, ES Building, No. 546, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464–8603 (Japan); Nishioka, Yukiko; Igarashi, Go [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, ES Building, No. 539, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464–8603 (Japan); Matsui, Kunio [Products and Marketing Development Dept. Asahi-KASEI Construction Materials Corporation, 106 Someya, Sakai-machi, Sashima-gun, Ibaraki, 306–0493 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports the microstructural changes and resultant bulk physical property changes in hardened cement paste (hcp) during the first desorption process. The microstructural changes and solid-phase changes were evaluated by water vapor sorption, nitrogen sorption, ultrasonic velocity, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance. Strength, Young's modulus, and drying shrinkage were also examined. The first drying process increased the volume of macropores and decreased the volume of mesopores and interlayer spaces. Furthermore, in the first drying process globule clusters were interconnected. During the first desorption, the strength increased for samples cured at 100% to 90% RH, decreased for 90% to 40% RH, and increased again for 40% to 11% RH. This behavior is explained by both microstructural changes in hcp and C–S–H globule densification. The drying shrinkage strains during rapid drying and slow drying were compared and the effects of the microstructural changes and evaporation were separated.

  3. Research on cement-based grouts for the OECD/NEA international Stripa project

    Onofrei, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the work that has been carried out on cement-based by AECL research in Canada. The results indicate that it is possible to manufacture low water content high-performance cement-grouts, the performance of which would be acceptable for at least thousands of years and probably for much longer periods. Moreover, these grouts were shown to have negligible hydraulic conductivity, associated with very low porosity and to be highly leach resistant in repository conditions. (TEC). 18 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  4. Basic survey project for Joint Implementation, etc. Feasibility study on the modernization of cement plant in Republic of Kazakhstan

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing greenhouse effect gas emissions, a project was studied for the modernization of a cement plant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. In the Semipalatinsk cement plant, an old wet type kiln is being used which is much consuming in energy and low in productivity. By replacing this kiln with the NSP dry type kiln, expected were the enhancement of efficiency, energy conservation, and reduction in greenhouse effect gas emissions. Further, it was planned that four lines for raw material production and four lines for clinker combustion are tied together to make it one, and the ball mill is replaced with the low power-consuming type roller mill. By this project, the energy consumption will decrease by 96,000 t/y in coal and 2,095,500 kWh/y in electric power, which is a decrease of approximately 39% from the energy consumption before the project being worked out. Moreover, as to greenhouse effect gases, there are no changes in CO2 gas emissions from limestone, but CO2 gas emissions from coal decrease by 216.960 t/y, which is a decrease of 28.5% from that before the project being worked out. (NEDO)

  5. From Project Management to Process Management - Effectively Organising Transdisciplinary Projects

    Moschitz, Heidrun

    2013-01-01

    In transdisciplinary projects, the roles of researchers change. In addition to being a source of knowledge, they are required to engage in knowledge exchange processes. This results in an alteration at project level: researchers need to creatively manage projects as group processes.

  6. In situ monitoring of the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement with ESEM

    Sun Wei; Zhang Yunsheng; Lin Wei; Liu Zhiyong

    2004-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) was used to in situ quantitatively study the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement under an 80% RH environment. An energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDXA) was also employed to distinguish the chemical composition of hydration product. The ESEM micrographs showed that metakaolin particles pack loosely at 10 min after mixing, resulting in the existence of many large voids. As hydration proceeds, a lot of gels were seen and gradually precipitated on the surfaces of these particles. At later stage, these particles were wrapped by thick gel layers and their interspaces were almost completely filled. The corresponding EDXA results illustrated that the molar ratios of K/Al increase while Si/Al decrease with the development of hydration. As a result, the molar ratios of K/Al and Si/Al of hydration products at an age of 4 h amounted to 0.99 and 1.49, respectively, which were close to the theoretical values (K/Al=1.0, Si/Al=1.0 for K-PS geopolymer cement paste). In addition, well-developed crystals could not been found at any ages; instead, spongelike amorphous gels were always been observed

  7. FUZZY LOGIC CONTROLLER AS MODELING TOOL FOR THE BURNING PROCESS OF A CEMENT PRODUCTION PLANT

    P.B. Osofisan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: A comprehensive optimisation of the cement production process presents a problem since the input variables as well as the output variables are non-linear, interdependent and contain uncertainties. To arrive at a solution, a Fuzzy Logic controller has been designed to achieve a well-defined relationship between the main and vital variables through the instrumentality of a Fuzzy Model. The Fuzzy Logic controller has been simulated on a digital computer using MATLAB 5.0 Fuzzy Logic Tool Box, using data from a local cement production plant.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die omvattende optimisering van 'n proses wat sement vervaardig, word beskryf deur nie-linieêre inset- en uitsetveranderlikes wat onderling afhanklik is, en ook van onsekere aard is. Om 'n optimum oplossing te verkry, word 'n Wasigheidsmodel gebruik. Die model word getoets deur gebruik te maak van die MATLAB 5.0 Fuzzy Logic Tool Box en data vanaf 'n lokale sementvervaardigingsaanleg.

  8. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT GRINDING PROCESS OF CEMENT CLINKER IN A BALL MILL

    Kuznetsova M.M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of theoretical and experimental research of grinding process of bulk materials in a ball mill. The new method of determination of energy efficiently mode of operation of ball mills in a process of a cement clinker grinding is proposed and experimentally tested.

  9. SNF Project Engineering Process Improvement Plan

    DESAI, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    This plan documents the SNF Project activities and plans to support its engineering process. It describes five SNF Project Engineering initiatives: new engineering procedures, qualification cards process; configuration management, engineering self assessments, and integrated schedule for engineering activities

  10. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  11. New manufacturing method for Fe-Si magnetic powders using modified pack-cementation process

    Byun, Ji Young; Kim, Jang Won; Han, Jeong Whan; Jang, Pyungwoo

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a new method for making Fe-Si magnetic powders using a pack-cementation process. It was found that Fe-Si alloy powders were formed by a reaction of the pack mixture of Fe, Si, NaF, and Al2O3 powders at 900 °C for 24 h under a hydrogen atmosphere. Separation of the Fe-Si alloy powders was dependent on the particle size of the Fe powders in the pack. For small Fe powders, magnetic separation in a medium of strong alkali solution was recommended. But, for relatively larger Fe powders, the Fe-Si alloy powders were easily separated from Al2O3 powders using a magnet in air atmosphere. The Si content in the Fe-Si magnetic powders were easily controlled by changing the weight ratio of Si to (Si+Fe) in the pack.

  12. Characterization of a calcium phosphate cement based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate obtained by wet precipitation process

    Thurmer, M.B.; Diehl, C.E.; Vieira, R.S.; Coelho, W.T.G.; Santos, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    There are several systems of calcium phosphate cements being studied. Those based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate are of particular interest. After setting they produce calcium deficient hydroxyapatite similar to bone like hydroxyapatite. This work aims to obtain alpha-tricalcium phosphate powders by the wet precipitation process, using calcium nitrate and phosphoric acid as reagents. This powder was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. In order to prepare the calcium phosphate cement, the powder was mixed with an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The mechanical properties of the cement were assessed and it was evaluated by means of apparent density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The described method produced crystalline alpha-tricalcium phosphate as the major phase. The calcium phosphate cement showed high values of compression strength (50 MPa). The soaking of the cement in a simulated body fluid (SBF) formed a layer of hydroxyapatite like crystals in the surface of the samples. (author)

  13. A Review of Metal Injection Molding- Process, Optimization, Defects and Microwave Sintering on WC-Co Cemented Carbide

    Shahbudin, S. N. A.; Othman, M. H.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-08-01

    This article is about a review of optimization of metal injection molding and microwave sintering process on tungsten cemented carbide produce by metal injection molding process. In this study, the process parameters for the metal injection molding were optimized using Taguchi method. Taguchi methods have been used widely in engineering analysis to optimize the performance characteristics through the setting of design parameters. Microwave sintering is a process generally being used in powder metallurgy over the conventional method. It has typical characteristics such as accelerated heating rate, shortened processing cycle, high energy efficiency, fine and homogeneous microstructure, and enhanced mechanical performance, which is beneficial to prepare nanostructured cemented carbides in metal injection molding. Besides that, with an advanced and promising technology, metal injection molding has proven that can produce cemented carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide hard metal has been used widely in various applications due to its desirable combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Moreover, areas of study include common defects in metal injection molding and application of microwave sintering itself has been discussed in this paper.

  14. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing Processes Based on Emergy and Ecological Footprint Analysis

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housin...

  15. Process-based project proposal risk management

    Alok Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We all are aware of the organizational omnipresence. Projects within the organizations are ubiquitous too. Projects achieve their goals successfully if they are planned, scheduled, controlled and implemented well. The project lifecycle of initiating, planning, scheduling, controlling and implementing are very well-planned by project managers and the organizations. Successful projects have well-developed risk management plans to deal with situations impacting projects. Like any other organisation, a university does try to access funds for different purposes too. For such organisations, running a project is not the issue, rather getting a project proposal approved to fund a project is the key. Project proposal processing is done by the nodal office in every organisation. Usually, these nodal offices help in administration and submission of a project proposal for accessing funds. Seldom are these nodal project offices within the organizations facilitate a project proposal approval by proactively reaching out to the project managers. And as project managers prepare project proposals, little or no attention is made to prepare a project proposal risk plan so as to maximise project acquisition. Risk plans are submitted while preparing proposals but these risk plans cater to a requirement to address actual projects upon approval. Hence, a risk management plan for project proposal is either missing or very little effort is made to treat the risks inherent in project acquisition. This paper is an integral attempt to highlight the importance of risk treatment for project proposal stage as an extremely important step to preparing the risk management plan made for projects corresponding to their lifecycle phases. Several tools and techniques have been proposed in the paper to help and guide either the project owner (proposer or the main organisational unit responsible for project management. Development of tools and techniques to further enhance project

  16. Techno-economic study of CO2 capture process for cement plants. Paper no. IGEC-1-107

    Nazmul Hassan, S.M.; Douglas, P.L.; Croiset, E.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is considered to be the major source of GHG responsible for global warming; man-made CO 2 contributes approximately 63.5% to all greenhouse gases. The cement industry is responsible for approximately 5% of global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions emitting nearly 900 kg of CO 2 for every 1000 kg of cement produced. Amine absorption processes, in particular the monoethanolamine (MEA) based process, is considered to be a viable technology for capturing CO 2 from low-pressure flue gas streams because of its fast reaction rate with CO 2 and low cost of raw materials compared to other amines. However, the MEA absorption process is associated with high capital and operating costs because a significant amount of energy is required for solvent regeneration and because of severe operating problems such as corrosion, solvent loss and solvent degradation. This research was motivated by the need to design, size and cost a CO 2 capture process from the cement industry. The MEA based absorption process was used as a potential technique to model CO 2 capture from cement plants. In this research four cases were considered all to reach a CO 2 purity of 98%: i) the plant operates at the highest capacity; ii) the plant operates at average load; iii) the plant operates at minimum operating capacity; and iv) switching to a lower carbon content fuel at average plant load. A comparison among the four cases were performed to determine the best operating conditions for capturing CO 2 from cement plants. A sensitivity analysis of the economics to the lean loading and percent recovery were carried out as well as the different absorber and striper tray combinations. (author)

  17. Testing and evaluation of alternative process systems for immobilizing radioactive mixed particulate waste in cement

    Weingardt, K.M.; Weber, J.R.

    1994-03-01

    Radioactive and Hazardous Mixed Wastes have accumulated at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Ongoing operations and planned facilities at Hanford will also contribute to this waste stream. To meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions most of this waste will need to be treated to permit disposal. In general this treatment will need to include stabilization/solidification either as a sole method or as part of a treatment train. A planned DOE facility, the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A, is scoped to provide this required treatment for containerized contact-handled (CH), mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at Hanford. An engineering development program has been conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to select the best system for utilizing a cement based process in WRAP Module 2A. Three mixing processes were developed for analysis and testing; in-drum mixing, continuous mixing, and batch mixing. Some full scale tests were conducted and 55 gallon drums of solidified product were produced. These drums were core sampled and examined to evaluate mixing effectiveness. Total solids loading and the order of addition of waste and binder constituents were also varied. The highest confidence approach to meet the WRAP Module 2A waste immobilization system needs appears to be the out-of-drum batch mixing concept. This system is believed to offer the most flexibility and efficiency, given the highly variable and troublesome waste streams feeding the facility

  18. Impact of Fuel Selection on Techno-environmental Performance of Post-combustion Calcium Looping Process Applied to a Cement Plant

    Schakel, Wouter; Orregioni, Gabriel; Strømman, Anders; Ramirez, Andrea

    Calcium looping CO2 capture is a promising technology to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production. Coal is generally considered the fuel used to drive the calcium looping process as coal is already used as feedstock for cement production. This study assesses the impact of different fuels (coal,

  19. Process of establishing JHP project

    Ishihara, Masayasu

    2013-01-01

    Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo was a Japanese central research institute as regards to nuclear physics, high energy physics, and cosmic ray physics. After the foundations of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, KEK, and Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, in early 1970s, the nuclear physics community worked out so-called NUMATRON project, which involved building a large heavy-ion synchrotron. It was, however, not successful in competition with TRISTAN project which was proposed by KEK to build a 30 GeV electron-positron collider. Alternative project of the nuclear physics community was so-called JHP (Japanese Hadron Project), to build 1 GeV proton linac in KEK site in collaboration with KEK, which included that the Institute for Nuclear Study should be consolidated to KEK leaving from The University of Tokyo. The reorganized KEK proposed in collaboration with JAEA, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, to build a big proton accelerator facility in JAEA site. This plan was realized as J-PARC, Japanese Proton Accelerator Research Complex, operating 50 GeV proton synchrotron. (author)

  20. Process-based software project management

    Goodman, F Alan

    2006-01-01

    Not connecting software project management (SPM) to actual, real-world development processes can lead to a complete divorcing of SPM to software engineering that can undermine any successful software project. By explaining how a layered process architectural model improves operational efficiency, Process-Based Software Project Management outlines a new method that is more effective than the traditional method when dealing with SPM. With a clear and easy-to-read approach, the book discusses the benefits of an integrated project management-process management connection. The described tight coup

  1. Study on applicability of low alkaline cement in Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project (2) (Contract research)

    Nakayama, Masashi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Matsuda, Takeshi; Noda, Masaru; Iriya, Keishiro; Takeda, Nobufumi

    2009-11-01

    In Horonobe Underground Research Center construction of underground facility began in 2005 and a construction practicality test with HFSC (Highly Fly-ash contained Silica-fume Cement) is planned in a part of the gallery. Before the HFSC is used as a tunnel support in the gallery, it is necessary to validate that the HFSC is valid under the actual construction condition. The research results in the FY 2007 are as follows. For evaluating corrosion behavior in the HFSC and the durability of the HFSC, reinforced concrete specimen with HFSC 226 have been exposed to off-shore condition in saline water and splashed zone for 6 years and analyzed the corrosion rate and the amount of chloride intrusion. The durability of the HFSC reinforced concrete was assessed to be more than 50 years until cracking due to corrosion is generated. The pH measurements and the analysis of the chemical composition of solid and liquid phase in the HFSC cocrete-water immersion experiments, which were started in the FY 2002, were carried out. Also for the experiments of cement paste for shotcreting, which were started in the FY 2005, were analyzed. Furthermore, results and findings obtained in earlier studies including this study were summarized, and based on those, method of quality control including test method, frequency, standards etc. was suggested. (author)

  2. Evaluation of long-term interaction between cement and bentonite for geological disposal (1) - Project Overview

    Owada, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Daisuke; Yahagi, Ryoji; Ishii, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonitic and cementitious materials are both planned for use as engineered barrier materials in the geological disposal of high level vitrified waste and TRU (transuranic) waste in Japan. As shown in Figure 1, bentonitic material will be placed around the waste packages as buffer material and a large amount of cementitious material is specified for use as filler, structure, support and grout. Cementitious material supplies an alkaline solution with high calcium concentration through reaction with groundwater. However, the alkaline solution will cause chemical and physical alteration of the bentonitic material. Since many important functions of an engineered barrier system (EBS), such as watertightness, chemical buffering, and sorption of radioactive nuclides, will be maintained by the properties of the buffer material, evaluation of long-term chemical or mechanical alteration of the buffer material is necessary to demonstrate the robustness of the EBS. Although many researches on chemical and mechanical alteration of bentonitic material, there was large uncertainty because the chemical alteration of bentonitic material is very slow and the altered region is very limited. In this project, the dissolution rate of montmorillonite under compaction and the spatial distribution of secondary C-S-H precipitation were obtained and mechanical and hydrological changes caused by the mineralogical change of bentonite material were modeled to reduce the uncertainty in the safety assessment of EBS performance. To improve the accuracy of the long term evaluation of the EBS performance, coupled analyses between hydraulic/mechanical calculations and geochemical-mass transport coupled calculations were performed. Alteration of mechanical properties caused by chemical degradation should be modeled for the coupled calculations. Because the mechanical properties of bentonitic material depend strongly on the montmorillonite content and

  3. Cermet cements.

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  4. SNF project engineering process improvement plan

    KELMENSON, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Process Improvement Plan documents the activities and plans to be taken by the SNF Project (the Project) to support its engineering process and to produce a consolidated set of engineering procedures that are fully compliant with the requirements of HNF-PRO-1819 (1819). These requirements are imposed on all engineering activities performed for the Project and apply to all life-cycle stages of the Project's systems, structures and components (SSCs). This Plan describes the steps that will be taken by the Project during the transition period to ensure that new procedures are effectively integrated into the Project's work process as these procedures are issued. The consolidated procedures will be issued and implemented by September 30, 1999

  5. Effects of Co-Processing Sewage Sludge in the Cement Kiln on PAHs, Heavy Metals Emissions and the Surrounding Environment.

    Lv, Dong; Zhu, Tianle; Liu, Runwei; Li, Xinghua; Zhao, Yuan; Sun, Ye; Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Qinglin

    2018-04-08

    To understand the effects of co-processing sewage sludge in the cement kiln on non-criterion pollutants emissions and its surrounding environment, the flue gas from a cement kiln stack, ambient air and soil from the background/downwind sites were collected in the cement plant. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals of the samples were analyzed. The results show that PAHs in flue gas mainly exist in the gas phase and the low molecular weight PAHs are the predominant congener. The co-processing sewage sludge results in the increase in PAHs and heavy metals emissions, especially high molecular weight PAHs and low-volatile heavy metals such as Cd and Pb in the particle phase, while it does not change their compositions and distribution patterns significantly. The concentrations and their distributions of the PAHs and heavy metals between the emissions and ambient air have a positive correlation and the co-processing sewage sludge results in the increase of PAHs and heavy metals concentrations in the ambient air. The PAHs concentration level and their distribution in soil are proportional to those in the particle phase of flue gas, and the co-processing sewage sludge can accelerate the accumulation of the PAHs and heavy metals in the surrounding soil, especially high/middle molecular weight PAHs and low-volatile heavy metals.

  6. Improvement of Construction Project Management Processes

    Nazarko, J.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The common denominator of the five papers published in the current edition of the Journal of Engineering, Project, and Production Management is the improvement of construction project management processes for effective use of resources. Execution of proper project management processes is widely recognized as a key success factor influencing likelihood of project success (Alleman, 2014. It is noticeable that four out of five papers in this issue of the Journal are authored or co-authored by Iranian researchers from the same Institute but their conclusions bear importance that cannot be limited to the authors’ region.

  7. Comparison of temperature change among different adhesive resin cement during polymerization process

    Murat Alkurt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the intra-pulpal temperature changes in adhesive resin cements during polymerization. Materials and Methods: Dentin surface was prepared with extracted human mandibular third molars. Adhesive resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, Panavia SA, and RelyX U200 were applied to the dentin surface and polymerized under IPS e.max Press restoration. K-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulpal chamber to measure temperature change (n = 7. The temperature data were recorded (0.0001 sensible and stored on a computer every 0.1 second for sixteen minutes. Differences between the baseline temperature and temperatures of various time points (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 minute were determined and mean temperature changes were calculated. At various time intervals, the differences in temperature values among the adhesive resin cements were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey honestly test (α = 0.05. Results: Significant differences were found among the time points and resin cements (P < 0.05. Temperature values of the Pan SA group were significantly higher than Pan F and RelyX (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Result of the study on self-adhesive and self-etch adhesive resin cements exhibited a safety intra-pulpal temperature change.

  8. Development of an immobilisation technique by cementation for non-radioactive simulated liquid waste, from Mo-99 production process

    Arva, E A; Marabini, S G; Varani, J L

    2012-01-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is the responsible for developing a management nuclear waste disposal programme. This programme contemplates the strictly environmental safe and efficient management of the radioactive waste from different sources. Since 1985, CNEA has been producing commercially Mo-99 for medical use. In this process two types of liquid waste are produced. One of them has high alkaline (NaOH 3,5M) and aluminate contents. Since Mo-99 production started, such liquid waste was stored in specially designed containers during production, and after a decay period in smaller containers in interim storage conditions. As this waste is still a liquid, development of an immobilisation technique is required. Immobilisation of radioactive liquid waste by cementation is a frequently used technique, and will be studied in the present work using Mo-99 non-radioactive simulated liquid waste. In this second stage, a full scale (200 liters drum) cementation test using simulated non radioactive waste was carried out. Such test included: using the BEBA 201 mixing machine - the same that will be used with real waste in the future for 'tuning up' the process, construction of a specially designed temperature sensor for measuring the maximum temperature value (five different positions, four inside the drum and one outside) and the time elapsed after all components mixing. Finally, standard specimens (IRAM 1622) were made for mechanical resistance tests after cement setting at 28 days. The results show values of temperature not above 40 o C with the maximum at 12 hours before component mixing and compression strength of 14 MPa. Such values are compatible for a waste immobilisation process by cementation (author)

  9. Plasma Spray and Pack Cementation Process Optimization and Oxidation Behaviour of Novel Multilayered Coatings

    Gao, Feng

    The hot section components in gas turbines are subjected to a harsh environment with the temperature being increased continuously. The higher temperature has directly resulted in severe oxidation of these components. Monolithic coatings such as MCrAIY and aluminide have been traditionally used to protect the components from oxidation; however, increased operating temperature quickly deteriorates the coatings due to accelerated diffusion of aluminum in the coatings. To improve the oxidation resistance a group of multilayered coatings are developed in this study. The multilayered coatings consist of a Cr-Si co-deposited layer as the diffusion barrier, a plasma sprayed NiCrA1Y coating as the middle layer and an aluminized top layer. The Cr-Si and aluminized layers are fabricated using pack cementation processes and the NiCrA1Y coatings are produced using the Mettech Axial III(TM) System. All of the coating processes are optimized using the methodology of Design of Experiments (DOE) and the results are analyzed using statistical method. The optimal processes are adopted to fabricate the multilayered coatings for oxidation tests. The coatings are exposed in air at 1050°C and 1150°C for 1000 hr. The results indicate that a Cr layer and a silicon-rich barrier layer have formed on the interface between the Cr-Si coating and the NiCrA1Y coating. This barrier layer not only prevents aluminum and chromium from diffusing into the substrate, but also impedes the diffusion of other elements from the substrate into the coating. The results also reveal that, for optimal oxidation resistance at 1050°C, the top layer in a multilayered coating should have at least Al/Ni ratio of one; whereas the multilayered coating with the All Ni ratio of two in the top layer exhibits the best oxidation resistance at 1150°C. The DOE methodology provides an excellent means for process optimization and the selection of oxidation test matrix, and also offers a more thorough understanding of the

  10. Preparation of hydraulic cement

    1921-08-28

    A process for the preparation of hydraulic cement by the use of oil-shale residues is characterized in that the oil-shale refuse is mixed with granular basic blast-furnace slag and a small amount of portland cement and ground together.

  11. Modernization of Byuzmeyinsky Cement Plant

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective of saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emission, investigations and discussions were given on a modernization project for Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory, the only cement factory in Turkmenistan. Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory uses the wet process which consumes a large amount of energy, is inferior in production efficiency and quality, and discharging a great amount of greenhouse effect gas. The present project will execute change of the raw material crusher into a vertical roll mill for one of the four wet kilns, and change of the facilities for raw material powder mixing and storing and clinker manufacturing into dry-type facilities using the NSP system. As a result of the discussions, the energy saving effect would be 86,321 tons of crude oil equivalent annually, and the greenhouse gas emission reducing effect would be 224,467 t-CO2 annually. The total fund amount required for the project is estimated to be 90,211,000 dollars. With regard to the profitability, the internal financial profit rate would be 9.71% after tax, and the ROE would be 18.62%, whereas the project is considered feasible. (NEDO)

  12. Assessment of Energy Performance and Emission Control Using Alternative Fuels in Cement Industry through a Process Model

    Azad Rahman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement manufacturing is one of the most energy intensive processes and is accountable for substantial pollutant emissions. Increasing energy costs compel stakeholders and researchers to search for alternative options to improve energy performance and reduce CO2 emissions. Alternative fuels offer a realistic solution towards the reduction of the usage of fossil fuels and the mitigation of pollutant emissions. This paper developed a process model of a precalciner kiln system in the cement industry using Aspen Plus software to simulate the effect of five alternative fuels on pollutant emissions and energy performance. The alternatives fuels used were tyre, municipal solid waste (MSW, meat and bone meal (MBM, plastic waste and sugarcane bagasse. The model was developed on the basis of energy and mass balance of the system and was validated against data from a reference cement plant. This study also investigated the effect of these alternative fuels on the quality of the clinker. The results indicated that up to a 4.4% reduction in CO2 emissions and up to a 6.4% reduction in thermal energy requirement could be achieved using these alternative fuels with 20% mix in coal. It was also found that the alternative fuels had minimum influence on the clinker quality except in the case of MSW. Overall, MBM was found to be a better option as it is capable on reducing energy requirement and CO2 emissions more than others. The outcomes of the study offer better understanding of the effects of solid alternative fuels to achieve higher energy performance and on mitigating pollutant emissions in cement industry.

  13. Itataia project - Development of the process

    Coelho, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    A process for treating the phosphorus uraniferous ore, from Itataia-CE mine in Brazil, was developed, establishing the basic flow chart for recovery two products: uranium concentrate and phosphoric acid. The developed process consists in physical concentration, chemical separation, solvent extraction, and it presented, in laboratory and pilot scales, recovery levels which assure the project viability technicaly and economicaly. The consolidation of project and the description of installations are presented by a documentary film. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Itataia project - Development of the process

    Coelho, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    A process for treating the phosphorous uraniferous ore, from Itataia-CE mine in Brazil, was developed, establishing the basic flow chart for recovery two products: uranium concentrate and phosphoric acid. The developed process consists in physical concentration, chemical separation, solvent extraction, and it presented, in laboratory and pilot scales, recovery leves which assure the project viability technically and economically. The consolidation of project and the description of installations are presented by a documentary film. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  16. Healing agent in cement-based materials and structures, and process for its preparation

    Jonkers, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to healing agent in cement-based materials and structures, wherein said healing agent comprises organic compounds and/or bacteria-loaded porous particles, which porous particles comprise expanded clay- or sintered fly ash. Furthermore, said porous particles are intact

  17. Modeling of a self-healing process in blast furnace slag cement exposed to accelerated carbonation

    Zemskov, S.V.; Ahmad, B.; Copuroglu, O.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the current research, a mathematical model for the post-damage improvement of the carbonated blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) exposed to accelerated carbonation is constructed. The study is embedded within the framework of investigating the effect of using lightweight expanded clay aggregate,

  18. Optimization and validation of a chemical process for uranium, mercury and cesium leaching from cemented radioactive wastes

    Reynier, N.; Lastra, R.; Laviolette, C.; Bouzoubaa, N., E-mail: nicolas.reynier@canada.ca [Natural Resources Canada, CanmetMINING, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Chapman, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) is developing a treatment and long-term management strategy for a legacy cemented radioactive waste that contains uranium, mercury, and fission products. Extracting the uranium would be advantageous for decreasing the waste classification and reducing the cost of long-term management. The chemical leachability of 3 key elements (U, Hg, and Cs) from a surrogate cemented waste (SCW) was studied with several lixiviants. The results showed that the most promising approach to leach and recover U, Hg, and Cs is the direct leaching of the SCW with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in strong saline media. Operating parameters such as particle size, temperature, pulp density, leaching time, acid and salt concentrations, number of leaching/washing steps, etc. were optimized to improve key elements solubilization. Sulfuric leaching in saline media of a SCW (U5) containing 1182 ppm of U, 1598 ppm of Hg, and 7.9 ppm of Cs in the optimized conditions allows key elements solubilisation of 98.5 ± 0.4%, 96.6 ± 0.1%, and 93.8 ± 1.1% of U, Hg, and Cs, respectively. This solubilization process was then applied in triplicate to 7 other SCWs prepared with different cements, liquid ratios, and at different aging times and temperatures. Concentrated sulfuric acid is added to the slurry until the pH is about 2, which causes the complete degradation of cement and the formation of CaSO{sub 4}. Sulfuric acid is particularly useful because it produces a leachate that is amenable to conventional ion exchange technology for the separation and recovery of uranium. (author)

  19. SNF project engineering process improvement plan

    DESAI, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Process Improvement Plan documents the activities and plans to be taken by the SNF Project to support its engineering process and to produce a consolidated set of engineering procedures that are fully compliant with the requirements of HNF-PRO-1819. All new procedures will be issued and implemented by September 30, 1999

  20. Optimization and validation of a chemical process for uranium, mercury and cesium leaching from cemented radioactive wastes

    Reynier, N.; Riveros, P.; Lastra, R.; Laviolette, C.; Bouzoubaa, N.; Chapman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is developing a treatment and long-term management strategy for a legacy cemented radioactive waste that contains uranium, mercury and fission products. Extracting the uranium would be advantageous for decreasing the waste classification and reducing the cost of long-term management. Consequently, there are safety and economic and environmental incentives for the extraction of uranium, mercury and cesium before subjecting the cemented waste to a stabilization process. The mineralogical analysis of the surrogate cemented waste (SCW) indicated that uranium forms calcium uranate, CaUO 4 , occurring as layers of several millimeters or as grains of 20 μm. Hg is found mostly as large (∼50 μm) and small grains (5-8 μm) of HgO. The chemical leachability of three key elements (U, Hg, and Cs) from a SCW was studied with several leaching materials. The results showed that the most promising approach to leach and recover U, Hg, and Cs is the direct leaching of the SCW with H 2 SO 4 in strong saline media. Operating parameters such as particle size, temperature, pulp density, leaching time, acid and salt concentrations, number of leaching/rinsing step, etc. were optimized to improve key elements solubilization. Sulfuric leaching in saline media of a SCW (U5) containing 1182 ppm of U, 1598 ppm of Hg, and 7.9 ppm of Cs in the optimized conditions allows key elements recovery of 98.5 ± 0.4%, 96.6 ± 0.1%, and 93.8 ± 1.1% of U, Hg, and Cs respectively. This solubilization process was then applied in triplicate to seven other SCW prepared with different cement, liquid ratio and at different aging time and temperature. Concentrated sulfuric acid is added to the slurry until the pH is about 2, which causes the complete degradation of cement and the formation of CaSO 4 . At this pH, the acid consumption is moderate and the formation of amorphous silica gel is avoided. Sulfuric acid is particularly useful because it produces a leachate that

  1. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe international best practices for pre-processing and coprocessing of MSW and sewage sludge in cement plants, for the benefit of countries that wish to develop co-processing capacity. The report is divided into three main sections. Section 2 describes the fundamentals of co-processing, Section 3 describes exemplary international regulatory and institutional frameworks for co-processing, and Section 4 describes international best practices related to the technological aspects of co-processing.

  2. An evaluation of realization of the production process in the cement mill

    Marek Krynke

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this chapter there were presented the characteristics of the research object (cement mill and the description of the enterprise products. There was introduced an analysis of the results obtained on the basis of the BOST questionnaire survey and there was made a statistical analysis concerning principle 4 of the Toyota. The structure of evaluation was determined and importance series were built.

  3. Low force cementation.

    Wilson, P R

    1996-07-01

    The marginal adaptation of full coverage restorations is adversely affected by the introduction of luting agents of various minimum film thicknesses during the cementation process. The increase in the marginal opening may have long-term detrimental effects on the health of both pulpal and periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of varying seating forces (2.5, 12.5, 25 N), venting, and cement types on post-cementation marginal elevation in cast crowns. A standardized cement space of 40 microns was provided between a machined gold crown and a stainless steel die. An occlusal vent was placed that could be opened or closed. The post-cementation crown elevation was measured, following the use of two commercially available capsulated dental cements (Phosphacap, and Ketac-cem Applicap). The results indicate that only the combination of Ketac-Cem Applicap and crown venting produced post-cementation crown elevation of less than 20 microns when 12.5 N seating force was used. Higher forces (25 N) and venting were required for comparable seating when using Phosphacap (19 microns). The amount of force required to allow maximum seating of cast crowns appears to be cement specific, and is reduced by effective venting procedures.

  4. Influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates in cement hidratation process on corrosion steel bars in concrete

    Bikić Farzet H.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chlorides in concrete is a permanent subject of research because they cause corrosion of steel bars. Chlorides added to the concrete during preparation, as accelerators of the bonding of cement minerals process, enter into reaction with aluminates, creating a phase known as chloroaluminate hydrates. In everyday conditions the product of chemical bonding between chlorides and aluminates is usually monochloridealuminate C3A·CaCl2·Hx, better known as Friedel's salt. In this paper, the influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates during the process of cement hydration on corrosion of steel bars in concrete was investigated. The process of chlorides bonding with aluminates yielding monochloride aluminate is monitored by XRD analyses. It was found that the amount of chlorides bonding with aluminates increases with an increase of temperature, and as a result, reduces the amount of 'free' chlorides in concrete. Potentiodynamic measurements have shown that increase in temperature of the heat treatment of working electrodes by chlorides leads to a reduction of steel bars corrosion as a result of either the increase of the monochloride-aluminate content or the decrease of free chlorides amount. Chlorides bound in chloroaluminate hydrates do not cause activation of steel bars corrosion in concrete. It was also proven that the increase of free chlorides concentration in the concrete leads to intensification of steel bars corrosion. This additionally approves that free chlorides are only the activators of process of steel bars corrosion in the concrete.

  5. Neutron diffraction for studying the influence of the relative humidity on the carbonation process of cement pastes

    Galan, I; Andrade, C; Castellote, M; Rebolledo, N; Sanchez, J; Toro, L; Puente, I; Campo, J; Fabelo, O

    2011-01-01

    The effect of humidity on hydrated cement carbonation has been studied by means of in-situ neutron diffraction measurements. The evolution of the main crystalline phases in the bulk of the sample, portlandite and calcite, has been monitored during the process. Data obtained from neutron diffraction allow the quantification of the phases involved. The results highlight the great influence of humidity on carbonation. At very low humidity there are almost no changes. Between 53 and 75% relative humidity, portlandite decrease and calcite increase data can be fitted to exponential decay functions. At very high humidity portlandite remains nearly constant while calcite increases slightly with time, almost linearly.

  6. Project No.3 - Cement solidification facility for spent ion exchange resins

    2000-01-01

    The existing storage capacity remaining for radioactive liquid wastes at the Ignalina NPP site is approximately 800 m 3 . The condition of the tanks is not fully known; however, recent engineering assessments have indicated that the tanks are unsuitable for interim storage of the liquid waste. The liquid waste currently stored in the tanks will need to be immobilised and the storage tanks emptied before they begin to deteriorate. The potential environment impact of these facilities must be reduced significantly. Project activities includes the design, construction and commissioning of the proposed facility, including all licensing documentation

  7. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Albert Calderon

    1998-01-01

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (4) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Conducting bench-scale tests to produce coke and acceptable tar from the process to satisfy Koppers, a prospective stakeholder; Consolidation of the project team players to execute the full size commercial cokemaking reactor demonstration; and Progress made in advancing the design of the full size commercial cokemaking reactor

  8. Accumulating project management knowledge through process theory

    Niederman, Fred; March, Salvatore T.; Mueller, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how the general notion of process theory can provide a foundational component in a portfolio of project management theories. The paper begins by outlining a variety of views pertaining to the nature of theory and theory development. This forms a basis for understanding how

  9. Flexible Processes in Project-Centred Learning

    Ceri, Stefano; Matera, Maristella; Raffio, Alessandro; Spoelstra, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Ceri, S., Matera, M., Raffio, A. & Spoelstra, H. (2007). Flexible Processes in Project-Centred Learning. In E. Duval, R. Klamma, and M. Wolpers (Eds.), European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 4753, pp. 463-468. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag

  10. Effect of Processing Parameters on 3D Printing of Cement - based Materials

    Lin, Jia Chao; Wang, Jun; Wu, Xiong; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Ri Xu; Bao, Ming

    2018-06-01

    3D printing is a new study direction of building method in recent years. The applicability of 3D printing equipment and cement based materials is analyzed, and the influence of 3D printing operation parameters on the printing effect is explored in this paper. Results showed that the appropriate range of 3D printing operation parameters: print height/nozzle diameter is between 0.4 to 0.6, the printing speed 4-8 cm/s with pumpage 9 * 10-2 m 3/ h.

  11. MeCrAl coatings obtained by arc PVD and pack cementation processes on nickel base superalloys

    Swadzba, L.; Maciejny, A.; Formanek, B.; Mendala, B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the results of researches on obtaining and structure of high temperature resistance coatings on superalloys. The coatings were deposited on nickel and nickel base superalloys in two stages. During the first stage, the NiCr and NiCrHf coatings were obtained by arc-PVD method. Basic technology, bias, arc current, rotation, parameters of deposition of NiCr and MeCrHf coatings were defined. The high efficiency of deposition of both single and two sources was observed. The targets were made by vacuum melting and machining. An influence of targets chemical composition on coating structure and chemical coatings composition was described. The second stage was made by pack cementation HTLA (high temperature low activity) on 1323 K chromoaluminizing process. These arc-PVD and diffusion (pack cementation) connected processes permitted to obtain MeCrAl and MeCrAlHf type of coatings. The morphology, structure and microchemical composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. (orig.)

  12. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  13. The Plasma Hearth Process Technology Development Project

    Geimer, R.; Batdorf, J.; Wolfe, P.

    1993-01-01

    The US DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) is currently evaluating the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) for potential treatment of several DOE waste types. The PHP is a high-temperature vitrification process that has potential application for a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level and transuranic mixed waste categories. The PHP is being tested under both the OTD Mixed Waste Integrated Program and the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. Initial testing has been completed on several different surrogate waste forms that are representative of some of the DOE mixed waste streams. Destruction of organic material exceeds that of conventional incineration technologies. The vitrified residual has leaching characteristics comparable to glass formulations produced in the high-level waste program. The first phase of the PHP demonstration project has been successfully completed, and the project is currently beginning a comprehensive second phase of development and testing

  14. FY 1974 Report on results of Sunshine Project. Research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions; 1974 nendo chinetsu kankyoka de shiyo kanona cement kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    NONE

    1975-03-30

    Researches are conducted for the (research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions). The research items include (1) surveys on test apparatuses, (2) basic surveys on cement, additives and cement slurry, (3) R and D of cement, and (4) researches on cement additives and slurry. For the item (1), bright prospects are obtained that US's Chandler can supply a thickening time tester serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 40,000 psi, and a cement curing device serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 5,000 psi. For the item (2), the surveys are conducted on the existing techniques for curing reactions and chemical resistance of cement at elevated temperature and pressure. For the item (3), the researches are conducted to develop cement resistant to heat and sulfates for geothermal development purposes, where portland cement and mixed portland cement are used as the bases which are incorporated with silica powder. As a result, it is found that the optimum Ca/SiO{sub 2} and CaO/SiO{sub 2}+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios are around 1.0 to 0.9 and 0.9 to 0.8, respectively. For the item (4), the tests are conducted to determine adequate conditions of conductor pipe cementing and cement slurry for 1,500m deep geothermal wells, and the standard composition is established. (NEDO)

  15. FY 1974 Report on results of Sunshine Project. Research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions; 1974 nendo chinetsu kankyoka de shiyo kanona cement kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    NONE

    1975-03-30

    Researches are conducted for the (research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions). The research items include (1) surveys on test apparatuses, (2) basic surveys on cement, additives and cement slurry, (3) R and D of cement, and (4) researches on cement additives and slurry. For the item (1), bright prospects are obtained that US's Chandler can supply a thickening time tester serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 40,000 psi, and a cement curing device serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 5,000 psi. For the item (2), the surveys are conducted on the existing techniques for curing reactions and chemical resistance of cement at elevated temperature and pressure. For the item (3), the researches are conducted to develop cement resistant to heat and sulfates for geothermal development purposes, where portland cement and mixed portland cement are used as the bases which are incorporated with silica powder. As a result, it is found that the optimum Ca/SiO{sub 2} and CaO/SiO{sub 2}+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios are around 1.0 to 0.9 and 0.9 to 0.8, respectively. For the item (4), the tests are conducted to determine adequate conditions of conductor pipe cementing and cement slurry for 1,500m deep geothermal wells, and the standard composition is established. (NEDO)

  16. A Study on the Manufacturing Properties of Crack Self-Healing Capsules Using Cement Powder for Addition to Cement Composites

    Choi, Yun-Wang; Oh, Sung-Rok; Choi, Byung-Keol

    2017-01-01

    We fabricated crack self-healing capsules using cement powder for mixing into cement composites and evaluated the properties of the capsule manufacturing process in this study. The manufacture of the self-healing capsules is divided into core production processing of granulating cement in powder form and a coating process for creating a wall on the surfaces of the granulated cement particles. The produced capsules contain unhardened cement and can be mixed directly with the cement composite m...

  17. Calderon cokemaking process/demonstration project

    Albert Calderon

    1998-01-01

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (i) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (ii) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (iii) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (iv) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Consolidation of the project team-players; Recruiting Koppers Industries as an additional stakeholder; Developing a closed system for the production of binder pitch from tar in the Calderon coking process as the incentive for Koppers to join the team; Gathering appropriate equipment for conducting a set of experiments at bench scale to simulate tar quality produced from the Calderon coking process for the production of binder pitch; and Further progress made in the design of the commercial coking reactor

  18. Solidification process for toxic and hazardous wastes. Second part: Cement solidification matrices; Inertizzazione di rifiuti tossici e nocivi (RTN). Parte seconda: Inertizzazione in matrici cementizie

    Donato, A; Arcuri, L; Dotti, M; Pace, A; Pietrelli, L; Ricci, G [ENEA - Dipartimento Ciclo del Combustibile, Centro Ricerche Energia, Casaccia (Italy); Basta, M; Cali, V; Pagliai, V [ENEA - Dipartimento Ciclo del Combustibile, Centro Ricerche Energia, Saluggia (Italy)

    1989-05-15

    This paper reports the second part of a general study carried out at the Nuclear Fuel Division aiming at verifying the possible application of the radioactive waste solidification processes to industrial hazardous wastes (RTN). The cement solidification of several RTN types has been taken into consideration, both from the technical and from the economic point of view. After a short examination of the Italian juridical and economical situation in the field, which demonstrates the need of the RTN solidification, the origin and characteristics of the RTN considered in the study and directly provided by the producing industries are reviewed. The laboratory experimental results of the cementation of RTN produced by gold manufacturing industries and by galvanic industries are reported. The cementation process can be considered a very effective mean for reducing both the RTN management costs and the environmental impact of RTN disposal. (author)

  19. CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Albert Calderon

    1999-01-01

    This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (4) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Consolidation of the team of stakeholders; Move the site for the commercial demonstration to LTV Steel, Cleveland, Ohio; Permitting for new site; Site specific engineering; Cost update of the project as it relates to the Cleveland location; FETC update; DCAA audit; and Updated endorsement of Calderon process by Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA, Region 5

  20. Pre-study on cementation processes in bentonite buffer under uneven saturation and temperature gradient

    Jaervinen, Joonas; Muurinen, Arto; Tanhua-Tyrkkoe, Merja

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Under final disposal conditions the uneven and slow saturation together with heat from the canister can lead to a situation where water vaporizes in certain areas in bentonite. The evaporation of ion rich water leads to enrichment of ions and precipitation of the components which may e.g. cement montmorillonite layers together and cause some changes in the bentonite properties. To study the cementation in bentonite buffer under uneven and slow saturation conditions the experimental setup was pre-modelled, constructed and tested. The experimental setups consist of a cylindrical cell (d:100 mm and h:100 mm), adsorption cells, heating system, hydration system, cooling system, sensors and a data acquisition system. A schematic drawing of the experimental equipment is presented in Figure 1. In the cell the hydration end of the bentonite was covered only partly by the sinter and the access of water to bentonite was thus limited. The cell was also equipped with holes in the upper part of the cylinder to allow the water vapour to escape from the cell. The released water vapour is collected on an adsorption material in the adsorption cells. Thermal and hydrological properties of the experimental system were pre-modelled in 2D by using TOUGH2, version 2.0. The aim of the model was to see if the planned experimental set-up leads to the wanted conditions, within reasonable time and to find justifiable parameters for experimental setup. An eleven months long pre-experiment was carried out to get preliminary understanding how the experimental arrangement works. After the experiment the cell was dismantled and water content, bulk density, CEC, exchangeable cations, poorly crystalline iron oxides and silicates, chloride, sulphate and carbonate were analysed and pH measured. The low water content and high chloride concentration next to the heater indicated movement of chloride ions from the hydration surface towards the heater and

  1. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  2. FY 2000 report on the basic survey to promote Joint Implementation, etc. Upgrading of energy utilization in the cement production process; 2000 nendo kyodo jisshi nado suishin kiso chosa hokokusho. Cement seizo kotei ni okeru energy kodoka

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted of a project for energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas reduction by introducing the steam injection gas turbine generator to production facilities of the Siam Cement Industry Corporation (SCI) in Thailand. In the project, studies were made on the following: no purchases of electric power by introduction of the steam injection gas turbine generator; additional heating by gas turbine exhaust gas by introduction of the kiln combustion air heater; remodeling of the preheater of raw materials, and the partial calcination before kiln sintering by introduction of the calcination furnace. As a result of the study, the energy conservation amount was 1,200 toe/y, and the greenhouse effect gas reduction amount was approximately 8,000 t-CO2/y, which led to the reserve power for increased production of clinker by about 18%. The size of investment was 314.5 million Baht in total. As to the evaluation of economical efficiency of the investment, the actual period of ROI was a little less than 5 years, and the internal earning rate was 17.7%, which substantially met with SCI's standards for equipment investment. However, there are problems on the gas supply infrastructure, recovery of the white cement demand, etc. (NEDO)

  3. Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

    2004-09-02

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

  4. Using dehydrated cement paste as new type of cement additive

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.; Dong, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study, including evaluation and modification, on using dehydrated cement paste (DCP) as a new type of cement additive. After a series of processes, normal DCP (N-DCP) was produced as before and a modified form of DCP (M-DCP) was produced as well. The cementitious

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  6. IV&V Project Assessment Process Validation

    Driskell, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) will launch NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). This launch vehicle will provide American launch capability for human exploration and travelling beyond Earth orbit. SLS is designed to be flexible for crew or cargo missions. The first test flight is scheduled for December 2017. The SLS SRR/SDR provided insight into the project development life cycle. NASA IV&V ran the standard Risk Based Assessment and Portfolio Based Risk Assessment to identify analysis tasking for the SLS program. This presentation examines the SLS System Requirements Review/System Definition Review (SRR/SDR), IV&V findings for IV&V process validation correlation to/from the selected IV&V tasking and capabilities. It also provides a reusable IEEE 1012 scorecard for programmatic completeness across the software development life cycle.

  7. Producing cement

    Stone, E G

    1923-09-12

    A process and apparatus are described for producing Portland cement in which pulverized shale is successively heated in a series of inclined rotary retorts having internal stirrers and oil gas outlets, which are connected to condensers. The partially treated shale is removed from the lowermost retort by a conveyor, then fed separately or conjointly into pipes and thence into a number of vertically disposed retorts. Each of these retorts may be fitted interiorly with vertical arranged conveyors which elevate the shale and discharge it over a lip, from whence it falls to the bottom of the retorts. The lower end of each casing is furnished with an adjustable discharge door through which the spent shale is fed to a hopper, thence into separate trucks. The oil gases generated in the retorts are exhausted through pipes to condensers. The spent shale is conveyed to a bin and mixed while hot with ground limestone. The admixed materials are then ground and fed to a rotary kiln which is fired by the incondensible gases derived from the oil gases obtained in the previous retorting of the shale. The calcined materials are then delivered from the rotary kiln to rotary coolers. The waste gases from the kiln are utilized for heating the retorts in which the ground shale is heated for the purpose of extracting therefrom the contained hydrocarbon oils and gases.

  8. Characterization of surrogate radioactive cemented waste: a laboratory study

    Fiset, J.F.; Lastra, R.; Bilodeau, A.; Bouzoubaa

    2011-01-01

    Portland cement is commonly used to stabilize intermediate and low level of radioactive wastes. The stabilization/solidification process needs to be well understood as waste constituents can retard or activate cement hydration. The objectives of this project were to prepare surrogate radioactive cemented waste (SRCW), develop a comminution strategy for SRCW, determine its chemical characteristics, and develop processes for long term storage. This paper emphasizes on the characterization of surrogate radioactive cemented waste. The SRCW produced showed a high degree of heterogeneity mainly due to the method used to add the solution to the host cement. Heavy metals such as uranium and mercury were not distributed uniformly in the pail. Mineralogical characterization (SEM, EDS) showed that uranium is located around the rims of hydrated cement particles. In the SRCW, uranium occurs possibly in the form of a hydrated calcium uranate.The SEM-EDS results also suggest that mercury occurs mainly in the form of HgO although some metallic mercury may be also present as a result of partial decomposition of the HgO. (author)

  9. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  10. Electromagnetic interference shielding with Portland cement paste containing carbon materials and processed fly ash

    Zornoza, E.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study described in this article explored the effect of adding different types of carbon materials (graphite powder and three types of carbon fibre, fly ash (with 5.6%, 15.9% and 24.3% Fe2O3, and a mix of both on electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding in Portland cement pastes. The parameters studied included the type and aspect ratio of the carbonic material, composite material thickness, the frequency of the incident electromagnetic radiation and the percentage of the magnetic fraction in the fly ash. The findings showed that the polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres, which had the highest aspect ratio, provided more effective shielding than any of the other carbon materials studied. Shielding was more effective in thicker specimens and at higher radiation frequencies. Raising the magnetic fraction of the fly ash, in turn, also enhanced paste shielding performance. Finally, adding both carbon fibre and fly ash to the paste resulted in the most effective EMI shielding as a result of the synergies generated.

    En el presente trabajo se investiga la influencia de la adición de diferentes tipos de materiales carbonosos (polvo de grafito y 3 tipos de fibra de carbono, de una ceniza volante con diferentes contenidos de fase magnética (5,6%, 15,9% y 24,3% de Fe2O3 y de una mezcla de ambos, sobre la capacidad de apantallar interferencias electromagnéticas de pastas de cemento Pórtland. Entre los parámetros estudiados se encuentra: el tipo de material carbonoso, la relación de aspecto del material carbonoso, el espesor del material compuesto, la frecuencia de la radiación electromagnética incidente y el porcentaje de fracción magnética en la ceniza volante. Los resultados obtenidos indican que entre los materiales carbonosos estudiados son las fibras de carbono basadas en poliacrilonitrilo con una mayor relación de aspecto las que dan mejores resultados de apantallamiento. Al aumentar

  11. Immobilisation of shredded soft waste in cement monolith

    Brown, D.J.; Dalton, M.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-04-01

    A grouting process for the immobilisation of shredded contaminated laboratory waste in a cement monolith is being developed at the Atomic Energy Establishment Winfrith. The objective is to produce a 'monolithic' type package which is acceptable both for sea and land disposal. The work carried out on this project in the period April 1982 - March 1983 is summarised in this report. (author)

  12. Molybdeno-Aluminizing of Powder Metallurgy and Wrought Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys by Pack Cementation process

    Tsipas, Sophia A.; Gordo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Wear and high temperature oxidation resistance of some titanium-based alloys needs to be enhanced, and this can be effectively accomplished by surface treatment. Molybdenizing is a surface treatment where molybdenum is introduced into the surface of titanium alloys causing the formation of wear-resistant surface layers containing molybdenum, while aluminizing of titanium-based alloys has been reported to improve their high temperature oxidation properties. Whereas pack cementation and other surface modification methods have been used for molybdenizing or aluminizing of wrought and/or cast pure titanium and titanium alloys, such surface treatments have not been reported on titanium alloys produced by powder metallurgy (PM). Also a critical understanding of the process parameters for simultaneous one step molybdeno-aluminizing of titanium alloys by pack cementation and the predominant mechanism for this process have not been reported. The current research work describes the surface modification of titanium and Ti-6Al-4V prepared by PM by molybdeno-aluminizing and analyzes thermodynamic aspects of the deposition process. Similar coatings are also deposited to wrought Ti-6Al-4V and compared. Characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. For both titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, the use of a powder pack containing ammonium chloride as activator leads to the deposition of molybdenum and aluminium into the surface but also introduces nitrogen causing the formation of a thin titanium nitride layer. In addition, various titanium aluminides and mixed titanium aluminium nitrides are formed. The appropriate conditions for molybdeno-aluminizing as well as the phases expected to be formed were successfully determined by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. - Highlights: •Simultaneous co-deposition of Mo-Al onto powder metallurgy and wrought Ti alloy •Thermodynamic calculations were used to optimize deposition conditions

  13. Molybdeno-Aluminizing of Powder Metallurgy and Wrought Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys by Pack Cementation process

    Tsipas, Sophia A., E-mail: stsipas@ing.uc3m.es; Gordo, Elena

    2016-08-15

    Wear and high temperature oxidation resistance of some titanium-based alloys needs to be enhanced, and this can be effectively accomplished by surface treatment. Molybdenizing is a surface treatment where molybdenum is introduced into the surface of titanium alloys causing the formation of wear-resistant surface layers containing molybdenum, while aluminizing of titanium-based alloys has been reported to improve their high temperature oxidation properties. Whereas pack cementation and other surface modification methods have been used for molybdenizing or aluminizing of wrought and/or cast pure titanium and titanium alloys, such surface treatments have not been reported on titanium alloys produced by powder metallurgy (PM). Also a critical understanding of the process parameters for simultaneous one step molybdeno-aluminizing of titanium alloys by pack cementation and the predominant mechanism for this process have not been reported. The current research work describes the surface modification of titanium and Ti-6Al-4V prepared by PM by molybdeno-aluminizing and analyzes thermodynamic aspects of the deposition process. Similar coatings are also deposited to wrought Ti-6Al-4V and compared. Characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. For both titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, the use of a powder pack containing ammonium chloride as activator leads to the deposition of molybdenum and aluminium into the surface but also introduces nitrogen causing the formation of a thin titanium nitride layer. In addition, various titanium aluminides and mixed titanium aluminium nitrides are formed. The appropriate conditions for molybdeno-aluminizing as well as the phases expected to be formed were successfully determined by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. - Highlights: •Simultaneous co-deposition of Mo-Al onto powder metallurgy and wrought Ti alloy •Thermodynamic calculations were used to optimize deposition conditions

  14. The cement recycling of the earthquake disaster debris by Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd

    Kataoka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    A tremendous quantity of earthquake disaster debris and tsunami sediment was resulted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd., a Sumitomo Osaka Cement subsidiary, was the first cement industry company to receive and process such waste materials outside of their usual prefecture area, while the company is performing their treatment and recycling services locally in Hachinohe City and Aomori Prefecture. This report provides an explanation about the recycling mechanism of waste materials and by-products in cement manufacturing process, and introduces an example of actual achievements for the disaster debris treatment by utilizing the cement recycling technologies at the Hachinohe Cement Plant. (author)

  15. Krsko periodic safety review project prioritization process

    Basic, I.; Vrbanic, I.; Spiler, J.; Lambright, J.

    2004-01-01

    Definition of a Krsko Periodic Safety Review (PSR) project is a comprehensive safety review of a plant after last ten years of operation. The objective is a verification by means of a comprehensive review using current methods that Krsko NPP remains safety when judged against current safety objectives and practices and that adequate arrangements are in place to maintain plant safety. This objective encompasses the three main criteria or goals: confirmation that the plant is as safe as originally intended, determination if there are any structures, systems or components that could limit the life of the plant in the foreseeable future, and comparison the plant against modern safety standards and to identify where improvements would be beneficial at justifiable cost. Krsko PSR project is structured in the three phases: Phase 1: Preparation of Detailed 10-years PSR Program, Phase 2: Performing of 10-years PSR Program and preparing of associated documents (2001-2003), and Phase 3: Implementation of the prioritized compensatory measures and modifications (development of associated EEAR, DMP, etc.) after agreement with the SNSA on the design, procedures and time-scales (2004-2008). This paper presents the NEK PSR results of work performed under Phase 2 focused on the ranking of safety issues and prioritization of corrective measures needed for establishing an efficient action plan. Safety issues were identified in Phase 2 during the following review processes: Periodic Safety Review (PSR) task; Krsko NPP Regulatory Compliance Program (RCP) review; Westinghouse Owner Group (WOG) catalog items screening/review; SNSA recommendations (including IAEA RAMP mission suggestions/recommendations).(author)

  16. Morphology of root canal surface: A reflection on the process of cementation of the composite relined glass fiber post

    Yasmine Mendes Pupo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted to evaluate the bond strength in the different root thirds (premolars and maxillary central incisors of composite relined glass fiber posts compared to untreated glass fiber posts cemented with dual- or chemical-cure cements. Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted premolars (flat canal (n = 15 and 12 maxillary central incisors were used (round canal (n = 3. The teeth were sectioned, and the roots received endodontic treatment. The standardized preparation of the canals was carried out, and the roots were randomly divided into four groups according to the cementation systems: G1: cemented posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G2: relined posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G3: cemented posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post; and G4: relined posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post. The roots were cut to give two slices of each third of the root canal per specimen. Push-out test was conducted at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the premolars (flat canal (P = 0.959. There was a significant difference in the central incisors between the middle and apical thirds in the cemented group when using the dual system (P = 0.04 and between the middle and apical thirds (P = 0.003 and cervical and apical thirds (P = 0.033 when using the chemical system. Conclusion: Due to the anatomy of the root canal, flat canal of the premolars does not require relining, but round canal of the maxillary central incisors demands it for more secure in the bond strength.

  17. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  18. Application of a Chilled Ammonia-based Process for CO2 Capture to Cement Plants

    Pérez-Calvo, José Francisco; Sutter, Daniel; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process (CAP) is considered one of the most promising alternatives to amine-based absorption processes for post-combustion carbon capture applied to power plants. This work provides an insight on the CAP adaptations required to meet the conditions found in the flue gas emitted in

  19. Decision-making process in investment projects

    Moutinho, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    We present projects evaluation approaches in what decision should be based. We try to understand what we have to take into account in a project analysis, knowing that we have to consider much unmeasured aspects, like non non-financial areas. We verify how all aspects are used and analysed in the project appraisal. We also desire to understand if companies have adequate tools and methods to correctly analyse and to take decisions in a project evaluation. In this study we identify several as...

  20. Quantifying Porosity through Automated Image Collection and Batch Image Processing: Case Study of Three Carbonates and an Aragonite Cemented Sandstone

    Jim Buckman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern scanning electron microscopes often include software that allows for the possibility of obtaining large format high-resolution image montages over areas of several square centimeters. Such montages are typically automatically acquired and stitched, comprising many thousand individual tiled images. Images, collected over a regular grid pattern, are a rich source of information on factors such as variability in porosity and distribution of mineral phases, but can be hard to visually interpret. Additional quantitative data can be accessed through the application of image analysis. We use backscattered electron (BSE images, collected from polished thin sections of two limestone samples from the Cretaceous of Brazil, a Carboniferous limestone from Scotland, and a carbonate cemented sandstone from Northern Ireland, with up to 25,000 tiles per image, collecting numerical quantitative data on the distribution of porosity. Images were automatically collected using the FEI software Maps, batch processed by image analysis (through ImageJ, with results plotted on 2D contour plots with MATLAB. These plots numerically and visually clearly express the collected porosity data in an easily accessible form, and have application for the display of other data such as pore size, shape, grain size/shape, orientation and mineral distribution, as well as being of relevance to sandstone, mudrock and other porous media.

  1. The Added Value of the Project Selection Process

    Adel Oueslati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The project selection process comes in the first stage of the overall project management life cycle. It does have a very important impact on organization success. The present paper provides defi nitions of the basic concepts and tools related to the project selection process. It aims to stress the added value of this process for the entire organization success. The mastery of the project selection process is the right way for any organization to ensure that it will do the right project with the right resources at the right time and within the right priorities

  2. Energy economy and industrial ecology in the Brazilian cement sector

    Tavares, Marina Elisabete Espinho; Schaeffer, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The article discusses the following issues of the Brazilian cement sector: the Brazilian cement main types specification, cement quantities evolution produced in Brazil from 1987 to 1997, energy conservation in the cement production process with additives, energy economy cost estimates from the utilization of additives, and several technologies energy economy cost used in the industrial sector

  3. Combustion of solid alternative fuels in the cement kiln burner

    Nørskov, Linda Kaare

    In the cement industry there is an increasing environmental and financial motivation for substituting conventional fossil fuels with alternative fuels, being biomass or waste derived fuels. However, the introduction of alternative fuels may influence emissions, cement product quality, process...... stability, and process efficiency. Alternative fuel substitution in the calciner unit has reached close to 100% at many cement plants and to further increase the use of alternative fuels rotary kiln substitution must be enhanced. At present, limited systematic knowledge of the alternative fuel combustion...... properties and the influence on the flame formation is available. In this project a scientific approach to increase the fundamental understanding of alternative fuel conversion in the rotary kiln burner is employed through literature studies, experimental combustion characterisation studies, combustion...

  4. PM2 : a Process Mining Project Methodology

    Eck, van M.L.; Lu, X.; Leemans, S.J.J.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Zdravkovic, J.; Kirikova, M.; Johannesson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Process mining aims to transform event data recorded in information systems into knowledge of an organisation’s business processes. The results of process mining analysis can be used to improve process performance or compliance to rules and regulations. However, applying process mining in practice

  5. Technological, economic and financial prospects of carbon dioxide capture in the cement industry

    Li, Jia; Tharakan, Pradeep; Macdonald, Douglas; Liang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Cement is the second largest anthropogenic emission source, contributing approximately 7% of global CO 2 emissions. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technology is considered by the International Energy Agency (IEA) as an essential technology capable of reducing CO 2 emissions in the cement sector by 56% by 2050. The study compares CO 2 capture technologies for the cement manufacturing process and analyses the economic and financial issues in deploying CO 2 capture in the cement industry. Post-combustion capture with chemical absorption is regarded as a proven technology to capture CO 2 from the calcination process. Oxyfuel is less mature but Oxyfuel partial capture—which only recycles O 2 /CO 2 gas in the precalciner—is estimated to be more economic than post-combustion capture. Carbonate looping technologies are not yet commercial, but they have theoretical advantages in terms of energy consumption. In contrast with coal-fired power plants, CO 2 capture in the cement industry benefits from a higher concentration of CO 2 in the flue gas, but the benefit is offset by higher SO x and NO x levels and the smaller scale of emissions from each plant. Concerning the prospects for financing cement plant CO 2 capture, large cement manufacturers on average have a higher ROE (return on equity) and lower debt ratio, thus a higher discount rate should be considered for the cost analysis than in power plants. IEA estimates that the incremental cost for deploying CCS to decarbonise the global cement sector is in the range US$350–840 billion. The cost estimates for deploying state-of-the art post-combustion CO 2 capture technologies in cement plants are above $60 to avoid each tonne of CO 2 emissions. However, the expectation is that the current market can only provide a minority of financial support for CO 2 capture in cement plants. Public financial support and/or CO 2 utilisation will be essential to trigger large-scale CCS demonstration projects in the cement

  6. Pre-contract project scoping processes : synthesis of practices.

    2016-02-01

    Scoping is the process of developing a projects objectives, need, preliminary cost estimate, and preliminary schedule based on a : recognized need that the project is intended to address. This study (INDOT/JTRP SPR-3944) was launched by the Indian...

  7. Management of Multi-projects In a Process oriented Organization

    Macheridis, Nikos; Nilsson, Carl-Henrik

    2006-01-01

    When projects are used as an organisational platform to conduct business, a project can be the only project in the organisation or one amongst several others. The latter case is called multi-project organisation. Usually an organization with a multi-project environment has a base organisation, which can be functional, matrix structure or another. The purpose of this article is to develop a model based on a process oriented organization as a complement to functional or matrix organizational st...

  8. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  9. PRINCIPLES OF RE-ENGINEERING METHODOLOGY FOR TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS IN PROCESSING OF RAW MATERIAL COMPONENTS WHILE PRODUCING CEMENT AND SILICATE PRODUCTS

    I. A. Busel

    2014-01-01

    necessity to modernize technological equipment used for grinding raw material components with the purpose to improve efficiency and quality, power- and resource saving. The possibility of using various grinding aids that permit to increase grinding productivity is shown in the paper. The paper studies an automation concept of the control system which used for grinding process of mineral raw material. A conceptual model for complexation of various methods grinding aids has been proposed in the paper. The paper presents methodological principles for simulation of technological process used for processing of mineral raw material while producing cement and silicate products. The parameters which are to be controlled and which are necessary for development of computer simulations of technological grinding process have been determined in the paper. The paper justifies an application of imitation simulation for creation of computer models. Methodology for imitation simulation of the technological process has been studied in the paper. The paper confirms the possibility to use analytical and probability methods. Imitation simulations of a grinding mill operation have been developed on the basis of experimental data and probability functions. The possibility of controlling technological process of raw material grinding has been demonstrated in the paper.While implementing the proposed complex of organizational and technical recommendations it is possible to increase grinding productivity up to 30-50 % and significantly reduce и существенно снизить energy consumption for mineral raw material grinding during production of cement and silicate products. The combined reengineering methodology for grinding process including all the mentioned intensification methods substantially increases quality of final products and reduces its self-cost that will favour its compatibility and attractiveness for consumers.

  10. Structure and properties of selected cemented carbides and cermets covered with TiN/(Ti,Al,SiN/TiN coatings obtained by the cathodic arc evaporation process

    Leszek A. Dobrzañski

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of microstructural examinations, mechanical tests and service performance tests carried out on thin TiN/(Ti,Al,SiN/TiN wear resistance coatings obtained by the CAE process on cermet and cemented carbide substrates. Microstructural examinations of the applied coatings and the substrate were made with an OPTON DSM 940 SEM and a LEICA MEF4A light microscope. Adhesion of the coatings on cemented carbides and cermets was measured using the scratch test. The cutting properties of the materials were determined from service tests in which continuous machining of C45E steel was carried out. The hardness of the substrate and the microhardness of the coatings were determined with a DUH 202 SHIMADZU ultra microhardness tester with a load of 70 mN. Roughness tests were also carried out before applying the coatings and after the PVD process. Cutting tests confirmed the advantages of the TiN/(Ti,Al,SiN/TiN type coatings obtained using the PVD method in the CAE mode on cemented carbides and cermets, as a material that undergoes very low abrasive, thermal and adhesion wear. These coatings extend tool life compared to commercially available uncoated tools with single and multi-layer coatings deposited using PVD/CVD methods.

  11. The influence of clay drilling grout on the quality of well cementation

    Romic, L; Martinko, B

    1979-01-01

    The influence of clay drilling grout on the behavior of the cement mixture during the cementing of casings is described. Experimental results are given which demonstrate that clay drill grout slows down the setting of the cement mixture, lowers the durability of cement stone and its adherence to the well's walls, and changes the rheological properties and viscosity of the cement mixture. Separating devices, which prevent the mixing of the clay drilling grout and the cement solutions during the cementation process, are recommended.

  12. Lunar cement

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  13. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  14. Cement stabilization of hazardous and radioactive electroplating sludge

    Langton, C.A.; Pickett, J.B.; Martin, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Cement stabilization was evaluated for treatment of nickel and uranium in electroplating sludge at the Savannah River Site. Waste forms were prepared by pretreating the sludge and the solidifying it in a variety of cement, cement plus flyash, and cement-flyash-slag mixes. The sludge was also treated by one-step filtration-solidification. Leaching results and processing data indicate the cement solidification is an effective method of treating hazardous-low-level electroplating waste

  15. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    Varas, M.J.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-01-01

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements

  16. US cement industry

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The use of process mapping in healthcare quality improvement projects.

    Antonacci, Grazia; Reed, Julie E; Lennox, Laura; Barlow, James

    2018-05-01

    Introduction Process mapping provides insight into systems and processes in which improvement interventions are introduced and is seen as useful in healthcare quality improvement projects. There is little empirical evidence on the use of process mapping in healthcare practice. This study advances understanding of the benefits and success factors of process mapping within quality improvement projects. Methods Eight quality improvement projects were purposively selected from different healthcare settings within the UK's National Health Service. Data were gathered from multiple data-sources, including interviews exploring participants' experience of using process mapping in their projects and perceptions of benefits and challenges related to its use. These were analysed using inductive analysis. Results Eight key benefits related to process mapping use were reported by participants (gathering a shared understanding of the reality; identifying improvement opportunities; engaging stakeholders in the project; defining project's objectives; monitoring project progress; learning; increased empathy; simplicity of the method) and five factors related to successful process mapping exercises (simple and appropriate visual representation, information gathered from multiple stakeholders, facilitator's experience and soft skills, basic training, iterative use of process mapping throughout the project). Conclusions Findings highlight benefits and versatility of process mapping and provide practical suggestions to improve its use in practice.

  18. A process model for design team communication within fast-track building projects using project websites

    Otter, den A.F.H.J.; Reymen, I.M.M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The factor time within building projects is on high pressure because of the increasing need for faster delivery of buildings. Within fast track, complex building projects the design process is an important key. Through case analyses offart-hack design processes it became obvious that process and

  19. Accumulating Project Management Knowledge Using Process Theory

    Niederman, Fred; March, Salvatore T.; Mueller, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Process theory has become an important mechanism for the accumulation of knowledge in a number of disciplines. In contrast with variance theory, which focuses on co-variation of dependent and independent variables, process theory focuses on sequences of activities, their duration and the intervals

  20. Process competencies in a problem and project based learning environment

    Du, Xiangyun; Kolmos, Anette

    2006-01-01

    with the expected professional competencies. Based on the educational practice of PBL Aalborg Model, which is characterized by problem-orientation, project-organization and team work, this paper examines the process of developing process competencies through studying engineering in a PBL environment from...... process competencies through doing problem and project based work in teams? 2) How do students perceive their achievement of these process competencies?......Future engineers are not only required to master technological competencies concerning solving problems, producing and innovating technology, they are also expected to have capabilities of cooperation, communication, and project management in diverse social context, which are referred to as process...

  1. Project Communication in Functions, Process and Project-Oriented Industiral Companies

    Samáková, Jana; Koltnerová, Kristína; Rybanský, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    The article is focused on the project communication management. Industrial enterprises, which use project management must constantly search the new ways for improving. One of the possibilities is the change of management from a functional oriented to the projectoriented or process-oriented. Process-oriented and project-oriented companies have better project communication management during the all project life cycle. Communication in the project is a very important factor. According to the arguments of several authors, one of the biggest problem is that threaten the success of the project is just the communication. In each project is an important pillar - and that is communication. Only on the base of communication can the project move forward and achieve the target.

  2. FY 1975 Report on results of Sunshine Project. Research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions; 1975 nendo chinetsu kankyoka de shiyo kanona cement no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    NONE

    1976-03-30

    Three types of base geothermal cement were developed, on a trial basis, using C{sub 3}S(3Ca{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}) and C{sub 3}A(3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and incorporated with silica as the strength stabilizer, to prepare geothermal cement samples. They were tested for 45 days at a geothermal well in the Takinoue Geothermal District, showing a tendency of increasing in strength. The cement sample was prepared by incorporating 42.8% of the purest silica and 0.45% of lignin-based curing retardant. It showed a thickening time of 3 hours and 5 minutes. It showed a strength of 400 kg/cm{sup 2} or higher, when cured at 130 and 200 degrees C. The mixed cement, with G cement as the base incorporated with 42.8% of silica as the strength stabilizer, showed a thickening time of 4 hours and 12 minutes, when incorporated with 0.5% of a dispersant and 1.2% of a lignin-based curing retardant, where the G cement is developed for a 300 to 400 m deep geothermal well (maximum bed temperature: 220 degrees C, circulation temperature at the pit bottom: 135 degrees C), in accordance with the casing program for a 1,500 m deep geothermal well. When cured at 220 degrees C, it showed a strength of 370 kg/cm{sup 2} after it was tested for 15 days. (NEDO)

  3. A feasible process for simultaneous removal of CO2, SO2 and NOx in the cement industry by NH3 scrubbing

    Dong, Ruifeng; Lu, Hongfang; Yu, Yunsong; Zhang, Zaoxiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simultaneous removal of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x is realized by NH 3 scrubbing with NaClO 2 . ► The crystallization process of NH 4 HCO 3 is employed instead of CO 2 regeneration. ► Energy consumption reduces hugely while CO 2 removal rate remains higher than 90%. ► Exergy calculation reveals that a higher thermodynamic perfection degree is achieved. -- Abstract: With the rapid economic and industrial development, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing enormously, which has greatly affected the global climate and human living environment. At present, a lot of technologies have been applied to CO 2 removal in fossil fuel-fired power plants, which are one of the main CO 2 emission sources. But few researches have been done in the cement industry, which is the third largest CO 2 emission source. There is no mature technology of CO 2 removal in cement industry mentioned before. This paper proposes a feasible process for simultaneous removal of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x in the cement industry by NH 3 scrubbing. As there is no ready steam source for the regeneration of CO 2 -rich loading solvent after absorption, a process with the final product of ammonium bicarbonate is developed. With the oxidative additive of NaClO 2 added in the aqueous ammonium absorbent, the simultaneous removal of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x is feasible by NH 3 scrubbing. The products of the process are mainly ammonium bicarbonate, ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate, which are all good fertilizers for crops and plants. The crystallization of NH 4 HCO 3 is easier for storage and transportation than that for liquid carbon dioxide, which becomes more stable when dicyandiamide (DCD) is added. The thermodynamic analysis proves that the proposed process has the advantages of energy conservation and high thermodynamic perfection degree compared with the traditional ones.

  4. Rockfall Hazard Process Assessment : Final Project Report

    2017-10-01

    After a decade of using the Rockfall Hazard Rating System (RHRS), the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) sought a reassessment of their rockfall hazard evaluation process. Their prior system was a slightly modified version of the RHRS and was...

  5. Calderon cokemaking process/demonstration project

    Albert Calderon

    1996-01-01

    This project which deals with the demonstration of a full size commercial coking retort using Calderon's proprietary technology for making metallurgical coke ran into a commercialization problem by virtue that the designed retort for two (2) tons of coke/hour necessitates thirty-two (32) retorts to produce the 500,000 tons of coke per year for a commercial plant. Bechtel Mining and Metals prepared a cost estimate of the commercial plant which indicated the commercial plant would not be economically feasible. The activity during this reporting period was directed to making changes to the design of the coking retort in order to reduce the number of retorts required for a 500,000 ton/year commercial coke facility. The result of this activity resulted in the drastic reduction of the number of retorts to eight (8) with each retort projected to produce 8.17 tons of coke/hour. Such decrease in number of retorts makes the Calderon technology quite competitive and therefore commercially feasible

  6. Global CO2 emissions from cement production

    Andrew, Robbie M.

    2018-01-01

    The global production of cement has grown very rapidly in recent years, and after fossil fuels and land-use change, it is the third-largest source of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. The required data for estimating emissions from global cement production are poor, and it has been recognised that some global estimates are significantly inflated. Here we assemble a large variety of available datasets and prioritise official data and emission factors, including estimates submitted to the UNFCCC plus new estimates for China and India, to present a new analysis of global process emissions from cement production. We show that global process emissions in 2016 were 1.45±0.20 Gt CO2, equivalent to about 4 % of emissions from fossil fuels. Cumulative emissions from 1928 to 2016 were 39.3±2.4 Gt CO2, 66 % of which have occurred since 1990. Emissions in 2015 were 30 % lower than those recently reported by the Global Carbon Project. The data associated with this article can be found at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.831455.

  7. Solar hydrogen project - Thermochemical process design

    Allen, D.J.; Ng, L.F.; Rao, M.S.M.; Wu, S.F.; Zoschak, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    The thermochemical decomposition of water using solar energy offers an elegant way of combining solar and chemical technologies to produce a high quality fuel. The DOE has sponsored Foster Wheeler to develop a process design for a solar water-splitting process based on the sulfuric acid/iodine cycle. The study has centered around the design of a sulfuric acid decomposition reactor and the central receiver. Materials' properties impose severe constraints upon the design of decomposition reactor. In this paper, the constraints imposed on the design are specified and a reactor and receiver design is presented together with a preliminary design of the balance of plant.

  8. "Emancipatory Disability Research": Project or Process?

    Barnes, Colin

    2002-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the core principles and implications of emancipatory disability research. It suggests the emancipatory research paradigm has begun to transform the material and social relations of research production and concludes by suggesting that emancipatory disability should be perceived as a process rather than a…

  9. Sets of Reports and Articles Regarding Cement Wastes Forms Containing Alpha Emitters that are Potentially Useful for Development of Russian Federation Waste Treatment Processes for Solidification of Weapons Plutonium MOX Fuel Fabrication Wastes for

    Jardine, L J

    2003-01-01

    This is a set of nine reports and articles that were kindly provided by Dr. Christine A. Langton from the Savannah River Site (SRS) to L. J. Jardine LLNL in June 2003. The reports discuss cement waste forms and primarily focus on gas generation in cement waste forms from alpha particle decays. However other items such as various cement compositions, cement product performance test results and some cement process parameters are also included. This set of documents was put into this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) releasable report for the sole purpose to provide a set of documents to Russian technical experts now beginning to study cement waste treatment processes for wastes from an excess weapons plutonium MOX fuel fabrication facility. The intent is to provide these reports for use at a US RF Experts Technical Meeting on: the Management of Wastes from MOX Fuel Fabrication Facilities, in Moscow July 9-11, 2003. The Russian experts should find these reports to be very useful for their technical and economic feasibility studies and the supporting R and D activities required to develop acceptable waste treatment processes for use in Russia as part of the ongoing Joint US RF Plutonium Disposition Activities

  10. Is it cement to be? Downhole cement that uses zeolite additive may offer lightweight alternative

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-05-01

    C2C Zeolite Corporation produces zeolites from a large deposit near Cache Creek, British Columbia, and processes them for use as an additive in downhole cement well casings. Early research indicates that zeolites can significantly improve the way downhole cement is made in the oil industry. Zeolites are made up mostly of silicates of aluminum and calcium. They have a great ability to absorb water, resulting in a lighter and more fluid cement than is currently available. C2C claims that zeolites will reduce cement weight, column pressure and operator costs. The cost benefits of using lighter cement downhole includes easier moving, processing and handling of the mix. Initial research suggests that zeolites might prove to be viable alternatives to other cement lighteners such as silica fumes or flyash. Zeolite-based cement also performed reasonably well in freeze-thaw tests and showed good adhesion and no evidence of shrinkage in downhole tests. 3 figs.

  11. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing

  12. Incineration process for chlorinated alpha-contaminated wastes: industrial application to the Valduc project

    Longuet, T.; Vincent, J.J.; Cartier, R.; Durec, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has pursued a broad research and development program for a number of years concerning the incineration of chlorinated α-contaminated wastes produced by work in confined atmosphere. This program has now reached the stage where an alternative solution is available to the conventional direct cement embedding method currently used for such wastes. The proposed solution is based on a two-step incineration process offering a significant volume reduction that constitutes a serious economic advantage for geological disposal. Moreover, the process produces ashes of a quality suitable for direct online vitrification, or for Pu recovery by dissolution with silver II. The process was developed under nonradioactive conditions in the IRIS incineration pilot facility operated by the CEA's Fuel Cycle Division (CEA/DCC), opening the way for the first industrial facility, planned for the VALDUC Research Center. USSI is the prime contractor in this 36-month project. The basic design work has now been completed, and the French safety authorities have authorized construction of the incinerator, based in large part on the experience and expertise acquired by the process licenser CEA/DCC. (author). 6 figs., 3 tabs

  13. The Process to Estimate Economical Benefits of Six Sigma Projects

    Jan Kosina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to define the process for the continuous evaluation of the financial benefits during Six Sigma project life time. The financial criteria are critical success factors of a Six Sigma project. The process has been developed as part of the six sigma project monitoring in order to estimate proper allocation of the resources taking in account the expected project benefits as well as evaluationof real achievements. The evaluation of the finacial benefits based on the quality costs is not sufficient in the real life and has to be accomplished with key financial performance indicators of the business to visualize the results. The evaluation based on the savings seems to be too difficult especially for green belts. The early involvement of the finance department in the project definition as well as ongoing evaluation is key. The defined process has been applied to real business enviroment.

  14. The process of selecting technology development projects: a practical framework

    Herps, Joost M.J.; van Mal, Herman H.; Halman, Johannes I.M.; Martens, Jack H.M.; Borsboom, Ron H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this article a practical framework is proposed, that can be used to organise the activities related to the selection-process of technology development projects. The framework is based upon recent literature and application at DAF Trucks Company. A technology development project has a long way to

  15. The process of selecting technology development projects : a practical framework

    Herps, J.M.J.; Mal, van H.H.; Halman, J.I.M.; Martens, J.H.M.; Borsboom, R.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this article a practical framework is proposed, that can be used to organise the activities related to the selection-process of technology development projects. The framework is based upon recent literature and application at DAF Trucks Company. A technology development project has a long way to

  16. Statistical Process Control. A Summary. FEU/PICKUP Project Report.

    Owen, M.; Clark, I.

    A project was conducted to develop a curriculum and training materials to be used in training industrial operatives in statistical process control (SPC) techniques. During the first phase of the project, questionnaires were sent to 685 companies (215 of which responded) to determine where SPC was being used, what type of SPC firms needed, and how…

  17. Understanding the selection processes of public research projects

    Materia, V.C.; Pascucci, S.; Kolympiris, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses factors that affect the funding of agricultural research projects by regional governments and other regional public authorities. We study the selection process of agricultural research projects funded by the emilia Romagna regional government in Italy, which follows funding

  18. NHDOT : process for municipally managed state aid highway program projects

    2006-05-23

    The design and construction of Municipally Managed State Aid Highway Program projects must comply with the requirements in this guideline in order to receive State Aid under the applicable provisions of RSA 235. Under this process, State Aid Construc...

  19. Camera calibration based on the back projection process

    Gu, Feifei; Zhao, Hong; Ma, Yueyang; Bu, Penghui

    2015-12-01

    Camera calibration plays a crucial role in 3D measurement tasks of machine vision. In typical calibration processes, camera parameters are iteratively optimized in the forward imaging process (FIP). However, the results can only guarantee the minimum of 2D projection errors on the image plane, but not the minimum of 3D reconstruction errors. In this paper, we propose a universal method for camera calibration, which uses the back projection process (BPP). In our method, a forward projection model is used to obtain initial intrinsic and extrinsic parameters with a popular planar checkerboard pattern. Then, the extracted image points are projected back into 3D space and compared with the ideal point coordinates. Finally, the estimation of the camera parameters is refined by a non-linear function minimization process. The proposed method can obtain a more accurate calibration result, which is more physically useful. Simulation and practical data are given to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  20. 44 CFR 78.10 - Project grant approval process.

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program FLOOD MITIGATION ASSISTANCE § 78.10 Project grant approval process. The State POC will solicit applications from...

  1. Project INOVEMAR: Innovation in Sea Produce Processment

    Maria Alberta Araújo

    2014-06-01

    Following information conveyed by Docapesca, the less valued species captured in the region are different mackerel species, Atlantic horse mackerel, pout, octopus and mullet. Mackerel and Atlantic horse mackerel, due to their high subcutaneous fat were used for smoking and for the production of canned smoked fillets and patés, with different sauces.The smoking process included: washing fresh fish, 30 minutes immersion in a 80º brine, followed by dripping and drying for 48h. Smoking was carried out at 70ºC during 3h, with a final stage at 90ºC. Several paté formulations were developed with mackerel and atlantic horse mackerel, with different types and quantities of ingredients and flavourings to obtain different products. Special attention was paid to the amounts of thickeners and emulsifiers to attain a pleasant spread ability. All preparations were sterilized for 15 minutes at 121ºC. A sensory panel with 10 judges and a consumer panel with 59 consumers were used to test the developed products. The 59 consumers (17-25 years of age classified smoked products as moderately pleasant. 82% of the consumers tested expressed willingness to purchase the product. In what concerns patés, sensory judges as well as consumers rated the majority of products as very good in the several parameters under evaluation, indication that there is a great potential for these type of commodities. Several fish species are being studied for pre-cooking conservation. In all the cases studied, typical Portuguese cuisine is being used, followed by rapid chilling and packing with modified atmospheres. Preparations, preservation and subsequent consumption are being carried out at the school's canteen. The results obtained until now show that low commercial valued species can be used with success, providing some culinary expertise is added. This is a very important aspect since, transferring this technology to industry, may lead to the development of new products and help an easy flow of

  2. Preparing hydraulic cement from oil-shale residue

    1921-08-28

    A process for preparation of hydraulic cement from oil-shale residue is characterized in that, as flux is used, rich-in-lime poor-in-sulfur portland-cement clinker, by which the usual gypsum addition, is avoided.

  3. Subgrade stabilization alternatives to lime and cement.

    2010-04-15

    This project involved four distinct research activities, (1) the influence of temperature on lime-stabilized soils, (2) the influence of temperature on cement-stabilized soils (3) temperature modeling of stabilized subgrade and (4) use of calcium chl...

  4. Understanding and Managing Process Interaction in IS Development Projects

    Bygstad, Bendik; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly, information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a challenge for the IS project manager, since business change and information systems development usually are performed as separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage......-technical innovation in a situation where the organisational change process and the IS development process are parallel but incongruent. We also argue that iterative software engineering frameworks are well structured to support process interaction. Finally, we advocate that the IS project manager needs to manage...... the relationship between these two kinds of processes. To understand the interaction between information systems development and planned organisational change we introduce the concept of process interaction. We draw on a longitudinal case study of an IS development project that used an iterative and incremental...

  5. Immobilisation of shredded waste in a cement monolith

    James, J.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1987-11-01

    During 1983/84 work was continued on the development of the process for the encapsulation of shredded waste in cement. Using simulant shredded waste the conditions for operating the process on the 500 litres scale have been established. Evaluation of the cemented product showed that it was satisfactorily infilled with cement grout with no significant voidage. (author)

  6. The Role of Demonstration Projects in Construction innovation processes

    Clausen, Lennie

    1999-01-01

    The article is describing the methodology of a case-study approach to the investigation of demonstration projects and their impact on the development of process and product innovations in the construction industry.......The article is describing the methodology of a case-study approach to the investigation of demonstration projects and their impact on the development of process and product innovations in the construction industry....

  7. Complex research and qualification methods of cement products for the processing, accumulation and storage of radioactive waste

    Kovalinska, T.; Ostapenko, I.; Sakhno, V.

    2015-01-01

    INR (Ukrainian Institute for Nuclear Research) has developed an installation to assess the degradation of cements and concretes over accelerated time and in hard operating conditions involving mechanical and chemical effects, radiation, high temperatures, electric fields...This testing installation is called a reactionary chamber. The experimental data obtained during these tests characterize the product functionality in the stationary, transitional and emergency modes. These data allow the solving of the equation system representing the state of a product at a current moment of time and to determine its reactions to various external influences. An example is given through the testing of concrete containers that are intended to store radioactive waste

  8. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    Rahman, A.A.; Glasser, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  9. Risk Factors in ERP Implementation Projects for Process Oriented

    Andrzej Partyka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper present review and analysis of risk factors, which could affect successful implementation of ERP system, for project performed in project oriented organizations. Presented risk breakdown structure and the list of common risk factors, are well-suited for ERP implementation projects. Considered risk categories allow for complex risk analysis. Additionally, mapping of risk importance for particular implementation phases is presented. Making presented model an important input for project risk management process, especially for the beginning phases which require identification of risk factors.

  10. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  11. Immobilisation of MTR waste in cement (product evaluation)

    Howard, C.G.; Lee, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The enriched uranium/aluminium fuel used in Material Testing Reactors is reprocessed at Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment (DNE). The main chemical component of the liquid waste produced by this process is acid deficient aluminium nitrate. The primary objective of this project is to find a suitable process for changing the highly mobile radioactive waste into an inert stable solid. Work carried out on the development of the immobilisation process showed that a conditioning stage (neutralisation) is required to make the acid waste compatible with cement. Small scale experiments showed that adding Ordinary Portland Cement blended with ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag to Simulant MTR Liquor produces an acceptable product. The process has been demonstrated at full scale (200 litres) and the products have been subjected to an extensive programme of destructive and non-destructive testing. (author)

  12. A Systematic Approach to Modelling Change Processes in Construction Projects

    Ibrahim Motawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Modelling change processes within construction projects isessential to implement changes efficiently. Incomplete informationon the project variables at the early stages of projects leads toinadequate knowledge of future states and imprecision arisingfrom ambiguity in project parameters. This lack of knowledge isconsidered among the main source of changes in construction.Change identification and evaluation, in addition to predictingits impacts on project parameters, can help in minimising thedisruptive effects of changes. This paper presents a systematicapproach to modelling change process within construction projectsthat helps improve change identification and evaluation. Theapproach represents the key decisions required to implementchanges. The requirements of an effective change processare presented first. The variables defined for efficient changeassessment and diagnosis are then presented. Assessmentof construction changes requires an analysis for the projectcharacteristics that lead to change and also analysis of therelationship between the change causes and effects. The paperconcludes that, at the early stages of a project, projects with a highlikelihood of change occurrence should have a control mechanismover the project characteristics that have high influence on theproject. It also concludes, for the relationship between changecauses and effects, the multiple causes of change should bemodelled in a way to enable evaluating the change effects moreaccurately. The proposed approach is the framework for tacklingsuch conclusions and can be used for evaluating change casesdepending on the available information at the early stages ofconstruction projects.

  13. Sunray project - A long-term, nationwide educational process

    Nikula, Anneli

    2000-01-01

    The Sunray project is a nationwide educational process coordinated by the Economic Information Bureau (TaT Group) for ninth graders in Finnish comprehensive schools. The project aims at giving thorough and versatile information on radiation within the framework of various subjects (physics, biology, domestic science, history, European languages, mother tongue, health education etc.). The Sunray project covers all ninth graders of the existing 600 Finnish comprehensive schools; in all involving some 65 000 pupils. The project, which has been repeated five times, was initiated as part of the European Science and Technology week in 1995. During the first two years it was strongly linked with the science week as natural sciences were seen as a good framework for the chosen perspective. Since 1997, the project has been run as an event in its own right. The project has applied the method of processing integrated groups of themes, which is an objective of the comprehensive school system and the experimental method of science. As schools make their own decisions about the educational programmes to be adopted every semester, the project has been marketed to schools at the beginning of May. The TaT Group has arranged marketing events in some 10 localities in Finland. The Economic Information Bureau of Finland coordinates the project and in 1995-2000 the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), the Finnish Energy Industries' Federation, the Finnish Electricity Association, Fortum Oyj and Teollisuuden Voima Oy have participated in the project

  14. Managing projects for life cycle success : perfecting the process

    Jenkins, A. [TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Babuk, T. [Empress International Inc., Westwood, NJ (United States); Mohitpour, M. [Tempsys Pipeline Solutions Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presented a historical summary of traditional project management along with a discussion on the project management and development philosophy that can be used in a large infrastructure company that develops and operates its own projects and facilities. Two case studies from the experiences of TransCanada Pipelines Limited were also presented. It was suggested that companies seeking a first-rate reputation must maintain a long-term focus with emphasis on the improvement of the total process and harmony with the environment and community. This paper explained how project managers can create balance between the proponents, stakeholders, participants and the people and the environment while ensuring a cost effective quality product over time. Successful project managers were shown to understand and manage the components of scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communication, risk, purchasing, safety and harmony with the community. Project development from the perspective of an owner-operator was presented with reference to consistency in approach and the decision making process. It was concluded that although project managers should focus on controlling and minimizing capital expenditures during project engineering and construction, the many elements that contribute to a project's value should also be recognized. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Process simulation and parametric modeling for strategic project management

    Morales, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Process Simulation and Parametric Modeling for Strategic Project Management will offer CIOs, CTOs and Software Development Managers, IT Graduate Students an introduction to a set of technologies that will help them understand how to better plan software development projects, manage risk and have better insight into the complexities of the software development process.A novel methodology will be introduced that allows a software development manager to better plan and access risks in the early planning of a project.  By providing a better model for early software development estimation and softw

  16. Controls on Cementation in a Chalk Reservoir

    Meireles, Leonardo Teixeira Pinto; Hussein, A.; Welch, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we identify different controls on cementation in a chalk reservoir. Biot’s coefficient, a measure of cementation, stiffness and strength in porous rocks, is calculated from logging data (bulk density and sonic Pwave velocity). We show that Biot’s coefficient is correlated...... that some degree of pore filling cementation occurred in Kraka (Alam, 2010). Lack of correlation between Biot’s coefficient and Gamma Ray (GR) indicates that the small amount of clay present is generally located in the pore space, thus not contributing to frame stiffness. While there was no compositional...... control on cementation via clay, we could infer that stratigraphy impacts on the diagenetic process....

  17. Influence of Cements Containing Calcareous Fly Ash as a Main Component Properties of Fresh Cement Mixtures

    Gołaszewski, Jacek; Kostrzanowska-Siedlarz, Aleksandra; Ponikiewski, Tomasz; Miera, Patrycja

    2017-10-01

    The main goal of presented research was to examine usability of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) from technological point of view. In the paper the results of tests concerning the influence of CEM II and CEM IV cements containing fly ash (W) on rheological properties, air content, setting times and plastic shrinkage of mortars are presented and discussed. Moreover, compatibility of plasticizers with cements containing fly ash (W) was also studied. Additionally, setting time and hydration heat of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) were determined. In a broader aspect, the research contributes to promulgation of the possibility of using calcareous fly ash (W) in cement and concrete technology, what greatly benefits the environment protection (utilization of waste fly ash). Calcareous fly ash can be used successfully as the main component of cement. Cements produced by blending with processed fly ash or cements produced by interginding are characterized by acceptable technological properties. In respect to CEM I cements, cements containing calcareous fly ash worsen workability, decrease air content, delay setting time of mixtures. Cements with calcareous fly ash show good compatibility with plasticizers.

  18. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's ''Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity

  19. Project Interface Requirements Process Including Shuttle Lessons Learned

    Bauch, Garland T.

    2010-01-01

    Most failures occur at interfaces between organizations and hardware. Processing interface requirements at the start of a project life cycle will reduce the likelihood of costly interface changes/failures later. This can be done by adding Interface Control Documents (ICDs) to the Project top level drawing tree, providing technical direction to the Projects for interface requirements, and by funding the interface requirements function directly from the Project Manager's office. The interface requirements function within the Project Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) Office would work in-line with the project element design engineers early in the life cycle to enhance communications and negotiate technical issues between the elements. This function would work as the technical arm of the Project Manager to help ensure that the Project cost, schedule, and risk objectives can be met during the Life Cycle. Some ICD Lessons Learned during the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Life Cycle will include the use of hardware interface photos in the ICD, progressive life cycle design certification by analysis, test, & operations experience, assigning interface design engineers to Element Interface (EI) and Project technical panels, and linking interface design drawings with project build drawings

  20. A project management focused framework for assuring quality work processes

    Gamsby, S.O.; Mize, J.D. [Allied Signal, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Federal Mfg. and Technologies; Reid, R.A. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/New Mexico (FM&T/NM) of AlliedSignal is an organization of approximately 300 associates providing operations support, engineering, and other technical services for DOE, New Mexico`s National Laboratories, etc. Work performed is primarily project-oriented and ranges from executing a major long-term contract for retrofitting and maintaining a large fleet of escort vehicles to creating a single, small, prototype electronic device for measuring radiation in a unique environment. FM&T/NM is functionally organized and operates in a classic matrix format with functional departments providing personnel with technical expertise, necessary physical resources, and administrative support to several project-based groups. Like most matrix-based organizations that provide support to diverse customers, FM&T/NM has encountered problems that occur when a group of project managers is expected to work together in using and scheduling a shared set of limited resources for the good of the organization as a whole. The framework for managing projects that we present focuses on developing, understanding, and managing the relationships between the functional organization structure, the system of work processes, and the management of projects. FM&T/NM retains its functional structure which primarily assigns personnel to work processes. The evolving role of the process leader focuses primarily on designing, managing, and improving the process, and the interactions among the subprocesses. The project manager is responsible for (1) translating customer requirements into product specifications, (2) determining the sequence of activities needed to meet project goals, (3) scheduling the required work processes, (4) monitoring project progress, (5) providing liaison between the customer and process leaders, and (6) having the desired product and/or service delivered to a satisfied customer in a timely manner.

  1. Orienting and Onboarding Clinical Nurse Specialists: A Process Improvement Project.

    Garcia, Mayra G; Watt, Jennifer L; Falder-Saeed, Karie; Lewis, Brennan; Patton, Lindsey

    Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) have a unique advanced practice role. This article describes a process useful in establishing a comprehensive orientation and onboarding program for a newly hired CNS. The project team used the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies as a guide to construct a process for effectively onboarding and orienting newly hired CNSs. Standardized documents were created for the orientation process including a competency checklist, needs assessment template, and professional evaluation goals. In addition, other documents were revised to streamline the orientation process. Standardizing the onboarding and orientation process has demonstrated favorable results. As of 2016, 3 CNSs have successfully been oriented and onboarded using the new process. Unique healthcare roles require special focus when onboarding and orienting into a healthcare system. The use of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists core competencies guided the project in establishing a successful orientation and onboarding process for newly hired CNSs.

  2. Low pH Cements

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    speciation of silicon at pH 10 has a significant impact upon the solubility of montmorillonite and would thus constitute a logical choice of pH limit for cement-derived pore fluids, but it is unlikely that cement-based grouts could be developed to meet this limit. Control of mass transport by diffusion processes serves as a significant constraint over the amount of bentonite that can be degraded. Computer simulations indicate that porosity reduction is likely at the interface between cement and bentonite. However, it is not clear how the transport properties of bentonite may be modified due to mineral alteration processes. There are considerable uncertainties concerning the precise mechanism of the rate of montmorillonite dissolution at elevated pH. The rate of dissolution may be inhibited by the presence of dissolved Si (and perhaps Al), but this mechanism has yet to be confirmed at high pH. The type of secondary minerals assumed to form from cement-bentonite interaction will also have a significant impact upon the rate of montmorillonite dissolution. Low-pH cement systems have received little attention thus far regarding the development of models for the chemical evolution of pore fluids. Low Ca/Si CSH gels show preferential leaching of Si, which is in marked contrast with gels of greater Ca/Si ratio. Models apparently capable of predicting pore fluid composition coexisting with low Ca/Si CSH gels are a modified Berner model and a solid-solution model proposed by Sugiyama and Fujita. The solubility of silica in pore fluids coexisting with low Ca/Si gels may exceed that of amorphous silica, and may pose problems regarding the stability of montmorillonite in relation to framework silicates such as feldspars. However, the potential rate of conversion of montmorillonite to feldspar under repository conditions is uncertain. It is necessary to use additives such as super plasticiser to improve the workability of low-pH cements. These organic additives have the potential to

  3. Low pH Cements

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    speciation of silicon at pH 10 has a significant impact upon the solubility of montmorillonite and would thus constitute a logical choice of pH limit for cement-derived pore fluids, but it is unlikely that cement-based grouts could be developed to meet this limit. Control of mass transport by diffusion processes serves as a significant constraint over the amount of bentonite that can be degraded. Computer simulations indicate that porosity reduction is likely at the interface between cement and bentonite. However, it is not clear how the transport properties of bentonite may be modified due to mineral alteration processes. There are considerable uncertainties concerning the precise mechanism of the rate of montmorillonite dissolution at elevated pH. The rate of dissolution may be inhibited by the presence of dissolved Si (and perhaps Al), but this mechanism has yet to be confirmed at high pH. The type of secondary minerals assumed to form from cement-bentonite interaction will also have a significant impact upon the rate of montmorillonite dissolution. Low-pH cement systems have received little attention thus far regarding the development of models for the chemical evolution of pore fluids. Low Ca/Si CSH gels show preferential leaching of Si, which is in marked contrast with gels of greater Ca/Si ratio. Models apparently capable of predicting pore fluid composition coexisting with low Ca/Si CSH gels are a modified Berner model and a solid-solution model proposed by Sugiyama and Fujita. The solubility of silica in pore fluids coexisting with low Ca/Si gels may exceed that of amorphous silica, and may pose problems regarding the stability of montmorillonite in relation to framework silicates such as feldspars. However, the potential rate of conversion of montmorillonite to feldspar under repository conditions is uncertain. It is necessary to use additives such as super plasticiser to improve the workability of low-pH cements. These organic additives have the potential to

  4. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  5. Achievement report for fiscal 1998. Energy consumption efficiency improvement model business for developing nations (Demonstration research project on new cooling system in cement clinker production); Hatten tojokoku energy shohi koritsuka model jigyo seika hokokusho. Cement clinker reikyaku sochi ni kakawaru jissho kenkyu

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The project aims at energy saving and CO2 emission reduction for a clinker cooling system (CCS), and a demonstration test was conducted at a demonstration cement plant in Indonesia. The plant started operation using the new CCS aiming for the enhancement of cooling and heat recovery efficiency. The actually achieved heat recovery efficiency attributable to the adoption of the new CCS was 60.8% against the target of 68%, this meaning an improvement of 8% over the value recorded prior to the new CCS adoption. As for increase in recovered heat due to heat recovery efficiency improvement of the CCS itself, it was 31kcal/kg-clinker. The heat reduction rate throughout the system thanks to the new CCS was 40kcal/kg-clinker. The kiln secondary air temperature increased for improved burner combustion performance for a rise of the clinker burning degree to 12kcal/kg in terms of calorie, and thus a reduction of 52kcal/kg-clinker in total was achieved. No mechanical trouble was reported with the new CCS. Investigations were conducted into cement supply/demand and technological trends in Indonesia, Vietnam, and China. Learnings from the investigation of German cement making technologies were fully utilized in the designing of the new system. (NEDO)

  6. Mg-phosphate ceramics produced from the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos

    Pérez-Estébanez, Marta; Mácová, Petra; Šašek, Petr; Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2014), s. 187-192 ISSN 1640-4920. [Conference on Environment and Mineral Processing /18./. Ostrava, 29.05.2014-31.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : cement -asbestos * magnesium phosphate ceramics * amorphous Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://www.potopk.com.pl/archiwum.html

  7. Improved cement solidification of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    1993-01-01

    Cementation was the first and is still the most widely applied technique for the conditioning of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Compared with other solidification techniques, cementation is relatively simple and inexpensive. However, the quality of the final cemented waste forms depends very much on the composition of the waste and the type of cement used. Different kinds of cement are used for different kinds of waste and the compatibility of a specific waste with a specific cement type should always be carefully evaluated. Cementation technology is continuously being developed in order to improve the characteristics of cemented waste in accordance with the increasing requirements for quality of the final solidified waste. Various kinds of additives and chemicals are used to improve the cemented waste forms in order to meet all safety requirements. This report is meant mainly for engineers and designers, to provide an explanation of the chemistry of cementation systems and to facilitate the choice of solidification agents and processing equipment. It reviews recent developments in cementation technology for improving the quality of cemented waste forms and provides a brief description of the various cement solidification processes in use. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Reducing CO2-Emission by using Eco-Cements

    Voit, K.; Bergmeister, K.; Janotka, I.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 concentration in the air is rising constantly. Globally, cement companies are emitting nearly two billion tonnes/year of CO2 (or around 6 to 7 % of the planet's total CO2 emissions) by producing portland cement clinker. At this pace, by 2025 the cement industry will be emitting CO2 at a rate of 3.5 billion tones/year causing enormous environmental damage (Shi et al., 2011; Janotka et al., 2012). At the dawn of the industrial revolution in the mid-eighteenth century the concentration of CO2 was at a level of ca. 280 ppm. 200 years later at the time of World War II the CO2 level had risen to 310 ppm what results in a rate of increase of 0,15 ppm per year for that period (Shi et al., 2011). In November 2011 the CO2 concentration reached a value of 391 ppm (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 2011), a rise of ca. 81 ppm in 66 years and an increased rate of around 1,2 ppm/year respectively. In the same period cement production in tons of cement has multiplied by a factor of ca. 62 (Kelly & Oss, US Geological Survey, 2010). Thus new CO2-saving eco-cement types are gaining in importance. In these cement types the energy-consuming portland cement clinker is partially replaced by latent hydraulic additives such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or zeolite. These hydraulic additives do not need to be fired in the rotary furnace. They ony need to be pulverized to the required grain size and added to the ground portland cement clinker. Hence energy is saved by skipping the engery-consuming firing process, in addition there is no CO2-degassing as there is in the case of lime burning. Therefore a research project between Austria and Slovakia, funded by the EU (Project ENVIZEO), was initiated in 2010. The main goal of this project is to develop new CEM V eco-types of cements and certificate them for common usage. CEM V is a portland clinker saving cement kind that allows the reduction of clinker to a proportion of 40-64% for CEM V/A and 20-39% for CEM V/B respectively by the

  9. Biomass for green cement

    Cumming, R. [Lafarge Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Lafarge examined the use of waste biomass products in its building materials and provided background information on its operations. Cement kiln infrastructure was described in terms of providing access to shipping, rail and highways; conveying and off-loading equipment; having large storage facilities; and, offering continuous monitoring and stack testing. The presentation identified the advantages and disadvantages of a few different biomass cases such as coal; scrap tires; non-recyclable household waste; and processed biomass. A chart representing landfill diversion rates was presented and the presentation concluded with a discussion of energy recovery and recycling. 1 tab., figs.

  10. Asphalt cement poisoning

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  11. Radioactivity of bone cement

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  12. Ultrafine portland cement performance

    C. Argiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available By mixing several binder materials and additions with different degrees of fineness, the packing density of the final product may be improved. In this work, ultrafine cement and silica fume mixes were studied to optimize the properties of cement-based materials. This research was performed in mortars made of two types of cement (ultrafine Portland cement and common Portland cement and two types of silica fume with different particle-size distributions. Two Portland cement replacement ratios of 4% and 10% of silica fume were selected and added by means of a mechanical blending method. The results revealed that the effect of the finer silica fume mixed with the coarse cement enhances the mechanical properties and pore structure refinement at a later age. This improvement is somewhat lower in the case of ultrafine cement with silica fume.

  13. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  14. High performance concrete with blended cement

    Biswas, P.P.; Saraswati, S.; Basu, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Principal objectives of the proposed project are two folds. Firstly, to develop the HPC mix suitable to NPP structures with blended cement, and secondly to study its durability necessary for desired long-term performance. Three grades of concrete to b considered in the proposed projects are M35, M50 and M60 with two types of blended cements, i.e. Portland slag cement (PSC) and Portland pozzolana cement (PPC). Three types of mineral admixtures - silica fume, fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag will be used. Concrete mixes with OPc and without any mineral admixture will be considered as reference case. Durability study of these mixes will be carried out

  15. Vitrification process equipment design for the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Chapman, C.C.; Drosjack, W.P.

    1988-10-01

    The vitrification process and equipment design is nearing completion for the West Valley Project. This report provides the basis and current status for the design of the major vessels and equipment within the West Valley Vitrification Plant. A review of the function and key design features of the equipment is also provided. The major subsystems described include the feed preparation and delivery systems, the melter, the canister handling systems, and the process off-gas system. 11 refs., 33 figs., 4 tabs

  16. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites

  17. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  18. Effect of project work on secondary school students science process ...

    The study investigated the effect of students' project work on secondary school science process skills acquisition in Biology. The study was carried out in Owerri North Local Government Area of Imo State. Three research questions guided the study and three null hypotheses were postulated and tested at 0.05 level of ...

  19. A Framework for Coordination Process into Construction Projects

    Alaloul Wesam S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry is recognized as high fragmentation, low efficiency, cost and time overruns in contrast with other industries. These peculiarities are the main roots of poor performance facing by the industry. Effective coordination is vital in construction projects success and mitigate the fragmentation dilemma, however it is often difficult to achieve and need iterative process. Coordination is core issue to improve performance in construction project. Relevant studies have addressed the coordination process importance and implementation, but not in a framework. This paper propose a framework for coordination process in construction projects, as well as its relationship with performance. The objective of the framework is to provide a roadmap for the construction parties to realize operational excellence so that collectively stakeholders can recognize the effect of coordination process application on the project performance. The data were obtained from literature review and structured interviews with five experts. The analysis produced the framework of coordination based on the extensively used procedures for information and data flow between stakeholders.

  20. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing ...

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housing and modern infrastructure, the aim of this paper is to analyse the Emergy and Ecological Footprint of different cement manufacturing processes for a particular cement plant. There are several mitigation measures that can be incorporated in the cement manufacturing process to reduce the demand for fossil fuels and consequently reduce the CO2 emissions. The mitigation measures considered in this paper were the use of alternative fuels and a more energy efficient kiln process. In order to estimate the sustainability effect of the aforementioned measures, Emergy and Ecological Footprint were calculated for four different scenarios. The results show that Emergy, due to the high input mass of raw material needed for clinker production, stays at about the same level. However, for the Ecological Footprint, the results show that by combining the use of alternative fuels together with a more energy efficient kiln process, the environmental impact of the cement manufacturing process can be lowered. The research paper presents an analysis of the sustainability of cement production , a major contributor to carbon emissions, with respect to using alternative fuels and a more efficient kiln. It show

  1. Characterization of monolith block of spent resin cementation

    Prayitno; Endro-Kismolo; Isman MT

    1996-01-01

    Spent resin immobilization process with cement was done to prevent release of radionuclide in the ultimate storage or disposal. The varied Composition of water/cement ratio in the cementation process were 0.3; 0.4; 0.5 and the various weight of resin waste are 25 g, 37.5 g and 50 gram. The compressive strength of the various water/cement ratio without spent resin was bigger than 0.3. This investigation proved that the compressive strength of Tiga Roda cement was bigger than those of Gresik cement or Nusantara cement. The compressive of the cement block of were the spent resin cementation was influenced by the water/cement ratio and the total spent resin addition. The best condition reached at the water/cement ratio of 0.3 and 25 gram spent resin, was compressive strength of 17.86 N/mm 2 . Leaching rate of the various weight composition of spent resin cementation for 91 days were between 10 -2 - 10 -4 gram.cm -2 .day -1

  2. INFLUENCE OF WINE ACID ON RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF WELL BORE CEMENT SLURRIES AND HARDENED CEMENT PROPERTIES

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of commercial types of domestic cements for use in cementing the deep wells is a process by which Yugoslav oil industry tends to solve problems of completion of those wells independently. In order to design a domestic, cheep and effective retarder, tests of applicability of wine acid on cement slurries have been carried out. Besides examining the necessary wine acid content to achieve desirable Theological properties, the influence of this additive on properties of hardened cement samples has been tested too (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Conditioning of radioactive waste solutions by cementation

    Vejmelka, P.; Rudolph, G.; Kluger, W.; Koester, R.

    1992-02-01

    For the cementation of the low and intermediate level evaporator concentrates resulting from the reprocessing of spent fuel numerous experiments were performed to optimize the waste form composition and to characterize the final waste form. Concerning the cementation process, properties of the waste/cement suspension were investigated. These investigations include the dependence of viscosity, bleeding, setting time and hydration heat from the waste cement slurry composition. For the characterization of the waste forms, the mechanical, thermal and chemical stability were determined. For special cases detailed investigations were performed to determine the activity release from waste packages under defined mechanical and thermal stresses. The investigations of the interaction of the waste forms with aqueous solutions include the determination of the Cs/Sr release, the corrosion resistance and the release of actinides. The Cs/Sr release was determined in dependence of the cement type, additives, setting time and sample size. (orig./DG) [de

  4. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  5. Feasibility study on energy conservation through modernization of cement plant (Sichuan Double Horse Cement Group Co. Ltd.)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted of possibilities of energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas emission reduction in the cement production process of Double Horse Cement Co., Mianyang City, Sichuan Province, China. Double Horse Cement adopts the wet type long kiln production system and has a production ability of approximately 1.5 million t/y. In the project, as to three production lines out of the six production lines, improvement was planned to be made of the technologies on the following: mixing of raw materials, grinding of raw materials, NSP, clinker cooler, clinker pre-grinder, high-efficiency separator, waste heat use power generation, etc. As a result of the study, it was found that the energy conservation amount obtained was 54,646 toe/y. And, the amount of greenhouse effect gas reduction was 169,086 t-CO2/y. The total fund required for this project was approximately 5.553 billion yen and the internal earning rate was 7.36% after tax. When the project is carried out, expenses vs. effects are 9.8 toe/million yen in energy conservation amount and 30.4 t-CO2/million yen in greenhouse effect gas reduction. (NEDO)

  6. 3.4. Chemical additives and granulometric composition influence on soils armed by cement

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of this work was to evaluate an influence of various chemical additives on soils armed by portland cement. Experimental research of kinetics of soil cements structure formation after adding the chemicals was carried out. According to the investigations it was determined that structure formation process of soil cements depended on granulometric composition of armed soil, cement quantity, type and quantity of chemical additives.

  7. Project and Innovation Management in New Product Development Processes

    Henriksen, Leif; Gayretli, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Although the process of innovation is one of the most important drivers behind the growth and prosperity of today’s global economy, it is one of the least understood. This paper aims to address specific problems in carrying out new product development processes. There are crucial issues related...... to product design processes like inefficient project management, increasing product complexity, conflict management, shortfall of existing methods and tools, and high failures in new product introduction. A new approach has been proposed for a system based platform, which consist of a product platform...

  8. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  9. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  10. Project management plan, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1, Project W-026

    Starkey, J.G.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Project (WRAP 1) has been established to support the retrieval and final disposal of approximately 400K grams of plutonium and quantities of hazardous components currently stored in drums at the Hanford Site.

  11. Project management plan, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1, Project W-026

    Starkey, J.G.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Project (WRAP 1) has been established to support the retrieval and final disposal of approximately 400K grams of plutonium and quantities of hazardous components currently stored in drums at the Hanford Site

  12. Establishment of cementation parameters of dried waste from evaporation coming from NPP operation

    Faria, Érica R.; Tello, Clédola C.O.; Costa, Bruna S.

    2017-01-01

    The radioactive wastes generated in Brazil are treated and sent to initial and intermediate storages. The 'Project RBMN' proposes the implantation of the Brazilian repository to receive and permanently dispose the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The CNEN NN 6.09 standard - Acceptance Criteria for Disposal of Low and Intermediate Radioactive Wastes (LIRW) - establishes the fundamental requirements to accept the wastes packages in the repository. The evaporator concentrate is one of liquid wastes generated in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation and usually it is cemented directly inside the packing. The objective of this research is to increase the amount of the incorporated waste in each package, using the drying process before the cementation, consequently reducing the volume of the waste to be disposed. Drying and cementation parameters were established in order to scale-up the process aiming at waste products that comply with the requirements of CNEN standard. The cementation of the resulting dry wastes was carried out with different formulations, varying the amount of cement, dry waste and water. These tests were analyzed in order to select the best products, with higher waste incorporation than current process and its complying the requirements of the standard CNEN NN 6.09. (author)

  13. Establishment of cementation parameters of dried waste from evaporation coming from NPP operation

    Faria, Érica R.; Tello, Clédola C.O., E-mail: erica.engqui@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte/MG (Brazil); Costa, Bruna S., E-mail: brusilveirac@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The radioactive wastes generated in Brazil are treated and sent to initial and intermediate storages. The 'Project RBMN' proposes the implantation of the Brazilian repository to receive and permanently dispose the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The CNEN NN 6.09 standard - Acceptance Criteria for Disposal of Low and Intermediate Radioactive Wastes (LIRW) - establishes the fundamental requirements to accept the wastes packages in the repository. The evaporator concentrate is one of liquid wastes generated in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation and usually it is cemented directly inside the packing. The objective of this research is to increase the amount of the incorporated waste in each package, using the drying process before the cementation, consequently reducing the volume of the waste to be disposed. Drying and cementation parameters were established in order to scale-up the process aiming at waste products that comply with the requirements of CNEN standard. The cementation of the resulting dry wastes was carried out with different formulations, varying the amount of cement, dry waste and water. These tests were analyzed in order to select the best products, with higher waste incorporation than current process and its complying the requirements of the standard CNEN NN 6.09. (author)

  14. Cement Types, Composition, Uses and Advantages of Nanocement, Environmental Impact on Cement Production, and Possible Solutions

    S. P. Dunuweera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We first discuss cement production and special nomenclature used by cement industrialists in expressing the composition of their cement products. We reveal different types of cement products, their compositions, properties, and typical uses. Wherever possible, we tend to give reasons as to why a particular cement type is more suitable for a given purpose than other types. Cement manufacturing processes are associated with emissions of large quantities of greenhouse gases and environmental pollutants. We give below quantitative and qualitative analyses of environmental impact of cement manufacturing. Controlling pollution is a mandatory legal and social requirement pertinent to any industry. As cement industry is one of the biggest CO2 emitters, it is appropriate to discuss different ways and means of CO2 capture, which will be done next. Finally, we give an account of production of nanocement and advantages associated with nanocement. Nanofillers such as nanotitania, nanosilica, and nanoalumina can be produced in large industrial scale via top-down approach of reducing size of naturally available bulk raw materials to those in the nanorange of 1 nm–100 nm. We mention the preparation of nanotitania and nanosilica from Sri Lankan mineral sands and quartz deposits, respectively, for the use as additives in cement products to improve performance and reduce the amount and cost of cement production and consequent environmental impacts. As of now, mineral sands and other treasures of minerals are exported without much value addition. Simple chemical modifications or physical treatments would add enormous value to these natural materials. Sri Lanka is gifted with highly pure quartz and graphite from which silica and graphite nanoparticles, respectively, can be prepared by simple size reduction processes. These can be used as additives in cements. Separation of constituents of mineral sands is already an ongoing process.

  15. Method for Assessment of Changes in the Width of Cracks in Cement Composites with Use of Computer Image Processing and Analysis

    Tomczak, Kamil; Jakubowski, Jacek; Fiołek, Przemysław

    2017-06-01

    Crack width measurement is an important element of research on the progress of self-healing cement composites. Due to the nature of this research, the method of measuring the width of cracks and their changes over time must meet specific requirements. The article presents a novel method of measuring crack width based on images from a scanner with an optical resolution of 6400 dpi, subject to initial image processing in the ImageJ development environment and further processing and analysis of results. After registering a series of images of the cracks at different times using SIFT conversion (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform), a dense network of line segments is created in all images, intersecting the cracks perpendicular to the local axes. Along these line segments, brightness profiles are extracted, which are the basis for determination of crack width. The distribution and rotation of the line of intersection in a regular layout, automation of transformations, management of images and profiles of brightness, and data analysis to determine the width of cracks and their changes over time are made automatically by own code in the ImageJ and VBA environment. The article describes the method, tests on its properties, sources of measurement uncertainty. It also presents an example of application of the method in research on autogenous self-healing of concrete, specifically the ability to reduce a sample crack width and its full closure within 28 days of the self-healing process.

  16. Fiscal 1999 international energy conservation model project. Report on result of demonstrative research concerning cement clinker cooling system; 1999 nendo kokusai energy shohi koritsuka nado model jigyo seika hokokusho. Cement clinker reikyaku sochi ni kakawaru jissho kenkyu

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing energy consumption and CO2 discharge in a cement plant in Indonesia, R and D was conducted on new clinker cooling system, high performance kiln combustion system, and technology for steady kiln operation and control, with the fiscal 1999 results reported. In the research on the optimum clinker cooling system, a new type clinker cooling system (CCS) was developed in which air beams are applied only to stationary grate rows, in an air beam type clinker cooling system where cooling air is fed to each block, with grate plates used as the air duct. This year, in an actual machine testing equipment (capacity 2,500 t/d), the whole heat recuperation area was modified for the CCS, with the operation started since February, 1999, aiming at the optimal clinker cooling effect and high heat recovery efficiency. The heat quantity for the entire system showed a decrease of 60 kcal/kg in the heat consumption rate through CCS modification, kiln burner adjustment, etc. So long as the demonstration plant is concerned, design of a new type burner and study/design for the kiln stabilization were nearly completed. (NEDO)

  17. UMTRA Ground Water Project management action process document

    1996-03-01

    A critical U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission is to plan, implement, and complete DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at facilities that were operated by or in support of the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). These facilities include the 24 inactive processing sites the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.) identified as Title I sites, which had operated from the late 1940s through the 1970s. In UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings and directed the DOE to stabilize, dispose of, and control the tailings in a safe and environmentally sound manner. The UMTRA Surface Project deals with buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the processing sites and any associated vicinity properties (VP). Surface remediation at the processing sites will be completed in 1997 when the Naturita, Colorado, site is scheduled to be finished. The UMTRA Ground Water Project was authorized in an amendment to the UMTRCA (42 USC Section 7922(a)), when Congress directed DOE to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. The UMTRA Ground Water Project addresses any contamination derived from the milling operation that is determined to be present at levels above the EPA standards

  18. Integrating chemical engineering fundamentals in the capstone process design project

    von Solms, Nicolas; Woodley, John; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    2010-01-01

    Reaction Engineering. In order to incorporate reactor design into process design in a meaningful way, the teachers of the respective courses need to collaborate (Standard 9 – Enhancement of Faculty CDIO skills). The students also see that different components of the chemical engineering curriculum relate......All B.Eng. courses offered at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) must now follow CDIO standards. The final “capstone” course in the B.Eng. education is Process Design, which for many years has been typical of chemical engineering curricula worldwide. The course at DTU typically has about 30...... of the CDIO standards – especially standard 3 – Integrated Curriculum - means that the course projects must draw on competences provided in other subjects which the students are taking in parallel with Process Design – specifically Process Control and Reaction Engineering. In each semester of the B...

  19. Aligning BIM with FM: streamlining the process for future projects

    Colleen Kasprzak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A study performed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA in 2004 found that owners account for approximately $10.6 billion of the $15.8 billion total inadequate interoperability costs of U.S. capital facility projects in 2002. Because of these inefficiency costs, it becomes vital that information produced during the design and construction phases of a project be transferred into operations with maximum leverage to the end users. However, very few owners have defined these informational needs or developed an integration strategy into existing maintenance management systems. To increase operational efficiency, an organization must first develop an understanding of their operating systems, as well as identify how Building Information Modeling (BIM will add value to their daily tasks. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU has a unique opportunity to diversely implement BIM processes because not only does the University act as an owner, but also as designer and construction manager on the majority of projects. The struggle that PSU faces is one that is unique only to owners with a large, existing, multifaceted building inventory. This paper outlines the current initiative by the Office of Physical Plant (OPP, the asset manager at PSU, to develop an information exchange framework between BIM and FM applications to be used internally. As a result of this research, PSU has been able to define owner operational requirements for future projects and develop a flexible integration framework to support additional BIM tasks and information exchanges.

  20. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases...... in Portland cement, i.e. tricalcium silicate, dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium alumino ferrite. Details of the The process of solid state synthesis are is described in general including practical advice on equipment and techniques. Finally In addition, some exemplary mix compositions...

  1. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  2. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.; Gordon, L.E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste

  3. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Design Verification and Validation Process

    OLGUIN, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a description of design verification and validation activities implemented by the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. During the execution of early design verification, a management assessment (Bergman, 1999) and external assessments on configuration management (Augustenburg, 1999) and testing (Loscoe, 2000) were conducted and identified potential uncertainties in the verification process. This led the SNF Chief Engineer to implement corrective actions to improve process and design products. This included Design Verification Reports (DVRs) for each subproject, validation assessments for testing, and verification of the safety function of systems and components identified in the Safety Equipment List to ensure that the design outputs were compliant with the SNF Technical Requirements. Although some activities are still in progress, the results of the DVR and associated validation assessments indicate that Project requirements for design verification are being effectively implemented. These results have been documented in subproject-specific technical documents (Table 2). Identified punch-list items are being dispositioned by the Project. As these remaining items are closed, the technical reports (Table 2) will be revised and reissued to document the results of this work

  4. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  5. Studies of the setting behavior of cement suspensions

    Rudolph, G.; Luo, S.; Vejmelka, P.; Koester, R.

    1983-10-01

    The design of process for cementation of radioactive waste solutions is determined not only by the quality of the final product but also by the behavior of the cement grout before and during setting. For these reasons quantitative investigations were performed on the characteristics of the cement suspensions considered for solidification of intermediate-level liquid wastes which are composed mainly of cement, bentonite, simulated waste solution, and water. Particular interest was given to the differences in behavior of the various types of cement. The parameters investigated include viscosity, bleeding, volume change during setting, influence of compacting by vibration, time of setting, heat of hydration. At the end of the report the merits and drawbacks of the different cements are tabulated. These data may serve as a decision aid in selecting an appropriate type of cement

  6. A research paper of 'the basic sciences of the radioactive waste treatment' (Jul. 28,29, 1994) and 'Interface and surface science of solid waste processing and disposal -differences between cement and bentonite' (Dec. 14, 1995)

    1995-12-01

    This report contains copies of OHP at the meetings of which discussions were centered upon the points of sameness and difference between cement and bentonite. There are sixteen papers, eleven in the first meeting and five in the second one. The following studies were read as under, on the first meeting, the role of retardation effect on the safety of high level atomic waste stratum processing, determination of colloid particle diameters by use of fieldflow fractionation, adsorption behavior of uranium, into black mica in granite, masstransfer mechanism of Cs and Se in the compression-bentonite, delay mechanism under conditions of mineral alteration, effects of humus on the behavior of radionuclides in stratum, formation of actinoids - humic acid complex and its effect on adsorption behavior, characteristic properties of water in bentonite, measurement of solubility of uranium and niobium, behavior of colloidal Am in the bentonite, illite - water system, effects of aging deterioration of bentonite on diffusion of nuclides, and on the second meeting, a view of cement materials, chemical behavior and long period stability of cement - relating to Atkinson model -, the present conditions of studies about sorption in cement, chemical properties of pore water in bentonite and interaction of bentonite and nuclides in solid - liquid interface. (S.Y.)

  7. A research paper of `the basic sciences of the radioactive waste treatment` (Jul. 28,29, 1994) and `Interface and surface science of solid waste processing and disposal -differences between cement and bentonite` (Dec. 14, 1995)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report contains copies of OHP at the meetings of which discussions were centered upon the points of sameness and difference between cement and bentonite. There are sixteen papers, eleven in the first meeting and five in the second one. The following studies were read as under, on the first meeting, the role of retardation effect on the safety of high level atomic waste stratum processing, determination of colloid particle diameters by use of fieldflow fractionation, adsorption behavior of uranium, into black mica in granite, masstransfer mechanism of Cs and Se in the compression-bentonite, delay mechanism under conditions of mineral alteration, effects of humus on the behavior of radionuclides in stratum, formation of actinoids - humic acid complex and its effect on adsorption behavior, characteristic properties of water in bentonite, measurement of solubility of uranium and niobium, behavior of colloidal Am in the bentonite, illite - water system, effects of aging deterioration of bentonite on diffusion of nuclides, and on the second meeting, a view of cement materials, chemical behavior and long period stability of cement - relating to Atkinson model -, the present conditions of studies about sorption in cement, chemical properties of pore water in bentonite and interaction of bentonite and nuclides in solid - liquid interface. (S.Y.)

  8. Processing the THOREX waste at the West Valley demonstration project

    Barnes, S.M.; Schiffhauer, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper focuses on several options for neutralizing the THOREX and combining it with the PUREX wastes. Neutralization testing with simulated wastes (nonradioactive chemicals) was performed to evaluate the neutralization reactions and the reaction product generation. Various methods for neutralizing the THOREX solution were examined to determine their advantages and disadvantages relative to the overall project objectives and compatibility with the existing process. The primary neutralization process selection criteria were safety and minimizing the potential delays prior to vitrification. The THOREX neutralization method selected was direct addition to the high pH PUREX wastes within Tank 8D-2. Laboratory testing with simulated waste has demonstrated rapid neutralization of the THOREX waste acid. Test results for various direct addition scenarios has established the optimum process operating conditions which provide the largest safety margins

  9. Overhead remote handling systems for the process facility modifications project

    Wiesener, R.W.; Grover, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Each of the cells in the process facility modifications (PFM) project complex is provided with a variety of general purpose remote handling equipment including bridge cranes, monorail hoist, bridge-mounted electromechanical manipulator (EMM) and an overhead robot used for high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter changeout. This equipment supplements master-slave manipulators (MSMs) located throughout the complex to provide an overall remote handling system capability. The overhead handling equipment is used for fuel and waste material handling operations throughout the process cells. The system also provides the capability for remote replacement of all in-cell process equipment which may fail or be replaced for upgrading during the lifetime of the facility

  10. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant - the project and process systems

    Swenson, L.D.; Miller, W.C.; Smith, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project is scheduled to start construction on the Hanford reservation in southeastern Washington State in 1991. The project will immobilize the liquid high-level defense waste stored there. The HWVP represents the third phase of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities that are focused on the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste, building on the experience of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River site, South Carolina, and of the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP), New York. This sequential approach to disposal of the country's commercial and defense high-level radioactive waste allows HWVP to make extensive use of lessons learned from the experience of its predecessors, using mature designs from the earlier facilities to achieve economies in design and construction costs while enhancing operational effectiveness

  11. Lessons learned in process control at the Halden Reactor Project

    Kennedy, W.G.

    1989-12-01

    This report provides a list of those findings particularly relevant to regulatory authorities that can be derived from the research and development activities in computerized process control conducted at the Halden Reactor Project. The report was prepared by a staff member of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission working at Halden. It identifies those results that may be of use to regulatory organizations in three main areas: as support for new requirements, as part of regulatory evaluations of the acceptability of new methods and techniques, and in exploratory research and development of new approaches to improve operator performance. More than 200 findings arranged in nine major categories are presented. The findings were culled from Halden Reactor Project documents, which are listed in the report

  12. Waste-form development for conversion to portland cement at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55)

    Veazey, G.W.; Schake, A.R.; Shalek, P.D.; Romero, D.A.; Smith, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    The process used at TA-55 to cement transuranic (TRU) waste has experienced several problems with the gypsum-based cement currently being used. Specifically, the waste form could not reliably pass the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) prohibition for free liquid and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) standard for chromium. This report describes the project to develop a portland cement-based waste form that ensures compliance to these standards, as well as other performance standards consisting of homogeneous mixing, moderate hydration temperature, timely initial set, and structural durability. Testing was conducted using the two most common waste streams requiring cementation as of February 1994, lean residue (LR)- and oxalate filtrate (OX)-based evaporator bottoms (EV). A formulation with a pH of 10.3 to 12.1 and a minimum cement-to-liquid (C/L) ratio of 0.80 kg/l for OX-based EV and 0.94 kg/L for LR-based EV was found to pass the performance standards chosen for this project. The implementation of the portland process should result in a yearly cost savings for raw materials of approximately $27,000 over the gypsum process

  13. Design and manufacture NCS instruments for cement factories

    Nguyen Thanh Tuy; Nguyen Tien Dung; Dang Nguyet Anh; Nguyen Phuc; Khuong Thanh Tuan; Luong Duc Long; Pham Trong Quyen

    2003-01-01

    The ministry project 'Design and manufacture some of NCS instruments for cement factories' is a part of instrumentation for cement production in Vietnam. The objectives of the project include: 1/Design and manufacture the automatic control system for cement raw material mixing, connected to components X-ray analyzer through serial port of PC; 2/Design and manufacture the automatic discharge control system using gamma rays. The instruments, made by the project , for controlling the conveyor belt weighing machine can be easily improved for various types of conveyor belt weighing machines. Their mobility and software equipped can be adapted for requirement of modern cement production technology. The instruments are operating well in some cement factories and they are helping in quality control. (NHA)

  14. Power is in the Process: The ACCORD project

    Mhairi Maxwell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ACCORD (Archaeology Community Co-Production of Research Data project worked together with communities to create 3D digital visualisations of heritage. Communities across Scotland chose monuments and sites that were of particular interest to them and then participated in the whole process of creating 3D visualisations of those places (from data-capture, to processing, to archiving together with researchers and heritage professionals. In the main we used consumer-level technology and relatively easy to pick up techniques of photogrammetry and Reflectance Transformation Imaging, while occasionally also using the specialist technique of laser-scanning I was the Post-Doctoral- Research-Assistant on the ACCORD project for 12 months from March 2014 through to 2015 and this article will reflect on my experience of participating in the making of 3D digital visualisations together with ACCORD communities. It argues that there exists in the field of digital heritage an uneasy tension between the current motivation to produce objective computerised visualisations and the actual desire of heritage community groups to connect to the past on a more emotional level. The article revels in the participatory process of making 3D digital visualisations of heritage; its power as a medium for inclusion, exploration and expression. This article should be read with reference to the archive.

  15. The Plasma Hearth Process demonstration project for mixed waste treatment

    Geimer, R.; Dwight, C.; McClellan, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) demonstration project is one of the key technology projects in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Testing to date has yielded encouraging results in displaying potential applications for the PHP technology. Early tests have shown that a wide range of waste materials can be readily processed in the PHP and converted to a vitreous product. Waste materials can be treated in their original container as received at the treatment facility, without pretreatment. The vitreous product, when cooled, exhibits excellent performance in leach resistance, consistently exceeding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) requirements. Performance of the Demonstration System during test operations has been shown to meet emission requirements. An accelerated development phase, being conducted at both bench- and pilot-scale on both nonradioactive and radioactive materials, will confirm the viability of the process. It is anticipated that, as a result of this accelerated technology development and demonstration phase, the PHP will be ready for a final field-level demonstration within three years

  16. Strength improvement of fibre cement product

    Waranya Sonphuak

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to improve the strength or the Modulus of Rupture (MOR of fibre cement. The Six Sigma approach with the DMAIC steps was applied to a case study company. This research started from defining problem, setting the project objective and the project scope. Next, the measurement system was analyzed and the process map was set up. The potential factors of the problem was then determined. Due to there were many factors that affect the MOR, the Cause and Effect Matrix and the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis technique were then used to reduce the number of factors to be studied further. Next, three process factors, which were the pulp slurry freeness, the film-layer thickness, and the pressure step, were optimized using the results from the Box-Behnken experimental design. Other 13 remaining factors were improved by creating or revising the standard work instructions and training the operators. After that, the statistical process control and the control plan were set up to control the production processes. After improvement, the process capability index (Ppk significantly increased from 0.26 to 1.35.

  17. Effects of Coal Gangue on Cement Grouting Material Properties

    Liu, J. Y.; Chen, H. X.

    2018-05-01

    The coal gangue is one of the most abundant industrial solid wastes and pollute source of air and water. The use of coal gangue in the production of cement grouting material comforms to the basic state policy of environment protection and the circular using of natural resources. Through coal gangue processing experiment, coal gangue cement grouting materials making test, properties detection of properties and theoretical analysis, the paper studied the effects of coal gangue on the properties of cement grouting materials. It is found that at the range of 600 to 700 °C, the fluidity and the compressive and flexural strengths of the cement grouting materials increase with the rising up of the calcination temperatures of coal gangue. The optimum calcination temperature is around 700 °C. The part substitution of cement by the calcined coal gangue in the cement grouting material will improve the mechanical properties of the cement grouting material, even thought it will decrease its fluidity. The best substitution amount of cement by coal gangue is about 30%. The fluidity and the long term strength of the ordinary silicate cement grouting material is obviously higher than that of the sulphoaluminate cement one as well as that of the silicate-sulphoaluminate complex cement one.

  18. A Study on the Manufacturing Properties of Crack Self-Healing Capsules Using Cement Powder for Addition to Cement Composites

    Yun-Wang Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated crack self-healing capsules using cement powder for mixing into cement composites and evaluated the properties of the capsule manufacturing process in this study. The manufacture of the self-healing capsules is divided into core production processing of granulating cement in powder form and a coating process for creating a wall on the surfaces of the granulated cement particles. The produced capsules contain unhardened cement and can be mixed directly with the cement composite materials because they are protected from moisture by the wall material. Therefore, the untreated cement is present in the form of a capsule within the cement composite, and hydration can be induced by moisture penetrating the crack surface in the event of cracking. In the process of granulating the cement, it is important to obtain a suitable consistency through the kneading agent and to maintain the moisture barrier performance of the wall material. We can utilize the results of this study as a basis for advanced self-healing capsule technology for cement composites.

  19. The differences between soil grouting with cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry

    Zhu, Mingting; Sui, Haitong; Yang, Honglu

    2018-01-01

    Cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry are the most widely applied for soil grouting reinforcement project. The viscosity change of cement slurry is negligible during grouting period and presumed to be time-independent while the viscosity of cement-water glass slurry increases with time quickly and is presumed to be time-dependent. Due to the significantly rheology differences between them, the grouting quality and the increasing characteristics of grouting parameters may be different, such as grouting pressure, grouting surrounding rock pressure, i.e., the change of surrounding rock pressure deduced by grouting pressure. Those are main factors for grouting design. In this paper, a large-scale 3D grouting simulation device was developed to simulate the surrounding curtain grouting for a tunnel. Two series of surrounding curtain grouting experiments under different geo-stress of 100 kPa, 150 kPa and 200 kPa were performed. The overload test on tunnel was performed to evaluate grouting effect of all surrounding curtain grouting experiments. In the present results, before 240 seconds, the grouting pressure increases slowly for both slurries; after 240 seconds the increase rate of grouting pressure for cement-water glass slurry increases quickly while that for cement slurry remains roughly constant. The increasing trend of grouting pressure for cement-water glass is similar to its viscosity. The setting time of cement-water glass slurry obtained from laboratory test is less than that in practical grouting where grout slurry solidifies in soil. The grouting effect of cement-water glass slurry is better than that of cement slurry and the grouting quality decreases with initial pressure.

  20. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers

    Peters, Susan; Kromhout, Hans; Thomassen, Yngvar; Fechter-Rink, Edeltraud

    2009-01-01

    A case study was carried out in 2006-2007 to assess the actual cement dust exposure among construction workers involved in a full-scale construction project and as a comparison among workers involved in various stages of cement and concrete production. Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed for several job types. Inhalable dust and cement dust (based on analysis of elemental calcium) concentrations were determined. Inhalable dust exposures at the construction site ranged from 0.05 to 34 mg/m3, with a mean concentration of 1.0 mg/m3. For inhalable cement dust mean exposure was 0.3 mg/m3 (range 0.02-17 mg/m3). Reinforcement and pouring workers had the lowest average concentrations. Inhalable dust levels in the ready-mix and pre-cast concrete plants were, on average, below 0.5 mg/m3 for inhalable dust and below 0.2 mg/m3 for inhalable cement dust. Highest dust concentrations were measured in cement production, particularly during cleaning tasks (inhalable dust GM=55 mg/m3; inhalable cement dust GM=33 mg/m3) at which point the workers wore personal protective equipment. Elemental measurements showed highest but very variable cement percentages in the cement plant and very low percentages of cement during reinforcement work and pouring.

  1. Extension of moment projection method to the fragmentation process

    Wu, Shaohua; Yapp, Edward K.Y.; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian; Xu, Rong; Yang, Wenming; Kraft, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The method of moments is a simple but efficient method of solving the population balance equation which describes particle dynamics. Recently, the moment projection method (MPM) was proposed and validated for particle inception, coagulation, growth and, more importantly, shrinkage; here the method is extended to include the fragmentation process. The performance of MPM is tested for 13 different test cases for different fragmentation kernels, fragment distribution functions and initial conditions. Comparisons are made with the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), hybrid method of moments (HMOM) and a high-precision stochastic solution calculated using the established direct simulation algorithm (DSA) and advantages of MPM are drawn.

  2. Defense waste processing facility project at the Savannah River Plant

    Baxter, R.G.; Maher, R.; Mellen, J.B.; Shafranek, L.F.; Stevens, W.R. III.

    1984-01-01

    The Du Pont Company is building for the Department of Energy a facility to vitrify high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will solidify existing and future radioactive wastes produced by defense activities at the site. At the present time engineering and design are 45% complete, the site has been cleared, and startup is expected in 1989. This paper will describe project status as well as features of the design. 9 figures

  3. Extension of moment projection method to the fragmentation process

    Wu, Shaohua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Yapp, Edward K.Y.; Akroyd, Jethro; Mosbach, Sebastian [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Xu, Rong [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore); Yang, Wenming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Block EA, Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Kraft, Markus, E-mail: mk306@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2017-04-15

    The method of moments is a simple but efficient method of solving the population balance equation which describes particle dynamics. Recently, the moment projection method (MPM) was proposed and validated for particle inception, coagulation, growth and, more importantly, shrinkage; here the method is extended to include the fragmentation process. The performance of MPM is tested for 13 different test cases for different fragmentation kernels, fragment distribution functions and initial conditions. Comparisons are made with the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), hybrid method of moments (HMOM) and a high-precision stochastic solution calculated using the established direct simulation algorithm (DSA) and advantages of MPM are drawn.

  4. Secondary fuels and raw materials in the Spanish cement industry

    Gordobil, J.C.U.; Guede, Elena [Cementos Lemona s.a. (Spain)

    1997-03-01

    The growing environmental and energy concern are having an impact on the Spanish cement industry. This article describes the impact on waste management, the operation of cement kilns and the possibility for recycling. Current projects and future prospects are described. (UK)

  5. Evaluation of cement treated base courses : technical assistance report.

    2000-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to determine the strength characteristics of soil cement bases that were constructed under stabilized procedures (DOTD TR 432M/432-99) and the cement treated design philosophy. This was accomplished by using the Fal...

  6. Examination of solidified and stabilized matrices as a result of solidification and stabilization process of arseniccontaining sludge with portland cement and lime

    Tanapon Phenrat

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available By solidification and stabilization (S/S with Portland cement and lime, it is possible to reduce arsenic concentration in leachate of the arsenic-containing sludge from arsenic removal process by coagulation with ferric chloride. From the initial arsenic concentration in leachate of unsolidified /unstabilized sludge which was around 20.75 mg/L, the arsenic concentrations in leachate of solidified/stabilized waste were reduced to 0.3, 0.58, 1.09, and 1.85 mg/L for the waste-to-binder ratios of 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, and 1, respectively, due tothe formation of insoluble calcium-arsenic compounds. To be more cost effective for the future, alternative uses of these S/S products were also assessed by measurement of compressive strength of the mortar specimens. It was found that the compressive strengths of these matrices were from 28 ksc to 461 ksc. In conclusion, considering compressive strength and leachability of the solidified matrices, some of these solidified/ stabilized products have potential to serve as an interlocking concrete paving block.

  7. Cementation and solidification of miscellaneous mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site produces a variety of wastes which are amenable to micro-encapsulation in cement Portland cement is an inexpensive and readily available material for this application. The Waste Projects (WP) group at Rocky Flats evaluated cementation to determine its effectiveness in encapsulating several wastes. These included waste analytical laboratory solutions, incinerator ash, hydroxide precipitation sludge, and an acidic solution from the Delphi process (a chemical oxidation technology being evaluated as an alternative to incineration). WP prepared surrogate wastes and conducted designed experiments to optimize the cement formulation for the waste streams. These experiments used a Taguchi or factorial experimental design, interactions between the variables were also considered in the testing. Surrogate waste samples were spiked with various levels of each of six Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed metals (Cd, Cr, Ba, Pb, Ni, and Ag), cemented using the optimized formulation, and analyzed for leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The metal spike levels chosen were based on characterization data, and also based on an estimate of the highest levels of contaminants suspected in the waste. This paper includes laboratory test results for each waste studied. These include qualitative observations as well as quantitative data from TCLP analyses and environmental cycling studies. The results from these experiments show that cement stabilization of the different wastes can produce final waste forms which meet the current RCRA Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements. Formulations that resulted in LDR compliant waste forms are provided. The volume increases associated with cementation are also lower than anticipated. Future work will include verification studies with actual mixed radioactive waste as well as additional formulation development studies on other waste streams

  8. Pre-cementation of deep shaft

    Heinz, W. F.

    1988-12-01

    Pre-cementation or pre-grouting of deep shafts in South Africa is an established technique to improve safety and reduce water ingress during shaft sinking. The recent completion of several pre-cementation projects for shafts deeper than 1000m has once again highlighted the effectiveness of pre-grouting of shafts utilizing deep slimline boreholes and incorporating wireline technique for drilling and conventional deep borehole grouting techniques for pre-cementation. Pre-cementation of deep shaft will: (i) Increase the safety of shaft sinking operation (ii) Minimize water and gas inflow during shaft sinking (iii) Minimize the time lost due to additional grouting operations during sinking of the shaft and hence minimize costly delays and standing time of shaft sinking crews and equipment. (iv) Provide detailed information of the geology of the proposed shaft site. Informations on anomalies, dykes, faults as well as reef (gold bearing conglomerates) intersections can be obtained from the evaluation of cores of the pre-cementation boreholes. (v) Provide improved rock strength for excavations in the immediate vicinity of the shaft area. The paper describes pre-cementation techniques recently applied successfully from surface and some conclusions drawn for further considerations.

  9. Steam gasification of coal, project prototype plant nuclear process heat

    Heek, K.H. van

    1982-05-01

    This report describes the tasks, which Bergbau-Forschung has carried out in the field of steam gasification of coal in cooperation with partners and contractors during the reference phase of the project. On the basis of the status achieved to date it can be stated, that the mode of operation of the gas-generator developed including the direct feeding of caking high volatile coal is technically feasible. Moreover through-put can be improved by 65% at minimum by using catalysts. On the whole industrial application of steam gasification - WKV - using nuclear process heat stays attractive compared with other gasification processes. Not only coal is conserved but also the costs of the gas manufactured are favourable. As confirmed by recent economic calculations these are 20 to 25% lower. (orig.) [de

  10. Understanding and Managing Process Interaction in IS Development Projects

    Bygstad, Bendik; Nielsen, Peter Axel

    2012-01-01

    Software-based information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a major challenge, since business change and the development of software-based information systems usually are performed in separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage...... critical events in the case, what led to the events, and what the consequences are. We discuss the implications for information systems research and in particular we discuss the contribution to project management of iterative and incremental software development.......Software-based information systems must be developed and implemented as a part of business change. This is a major challenge, since business change and the development of software-based information systems usually are performed in separate processes. Thus, there is a need to understand and manage...

  11. Integrated project scheduling and staff assignment with controllable processing times.

    Fernandez-Viagas, Victor; Framinan, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses a decision problem related to simultaneously scheduling the tasks in a project and assigning the staff to these tasks, taking into account that a task can be performed only by employees with certain skills, and that the length of each task depends on the number of employees assigned. This type of problems usually appears in service companies, where both tasks scheduling and staff assignment are closely related. An integer programming model for the problem is proposed, together with some extensions to cope with different situations. Additionally, the advantages of the controllable processing times approach are compared with the fixed processing times. Due to the complexity of the integrated model, a simple GRASP algorithm is implemented in order to obtain good, approximate solutions in short computation times.

  12. Integrated Project Scheduling and Staff Assignment with Controllable Processing Times

    Victor Fernandez-Viagas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a decision problem related to simultaneously scheduling the tasks in a project and assigning the staff to these tasks, taking into account that a task can be performed only by employees with certain skills, and that the length of each task depends on the number of employees assigned. This type of problems usually appears in service companies, where both tasks scheduling and staff assignment are closely related. An integer programming model for the problem is proposed, together with some extensions to cope with different situations. Additionally, the advantages of the controllable processing times approach are compared with the fixed processing times. Due to the complexity of the integrated model, a simple GRASP algorithm is implemented in order to obtain good, approximate solutions in short computation times.

  13. Advanced cementation concepts

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  14. 75 FR 7303 - Drake Cement, LLC-Acquisition Exemption-Clarkdale Arizona Central Railroad, LLC

    2010-02-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [STB Finance Docket No. 35350] Drake Cement, LLC--Acquisition Exemption--Clarkdale Arizona Central Railroad, LLC Drake Cement, LLC (DC), a..., Drake Switching Company, LLC --Operation Exemption-- Drake Cement, LLC. DC certifies that the projected...

  15. A practical data processing workflow for multi-OMICS projects.

    Kohl, Michael; Megger, Dominik A; Trippler, Martin; Meckel, Hagen; Ahrens, Maike; Bracht, Thilo; Weber, Frank; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Baba, Hideo A; Sitek, Barbara; Schlaak, Jörg F; Meyer, Helmut E; Stephan, Christian; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Multi-OMICS approaches aim on the integration of quantitative data obtained for different biological molecules in order to understand their interrelation and the functioning of larger systems. This paper deals with several data integration and data processing issues that frequently occur within this context. To this end, the data processing workflow within the PROFILE project is presented, a multi-OMICS project that aims on identification of novel biomarkers and the development of new therapeutic targets for seven important liver diseases. Furthermore, a software called CrossPlatformCommander is sketched, which facilitates several steps of the proposed workflow in a semi-automatic manner. Application of the software is presented for the detection of novel biomarkers, their ranking and annotation with existing knowledge using the example of corresponding Transcriptomics and Proteomics data sets obtained from patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma. Additionally, a linear regression analysis of Transcriptomics vs. Proteomics data is presented and its performance assessed. It was shown, that for capturing profound relations between Transcriptomics and Proteomics data, a simple linear regression analysis is not sufficient and implementation and evaluation of alternative statistical approaches are needed. Additionally, the integration of multivariate variable selection and classification approaches is intended for further development of the software. Although this paper focuses only on the combination of data obtained from quantitative Proteomics and Transcriptomics experiments, several approaches and data integration steps are also applicable for other OMICS technologies. Keeping specific restrictions in mind the suggested workflow (or at least parts of it) may be used as a template for similar projects that make use of different high throughput techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post

  16. Management of uranium mining and processing wastes at Turamdih project

    Puri, R.C.; Verma, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Based on environmental impact assessment, comprehensive plan for management of wastes has been drawn up. No solid waste from the mine is being disposed off outside the project area. The quantity of waste generated after processing of ore is large because of low content of uranium in the ore. A big tailings pond has been planned in specially selected suitable valley near the plant. No liquid effluents are to be discharged into general surrounding environment. Mine water is to be fed to the process plant. Effluents from tailings pond will be collected in a storage cum evaporation pond. All water from different zones of the project shall be collected in zonal ponds and then pumped to tailings effluent storage pond. All the ponds will be provided with requisite impervious liners. The effluents of the storage pond will be treated for removal of radium and manganese and discharged into monitoring pond. Large surface areas for various ponds are envisaged to take advantage of evaporation with aim for zero discharge. To reduce impact from gaseous emissions, high efficiency dust suppression and extraction systems shall be provided. High stacks have been incorporated for DG set, boiler plants, sulphuric acid plant and dust extraction systems for crushing and grinding section and the quality of discharges will be very much within the prescribed limits. The paper describes the management plan in detail. (author)

  17. Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)

    Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

    1997-11-14

    Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

  18. Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)

    Hsu, R.H.; Oji, L.N.

    1997-01-01

    Under the Tritium Facility Modernization ampersand Consolidation (TFM ampersand C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM ampersand C Project also provides for a new replacement R ampersand D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H

  19. A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices

    Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1994-03-01

    The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties

  20. Design of remote handled process assemblies for the process facility modifications project

    Smets, J.L.; Ajifu, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The modular design philosophy for the process facility modification project utilizes an integrated design of components to facilitate operations and maintenance of nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment in a hot cell environment. The utilization of a matrix of remoteable base frames combines with process equipment designed as remote assemblies and sub-assemblies has simplified the overall design. Modularity will allow future flexibility while providing advantages for construction and maintenance in the initial installation

  1. Micropore characteristics of organic matter pools in cemented and non-cemented podzolic horizons

    Catoni, M.; D'amico, M.E.; Mittelmeijer-Hazeleger, M.C.; Rothenberg, G.; Bonifacio, E.

    2014-01-01

    In Podzols, organic matter (OM) is stabilized mainly by interaction with minerals, as a direct consequence of pedogenic processes. Metal-organic associations strongly affect OM surface features, particularly microporosity. Cemented ortstein horizons (CM) may form during podzolization, accompanied by

  2. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. Because hydraulic cement requires a chemical hydration reaction for setting and hardening, it is subject to potential interactions between elements in the waste and binder that can retard or prevent solidification. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above its melting point, combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991

  3. Analysis of rheological properties of bone cements.

    Nicholas, M K D; Waters, M G J; Holford, K M; Adusei, G

    2007-07-01

    The rheological properties of three commercially available bone cements, CMW 1, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC, were investigated. Testing was undertaken at both 25 and 37 degrees C using an oscillating parallel plate rheometer. Results showed that the three high viscosity cements exhibited distinct differences in curing rate, with CMW 1 curing in 8.7 min, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC in 13 min at 25 degrees C. Furthermore it was found that these curing rates were strongly temperature dependent, with curing rates being halved at 37 degrees C. By monitoring the change of viscosity with time over the entire curing process, the results showed that these cements had differing viscosity profiles and hence exhibit very different handling characteristics. However, all the cements reached the same maximum viscosity of 75 x 10(3) Pa s. Also, the change in elastic/viscous moduli and tan delta with time, show the cements changing from a viscous material to an elastic solid with a clear peak in the viscous modulus during the latter stages of curing. These results give valuable information about the changes in rheological properties for each commercial bone cement, especially during the final curing process.

  4. Behind the scenes: A medical natural language processing project.

    Wu, Joy T; Dernoncourt, Franck; Gehrmann, Sebastian; Tyler, Patrick D; Moseley, Edward T; Carlson, Eric T; Grant, David W; Li, Yeran; Welt, Jonathan; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2018-04-01

    Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) capabilities in medicine can help address many pressing problems in healthcare. However, AI research endeavors in healthcare may not be clinically relevant, may have unrealistic expectations, or may not be explicit enough about their limitations. A diverse and well-functioning multidisciplinary team (MDT) can help identify appropriate and achievable AI research agendas in healthcare, and advance medical AI technologies by developing AI algorithms as well as addressing the shortage of appropriately labeled datasets for machine learning. In this paper, our team of engineers, clinicians and machine learning experts share their experience and lessons learned from their two-year-long collaboration on a natural language processing (NLP) research project. We highlight specific challenges encountered in cross-disciplinary teamwork, dataset creation for NLP research, and expectation setting for current medical AI technologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Strength properties of sandy soil-cement admixtures

    Sara Rios; António Joaquim Pereira Viana Da Fonseca

    2009-01-01

    This paper will focus on the sensitivity of strength and stiffness properties of silty-sands, from granitic residual soil, which can be converted to a highly improved material if stabilized with cement. The study of soil stabilization with cement demands to quantify the influence of the cement percentage, porosity and water content adopted in the admixing process for different stresses and physical states. Firstly, this influence was quantified in terms of the unconfined strength and maximum ...

  6. Macro-defect free cements. State of art

    Holanda, J.N.F.; Povoa, G.E.A.M.; Souza, G.P.; Pinatti, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to prevent a state of art about macro-defect-free cement pastes (MDF cement ) of high mechanical strength. This new type of cement paste is obtained through addition of a water-soluble polymer, followed by intense shear mixing and application of low compacting pressure. It is presented fundamental aspects related to the processing of this MDF paste, as well as its main properties and applications are discussed. (author)

  7. A positron annihilation study on the hydration of cement pastes

    Consolati, G.; Quasso, F.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy experiments were carried out in various ordinary Portland cement pastes, in an attempt to monitor the porosity of the pastes. It is found that positronium intensity is well correlated to the time evolution of the total porosity and it is influenced by the water-to-cement ratio. This parameter is also sensitive to the delayed hydration process induced by adding methanol to the water-cement mixture

  8. Use sulfoferritic cements in construction

    Samchenko, Svetlana V.; Zorin, Dmitriy A.

    2018-03-01

    Currently, high-rise construction has received increasing attention around the world. In the big cities under construction is less space and one solution is the high-rise construction. However, high-rise buildings use special requirements, such as strength, thermal insulation, wind load and others. When concrete is exposed to continuous loads by wind or to mechanical loads, it undergoes abrasion. Resistance to this process depends on the characteristics of materials that the concrete and finishing seams are made of. Research on increasing impact and abrasion resistance of calcium sulfoferrite-based cement stone from the perspective of formation of cement stone structure will be instrumental in developing durable materials for application in high-rise construction.

  9. The density of cement phases

    Balonis, M.; Glasser, F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The densities of principal crystalline phases occurring in Portland cement are critically assessed and tabulated, in some cases with addition of new data. A reliable and self-consistent density set for crystalline phases was obtained by calculating densities from crystallographic data and unit cell contents. Independent laboratory work was undertaken to synthesize major AFm and AFt cement phases, determine their unit cell parameters and compare the results with those recorded in the literature. Parameters were refined from powder diffraction patterns using CELREF 2 software. A density value is presented for each phase, showing literature sources, in some cases describing limitations on the data, and the weighting attached to numerical values where an averaging process was used for accepted data. A brief discussion is made of the consequences of the packing of water to density changes in AFm and AFt structures.

  10. Immobilisation of MTR waste in cement (product evaluation). Final report. December 1987

    Howard, C.G.; Lee, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The enriched uranium/aluminium fuel used in Material Testing Reactors is reprocessed at Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment (DNE). The main chemical component of the liquid waste produced by this process is acid deficient aluminium nitrate. This is stored in stainless steel tanks at DNE. As a result of work carried out under the UKAEA radioactive waste management programme a decision was taken to immobilise the waste in cement. The programme had two main components, plant design and development of the cementation process. The plant for the cementation of MTR waste is under construction and will be commissioned in 1988/9. The primary objective of this project is to find a suitable process for changing the highly mobile radioactive waste into an inert stable solid. Work carried out on the development of the immobilisation process showed that a conditioning stage (neutralisation) is required to make the acid waste compatible with cement. Small scale experiments showed that adding Ordinary Portland Cement blended with ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag to Simulant MTR Liquor produces an acceptable product. The process has been demonstrated at full scale (200 litres) and the products have been subjected to an extensive programme of destructive and non-destructive testing. Specimens have been tested up to 1200 days after manufacture and show no significant signs of deterioration even when stored underwater or when subjected to freeze thaw cycling. Development work has also shown that the process can successfully immobilise simulant MTR liquor over a wide range of liquor concentrations. The programme therefore successfully produced a formulation that met all the requirements of both the process and product specification. (author)

  11. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  12. Radioactive waste cementation

    Soriano B, A.

    1996-01-01

    This research was carried out to develop the most adequate technique to immobilize low and medium-activity radioactive waste. different brands of national cement were used, portland and pozzolanic cement. Prismatic and cylindrical test tubes were prepared with different water/cement (W/C) relationship. Additives such a as clay and bentonite were added in some other cases. Later, the properties of these test tubes were evaluated. Properties such as: mechanical resistance, immersion resistance, lixiviation and porosity resistance. Cement with the highest mechanical resistance values, 62,29 MPa was pozzolanic cement for a W/C relationship of 0,35. It must be mentioned that the other types of cements reached a mechanical resistance over 10 MPa, a value indicated by the international standards for transportation and storage of low and medium-activity radioactive waste at a superficial level. However, in the case of immersion resistance, Sol cement (portland type I) with a W/C relationship of 0,35 reached a compression resistance over 61,92 MPa; as in the previous cases, the other cements reached a mechanical resistance > 10 MPa. Regarding porosity, working with W/C relationships = 0,35 0,40 and 0,45, without additives and with additives, the percentage of porosity found for all cements is lower than 40% percentage indicated by international standards. With regard to the lixiviation test, pozzolanic cement best retained Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60, and increased its advantages when bentonite was added, obtaining a lixiviation rate of 2,02 x E-6 cm/day. Sol cement also improved its properties when bentonite was added and obtained a lixiviation rate of 2,84 x E-6 cm/day for Cesium-137. However, Cobalt-60 is almost completely retained with the 3 types of cement with or without additives, reaching the limits indicated by the international standards for the lixiviation rate of beta-gamma emitter < 5,00E-4 cm/day. Characterizing the final product involves the knowledge of its

  13. Soft sensor for real-time cement fineness estimation.

    Stanišić, Darko; Jorgovanović, Nikola; Popov, Nikola; Čongradac, Velimir

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of soft sensors to estimate cement fineness. Soft sensors are mathematical models that use available data to provide real-time information on process variables when the information, for whatever reason, is not available by direct measurement. In this application, soft sensors are used to provide information on process variable normally provided by off-line laboratory tests performed at large time intervals. Cement fineness is one of the crucial parameters that define the quality of produced cement. Providing real-time information on cement fineness using soft sensors can overcome limitations and problems that originate from a lack of information between two laboratory tests. The model inputs were selected from candidate process variables using an information theoretic approach. Models based on multi-layer perceptrons were developed, and their ability to estimate cement fineness of laboratory samples was analyzed. Models that had the best performance, and capacity to adopt changes in the cement grinding circuit were selected to implement soft sensors. Soft sensors were tested using data from a continuous cement production to demonstrate their use in real-time fineness estimation. Their performance was highly satisfactory, and the sensors proved to be capable of providing valuable information on cement grinding circuit performance. After successful off-line tests, soft sensors were implemented and installed in the control room of a cement factory. Results on the site confirm results obtained by tests conducted during soft sensor development. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of GIS technologies to facilitate the transportation project programming process.

    2008-05-01

    Transportation project programming in a transportation agency is a process of matching : potential projects with available funds to accomplish the agencys mission and goals of a : given period of time. Result of this process is normally a transpor...

  15. In-situ Mechanical Manipulation of Wellbore Cements as a Solution to Leaky Wells

    Kupresan, D.; Radonjic, M.; Heathman, J.

    2013-12-01

    mechanical manipulation (shear stress). The main advantage of this methodology is that mechanical manipulation of cement can induce healing of existing fractures, channels and microannulus seal in a wellbore without introducing new materials (e.g. cement squeeze jobs). Furthermore, this methodology is less sensitive to the influence of downhole conditions such as pressure, temperature and formation fluids, since it uses cement pore water as a medium to alter cement sheath. Based on lab experiments observation, it is possible to perceive that once tested at the industrial scale and if successful, the implementation of this method in the field can potentially mitigate leaky wells in CO2 sequestration projects, wellbores completed for hydraulic-fracturing and other conventional oil and gas producing wells. Key words: Wellbore cement integrity; Leaky wells; Cement microstructures; Casing expansion effect on cement mineralogy alterations.

  16. VUJE experience with cementation of liquid and wet radioactive waste

    Kravarik, Kamil; Holicka, Zuzana; Pekar, Anton; Zatkulak, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Liquid and wet LLW generated during operation as well as decommissioning of NPPs is treated with different methods and fixed in a suitable fixation matrix so that a final product meets required criteria for its disposal in a final repository. Cementation is an important process used for fixation of liquid and wet radioactive waste such as concentrate, spent resins and sludge. Active cement grout is also used for fixation of low level solid radioactive waste loaded in final packing containers. VUJE Inc. has been engaged in research of cementation for long. The laboratory for analyzing radioactive waste properties, prescription of cementation formulation and estimation of final cement product properties has been established. Experimental, semi-production cementation plant has been built to optimize operation parameters of cementation. VUJE experience with cementation of liquid and wet LLW is described in the presented paper. VUJE has assisted in commissioning of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. Cement formulations for treatment of concentrate, spent resins and sludge have been developed. Research studies on the stability of a final concrete packaging container for disposal in repository have been performed. Gained experience has been further utilized for design and manufacture of several cementation plants for treatment of various liquid and wet LLW. Their main technological and technical parameters as well as characterization of treated waste are described in the paper. Applications include the Mochovce Final Treatment Centre, Movable Cementation Facility utilizing in-drum mixing for treatment of sludge, Cementation Facility for treatment of tritiated water in Latvia and Cementation Facility for fixation of liquid and solid institutional radioactive waste in Bulgaria, which utilizes lost stirrer mixer. (author)

  17. Photoactive glazed polymer-cement composite

    Baltes, Liana; Patachia, Silvia; Tierean, Mircea; Ekincioglu, Ozgur; Ozkul, Hulusi M.

    2018-04-01

    Macro defect free cements (MDF), a kind of polymer-cement composites, are characterized by remarkably high mechanical properties. Their flexural strengths are 20-30 times higher than those of conventional cement pastes, nearly equal to that of an ordinary steel. The main drawback of MDF cements is their sensitivity to water. This paper presents a method to both diminish the negative impact of water on MDF cements mechanical properties and to enlarge their application by conferring photoactivity. These tasks were solved by glazing MDF cement with an ecological glaze containing nano-particles of TiO2. Efficiency of photocatalytic activity of this material was tested against methylene blue aqueous solution (4.4 mg/L). Influence of the photocatalyst concentration in the glaze paste and of the contact time on the photocatalysis process (efficiency and kinetic) was studied. The best obtained photocatalysis yield was of 97.35%, after 8 h of exposure to 254 nm UV radiation when used an MDF glazed with 10% TiO2 in the enamel paste. Surface of glazed material was characterized by optic microscopy, scratch test, SEM, XRD, and EDS. All these properties were correlated with the aesthetic aspect of the glazed surface aiming to propose using of this material for sustainable construction development.

  18. Development of a biodegradable bone cement

    Yusof Abdullah; Nurhaslinda Ee Abdullah; Wee Pee Chai; Norita Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradable bone cement is a newly developed bone repair material, which is able to give immediate support to the implant area, and does not obstruct the bone repairing and regeneration process through appropriate biodegradation rate, which is synchronized with the mechanical load it should bear. The purpose of this study is to locally produce biodegradable bone cement using HA as absorbable filler. The cement is composed of an absorbable filler and unsaturated polyester for 100% degradation. Cross-linking effect is achieved through the action of poly (vinyl pyrrol lidone) (PVP) and an initiator. On the other hand, PPF was synthesized using direct esterification method. Characteristics of the bone cement were studied; these included the curing time, cross-linking effect and curing temperature. The products were characterized using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) to perform phase analysis and Scanning Electrons Microscopes to determine the morphology. The physical and mechanical properties of the bone cement were also investigated. The biocompatibility of the bone cement was tested using simulated body physiological solution. (Author)

  19. Solidification and performance of cement doped with phenol

    Vipulanandan, C.; Krishnan, S.

    1991-01-01

    Treating mixed hazardous wastes using the solidification/stabilization technology is becoming a critical element in waste management planning. The effect of phenol, a primary constituent in many hazardous wastes, on the setting and solidification process of Type I Portland cement was evaluated. The leachability of phenol from solidified cement matrix (TCLP test) and changes in mechanical properties were studied after curing times up to 28 days. The changes in cement hydration products due to phenol were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) powder technique. Results show that phenol interferes with initial cement hydration by reducing the formation of calcium hydroxide and also reduces the compressive strength of cement. A simple model has been proposed to quantify the phenol leached from the cement matrix during the leachate test

  20. Design of Fit-for-Purpose Cement to Restore Cement-Caprock Seal Integrity

    Provost, R.

    2015-12-01

    This project aims to study critical research needs in the area of rock-cement interfaces, with a special focus on crosscutting applications in the Wellbore Integrity Pillar of the SubTER initiative. This study will focus on design and test fit-for-purpose cement formulations. The goals of this project are as follows: 1) perform preliminary study of dispersing nanomaterial admixtures in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) mixes, 2) characterize the cement-rock interface, and 3) identify potential high-performance cement additives that can improve sorption behavior, chemical durability, bond strength, and interfacial fracture toughness, as appropriate to specific subsurface operational needs. The work presented here focuses on a study of cement-shale interfaces to better understand failure mechanisms, with particular attention to measuring bond strength at the cement-shale interface. Both experimental testing and computational modeling were conducted to determine the mechanical behavior at the interface representing the interaction of cement and shale of a typical wellbore environment. Cohesive zone elements are used in the finite element method to computationally simulate the interface of the cement and rock materials with varying properties. Understanding the bond strength and mechanical performance of the cement-formation interface is critical to wellbore applications such as sequestration, oil and gas production and exploration and nuclear waste disposal. Improved shear bond strength is an indication of the capability of the interface to ensure zonal isolation and prevent zonal communication, two crucial goals in preserving wellbore integrity. Understanding shear bond strength development and interface mechanics will provide an idea as to how the cement-formation interface can be altered under environmental changes (temperature, pressure, chemical degradation, etc.) so that the previously described objectives can be achieved. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi

  1. The Mechanism of Disintegration of Cement Concrete at High Temperatures

    Jocius Vytautas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a composite material composed of a binder, aggregates, water and additives. Mixing of cement with water results in a number of chemical reactions known as cement hydration. Heating of concrete results in dehydration processes of cement minerals and new hydration products, which disintegrate the microstructure of concrete. This article reviews results of research conducted with Portland and alumina cement with conventional and refractory concrete aggregates. In civic buildings such common fillers as gravel, granite, dolomite or expanded clay are usually used. It is important to point out the differences between fillers because they constitute the majority of the concrete volume.

  2. Conceptual project of waste treatment plant of CDTN

    Gabriel, J.L.; Astolfi, D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual project of the waste treatment plant of CDTN. Several areas, such as: process area, material entrance and exit area are studied. The treatment processes are: evaporation, filtration, cementation, cutting and processing of solid wastes. (C.M.)

  3. the Danish cement industry

    la Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Møllgård, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We test econometrically whether the sole Danish producer of cement holds a dominant position in the Danish market for (grey) cement. In import penetration tests, we find that its pricing and quantity decisions are independent of import price and quantity, implying that it can act to a considerable extent independently of its competitors. We also test whether it can act independently of its customers and find that its demand is inelastic with respect to its price. It thus holds a dominant posi...

  4. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  5. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement

  6. Upgrading of oil palm wastes by radiation processing - project review

    Nahrul Khair Alang Md Rashid

    1998-01-01

    Early works on oil palm waste treatment at MINT started in 1984 with the objective of degrading EFB (Empty Fruit Bunches) by radiation. This idea was shared by JAERI that adopted the research project with MINT in 1986 under the Japanese Science and Technology Agency (STA) programme. The results of these preliminary works show that EFB can be degraded using gamma radiation at a dose of ranging from 500 to 1000 kGy - 50 to 100 times higher than what is considered to be the economic dose. It is generally accepted that the economics of radiation treatment process could only be realised if the treatment dose can be kept below 10 kGy, which was incidentally, during the course of this early works, found to be the pasteurisation dose for oil palm by - products. With these information, MINT and JAERI agreed to pursue further research in this area and formulated a bilateral research co-operation in radiation pasteurisation of EFB and subsequent degradation by cellulolytic fungi or mushrooms. The research has the objective of upgrading EFB, which was not considered as suitable for feed due to its known physical properties as coarse and highly fibrous, to animal feed as well as substrate for mushroom cultivation and enzyme production. In addition to the desire to provide an environment friendly method for waste disposal to a growing industry, the possibility of catalysing the development of livestock industry by commercial farming in the process is another motivation for this project. Malaysia is estimated to be only about 40% self-sufficient in beef production. Thus there is great opportunity for the growth and expansion of this industry in Malaysia. However, growth in ruminant population should not result in the alienation of land for pastures. Among the reasons for the lack of interest in livestock production through commercial farming is the unavailability of local feed material which could be cheaper than imported feed grains, particularly maize. Feed is one the main cost

  7. Upgrading of oil palm wastes by radiation processing - project review

    Alang Md Rashid, Nahrul Khair [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi (Malaysia)

    1998-07-01

    Early works on oil palm waste treatment at MINT started in 1984 with the objective of degrading EFB (Empty Fruit Bunches) by radiation. This idea was shared by JAERI that adopted the research project with MINT in 1986 under the Japanese Science and Technology Agency (STA) programme. The results of these preliminary works show that EFB can be degraded using gamma radiation at a dose of ranging from 500 to 1000 kGy - 50 to 100 times higher than what is considered to be the economic dose. It is generally accepted that the economics of radiation treatment process could only be realised if the treatment dose can be kept below 10 kGy, which was incidentally, during the course of this early works, found to be the pasteurisationdose for oil palm by - products. With these information, MINT and JAERI agreed to pursue further research in this area and formulated a bilateral research co-operation in radiation pasteurisation of EFB and subsequent degradation by cellulolytic fungi or mushrooms. The research has the objective of upgrading EFB, which was not considered as suitable for feed due to its known physical properties as coarse and highly fibrous, to animal feed as well as substrate for mushroom cultivation and enzyme production. In addition to the desire to provide an environment friendly method for waste disposal to a growing industry, the possibility of catalysing the development of livestock industry by commercial farming in the process is another motivation for this project. Malaysia is estimated to be only about 40% self-sufficient in beef production. Thus there is great opportunity for the growth and expansion of this industry in Malaysia. However, growth in ruminant population should not result in the alienation of land for pastures. Among the reasons for the lack of interest in livestock production through commercial farming is the unavailability of local feed material which could be cheaper than imported feed grains, particularly maize. Feed is one the main cost

  8. Cementation of wastes with boric acid

    Tello, Cledola C.O.; Haucz, Maria Judite A.; Alves, Lilian J.L.; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear power plants (PWR) are generated wastes, such as concentrate, which comes from the evaporation of liquid radioactive wastes, and spent resins. Both have boron in their composition. The cementation process is one of the options to solidify these wastes, but the boron has a negative effect on the setting of the cement mixture. In this paper are presented the experiments that are being carried out in order to overcome this problem and also to improve the efficiency of the process. Simulated wastes were cemented using additives (clays, admixtures etc.). In the process and product is being evaluated the effect of the amount, type and addition order of the materials. The mixtures were selected in accordance with their workability and incorporated waste. The solidified products are monolithic without free water with a good mechanical resistance. (author)

  9. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator's console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A

  10. Cementation of the solid radioactive waste with polymer-cement solutions using the method of impregnation

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of solid radioactive waste (SRW), i.e. inclusion of solid radioactive waste into cement matrix without cavities - is one of the main technological processes used for conditioning low and intermediate level radioactive waste. At FSUE 'Radon' the industrialized method of impregnation has been developed and since 2003 has been using for cementation of solid radioactive waste. The technology is that the polymer-cement solution, having high penetrating properties, is supplied under pressure through a tube to the bottom of the container in which solid radioactive waste has preliminarily been placed. The polymer-cement solution is evenly moving upwards through the channels between the particles of solid radioactive waste, fills the voids in the bulk volume of the waste and hardens, forming a cement compound, the amount of which is equal to the original volume. The aim of the investigation was a selection of a cement solution suitable for SRW impregnation (including fine particles) without solution depletion and bottom layers stuffing. It has been chosen a polymer: PHMG (polyhexamethylene-guanidine), which is a stabilizing and water-retaining component of the cement solution. The experiments confirm that the polymer increases the permeability of the cement solution by a 2-2.5 factor, the viscosity by a 1.2 factor, the stability of the consistency by a 1.5-1.7 factor, and extends the operating range of the W/C ratio to 0.5-1.1. So it is possible to penetrate a volume of SRW bigger by a 1.5-2.0 factor. It has been proved, that PHMG polymer increases strength and frost-resistance of the final compounds by a 1.8-2.7 factor, and contributes to fast strength development at the beginning of hardening and it decreases Cs-137 leashing rate by a 1.5-2 factor

  11. Project W-320 SAR and process control thermal analyses

    Sathyanarayana, K.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of thermal hydraulic computer modeling supporting Project W-320 for process control and SAR documentation. Parametric analyses were performed for the maximum steady state waste temperature. The parameters included heat load distribution, tank heat load, fluffing factor and thermal conductivity. Uncertainties in the fluffing factor and heat load distribution had the largest effect on maximum waste temperature. Safety analyses were performed for off normal events including loss of ventilation, loss of evaporation and loss of secondary chiller. The loss of both the primary and secondary ventilation was found to be the most limiting event with saturation temperature in the bottom waste reaching in just over 30 days. An evaluation was performed for the potential lowering of the supernatant level in tank 241-AY-102. The evaluation included a loss of ventilation and steam bump analysis. The reduced supernatant level decreased the time to reach saturation temperature in the waste for the loss of ventilation by about one week. However, the consequence of a steam bump were dramatically reduced

  12. An Experimental Study on Effect of Palm – Shell Waste Additive to Cement Strenght Enhancement

    Adi Novriansyah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the cement strength through attaching chemical additive has been popular to meet the required condition for a particular well-cementing job. However, due to a low oil-price phenomenon, pouring and additive should be reconsidered because it can raise the cost and make the project become uneconomic. Another additive material in nanocomposite form will be introduced through this experimental study. The nanocomposite material consist of silica nanoparticle, known as “Nanosilica” and a palm-shell-waste, which is abundant in Indonesia. Before making a nanocomposite, the palm-shell should be burned to obtain a charcoal form, ground and sieved to attain a uniform size.   The study focuses on the two parameters, compressive strength and shear bond strength, which can reflect the strength of the cement. These values are obtained by performing a biaxial loading test to the cement sample. Various samples with different concentration of nanocomposite should be prepared and following the mixing, drying, and hardening process before the loading test is carried out. The result from the test shows a positive indication for compressive strength and shear bond strength values, according to the representative well cementing standards. Increasing the nanocomposite concentration on the cement will increase these values. Furthermore, an investigation on the temperature effect confirms that the sample with 700oC burning temperature have highest compressive-strength and shear-bond-strength values. This is a potential opportunity utilizing a waste-based material to produce another product with higher economic value.

  13. Investigating conceptual models for physical property couplings in solid solution models of cement

    Benbow, Steven; Watson, Claire; Savage, David

    2005-11-01

    The long-term behaviour of cementitious engineered barriers is an important process to consider when modelling the migration of radionuclides from a geological repository for nuclear waste. The modelling of cement is complicated by the fact that the cement is dominated by the behaviour of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel which is a complex solid exhibiting incongruent dissolution behaviour. In this report, we have demonstrated the implementation of a solid-solution CSH gel model within a geochemical transport modelling framework using the Raiden computer code to investigate cement/concrete-groundwater interactions. The modelling conducted here shows that it is possible to couple various conceptual models for the evolution of physical properties of concrete with a solid solution model for cement degradation in a fully coupled geochemical transport model to describe the interaction of cement/concrete engineered barriers with groundwater. The results show that changes to the conceptual models and flow rates can give rise to very different evolutions. Most simulations were carried out at a reduced 'experimental' scale rather than full repository scale. The work has shown the possibility to investigate also the changing physical properties of degrading cement. To further develop the model more emphasis is needed on kinetics and the detailed development of a nearly clogged pore space. Modelling of the full repository scale could be another way forward to understand the behaviour of degrading concrete. A general conclusion is that the combined effects of chemical evolution and physical degradation should be analysed in performance assessments of cementitious repositories. Moreover, the project results will be used as one basis in coming reviews of SKB's safety assessments of repositories for spent fuel and low-and intermediate level waste

  14. Investigating conceptual models for physical property couplings in solid solution models of cement

    Benbow, Steven; Watson, Claire; Savage, David [Quintesssa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    The long-term behaviour of cementitious engineered barriers is an important process to consider when modelling the migration of radionuclides from a geological repository for nuclear waste. The modelling of cement is complicated by the fact that the cement is dominated by the behaviour of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel which is a complex solid exhibiting incongruent dissolution behaviour. In this report, we have demonstrated the implementation of a solid-solution CSH gel model within a geochemical transport modelling framework using the Raiden computer code to investigate cement/concrete-groundwater interactions. The modelling conducted here shows that it is possible to couple various conceptual models for the evolution of physical properties of concrete with a solid solution model for cement degradation in a fully coupled geochemical transport model to describe the interaction of cement/concrete engineered barriers with groundwater. The results show that changes to the conceptual models and flow rates can give rise to very different evolutions. Most simulations were carried out at a reduced 'experimental' scale rather than full repository scale. The work has shown the possibility to investigate also the changing physical properties of degrading cement. To further develop the model more emphasis is needed on kinetics and the detailed development of a nearly clogged pore space. Modelling of the full repository scale could be another way forward to understand the behaviour of degrading concrete. A general conclusion is that the combined effects of chemical evolution and physical degradation should be analysed in performance assessments of cementitious repositories. Moreover, the project results will be used as one basis in coming reviews of SKB's safety assessments of repositories for spent fuel and low-and intermediate level waste.

  15. Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document

    1996-04-01

    This document is the prescribed means for providing direct input to the US Department of Energy Headquarters regarding the status, accomplishments, strategy, and issues of the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. The project mission, organizational interfaces, and operational history of the Hanford Site are provided. Remediation strategies are analyzed in detail. The document includes a status of Richland Environmental Restoration project activities and accomplishments, and it presents current cost summaries, schedules, and technical baselines

  16. Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document is the prescribed means for providing direct input to the US Department of Energy Headquarters regarding the status, accomplishments, strategy, and issues of the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. The project mission, organizational interfaces, and operational history of the Hanford Site are provided. Remediation strategies are analyzed in detail. The document includes a status of Richland Environmental Restoration project activities and accomplishments, and it presents current cost summaries, schedules, and technical baselines.

  17. Factors Affecting Process Innovation Teams’ Learning and Their Impact on the Success of the Process Innovation Projects

    İbrahim H. Seyrek

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on 145 process innovation teams, we have studied factors supporting team learning and their impact on the success of the process innovation projects. As a result, we have found that team vision, recording and reviewing project related information, filing, following a structural development process and co-location of team members are factors supporting team learning and project success. Also, two dimensions of learning, information acquisition and information implementation, are positively related to the success of the process innovation projects

  18. Nanoparticles usage tendencies in cementing systems for hydrocarbon wells

    Balza, A.; Perera, Y.; Brito, J.; Hurtado, A.; Quercia Bianchi, G.; Corona, O.; Colina, A.; Blanco, A.; Palomo, A.; Zaragoza, A.; Lopez, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In oil and gas wells construction, one of the most critical processes is oil well cementing, whose function is to provide a zonal isolation between the pipe and sedimentary formation. For these reasons, one of the needs in the oil industry, specifically in cementing wells area, is the use of

  19. Data acquisition and monitoring of radwaste cementation plants

    Cable, A.S.; Lee, D.J.; Samways, J.; Weller, F.C.; Williams, J.R.A.

    1988-03-01

    This paper summarises the progress made in the two years to June 1987 on the DOE funded programme for Data acquisition and monitoring of Radwaste Cementation Plants. The results of the computer based data logging and processing system fitted to an in-drum mixing station, cement powder plant and sludge handling plant are reported. (author)

  20. THE SYSTEM OF PROCESSES AND PROJECTS OF THE AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS MAINTENANCE

    Alexander A. Itskovich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the aviation enterprise as a unified system of processes and projects of the aircraft airworthiness maintenance (AAM is presented. The relevance of project management tools usage, including the transport branch, is noted; the examples of successful implementation of the development projects at domestic enterprises manufacturing aircraft engines are given. A scheme for the classification of the AAM projects and processes, reflecting their interrelationship, is proposed. The operational activity of the enterprise is a combination of its business processes. The company selects plans and implements the relevant projects for the business processes optimization. At the same time, the projects themselves are the objects of management based on standardized processes. The processes of project management and the main processes of the enterprise are also interrelated and can be objects included in the unified regulations of its units. Increasing the efficiency of operational processes and processes of the aviation enterprise management is the goal of development projects, which are divided into investment projects and organizational changes projects.Limitation of organizational and financial resources of the company requires the identification and systematization of all projects and processes, while the application of project management standards allows to analyze the opportunities and to determine the sequence of their implementation. The importance of accumulating experience of completed projects is shown; the results can become typical methods for planning, organizing the implementation and monitoring of AAM projects. Specific forms of the project management standards implementation for AN-124-100 constructive modification project in LLC Volga-Dnepr Airlines are demonstrated: the control events plan and the project team formation.

  1. Carbonate Looping for De-Carbonization of Cement Plants

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Andersen, Maria Friberg; Lin, Weigang

    2011-01-01

    Cement industry is one of the largest emitter of CO2 other than power generation plants, which includes the emissions from combustion of fuel and also from calcination of limestone for clinker production. In order to reduce CO2 emissions from the cement industry an effective an economically...... feasible technology is to be developed. The carbonate looping process is a promising technology, which is particularly suitable for the cement industry as limestone could be used for capture and release of CO2. Integration of carbonate looping process into cement pyroprocess has two advantages: 1...... integrated into cement pyro-process. The energy required for regeneration in the calciner increases with increase in average conversion of calcined limestone and energy that can be extracted from carbonator decreases with increasing average conversion. Further the influence of type of limestone...

  2. Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona

    Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E.; Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM

    2007-05-17

    A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.

  3. Preparation of iron-modified portland cement adsorbent and the investigation of its decolorization performance

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Huifeng; Li, Yang; Li, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    The ordinary portland cement was modified by ferric salt impregnation method. Through the technologies of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the physicochemical properties of modified cement were detected and analyzed. It was found that after the modification, the main constituents of raw cement, tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate had been depleted, and the new crystal mineral of antarcticite replaced them. The iron precipitates and cement hydration products calcium silicate hydrate gel mainly existed in the form of amorphous on modified cement. The results of BET specific surface determination showed that the modified cement particles had mesoporous distribution. The results of adsorption experiment revealed modified cement exhibited excellent adsorption performance on reactive brilliant blue KNR. The combination mechanism between modified cement and adsorbate was mainly electrostatic interaction. The adsorption process satisfied with the pseudo-second order kinetics model, and the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous endothermic process.

  4. Solidification of liquid radioactive concentrates by fixation with cement

    Pekar, A.; Breza, M.; Timulak, J.; Krajc, T.

    1985-01-01

    In testing the technology of liquid radioactive wastes cementation, the effect was mainly studied of the content of boric acid and its salts on cement solidification, the effect of additives on radionuclide leachability and the effect of the salt content on the cementation product. On the basis of experimental work carried out on laboratory scale with model samples and samples of radioactive concentrate from the V-1 nuclear power plant, the following suitable composition of the cementation mixture was determined: 40% Portland cement, 40% zeolite containing material and 20% power plant ash. The most suitable ratio of liquid radioactive wastes and the cementation mixture is 0.5. As long as in such case the salt content of the concentrate ranges between 20 and 25%, the cementation product will have a maximum salt content of 10% and a leachability of the order of 10 -3 to 10 -4 g/cm 2 per day with a mechanical strength allowing safe handling. It was also found that the quality processing of the cement paste with degassing, e.g., by vibration, is more effective for the production of a pore-free cementation product than the application of various additives which are supposed to eliminate pore formation. (Z.M.)

  5. Effect of olive waste (Husk on behavior of cement paste

    Sharaf Alkheder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jordan is a famous country in terms of olive trees agriculture that resulted in a mass production of olive oil products. The huge amounts of olive waste (husk that resulted from olives processing to produce olive oil represent an environmental challenge in the country. The idea in this paper comes to use olive waste as a partial replacement for Portland cement in cement paste to conserve the environment, reduce cement consumption and increase cost efficiency. The wastes were burned properly in an oven and maintained for 6 h until it was fully transformed into ashes. Then, the oven was turned off and ashes were allowed to cool. After cooling, the material passed sieve #200 were used. The sieved ashes were used in the cement mix as a partial cement replacement for making the mortar and cement paste. Normal consistency and setting time were determined as well as soundness, compressive strength. Results indicated that normal consistency of the cement pastes containing different percentage of olive waste is somehow lower than that of the ordinary cement paste and slightly decreases with increasing the percentage. The results also indicated that the compressive strength of hardened blended cement paste containing different percentages of olive waste slightly decrease with olive waste content at 3, 7, and 28 days.

  6. THE MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION OF THE INTERNAL COMMUNICATION PROCESS IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    Pop Alexandra Mihaela

    2013-07-01

    The model is a useful tool for improving the internal communication process of a project and help the project raise its efficiency. It has been created based on the characteristics of the information flow within a project. Also the Internal Communication Analysis Model – ICAM – helps improve the projects‘ deliverables by making sure that everyone in the project understood their roles correctly.

  7. Influence of Superplasticizer-Microsilica Complex on Cement Hydration, Structure and Properties of Cement Stone

    Ivanov, I. M.; Kramar, L. Ya; Orlov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    According to the study results, the influence of complex additives based on microsilica and superplasticizers on the processes of the heat release, hydration, hardening, formation of the structure and properties of cement stone was determined. Calorimetry, derivatography, X-ray phase analysis, electronic microscopy and physical-mechanical methods for analyzing the properties of cement stone were used for the studies. It was established that plasticizing additives, in addition to the main water-reducing and rheological functions, regulate cement solidification and hardening while polycarboxylate superplasticizers even contribute to the formation of a special, amorphized microstructure of cement stone. In a complex containing microsilica and a polycarboxylate superplasticizer the strength increases sharply with a sharp drop in the capillary porosity responsible for the density, permeability, durability, and hence, the longevity of concrete. All this is a weighty argument in favor of the use of microsilica jointly with a polycarboxylate superplasticizer in road concretes operated under aggressive conditions.

  8. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  9. Relationship between empathic processing and drinking behavior in project MATCH.

    Robinson, Charles S H; Fokas, Kathryn; Witkiewitz, Katie

    2018-02-01

    Family relationships, social connectedness and a greater network of supportive others each predict better drinking outcomes among individuals with alcohol use disorder (AUD). The association between social factors and drinking may be related to the ability of individuals to take the perspectives of others' mental and emotional states, defined as empathic processing (EP). As such, it may be the case that EP is associated with social support (SS) and drinking behavior among individuals with AUD, yet few prior studies have attempted to define EP in an AUD sample. The current study was a secondary data analysis of Project MATCH (N=1726) using structural equation modeling to model EP as a latent factor. The study also sought to test the baseline associations between EP, SS, and drinking behavior, as well as sex differences in the associations between EP, SS, and drinking. It was hypothesized that EP would be positively associated with SS and negatively associated with drinking behavior. Results suggested adequate model fit of the EP construct. Structural equation models indicated significant associations between EP, SS, and both drinking consequences and percent drinking days, but only for males. Males reported significantly lower EP and SS from friends, but more SS from family, compared to females. EP was not related to drinking among females. The current study validated a model of EP in a treatment-seeking sample of individuals with alcohol use disorder. Future work may consider EP as a treatment-modifiable risk factor for drinking frequency and consequences in males. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Using bio-based polymers for curing cement-based materials

    Zlopasa, J.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Picken, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Curing is the process of controlling the rate and extent of moisture loss from the surface of cement based materials. It is the final stage in the production of cement-based materials and it is the essential part for achieving continuous hydration of cement, while avoiding cracking due to drying

  11. From Rocks to Cement. What We Make. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Science Education Center.

    This module deals with the materials used in making concrete hollow blocks. Topics discussed include: (1) igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks; (2) weathering (the process of breaking down rocks) and its effects on rocks; (3) cement; (4) stages in the manufacturing of Portland cement; and (5) the transformation of cement into concrete…

  12. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  13. Case study of an MBT plant producing SRF for cement kiln co-combustion, coupled with a bioreactor landfill for process residues.

    Grosso, Mario; Dellavedova, Stefano; Rigamonti, Lucia; Scotti, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the performances of the energy recovery pathway from the residual waste based on the production of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) to be exploited via co-combustion in a cement kiln. The SRF is produced in a single stream Mechanical-Biological Treatment plant, where bio-drying of the waste is followed by mechanical refining in order to fulfil the quality requirements by the cement kilns. Peculiar of this MBT is the fact that sorting residues are disposed in a nearby landfill, managed according to a bioreactor approach, where landfill gas is collected for electric energy recovery. A detailed mass and energy balance of the system is presented based on one year operational data, followed by its Life Cycle Assessment. Results show that the system is energetically and environmentally effective, with most of the impacts being more than compensated by the savings of materials and energy. Major role in determining such outcome is the displacement of petcoke in the cement kiln, both in terms of its fossil CO2 emissions and of its life cycle impacts, including the trans-oceanic transport. To check the robustness of the results, two sensitivity analyses are performed on the landfill gas collection efficiency and on the avoided electric energy mix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ready to Retrofit: The Process of Project Team Selection, Building Benchmarking, and Financing Commercial Building Energy Retrofit Projects

    Sanders, Mark D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parrish, Kristen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mathew, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This guide presents a process for three key activities for the building owner in preparing to retrofit existing commercial buildings: selecting project teams, benchmarking the existing building, and financing the retrofit work. Although there are other essential steps in the retrofit process, the three activities presented in this guide are the critical elements where the building owner has the greatest influence on the outcome of the project.

  15. The incorporation of low and medium level radioactive wastes (solids and liquids) in cement

    Palmer, J.D.; Smith, D.L.

    1985-07-01

    Experimentation has shown that high temperatures generated during the setting of ordinary Portland cement/simulant waste mixes can be significantly reduced by the use of a blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag and ordinary Portland cement. Trials on simulated waste showed that blended cement gave improved stability and a reduction in leach rates, and confirmed that the cement-based process can be used for the immobilisation of most types of low and medium level waste. (U.K.)

  16. Development of alkali activated cements and concrete mixture design with high volumes of red mud

    Krivenko, Pavel; Kovalchuk, Oleksandr; Pasko, Anton; Croymans, Tom; Hutt, Mikael; Lutter, Guillaume; Vandevenne, Niels; Schreurs, Sonja; Schroeyers, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    Dedicated cement compositions were formulated to enable the incorporation of large volume fractions of red mud in alkali activated cements, taking into account the role of the aluminosilicate phase in the processes of hydration and hardening. High volume red mud alkali activated cements were synthesized using a proper combination of red mud, low basic aluminosilicate compounds with a glass phase (blast-furnace slag) and additives selected from high-basic Ca-containing cements with a crystalli...

  17. Early-age monitoring of cement structures using FBG sensors

    Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Zhichun; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    With more and more broad applications of the cement-based structures such as neat cement paste, cement mortar and concrete in civil engineering, people hope to find out what their performances should like. The in-service performances of cement-based structures are highly affected by their hardening process during the early-age. But it is still a big problem for traditional sensors to be used to monitor the early curing of cement-based structures due to such disadvantages as difficulties to install sensors inside the concrete, limited measuring points, poor durability and interference of electromagnetic wave and so on. In this paper, according to the sensing properties of the Fiber Bragg Grating sensors and self-characters of the cement-based structures, we have successfully finished measuring and monitoring the early-age inner-strain and temperature changes of the neat cement paste, concrete with and without restrictions, mass concrete structures and negative concrete, respectively. Three types of FBG-based sensors have been developed to monitor the cement-based structures. Besides, the installation techniques and the embedding requirements of FBG sensors in cement-based structures are also discussed. Moreover, such kind of technique has been used in practical structure, 3rd Nanjing Yangtze Bridge, and the results show that FBG sensors are well proper for measuring and monitoring the temperature and strain changes including self-shrinkage, dry shrinkage, plastic shrinkage, temperature expansion, frost heaving and so on inside different cement-based structures. This technique provides us a new useful measuring method on early curing monitoring of cement-based structures and greater understanding of details of their hardening process.

  18. Cement waste form development for ion-exchange resins and fine particles ILW of AREVA La Hague Reprocessing Plant

    Chartier, D.; Sanchez-Canet, J.; Avril, D.; Roussel, C.; Pineau, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Wastes have been temporarily stored in dedicated silos in La Hague reprocessing plant. These wastes are to be retrieved in the near future and to be conditioned for final disposal. Some of these wastes are supposed to be encapsulated in cement matrix and, depending on the chemical composition of the waste streams, several projects are presently ongoing. The present article aims to focus on one amongst these cement encapsulation relevant projects, namely the conditioning of a mix of spent ion-exchange resins (from filtration of pool) and fine particles (insoluble fission products from spent fuel dissolution and Zircaloy and stainless steel fines from cladding shearing). The project, aims to retrieve these wastes from a silo, separate the resins and fine particles from the other waste (hulls and end pieces), in order to encapsulate the intermediate-level fines and resins in a cement matrix. The waste forms will be produced in AREVA's La Hague reprocessing plant, prior to being sent as intermediate-level waste to a long-term repository. The cement formulation developments were initially carried out at a small scale at C.E.A. Marcoule on surrogate wastes. One of the main issues that were considered was the chemical compatibility between waste and cement matrix. Indeed, swelling phenomena are sometimes reported when ion exchange resins are embedded in cement matrixes such as Portland cement. This kind of destructive phenomenon has been prevented by the use of cement containing a high amount of ground granulated blast furnace slag. The impact of the variability of ionic charge of the resins on the waste form's properties has also been addressed in order to comfort the results obtained on the reference ionic charge of resins NaNO 3 . Once the results obtained were satisfactory, intermediate scale and full scale tests were performed by AREVA. These tests have focused on adjusting the mixing process and controlling the thermal properties of the mix during setting

  19. Process evaluation of the Bristol girls dance project

    S. J. Sebire

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bristol Girls Dance Project was a cluster randomised controlled trial that aimed to increase objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA levels of Year 7 (age 11–12 girls through a dance-based after-school intervention. The intervention was delivered in nine schools and consisted of up to forty after-school dance sessions. This paper reports on the main findings from the detailed process evaluation that was conducted. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from intervention schools. Dose and fidelity were reported by dance instructors at every session. Intervention dose was defined as attending two thirds of sessions and was measured by attendance registers. Fidelity to the intervention manual was reported by dance instructors. On four randomly-selected occasions, participants reported their perceived level of exertion and enjoyment. Reasons for non-attendance were self-reported at the end of the intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all dance instructors who delivered the intervention (n = 10 and school contacts (n = 9 in intervention schools. A focus group was conducted with girls who participated in each intervention school (n = 9. Results The study did not affect girls’ MVPA. An average of 31.7 girls participated in each school, with 9.1 per school receiving the intervention dose. Mean attendance and instructors’ fidelity to the intervention manual decreased over time. The decline in attendance was largely attributed to extraneous factors common to after-school activities. Qualitative data suggest that the training and intervention manual were helpful to most instructors. Participant ratings of session enjoyment were high but perceived exertion was low, however, girls found parts of the intervention challenging. Conclusions The intervention was enjoyed by participants. Attendance at the intervention sessions was low but typical of after

  20. Cement and concrete options paper

    1999-10-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of concrete are projected to increase from 10.5 million tonnes in 1990 to almost 14 million tonnes in 2010. Over half of this amount will be non-energy related emissions of carbon dioxide resulting from the conversion of limestone to lime. According to this report by industry experts, the industry has an excellent record of improving energy efficiency and there are few easy gains remaining. Nevertheless, improvements in energy efficiency and fuel use, increased use of concrete where it can be shown to result in net reduction of GHG emissions, and partial replacement of cement by supplementary cementitious materials that involve no additional generation of GHGs, could yield an approximate reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of nearly seven million tons in 2010. The industry proposes three measures to realise these benefits: (1) encouraging replacement of fossil fuels by otherwise waste material, (2) encouraging increased use of concrete in constructing houses and roads, and (3) encouraging increased use of supplementary cementing materials. The industry is opposed to carbon or energy taxes that increase the cost of doing business, on the grounds that such taxes would adversely affect the industry's competitive position internationally. tabs

  1. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  2. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  3. Experimental study with domestic bone cement in the percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Ni Caifang; Liu Xisheng; Chen Long; Yang Huilin; Tang Tiansi; Ding Yi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of injecting domestic bone cement in the process of the percutaneous vertebroplasty. Methods: (1) Various types cement were disposed with domestic PMMA. The concretionary phases of cement were observed according to the stages and holding time. Then the most ideal ratio of the mixed cement was selected and ten cement columns were made with this ratio, which was taken as the trial group. The other ten referring to was taken as the contrast one. The biological mechanics was measured with a load and the data of the results were compared. (2) Twenty thoracic and lumbar adjacent bodies were removed intact from five human corpses. These bodies were divided into two groups, in one group PMMA were injected, the other was severed as the contrast one. Then in these twenty vertebral bodies the biological mechanics was measured and the treatment effect was evaluated. (3) In 12 healthy dogs PVP in lumber was tried so as to observe the operational difficulty during the process of injected this bone cement and CT was used to evaluate the result of PMMA, diffusion and the complications caused by it. Results: The most ideal ratio was 4:2.6:1 (g, ml, ml) between powder, monome and contrast. After injecting this kind of cement, the loading strength of these vertebral bodies was increased remarkably (P<0.01). Conclusion: Injecting domestic bone cement provides the theoretical foundations for the clinical application of PVP. (author)

  4. The incorporation of low and medium level radioactive wastes (solids and liquids) in cement

    Palmer, J.D.; Smith, D.L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The use of cement has been investigated for the immobilization of liquid and solid low and medium level radioactive waste. 220 litre mixing trials have demonstrated that the high temperatures generated during the setting of ordinary Portland cement/simulant waste mixes can be significantly reduced by the use of a blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag and ordinary Portland cement. Laboratory and 220 litre trials using simulant wastes showed that the blended cement gave an improvement in properties of the cemented waste product, e.g. stability and reduction in leach rates compared with ordinary Portland cement formulations. A range of 220 litre scale mixing systems for the incorporation of liquid and solid wastes in cement was investigated. The work has confirmed that cement-based processes can be used for the immobilization of most types of low and medium level waste

  5. Low-level waste cement solidification design, installation, and start-up

    Jezek, G.R.

    1988-08-01

    This report describes the design, installation, and start-up activities of the Cement Solidification System (CSS) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), West Valley, New York. The CSS, designed to operate within an existing process cell, automatically and remotely solidifies low-level nuclear waste by mixing it with Portland Type I cement. The qualified waste form mixture is placed into square, 270-litre (71-gallon) metal drums. The drums have an integral polyethylene liner to protect the carbon-steel material from potential corrosion. The CSS produces drums at a continuous operation rate of four drums per hour. All system processing data is monitored by a computerized Data Acquisition System (DAS). 6 figs

  6. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  7. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  8. Chemical recycling of carbon dioxide emissions from a cement plant into dimethyl ether, a case study of an integrated process in France using a Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) step

    Vibhatavata, Phuangphet; Borgard, Jean-Marc; Tabarant, Michel; Bianchi, Daniel; Mansilla, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) into liquid fuel technology has recently gained wide public interest since it is a potential pathway to increase the liquid fuel supply and to mitigate CO 2 emissions simultaneously. In France, the majority of the electricity production is derived from nuclear and renewable energy which have a low CO 2 footprint. This electricity power enables a potential for massive hydrogen production with low carbon emissions. We studied the possibility to develop this technology at an industrial scale in the French context on a typical industrial example of a cement manufacture in the south of France. An integrated process is proposed, which enables the use of the heat released by the CO 2 to fuel process to help to capture the CO 2 released by the cement manufacture. Some technological issues are discussed, and a potential solution is proposed for the catalyst used in the critical step of the Reverse Water Gas-Shift reaction (RWGS) of the process. (authors)

  9. Sustainable Blended Cements-Influences of Packing Density on Cement Paste Chemical Efficiency.

    Knop, Yaniv; Peled, Alva

    2018-04-18

    This paper addresses the development of blended cements with reduced clinker amount by partial replacement of the clinker with more environmentally-friendly material (e.g., limestone powders). This development can lead to more sustainable cements with reduced greenhouse gas emission and energy consumption during their production. The reduced clicker content was based on improved particle packing density and surface area of the cement powder by using three different limestone particle diameters: smaller (7 µm, 3 µm) or larger (70 µm, 53 µm) than the clinker particles, or having a similar size (23 µm). The effects of the different limestone particle sizes on the chemical reactivity of the blended cement were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), loss on ignition (LOI), isothermal calorimetry, and the water demand for reaching normal consistency. It was found that by blending the original cement with limestone, the hydration process and the reactivity of the limestone itself were increased by the increased surface area of the limestone particles. However, the carbonation reaction was decreased with the increased packing density of the blended cement with limestone, having various sizes.

  10. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  11. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  12. Transportation of ions through cement based materials

    Chatterji, S.

    1994-01-01

    Transportation of ions, both anions and cations, through cement based materials is one of the important processes in their durability and as such has been studied very extensively. It has been studied from the point of view of the reinforcement corrosion, alkali-silica reaction, sulfate attack on cement and concrete, as well as in the context of the use of the cement based materials in the disposal of nuclear waste. In this paper the fundamental equations of diffusion, i.e. Fick's two equations, Nernst and Nernst-Planck equations have been collected. Attention has been drawn to the fact that Fick's two equations are valid for non-ionic diffusants and that for ions the relevant equations are those of Nernst and Nernst-Planck. The basic measurement techniques have also been commented upon

  13. A Process Towards Societal Value within a Community-Based Regional Development Project

    Anna Åslund

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Processes, activities and tasks of a community-based area development project are described. The main process has been used three times and a model is presented. An earlier developed process map has been verified. The description of the project can help other communities to plan development projects. The illustration can be valuable for entrepreneurs who are planning a societal value initiative and for decision-makers and stakeholders who can contribute to, are concerned with, or may be affected by societal entrepreneurship. Observation, participating studies, dokumentations and an interview with the project leader has been carried out. Data have been analyzed and compared with the previously developed process map to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes within societal entrepreneurship. The purpose was to study and describe the processes of a community-based area development project and to compare it with a previously developed process map and to verify the process map.

  14. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  15. ACACIA Project - Development of a Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Process. Case of the DMXTM Process

    Gomez, A.; Briot, P.; Raynal, L.; Broutin, P.; Gimenez, M.; Soazic, M.; Cessat, P.; Saysset, S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the ACACIA project was to develop processes for post-combustion CO 2 capture at a lower cost and with a higher energetic efficiency than first generation processes using amines such as Monoethanolamine (MEA) which are now considered for the first Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) demonstrators. The partners involved in this project were: Rhodia (Solvay since then), Arkema, Lafarge, GDF SUEZ, Veolia Environnement, IFP Energies nouvelles, IRCE Lyon, LMOPS, LTIM, LSA Armines. To validate the relevance of the breakthrough processes studied in this project, techno-economic evaluations were carried out with comparison to the reference process using a 30 wt% MEA solvent. These evaluation studies involved all the industrial partners of the project, each partner bringing specific cases of CO 2 capture on their industrial facilities. From these studies, only the process using de-mixing solvent, DMX TM , developed by IFPEN appears as an alternative solution to the MEA process. (authors)

  16. FY 2000 report on the basic survey to promote Joint Implementation, etc. Energy conservation by modernization of a cement plant (Double Horse Cement Co.) in China; 2000 nendo kyodo jisshi nado suishin kiso chosa hokokusho. Chugoku cement kojo (Double Horse Cement) kindaika ni yoru sho energy

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted of possibilities of energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas emission reduction in the cement production process of Double Horse Cement Co., Mianyang City, Sichuan Province, China. Double Horse Cement adopts the wet type long kiln production system and has a production ability of approximately 1.5 million t/y. In the project, as to three production lines out of the six production lines, improvement was planned to be made of the technologies on the following: mixing of raw materials, grinding of raw materials, NSP, clinker cooler, clinker pre-grinder, high-efficiency separator, waste heat use power generation, etc. As a result of the study, it was found that the energy conservation amount obtained was 54,646 toe/y. And, the amount of greenhouse effect gas reduction was 169,086 t-CO2/y. The total fund required for this project was approximately 5.553 billion yen and the internal earning rate was 7.36% after tax. When the project is carried out, expenses vs. effects are 9.8 toe/million yen in energy conservation amount and 30.4 t-CO2/million yen in greenhouse effect gas reduction. (NEDO)

  17. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Lee, Chang Hwa; Heo, Cheol Min; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho

    2011-01-01

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  18. Process performance indicators in project pre-design stage

    Haponava, T.; Al-Jibouri, Saad H.S.; Reymen, Isabelle; Scheublin, F.; Pronk, A.; Prins, M.; Emmitt, S.; den Otter, A

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally performance in construction is measured based on the "iron-triangle”- time, cost and quality. In recent years indicators have been developed to include the measurements of other aspects of project performance. The main shortcoming of these however is that most of them are lagging

  19. Evaluation of the application process of FATIH project: Students’ views

    Abdullah Kuzu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out the students’views about the innovations brought about by FATIH Project. The research data were collected via field notes, in-class observations made in 10 class hours and focus group interviews held with 45 students participating in the study on voluntary basis from five state schools located in the cities of Ankara, Karaman, Mersin (2 and Uşak. Within the scope of the study the data were analyzed with the content analysis method. It was found out the innovations brought about by FATIH Project led to positive changes in students’ interest and willingness in classes, their achievement levels, their motivations, their pace of learning, their technology use and research skills, permanency in their learning and their self-confidence. The students reported that the negative changes included distraction of students’ attention to classes, limitation in face-to-face communication with the teacher, the slowing pace of teaching, time-taking classes, confidence problems, the teacher’s increasing desire to control students and difficulty in class-management.It was also revealed that use of tablets for a long time resulted in eye diseases and headaches and that the project helped the students instantly reach the information they needed, contributed to their motivation in learning yet had negative influence on their socialization. It was found that the students felt themselves privileged as they were involved in the project; that they were pleased as the classes were taught in a more entertaining manner; and that inefficient content and interaction problems between the interactive whiteboard and tablet computers were considered to be negative consequences of the innovations brought about by the project.

  20. Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-09-23

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  1. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  2. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  3. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of Ni speciation in hardened cement paste.

    Vespa, M; Dähn, R; Grolimund, D; Wieland, E; Scheidegger, A M

    2006-04-01

    Cement-based materials play an important role in multi-barrier concepts developed worldwide for the safe disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cement is used to condition and stabilize the waste materials and to construct the engineered barrier systems (container, backfill, and liner materials) of repositories for radioactive waste. In this study, Ni uptake by hardened cement paste has been investigated with the aim of improving our understanding of the immobilization process of heavy metals in cement on the molecular level. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques were used to determine the local environment of Ni in cement systems. The Ni-doped samples were prepared at two different water/cement ratios (0.4, 1.3) and different hydration times (1 hour to 1 year) using a sulfate-resisting Portland cement. The metal loadings and the metal salts added to the system were varied (50 up to 5000 mg/kg; NO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl-). The XAS study showed that for all investigated systems Ni(ll) is predominantly immobilized in a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase, which was corroborated by DRS measurements. Only a minor extent of Ni(ll) precipitates as Ni-hydroxides (alpha-Ni(OH)2 and beta-Ni(OH)2). This finding suggests that Ni-Al LDH, rather than Ni-hydroxides, is the solubility-limiting phase in the Ni-doped cement system.

  5. Corneal permeability for cement dust: prognosis for occupational safety

    Kalmykov, R. V.; Popova, D. V.; Kamenskikh, T. G.; Genina, E. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Bashkatov, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    The high dust content in air of a working zone causes prevalence of pathologies of the anterior segment of the eye of workers of cement production. Therefore, studying of features of cement dust impact on structure of a cornea and development of ways of eye protection from this influence is relevant. In this work experimental studies were carried out with twenty eyes of ten rabbits. OCTtomography was used to monitor the light attenuation coefficient of the cornea in vitro during the permeability of cement dust and/or keratoprotector (Systein Ultra). The permeability coefficients of the cornea for water, cement dust and keratoprotector were measured. A computer model allowing one to analyze the diffusion of these substances in the eye cornea was developed. It was shown that 1) the cement dust falling on the eye cornea caused pronounced dehydration of the tissue (thickness decreasing) and led to the increase of the attenuation coefficient, which could affect the deterioration of the eyesight of workers in the conditions of cement production; 2) the application of the keratoprotector to the eye cornea when exposed by cement dust, slowed significantly the dehydration process and did not cause the increase of the attenuation coefficient that characterized the stabilization of visual functions. At this, the keratoprotector itself did not cause dehydration and led to the decrease of the attenuation coefficient, which could allow it to be used for a long time in the order to protect the organ of vision from the negative effects of cement dust.

  6. Storytelling Practices in Project Management : Exploratory study in new business process implementation in Information and Communication Technology projects

    Abdubaliev, Ulukbek; Akysheva, Aizhan

    2017-01-01

    Stories have always been present in the life of people as a part of their culture, it is a rather ancient narrative technique. The message delivered in a form of a story is specifically appealing to listeners, which makes it a powerful communication tool. The thesis explores storytelling practices in project management by answering the question: “How project managers use storytelling in new business process implementation in ICT projects?” The choice of the topic was driven by the gap in the ...

  7. Analysis and Development of a Project Evaluation Process.

    Coutant, Charles C.; Cada Glenn F.

    1985-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration has responsibility, assigned by the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-501; 16 USC 839), for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. One aspect of this responsibility is evaluation of project proposals and ongoing and completed projects. This report recommends formalized procedures for conducting this work in an accurate, professional, and widely respected manner. Recommendations and justifications are based largely on interviews with federal and state agencies and Indian tribes in the Northwest and nationally. Organizations were selected that have evaluation systems of their own, interact with the Fish and Wildlife Program, or have similar objectives or obligations. Perspective on aspects to be considered were obtained from the social science of evaluation planning. Examples of procedures and quantitative criteria are proposed. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  8. Keynote presentation: Project Management, Technology and Evolving Work Processes

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    not be used in the workplace when students graduate, but rather on the ”engine” of problem solving and communication strategies which drives projects and affects project success from the stakeholders point of view. Once students understand the engine, they are able to not only use software tools...... management documents looked like, but also how these documents are interconnected and work together to solve a problem. In addition, as they were in communication with a real client, they needed to work iteratively, ch anging their understanding of the problem, which in turn changed their options for solving...... the problem as well as planning and communicating the solution. This dynamic participation in problem solving helped students gain experience beyond recognition and reproduction  Campus Encounters – Bridging Learners Conference “Developing Competences for Next Generation Service Sectors” April 13–14, 2011...

  9. Impact of Requirements Elicitation Processes on Success of Information System Development Projects

    Bormane Līga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Requirements articulating user needs and corresponding to enterprise business processes are a key to successful implementation of information system development projects. However, the parties involved in projects frequently are not able to agree on a common development vision and have difficulties expressing their needs. Several industry experts have acknowledged that requirements elicitation is one of the most difficult tasks in development projects. This study investigates the impact of requirements elicitation processes on project outcomes depending on the applied project development methodology.

  10. Controlling the Instructional Development Process. Training Development and Research Center Project Number Fifteen.

    Sleezer, Catherine M.; Swanson, Richard A.

    Process control is a way of training managers in business and industry to plan, monitor, and communicate the instructional development process of training projects. Two simple and useful tools that managers use in controlling the process of instructional development are the Process Control Planning Sheet and the Process Control Record. The Process…

  11. Expansion control for cementation of incinerated ash

    Nakayama, T.; Suzuki, S.; Hanada, K.; Tomioka, O.; Sato, J.; Irisawa, K.; Kato, J.; Kawato, Y.; Meguro, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose of radioactive incinerated ash waste. A small amount of metallic Al, which was not oxidized in the incineration, existed in the ash. When such ash was mixed with a cement material and water, alkaline components in the ash and the cement were dissolved in the mixing water and then metallic Al reaction with the alkaline compounds resulted in generation of H 2 . Because the H 2 generation began immediately just after the mixing, H 2 bubbles pushed up the mixed grout material and an expanded solidified form was obtained. The expansion leads to lowering the strength of the solidified form and making harmful void. In this study, we tried to control H 2 generation from the reaction of metallic Al in the cementation by means of following two methods, one was a method to let metallic Al react prior to the cementation and the other was a method to add an expansion inhibitor that made an oxide film on the surface of metallic Al. In the pre-treatment, the ash was soaked in water in order to let metallic Al react with it, and then the ash with the immersion solution was dried at 105 Celsius degrees. The pre-treated ash was mixed with an ordinary portland cement and water. The inhibitor of lithium nitrite, sodium nitrite, phosphoric acid, or potassium dihydrogen phosphate was added at the mixing process. The solidified forms prepared using the pre-treated ash and lithium nitrite were not expanded. Phosphoric acid and sodium nitrite were effective for expansion control, but potassium dihydrogen phosphate did not work. (authors)

  12. Value Creation by Process-Oriented Project Management

    Geijtenbeek, W.; Eekelen, van A.L.M.; Kleine, A.J.; Favie, R.; Maas, G.J.; Milford, R.

    2007-01-01

    The start of a design process based on value creation requires a different approach and new models. The aim of this study is to provide insight into how a design process based on value creation can be initiated. The intended result of the study is the design of the of a collaboration model that can

  13. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  14. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    Lisovsky, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  15. Radiation processing project at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research

    Tsai, C.M.; Fu, Y.K.; Yang, Y.H.; Chen, Y.T.; Wei, Y.H.; Lee, K.P.; Wang, Y.K.

    1981-01-01

    The utilization of scientific approach to preserve and sterilize the agricultural products has long been studied since 1954 and was adopted by several countries gradually since 1958. Starting from July 1977 this Institute began to study the preservation of potatoes and onions with reference to sprout inhibition which is discussed and its economical aspect is evaluated. The design concept of a megacurie 60 Co irradiator at this Institute is illustrated. The progress of construction work for the irradiator and the safety device in particular are reported. Current research project on the preservation of agricultural products in this Institute is presented. (author)

  16. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    ELsourougy, M R; Zaki, A A; Aly, H F [Atomic energy authority, hot laboratory center, Cairo, (Egypt); Khalil, M Y [Nuclear engineering department, Alexandria university. Alexandria, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    ELsourougy, M.R.; Zaki, A.A.; Aly, H.F.; Khalil, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Space Processing Applications Rocket project, SPAR 1. Final report

    Reeves, F.; Chassay, R.

    1976-12-01

    The experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of nine scientific experiments conducted during the first Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight are summarized. The nine individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: solidification of Pb-Sb eutectic, feasibility of producing closed-cell metal foams, characterization of rocket vibration environment by measurement of mixing of two liquids, uniform dispersions of crystallization processing, direct observation of solidification as a function of gravity levels, casting thoria dispersion-strengthened interfaces, contained polycrystalline solidification, and preparation of a special alloy for manufacturing of magnetic hard superconductor under zero-g environment

  19. Space Processing Applications rocket project SPAR III. Final report

    Reeves, F.

    1978-01-01

    This document presents the engineering report and science payload III test report and summarizes the experiment objectives, design/operational concepts, and final results of each of five scientific experiments conducted during the third Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR) flight flown by NASA in December 1976. The five individual SPAR experiments, covering a wide and varied range of scientific materials processing objectives, were entitled: Liquid Mixing, Interaction of Bubbles with Solidification Interfaces, Epitaxial Growth of Single Crystal Film, Containerless Processing of Beryllium, and Contact and Coalescence of Viscous Bodies

  20. Process for planning and control of software projects using XedroGESPRO

    Jacqueline Marín-Sánchez; José Alejandro Lugo-García; Pedro Yobanis Piñero-Pérez; Alena María Santiesteban-García; Félix Noel Abelardo-Santana; Javier Menéndez-Rizo

    2014-01-01

    The software project management in Cuba has become a key area for improving production processes and decisionmaking in organizations. Several models and standards for process improvement, related with project management, proposed best practices on issues of planning and control of projects. However, they are generic guidelines that describe only those activities to execute, leaving the responsibility for implementing to organizations, using sometimes , expensive proprietary infor...

  1. A functional-dynamic reflection on participatory processes in modeling projects.

    Seidl, Roman

    2015-12-01

    The participation of nonscientists in modeling projects/studies is increasingly employed to fulfill different functions. However, it is not well investigated if and how explicitly these functions and the dynamics of a participatory process are reflected by modeling projects in particular. In this review study, I explore participatory modeling projects from a functional-dynamic process perspective. The main differences among projects relate to the functions of participation-most often, more than one per project can be identified, along with the degree of explicit reflection (i.e., awareness and anticipation) on the dynamic process perspective. Moreover, two main approaches are revealed: participatory modeling covering diverse approaches and companion modeling. It becomes apparent that the degree of reflection on the participatory process itself is not always explicit and perfectly visible in the descriptions of the modeling projects. Thus, the use of common protocols or templates is discussed to facilitate project planning, as well as the publication of project results. A generic template may help, not in providing details of a project or model development, but in explicitly reflecting on the participatory process. It can serve to systematize the particular project's approach to stakeholder collaboration, and thus quality management.

  2. Bioenergy/Biotechnology projects

    Napper, Stan [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Palmer, James [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Wilson, Chester [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Guilbeau, Eric [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Allouche, Erez [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States)

    2012-06-30

    This report describes the progress of five different projects. The first is an enzyme immobilization study of cellulase to reduce costs of the cellulosic ethanol process. High reusability and use of substrates applicable to large scale production were focus areas for this study. The second project was the development of nanostructured catalysts for conversion of syngas to diesel. Cobalt nanowire catalyst was used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The third project describes work on developing a microfluidic calorimeter to measure reaction rates of enzymes. The fourth project uses inorganic polymer binders that have the advantage of a lower carbon footprint than Portland cement while also providing excellent performance in elevated temperature, high corrosion resistance, high compressive and tensile strengths, and rapid strength gains. The fifth project investigates the potential of turbines in drop structures (such as sewer lines in tall buildings) to recover energy.

  3. Quality improvement process pilot project at Gallagher station

    Vondielingen, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    A Quality Improvement Process was piloted at Gallagher station in 1990 to address issues of two Electric System Strategy Group (ESSG) goals. Darrell McElravy headed a group to address quality, productivity and prove and Judy Rushing headed a group to address innovation and recognition. These groups combined when a process was identified that could address both issues. The process was designed for PSI Energy by Business Incentives and is an incentive-based quality improvement process that seeks employee involvement to identify inhibitors t performance and to establish a method to eliminate the problem. Performance goals were also established that help focus efforts to improve performance and reward employees for their efforts

  4. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test report

    Silvan, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: (1) proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; (2) proper operation of all display data on the operators' console; (3) proper operation of all required alarms; and (4) proper operation of all required interlocks. This test only verifies the proper operation of the Westinghouse control configuration (or program). It will not be responsible for verifying proper operation of the MICON hardware or operating software. Neither does it test any of the B610 instrument. The MICON hardware and software has been tested as part of the equipment procurement. Instrumentation and wiring installed under project B620 will be tested under a separate functional test. In some cases, precise transmitter ranges, alarm setpoints, and controller tuning parameters are not available at this time. Therefore, approximate values are used during the test. This should not affect the proper operation of the configuration or the validity of this test. Final values will be assigned during operability testing

  5. Mathematical modelling of transport phenomena in radioactive waste-cement-bentonite matrix

    Plecas, Ilija; Dimovic, Slavko

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from spent mix bead (anion and cation) exchange resins in a cement-bentonite matrix has been studied. Transport phenomena involved in the leaching of a radioactive material from a cement-bentonite matrix are investigated using three methods based on theoretical equations. These are: the diffusion equation for a plane source an equation for diffusion coupled to a first-order equation and an empirical method employing a polynomial equation. The results presented in this paper are from a 25-year mortar and concrete testing project that will influence the design choices for radioactive waste packaging for a future Serbian radioactive waste disposal center. Radioactive waste is waste material containing radioactive chemical elements which does not have a practical purpose. It is often the product of a nuclear process, such as nuclear fission. Waste can also be generated from the processing of fuel for nuclear reactors or nuclear weapons. The main objective in managing and disposing of radioactive (or other) waste is to protect people and the environment. This means isolating or diluting the waste so that the rate or concentration of any radionuclides returned to the biosphere is harmless. Storage as the placement of waste in a nuclear facility where isolation, environmental protection and human control are provided with the intent that the waste will be retrieved at a later time. Disposal as the emplacement of waste in an approved, specified facility (e.g. near surface or geological repository) without the intention of retrieval. The processing of radioactive wastes may be done for economic reasons (e.g. to reduce the volume for storage or disposal, or to recover a 'resource' from the waste), or safety reasons (e.g. converting the waste to a more 'stable' form, such as one that will contain the radionuclide inventory for a long time). Typically processing involves reducing

  6. Considerations on the mechanical behavior and hydration process supersulphated cement (CSS) formulated with phosphogypsum; Consideracoes sobre a resistencia mecanica e o processo de hidratacao de cimentos supersulfatados (CSS) formulados com fosfogesso

    Gracioli, Bruna; Varela, Maxwell Vinicius Favero; Beutler, Cheila Sirlene; Frare, Andreza; Luz, Caroline Angulski da; Pereira Filho, Jose Ilo, E-mail: maxwell@alunos.utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: cheila.beutler@gmail.com, E-mail: andreza2694@hotmail.com, E-mail: ilofilho@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: angulski@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Pato Branco, PR (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Supersulfated Cements (SSC) are composed from blast furnace slag (90%), calcium sulfate (10-20%) and a small amount of alkali activator (up 5%). Gypsum is a conventional source of calcium sulfate, however, it can be replaced by phosphogypsum (PG), a byproduct from the production of phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) with similar chemical and mineralogical composition of the gypsum. In Brazil, the production of this material is about 4.5 million tons per year. Because the SSC contains a higher calcium sulfate content (20%) in relation to Portland cement, a higher consumption of phosphogypsum is possible. The goal of this study was to investigate the phosphogypsum (PG) as an alternative source of calcium sulfate in order to obtain CSS. In addition to use of PG, the effects of both calcium sulfate and alkali activator content on the process of hydration were investigated. The results showed that SSC made with phosphogypsum met the minimum compressive strength required by the European standard for SSC (EN 15743/2010). Low heat of hydration rates mainly influenced by the low alkali activator content was observed. The excess of alkali activator (KOH) had different influences according to calcium sulfate content. In pastes made with low content (10%), 0.8% of KOH reduced the compressive strength, while in those with a high calcium sulfate content (20%) the high alkaline content resulted in the instability of ettringite. (author)

  7. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  8. Comparison of the leachability of three TRU cement waste forms

    Ross, W.A.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Roberts, F.P.; Harvey, C.O.

    1982-11-01

    Cement waste forms prepared by three processes, casting, cold pressing, and FUETAP (Formed Under Elevated Temperatures and Pressure) have been compared for their leachability by using the MCC-1 leach test. The results indicate that releases of plutonium are not controlled by the waste form matrix and that there is no significant overall advantage to any of the three cement processes from a leachability viewpoint

  9. EPOS Thematic Core Service Anthropogenic Hazards for SHEER project: maintain, process and manage your project research data

    Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Staszek, Monika; Olszewska, Dorota; Urban, Pawel; Jaroslawski, Janusz; Cielesta, Szymon; Mirek, Janusz; Wiszniowski, Jan; Picozzi, Matteo; Solaro, Giuseppe; Pringle, Jamie; Toon, Sam; Cesca, Simone; Kuehn, Daniela; Ruigrok, Elmer; Gunning, Andrew; Isherwood, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    The main objective of the "Shale gas exploration and exploitation induced risks - SHEER" project (Horizon 2020, call LCE 16-2014) is to develop a probabilistic methodology to assess and mitigate the short- and the long-term environmental risks associated with the exploration and exploitation of shale gas. To this end, the SHEER project makes use of a large amount of heterogeneous data of various types. This data, from different disciplines of science e.g. geophysical, geochemical, geological, technological, etc., must be homogenized, harmonized and made accessible exclusively for all project participants. This requires to develop an over-arching structure for high-level multidisciplinary data integration. The bespoke solution is provided by Thematic Core Service Anthropogenic Hazards (TCS AH) developed in the framework of European Plate Observing System Program (https://tcs.ah-epos.eu/, infrastructural projects IS-EPOS, POIG.02.03.00-14-090/13-00 and EPOS IP, H2020-INFRADEV-1-2015-1). TCS AH provides virtual access to a comprehensive, wide-scale and high quality research infrastructure in the field of induced seismicity and other anthropogenic hazards evoked by exploration and exploitation of geo-resources. TCS AH is designed as a functional e-research environment to ensure a researcher the maximum possible freedom for experimentation by providing a virtual laboratory flexible to create own workspace for processing streams. A data-management process promotes the use of research infrastructure in novel ways providing an access to (i) data gathered in the so-called "episodes", comprehensively describing a geophysical process, induced or triggered by human technological activity, which under certain circumstances can become hazardous for people, infrastructure and the environment, (ii) problem-oriented, specific services, with the particular attention devoted to methods analyzing correlations between technology, geophysical response and resulting hazards, (iii) the

  10. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  11. Cement-latex grouting mortar for cementing boreholes

    Kateev, I S; Golyshkina, L A; Gorbunova, I V; Kurochkin, B M; Vakula, Ya V

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of cement-latex grouting mortar for the purpose of separating strata when reinforcing boreholes at deposits in the Tatar Associated SSR is evaluated. Results of studies of the physical and mechanical properties of cement-latex grouting mortar systems (mortar plus brick) are presented. Formulas for preparing cement-latex grouting mortor are evaluated and results of industrial tests of such mortars shown.

  12. Multi-site risk-based project planning, optimization, sequencing, & budgeting process and tool for the integrated facility disposition project

    Nelson, J.G.; Castillo, C.; Huntsman, J.; Killoy, S.; Lucek, H.; Marks, T.C.

    2011-01-01

    Faced with the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex Transformation, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) was tasked with developing an integrated plan for the decommissioning of over 400 facilities and 300 environmental remediation units, as well as the many reconfiguration and modernization projects at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Y-12 Complex. Manual scheduling of remediation activities is time-consuming and inherently introduces bias of the scheduler or organization into the process. Clearly a well-defined process, quantitative risk-based tool was needed to develop an objective, unbiased baseline sequence and schedule with a sound technical foundation for the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP). Faced with limited available data, innovation was needed to extrapolate intelligent relative data for key risk parameters based on known data elements. The IFDP Supermodel was customized and expanded to provide this capability for conceptual planning of diverse project portfolios and multiple sites. (author)

  13. Identifying improvement potentials in cement production with life cycle assessment.

    Boesch, Michael Elias; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2010-12-01

    Cement production is an environmentally relevant process responsible for 5% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions and 7% of industrial fuel use. In this study, life cycle assessment is used to evaluate improvement potentials in the cement production process in Europe and the USA. With a current fuel substitution rate of 18% in Europe and 11% in the USA, both regions have a substantial potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save virgin resources by further increasing the coprocessing of waste fuels. Upgrading production technology would be particularly effective in the USA where many kiln systems with very low energy efficiency are still in operation. Using best available technology and a thermal substitution rate of 50% for fuels, greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 9% for Europe and 18% for the USA per tonne of cement. Since clinker production is the dominant pollution producing step in cement production, the substitution of clinker with mineral components such as ground granulated blast furnace slag or fly ash is an efficient measure to reduce the environmental impact. Blended cements exhibit substantially lower environmental footprints than Portland cement, even if the substitutes feature lower grindability and require additional drying and large transport distances. The highest savings in CO(2) emissions and resource consumption are achieved with a combination of measures in clinker production and cement blending.

  14. A New Biphasic Dicalcium Silicate Bone Cement Implant

    Fausto Zuleta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the processing parameters and biocompatibility of a novel biphasic dicalcium silicate (C2S cement. Biphasic α´L + β-C2Sss was synthesized by solid-state processing, and was used as a raw material to prepare the cement. In vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies were assessed by soaking the cement samples in simulated body fluid (SBF and human adipose stem cell cultures. Two critical-sized defects of 6 mm Ø were created in 15 NZ tibias. A porous cement made of the high temperature forms of C2S, with a low phosphorous substitution level, was produced. An apatite-like layer covered the cement’s surface after soaking in SBF. The cell attachment test showed that α´L + β-C2Sss supported cells sticking and spreading after 24 h of culture. The cement paste (55.86 ± 0.23 obtained higher bone-to-implant contact (BIC percentage values (better quality, closer contact in the histomorphometric analysis, and defect closure was significant compared to the control group (plastic. The residual material volume of the porous cement was 35.42 ± 2.08% of the initial value. The highest BIC and bone formation percentages were obtained on day 60. These results suggest that the cement paste is advantageous for initial bone regeneration.

  15. Application of high-strength non-shrink cement based grouting material in nuclear power installations

    Li Zhong; Zuo Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the related technical requirement of secondary grouting during the process of equipment installation in nuclear power projects. The method and procedure are introduced in detail from the aspects of acceptance, preparation, pouring, collecting and maintenance of the high-strength non-shrinking based pouring cement material, and the cautions during the construction is also provided. The factors affecting the quality of the field grouting is analyzed, and the measures to reduce or eliminate the micro-cracks during the process is provided. (authors)

  16. Chemical environment in cements

    Glasser, F.B.; Angus, M.J.; McCulloch, C.E.; Macphee, D.; Rahman, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The alkalinity of Portland cements is responsible for precipitation and low solubility of many radwastes species. The sources of alkalinity are evaluated and two chemical models, based on experimental and theoretical data presented enabling the effect of blending agents (PFA, silica fume, etc.) to be evaluated and the alkalinity of the system at longer ages predicted. The data take the form of a solubility model which is applicable to non-heat generating wastes. 7 refs., 10 figs

  17. Statistical study of chemical additives effects in the waste cementation

    Tello, Cledola C.O. de; Diniz, Paula S.; Haucz, Maria J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the statistical study, that was carried out to analyse the chemical additives effect in the waste cementation process. Three different additives from two industries were tested: set accelerator, set retarder and super plasticizers, in cemented pates with and without bentonite. The experiments were planned in accordance with the 2 3 factorial design, so that the effect of each type of additive, its quantity and manufacturer in cemented paste and specimens could be evaluated. The results showed that the use of these can improve the cementation process and the product. The admixture quantity and the association with bentonite were the most important factors affecting the process and product characteristics. (author). 4 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  19. Conceptual process description of M division incinerator project

    Thompson, T.K.

    1989-04-13

    This interoffice memorandum describes an incineration system to be used for incinerating wood. The system is comprised of a shredder and an incinerator. The entire process is described in detail. A brief study of particulates, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen oxides emission is presented.

  20. 78 FR 18481 - Project-Level Predecisional Administrative Review Process

    2013-03-27

    ... respondents expressed a preference for the post- decisional appeal process. One respondent stated that ``It is... this time are somewhat limited, but the final rule does include some modifications in response to the... provision allowing for extension of time to file appeals or objections. These procedures have been in place...

  1. Developing 21st Century Process Skills through Project Design

    Yoo, Jeong-Ju; MacDonald, Nora M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to illustrate how the promotion of 21st Century process skills can be used to enhance student learning and workplace skill development: thinking, problem solving, collaboration, communication, leadership, and management. As an illustrative case, fashion merchandising and design students conducted research for a…

  2. New product development processes for ICT-for-development projects

    McAlister, BN

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available in developing regions of the world is increasing rapidly. A number of methods and practices have been used by organizations to develop and deliver such ICT solutions, but a need exists to formalize product development processes for use in the ICT...

  3. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  4. Copper-promoted cementation of antimony in hydrochloric acid system: A green protocol

    Wu, Lian-Kui; Li, Ying-Ying; Cao, Hua-Zhen; Zheng, Guo-Qu, E-mail: zhenggq@zjut.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Antimony can be efficiently removed by cementation with copper powder. • Cemented antimony is in the form of Cu{sub 2}Sb. • Consumed copper powder is transformed to CuCl. • The cementation is a chemically controlled step. • No toxic stibine generates during the cementation process. - Abstract: A new method of recovering antimony in hydrochloric acid system by cementation with copper powder was proposed and carried out at laboratory scale. Thermodynamic analysis and cyclic voltammetry test were conducted to study the cementation process. This is a novel antimony removal technology and quite meets the requirements of green chemistry. The main cement product Cu{sub 2}Sb is a promising anodic material for lithium and sodium ion battery. And nearly all consumed copper powder are transformed into CuCl which is an important industrial material. The effect of reaction temperature, stoichiometric ratio of Cu to Sb(III), stirring rate and concentration of HCl on the cementation efficiency of antimony were investigated in detail. Optimized cementation condition is obtained at 60 °C for 120 min and stirring rate of 600 rpm with Cu/Sb(III) stoichiometric ratio of 6 in 3 mol L{sup −1} HCl. At this time, nearly all antimony can be removed by copper powder and the cementation efficiency is over 99%. The structure and morphologies of the cement products were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Results show that the reaction temperature has little influence on the morphology of the cement products which consist of particles with various sizes. The activation energy of the cementation antimony on copper is 37.75 kJ mol{sup −1}, indicating a chemically controlled step. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry results show that no stibine generates during the cementation process.

  5. Low porosity portland cement pastes based on furan polymers

    Darweesh, H.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of three different types of Furan polymers on the porosity, mechanical properties, mechanism of hydration and microstructure of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) pastes was investigated. The results showed that mixing the OPC with Furan polymers, the standard water of consistency of the different cement pastes decreases and therefore the setting times (initial and final) are shortened. The total porosity of the hardened cement pastes decreased, while the mechanical properties improved and enhanced at all curing ages of hydration compared with those of the pure OPC pastes. The hydration process with Furan polymers proceeded according to the following decreasing order: F.ac. > F.ph. > F.alc. > OPC

  6. The application of modern project management principles and processes in major nuclear decommissioning programmes

    Bayliss, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    The UKAEA has embarked upon an accelerated programme of decommissioning works. This has resulted in a review of its project management systems and processes. This paper describes these processes and their application to nuclear decommissioning and associated new build construction projects. Efficiencies from these processes are necessary. In addition this paper describes how UKAEA, where appropriate, utilizes modern forms of alliance contract so as to work in partnership with its contractors. (author)

  7. Improving Packet Processing Performance in the ATLAS FELIX Project

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)752705; The ATLAS collaboration; Anderson, John Thomas; Borga, Andrea; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Kai; Drake, Gary; Francis, David; Gorini, Benedetto; Lanni, Francesco; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Levinson, Lorne; Narevicius, Julia; Plessl, Christian; Roich, Alexander; Ryu, Soo; Schreuder, Frans Philip; Vandelli, Wainer; Zhang, Jinlong; Vermeulen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in high-energy physics (HEP) and related fields often impose constraints and challenges on data acquisition systems. As a result, these systems are implemented as unique mixtures of custom and commercial-off-the-shelf electronics (COTS), involving and connecting radiation-hard devices, large high-performance networks, and computing farms. FELIX, the Frontend Link Exchange, is a new PC-based general purpose data routing device for the data-acquisition system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. Performance is a very crucial point for devices like FELIX, which have to be capable of processing tens of gigabyte of data per second. Thus it is important to understand the performance limitations for typical workloads on modern hardware. We present an analysis of a packet processing algorithm that is used in FELIX, and show how the PC system's memory architecture plays a key factor in the overall data throughput achieved by the application. Finally, we present optimizations that increase the processing throug...

  8. Stabilization/solidification of selenium-impacted soils using Portland cement and cement kiln dust.

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Grubb, Dennis G; Reilly, Trevor L

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes were utilized to immobilize selenium (Se) as selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) and selenate (SeO(4)(2-)). Artificially contaminated soils were prepared by individually spiking kaolinite, montmorillonite and dredged material (DM; an organic silt) with 1000 mg/kg of each selenium compound. After mellowing for 7 days, the Se-impacted soils were each stabilized with 5, 10 and 15% Type I/II Portland cement (P) and cement kiln dust (C) and then were cured for 7 and 28 days. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the S/S treatments. At 28 days curing, P doses of 10 and 15% produced five out of six TCLP-Se(IV) concentrations below 10mg/L, whereas only the 15% C in DM had a TCLP-Se(IV) concentration soil-cement slurries aged for 30 days enabled the identification of Se precipitates by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). XRD and SEM-EDX analyses of the Se(IV)- and Se(VI)-soil-cement slurries revealed that the key selenium bearing phases for all three soil-cement slurries were calcium selenite hydrate (CaSeO(3).H(2)O) and selenate substituted ettringite (Ca(6)Al(2)(SeO(4))(3)(OH)(12).26H(2)O), respectively.

  9. Kinetics of strength gain of biocidal cements

    Rodin Aleksandr Ivanovich

    Full Text Available Biocorrosion becomes the determinative durability factor of buildings and constructions. Damages of construction materials caused by bacteria, filamentous fungi, actinomycetes constitute a serious danger to the constructions of a building or a structure and to the health of people. Biodeteriorations are typical both in old and new constructions. A great quantity of destruction factors of industrial and residential buildings under the influence of microorganisms was established in practice. Providing products and constructions based on concretes fungicidal and bactericidal properties is an important direction of modern construction material science. The most efficient way to solve this task is creation of biocidal cements. The article presents the results of experimental studies of kinetic dependences of strength gain by biocidal cements by physico-mechanical and physico-chemical analysis methods. The identical velocity character of initial hydration of the developed compositions of biocidal cements is set, as well as a more calm behavior of hardening processes at later terms. It has been established that the compositions of biocidal cements modified by sodium sulfate and sodium fluoride possess the greatest strength.

  10. The sorption and mechanical properties of the modified cement matrix used for conditioning of radioactive waste

    Dogaru, Daniela; Nuculae, Ortenzia; Jinescu, Gheorghita; Duliu, Octavian; Dogaru, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive contaminant sorption onto concrete represents one of the most important retardation mechanisms in engineered barriers such as the conditioning matrix itself, concrete walls and concrete floors. During the life of a disposal facility for radioactive waste, the sorption properties as well as the mechanical properties of the cement are affected by both external and internal processes. The most important sorbing material present in concrete is the hydrated cement. The sorption data obtained for specific cement or cement mixes in general may be used to characterize a given cement type. In order to improve the mechanical and sorption properties of the cement matrix, different additives were used in the laboratory tests. The used additives are known to have good sorption properties. The paper describes the influence of the concentration of additives on the mechanical and sorption properties of the cement matrix. As radioactive contaminants 134 Cs, 60 Co, 3 H, 241 Am were used. (authors)

  11. The crucial effect of early-stage gelation on the mechanical properties of cement hydrates

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Kanduč, Matej; Li, Lunna; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-07-01

    Gelation and densification of calcium-silicate-hydrate take place during cement hydration. Both processes are crucial for the development of cement strength, and for the long-term evolution of concrete structures. However, the physicochemical environment evolves during cement formation, making it difficult to disentangle what factors are crucial for the mechanical properties. Here we use Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations to study a coarse-grained model of cement formation, and investigate the equilibrium and arrested states. We can correlate the various structures with the time evolution of the interactions between the nano-hydrates during the preparation of cement. The novel emerging picture is that the changes of the physicochemical environment, which dictate the evolution of the effective interactions, specifically favour the early gel formation and its continuous densification. Our observations help us understand how cement attains its unique strength and may help in the rational design of the properties of cement and related materials.

  12. Analysis of architect’s performance indicators in project delivery process

    Marisa, A.

    2018-03-01

    Architect as a professional in the construction industry should possess a good performance in project delivery process. As a design professional, architect has an important role to ensure that the process is well-conducted by delivering a high-quality product for the clients. Thus, analyzing architect’s performance indicators is crucial in the project delivery process. This study aims to analyze the relative importance of architect performance indicators in project delivery process among registered architects in North Sumatera, Indonesia. A total of five indicators that measure architect performance in project delivery process were identified and 110 completed questionnaires were obtained and used for data analysis. A relative importance index is used to rank the relative importance of architect performance indicators. Results indicate that focus on the clients is the most important indicator of architect performance in project delivery process. This study demonstrates project communication as one of crucial indicators perceived by the architects for measuring their performance, and fills a knowledge gap on the importance of identifying the most important indicator for measuring architect performance from their own perspectives which previous studies have overlooked to improve performance assessment in project delivery process.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

    2008-01-31

    This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in

  14. Stability of reinforced cemented backfills

    Mitchell, R.J.; Stone, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mining with backfill has been the subject of several international meetings in recent years and a considerable research effort is being applied to improve both mining economics and ore recovery by using backfill for ground support. Classified mill tailings sands are the most commonly used backfill material but these fine sands must be stabilized before full ore pillar recovery can be achieved. Normal portland cement is generally used for stabilization but the high cost of cement prohibits high cement usage. This paper considers the use of reinforcements in cemented fill to reduce the cement usage. It is concluded that strong cemented layers at typical spacings of about 3 meters in a low cement content bulk fill can reinforce the fill and reduce the overall cement usage. Fibre reinforcements introduced into strong layers or into bulk fills are also known to be effective in reducing cement usage. Some development work is needed to produce the ideal type of anchored fibre in order to realize economic gains from fibre-reinforced fills

  15. Pre-analytic process control: projecting a quality image.

    Serafin, Mark D

    2006-09-26

    Within the health-care system, the term "ancillary department" often describes the laboratory. Thus, laboratories may find it difficult to define their image and with it, customer perception of department quality. Regulatory requirements give laboratories who so desire an elegant way to address image and perception issues--a comprehensive pre-analytic system solution. Since large laboratories use such systems--laboratory service manuals--I describe and illustrate the process for the benefit of smaller facilities. There exist resources to help even small laboratories produce a professional service manual--an elegant solution to image and customer perception of quality.

  16. Feasibility of backfilling mines using cement kiln dust, fly ash, and cement blends

    Beltagui, Hoda; Sonebi, Mohammed; Maguire, K.; Taylor, Susan

    2018-01-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is an industrial by-product of the cement manufacturing process, the composition of which can vary widely. Recent years of using alternative fuels have resulted in higher chloride and alkali contents within CKDs; as such, this limits the applications in which CKDs can be utilised. Using a CKD containing a high free lime content of 29.5%, it is shown that this CKD is capable of activating pulverized fuel ash (PFA) due to its high alkalinity, which can be utilised in low ...

  17. Application of precise MPD & pressure balance cementing technology

    Yong Ma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The precise managed pressure drilling (MPD technology is mainly used to deal with the difficulties encountered when oil and gas open hole sections with multiple pressure systems and the strata with narrow safety density window are drilled through. If its liner cementing is carried out according to the conventional method, lost circulation is inevitable in the process of cementing while the displacement efficiency of small-clearance liner cementing is satisfied. If the positive and inverse injection technology is adopted, the cementing quality cannot meet the requirements of later well test engineering of ultradeep wells. In this paper, the cementing operation of Ø114.3 mm liner in Well Longgang 70 which was drilled in the Jiange structure of the Sichuan Basin was taken as an example to explore the application of the cementing technology based on the precise MPD and pressure balancing method to the cementing of long open-hole sections (as long as 859 m with both high and low pressures running through multiple reservoirs. On the one hand, the technical measures were taken specifically to ensure the annulus filling efficiency of slurry and the pressure balance in the whole process of cementing. And on the other hand, the annulus pressure balance was precisely controlled by virtue of precise MPD devices and by injecting heavy weight drilling fluids through central pipes, and thus the wellbore pressure was kept steady in the whole process of cementing in the strata with narrow safety density window. It is indicated that Ø114.3 mm liner cementing in this well is good with qualified pressure tests and no channeling emerges at a funnel during the staged density reduction. It is concluded that this method can enhance the liner cementing quality of complex ultradeep gas wells and improve the wellbore conditions for the later safe well tests of high-pressure gas wells. Keywords: Ultradeep well, Liner cementing, Narrow safety density window, Precise

  18. Evaluation of ternary blended cements for use in transportation concrete structures

    Gilliland, Amanda Louise

    This thesis investigates the use of ternary blended cement concrete mixtures for transportation structures. The study documents technical properties of three concrete mixtures used in federally funded transportation projects in Utah, Kansas, and Michigan that used ternary blended cement concrete mixtures. Data were also collected from laboratory trial batches of ternary blended cement concrete mixtures with mixture designs similar to those of the field projects. The study presents the technical, economic, and environmental advantages of ternary blended cement mixtures. Different barriers of implementation for using ternary blended cement concrete mixtures in transportation projects are addressed. It was concluded that there are no technical, economic, or environmental barriers that exist when using most ternary blended cement concrete mixtures. The technical performance of the ternary blended concrete mixtures that were studied was always better than ordinary portland cement concrete mixtures. The ternary blended cements showed increased durability against chloride ion penetration, alkali silica reaction, and reaction to sulfates. These blends also had less linear shrinkage than ordinary portland cement concrete and met all strength requirements. The increased durability would likely reduce life cycle costs associated with concrete pavement and concrete bridge decks. The initial cost of ternary mixtures can be higher or lower than ordinary portland cement, depending on the supplementary cementitious materials used. Ternary blended cement concrete mixtures produce less carbon dioxide emissions than ordinary portland cement mixtures. This reduces the carbon footprint of construction projects. The barriers associated with implementing ternary blended cement concrete for transportation projects are not significant. Supplying fly ash returns any investment costs for the ready mix plant, including silos and other associated equipment. State specifications can make

  19. Radioactivity analysis of local and imported cement in Sudan

    Ahmed, Shimaa Nasr Eldeen Mohamed.

    2016-04-01

    In this study 10 cement samples were collected from local market. 2 sample taken from each type were samples labeled by A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, were A and B is Atbara cement C, D, Sakher Elsudan cement E, F, barber cement , G, H, black massy, I,J white hallway. 500 grams of cement sample was weighed and closed in plastic containers for four weeks so as to have secular equilibrium for uranium. Our goal of this study was estimate investigation of uranium-238, potassium-40, and thorium-232 level in cement samples. Natural radioactivity concentration in cement samples were measured by gamma ray spectrometry using Nal (TI). Calibration process carried out for gamma spectroscopy using MW652 as a reference source which recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) including-source-Cs-137 and Co-60 with two energy levels. The mean ± standard deviation concentration of k-40 was found 77.601±26.20 Bq/kg. The concentration of U-238 was found 25.19±9.142/kg and the concentration of Th-232 was found 08.94±04.23 Bq/kg. (Author)

  20. Influence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cements

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Le Saout, Gwenn; Gallucci, Emmanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the presence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cement was investigated. Blending of Portland cement with limestone was found to influence the hydrate assemblage of the hydrated cement. Thermodynamic calculations as well as experimental observations indicated that in the presence of limestone, monocarbonate instead of monosulfate was stable. Thermodynamic modelling showed that the stabilisation of monocarbonate in the presence of limestone indirectly stabilised ettringite leading to a corresponding increase of the total volume of the hydrate phase and a decrease of porosity. The measured difference in porosity between the 'limestone-free' cement, which contained less than 0.3% CO 2 , and a cement containing 4% limestone, however, was much smaller than calculated. Coupling of thermodynamic modelling with a set of kinetic equations which described the dissolution of the clinker, predicted quantitatively the amount of hydrates. The quantities of ettringite, portlandite and amorphous phase as determined by TGA and XRD agreed well with the calculated amounts of these phases after different periods of time. The findings in this paper show that changes in the bulk composition of hydrating cements can be followed by coupled thermodynamic models. Comparison between experimental and modelled data helps to understand in more detail the dominating processes during cement hydration

  1. Use of petroleum code as fuel in the cement industry

    Nawaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Cement industry is a very energy intensive industry. Each ton of cement produced requires 60 to 130 kilograms of fuel oil or an equivalent fuelling amount also requires an average 110 kWh of electricity as well over 40% of total production cost is the energy requirements in the cement industry (i.2). Normally oil, gas or coal is fired in cement kilns as traditional fuels. However use of waste, both as alternative fuels and raw materials is now common practice in many cement companies. Many different types of wastes are burnt today in cement kilns like used tyres, rubber, paper waste, waste oils, waste wood, paper sludge, sewage, animal meal and animal remains (i,4). The choice of fuel for the purpose is normally based on price and availability considering different properties of the fuel as energy contents, ash contents, moisture and volatiles contents. Petcoke is not yet produced in any petroleum refinery in Pakistan but it is abundantly available in the market worldwide as it is obtained as a waste product during the refining processes. The purpose of the current research is to figure out the suitability of petroleum coke as a fuel for cement industry both on technical and economic basis. (author)

  2. Investigation of magnesium oxychloride cement at the initial hardening stage

    Averina Galina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the process of variation of magnesium oxychloride cement deformations at the initial hardening stage depending on the activity of magnesium oxide powder which is determined by the parameters of the source material burning. Investigation is focused on magnesium cements obtained from pure magnesium hydroxide. Source materials were burnt at various temperatures with the purpose to obtain magnesium oxide powder with different activity. Regular content of hydrated phases was determined in hardened magnesium cement prepared on the basis of binders with different activity. The study reveals the influence of magnesium oxide powder activity on the process of deformation occurrence in hardened magnesium cement and its tendency to crack formation.

  3. Encapsulation of ILW raffinate in the Dounreay cementation plant

    Sinclair, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    The Dounreay Cementation Plant has been designed and constructed to encapsulate the first cycle liquid raffinate arising from the reprocessing of irradiated Research Reactor fuel into a cementitious matrix. The acidic liquid waste is conditioned with sodium hydroxide prior to mixing with the cement powders (a 9:1 ratio of Blast Furnace Slag / Ordinary Portland Cement with 5% Lime). The complete cement mixing process is performed within the 500-liter drum, which provides the waste package primary containment. The plant has recently been commissioned and has commenced routine operation, processing stocks of existing raffinate that has been stored at Dounreay for up to 30 years. The waste loading per drum has been optimised within the constraints of the chemical composition of the raffinate, with an expected plant throughput of 2.5 m 3 /week. (author)

  4. Evaluation of brazilian bentonites as additive in the radwaste cementation

    Tello, C.C.O. de.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of some Brazilian bentonites has been evaluated, concerning to their use as additive in the radwaste cementation. The purpose of the bentonite is to retain the radioelements in the final product in leaching process. Experiments to determine properties such as compressive strenght, viscosity, set time leaching and cesium sorption have been carried out to this evaluation. After one-year test, the results show that the bentonites greatly reduce the cesium release. A literature survey about cementation process and plants and about the cement product characteristics has been made in order to obtain a reliable final product, able to be transported and storaged. Some leaching test methods and mathematical models, that could be applied in the evaluation of cement products with bentonite have been evaluated. (author) [pt

  5. Penetration of natural gas in industrial processes for direct burning: the case of ceramics, cement and glass industries; Penetracao do gas natural em processos industriais de queima direta: caso das industrias ceramica, cimento e vidro

    Berni, Mauro Donizeti; Leite, Alvaro A. Furtado [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Dorileo, Ivo Leandro [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (NIEPE/UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Estudos em Planejamento Energetico; Bajay, Sergio Valdir [Universidade estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia], e-mail: bajay@fem.unicamp.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Industrial sector can use the natural gas (NG) as raw material, as fuel and in co-generation. The NG as fuel is used, predominantly, to produce heat in the Brazilian industries. That rate, both main forms of industrial use of the NG are its direct burning in kilns - when the direct contact is had with the product - and the supply of process heat through boilers, for instance. Direct burning is used in the ceramic, cement and glass industries. This work discuss the penetration opportunity of the NG in the direct burning regarding the fuel oil and other energy that it can substitute, the environmental effects and the co-generation possibilities in each one of the analyzed industrial blanches in this work. (author)

  6. MANAGEMENT OF A COMPANY’S ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY IN THE PROCESS OF INNOVATIVE PROJECTS IMPLEMENTATION

    Juliana M. Sulejmanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to management of a company’s sustainability in the process of innovative projects implementation. The author suggests using dynamic index named aggregated index of a company’s economic stability. Criteria of choosing innovative projects to be implemented are worked out. These criteria add traditional estimation and take into account changing company’s economic stability at every stage of project lifecycle.

  7. Diagraphies de cimentation : vers une analyse de la qualité du contact ciment-formation Cement Logging: Toward an Analysis of the Quality of Cement-Formation Bonding

    Isambourg P.

    2006-11-01

    specialists (VDL tool. The greatest progress that could be made with cementing logs was to detect defects in the cement-formation interface. This is what we have done within the framework of a project financed by ARTEP (Association de Recherche sur les Techniques d'Exploitation du Pétrole, made up of Total, Gaz de France (GDF, Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP and Elf Aquitaine Production (EAP. Laboratory experiments performed in the Fluid Analysis Service at Boussens involved the injecting of cement between a casing and a simulated formation, with or without the presence of mud having varying thicknesses. Fast or slow formations as well as fast or slow cements were used. The ultrasonic echoes obtained by a ceramic CET sonde were recorded and analyzed. Both theory and the experiments showed that ultrasonic echoes are modified in the presence of mud and/or gas. The relations between the shape of the ultrasonic wave and presence of mud and gas between the cement and the formation were determined. A processing procedure is proposed with its limitations. Cementing Quality : If we had to set forth a quality criterion for cementing, we would say: For cementing to be considered as being of good quality, the cement sheath must be at least as leakproof as the formation it replaces. When a borehole is drilled, different zones are effectively brought into communication. The initial isolation will be established by the casing + cement sheath. This function will thus be correctly ensured if this combination lets pass only the start of a fluid leak (water, oil, gas that is less than or equal to what is allowed by an equivalent section of formation drilled through. Naturally, this concept is mainly applied to sensitive zones, e. g. such as the overburden of a reservoir. However, it should be noted that this concept is also applied to the reservoir itself and not only to the overburden. Indeed, a leaky cement sheath at the level of a reservoir with relatively low permeability could, for

  8. Cement encapsulation of low-level radioactive slurries of complex chemistry

    Cau Dit Coumes, C.

    2000-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out to solidify in cement a low-level radioactive waste of complex chemistry which should be produced in a new plant designed to process radioactive effluents from CEA Cadarache Research Center. Direct cementation comes up against a major problem: a very long setting time of cement due to strong inhibition by borates from the waste. A two-stage process, including a chemical treatment prior to immobilization, has been elaborated and the resulted material characterized. (authors)

  9. Integrating a Procurement Management Process into Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM: A Case-Study on Oil and Gas Projects, the Piping Process

    Sung-Hwan Jo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC of oil and gas megaprojects often experience cost overruns due to substantial schedule delays. One of the greatest causes of these overruns is the mismanagement of the project schedule, with the piping works (prefabrication and installation occupying a majority of that schedule. As such, an effective methodology for scheduling, planning, and controlling of piping activities is essential for project success. To meet this need, this study used the Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM to develop a piping construction delay prevention methodology, incorporating material procurement processes for EPC megaprojects. Recent studies indicate that the traditional scheduling method used on oil and gas mega projects has critical limitations regarding resource scarcity, calculation of activity duration, and dealing with uncertainties. To overcome these limitations, the Theory of Constraints-based CCPM was proposed and implemented to provide schedule buffers management. Nonexistent in literature, and of critical importance, is this paper’s focus on the resource buffer, representing material uncertainty and management. Furthermore, this paper presents a step-by-step process and flow chart for project, construction, and material managers to effectively manage a resource buffer through the CCPM process. This study extends the knowledge of traditional resource buffers in CCPM to improve material and procurement management, thus avoiding the shortage of piping materials and minimizing delays. The resultant process was validated by both deterministic and probabilistic schedule analysis through two case studies of a crude pump unit and propylene compressor installation at a Middle Eastern Refinery Plant Installation. The results show that the CCPM method effectively handles uncertainty, reducing the duration of piping works construction by about a 35% when compared to the traditional method. Furthermore, the

  10. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

    2010-12-22

    This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

  11. Accelerator Production of Tritium project process waste assessment

    Carson, S.D.; Peterson, P.K.

    1995-09-01

    DOE has made a commitment to compliance with all applicable environmental regulatory requirements. In this respect, it is important to consider and design all tritium supply alternatives so that they can comply with these requirements. The management of waste is an integral part of this activity and it is therefore necessary to estimate the quantities and specific wastes that will be generated by all tritium supply alternatives. A thorough assessment of waste streams includes waste characterization, quantification, and the identification of treatment and disposal options. The waste assessment for APT has been covered in two reports. The first report was a process waste assessment (PWA) that identified and quantified waste streams associated with both target designs and fulfilled the requirements of APT Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Item 5.5.2.1. This second report is an expanded version of the first that includes all of the data of the first report, plus an assessment of treatment and disposal options for each waste stream identified in the initial report. The latter information was initially planned to be issued as a separate Waste Treatment and Disposal Options Assessment Report (WBS Item 5.5.2.2)

  12. Accelerator Production of Tritium project process waste assessment

    Carson, S.D.; Peterson, P.K.

    1995-09-01

    DOE has made a commitment to compliance with all applicable environmental regulatory requirements. In this respect, it is important to consider and design all tritium supply alternatives so that they can comply with these requirements. The management of waste is an integral part of this activity and it is therefore necessary to estimate the quantities and specific wastes that will be generated by all tritium supply alternatives. A thorough assessment of waste streams includes waste characterization, quantification, and the identification of treatment and disposal options. The waste assessment for APT has been covered in two reports. The first report was a process waste assessment (PWA) that identified and quantified waste streams associated with both target designs and fulfilled the requirements of APT Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Item 5.5.2.1. This second report is an expanded version of the first that includes all of the data of the first report, plus an assessment of treatment and disposal options for each waste stream identified in the initial report. The latter information was initially planned to be issued as a separate Waste Treatment and Disposal Options Assessment Report (WBS Item 5.5.2.2).

  13. The asbestos cement container and its characterization program

    Kertesz, C.; Oliver, J.; Jaouen, C.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of packing container is designed in France, by SGN, for the reprocessing wastes conditioning: the asbestos cement container (CAC) made by the industrial process for pipes fabrication. Two types of CAC are studied, differing from each other by their wall thickness. The technology of which SGN is in charge is presented. A characterization program is operated by CEA in view of satisfying to regulatory requirements. Emphasis is placed upon the radionuclides migration study, through different asbestos cement samples

  14. The development of stochastic process modeling through risk analysis derived from scheduling of NPP project

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Roh, Myung Sub

    2013-01-01

    There are so many different factors to consider when constructing a nuclear power plant successfully from planning to decommissioning. According to PMBOK, all projects have nine domains from a holistic project management perspective. They are equally important to all projects, however, this study focuses mostly on the processes required to manage timely completion of the project and conduct risk management. The overall objective of this study is to let you know what the risk analysis derived from scheduling of NPP project is, and understand how to implement the stochastic process modeling through risk management. Building the Nuclear Power Plant is required a great deal of time and fundamental knowledge related to all engineering. That means that integrated project scheduling management with so many activities is necessary and very important. Simulation techniques for scheduling of NPP project using Open Plan program, Crystal Ball program, and Minitab program can be useful tools for designing optimal schedule planning. Thus far, Open Plan and Monte Carlo programs have been used to calculate the critical path for scheduling network analysis. And also, Minitab program has been applied to monitor the scheduling risk. This approach to stochastic modeling through risk analysis of project activities is very useful for optimizing the schedules of activities using Critical Path Method and managing the scheduling control of NPP project. This study has shown new approach to optimal scheduling of NPP project, however, this does not consider the characteristic of activities according to the NPP site conditions. Hence, this study needs more research considering those factors

  15. The development of stochastic process modeling through risk analysis derived from scheduling of NPP project

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Roh, Myung Sub [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    There are so many different factors to consider when constructing a nuclear power plant successfully from planning to decommissioning. According to PMBOK, all projects have nine domains from a holistic project management perspective. They are equally important to all projects, however, this study focuses mostly on the processes required to manage timely completion of the project and conduct risk management. The overall objective of this study is to let you know what the risk analysis derived from scheduling of NPP project is, and understand how to implement the stochastic process modeling through risk management. Building the Nuclear Power Plant is required a great deal of time and fundamental knowledge related to all engineering. That means that integrated project scheduling management with so many activities is necessary and very important. Simulation techniques for scheduling of NPP project using Open Plan program, Crystal Ball program, and Minitab program can be useful tools for designing optimal schedule planning. Thus far, Open Plan and Monte Carlo programs have been used to calculate the critical path for scheduling network analysis. And also, Minitab program has been applied to monitor the scheduling risk. This approach to stochastic modeling through risk analysis of project activities is very useful for optimizing the schedules of activities using Critical Path Method and managing the scheduling control of NPP project. This study has shown new approach to optimal scheduling of NPP project, however, this does not consider the characteristic of activities according to the NPP site conditions. Hence, this study needs more research considering those factors.

  16. Delivering Software Process-Specific Project Courses in Tertiary Education Environment: Challenges and Solution

    Rong, Guoping; Shao, Dong

    2012-01-01

    The importance of delivering software process courses to software engineering students has been more and more recognized in China in recent years. However, students usually cannot fully appreciate the value of software process courses by only learning methodology and principle in the classroom. Therefore, a process-specific project course was…

  17. The INNOHYP-CA Project: producing Hydrogen by innovative high-temperature processes

    Giaconia, A.; Giorgiantoni, G.; Liberatore, R.; Tarquini, P.; Vignolini, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Project, financed under the 6. Framework Programme, has selected a member of innovative high-temperature processes that seem promising for large-scale production of Hydrogen. ENEA has contributed to the analysis of the status of national and regional projects in the European countries and to the definition of guidelines for the future development of these technologies [it

  18. High Performance Parallel Processing Project: Industrial computing initiative. Progress reports for fiscal year 1995

    Koniges, A.

    1996-02-09

    This project is a package of 11 individual CRADA`s plus hardware. This innovative project established a three-year multi-party collaboration that is significantly accelerating the availability of commercial massively parallel processing computing software technology to U.S. government, academic, and industrial end-users. This report contains individual presentations from nine principal investigators along with overall program information.

  19. pep-up: a review of the umgeni valley pro.ject evaluation process

    The evaluation process at the Umgeni Valle~ Project is.described. Its evolution, background and ... mental Education circles in Southern Africa. The ... t? the percei~ed need for evaluation of the Umgen1 Valley ProJect. ... This group, insisting that they were facilitating .... Phase : An integrated summary of all fielc and working ...

  20. Assessment of cement durability in repository environment

    Ferreira, E.G.A.; Vicente, R.; Isiko, V.L.K.; Miyamoto, H.; Marumo, J.T.; Gobbo, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed at investigating the durability of cement paste under nuclear waste repository conditions using accelerated tests. Cement paste samples are examined after being exposed to the environmental conditions that are expected to prevail in the repository environment and the results are compared with those obtained with unexposed specimens or specimens exposed to reference conditions. The following exposure conditions were selected: a) Immersion in salt solution, distilled water, or kept in dry storage; b) Room temperature (20 C. degrees) or high temperature (60 C. degrees); c) Immersion time of 30 days or 60 days (not for dry storage); d) Irradiation to a dose of (400 kGy) or background radiation (0 kGy). After exposure to the stressing conditions, the effects of each factor on the cement paste samples were observed by changes in their characteristics. Compressive strength tests were performed on all samples and some of them were investigated in terms of changes in mineralogy by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). With the results obtained so far it was possible to point out the following conclusions. First, after a period of immersion in water, cement paste samples further hydrated and presented higher mechanical resistance, as expected. Secondly, dry storage did not allow a complete hydration as a consequence of pore water evaporation. High temperatures intensified this process and led to the ettringite decomposition to meta-ettringite. Thirdly, higher temperature accelerated hydration kinetics and promoted higher mechanical resistance in samples kept under immersion. Fourthly, the irradiation dose applied was unable to change the mineralogy of cement paste samples and fifthly, no statistically significant differences were observed between 30 or 60 days exposure time, for the test conditions

  1. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  2. Design and application of environmentally effective concrete with usage of chrysotile-cement waste

    Egorova Lada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction is resource-demanding industry, characterized by a large volume of waste. Particularly chrysotile cement waste obtained both in production and in dismantling over age chrysotile-cement products: corrugated asbestos boards and flat sheets, chrysotile-cement tubes. We propose to use dry chrysotile-cement waste as recycled aggregate for concrete. Based on developed compositions and identified properties of heavy concrete with chrysotile-cement waste introduce this technology to the production of foundation wall blocks. The studies confirmed the possibility of using chrysotile-cement aggregate and fine screening of crushing as a secondary coarse and fine aggregates for concrete with proper quality without increasing the cost of the product. Environmental safety of the obtained products was ensured. The direction for implementation of the research project was proposed.

  3. Silver-Doped Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements with Antibacterial Properties

    J. V. Rau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPCs with antibacterial properties are demanded for clinical applications. In this study, we demonstrated the use of a relatively simple processing route based on preparation of silver-doped CPCs (CPCs-Ag through the preparation of solid dispersed active powder phase. Real-time monitoring of structural transformations and kinetics of several CPCs-Ag formulations (Ag = 0 wt %, 0.6 wt % and 1.0 wt % was performed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction technique. The partial conversion of β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP phase into the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD took place in all the investigated cement systems. In the pristine cement powders, Ag in its metallic form was found, whereas for CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, CaAg(PO33 was detected and Ag (met. was no longer present. The CPC-Ag 0 wt % cement exhibited a compressive strength of 6.5 ± 1.0 MPa, whereas for the doped cements (CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % the reduced values of the compressive strength 4.0 ± 1.0 and 1.5 ± 1.0 MPa, respectively, were detected. Silver-ion release from CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, measured by the Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, corresponds to the average values of 25 µg/L and 43 µg/L, respectively, rising a plateau after 15 days. The results of the antibacterial test proved the inhibitory effect towards pathogenic Escherichia coli for both CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, better performances being observed for the cement with a higher Ag-content.

  4. Negotiation processes in urban redevelopment projects: dealing with conflicts by balancing integrative and distributive approaches

    Baarveld, Marlijn; Smit, Marnix; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Dealing with conflict through dialogue receives considerable attention in current planning approaches. However, debate and negotiation are also inevitable features in the planning of urban redevelopment projects. Insight into the negotiation process contributes to current planning practice as

  5. Foaming in Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant LAW Evaporation Processes - FY01 Summary Report

    Calloway, T.B.

    2002-01-01

    The LAW evaporation processes currently being designed for the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant are subject to foaming. Experimental simulant studies have been conducted in an effort to achieve an effective antifoam agent suitable to mitigate such foaming

  6. PLANNING QUALITY ASSURANCE PROCESSES IN A LARGE SCALE GEOGRAPHICALLY SPREAD HYBRID SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    Святослав Аркадійович МУРАВЕЦЬКИЙ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There have been discussed key points of operational activates in a large scale geographically spread software development projects. A look taken at required QA processes structure in such project. There have been given up to date methods of integration quality assurance processes into software development processes. There have been reviewed existing groups of software development methodologies. Such as sequential, agile and based on RPINCE2. There have been given a condensed overview of quality assurance processes in each group. There have been given a review of common challenges that sequential and agile models are having in case of large geographically spread hybrid software development project. Recommendations were given in order to tackle those challenges.  The conclusions about the best methodology choice and appliance to the particular project have been made.

  7. GENERAL ALGORITHMIC SCHEMA OF THE PROCESS OF THE CHILL AUXILIARIES PROJECTION

    A. N. Chichko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The general algorithmic diagram of systematization of the existing approaches to the process of projection is offered and the foundation of computer system of the chill mold arming construction is laid.

  8. Optimization and characterization of a cemented ultimate-storage product

    Brunner, H.

    1981-12-01

    The U- and Pu-containing packaging wastes can be homogeneously cemented after a washing and fragmentation process. Both finely crushed and coarsely fragmented raw wastes yield products with sufficient mechanical stability. The processability limit of the coarsely fragmented raw waste using cement paste or mortar is largely determined by the cellulose content, which is not to exceed 1.3% by weight in the end waste. Of 9 binders studied, the most corrosion-resistant products were obtained with blast-furnace slag cement, whereas poured concrete and Maxit are much less resistant in five-component brine. In the cemented product, hydrolysis of plasticizers (DOP) from plastics (PVC) occurs, leading to release of 2-ethyl-hexanol. This reaction occurs to a much lower degree with blast-furnace slag cement than with all other binders studied. The binder chosen for further tests consists of blast-furnace slag cement, concrete fluidizer and a stabilizer, and is processed at a W/C ratio of 0.43.

  9. Final Report Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Bryan, Frank [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Dennis, John [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Whitney, Michael M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  10. Collaborative Project: Improving the Representation of Coastal and Estuarine Processes in Earth System Models

    Bryan, Frank [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Dennis, John [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); MacCready, Parker [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whitney, Michael [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-10-20

    This project aimed to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving and enhancing the representation of the processes involved in the cycling of freshwater through estuaries and coastal regions. This was a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of physical oceanographers, climate model developers, and computational scientists. It specifically targeted the DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  11. Health hazards of cement dust

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  12. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  13. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  14. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  15. Assessing the value of retrofitting cement plants for carbon capture: A case study of a cement plant in Guangdong, China

    Liang Xi; Li Jia

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A techno-economic analysis on retrofitting cement plants to CO 2 capture is conducted. ► A list of criteria is suggested to investigate the CO 2 capture retrofit potential in cement plants. ► The baseline estimated cost of CO 2 avoidance for retrofitting a cement plant is US$70/tCO 2 e. ► The value of retrofit option is US$1.2 million with a 7.3% probability of economic viability. ► The retrofit option value reaches US$20 m with 67% probability under a high carbon price growth. - Abstract: The cement manufacturing sector is the second largest source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in the world. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is one of the most important technologies to decarbonise the cement manufacturing process. China has accounted for more than half of global cement production since 2008. This study suggests criteria to assess the potential to retrofit cement plants and analyses the economics of retrofitting cement plants for CCS with a case study of a modern dry process cement plant locating in Guangdong province, China. The study assumes the extra heat and power for CO 2 capture and compression is provided by a new 200 MW combined heat and power unit (CHP) (US$17.5/MW h thermal for the cost of coal). The estimated cost of CO 2 avoidance by retrofitting a cement plant for carbon capture in 2012 is US$70/tonne at a 14% discount rate with 25 years remaining lifetime. Through a stochastic cash flow analysis with a real option model and Monte Carlo simulation, the study found the value of an option to retrofit to be US$1.2 million with a 7.3% probability of economic viability. The estimate is very sensitive to the assumptions in the carbon price model (i.e. base carbon price is US$12.00/tCO 2 e in 2012 and the mean growth rate is 8%). The option value and the probability can reach US$20 million and 67% respectively, if a 10% mean carbon price growth is assumed. Compared with post-combustion carbon capture retrofitting prospect in

  16. Some Mechanical Properties of Concrete by using Manufactured Blended Cement with Grinded Local Rocks

    Zena K. Abbas Al-Anbori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available he use of blended cement in concrete provides economic, energy savings, and ecological benefits, and also provides. Improvement in the properties of materials incorporating blended cements. The major aim of this investigation is to develop blended cement technology using grinded local rocks . The research includes information on constituent materials, manufacturing processes and performance characteristics of blended cements made with replacement (10 and 20 % of grinded local rocks (limestone, quartzite and porcelinite from cement. The main conclusion of this study was that all types of manufactured blended cement conformed to the specification according to ASTM C595-12 (chemical and physical requirements. The percentage of the compressive strength for blended cement with 10% replacement are (20, 11 and 5 % , (2 , 12 and, 13 % and (18, 15 and 16 % for limestone , quartzite and porcelinite respectively at (7,28 and 90days for each compare to the reference mix, while blended cement with 20% replacement are (-3, -5 and -11 ,(6, -4% and -5 and (6, 4 and 6 % for limestone , quartzite and porcelinite respectively at (7, 28 and 90days compare to the reference mix .The other mechanical properties (flexural tensile strength and splitting tensile strength are the same phenomena of increase and decrease in compressive strength. The results indicated that the manufacture Portland-limestone cement, Portland-quartzite cement and Portland-porcelinite cement with 10% replacement of cement with improvable mechanical properties while the manufacture Portland-porcelinite cement with 20% replacement of cement with slight improvable mechanical properties and more economical cost.

  17. Immobilisation of strontium, nickel and iodide by a sulphate-resisting Portland cement

    Wieland, E.; Tits, J.; Spieler, P.; Dobler, J.-P.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of Sr(II), Ni(II) and I(-I) with sulphate-resisting Portland cement was investigated under highly alkaline conditions. Batch-sorption studies were performed by contacting HTS cement (haute teneur en silice, sulphate-resisting Portland cement, Lafarge, France) with artificial cement pore water (ACW). The composition of ACW was 0.18 M KOH, 0.114 M NaOH and 1.2 mM Ca(OH) 2 . 85 Sr, 63 Ni and 125 I were used as tracers. In the experiments with Sr(II) and Ni(II), isosaccharinic acid (ISA) was added to ACW at 10 -5 M to 10 -2 M in order to study the effect of complexing ligands on radionuclide retention. The stability of the tracer solutions and the cement suspensions were first assessed. Moreover, the inventory of the stable elements were determined in cement and cement pore water. We then studied the kinetics of the radionuclide-cement interaction process and measured the dependence of the distribution ratio (R d ) on the concentration of ISA and on the concentration of cement particles (S:L ratio). In the case of 63 Ni and 125 I a strong decrease in the distribution ratio (R d ) with increasing S:L ratio was observed. There is strong indication that the inventory of the stable fraction of an element present in cement pore water accounts for the retention of the radioisotope fraction. The results further indicate that phase transformations may occur in non-pre-equilibrated cement systems (non-equilibrium conditions) which affect 63 Ni uptake by HTS cement. The distribution ratios measured on HTS cement were compared with values obtained from measurements on important cement components (portlandite, CSH/C(A)SH-phases)

  18. Process, cost modeling and simulations for integrated project development of biomass for fuel and protein

    Pannir Selvam, P.V.; Wolff, D.M.B.; Souza Melo, H.N.

    1998-01-01

    The construction of the models for biomass project development are described. These models, first constructed using QPRO electronic spread sheet for Windows, are now being developed with the aid of visual and object oriented program as tools using DELPHI V.1 for windows and process simulator SUPERPRO, V.2.7 Intelligent Inc. These models render the process development problems with economic objectives to be solved very rapidly. The preliminary analysis of cost and investments of biomass utilisation projects which are included for this study are: steam, ammonia, carbon dioxide and alkali pretreatment process, methane gas production using anaerobic digestion process, aerobic composting, ethanol fermentation and distillation, effluent treatments using high rate algae production as well as cogeneration of energy for drying. The main project under developments are the biomass valuation projects with the elephant (Napier) grass, sugar cane bagasse and microalgae, using models for mass balance, equipment and production cost. The sensibility analyses are carried out to account for stochastic variation of the process yield, production volume, price variations, using Monte Carlo method. These models allow the identification of economical and scale up problems of the technology. The results obtained with few preliminary project development with few case studies are reported for integrated project development for fuel and protein using process and cost simulation models. (author)

  19. Preparation of cement from oil shale

    1922-08-24

    A process for preparing cement from oil shale is described. The simultaneous recovery of shale oil by heating the oil shale formed into briquets with finely ground lime or limestone in a stream of hot gases is characterized by the fact that live steam or fine drops of water as preserving and carbonization means is introduced into the furnace, at the place, where the temperature of the briquet reaches about 500 to 600/sup 0/ C.

  20. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof