WorldWideScience

Sample records for cement grouts

  1. Grouting Rock Fractures with Cement Grout

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tani, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    The radial flow rate of a cement grout in a rock fracture is obtained from Bingham's relation and the fact that the power expended by the injection mechanism is the energy dissipated by viscous effects. The energy balance reveals that the advance ratio is of fundamental importance in the grouting process and is inherently related to the rest and advance phases of a cement grout. This allows giving a precise definition of the zero flow path that divides the energy diagram into two distinct domains for advancing and non-advancing grout. The advance ratio and the zero flow path are used to explore the grouting of one or more fractures, analyze the GIN model in the context of the SL dispute, draw a terminal sequence considering the energy interval alternative, and reformulate the refusal criterion of the North American grouting method. Secondary grouting effects are also investigated.

  2. Investigation of a Hardened Cement Paste Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S.......This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S....

  3. Bleeding and Filtration of Cement-Based Grout

    OpenAIRE

    Draganovic, Almir

    2009-01-01

    Grouting is a common method of sealing rock around tunnels to reduce or stop water inflow. Successful grouting significantly minimizes the maintenance cost and safety of the tunnel. Some questions about bleeding and penetrability of the grouts have to be examined more closely to carry out a successful grouting. Bleeding of cement-based grout is a complex problem. Measuring methods used today originate from the measuring of the bleeding of cement pastes used in ordinary building industry. Whet...

  4. Laboratory studies on the longevity of cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes laboratory studies of the longevity of cement-based grouts being carried out as part of the International Stripa Project Phase III. The longevity properties determined for a reference grout (90% Sulphate Resistant Portland Cement, 10% silica fume, 0.4< water/cement<0.6 and superplasticizer) are compared with those of a slag cement grout. Laboratory tests have been carried out to determine the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer in fresh cement pastes; the leachability of the sorbed superplasticizer and its location in the structure of hardened cement paste; and the general leaching properties of selected cement-based grouts

  5. Microbial analyses of cement and grouting additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, L.; Jaegevall, S.; Paeaejaervi, A.; Rabe, L.; Edlund, J.; Eriksson, S. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    During sampling in the ONKALO tunnel in 2006, heavy growth of a slimy material was observed in connection with grouting. It was suggested to be microbial growth on organic additives leaching from the grout. Two sampling campaigns resulted in the isolation of several aerobic bacterial strains. Some of these strains were used in biodegradation studies of three solid cement powders, eight liquid grout additives, and six plastic drainage materials. Degradation was also studied using ONKALO groundwaters as inoculums. The isolated strains were most closely related to hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms. The biodegradation of seven of the products was tested using microorganisms isolated from the ONKALO slime in 2006; none of these strains could degrade the tested products. When ONKALO drillhole groundwaters were used as inoculums in the degradation studies, it was demonstrated that Structuro 111X, Mighty 150, and Super-Parmix supported growth of the groundwater microorganisms. Structuro 111X is a polycarboxylate condensate while Mighty 150 and Super-Parmix are condensates with formaldehyde and naphthalene. Some of the isolated microorganisms belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, many strains of which can degrade organic molecules. None of the plastic drainage materials supported growth during the degradation studies. Microorganisms were present in two of the liquid products when delivered, GroutAid and Super-Parmix. The potential of the organic compounds in grout additives to be degraded by microorganisms, increasing the risk of biofilm formation and complexing compound production, must be considered. Microbial growth will also increase the possibility of hydrogen sulphide formation. (orig.)

  6. Strength of a granular medium reinforced by cement grouting

    OpenAIRE

    Maalej, Yamen; Dormieux, Luc; Canou, Jean; Dupla, Jean Claude

    2007-01-01

    The present Note describes an experimental study devoted to the strength of a sand reinforced by cement grouting. Through grouting, the granular medium gains a cohesion without significant change of the friction angle. The most significant experimental feature is that the cohesion is proportional to the volume fraction of cement in the grouted material. This result is interpreted within the framework of a periodic homogenization applied to yield design.

  7. Penetrability due to filtration tendency of cement based grouts

    OpenAIRE

    Eklund, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Grouting as a method of strengthening and sealing rock, soil and concrete is widely used. The possibilities of sealing structures are of great importance from both an economical and environmental point of view. The cost of grouting has in certain projects been as high as the cost for the blasting and excavation of the tunnel. To improve the technique of grouting with cement based material, it is necessary to focus on the properties of the used grout mixture. The ability of a grout to penetrat...

  8. Efficiency of Micro-fine Cement Grouting in Liquefiable Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of strong ground motion, liquefaction hazards are likely to occur in saturated cohesion-less soils. The risk of liquefaction and subsequent deformation can be reduced by various ground improvement methods including the cement grouting technique. The grouting method was proposed for non-disruptive mitigation of liquefaction risk at developed sites susceptible to liquefaction. In this research, a large-scale experiment was developed for assessment of micro-fine cement grouting effect on strength behavior and liquefaction potential of loose sand. Loose sand samples treated with micro-fine grout in multidirectional experimental model, were tested under cyclic and monotonic triaxial loading to investigate the influence of micro-fine grout on the deformation properties and pore pressure response. The behavior of pure sand was compared with the behavior of sand grouted with a micro-fine cement grout. The test results were shown that cement grouting with low concentrations significantly decreased the liquefaction potential of loose sand and related ground deformation

  9. Bell Canyon Test (BCT) cement grout development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of the cement grout for the Bell Canyon Test was accomplished at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. Initial development work centered on a saltwater grout with Class H cement, fly ash, and an expansive additive. Testing of the saltwater grout showed suitable properties except for the interface between anhydrite rock and grout in small core samples. Higher than expected permeability occurred at the interface because of space between the grout and the anhydrite; the space was produced as a result of allowing the specimens to dry. A change to freshwater grout and proper care to prevent the specimens from drying alleviated this condition. The BCT-1FF freshwater grout mixture was used in both the plug ONE and ONEX field grouting operations. Testing of the development grout mixtures was also done at Dowell, Pennsylvania State University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results of the testing and evaluation by the four laboratories are included in the report. Field batching, mixing, and placement of the grout at the plug locations for both plug ONE and ONEX were satisfactory with adequate quality control. The freshwater grout mixture maintained adequate flow characteristics for pumpability for 3 1/2 h during each of the two field operations. Physical property and expansivity data for the field samples through 90 days' age are in general agreement with laboratory development data. A large number of samples were obtained for inclusion in the long-term durability studies and the geochemical programs. The high-density, low water-cement ratio expansive grout (BCT-1FF) is considered to be an excellent candidate for plugging boreholes at most locations

  10. Studies of cement grouts and grouting techniques for sealing a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates a cement-based grout (90% Type 50, 10% silica fume, 0.4< water-to-cement ratio, w/c<0.6) that has been used in field trials to evaluate suitable grouts and grouting techniques that could be used for sealing a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault mined deep in granite. The authors describe laboratory studies carried out to determine the following grout properties: hydraulic conductivity (k); resistance to piping and erosion during setting; influence of group on the pH and chemical composition of water permeating grouted rock; and the ability of the grout to self-seal after fracturing. Laboratory tests have confirmed the low intrinsic k of these cement mixtures (10-14 m/s). Using a specially developed cone-in-cone apparatus, the authors have studied the effect of fracture dilation and temperature changes on the k of thin films of cement. If fractured, the grout has an ability to self-seal and the rate of self-sealing increases with increasing temperature. Test results are reported

  11. Superplasticizer function and sorption in high performance cement based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes laboratory studies undertaken to determine interactions between the main components of high-performance cement-based grout. These interactions were studied with the grouts in both their unset and hardened states with the specific intention of determining the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer; the phase of residence of the superplasticizer in hardened materials; and the permanence of the superplasticizer in hardened grouts. In unset pastes attempts were made to extract superplasticizer by mechanical processes. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was leached from the grouts. A microautoradiographic method was developed to investigate the phases of residence of superplasticizer in hardened grouts and confirm the inferences from the leaching studies. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was located on the hydrated phases formed during the early stages of cement hydration. These include tricalcium aluminate hydrates and tricalcium silicate phases. There is some tendency for the superplasticizer to sorb on ettringite. The presence of superplasticizer did not coincide with the locations of unreacted silica fume and high silica content phases such as C2S-H. The observations explain the findings of the studies of unset pastes which also showed that the sorption of superplasticizer is likely to be enhanced with increased mixing water content and, hence, distribution in and exposure to the hydration reaction surfaces in the grout. Superplasticizer can be leached in very small quantities from the hardened grouts. Rapid release takes place from the unsorbed superplasticizer contained in the accessible pore space. Subsequent release likely occurs with dissolution of the cement phases and the exposure of isolated pores to groundwater. (au) (37 refs.)

  12. Cement based grouts - longevity laboratory studies: leaching behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a series of laboratory tests carried out to determine the possible leaching behaviour of cement-based grouts in repository environments. A reference high-performance cement-based grout, comprised of Canadian Type 50 (U.S. Type V) Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement, silica fume, potable water and superplasticizer, and a commercially available cement grout were subjected to leaching in distilled water and three simulated groundwaters of different ionic strength. Hardened, monolithic specimens of the grout were leached in static, pulsed-flow and continuous flow conditions at temperatures from 10 degrees C to 150 degrees C for periods of up to 56 days. The changes in concentration of ions in the leachants with time were determined and the changes in the morphology of the surfaces of the grout specimens were examined using electron microscopy. After a review of possible mechanisms of degradation of cement-based materials, the data from these experiments are presented. The data show that the grouts will leach when in contact with water through dissolution of more soluble phases. Comparison of the leaching performance of the two grouts indicates that, while there are some minor differences, they behaved quite similarly. The rate of the leaching processes were found to tend to decrease with time and to be accompanied by precipitation and/or growth of an assemblage of secondary alteration phases (i.e., CaCO3, Mg(OH)2). The mechanisms of leaching depended on the environmental conditions of temperature, groundwater composition and water flow rate. Matrix dissolution occurred. However, in many of the tests leaching was shown to be limited by the precipitated/reaction layers which acted as protective surface coatings. (37 refs.) (au)

  13. In situ grouting of low-level burial trenches with a cement-based grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A restoration technology being evaluated for use in the closure of one of the low-level radwaste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is trench stabilization using a cement-based grout. To demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of this technology, two interconnecting trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) were selected as candidates for in situ grouting with a particulate grout. The primary objective was to demonstrate the increased trench stability and decreased potential for leachate migration following in situ injection of a particulate grout into the waste trenches. Stability against trench subsidence is a critical issue. After grouting, soil-penetration tests disclosed that stability had been improved greatly. For example, refusal (defined as > 100 blows to penetrate 1 ft) was encountered in 17 of the 22 tests conducted within the trench area. Mean refusal depths for the two trenches were 3.5 and 2.6 m. Stability of the trench was significantly better than pregrout conditions, and at depths > 2.4 m, the stability was very near that observed in the native soil formation outside the trench. Tests within the trench showed lower stability within this range probably because of the presence of intermediate-sized soil voids (formed during backfilling) that were too small to be penetrated and filled by the conventional cement grout formulation. Hydraulic conductivity within the trench remained very high (>0.1 cm/s) and significantly greater than outside the trench. Postgrout air pressurization tests also revealed a large degree of intervoid linkage within and between the two trenches. To effectively reduce hydraulic conductivity and to develop stability within the upper level of the trench, injection of a clay/microfine cement grout into the upper level of the grouted trench is planned

  14. Estimated longevity of performance of Portland cement grout seal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sealing of boreholes, fractures and underground workings of repositories is a common concern for all programs investigating the deep burial of nuclear waste as a disposal mechanism. Two grouting materials, bentonite and portland cement, have been identified by many programs as likely candidate seal materials. The longevity of performance of both of these materials is currently being investigated under the auspices of the Stripa Project. These investigations comprise coordinated laboratory, field and modeling studies to produce fundamental data, practical experience and estimates of long-range performance, respectively. Long-term performance is an especially sensitive issue for cement because the phases that comprise cement are metastable. Accordingly, it may be assumed that cement grout performance will degrade with time. For a simplified cement system, two mechanisms for chemical degradation have been considered: phase change and dissolution. When considering dissolution, both equilibrium (slow flow) and open (fast flow) systems have been analyzed to establish bounds. Granitic terrain groundwaters ranging from fresh to saline have been taken as solvents. To assess the consequences in terms of flow, an empirical relation between cement permeability and porosity has been developed. Predictions of performance changes with time have been produced by making conservative estimates of local hydraulic head conditions for various periods of repository history. For the crystalline rock environments considered, preliminary results indicate that cement grout performance may be acceptable for tens of thousands to millions of years providing its initial hydraulic conductivity is on the order of 10-12 m/s

  15. Cement-based grouts in geological disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrei, M. [AECL Research, Pinnawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    The behavior and performance of a specially developed high-performance cement-based grout has been studied through a combined laboratory and in situ research program conducted under the auspices of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP). A new class of cement-based grouts - high-performance grouts-with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures was developed and investigated. These high-performance grouts, which were injected into fractures in the granitic rock at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada, are shown to successfully reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass from <10{sup -7} m s{sup -1} to 10{sup -9} m s{sup -1} and to penetrate fissures in the rock with apertures as small as 10 {mu}m. Furthermore, the laboratory studies have shown that this high - performance grout has very low hydraulic conductivity and is highly leach resistant under repository conditions. Microcracks generated in this materials from shrinkage, overstressing or thermal loads are likely to self-seal. The results of these studies suggest that the high-performance grouts can be considered as viable materials in disposal-vault sealing applications. Further work is needed to fully justify extrapolation of the results of the laboratory studies to time scales relevant to performance assessment.

  16. Cement grouting during installation of ground anchors in non-cohesive soils

    OpenAIRE

    Domes, Xenia A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure grouting during installation of grouted ground anchors is known to increase anchor capacity in non-cohesive soils, but little information is available on correlations between applied grouting pressures, duration of grouting, ground conditions and increase of anchor pull-out capacity. The presented PhD study is concerned with processes taking place during installation of grouted ground anchors in non-cohesive soils, where filtration of the cement grout is assumed. It...

  17. Rheology of cement grout  : Ultrasound based in-line measurement technique and grouting design parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Mashuqur

    2015-01-01

    Grouting is performed in order to decrease the permeability and increase the stiffness of the material, especially soil and rock. For tunnelling and underground constructions, permeation grouting is done where cement based materials are pumped inside drilled boreholes under a constant pressure, higher than the ground water pressure. The aim of permeation grouting is to reduce the water flow into tunnels and caverns and to limit the lowering of the surrounding groundwater table. Cement based m...

  18. The use of cement grouts for the immobilisation of solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of cement grouts is being considered for the immobilisation of solid items of radioactive waste. In this report the factors which influence the selection of a grout for use in an active plant are identified. The properties and limitations of standard cement grouts are summarised. Inactive grouting trials carried out in the period September 1981 to June 1982 on the 220 dm3 scale are described. (author)

  19. Influence of using slag cement on the microstructure and durability related properties of cement grouts for micropiles

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega Álvarez, José Marcos; Albaladejo Ruiz, Arturo; Pastor Navarro, José Luis; Sánchez Martín, Isidro; Climent, Miguel-Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Today, the use of micropiles for different applications has become very common. In Spain, the cement grouts for micropiles are prepared using ordinary Portland cement and w:c ratio 0.5, although the micropiles standards do not restrict the cement type to use, provided that it reaches a certain compressive strength. In this study, the influence of using slag cement on the microstructure and durability related properties of cement grouts for micropiles have been studied until 90 hardening days,...

  20. Application of resistivity monitoring to evaluate cement grouting effect in earth filled dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mo; Yoon, Wang-Jung [Department of Energy and Resources, Chonnam national university, Gwangju, 500-757, Rep of KOREA (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, we applied electrical resistivity monitoring method to evaluate the cement grouting effect. There are a lot of ways to evaluate cement grouting effect. In order to do this evaluation in a great safety, high efficiency, and lower cost, resistivity monitoring is found to be the most appropriate technique. In this paper we have selected a dam site from Korea to acquire resistivity monitoring data and compare the results of inversion to estimate the cement grouting effect.

  1. Properties of cement-fly ash grout admixed with bentonite, silica fume, or organic fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed laboratory study was conducted to investigate the properties of cement-fly ash grout mixtures as barriers for isolation of hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In the grout studied, fly ash was used to replace 30 percent by mass of cement. Three additives including bentonite, silica fume, and polypropylene fiber were used individually in the grout mixes to improve the properties of the grouts in different aspects. The flowability, bleeding, and setting time of freshly mixed grouts were determined; and the unconfined compressive strength, pore size distribution, and water permeability were determined for hardened grouts at various curing durations up to 120 days. Finally, the durability of cement-fly ash grouts was carefully examined in terms of the changes in their physical properties after different levels of exposure to sulfate attack and wet-dry cycles

  2. Durability and compressive strength of blast furnace slag-based cement grout for special geotechnical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega Álvarez, José Marcos; Pastor Navarro, José Luis; Albaladejo Ruiz, Arturo; Sánchez Martín, Isidro; Climent, Miguel-Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Special foundations, most prominently micropiles and soil anchors, are frequently used in construction today. In Spain, the grout for these special technical applications is generally prepared with portland cement, although the codes and standards in place stipulate only the minimum compressive strength required, with no mention of cement type. Those texts also establish a range of acceptable water:cement ratios. In the present study, durability and compressive strength in cement grout prepar...

  3. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Hole Spacing for Cement Grouting in Rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Ping; Zhang, Jinjie; Xing, Zhanqing; Yang, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    The fine fissures of V-diabase were the main stratigraphic that affected the effectiveness of foundation grout curtain in Dagang Mountain Hydropower Station. Thus, specialized in situ grouting tests were conducted to determine reasonable hole spacing and other parameters. Considering time variation of the rheological parameters of grout, variation of grouting pressure gradient, and evolution law of the fracture opening, numerical simulations were performed on the diffusion process of cement g...

  4. Practical Model of Cement Based Grout Mix Design, for Use into Low Level Radiation Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Lidia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cement based grouts, as functional performance composite materials, are widely used for both immobilisation and encapsulation as well as for stabilization in the field of inorganic waste management. Also, to ensure that low level radioactive waste (LLW are contained for storage and ultimate disposal, they are encapsulated or immobilized in monolithic waste forms, with cement –based grouts.

  5. Experimental Research on Performances of Dry-grinding Fine Cement for Grouting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The performances of dry-grinding fine cement (DFC) in grouting procedure were experimentally studied.The measurement of its fineness and simulated test for injectability showed that this DFC could be used to inject rock mass with micro-fissure.In order to improve the grouting quality,the water-cement ratio and discarding time of slurry should be controlled precisely.If the water-cement ratio is over 2∶1 in slurry that is made from DFC,it is not suitable to grout.Finally,the influence of different mixing times on strength of hydrated cement made from the DFC is explained by microstructure analysis with SEM.

  6. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Hole Spacing for Cement Grouting in Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fine fissures of V-diabase were the main stratigraphic that affected the effectiveness of foundation grout curtain in Dagang Mountain Hydropower Station. Thus, specialized in situ grouting tests were conducted to determine reasonable hole spacing and other parameters. Considering time variation of the rheological parameters of grout, variation of grouting pressure gradient, and evolution law of the fracture opening, numerical simulations were performed on the diffusion process of cement grouting in the fissures of the rock mass. The distribution of permeability after grouting was obtained on the basis of analysis results, and the grouting hole spacing was discussed based on the reliability analysis. A probability of optimization along with a finer optimization precision as 0.1 m could be adopted when compared with the accuracy of 0.5 m that is commonly used. The results could provide a useful reference for choosing reasonable grouting hole spacing in similar projects.

  7. Properties of low-ph cement grout as a sealing material for the geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current solution to the problem of using cementitious material for sealing purposes in a final radioactive waste repository is to develop a low-pH cement grout. In this study, the material properties of a low-pH cement grout based on a recipe used at ONKALO are investigated by considering such factors as pH variation, compressive strength, dynamic modulus, and hydraulic conductivity by using silica fume and micro-cement. From the pH measurements of the hardened cement grout, the required pH (< pH 11) is obtained after 130 days of curing. Although the engineering properties of the low-pH cement grout used in this study are inferior to those of conventional high-pH cement grout, the utilization of silica fume and micro-cement effectively meets the long-term environmental and durability requirements for cement grout in a radioactive waste repository

  8. High-pH plume from fracture grouting. Application to low-pH-cement grouting at ONKALO (Finland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. M.; Vuorio, M.; Hautojärvi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Grouting of water-conducting fractures with low-alkali cement is foreseen by Posiva (Finnish nuclear waste management agency) for the potential future repository for high-level nuclear waste in Finland (ONKALO). A possible consequence of the interaction between groundwater and grout is the formation of high-pH solutions which will be able to react with the host rock and engineering-barrier materials, altering their mineralogy and porosity. Calculations were already performed (Soler et al., 2011) simulating the interaction between flowing water and grout and the alteration of the host rock (gneiss) as this water flowed beyond the grouted section of the fracture. The calculations included the hydration and simultaneous leaching of the grout through diffusive exchange between the porewater in the grout and the flowing water in the fracture. The formation of an alkaline plume was extremely limited when the low-pH grout was used. And even when using a grout with a lower silica fume content the extent and magnitude of the alkaline plume were rather minor. New calculations have now addressed the effect of different groundwater compositions. The results show that after grouting with low-pH cement, the duration of the initial high-pH peak is short (grout-fracture interface, which consumes OH-. In the longer term, the results show a gradually decaying pH tail (pH grout-fracture interface. The duration of this tail correlates inversely with the carbonate content of the inflowing groundwater. A major outcome of this study is that mineral precipitation controls the formation of a potential high-pH plume by consuming alkalinity and limiting diffusive solute exchange between the grout and the circulating groundwater. Assumption of long-term interaction between rocks or engineering-barrier materials with flowing high-pH (> 12) solutions is most probably very unrealistic. Funding from POSIVA is gratefully acknowledged. Reference Soler, J.M., Vuorio M., Hautojärvi, A., 2011

  9. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Cement Grouts Mixed with Different Super Plasticisers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A. Anagnostopoulos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of super plasticisers in microfine or regular cement-based grouts has become of vital importance in advanced professional grouting practices. These super plasticisers play an important role in the production of more durable grouts with improved rheological characteristics. This report presents a laboratory study of the effects of a new-generation Polycarboxylate Super Plasticiser (PCE on the rheological properties, mechanical strength, final setting time and bleeding of cement grouts in comparison to that of a polynaphthalene (SNF and a modified Lignosulfonate (MLS superplasticisers. The experiments were conducted using different super plasticiser dosages with cement grouts proportioned with a water to cement ratio (w/c of 0.33, 0.4 or 0.5. The results showed that grouts with PCE had higher viscosity, slightly increased bleeding and longer setting times compared with the SNF admixture. However, the PCE improved the final strength, especially for grouts with a w/c ratio of 0.4 and 0.5 and decreased the yield stress. Among the three super plasticisers, MLS had the less effect on improving the different properties of the grouts.

  10. Hybrid life cycle assessment comparison of colloidal silica and cement grouted soil barrier remediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We use LCA to study environmental impacts of grouting techniques for site remediation. ► We consider colloidal silica permeation grouting and cement jet grouting. ► Manufacturing and transportation contribute significantly in all impact categories. ► Activity outside of direct site activity is important in assessing impacts. ► LCA can be used to consider sustainability criteria for remediation decisions. -- Abstract: Site remediation involves balancing numerous costs and benefits but often neglects the environmental impacts over the entire project life cycle. Life cycle assessment (LCA) offers a framework for inclusion of global environmental “systems-level” decision metrics in combination with technological and cost analysis. We compare colloidal silica (CS) and cement grouted soil barrier remediation technologies for soils affected by low level radionuclides at a U.S. Superfund site using hybrid LCA methods. CS is a new, high performance grouting material installed using permeation grouting techniques. Cement, a more traditional grouting material, is typically installed using jet grouting techniques. Life cycle impacts were evaluated using the US EPA TRACI 2 model. Results show the highest life cycle environmental impacts for the CS barrier occur during materials production and transportation to the site. In general, the life cycle impacts for the cement barrier were dominated by materials production; however, in the extreme scenario the life cycle impacts were dominated by truck transportation of spoils to a distant, off-site radioactive waste facility. It is only in the extreme scenario tested in which soils are transported by truck (Option 2) that spoils waste transport dominates LCIA results. Life cycle environmental impacts for both grout barriers were most sensitive to resource input requirements for manufacturing volumes and transportation. Uncertainty associated with the efficacy of new technology such as CS over its required

  11. Hybrid life cycle assessment comparison of colloidal silica and cement grouted soil barrier remediation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Patricia M; Spatari, Sabrina; Cucura, Jeffrey

    2013-04-15

    Site remediation involves balancing numerous costs and benefits but often neglects the environmental impacts over the entire project life cycle. Life cycle assessment (LCA) offers a framework for inclusion of global environmental "systems-level" decision metrics in combination with technological and cost analysis. We compare colloidal silica (CS) and cement grouted soil barrier remediation technologies for soils affected by low level radionuclides at a U.S. Superfund site using hybrid LCA methods. CS is a new, high performance grouting material installed using permeation grouting techniques. Cement, a more traditional grouting material, is typically installed using jet grouting techniques. Life cycle impacts were evaluated using the US EPA TRACI 2 model. Results show the highest life cycle environmental impacts for the CS barrier occur during materials production and transportation to the site. In general, the life cycle impacts for the cement barrier were dominated by materials production; however, in the extreme scenario the life cycle impacts were dominated by truck transportation of spoils to a distant, off-site radioactive waste facility. It is only in the extreme scenario tested in which soils are transported by truck (Option 2) that spoils waste transport dominates LCIA results. Life cycle environmental impacts for both grout barriers were most sensitive to resource input requirements for manufacturing volumes and transportation. Uncertainty associated with the efficacy of new technology such as CS over its required design life indicates that barrier replacement could increase its life cycle environmental impact above that of the cement barrier. PMID:23500422

  12. Laboratory testing of cement grouting of fractures in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractures in the rock mass surrounding a repository and its shafts, access drifts, emplacement rooms and holes, and exploratory or in-situ testing holes, may provide preferential flowpaths for the flow of groundwater or air, potentially containing radionuclides. Such cracks may have to be sealed. The likelihood that extensive or at least local grouting will be required as part of repository sealing has been noted in numerous publications addressing high level waste repository closing. The objective of this work is to determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing (grouting) in welded tuff. Experimental work includes measurement of intact and fracture permeability under various normal stresses and injection pressures. Grout is injected into the fractures. The effectiveness of grouting is evaluated in terms of grout penetration and permeability reduction, compared prior to and after grouting. Analysis of the results include the effect of normal stress, injection pressure, fracture roughness, grout rheology, grout bonding, and the radial extent of grout penetration. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders with three types of fractures: (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural fractures, and (3) sawcuts. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and of the fractures is measured under a range of normal stresses. The surface topography of the fracture is mapped, and the results are used to determine aperture distributions across the fractures. 72 refs., 76 figs., 25 tabs

  13. Modified-sulfur cements for use in concretes, flexible pavings, coatings, and grouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1981-05-01

    A family of modified-sulfur cements was developed for the preparation of construction materials with improved properties. Various types of sulfur cements were prepared by reacting sulfur with mixtures of dicyclopentadiene and oligomers of cyclopentadiene. Durable cements were prepared with structural characteristics ranging from rigid to flexible. These cements were used to prepare corrosion-resistant materials for use in a wide variety of industrial applications where resistance to acidic and salt conditions is needed. These materials were prepared as rigid concretes, flexible pavings, spray coatings, and grouts. Production of modified-sulfur cements in a commercial-size plant was demonstrated.

  14. Blast furnace slag-cement grout blends for the immobilization of technetium-containing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed low-level radioactive and chemically toxic process treatment wastes from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are stabilized by solidification in cement-based grouts. Conventional portland cement and fly ash grouts are shown to be very effective for retention of hydrolyzable heavy metals (including lead, cadmium, uranium, and nickel), but are marginally acceptable for retention of radioactive 99Tc (which is present in the waste as the highly mobile pertechnate anion). Addition of ground blast furnace slag to the grout is shown to reduce the effective diffusivity of technetium by several orders of magnitude; retention of technetium is improved by decreasing the waste loading in the grout or by increasing the proportion of blast furnace slag in the grout dry mix. The selective effect of slag is believed to be due to its ability to reduce Tc(VIII) to the less soluble Tc(IV) species. The addition of other reductive grout admixtures (e.g., sodium sulfide, ferrous ion, and powdered iron metal) also appear to improve the retention of technetium in grout. 31 refs., 2 figs., 25 tabs

  15. New composite grouting materials:Modified urea-formaldehyde resin with cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Hongfei; Jiang Zhenquan; Zhu Shuyun; Yao Pu; Sun Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A new composite two component grout comprised of modified urea-formaldehyde resin and cement was formulated to take account of the advantages and disadvantages of both the cement grout and the chemical grout.The new grout is designed for water blocking by reinforcing as well as seepage control by bore grouting.The A component consists of a modified urea-formaldehyde resin A component,some cement,and some water.The B component is an alkaline coagulant.An orthogonal test of four factors at three levels showed that gel time increased with increased water content and with urea-formaldehyde resin content.Gel time decreased at increased levels of alkaline coagulant.The A component of this new composite grout is stable over time.A mixed cross-over test showed that as the volume ratio of A to B increases the gel time falls at first but then increases.The solid strength decreases with increasing levels of the B component.The solid strength increases over time and becomes stable by the 28th day after mixing.The viscosity increases with increasing levels of resin A component.The increase is exponential and may be fit to;μ = 8.162e0.0286x.

  16. Influence of degree of saturation on the borehole sealing performance of an expansive cement grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strength measures of expansive cement grout borehole plugs cast in welded tuff cylinders is investigated as a function of the degree of saturation of the plugged rock cylinder and of borehole size. Details on experimental procedure regarding rock cylinder and cement grout preparation, sample curing conditions, experimental apparatus, sample loading, mechanical characterization of the rock, and cement grout, along with procedures for the determination of the sample saturation assuming uniform saturation, and strength measures are presented. The extrapolated axial strengths to a plug radius of 100 mm show that the more saturated samples show higher strengths as compared to the dry samples. The strength measures decrease with increasing plug radius, obeying a power law

  17. Estimation of longevity of portland cement grout using chemical modeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portland cement has been identified as a likely candidate seal material by programs investigating the deep burial of nuclear waste as a disposal mechanism. The longevity of performance of cement grout is currently being investigated, along with bentonite, under the auspices of the Stripa Project. Coordinated laboratory, field, and modeling studies are underway to produce fundamental data, practical experience, and estimates of long-range performance, respectively. Long-term performance of cement grout is of particular concern. Since most of the solid phases of which grout is comprised are metastable, it is likely that grout performance will decrease with time. The question is whether performance will still be acceptable after this decrease. This issue is being addressed with the coupled use of geochemical and permeability modeling. For a simplified cement system, two mechanisms for chemical degradation have been considered: phase change and dissolution. For dissolution, both equilibrium (slow flow) and open (fast flow) systems have been analyzed as bounding scenarios. Granitic terrain groundwaters ranging from fresh to saline have been used in the analyses. To assess the consequences in terms of flow, an empirical relation between cement permeability and porosity has been developed. Performance changes with time have been predicted by making conservative estimates of local hydraulic head conditions for successive periods of repository history. For the granitic rock environments considered, preliminary results indicate that cement grout performance may be acceptable for tens of thousands to millions of years, providing its initial hydraulic conductivity is on the order of 10-12 m/s. Other conditions favoring long-term performance include minimizing the ettringite content of the grout, and emplacement at a site where the groundwater has an elevated TDS, and where the local hydraulic gradient is flat or repository resaturation times are short

  18. Low-level radioactive Hanford wastes immobilized by cement-based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 5,300,000 liters (1,400,000 gal) of phosphate/sulfate waste (PSW) grout were produced and placed in vault 101 at the Hanford Site. This waste was generated during decontamination operations and maintenance of the fuel storage basin at the N Reactor. The low-level radioactive liquid wastes were mixed with a blend of portland cement, fly ash, and clays. Through cementing and pozzolanic reactions with water, the grout was solidified to immobilize contaminants and retain low permeability to groundwater. Testing conducted before the campaign is described. The usefulness of each quality verification technique is discussed, focusing mainly on data from the core samples. These data provide the best information on PSW grout since core samples from all regions and depths in the vault were tested. The nondestructive testing data are also useful as they provide property data from broad regions of the vault. The mean compressive strength of the PSW grout cores is 4.17 MPa, much higher than the criterion value of 0.35 MPa. Results also show that the leachability indices for 137Cs, 60Co, sodium, and SO4 for PSW grout cores exceed the leachability criterion by at least one index point. This means that the ability of the grout to resist leaching of waste species is at least ten times greater than the limiting criterion

  19. Laboratorial study of soil-cement mixtures for aplication in Jet Grouting

    OpenAIRE

    Valente, Tiago; Correia, A. Gomes; Vale, José Machado do; Barata, J.; Cebola, Duílio; Coelho, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    In this paper is presented a laboratorial study of different formulations of soil-cement mixtures to support field trial of Jet Grouting columns. Laboratorial tests results of mechanical and physical characterization are discussed, specifically the uniaxial compressive strength (450 specimens), initial, maximum, secant ant tangent to 50% stiffness moduli (18 specimens) and density of the soil-cement mixtures (468 specimens). The stiffness moduli were obtained using the technique of measuremen...

  20. Durability and compressive strength of blast furnace slag-based cement grout for special geotechnical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Special foundations, most prominently micropiles and soil anchors, are frequently used in construction today. In Spain, the grout for these special technical applications is generally prepared with portland cement, although the codes and standards in place stipulate only the minimum compressive strength required, with no mention of cement type. Those texts also establish a range of acceptable water:cement ratios. In the present study, durability and compressive strength in cement grout prepared with blast furnace slag cement at different w/c ratios are characterised and compared to the findings for a reference portland cement grout. The results show that slag grout exhibits greater durability than the portland cement material and complies with the compressive strength requirements laid down in the respective codes.Actualmente es muy frecuente el empleo de cimentaciones especiales, entre las que destacan los micropilotes y los anclajes. En España, las lechadas de cemento para estos trabajos geotécnicos especiales se preparan habitualmente con cemento Portland, aunque las diferentes normativas al respecto no restringen el tipo de cemento a emplear, siempre que se alcance una determinada resistencia a compresión. Respecto a la dosificación de las lechadas, la normativa permite emplear diferentes relaciones agua/cemento dentro de un determinado rango. En vista de ello, en este trabajo se han caracterizado las propiedades de durabilidad y resistencia a compresión de lechadas de cemento preparadas con un cemento con escoria de alto horno y con diferentes relaciones a/c, tomando como referencia de comportamiento lechadas de cemento Portland. El uso de un cemento con escoria conlleva una mejora en la durabilidad de las lechadas, cumpliendo los requisitos de resistencia a compresión establecidos por la normativa.

  1. Interactions between cement grouts and sulphate bearing ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of mixtures of Ordinary Portland cement and blastfurnace slag or pulverized fuel ash, exposed to a sulphate-bearing ground water at different temperatures and pressures, were investigated in order to assess the long term durability of cements for encapsulating radioactive waste and backfilling a repository. The effect of the ground water on the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the cements is minimal. Calcite and C-S-H are present in all the samples and are durable throughout the test. Dimensional changes in the cements during setting and curing may cause weaknesses in the materials which may increase the effects of a percolating ground water. (author)

  2. Mechanical and hydraulic performance of sludge-mixed cement grout in rock fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khomkrit Wetchasat

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to assess the performance of sludge mixed with commercial grade Portland cement type I for use in minimizing the permeability of fractured rock mass. The fractures were artificially made by applying a line load to sandstone block specimens. The sludge comprises over 80% of quartz with grain sizes less than 75 μm. The results indicate that the mixing ratios of sludge:cement (S:C of 1:10, 3:10, 5:10 with water:cement ratio of 1:1 by weight are suitable for fracture grouting. For S:C = 3:10, the compressive strength and elastic modulus are 1.22 MPa and 224 MPa which are comparable to those of bentonite mixed with cement. The shear strengths between the grouts and fractures surfaces are from 0.22 to 0.90 MPa. The S:C ratio of 5:10 gives the lowest permeability. The permeability of grouted fractures with apertures of 2, 10, and 20 mm range from 10-16 to 10-14 m2 and decrease with curing time.

  3. Progress in the investigation of the longevity of Portland cement grout seal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sealing of openings in underground repositories and the assessment of the potential for seal materials to perform acceptably for long periods of time are concerns shared by programs considering the deep disposal of nuclear waste. Two grouting materials, bentonite and portland cement, have been identified by many programs as likely candidate seal materials. As a part of Phase III of the Stripa Project, the longevity of both of these materials is being investigated in a series of coordinated laboratory, modeling, and field studies. Long-term performance is an important issue particularly for cement, since most solid phases in cement are metastable, and therefore it is likely that cement seal performance would degrade with time. In this investigation, geochemical and permeability modeling have been used together to estimate how long cement seals may be expected to perform acceptably. Analyses to assess cement degradation due to phase inversion and dissolution have been performed; for dissolution calculations, both slow flow and fast flow hydrologic systems have been analyzed to establish bounding conditions. Actual granitic terrain grounwater compositions ranging from fresh to saline have been used to calculate cement-groundwater interactions. A relationship between cement permeability and porosity has been developed based on empirical data. Changes in performance with time have been predicted by conservatively estimating hydrologic conditions at successive stages of post-closure repository history. For the conditions considered, preliminary results indicate that the single largest determinant of seal performance is the initial hydraulic conductivity of the cement. Based on this investigation, cement grout performance may be acceptable for very long periods of time (tens of thousands to millions of years) providing its initial conductivity is on the order of 10-12 m/s

  4. 水工隧洞水泥灌浆的若干问题%Some Issues on Cement Grouting of Hydraulic Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏鲁平

    2002-01-01

    Based on the practices of construction supervision to cement grouting at the reservoir emptying and power tunnels of the TSQ stage Ⅰ Hydropower station, some issues on quality control of cement grouting of hydraulic tunnel are discussed, and corresponding suggestions are put forward for revision of current standard (SL62-94). It is regarded that the refilling grouting could not be used for remedying the thickness of concrete lining; the end sealing of refilling grouting section should not be neglected; higher grouting pressure would be used. For the consolidation grouting, grout return pipe should be placed at the grout hole top for pure pressure type grouting; five-grade water cement ratio of grout mix is suggested; a certain standard should be specified for changing the grout to thicker mix by skipping the intermediate grade; the standard for ending the grouting should be relaxed. In current grouting standard, some terms should be complemented for contact grouting of steel penstock and spiral case and for plug grouting of circular-anchor hole.

  5. Phase I - Laboratory Study Effects of Cement Grout Structures on Colloid Formation from SRS Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted to better understand the influence of grout structures and fills on colloid formation. Low-Level Waste is disposed in concrete vaults and trenches at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (LLWF). Two types of enhanced trench disposal are approved for use including; Intimately-Mixed Cement-Stabilized waste forms, such as Ashcrete and Blowcrete resulting from operation of the Consolidated Incinerator Facility, and Cement-Stabilized Encapsulated waste, where waste forms (e.g., contaminated equipment) will be surrounded by a grout or other cementitious material. The presence of concrete structures and process of grouting in trenches are expected to generate colloids, both from the grout itself and as a result of the interactions of these cementitious materials and their degradation products with the surrounding soils. The extent of occurrence, mobility, and influence on contaminant transport of colloidal materials in aquifer systems is the subject of this study. The intent of this study is not to modify the PA but to aid in our understanding of the significance of this phenomenon. Information generated in this study will help in considering whether colloid-enhanced contaminant migration should be considered in establishing waste acceptance criteria and in the design and development of waste disposal systems

  6. Research on rheological properties of micro-fine grouting cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管学茂; 王雨利; 杨雷

    2003-01-01

    This article studies the influence of the fineness of cement, fly ash(FA), its composite admixture and the amount and way mixed with superplasticizer on the rheological properties of micro-fine cement(MC). By means of modern instruments and technologies (such as XRD, SEM, laser granulometer and superficial-potential apparatus etc.), the article studies the mineral compositions, the appearance character of grains, particle size distribution and superficial potential of FA and its composite materials. And through that, the reducing mechanism of FA is thoroughly analyzed. The study shows that FA and its composite admixture are excellent components which can effectively improve the rheological properties of micro-fine cement, and that the superplasticizer has a saturation point and the mixing way of it has a great influence on the rheological properties.

  7. Quantitative modelling of the degradation processes of cement grout. Project CEMMOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Galindez, Juan-Manuel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge (Amphos21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-05-15

    Grout cement is planned to be used in the sealing of water-conducting fractures in the deep geological storage of spent nuclear fuel waste. The integrity of such cementitious materials should be ensured in a time framework of decades to a hundred of years as mimum. However, their durability must be quantified since grout degradation may jeopardize the stability of other components in the repository due to the potential release of hyperalkaline plumes. The model prediction of the cement alteration has been challenging in the last years mainly due to the difficulty to reproduce the progressive change in composition of the Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) compounds as the alteration proceeds. In general, the data obtained from laboratory experiments show a rather similar dependence between the pH of pore water and the Ca-Si ratio of the CSH phases. The Ca-Si ratio decreases as the CSH is progressively replaced by Si-enriched phases. An elegant and reasonable approach is the use of solid solution models even keeping in mind that CSH phases are not crystalline solids but gels. An additional obstacle is the uncertainty in the initial composition of the grout to be considered in the calculations because only the recipe of low-pH clinker is commonly provided by the manufacturer. The hydration process leads to the formation of new phases and, importantly, creates porosity. A number of solid solution models have been reported in literature. Most of them assumed a strong non-ideal binary solid solution series to account for the observed changes in the Ca-Si ratios in CSH. However, it results very difficult to reproduce the degradation of the CSH in the whole Ca-Si range of compositions (commonly Ca/Si=0.5-2.5) by considering only two end-members and fixed nonideality parameters. Models with multiple non-ideal end-members with interaction parameters as a function of the solid composition can solve the problem but these can not be managed in the existing codes of reactive

  8. Relaxation study of cement based grouting material using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xianzhong; Lin Baiquan; Zhai Cheng; Ni Guanhua; Li Ziwen

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at actual condition of poor effect of hole sealing for the reason of poor cement paste fluidity in the process of coal mine gas drainage,by adding a water reducing agent,cement paste for hole sealing was produced.The changes of initial distribution,weighted average values and total relaxation signal intensity of transverse relaxation time (T2) of water in pure cement paste and water reducing agent added cement paste were studied with low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).The results show that there are four peaks in T2 distribution curves of cement paste:the first peak is related to the bound water in flocculation,the second and the third peaks are related to the water in flocculation,water reducing agent makes it extending towards the long relaxation time,increasing its liquidity,and the fourth peak is related to the free water.By using weighted average values of T2 and total relaxation signal intensity,hydration process of cement pastes could be roughly divided into four stages:the initial period,reaction period,accelerated period and steady period.By analyzing the periods,it makes sure that the grouting process should be completed in the reaction period in the site,and the drainage process should be started in the steady period.The results have great guiding significance to the hole sealing and methane drainage.

  9. Relaxation study of cement based grouting material using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li; Xianzhong; Lin; Baiquan; Zhai; Cheng; Ni; Guanhua; Li; Ziwen

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at actual condition of poor effect of hole sealing for the reason of poor cement paste fluidity in the process of coal mine gas drainage,by adding a water reducing agent,cement paste for hole sealing was produced.The changes of initial distribution,weighted average values and total relaxation signal intensity of transverse relaxation time(T 2) of water in pure cement paste and water reducing agent added cement paste were studied with low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR).The results show that there are four peaks in T2 distribution curves of cement paste:the first peak is related to the bound water in flocculation,the second and the third peaks are related to the water in flocculation,water reducing agent makes it extending towards the long relaxation time,increasing its liquidity,and the fourth peak is related to the free water.By using weighted average values of T2 and total relaxation signal intensity,hydration process of cement pastes could be roughly divided into four stages:the initial period,reaction period,accelerated period and steady period.By analyzing the periods,it makes sure that the grouting process should be completed in the reaction period in the site,and the drainage process should be started in the steady period.The results have great guiding significance to the hole sealing and methane drainage.

  10. Quantitative modelling of the degradation processes of cement grout. Project CEMMOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grout cement is planned to be used in the sealing of water-conducting fractures in the deep geological storage of spent nuclear fuel waste. The integrity of such cementitious materials should be ensured in a time framework of decades to a hundred of years as mimum. However, their durability must be quantified since grout degradation may jeopardize the stability of other components in the repository due to the potential release of hyperalkaline plumes. The model prediction of the cement alteration has been challenging in the last years mainly due to the difficulty to reproduce the progressive change in composition of the Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) compounds as the alteration proceeds. In general, the data obtained from laboratory experiments show a rather similar dependence between the pH of pore water and the Ca-Si ratio of the CSH phases. The Ca-Si ratio decreases as the CSH is progressively replaced by Si-enriched phases. An elegant and reasonable approach is the use of solid solution models even keeping in mind that CSH phases are not crystalline solids but gels. An additional obstacle is the uncertainty in the initial composition of the grout to be considered in the calculations because only the recipe of low-pH clinker is commonly provided by the manufacturer. The hydration process leads to the formation of new phases and, importantly, creates porosity. A number of solid solution models have been reported in literature. Most of them assumed a strong non-ideal binary solid solution series to account for the observed changes in the Ca-Si ratios in CSH. However, it results very difficult to reproduce the degradation of the CSH in the whole Ca-Si range of compositions (commonly Ca/Si=0.5-2.5) by considering only two end-members and fixed nonideality parameters. Models with multiple non-ideal end-members with interaction parameters as a function of the solid composition can solve the problem but these can not be managed in the existing codes of reactive

  11. Method Cement Post-grouting to Increase the Load Capacity for Bored Pile

    OpenAIRE

    Loc Nguyen; Lei Nie; Min Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Drilled shafts foundations are used as an indispensable solution for long span bridges in Vietnam. In order to increase the bearing capacity, aside from the increasing of the pile length and diameter, an interested way now is treatment of pile bases after concrete placement. This study is aimed at investigating the defect at the bottom of the bored pile from the sonic test. The injection of hight pressure of cement grout to the shaft and tip of the defected bored pile was conducted to increas...

  12. Method Cement Post-grouting to Increase the Load Capacity for Bored Pile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Loc Nguyen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drilled shafts foundations are used as an indispensable solution for long span bridges in Vietnam. In order to increase the bearing capacity, aside from the increasing of the pile length and diameter, an interested way now is treatment of pile bases after concrete placement. This study is aimed at investigating the defect at the bottom of the bored pile from the sonic test. The injection of hight pressure of cement grout to the shaft and tip of the defected bored pile was conducted to increase the bearing capacity of pile. The bearing capacity of defected bored pile is calculated by the TCXD-205:1998 an finite element mothod. After post-grouting technique done, the soil investigation tests have been carried out to define the properties of treated soils. The analytic mothod, finite element method an load test also have been applied to determine the bearing capacity of treated bored pile. The results show that the post-grouting to the shaft and tip of pile can increase two times of bearing capacity of defected bored pile and about 20% compared to the normal bored pile.

  13. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    Rock bolts have been considered one of indispensable support method to improve load bearing capacity of many underground engineering projects, and thus, various types of them have been developed until now for different purposes. Although mechanically anchored rock bolts can be successfully installed to prevent structurally controlled instabilities in hard rocks, in comparison with cement and resin grouted rock bolts, these types of anchors are not so effective in weak rocks characterized by relatively low mechanical properties. In order to investigate the applicability and to measure relative performance of cement and resin grouted rock bolts into weak and heavily jointed rock mass, a research program mainly consisting of pull-out tests was performed in a metal mine in Turkey. The rock materials excavated in this underground mining were described as basalt, tuff, ore dominated volcanic rocks and dacite. To achieve more representative results for rock materials found in this mining and openings excavated in varied dimensions, the pull-out tests were conducted on rock bolts used in many different locations where more convergences were measured and deformation dependent instability was expected to cause greater engineering problems. It is well known that the capacity of rock bolts depends on the length, diameter and density of the bolt pattern, and so considering the thickness of plastic zone in the studied openings, the length and diameter of rock bolts were taken as 2.4 m. and 25 mm., respectively. The spacing between rows changed between 70 and 180 cm. In this study, totally twenty five pull-out tests were performed to have a general understanding about axial load bearing capacity and support reaction curves of cement and resin grouted rock bolts. When pull load-displacement curves belongs to cement and resin grouted rock bolts were compared with each other, it was determined that cement grouted rock bolts carry more load ranging between 115.6 kN and 127.5 kN with

  14. Blended Calcium Aluminate-Calcium Sulfate Cement-Based Grout For P-Reactor Vessel In-Situ Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH ≤ 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts (Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010). Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere (Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively). Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document (Reyes-Jimenez, 2010).

  15. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  16. The effect of W/C ratio and cement type on the longevity of grouts for use in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement-based grouts are being considered for use as sealing materials in the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. This paper describes laboratory studies of the longevity of these materials, with special emphasis on the effect of hardened grout porosity and cement type. The longevity properties determined for reference grout (90% Type 50 cement, 10% silica fume and superplasticizer) are compared with those of a slag cement grout. The fractional factorial statistical method of Box-Behnken was used to design a series of leach tests, which covered a wide range of conditions that could occur in a nuclear waste disposal vault. The leach tests have been carried out to determine the effect of temperature, ionic strength of groundwater, and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of clay (which may be in contact with the grout) on the leach resistance of the cement. The temperature ranged from 25 to 150 degrees C and the ionic strength of the groundwaters from 0.0015 to 1.37 mol. Leach rates of Ca and Si were taken as the major indicators of the long-term chemical stability of the grouts. Preliminary analysis suggests that the reference grout would be more stable than slag cement in the high-temperature environment of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Within the ranges investigated, decreasing the porosity appears not to significantly decrease leach rates

  17. Dissolution kinetics of tuff rock and mechanism of chemical bond formation at the interface with cement grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of tuff rock and cement was studied to evaluate the effectiveness of sealing of tuff boreholes with cementitious grouts. Previous studies indicated chemical bond formation between tuff and cement. Dissolution studies were carried out on Topopah Spring member tuff and on tuff with cement. The results indicate the formation of calcium silicate and calcium aluminosilicate hydrates; phase identification is confirmed by XRD studies. The significance of the results obtained and their implications on properties of the interfacial region are included. 7 refs., 6 figs

  18. Pre-excavation grouting with micro-fine cement below four hundreds meter depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory' has been carrying out scientific research in granite to establish the technological basis for high-level radioactive waste disposal. To get reliable information on the rock mass geology and hydrogeology and on the bedrock conditions, a pilot borehole investigation was carried out before sinking the Ventilation Shaft. During this investigation, a zone with high hydraulic head and low hydraulic conductivity was observed at around GL-400 m. To reduce water inflow during excavation, pre-excavation grouting with micro-fine cement was done in this region before sinking the Ventilation Shaft. Despite the high hydraulic head and the low hydraulic conductivity, effective reduction of water-inflow was achieved. (author)

  19. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency

  20. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-01

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  1. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu [Changzhou Key Laboratory of Sensor Networks and Environmental Sensing, College of IOT, Hohai University Changzhou, Jiangsu, 213022 (China)

    2014-02-18

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  2. In-Line Rheological Measurements of Cement Based Grouts Using the UVP-PD Method

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, MD. Mashuqur

    2010-01-01

    In underground construction grouting is performed to seal tunnels and caverns against excessive water inflow or to reduce the lowering of the ground water table. The rheological properties, such as viscosity and yield stress, of the used grouts play a fundamental role in grouting. No method has been developed yet to measure these properties in-line in the field during grouting. Methods used today are rather primitive and not robust enough for field use and they are mainly performed in order t...

  3. Microfine grouting in tight fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfine cements were used to grout tight fractures in basalt at McNary Dam in Umatilla, Oregon. Six boreholes were grouted with different microfine mixes. Hydraulic conductivity testing before and after the grouting provided a quantitative estimate of average fracture apertures and the effect of grouting on rock mass permeability. A downhole video camera survey was conducted in each hole to determine which fractures and joint sets allowed grout penetration. Pressure and the flow rate for grout were monitored during the testing. Total grout takes were calculated for each borehole stage grouted. Grouting pressures varied from less than a quarter to more than five times the estimated overburden pressure. The results of this testing indicate that tight fractures can be grouted with microfine cements. In addition, for tight fracture the relationship of injection pressures to grout take is significantly more non-linear than conventional grouting experience has suggested

  4. Calorimetric examination of hydrofracture grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrofracture grout sample obtained during the SI-10 injection campaign was studied by calorimetry. The calorimetry curve of this grout was compared with laboratory-produced grout containing simulated wastes. Initiation of the cement-water reaction for the actual grout was delayed several days by the presence of a large quantity of boron in the waste. Although the hydration of cement was delayed, eventually the cement reacted with water and the grout hardened. This test indicates the potential need to analyze sludges for compounds known to retard cement hydration. 10 references, 5 figures, 4 tables

  5. Calorimetric examination of hydrofracture grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrofracture grout sample obtained during the SI-10 injection campaign was studied by calorimetry. The calorimetry curve of this grout was compared with laboratory-produced grout containing simulated wastes. Initiation of the cement-water reaction for the actual grout was delayed several days by the presence of a large quantity of boron in the waste. Although the hydration of cement was delayed, eventually the cement reacted with water and the grout hardened. This test indicates the potential need to analyze sludges for compounds known to retard cement hydration

  6. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

  7. Study of the Behavior of Grouting Cement Mortar%注浆用水泥浆体性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁乃兴; 陈忠明

    2000-01-01

    对注浆加固公路路基用的水泥浆体从稳定性、流动度、粘滞度、凝结时间、析水率等方面进行了研究.掺加适量的粉煤灰可增加浆体的稳定性,外加剂水玻璃可增加浆体的稳定性及结石率,同时对浆体的流动性有降低作用,而外加剂氯化钙则对浆体的流动性有增强作用.%In this paper, the behavior of grouting cement mortar to reinforce highway subgrade is analyzed from the aspects of stability, fluidity, viscosity, bleeding ratio and setting time of cement mortar. Mixing a certain content of fly ash to cement mortar can improve stability of mortar. Mixing water glass can improve stability and increase forming stone percent of mortar and can reduce the fluidity of mortar. While mixing CaCl2 can increase fluidity of mortar also

  8. Effect of Nanosilica on the Fresh Properties of Cement-Based Grouting Material in the Portland-Sulphoaluminate Composite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of NS particle size and content on the fresh properties of the grouting material based on the portland-sulphoaluminate composite system was analyzed. The experimental results indicated that air content increased and apparent density decreased, with increased NS content, but the NS particle sizes have minimal effect on the air content and apparent density. The setting time of mortar was significantly shortened, with increased NS content; however, NS particle sizes had little influence on the setting time. The effect of fluidity on the mortars adding NS with particle size of 30 nm is larger than NS with particle sizes of 15 and 50 nm and the fluidity decreased with increased NS content, but the fluidity of mortars with the particle sizes of 15 and 50 nm is almost not affected by the NS content. XRD analysis shows that the formation of ettringite was promoted and the process of hydration reaction of cement was accelerated with the addition of NS. At the microscopic level, the interfacial transition zone (ITZ of the grouting material became denser and the formation of C-S-H gel was promoted after adding NS.

  9. High-pH plume from low-alkali-cement fracture grouting: Reactive transport modeling and comparison with pH monitoring at ONKALO (Finland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouting of water-conducting fractures with low-alkali cement is foreseen for the potential future repository for spent nuclear fuel in Finland (ONKALO site). A possible consequence is the formation of high-pH solutions which will be able to react with the host rock. Calculations have been performed including the hydration and simultaneous leaching of the grout. The effect of different possible groundwater compositions has been studied. The results show that after grouting, the duration of the initial high-pH peak is short (−. In the longer term, the results show a gradually decaying pH tail (pH 12) solutions may not be very realistic.

  10. The Evaluation of Material Properties of Low-pH Cement Grout for the Application of Cementitious Materials to Deep Radioactive Waste Repository Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Seop; Kwon, S. K.; Cho, W. J.; Kim, G. W

    2009-12-15

    Considering the current construction technology and research status of deep repository tunnels for radioactive waste disposal, it is inevitable to use cementitious materials in spite of serious concern about their long-term environmental stability. Thus, it is an emerging task to develop low pH cementitious materials. This study reviews the state of the technology on low pH cements developed in Sweden, Switzerland, France, and Japan as well as in Finland which is constructing a real deep repository site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. Considering the physical and chemical stability of bentonite which acts as a buffer material, a low pH cement limits to pH {<=}11 and pozzolan-type admixtures are used to lower the pH of cement. To attain this pH requirement, silica fume, which is one of the most promising admixtures, should occupy at least 40 wt% of total dry materials in cement and the Ca/Si ratio should be maintained below 0.8 in cement. Additionally, selective super-plasticizer needs to be used because a high amount of water is demanded from the use of a large amount of silica fume. In this report, the state of the technology on application of cementitious materials to deep repository tunnels for radioactive waste disposal was analysed. And the material properties of low-pH and high-pH cement grouts were evaluated base on the grout recipes of ONKALO in Finlan.

  11. Reactivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) grout and various lithologies from the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian Beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC. (author)

  12. Mechanical and hydraulic performance of sludge-mixed cement grout in rock fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Khomkrit Wetchasat; Kittitep Fuenkajorn

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to assess the performance of sludge mixed with commercial grade Portland cement type I for use in minimizing the permeability of fractured rock mass. The fractures were artificially made by applying a line load to sandstone block specimens. The sludge comprises over 80% of quartz with grain sizes less than 75 μm. The results indicate that the mixing ratios of sludge:cement (S:C) of 1:10, 3:10, 5:10 with water:cement ratio of 1:1 by weight are suitable for fracture gr...

  13. The Rheological Properties of Ultra-fine High Performance Grouting Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The material properties of surface and powder, rheological property and mineral composition were investigated by means of SEM, XRD, Malvern laser granulometer and rotary viscometer.The influence of admixture on ultra-fine cement rheological properties and its mechanism were studied in material theories.The results show that the ultra-fine fly ash has a higher zeta potential, and improves flowability of ultra-fine cement paste,decreases flowability loss as time prolonging,improves compatibility between superplasticizers and cement because of the electrostatic repulsion, ball bearing effect, filling and dispersing effect of admixtures and delay-releasing effect of superplasticizers.

  14. Steering Parameters for Rock Grouting

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnar Gustafson; Johan Claesson; Åsa Fransson

    2013-01-01

    In Swedish tunnel grouting practice normally a fan of boreholes is drilled ahead of the tunnel front where cement grout is injected in order to create a low permeability zone around the tunnel. Demands on tunnel tightness have increased substantially in Sweden, and this has led to a drastic increase of grouting costs. Based on the flow equations for a Bingham fluid, the penetration of grout as a function of grouting time is calculated. This shows that the time scale of grouting in a borehole ...

  15. The application research of lightweight foam cement in the grouting materials%轻质泡沫水泥注浆材料的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡焕校; 罗玮; 唐良智; 彭春雷; 夏凌云

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary study was made that inflatable foam cement slurry was used as grouting material by employing orthogonal experiment. The indicators such as specific density, viscosity, syneresis rate, stone density and stone rate of inflatable foam cement slurry had been tested, which depended on the different foaming and foam stabilizing agent by the orthogonal experimental method. The experimental results show that it can be used as grouting material for a variety of anti-seepage grouting works. The reasonable parameters and ratio were given by considering stone density and stone rate of inflatable foam cement slurry.%用不同的发泡剂和稳泡剂,采用正交实验,对轻质泡沫水泥浆液作为注浆材料作了初步研究,测试了轻质泡沫水泥浆液的比重、粘度、析水率、结石体密度和结石率等指标,根据实验结果进行了分析研究,从结石体密度和结石体的结石率考虑优选出一种作为注浆材料用于充填防渗注浆的轻质泡沫水泥浆液的合理参数配比.

  16. Grouting methodology in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For this paper, an initial literature review was conducted to investigate the potential applications of grouting technology for geological disposal of high level radioactive waste (hereafter called geological disposal), and the potential grouting material for each application. The results show the necessity of using suspension grout, such as cement-based grout, during excavation work, especially deep underground. Next, the method to achieve highly effective seals in crystalline rock with cement grout is studied. To enhance the sealing quality, cement grout should penetrate into very fine fractures, e.g. less than 100 μm aperture. In the case of suspension grout, clogging with grout at the openings of rock fractures, especially fine fractures, tends to occur, which results in poor grout penetration. A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the clogging phenomenon; the results suggest that high injection pressures could be effective to prevent clogging. Finally, focusing on pre-excavation grouting for horizontal tunnels in crystalline rock, the effective grout hole patterns for achieving high quality sealing was studied. A series of theoretical calculations for water inflow and cost studies were conducted. The results indicate that a dense arrangement of grout holes in a relatively narrow area around a tunnel section, as practised in the Nordic countries, is favorable in hard crystalline rock. (author)

  17. Penetration grouting reinforcement of sandy gravel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; PENG Zhen-bin; TANG Yi-qun; PENG Wen-xiang; HE Zhong-ming

    2008-01-01

    To study the relationship between grouting effect and grouting factors, three factors (seven parameters) directionless pressure and small cycle grouting model experiment on sandy gravel was done, which was designed according to uniform design method. And regressing was applied to analysis of the test data. The two models test results indicate that when the diffusing radius of grout changes from 26 to 51 era, the grouted sandy gravel compressing strength changes fTom 2.13 to 12.30 MPa; the relationship between diffusing radius(R) and water cement ratio(m), permeability coefficient(k), grouting pressure(p), grouting time(t) is R=19.953m0.121k0.429p0.412t0.437, the relationship between compressing strength(P) and porosity(n), water cement ratio, grouting pressure, grouting time is P=0.984n0.517m-1.488p0.118t0.031.So the porosity of sandy gravel, the permeability coefficient of sandy gravel, grouting pressure, grouting time, water cement ratio are main factors to influence the grouting effect. The grouting pressure is the main factor to influence grouting diffusing radius, and the water cement ratio is the main factor to influence grouted sandy gravel compressing strength.

  18. 水泥基灌浆材料流动性能的研究%Study on the flow property of cement based grouting material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高汉青; 于大第; 杨晓光; 王炜; 潘美; 郑旗

    2014-01-01

    Two test methods were introduced for the flow property testing of cement based grouting material ,truncated cone method and flow cone method.Experiments were carried out to compare the flow performances of same cement based grouting material by the two dif-ferent test methods,and the result showed that the flow property of cement based grouting material with high fluidity could not be fully characterized only by the truncated method.Cement based material with excellent flow performance was prepared by using the self-made anti-settling agent,and it could meet the requirements of both GB/T 50448-2008 and ASTM-C939-2012.%介绍了国内标准与ASTM标准测试水泥基灌浆材料流动性能所采用的两种方法:截锥圆模法和流锥法,试验比较了水泥基灌浆材料在两种测试方法下的性能表现差异,结果表明国内标准仅采用截锥圆模法无法全面表征大流动度水泥基灌浆材料的流动特性。采用自制防沉剂,配制了同时满足GB/T 50448-2008和ASTM C939-2012要求的具有高流动性能的水泥基灌浆材料。

  19. Steering Parameters for Rock Grouting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Gustafson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Swedish tunnel grouting practice normally a fan of boreholes is drilled ahead of the tunnel front where cement grout is injected in order to create a low permeability zone around the tunnel. Demands on tunnel tightness have increased substantially in Sweden, and this has led to a drastic increase of grouting costs. Based on the flow equations for a Bingham fluid, the penetration of grout as a function of grouting time is calculated. This shows that the time scale of grouting in a borehole is only determined by grouting overpressure and the rheological properties of the grout, thus parameters that the grouter can choose. Pressure, grout properties, and the fracture aperture determine the maximum penetration of the grout. The smallest fracture aperture that requires to be sealed thus also governs the effective borehole distance. Based on the identified parameters that define the grouting time-scale and grout penetration, an effective design of grouting operations can be set up. The solution for time as a function of penetration depth is obtained in a closed form for parallel and pipe flow. The new, more intricate, solution for the radial case is presented.

  20. Experimental Research on the high-strength composite cement-based grout%高强复合水泥基灌浆料试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹雷; 王振兴; 聂小敏; 雷盼盼

    2014-01-01

    通过试验分析减水剂、配合比、矿物掺合料对水泥基灌浆料工作性能和力学性能的影响。结果表明:聚羧酸减水剂与水泥相容性好;粉煤灰掺量宜控制在10%以内;矿粉最佳掺量为5%。%The influence of superplasticizer, formulations, mineral admixtures on work performance and mechanical properties of cement-based grout was analyzed.The result showed that Polycarboxylate superplasticizer has good compatibility with the cement;the content of fly ash should be control ed within 10%;the best content of mineral was 5%.

  1. Prevention of clogging phenomenon with high-grouting pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study on grouting strategy for crystalline rock. First, grouting practices used in Nordic countries are summarized. Their main characteristics are the usage of thick slurry of micro-cement, dense pattern of grout holes and simultaneous injection of plural holes, which enable both of high-level water sealing and shortening of grouting work. To investigate the applicability of thick cement slurry, high-pressure clogging test simulating real grouting work has been conducted. The test results indicated the possibility to prevent the clogging phenomenon of thick cement slurry, i.e. water cement ratio of 1.6, by increasing the injection pressure gradually. (author)

  2. Design approaches for grouting of rock fractures; Theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghoobi Rafi, Jalaleddin

    2013-01-01

    Currently, cement base grout is used widely for sealing of the rock fractures in order to decrease the permeability of rock mass. Grouting procedure is one of the main tasks in cycle of rock excavation. In addition, huge amount of grout should be used during dam construction in order to seal the bedding and embankment walls. Therefore, considering the effect of grouting in duration and cost of the project, improving the design methods seems essential. In successful grouting the goal is to ach...

  3. Analysis of Homogel Uniaxial Compression Strength on Bio Grouting Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungho Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed uniaxial compression strength over time by preparing a homogel specimen from a bio grouting material, a cement-like form produced by environment-friendly microbial reactions. Among chemical grouting methods, the most commonly used method is the Labile Waterglass method. In this study, the homogel uniaxial compressive strength of Labile Waterglass (LW injection material and that of bio grouting material were measured and analyzed. In order to perform the experiment, a total of 10 types of grouting mixing ratios were prepared by a combination of different materials such as Ordinary Portland Cement, Micro Cement, Bio Grouting Material and Sodium Silicate. They were cured in the air, and their homogel uniaxial compression strengths were measured on days 1, 3, 7 and 28 Based on the test results, it was confirmed that the uniaxial strength of the specimen made with Bio Grouting Material, Ordinary Portland Cement and Micro Cement was increased by more than 30% than that of the specimen only used with Ordinary Portland Cement, as a result of hydrogen-released heat reaction between calcium carbonate, the main ingredient of the bio grouting material, and calcium silicate in the cement. This indicates that the use of 30% bio-grouting material instead of cement in the grouting can be a reasonable mixing ratio to save the use of cement, leading to reduction in CO2 emission.

  4. Grout Facilities standby plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan defines how the Grout Facilities will be deactivated to meet the intent of the recently renegotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA calls for the use of the grout process as an emergency option only in the event that tank space is not available to resolve tank safety issues. The availability of new tanks is expected by 1997. Since a grout startup effort would take an estimated two years, a complete termination of the Grout Disposal Program is expected in December 1995. The former Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) Strategy, adopted in 1988, called for the contents of Hanford's 28 newer double-shell waste tanks to be separated into high-level radioactive material to be vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository; low-level wastes were to be sent to the Grout Facility to be made into a cement-like-mixture and poured into underground vaults at Hanford for disposal. The waste in the 149 older single-shell tanks (SST) were to undergo further study and analysis before a disposal decision was made

  5. Numerical predictions of the thermal behaviour and resultant effects of grouting cements while setting prosthetic components in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarini, G L; Learmonth, I D; Gheduzzi, S

    2006-07-01

    Acrylic cements are commonly used to attach prosthetic components in joint replacement surgery. The cements set in short periods of time by a complex polymerization of initially liquid monomer compounds into solid structures with accompanying significant heat release. Two main problems arise from this form of fixation: the first is the potential damage caused by the temperature excursion, and the second is incomplete reaction leaving active monomer compounds, which can potentially be slowly released into the patient. This paper presents a numerical model predicting the temperature-time history in an idealized prosthetic-cement-bone system. Using polymerization kinetics equations from the literature, the degree of polymerization is predicted, which is found to be very dependent on the thermal history of the setting process. Using medical literature, predictions for the degree of thermal bone necrosis are also made. The model is used to identify the critical parameters controlling thermal and unreacted monomer distributions. PMID:16898219

  6. 矿物掺合料对硫铝酸盐水泥基灌浆料性能的影响%Effect of mineral admixtures on performance of grout material based on sulphate aluminium cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴民; 赵慧

    2014-01-01

    为研究矿物掺合料对硫铝酸盐水泥基灌浆料力学性能及流动性能的影响,分别以硅灰、双飞粉、轻质碳酸钙为掺合料制备了硫铝酸盐水泥基灌浆料。在不同水胶比条件下,测试了灌浆料的流动度及不同龄期的抗折、抗压强度。试验结果表明:加入一定量硅灰可以提高灌浆料各龄期强度,但随着硅灰掺量增大,灌浆料流动度降低;加入一定量双飞粉对灌浆料流动度及各龄期强度均有负面影响;加入一定量轻质碳酸钙对灌浆料不同龄期抗压强度有所提高,对流动度及抗折强度没有明显影响。%In order to study mineral admixtures' impact on the mechanical and flow properties of sulfur aluminate cement-based grouting material,the author produces sulfur aluminate cement-based grouting material samples by useing silica fume ,Flying powder and light cal-cium carbonate as mineral admixtures.The author also tests and analysises fluidity ,strength index in different water cement ratio. The fl-lowing are the results that we can conclude:(1)adding a certain amount of silica fume can improve the strength of grouting material in each stage,while the grout fluidity will reduce when the dosage of silica fume increases;(2)adding a certain amount of flying powder has negative effects on the grout fluidity and the strength in each stage;(3)adding a certain amount of light calcium carbonate can improve the compressive strength of grout in ecah stage,while has no obvious effects on fluidity and flexural strength.

  7. An Experimental Study to Measure And Improve the Grout Penetrability

    OpenAIRE

    Nejad Ghafar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    An essential demand in any underground facility is to seal it against the water ingress to reduce the time and cost of the construction and the corresponding environmental hazards. To achieve this, obtaining sufficient grout spread is of great importance. Among the grouts, cement grouts with lower costs and environmental issues have been more reliable, whereas their main problem is filtration that restricts the grout spread. Several investigations have been therefore aimed to develop instrume...

  8. Comparison of grouted and un-grouted tendons in NPP containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Containments of nuclear power plants are prestressed by post-tensioned prestressing systems using grouted or un-grouted tendons. Cement grout is normally adopted for protection of tendons from corrosion in case of grouted tendon systems. This practice has widely been followed in France and for all the plants of French origin. On the other hand, un-grouted (greased) tendon systems were used for prestressing of containments of American nuclear power plants. Grouted tendons, once grouted, are not available for direct inspection and cannot be replaced after they are grouted, while greased tendons can be directly inspected after installation and may be replaced if required. This paper discusses details of grouted and un-grouted tendons, including their advantages and disadvantages over each other. In addition, in-service inspection techniques normally followed for both categories have been briefed. The question, whether to follow grouted or un-grouted tends to become more a philosophical than a technical one because both the practises have produced good results. lt can possibly be commented that desired results in each case can be obtained through proper detailing, improved construction practices and using more refined material constituents which require further research and development

  9. Laboratory Study on Grout Injection for Improving Subgrade of Airfield Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck Shang Goh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shares the authors’ experience of using low pressure grouting to improve the subgrade performance. The first part of the paper introduced a case history where low pressure grouting was applied in weakened subgrade of the active airport pavements in Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA. The treated areas seemed to have been improved and only one of all eight treated areas had reoccurrence of depression. However, the performance of the treated area was difficult to be evaluated. The latter part of the paper investigated the effectiveness of grout injection through laboratory experiments. The laboratory equipment used for the grout injection tests included an injection mold and a steel tank of 1 m length x 0.6 m wide x 0.6 m depth for subgrade soil sample. Three grout types namely neat cement grout, fly ash cement grout, bentonite cement grout were used for this study. Six tests were conducted on sandy soil samples to examine the effect of grout type on the effectiveness of injection. The sandy soil was compacted to approximate 80 % of the maximum dry density. The injection pressure was fixed at 0.5 MPa. Insitu CBR test was also conducted to determine the strength of the grouted sample. The results showed that the fly ash cement grout could penetrate further than the neat cement grout; however its strength was lower than the neat cement grout.

  10. 水泥基浆材室内试验及其边坡加固应用研究%Laboratory Test of Cement Matrix Grouting Material and Its Application in Slope Reinforcement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晴; 饶军应; 谢涛; 刘强

    2015-01-01

    Slope is often associated with collapse, landslides, mudslides and other disasters, which is endangering the lives and property of the masses around the project seriously. It is significant to take a research on slope reinforcement. The slope stability can be reinforced by plunging the cement liquid into the fractured rock mass of the slope. The optimum mix ratio, physical and mechanical properties, initial setting time and final setting time of five different kinds of cement based grouting material were determined by the laboratory test. The equations pressure and diffusion radius of grouting were provided. The layout of grouting reinforcement was presented and put into effect on the base of a slope in Xu-Huai Highway. The reinforcement effect was verified by numerical simulation and field test. Results show: the physical and mechanical properties can be improved; the strength and bearing capacity of soil can be enhanced. It is practicable and remarkable for grouting reinforcement by the cement matrix comprised with cement, yellow ground and fly ash.%边坡常伴随崩塌、滑坡和泥石流等灾害,严重危害着工程周围群众的生命财产安全,研究边坡加固意义重大。将注浆液压入破碎边坡内部,通过对软弱岩土体的加固可提高边坡稳定性。通过室内试验,确定了5种水泥基注浆材料的最佳配比、物理力学性能和初凝终凝时间。在推导了注浆压力和注浆扩散半径的公式后,结合溆怀高速边坡加固工程实践,提出并实施了具体注浆加固方案。最后,通过数值模拟和现场检测对注浆加固效果进行了验证。结果表明:注浆改善了土层物理力学性质,提高了土体强度及承载力,水泥黄砂粉煤灰注浆加固切实可行,效果显著。

  11. Experimental Evaluation of the Effects of Dynamic Pressure on Improving Cement-based Grout Penetrability : A study performed with the short slot

    OpenAIRE

    Mentesidis, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    The increasing need for watertight underground works, such as tunnel excavations, has sparked an interest in a number of research studies with grout penetrability being the focus. The research has so far contributed to a deeper understanding regarding the assessment of a successful grouting operation from different perspectives such as choice of equipment, material properties, phase planning and performance.  It is well established that several crucial factors influence the penetrability of g...

  12. Latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried transuranic/mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven national Laboratory was requested to investigate latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried TRU/mixed waste for INEL. The waste exists in shallow trenches that were backfilled with soil. The objective was to formulate latex-modified grouts for use with the jet grouting technique to enable in-situ stabilization of buried waste. The stabilized waste was either to be left in place or retrieved for further processing. Grouting prior to retrieval reduces the potential release of contaminants. Rheological properties of latex-modified grouts were investigated and compared with those of conventional neat cement grouts used for jet grouting.

  13. 新近系松散一半胶结砂砾石含水层的注浆改造试验及效果%Neogene Loose-Weakly Cemented Sandy Gravel Aquifer Grouting Reformation Test and Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵兰春; 李经海; 高祥川; 牛淑敏

    2012-01-01

    Safely driving through the Neogene sandy gravel is a common hard nut in inclined shaft opening out. To provide basis for surface advance grouting or concrete curtain grouting, the Xinwen Group has carried out special grouting test and pumping test, coring etc. to contrast and validated for Neogene gravel layer (intercalated with sandy clay) with total thickness 20~30m near the Heiliang coalmine main and auxiliary inclines, Shanghaimiao west mine area, Inner Mongolia. The result has demonstrated that although the loose-weakly cemented gravel layer has certain groutability beyond the IMPa grouting pressure "threshold" , but the slurry diffusive extent is less than 2~3m; also, the diffusive mode is irregular, uncontrollable and cannot form a reliable slurry diffusive consolidated ring, thus no improved effects on gravel layer water-bearing property and transmissibility have been found. Through this test, has grappled grouting performance in loose -weakly cemented gravel layer better, and obtained related grouting parameters and experiences, thus have guiding significance in grouting reformation and underground engineering construction safety in similar strata.%矿井斜井开拓安全通过新近系砂砾石含水层是一个普遍的难题,为给斜井地面预注浆或帷幕注浆法过砾石层提供依据,新矿集团在内蒙古自治区上海庙西矿区黑梁煤矿主副斜井附近对总厚20~30m的新近系砾石层(夹砂质粘土层)进行了专门注浆试验及抽水、取心等对比验证工作.结果表明,松散-半胶结砾石层虽然在超过1MPa的注浆压力“阀值”后具有一定的可注性,但浆液扩散范围小于2~3m,而且扩散方式不规则、不可控、形不成可靠的浆液扩散加固圈,对砾石层的含、导水性未发现有改善效果.通过本次试验,较好地掌握了松散-半胶结砾石层注浆性能,获得了有关注浆参数和经验,对类似地层的注浆改造和井巷工程的安全施工具有指导意义.

  14. Grout pump selection process for the Transportable Grout Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected low-level radioactive liquid wastes at Hanford will be disposed by grouting. Grout is formed by mixing the liquid wastes with solid materials, including Portland cement, fly ash, and clay. The mixed grouts will be pumped to disposal sites (e.g., trenches and buried structures) where the grout will be allowed to harden and, thereby, immobilize the wastes. A Transportable Grout Facility (TGF) will be constructed and operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations to perform the grouting function. A critical component of the TGF is the grout pump. A preliminary review of pumping requirements identified reciprocating pumps and progressive cavity pumps as the two classes of pumps best suited for the application. The advantages and disadvantages of specific types of pumps within these two classes were subsequently investigated. As a result of this study, the single-screw, rotary positive displacement pump was identified as the best choice for the TGF application. This pump has a simple design, is easy to operate, is rugged, and is suitable for a radioactive environment. It produces a steady, uniform flow that simplifies suction and discharge piping requirements. This pump will likely require less maintenance than reciprocating pumps and can be disassembled rapidly and decontaminated easily. If the TGF should eventually require discharge pressures in excess of 500 psi, a double-acting duplex piston pump is recommended because it can operate at low speed, with only moderate flow rate fluctuations. However, the check valves, stuffing box, piston, suction, and discharge piping must be designed carefully to allow trouble-free operations

  15. Grouting Control for Deep-Water Jacket Skirt Pile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qing; ZHANG Jianxin; XU Lianjiang

    2006-01-01

    Deep-water jacket skirt pile grouting is a critical step in ocean platform construction. Because of the complexity of the skirt pile structure and grouting pipeline, the calculation of grouting pressure and the control of output pressure are involved. Beginning with the jacket skirt pile grouting construction scheme, grouting pressure is estimated on the basis of engineering fluid mechanics theory and variable frequency control technique. Programmable logic controller is the center of grouting pressure control system, which accomplishes the flow control of cement buffer tank water buffer tank, additive buffer tank, cement metering tank, water metering tank, additive metering tank, mixer and agitator. Based on PROFIBUS-DP network, the output pressure of the slurry pump is controlled by the inverter. This method has been applied successfully in JZ20-2 Nor. high spot jacket platform construction.

  16. Erosion of clay-based grouts in simulated rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a laboratory study on the erosion of clay-based grouts in a simulated rock fracture and in a simulated rock fracture network. The apparatus specially constructed for these experiments and the testing procedure are described. The testing results have shown that a partially eroded clay-based grout may still be effective in sealing rock fractures and that the addition of cement in a clay grout can minimize erosion

  17. Analysis of Homogel Uniaxial Compression Strength on Bio Grouting Material

    OpenAIRE

    Kyungho Park; Daehyeon Kim

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed uniaxial compression strength over time by preparing a homogel specimen from a bio grouting material, a cement-like form produced by environment-friendly microbial reactions. Among chemical grouting methods, the most commonly used method is the Labile Waterglass method. In this study, the homogel uniaxial compressive strength of Labile Waterglass (LW) injection material and that of bio grouting material were measured and analyzed. In order to perform the experiment, a tota...

  18. Hanford transportable grout facility: technology and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouting of selected low-level liquid waste (LLW) is a key part of the overall management strategy developed for disposal of some Hanford site wastes. Cement-based grouts will be utilized to immobilize LLW generated from a variety of sources. It is expected that up to 415,000 m3 (108 gal) of grout may be produced over the next 25 yr. The mixing of LLW with cementitious materials to form grout will make valuable double-shell tank storage space available for other wastes, reduce the construction of new double-shell tanks, and dispose of waste in an environmentally safe manner. Specific grout formulations are being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, tailored for each category of Hanford LLW. Bulk powdered materials will be blended to produce a homogeneous dry mix. Grout formulations are developed to maximize the waste loading using commercially available, low-cost raw materials. The grout production facilities will consist of several major systems the Dry Materials Receiving and Handling Facility (DMRHF), a one-million-gal liquid feed tank, the transportable grout equipment (TGE), and the disposal system. These facilities can be operated safely and within US Dept. of Energy orders and standards

  19. Influence Mechanism of Grouting on Mechanical Characteristics of Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jixun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouting technology has been widely used in all fields of geotechnical and civil engineering. Prospective engineering objectives including reinforcement of rock mass and groundwater leakage treatment can be achieved by grouting which will change the mechanical parameters of rock mass such as strength, elastic modulus, and coefficient of permeability. In this paper, rock mass is assumed as a composite material consisting of rock particles and random microcracks initially. Since part or all of the cracks will be filled with cement slurry after grouting, rock mass consists of rock particles, grout condensate, and some or no random microcracks after grouting. The damage constitutional law of the mesoscopic element is established based on the theory of mesoscopic damage mechanics. With the heterogeneity of the components of rock mass considered, the variation of mechanical characteristics of rock mass is studied before and after grouting. And the influence mechanism of grouting on rock mass is investigated at mesoscale level.

  20. Theoretical investigations of grout seal longevity - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical investigations into the longevity of repository seals have dealt primarily with the development of a methodology to evaluate interactions between portland cement-based grout and groundwater. Evaluation of chemical thermodynamic equilibria between grout and groundwater, and among grout, groundwater, and granitic host rock phases using the geochemical codes EQ3NR/EQ6 suggests that a fracture filled with grout and saturated with groundwater will tend to fill and 'tighten' with time. Results of these investigations suggest that cement grout seals will maintain an acceptable level of performance for tens of thousands to millions of years, provided the repository is sited where groundwater chemistry is compatible with the seals and hydrologic gradients are low. The results of the grout: groundwater: rock calculations suggest that buffering of the fracture seals chemical systems by the granite rock may be important in determining the long-term fate of grout seals and the resulting phase assemblage in the fracture. The similarity of the modelled reaction products to those observed in naturally filled fractures suggests that with time equilibrium will be approached and grouted fractures subject to low hydrologic gradients will continue to seal. If grout injected into fractures materially reduces groundwater flux, the approach to chemical equilibrium will likely be accelerated. In light of this, even very thin or imperfectly grouted fractures would tighten in suitable hydrogeologic environments. (29 refs.) (au)

  1. 超细高性能灌浆水泥组分优化试验研究%Study on the Optimizing Components of Microfine High Performance Grouting Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管学茂; 胡曙光; 丁庆军

    2002-01-01

    按逐次叠加原理和正交设计理论,配制出了超细高性能灌浆水泥(microfine high performance grouting cement,简称MHPGC).对该材料组成与性能的关系进行了系统研究,并用SEM对其微观结构进行了分析.研究表明,在MHPGC中合理地掺入粉煤灰、矿渣、膨胀剂、石膏等材料,能产生超叠加效应,显著提高MHPGC的强度,降低水泥熟料的用量.

  2. PNC'S research and development of sealing technology and the field grouting test of single fractures in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1980, PNC has been continuing the R and D of sealing technology such as studies on sealing materials and designing and executing methods. Field grouting tests were carried out at the granite quarry. Single fractures within 5 meters below the surface were selected for the grouting test. The conventional grouting method and the supersonic grouting method were adopted. Effective grouting was achieved at a fracture of around 0.05 mm aperture up to 1 m away from the grout injection hole by these methods using super fine cement and colloid cement

  3. Grout pump characteristics evaluated with the UVP+PD method

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Mashuqur; Håkansson, Ulf; Wiklund, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Rock grouting is performed to decrease the hydraulic conductivity around underground structures, such as tunnels and caverns. Cement grouts are often used and pumped into joint and fractures of the rock formation. Piston type pumps are mostly used for high pressure rock grouting. A pulsation effect is inevitable when using this type of pump due to the movement of the piston. The effect of this pulsation on rock grouting is yet to be known but believed to be benefi-cial for the penetration of ...

  4. Strength of Experimental Grouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

     The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....... The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  5. Proposal of efficient pre-excavation grouting concept for deep underground rock excavation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study on efficient pre-excavation grouting concept using cement grout for reducing water-inflow during deep underground excavation in hard crystalline rock. Although thick grout mix is favorable for the efficiency, clogging phenomenon at the entrance of rock fractures in grout hole is a critical issue. The clogging phenomenon is therefore studied by laboratory experiments considering single and plural fractures. Although it is possible to increase grout volume by raising grout pressure for the case of single fracture, it is unrealistic to raise grout pressure for the case of plural fractures due to the concentrated flow into large fracture. Finally, the efficient pre-excavation grouting concept with moderate to thick grout mix is proposed based on laboratory studies. (author)

  6. Grouting as a waste immobilization/disposal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many options are available today for the immobilization and disposal of wastes that contain environmentally harmful materials. The option chosen depends upon the type of waste, regulatory requirements, and economics of process. Some options are specific to a given waste type; others are more versatile. This presentation discusses a very versatile option for waste immobilization/disposal, i.e. grouting. Many types of grout are available, such as chemical, clays or other particulates, fly ash, cements, or a combination of these. Within the limited allowable time, this presentation discusses the application of a variety of cement-based grouting techniques available for disposal of environmentally harmful materials. Areas discussed are in situ grouting of pits, ponds and lagoons, grouting as remedial action, and fixation for disposal in burial trenches or vaults

  7. Polyurethane grouting technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Bodi, Jan; Bodi, Zoltan; Scucka, Jiri; Martinec, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Grouting with polyurethane [PU] resins represents an effective method of improvement of mechanical and sealing properties of soil and rock environment and constructions. The principle of grouting technologies is injection of liquid grouting material into the rock environment or construction under pressure. During the grouting process, fissures and pores are filled with the grouting material, which subsequently hardens and connects the disintegrated parts of the rock mass or grains of loo...

  8. Sealing of exploratory boreholes in clay reactivity of ordinary portland cement (OPC) grouts and various lithologies from the Harwell research site. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a research programme on the disposal of radioactive wastes in clay, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC

  9. R20 Programme: The development of grouting technique. Stop criteria and field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a part of the project 'Grouting Technique' by Posiva Oy, which is responsible for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. This study attempts to collect disperse information about the design parameters of the grouting and about a field-test stop criterion, which differs from the prevailing practice. The literature study describes salient processes of grouting design in sufficient extent. Different methods for grouting stop criterion are described in more detail. Grouting design based on selected grouting theory, grouting and evaluating of the grouting results are presented in the experiential part of this study. This study focuses on rock tunnel grouting using cement-based grout. The requirements for water tightness, which are set down by customer, direct the grouting design. Information about fractures in rock mass, which surrounds the rock facility, is the prime initial data for grouting design. In grouting work, fracturing is generally studied by water loss measurements performed in investigation, probe and grouting holes. Besides the water loss measurement, the Posiva Flow Log -tool, which measures location and transmissivity for every single fracture, is used in ONKALO. Grouting pressure and grout must be chosen together and case-specifically. Both pressure and yield strength of grout are influencing the penetration length of grout in a fracture. Grouting pressure must be high enough to ensure sufficient penetration length, but pressure must be under the level where rock mass breaks to avoid hydraulic fracturing. Raising the water to dry material ratio reduces the yield strength of grout, in which case the grouting pressure can be lowered. Stop criterion for grouting aims to define the point, when the result of the grouting is adequate, and the grouting after that point is uneconomical. Properly specified stop criterion minimizes extra grout volume and reduces the running time of grouting work. From the references, three different

  10. The application of strength grouts to the rehabilitation of existing concrete gravity dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new way of improving the stability of concrete dams on rock foundations was investigated involving the development of cohesion in the unbonded contacts of the dam foundation interface by specifically designed strength grouts, using Type 10 Portland cement and MC 900 cement. It was shown that cement based grouts, having low bleed at small viscosities, develop tensile strengths within concrete-rock contacts that exceed 0.4 MPa. This paper presents a methodology to assess the suitability of increasing the stability of a concrete gravity dam through the injection of these specifically-designed strength grouts into the dam-foundation interface. It was shown that strength grouting can be carried out using current grouting practices that are familiar to contractors and engineers. Similarly, it was demonstrated that adequate increases in the safety factor can be obtained even if field grouting achieves only a relatively low penetration ratio in the unbonded interface. 6 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  11. Field test of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting into rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline rocks have fractures which may cause unexpected routes of groundwater seepage. Cement grouting is one of the most effective methods to minimize seepage; however, cement materials may not be suitable for the purpose of extra-long durability, because cement is neutralized or degraded by chemical and physical influence of chemical reaction. Natural clay like bentonite is one of the most promising materials for seepage barrier; however, water/bentonite grout is so viscous that enough amount of bentonite can not be grouted into rock fractures. To increase bentonite content in grout with low viscosity, the utilization of ethanol as a mixing liquid was studied. Ethanol suppresses bentonite swelling, and more bentonite can be injected more than that of water/bentonite slurry. In this paper, grouting into in-situ rock mass fracture from the ground surface was tested to investigate the barrier performance and workability of ethanol/bentonite slurry as a grouting material. (author)

  12. Feasibility of permeation grouting for constructing subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efforts are being made to devise technologies that provide interim containment of waste sites while final remediation alternatives are developed. Permeation grouting, a technique used extensively in the civil and mining engineering industry has been investigated as a method for emplacing a subsurface containment barrier beneath existing waste sites. Conceptually an underlying barrier is placed by injecting grout into the formation at less than fracturing pressure from a series of directionally drilled boreholes beneath the waste site. This study evaluated the penetration and performance characteristics in varying soil conditions of four different grout materials (two microfine cements, mineral wax, and sodium silicate) at a field scale. Field testing consisted of grout injection via sleeve (tube-a'-manchette) pipe into both vertical and horizontal borehole configurations at the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration site at Sandia National Laboratories. Prior to, during, and after grout injection non-intrusive geophysical techniques were used to map grout flow. Following the tests, the site was excavated to reveal details of the grout permeation, and grouted soil samples were cored for laboratory characterization. The non-intrusive and intrusive grout mapping showed preferential flow patterns, i.e., the grout tended to follow the path of least resistance. Preliminary testing indicates that permeation grouting is a feasible method for emplacing a low permeability subsurface barrier in the semi-arid unconsolidated alluvial soils common to the Southwest. Despite the success of this project, difficulties in predicting grout flow in heterogeneous soils and non-intrusive methods for imaging grout location and continuity are issues that need more attention

  13. Protection against water or mud inrush in tunnels by grouting: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Grouting is a major method used to prevent water and mud inrush in tunnels and underground engineering. In this paper, the current situation of control and prevention of water and mud inrush is summarized and recent advances in relevant theories, grout/equipment, and critical techniques are introduced. The time-variant equations of grout viscosity at different volumetric ratios were obtained based on the constitutive relation of typical fast curing grouts. A large-scale dynamic grouting model testing system (4000 mm × 2000 mm × 5 mm was developed, and the diffusions of cement and fast curing grouts in dynamic water grouting were investigated. The results reveal that the diffusions of cement grouts and fast curing grouts are U-shaped and asymmetric elliptical, respectively. A multi-parameter real-time monitoring system (ϕ = 1.5 m, h = 1.2 m was developed for the grouting process to study the diffusion and reinforcement mechanism of grouting in water-rich faulted zone. A high early strength cream-type reinforcing/plugging grout, a high permeability nano-scale silica gel grout, and a high-expansion filling grout were proposed for the control of water hazards in weak water-rich faulted zone rocks, water inrush in karst passages, and micro-crack water inrush, respectively. Complement technologies and equipment for industrial applications were also proposed. Additionally, a novel full-life periodic dynamic water grouting with the critical grouting borehole as the core was proposed. The key techniques for the control of water inrush in water-rich faulted zone, jointed fissures and karst passages, and micro-crack water inrush were developed.

  14. Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Injected Granular Soil with Thick Super Plasticized Grouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A. Anagnostopoulos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of super-plasticizers in micro fine or regular cement-based grouts has become of vital importance in advanced professional grouting practices. These super-plasticizers play an important role in the production of more durable grouts with improved rheological characteristics. This report presents a laboratory study of the effect of a new-generation Polycarboxylate Super-plasticizer (PCE on the inject ability of thick cement grouts into a coarse soil, under different grouting pressures, in comparison to that of a polynaphthalene (SNF super-plasticizer. Finally, the physical (dry unit weight, porosity and permeability and mechanical properties (compressive strength, elastic modulus of grouted specimens with various grouts were examined. The experiments were conducted using different additive dosages with grouts proportioned with a water to cement ratio (w/c of 0.33, 0.4 and 0.5, respectively. The results showed that PCE super-plasticizer is more effective than the SNF one for the increase of grout inject ability and the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of grouted soil.

  16. Tank closure reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  17. Characterization of phosphate/sulfate waste grout cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1993-09-01

    As part of efforts to clean up federal production sites, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is treating selected low-level liquid wastes by incorporating them into cementitious waste forms. At the Hanford Site, low-level radioactive liquid wastes will be mixed with a blend of Portland cement, fly ash, clays, and other ingredients in a continuous process at the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). The resulting grout slurry will be pumped to lined, underground concrete vaults where the grout will harden, thereby immobilizing contaminants. Physical property measurements and American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 leach tests have been completed on 45 samples obtained from five cores from the phosphate/sulfate waste (PSW) grout vault. A summary of the compressive strength, bulk density, and sonic velocity data is compared with data from other PSW grout samples. Results of moisture content, thermal conductivity, and the leaching of aluminium, calcium, sodium, sulfate, cobalt-60, and cesium-137 are given.

  18. Prediction of grout penetration in fractured rocks by numerical simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, MJ; Yue, ZQ; Lee, PKK; Su, B; Tham, LG

    2002-01-01

    As fractures in rock significantly reduce the strength as well as the stiffness of the rock mass, grouting may be required to improve the performance of the rock mass in engineering or mining projects. During grouting, mortar of cement or other materials is injected into the rock mass so that the fractures can be filled up and the rock mass can act as an integral unit. Unlike water, grouts are usually viscous and behave as non-Newtonian fluids. Therefore, the equations describing the flow of ...

  19. Formulation verification study results for 241-AN-106 waste grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests were conducted to determine whether the reference formulation and variations around the formulation are adequate for solidifying 241-AN-106 (106-AN) waste into a grout waste form. The reference formulation consists of 21 wt% type I/II Portland cement, 68 wt% fly ash, and 11 wt% attapulgite clay. The mix ratio is 8.4 lb/gal. Variations in dry blend component ratios, mix ratio, and waste concentration were assessed by using a statistically designed experimental matrix consisting of 44 grout compositions. Based on the results of the statistically designed variability study, the 106-AN grout formulations tested met all the formulation criteria except for the heat of hydration

  20. Experimental assessment of the sealing effectiveness of rock fracture grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effectiveness of cement grouts as sealants of fractures in rock. Laboratory experiments have been conducted on seven 15-cm granite cubes containing saw cuts, three 23-cm diameter andesite cores containing induced tension cracks, and one 15-cm diameter marble core containing a natural fracture. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the fractures is determined under a range of normal stresses, applied in loading and unloading cycles, from 0 to 14 MPa (2000 psi). Grout is injected through an axial borehole, at a pressure of 1.2 to 8.3 MPa (180 to 1200 psi), pressure selected to provide a likely groutable fracture aperture, while the fracture is stressed at a constant normal stress. The fracture permeability is measured after grouting. Flow tests on the ungrouted samples confirm the inverse relation between normal stress and fracture permeability. The equivalent aperture determined by these tests is a reliable indicator of groutability. Postgrouting permeability measurements as performed here, and frequently in practice, can be misleading, since incomplete grouting of fractures can result in major apparent reductions in permeability. The apparent permeability reduction is caused by grouting of a small area of a highly preferential flowpath directly adjacent to the hole used for grouting and for permeability testing. Experimental results confirm claims in the literature that ordinary portland cement inadequately penetrates fine fractures

  1. Summary report on the development of a cement-based formula to immobilize Hanford facility waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report recommends a cement-based grout formula to immobilize Hanford Facility Waste in the Transportable Grout Facility (TGF). Supporting data confirming compliance with all TGF performance criteria are presented. 9 refs., 24 figs., 50 tabs

  2. Maxey Flats in situ waste grouting demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Maxey Flats Disposal Site located in Fleming County, Kentucky was added to the US EPA National Priority List in 1986 and is currently being evaluated for remediation and closure under the CERCLA/Superfund program. The Commonwealth of Kentucky has cosponsored a program with the US DOE Low Level Waste Management Program to demonstrate various remedial technologies which may be applied to source containment at the Maxey Flats site. This paper describes the field demonstration of in-situ waste grouting using a particulate (cement) grout. This demonstration is a follow-on to a similar demonstration using a solution grout. Both programs were designed to develop injection techniques, to assess the ability of the grout to fill the accessible voids within the waste/backfill matrix, to measure the reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the waste/backfill matrix, and to determine the operational difficulties in implementing a site-wide grouting program. The paper concludes with lessons-learned during the project and estimated costs for full scale implementation

  3. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix

  4. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

    2000-08-31

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  5. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

    2000-08-01

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  6. Colloidal silica-grouting in demonstration tunnel 2 in ONKALO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva carried out grouting using colloidal silica as the grouting material and with the time stop method as the design approach.Three fans were pre-grouted at Posiva Oy's research space ONKALO demonstration tunnel 2 in autumn 2011 and early winter 2012. Colloidal silica is a mix of one-component colloidal silica and accelerator. Before gelling, colloidal silica behaves like a Newtonian liquid. Colloidal silica's efficiency of penetrating hydraulic apertures in small fractures in rock is significantly better than that of cement-based grout. The grouting design was based on an analytical calculation model. A new technique was used in the grouting implementation, which primarily differed from the previous technique in regard to vacuum pumping and packers. The goal of the first grouting fan in the demonstration tunnel was to check the functionality of the equipment and the method; therefore, the fan was drilled into rock mass with no hydraulic conducting fractures. The second grouting fan was drilled into rock mass with an observed fairly low hydraulic conductivity that was lower than the start criterion established in Posiva Oy's requirements to manage groundwater inflows. Nevertheless, the grouting was carried out. The sealing effect was estimated from the control holes, and a slight improvement in sealing was noted. The holes of the third grouting fan clearly penetrated a water conductive rock mass. The grouting was carried out in two phases, in which the new holes in the second phase were drilled between the existing ones that were drilled in the first phase. In the third fan, the grouting holes of the first phase were noted to be significantly crooked and the second phase grouting holes were drilled in locations that differed from the original design. The quantity of grouting holes was increased in the second phase. The sealing effect was estimated by monitoring the second phase holes and control holes. Based on observations from the control holes

  7. Colloidal silica-grouting in demonstration tunnel 2 in ONKALO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmen, K.; Sievaenen, U. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Funehag, J.; Granberg, N. [Tyrens AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lyytinen, T.; Syrjaenen, P. [ELY Management Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-12-15

    Posiva carried out grouting using colloidal silica as the grouting material and with the time stop method as the design approach.Three fans were pre-grouted at Posiva Oy's research space ONKALO demonstration tunnel 2 in autumn 2011 and early winter 2012. Colloidal silica is a mix of one-component colloidal silica and accelerator. Before gelling, colloidal silica behaves like a Newtonian liquid. Colloidal silica's efficiency of penetrating hydraulic apertures in small fractures in rock is significantly better than that of cement-based grout. The grouting design was based on an analytical calculation model. A new technique was used in the grouting implementation, which primarily differed from the previous technique in regard to vacuum pumping and packers. The goal of the first grouting fan in the demonstration tunnel was to check the functionality of the equipment and the method; therefore, the fan was drilled into rock mass with no hydraulic conducting fractures. The second grouting fan was drilled into rock mass with an observed fairly low hydraulic conductivity that was lower than the start criterion established in Posiva Oy's requirements to manage groundwater inflows. Nevertheless, the grouting was carried out. The sealing effect was estimated from the control holes, and a slight improvement in sealing was noted. The holes of the third grouting fan clearly penetrated a water conductive rock mass. The grouting was carried out in two phases, in which the new holes in the second phase were drilled between the existing ones that were drilled in the first phase. In the third fan, the grouting holes of the first phase were noted to be significantly crooked and the second phase grouting holes were drilled in locations that differed from the original design. The quantity of grouting holes was increased in the second phase. The sealing effect was estimated by monitoring the second phase holes and control holes. Based on observations from the control holes

  8. Water pressure resistance of liquid-type grout in rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted several tests of durable liquid-type grout (colloidal silica) to investigate basic characteristics of liquid-type grout for geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW). Liquid-type grout is inferior to cement grout in the resistance strength against high water pressure. Laboratory tests were performed to measure resistance strength of liquid-type grout in rock fracture, which was modelized by a parallel plane made of iron and acryl plate. As tests results, the shear resistance of the liquid-type grout could be expected about 3% of shear strength derived from triaxial compression tests. Based on test results, we conducted simple calculation for required grout injection area. (author)

  9. Grout testing and characterization for shallow-land burial trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was conducted to develop grout formulations suitable for in situ stabilization of low-level and transuranic (TRU) waste in shallow-land burial trenches at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The acceptabilities of soil, ordinary particulate, and fine particulate grouts were evaluated based on phase separation, compressive strength, freeze/thaw, penetration resistance, rheological, water permeability, column, and other tests. Soil grouts with soil-to-cement weight ratios from 0.91 to 1.60 were found to be suitable for open trench or drum disposal. Ordinary particulate grouts containing type I,II Portland cement, class C fly ash, bentonite, water, and a fluidizer were formulated to fill large voids within the soil/waste matrix of a closed shallow-land burial trench. Fine particulate grouts containing fine (mean particle size, 9.6 m) cement and water were formulated to fill smaller voids and to establish a grout-soil barrier to prevent water intrusion into the grouted waste trench. Solution, or chemical grouts, were evaluated as possible substitutes for the fine particulate grouts

  10. THERMALLY CONDUCTIVE CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS. PROGRESS REPORT BY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

    1998-11-01

    Research commenced in FY 97 to determine the suitability of superplasticized cement-sand grouts for backfilling vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. The overall objectives were to develop, evaluate and demonstrate cementitious grouts that could reduce the required bore length and improve the performance of GHPs. This report summarizes the accomplishments in FY 98.

  11. Test execution of liquid-type grout at depth of 300 m of Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory, the water inflow should be minimized, considering water treatment expense. Although cement grout has been applied to reduce water inflow up to 460 m depth, water inflow through small fractures which cement grout cannot penetrate cannot be neglected at deeper underground. Liquid-type grout which has high durability as well as good penetrability was therefore tested at the depth of 300 m. Test results indicated that liquid-type grout could sufficiently reduce hydraulic conductivity of rock mass with less than 1 Lu, and could keep improvement effect even after applied water pressure of more than 9 MPa was applied. (author)

  12. A new and superior ultrafine cementitious grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sealing fractures in nuclear waste repositories concerns all programs investigating deep burial as a means of disposal. Because the most likely mechanism for contaminant migration is by dissolution and movement through groundwater, sealing programs are seeking low-viscosity sealants that are chemically, mineralogically, and physically compatible with the host rock. This paper presents the results of collaborative work directed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and supported by Whiteshell Laboratories, operated by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The work was undertaken in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), an underground nuclear waste repository located in a salt formation east of Carlsbad, NM. This effort addresses the technology associated with long-term isolation of nuclear waste in a natural salt medium. The work presented is part of the WIPP plugging and sealing program, specifically the development and optimization of an ultrafine cementitious grout that can be injected to lower excessive, strain-induced hydraulic conductivity in the fractured rock termed the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ) surrounding underground excavations. Innovative equipment and procedures employed in the laboratory produced a usable cement-based grout; 90% of the particles were smaller than 8 microns and the average particle size was 4 microns. The process involved simultaneous wet pulverization and mixing. The grout was used for a successful in situ test underground at the WIPP. Injection of grout sealed microfractures as small as 6 microns (and in one rare instance, 3 microns) and lowered the gas transmissivity of the DRZ by up to three orders of magnitude. Following the WIPP test, additional work produced an improved version of the grout containing particles 90% smaller than 5 microns and averaging 2 microns. This grout will be produced in dry form, ready for the mixer

  13. Comparing the shear strength of grouted fractures: conventional methods vs biomineralisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mountassir, G.; Tobler, D. J.; Moir, H.; Lunn, R. J.; Phoenix, V. R.

    2011-12-01

    For many engineering applications, such as geological disposal of nuclear waste, underground railways etc., it is necessary to limit fluid flow through fractures. The particle size of conventional cementitious grouts limits the size of fractures into which they can penetrate. To address this issue increasingly microfine and ultrafine cement grouts are becoming commercially available. Despite this the radius of penetration remains dependent on the grout viscosity alongside injection pressure, pumping rate, grout setting time and grout cohesion. As such lower viscosity aqueous solutions may have a greater radius of penetration potentially requiring fewer injection points. In addition cementitious grouts typically undergo volumetric shrinkage during setting. In many applications this change in volume may not be of particular importance but in others where a very low hydraulic conductivity is a critical design criterion, as in nuclear waste repositories, this reduction in volume may be highly significant. This study investigates the use of microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MCP) as a technique for grouting fine aperture rock fractures. Artificial fractures were created in granite cores and were subjected to conventional cementitious grouting methods and MCP. Following treatment the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the grouted fractures were investigated. The mechanical properties of grouts after setting is not usually considered to be a significant issue, but in applications which consider much longer timescales (100,000 years) grouts which result in fractures with improved strength and lower hydraulic conductivity are likely to be preferred.

  14. Monitoring of grout material injected under a reservoir using electrical and electromagnetic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Oyama, Takahiro; Kawashima, Fumiharu; Tsukada, Tomoyuki; Jyomori, Akira

    2010-02-01

    In order to reduce leakage from a reservoir, a large amount of cement milk (grout) was injected from boreholes drilled around the shores of the reservoir, and monitored to establish the infiltration of cement milk into the bedrock under the reservoir. From laboratory tests using rock core samples, it was revealed that the resistivity of cement milk is much lower than that of the groundwater at this location. Therefore, it was expected that the resistivity of the zones filled with cement milk would be significantly reduced. Geophysical surveys are expected to be suitable methods to check the effectiveness of grouting in improving the water-retaining performance of a reservoir. DC electrical surveys (seven in total) and two Controlled Source Audio-frequency Magneto-Telluric (CSAMT) surveys were conducted along survey lines in the reservoir to monitor the infiltration of cement milk during the grouting. Extremely low resistivity zones (10Ωm or less) were observed in resistivity sections obtained by 2D inversion. The zones are inferred to be fractured zones filled with cement milk. In sections showing the rate of change of resistivity, three zones that showed significant change showed gradual expansion to deeper parts as the grouting progressed. These zones correspond to highly permeable zones detected by Lugeon tests at grout boreholes. We have confirmed that it is possible to measure the resistivity change by DC electrical and CSAMT surveys from the surface of the reservoir. It seems that such monitoring results could be reflected in future grouting plans.

  15. 向家坝水电站挠曲核部破碎带水泥-环氧树脂复合灌浆试验研究%Cement-epoxy Resin Grouting Treatment for the Flexural Fracture Zone in Xiangjiaba Hydropower Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏涛; 张健; 陈亮; 肖承京

    2015-01-01

    向家坝水电站坝址岩性岩相多变,地质条件非常复杂,坝右岸存在挠曲核部破碎带,对大坝的渗透稳定非常不利。现场施工发现水泥灌浆难以对坝基存在的挠曲核部破碎带进行有效处理,为解决挠曲核部破碎带地质缺陷,长江科学院在右岸二期基坑高程257 m 平台进行了水泥-环氧树脂复合灌浆试验。灌后检查显示:透水率由复合灌浆前的平均透水率3.05 Lu降为0.075 Lu,做全压力为2.265 MPa的疲劳压水试验,经72 h 透水率为0 Lu;水力破坏坡降比灌前提高了11.54倍;灌浆后平均波速比灌前提高16.8%。试验结果表明:湿磨细水泥-环氧树脂同孔复合灌浆的工艺是可行的,CW510环氧树脂灌浆材料能够浸润和渗透到挠曲核部破碎带不良地质体中,试验中所获得的工艺参数可以在向家坝水电站挠曲核部破碎处理中推广应用,并可为其他水工建筑物基础处理借鉴。%The geological conditions of Xiangjiaba hydropower station is very complicated with a flexural core frac-ture zone at the right side of dam foundation,detrimental to the seepage stability of the dam.It’s hard to mend these geological defects such as siltstone and argillaceous siltstone with cement grouting .In view of this we conduc-ted test on platform at elevation 257m on the right bank of second-stage foundation pit using cement-epoxy resin grouting to mend the geological defects.The quality inspection results after grouting are as follows:water permea-bility reduced from 3.05 Lu to 0.075 Lu;the water permeability of fatigue water pressure test with full pressure of 2.265 MPa is 0 Lu after 72h;the gradient of hydraulic damage is 11.54 times higher than that before grouting;the average wave velocity improved by 16.8% over the previous grouting.The test results indicate that the treatment of cement-epoxy resin compound grouting for flexural core fracture zone in Xiangjiaba

  16. Grouting Applications in Cindere Dam

    OpenAIRE

    Alkaya, Devrim; Burak YEŞİL

    2011-01-01

    Grouting is one of the most popular method to control the water leakage in fill dam constructions. With this regard this method is widely used in all the world. Geological and geotechnical properties of rock are important parameters affect the design of grouting. In this study, geotechnical properties of Cindere Dam's base rock and the grouting prosedure have been investigated with grouting pressure.

  17. Strength of High Performance Grouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations.......The present report describes tests carried out on 5 experimental grouts developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  18. Fate of Contaminants in Contact with West Valley Grouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhrmann,M.; Gillow, J.

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the work described here is to determine to what extent a variety of contaminants, including fission products, actinides, and RCRA elements are sequestered by the two grout formulations. The conceptual model for this study is as follows: a large mass of grout having been poured into a high-level waste tank is in the process of aging and weathering for thousands of years. The waste remaining in the tank will contain radionuclides and other contaminants, much of which will adhere to tank walls and internal structures. The grout will encapsulate the contaminants. Initially the grout will be well sequestered, but over time rainwater and groundwater will gain access to it. Ultimately, the grout/waste environment will be an open system. In this condition water will move through the grout, exposing it to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} from the air and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} from the groundwater. Thus we are considering an oxic environment containing HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Initially the solubility of many contaminants, but not all, will be constrained by chemistry dominated by the grout, primarily by the high pH, around 11.8. This is controlled and buffered by the portland cement and blast furnace slag components of the grout, which by themselves maintain a solution pH of about 12.5. Slowly the pH will diminish as Ca(OH){sub 2} and KOH dissolve, are carried away by water, and CaCO{sub 3} forms. As these conditions develop, the behavior of these elements comes into question. In our conceptual model, although the grout is formulated to provide some reducing capacity, in order to be conservative this mechanism is not considered. In addition to solubility constraints imposed by pH, the various contaminants may be incorporated into a variety of solid phases. Some may be incorporated into newly forming compounds as the grout sets and cures. Others (like soddyite, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}) are the result of slower reactions but may become important over time

  19. ORNL grouting technologies for immobilizing hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cement and Concrete Applications Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed versatile and inexpensive processes to solidify large quantities of hazardous liquids, sludges, and solids. By using standard off the shelf processing equipment, these batch or continuous processes are compatible with a wide range of disposal methods, such as above-ground storage, shallow-land burial, deep geological disposal, sea-bed dumping, and bulk in-situ solidification. Because of their economic advantages, these latter bulk in-situ disposal scenarios have received the most development. ORNL's experience has shown that tailored cement-based formulas can be developed which tolerate wide fluctuations in waste feed compositions and still maintain mixing properties that are compatible with standard equipment. In addition to cements, these grouts contain pozzolans, clays and other additives to control the flow properties, set-times, phase separations and impacts of waste stream fluctuation. The cements, fly ashes and other grout components are readily available in bulk quantities and the solids-blends typically cost less than $0.05 to 0.15 per waste gallon. Depending on the disposal scenario, total disposal costs (material, capital, and operating) can be as low as $0.10 to 0.50 per gallon

  20. Formulation studies and grout development for fixation of variable phosphate/sulfate waste, Milestone 195

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to develop a range of cement-based blended dry solids which, when mixed with variable phosphate/sulfate waste (PSW), produce grouts that are processible in the Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO) Transportable Grout Facility (TGF). The selected formula(s) will also utilize commerically available materials requiring no custom processing and meet all criteria as identified and quantified by RHO, not only for grouts made with the reference formula, but also for those grouts made with reasonable deviations from the reference formula expected during routine TGF operation. This report presents experimental data for processibility and solid performance as well as graphical representations of the data. Based upon the results of the preliminary study, several grout formulas were found that produced acceptable grouts. One such formula, composed of Type III Portland cement (50 wt%), class F fly ash (28 wt%), Attapulgite-150 clay (14 wt%), and Indian red pottery clay (IRPC) (8 wt%), produced acceptable grouts with several of the waste concentrations studied. When mixed with 100% sulfate waste, this blend produced acceptable grouts at mix ratios of 8, 8.5, and 9 lb/gal. This particular blend also produced acceptable grouts at waste concentrations of 25/75 and 75/25 PSW. 12 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs

  1. Tracing the interaction of acid mine drainage with coal utilization byproducts in a grouted mine: Strontium isotope study of the inactive Omega Coal Mine, West Virginia (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to ameliorate acidic discharge, the inactive Omega Coal Mine, West Virginia was partially filled by injection of a grout consisting of 98% coal utilization byproducts (CUB), including fluidized bed combustion ash and fly ash, and 2% Portland cement. In this study, discharge chemistry and Sr isotope ratios were determined to identify and quantify the extent of interaction between mine waters and the CUB-cement grout. Eight sampling sites were monitored around the downdip perimeter of the mine. The major and trace element chemistry of the discharges was generally not sufficient to distinguish between discharges that interacted with grout and those that did not. Elements that showed the most separation include K and As, which were elevated in some waters that interacted with CUB-cement grout. In contrast, the Sr isotope ratios clearly distinguished discharges from grouted and non-grouted areas. Discharges that bypassed the grouted portions had 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.71510 to 0.71594, while two discharges that interacted with grout had ratios in the range of 0.71401-0.71456. The Treatment Inlet, which includes both grouted and ungrouted discharges, yielded intermediate isotopic ratios. Leaching experiments on CUB-cement grout, coal and surrounding rocks are consistent with the isotopic trends observed in the discharges. Based on these results, waters that interacted with grout received 30-40% of their Sr from the CUB-cement grout material. These results suggest that the grout material is chemically eroding at a rate of approximately 0.04% per year. This novel application of the Sr isotope system illustrates its ability to sensitively track and quantify fluid interaction with coal and CUB-based grout.

  2. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  3. ELAWD GROUT HOPPER MOCK-UP TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickenheim, B.; Hansen, E.; Leishear, R.; Marzolf, A.; Reigel, M.

    2011-10-27

    A 10-inch READCO mixer is used for mixing the premix (45 (wt%) fly ash, 45 wt% slag, and 10 wt% portland cement) with salt solution in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The Saltstone grout free falls into the grout hopper which feeds the suction line leading to the Watson SPX 100 duplex hose pump. The Watson SPX 100 pumps the grout through approximately 1500 feet of piping prior to being discharged into the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. The existing grout hopper has been identified by the Saltstone Enhanced Low Activity Waste Disposal (ELAWD) project for re-design. The current nominal working volume of this hopper is 12 gallons and does not permit handling an inadvertent addition of excess dry feeds. Saltstone Engineering has proposed a new hopper tank that will have a nominal working volume of 300 gallons and is agitated with a mechanical agitator. The larger volume hopper is designed to handle variability in the output of the READCO mixer and process upsets without entering set back during processing. The objectives of this task involve scaling the proposed hopper design and testing the scaled hopper for the following processing issues: (1) The effect of agitation on radar measurement. Formation of a vortex may affect the ability to accurately measure the tank level. The agitator was run at varying speeds and with varying grout viscosities to determine what parameters cause vortex formation and whether measurement accuracy is affected. (2) A dry feeds over addition. Engineering Calculating X-ESR-Z-00017 1 showed that an additional 300 pounds of dry premix added to a 300 gallon working volume would lower the water to premix ratio (W/P) from the nominal 0.60 to 0.53 based on a Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant. A grout with a W/P of 0.53 represents the upper bound of grout rheology that could be processed at the facility. A scaled amount of dry feeds will be added into the hopper to verify that this is a recoverable situation

  4. ELAWD Grout Hopper Mock-Up Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10-inch READCO mixer is used for mixing the premix (45 (wt%) fly ash, 45 wt% slag, and 10 wt% portland cement) with salt solution in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The Saltstone grout free falls into the grout hopper which feeds the suction line leading to the Watson SPX 100 duplex hose pump. The Watson SPX 100 pumps the grout through approximately 1500 feet of piping prior to being discharged into the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. The existing grout hopper has been identified by the Saltstone Enhanced Low Activity Waste Disposal (ELAWD) project for re-design. The current nominal working volume of this hopper is 12 gallons and does not permit handling an inadvertent addition of excess dry feeds. Saltstone Engineering has proposed a new hopper tank that will have a nominal working volume of 300 gallons and is agitated with a mechanical agitator. The larger volume hopper is designed to handle variability in the output of the READCO mixer and process upsets without entering set back during processing. The objectives of this task involve scaling the proposed hopper design and testing the scaled hopper for the following processing issues: (1) The effect of agitation on radar measurement. Formation of a vortex may affect the ability to accurately measure the tank level. The agitator was run at varying speeds and with varying grout viscosities to determine what parameters cause vortex formation and whether measurement accuracy is affected. (2) A dry feeds over addition. Engineering Calculating X-ESR-Z-00017 1 showed that an additional 300 pounds of dry premix added to a 300 gallon working volume would lower the water to premix ratio (W/P) from the nominal 0.60 to 0.53 based on a Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant. A grout with a W/P of 0.53 represents the upper bound of grout rheology that could be processed at the facility. A scaled amount of dry feeds will be added into the hopper to verify that this is a recoverable situation

  5. Thermally conductive cementitious grouts for geothermal heat pumps. Progress report FY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1998-11-01

    Research commenced in FY 97 to determine the suitability of superplasticized cement-sand grouts for backfilling vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. The overall objectives were to develop, evaluate and demonstrate cementitious grouts that could reduce the required bore length and improve the performance of GHPs. This report summarizes the accomplishments in FY 98. The developed thermally conductive grout consists of cement, water, a particular grade of silica sand, superplasticizer and a small amount of bentonite. While the primary function of the grout is to facilitate heat transfer between the U-loop and surrounding formation, it is also essential that the grout act as an effective borehole sealant. Two types of permeability (hydraulic conductivity) tests was conducted to evaluate the sealing performance of the cement-sand grout. Additional properties of the proposed grout that were investigated include bleeding, shrinkage, bond strength, freeze-thaw durability, compressive, flexural and tensile strengths, elastic modulus, Poisson`s ratio and ultrasonic pulse velocity.

  6. MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

  7. Magnesium Mono Potassium Phosphate Grout For P-Reactor Vessel In-Situ Decomissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material (≤ 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH2PO4 and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete(regsign) magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

  8. Durability of low-pH injection grout. A literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication provides an overview of the durability of injection grouts. It is intended for use during planning and construction at the ONKALO underground research facility. The review has been done with respect to the application conditions, materials and service life requirements expressed by Posiva Oy. The publication describes all types of cement-based material durability, with an emphasis on the key issues of shrinkage cracking, leaching and sulphate attack. The second part of the report provides information on how durability expectations have changed with the history of injection grout development. The report gives information specific to low-pH injection grouts containing high amounts of silica fume performance and how their durability is expected to differ from traditional normal cement-based mixtures. The final part of the report provides suggestions for future research needs for ensuring the service life of injection grouts. The key finding from this study is that the low-pH grout material is not expected to have worse durability performance compared to the standard injection grout. Combining high amounts of silica fume with the cement to produce low-pH grout should result in a material having lower permeability and thus greater resistance to leaching and chemical attack. Further laboratory testing is needed to quantitatively verify these findings and to provide inputs for future service life modeling. (orig.)

  9. Performance testing of blast furnace slag for immobilization of technetium in grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement-based grouts are the most widely used method for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous waste because of their low processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Grouts, which meet all applicable regulatory requirements for the disposal of heavy metals, selected organics, and radionuclides, have been developed. In general, the performance of these grouts in sequestering the waste constituents of concern is most successful when the constituent of interest is relatively insoluble in the high pH of the grout pore water. Grouts, particularly neat cement-paste grouts, have proven less successful ins equestering species such as technetium and nitrates, which are readily soluble in pore water. Technetium is one of four radionuclides (99Tc, 3H, 14C, and 131I) of particular concern to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because of their mobility and biological activity. This paper presents preliminary results of a grout development effort to identify grout formulas that can satisfactorily sequester 99Tc contained in an existing Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant waste

  10. Sealing of fractured rock: grout composition and group properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of smectite-rich clay with additives of quartz filler and salt and the properties of cement with additives of silica fume and superplasticizer are tested with respect to their usefulness for sealing fractured rock. Laboratory tests of the viscous properties as well as the longevity of the materials are performed. A flow theory for the behaviour of the grouts at static and dynamic pressure has been developed and tested in laboratory injection tests. The results show, so far, that the grout materials and the dynamic injection technique are well suited for sealing rock with narrow fractures

  11. On the use of hydration heat for quality management of borehole heat exchanger grouting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suibert Oskar Seibertz, Klodwig; Händel, Falk; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The ongoing energy transition from conventional, fossil fuel based energy generation, over to renewable energy sources led to an increase in geothermal energy use. Different systems for extracting heat from the subsurface are in use, whereas a commonly used system is the borehole heat exchanger (BHE). A BHE generally consist of a closed loop pipe system through which a heat exchanging fluid is circulated. The BHE is surrounded by grouting. The grouting, focus of this work, has two main objectives to fulfill: Firstly, to thermally couple the subsurface and the BHE pipes; and, secondly, to protect the pipes and to prevent the heat exchanging fluid from entering the subsurface in case of BHE mechanical failure. Therefore, to provide proper functionality, efficiency, and safety of a BHE, it has to be guaranteed that the grouting does not have defects. The hardening reaction (hydration) of the grouting is exothermic, whereas the grouting is mostly a variant of (thermally enhanced) cement. The hydration temperature depends on the type of grout as well as the possible dilutions (resulting in defects) of the grouting material by water, air or drilling debris, and the thermal transport potential of the subsurface. Therefore the quality of the grouting can be investigated by temperature measurements during the hardening process. To validate this further, tests on field and laboratory scale were conducted. For laboratory testing, different columns were built in which different defects of BHE grouting and pipes were simulated. For defect simulation isolation and mixing with drilling debris were chosen, representing inclusions of water and/or air during cement casting as well as partial collapse of the borehole. The temperature changes during installation and hardening of the grouting are measured by fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS). This allows for temporal and spatial high resolution, continuous temperature measurements at the interface of pipe to grout

  12. Grouting Applications in Cindere Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devrim ALKAYA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouting is one of the most popular method to control the water leakage in fill dam constructions. With this regard this method is widely used in all the world. Geological and geotechnical properties of rock are important parameters affect the design of grouting. In this study, geotechnical properties of Cindere Dam's base rock and the grouting prosedure have been investigated with grouting pressure.

  13. Monitoring of Grouting Compactness in a Post-Tensioning Tendon Duct Using Piezoceramic Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyong; Kong, Qingzhao; Wang, Wenxi; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    A post-tensioning tendon duct filled with grout can effectively prevent corrosion of the reinforcement, maintain bonding behavior between the reinforcement and concrete, and enhance the load bearing capacity of concrete structures. In practice, grouting of the post-tensioning tendon ducts always causes quality problems, which may reduce structural integrity and service life, and even cause accidents. However, monitoring of the grouting compactness is still a challenge due to the invisibility of the grout in the duct during the grouting process. This paper presents a stress wave-based active sensing approach using piezoceramic transducers to monitor the grouting compactness in real time. A segment of a commercial tendon duct was used as research object in this study. One lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoceramic transducer with marble protection, called a smart aggregate (SA), was bonded on the tendon and installed in the tendon duct. Two PZT patch sensors were mounted on the top outside surface of the duct, and one PZT patch sensor was bonded on the bottom outside surface of the tendon duct. In the active sensing approach, the SA was used as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the PZT sensors were utilized to detect the wave response. Cement or grout in the duct functions as a wave conduit, which can propagate the stress wave. If the cement or grout is not fully filled in the tendon duct, the top PZT sensors cannot receive much stress wave energy. The experimental procedures simulated four stages during the grout pouring process, which includes empty status, half grouting, 90% grouting, and full grouting of the duct. Experimental results show that the bottom PZT sensor can detect the signal when the grout level increases towards 50%, when a conduit between the SA and PZT sensor is formed. The top PZT sensors cannot receive any signal until the grout process is completely finished. The wavelet packet-based energy analysis was adopted in this research to

  14. Variability in properties of grouted Phosphate/Sulfate N-Reactor Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Transportable Grout Facility (TGF) is being constructed at the Hanford site in Washington State to convert various low-level liquid wastes to a grout waste form for onsite disposal. The TGF Project is managed by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has provided a grout formulation for Phosphate/Sulfate N-Reactor Waste, the first waste stream scheduled for grouting beginning in late 1987. The formulation includes a blend of portland cement, fly ash, attapulgite clay, and an illitic clay. Grout will be produced by mixing the blend with Phosphate/Sulfate N-Reactor Waste. These wastes result from decontamination and ion-exchange regeneration activities at Hanford's N-Reactor. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting studies on grouted Phosphate/Sulfate N-Reactor Waste to verify that the grout can be successfully processed and, when hardened, that it will meet all performance and regulatory requirements. As part of these studies, PNL is assessing the variability that may be encountered when processing Phosphate/Sulfate N-Reactor Waste grout. Sources of variability that may affect grout properties include the composition and concentrations of the waste and dry solids, temperature, efficiency of dry solids blending, and dry blend storage time. 13 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Grout gas generation test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed are detailed procedures for measuring the rate of gas generation by grout made from synthetic tanks wastes or actual tank material. Objective is to measure the rate of gas generation for various gases (H2, N2O, etc.) produced when grout, prepared using tank waste, is heated at 65 C. Experiments will also be conducted using grout from synthetic tank waste, as practice. Purpose is to provide data for evaluation of safety risks presented by gas generation in the grout vault after making grout with tank waste, as verification/confirmation for gas generation rates for the ANL testing

  16. An investigation into increasing the interface strength of concrete dams on rock foundations by grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method to improve the stability of concrete dams on rock foundations was studied. Currently, tensioned anchors are used to increase normal stress and relief drains are used to decrease the uplift. The new method involves injecting a specifically designed cement based grout into the unbonded dam foundation interface. These strength grouts develop a cohesion component of the interface strength and improve stability. Laboratory tests were conducted to study the bleed, Marsh funnel viscosity, and the tensile strengths developed by the strength grouts. The tensile strengths developed by the strength grouts showed good comparison with the tensile strengths of concrete-rock contacts recovered from the dam-foundation interface. The use of this new method for the rehabilitation of existing dams was also discussed. It was shown that the use of strength grouts can improve the stability of concrete dams on rock foundations at a lower cost than tensioned anchors

  17. Reactive transport modeling of the interaction between water and a cementitious grout in a fractured rock. Application to ONKALO (Finland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → It is planned to seal conductive fractures near a repository with cementitious grout. → Modeling includes simultaneous hydration and leaching of the grout. → Modeling results show a very limited formation of the high-pH plume. → Results are in qualitative agreement with borehole monitoring data. - Abstract: Grouting of water-conducting fractures with low-alkali cement is foreseen for the potential future repository for spent nuclear fuel in Finland (ONKALO). A possible consequence of the interaction between groundwater and grout is the formation of high-pH solutions which will be able to react with the host rock (gneisses) and alter its mineralogy and porosity. A reactive transport modeling study of this possible alteration has been conducted. First, the hydration of the low-alkali cementitious grout has been modeled, using results from the literature as a guide. The hydrated cement is characterized by the absence of portlandite and the presence of a C-S-H gel with a Ca/Si ratio about 0.8 after tens of years (Ca/Si is about 1.7 in Ordinary Portland Cement). Second, calculations have simulated the interaction between flowing water and grout and the formation of an alkalinity plume, which flows beyond the grouted section of the fracture. The calculations include the hydration and simultaneous leaching of the grout through diffusive exchange between the porewater in the grout and the flowing water in the fracture. The formation of an alkaline plume is extremely limited when the low-pH grout is used. Even when using a grout with a lower silica fume content, the extent and magnitude of the alkaline plume is quite minor. These results are in qualitative agreement with monitoring at ONKALO.

  18. Examinations of samples of Bell Canyon Test 1-FF grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portland cement grout identified as BCT-1-FF (Bell Canyon Test 1-FF) was used in borehole plugging experiments of the Bell Canyon Tests in Holl AEC-7 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in New Mexico during September 1979 and February 1980. This grout was made with fresh water. A study of this grout was begun in August 1979 in the laboratory to evauate the possible effects of temperature, pressure, and storage in fresh water or simulated groundwater (brine) on its phase composition and compressive strength at early ages. Phase composition was determined by X-ray diffraction. Temperatures ranged up to about 1500F and included elevation at a few hours age after mixing; pressure was as high as 1500 psi; specimens were stored in simulated groundwater (brine) or in fresh water. Data from 1 to 90 days showed: (a) Higher temperature accelerated early strength gain. These differences essentially vanished by 90 days age. (b) Hydration products as identified by X-ray diffraction were normal; this indicated that a temperature range of 78 to 1530F was not significant. (c) Pressure did not affect composition. (d) Storage in simulated groundwater (brine) or fresh water had no detectable effect. (e) Since the BCT-1-FF grout mixture contained added sulfate, it formed more ettringite as judged by X-ray diffraction than comparable portland cement mixtures without added sulfate

  19. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

  20. Chemical modeling of cementitious grout materials alteration in HLW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on an investigation initiated into the nature of the chemical alteration of cementitious grout in HLW repository seals, and the implications for long-term seal performance. The equilibrium chemical reaction of two simplified portland cement-based grout models with natural Canadian Shield groundwater compositions was modeled with the computer codes PHREEQE and EQ3NR/EQ6. Increases in porosity and permeability of the grout resulting from dissolution of grout phases and precipitation of secondary phases were estimated. Two bounding hydrologic scenarios were evaluated, one approximating a high gradient, high flow regime, the other a low-gradient, sluggish flow regime. Seal longevity depends in part upon the amount of groundwater coming into intimate contact with, and dissolving, the grout per unit time. Results of the analyses indicate that, given the assumptions and simplifications inherent in the models, acceptable seal performance (i.e., acceptable increases in hydraulic conductivity of the seals) may be expected for at least thousands of years in the worst cases analyzed, and possibly much longer

  1. Effects of Using Silica Fume and Polycarboxylate-Type Superplasticizer on Physical Properties of Cementitious Grout Mixtures for Semiflexible Pavement Surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S.; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout. PMID:24526911

  2. Effects of using silica fume and polycarboxylate-type superplasticizer on physical properties of cementitious grout mixtures for semiflexible pavement surfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koting, Suhana; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout. PMID:24526911

  3. Effects of Using Silica Fume and Polycarboxylate-Type Superplasticizer on Physical Properties of Cementitious Grout Mixtures for Semiflexible Pavement Surfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhana Koting

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout.

  4. Geochemical modelling of grout-groundwater-rock interactions at the seal-rock interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical investigations into the longevity of repository seals have dealt primarily with the development of a methodology to evaluate interactions between portland cement-based grout and groundwater. Evaluation of chemical thermodynamic equilibria among grout, groundwater, and granitic host rock phases using the geochemical codes EQ3NR/EQ6 suggests that a fracture filled with grout and saturated with groundwater will tend to fill and 'tighten' with time. These calculations predict that some grout and rock phases will dissolve, and that there will be precipitation of secondary phases which collectively have a larger overall volume than that of the material dissolved. Model assumptions include sealing of the fracture in a sluggish hydrologic regime (low gradient) characterized by a saline groundwater environment. The results of the calculations suggest that buffering of the fracture seals chemical system by the granitic rock may be important in determining the long-term fate of grout seals and the resulting phase assemblage in the fracture. The similarity of the predicted reaction product phases to those observed in naturally filled fractures suggests that with time equilibrium will be approached and grouted fractures subject to low hydrologic gradients will continue to seal. If grout injected into fractures materially reduces groundwater flux, the approach to chemical equilibrium will likely be accelerated. In light of this, even very thin or imperfectly grouted fractures would tighten in suitable hydrogeologic environments. In order to determine the period of time necessary to approach equilibrium, data on reaction rates are required. (au)

  5. Mixing conditions in application of bentonite grouting to radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to understand the flow properties and permeability of bentonite grout with NaCl added, using laboratory tests, and to clarify the mixing conditions of bentonite as a material. Given that the required permeability of clay grout is 10-9 (m/s), the combination of grout (W/B) becomes 6 or less. The viscosity of the grout was measured, and because the viscosity was higher than the thickest cement milk on dam grouting, it was found that grout with a W/B of less than 10 was difficult to inject into rock joints. We then added NaCl to grout with a W/B is 6, and its viscosity decreased as the amount of NaCl increased. A grout of viscosity able to be injected into rock joints was achieved by adding NaCl in a density higher than 'W:NaCl=40:1'. Next, the permeability of a bentonite suspension with NaCl was examined using the falling head permeability test. Testing the sample 'B:W:NaCl=20:20:1' for 10 days revealed that the initial permeability 10-8 (m/s) decreased to 10-10 - 10-11 (m/s). These results showed that a suspension to inject into rock joints could be made by adding NaCl, and clarified that permeation of groundwater into the suspension causes a decline in permeability. (author)

  6. Experimental study on pile-end post-grouting piles for super large bridge pile foundations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiming GONG; Guoliang DAI; Haowen ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    The application of pile-end post-grouting piles for super-large bridge pile foundations in some important projects was introduced in this paper. There are totally 21 test piles. The maximum pile diameter varies from 2.5 m to 3 m, and the maximum length is 125m; the bearing capacity of the post-grouting piles is over ten thousands tons. Based on the test results, the bearing capacity,displacement, and beating characteristics before and after grouting were analyzed. The results show that the beating capacity of the piles is increased in different degrees after grouting although the technical parameters, including the patterns of grouting pipes, pressure, dosages of cement, duration of grouting lasting time, are different. However,the obtained values are very discrete. In addition, the calculation formula for the post-grouting piles under specified grouting condition was deduced based on the statistics analysis results of 57 test piles. The research results have been applied in the design of bridge foundation.

  7. Grout treatment facility operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the operation of the Grout Treatment Facility from initial testing to the final disposal to date of 3.8 x 103 m3 (1 Mgal) of low-level radioactive waste. It describes actual component testing and verification, testing of the full-scale system with simulated waste feed, summary of the radioactive disposal operation, lessons learned and equipment performance summary, facility impacts from safety analyses, long-term performance assessments, the Part B application, and projected facility modifications. The Grout Treatment Facility is one of two operations for permanently disposing of liquid defense wastes at the Hanford site near Richland, Washington, for the U.S. Department of Energy. High- and low-level radioactive wastes have been accumulating from defense material production since the mid-1940s at the Hanford site. All radioactive low-level and low-level mixed liquid wastes will be disposed of at the future Hanford Vitrification Facility

  8. Study on grout-filled coupling steel sleeve. Part 1. Basic characteristics; Kokan sleeve wo mochiita grout juten shiki tekkin tsugite ni kansuru kenkyu. 2. Kisoteki seino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, K.; Shimizu, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Sato, Y. [Okumura Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-11-15

    With an objective to establish a design technology on a grout-filled bar-reinforced joint consisted of a sleeve made of electric resistance welded steel tube and grout, discussions were given on the effects of different factors on the joint performance. The factors discussed include the kinds of grout (cement paste and mortar), reinforcing bar settlement length, and reinforcing bar quality. Increase in the grout strength causes the joint strength and rigidity to increase. To obtain the strength and rigidity equivalent to those in the reinforcing bars in the base material, the compaction strength required in the grout for the case of SB400 class reinforcing bars is 900 kgf/cm{sup 2}. A longer settlement length may increase the joint strength and rigidity, but its effect on tenacity is not clear. Increased grout strength can improve the tenacity. The maximum deposition stress increases in proportion with the compaction strength of the grout in any of the reinforcing bar unyielding positions and the yield occurring positions. The experiment resulted in estimating the following three fracture modes: a fracture mode with reinforcing bar slipping out without yield, a fracture mode with a reinforcing bar slipping out after yield, and a reinforcing bar tensile fracture mode. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Reactive transport modeling of grout-rock interaction at the ONKALO site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouting of water-conducting fractures with low-alkali cement is foreseen for the potential future repository for spent nuclear fuel in Finland (ONKALO site). A possible consequence of the interaction between groundwater and grout is the formation of high pH solutions which will be able to react with the host rock (gneisses) and alter its mineralogy and porosity. A reactive transport modeling study of this possible alteration has been conducted. First, the hydration of the low-alkali cementitious grout has been modeled, using results from the literature as a guide. The hydrated cement is characterized by the absence of portlandite and the presence of a C-S-H gel with a Ca/Si ratio about 0.8 after tens of years (Ca/Si is about 1.7 in Ordinary Portland Cement). Afterwards, a one-dimensional system simulating the contact between a grouted section of a fracture and the gneiss has been studied. Diffusion is the only solute transport mechanism in this case. The results from the simulations show a very fast (days to tens of days) sealing of porosity at the rock-grout interface. The precipitation of C-S-H, and also ettringite in some cases, is responsible for this fast sealing of porosity. The mixing by diffusion of a high-pH Carich solution from the grout and a Si-rich solution from the rock (plagioclase dissolution) causes this precipitation. Finally, calculations have simulated the interaction between flowing water and grout and the formation of an alkalinity plume, which flows beyond the grouted section of the fracture. The calculations include the hydration and simultaneous leaching of the grout through diffusive exchange between the porewater in the grout and the flowing water in the fracture. The formation of an alkaline plume is extremely limited when the low-pH grout is used. Even when using a grout with a lower silica fume content, the extent and magnitude of the alkaline plume is rather minor. These results are in qualitative agreement with monitoring at ONKALO

  10. The diffusion of radionuclides through waste encapsulation grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    United Kingdom Nirex Limited develops and advises on safe, environmentally sound and publicly acceptable options for the long-term management of radioactive waste. One option Nirex has developed is a phased geological repository concept for intermediate level waste and some low level wastes that makes use of a combination of engineered and natural barriers. Physical containment of radionuclides would be achieved by immobilisation and packaging of wastes (mostly) in stainless steel containers. Existing models of the migration of dissolved radionuclides from packaged wastes suggest that radionuclide release is determined largely by the rate of diffusion through the encapsulation grout used to immobilise the waste. The use of such models requires diffusion coefficient data for radionuclides in waste encapsulation grouts. This paper describes a programme of through-diffusion experiments, and modelling interpretation, aimed at deriving diffusion coefficients for some radionuclides in two types of encapsulation grout. An intrinsic diffusion coefficient of HTO of around 1x10-13 to 2x10-13 m2s-1 was determined for a 3:1 mix of blast furnace slag to ordinary Portland cement, compared to around 4x10-13 to 5x10-13 m2s-1 for a 3:1 mix of pulverised fuel ash to ordinary Portland cement. These values are lower than that assumed for a non-sorbing radionuclide in an earlier modelling exercise. Porosity values around 0.3 were obtained in each case. For 36Cl as chloride, the experiments showed no significant breakthrough over the experimental timescale of about one year, suggesting an intrinsic diffusion coefficient below 5x10-13 m2s-1. One possibility is that chlorine-containing solids are precipitating in the cement. An intrinsic diffusion coefficient for 137Cs in the 3:1 mix of pulverised fuel ash to ordinary Portland cement of 4x10-15 m2s-1 was estimated, significantly lower than that determined for HTO. The results from three of the sixteen experiments could not be fitted with

  11. Cure shrinkage in epoxy grouts for grouted repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddoha, Md.; Islam, Md. Mainul; Aravinthan, Thiru; Manalo, Allan; Lau, Kin-tak

    2013-08-01

    Structures can go through harsh environmental adversity and can experience material loss and cracks during their service lives. Infill material is used to ensure a supporting bed for a grouted repair. Epoxy grouts are used for repairing and rehabilitating structures, such as foundations, bridges, piers, transportation pipelines, etc., because they are resistant to typical chemicals and possess superior mechanical properties than other grouts. The resin based infill used inside the void or cracked space of the repair is vulnerable to shrinkage. When these filled grouts have high resin content, cracks can develop from residual stresses, which can affect the load transfer performance. It follows that interlayer separation and cracking of infill layer can occur in a grouted repair. In this study, volumetric shrinkage of two epoxy grouts was measured over 28 days using a Pycnometer. The highest volumetric shrinkage measured after 7 days was found to be 2.72%. The results suggest that the volumetric shrinkage can be reduced to 1.1% after 7 days, through the introduction of a coarse aggregate filler; a 2.5 times reduction in shrinkage. About 98% and 92% of the total shrinkage over the 28 day period, of the unfilled and filled grouts respectively, was found to occur within 7 days of mixing. The gel-time shrinkages were also calculated, to determine the "postgel" part of the curing contraction which subsequently produces residual stresses in the hardened grout systems.

  12. Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum ''recipe'' for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600 C

  13. THE CONTINUUM APPROACH IN A GROUTING MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Demchuk, M.; Saiyouri, N.

    2014-01-01

    Получено значение максимального размера поры, при котором континуальный подход всё ещё можно применять в моделировании распространения цемента в насыщенном песке при цементации, которая не разрушает структуру грунта.The value of the maximal pore size whereby the continuum approach can still be adopted for modeling cement grout propagation in saturated sand during permeation grouting is obtained....

  14. CsIX/TRU Grout Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A settlement agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that liquid waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC - formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, ICPP) will be calcined by the end of year 2012. This study investigates an alternative treatment of the liquid waste that removes undissolved solids (UDS) by filtration and removes cesium by ion exchange followed by cement-based grouting of the remaining liquid into 55-gal drums. Operations are assumed to be FR-om January 2008 through December 2012. The grouted waste will be contact-handled and will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico for disposal. The small volume of secondary wastes such as the filtered solids and cesium sorbent (resin) would remain in storage at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for treatment and disposal under another project, with an option to dispose of the filtered solids as a r emote-handled waste at WIPP

  15. CsIX/TRU Grout Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. J. Losinski; C. M. Barnes; B. K. Grover

    1998-11-01

    A settlement agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho mandates that liquid waste now stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC - formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, ICPP) will be calcined by the end of year 2012. This study investigates an alternative treatment of the liquid waste that removes undissolved solids (UDS) by filtration and removes cesium by ion exchange followed by cement-based grouting of the remaining liquid into 55-gal drums. Operations are assumed to be from January 2008 through December 2012. The grouted waste will be contact-handled and will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico for disposal. The small volume of secondary wastes such as the filtered solids and cesium sorbent (resin) would remain in storage at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for treatment and disposal under another project, with an option to dispose of the filtered solids as a r emote-handled waste at WIPP.

  16. Acute toxicity screening of Hanford Site waste grouts using aquatic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 50 years operation of the Hanford Site of the US Department of Energy near Richland, Washington. The current strategy for the disposal of the low-level radioactive portion of these wastes involves immobilization of the waste in the form of grout. Because the potential risk of animal and plant exposure to grouts is unknown, acute toxicity screening of grouts is needed. Grouts were prepared by mixing a surrogate nonradioactive liquid waste with a blend consisting of cement, fly ash, and clay. Aqueous extracts of the grout were then screened for acute toxicity using aquatic invertebrates as test organisms and a fluorogenic substrate as the toxic stress indicator. After a 1-hour exposure of juvenile daphnids (D, magna, D. pulex, and C. dubia) to the grout extracts followed by a 15-minute reaction with the fluorogenic substrate, the degree of in vivo enzymatic inhibition was measured by the number of resulting fluorescent daphnids. The EC50 values calculated by probit analysis were 2,877 mg/L, 2,983 mg/L, and 3,174 mg/L for D. pulex, D. magna, and C. dubia, respectively. The slight difference in the responses may be attributed to the subjective pass-fail scoring of the fluorescence criterion. The results indicated that the grout studied is nonhazardous and nondangerous

  17. Design procedure for formulating and assessing the durability of particulate grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current disposal plans for low-level wastes call for stabilizing or encapsulating and storing of these wastes in steel drums which in turn are buried in shallow trenches. Complete sealing is accomplished with grout, a liquid injection comprising principally of cement and fly ash, etc. Upon solidification, the grout forms a rigid mass around the drum, thereby eliminating access of groundwater into or out of the waste barrier, or leaching of radionuclides. Since the primary mechanism for the likely introduction of hazardous and/or radioactive elements into the biosphere in this situation, is through physical or chemical deterioration of the waste barrier, it is necessary that the effect of adverse environments on the durability of the grouts be examined and incorporated in barrier design. Currently, procedures for formulating grout mixes to assure a given impermeability or durability of the grout over its service period is lacking, and so are the techniques for monitoring the in-service performance of waste barrier systems. This paper depicts a serious limitation in waste barrier system technology, for it is time that optimization in design be possible. To allow this, a method is needed that creates the grout formulation specification for an optimization of behavior parameters in the resulting product. These considerations suggest a strong need for improvement in the grout formulation specification to allow a focus upon behavior properties desired by the engineer in the creation of optimum performance. This paper addresses these problems

  18. Development of a grout database for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed a grout database (GDB) comprising the latest technical data of grout materials relevant to the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Currently, only newly developed grout materials of low pH cements, superfine spherical silica and colloidal silica, which are expected to provide a target pH ≤ 11 leachate, are included in the GDB. Case examples from on-site works and laboratory-based tests that have been published in the literature have been used to add construction and material details to the GDB. The GDB is available online (https://groutdb.jaea.go.jp/grout/ [in Japanese]) for registered users to obtain and provide data of grout technology. Furthermore, the GDB can be used to correlate requirements of mechanical, physical, and/or chemical properties of a grout material to specifically address concerns over safety assessment, material and injection method development, and/or prediction of grout penetration. (author)

  19. Long-term degradation (or improvement?) of cementitious grout/concrete for waste disposal at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepho, M.G. [Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    If grout and/or concrete barriers and containments are considered for long-term (500 yrs to 100,000 ) waste disposal, then long-term degradation of grout/cement materials (and others) need to be studied. Long-term degradations of a cementitious grout monolith (15.4mW x 10.4mH x 37.6mL) and its containment concrete shell and asphalt shell (each 1-m thick) were analyzed. The main degradation process of the concrete shell was believed to be fractures due to construction joints, shrinkage, thermal stress, settlement, and seismic events. A scenario with fractures was modeled (flow and transport model) for long-term risk performance (out to a million yrs). Even though the concrete/grout is expected to fracture, the concrete/grout chemistry, which has high Ph value, is very beneficial in causing calcite deposits from calcium in the water precipitating in the fractures. These calcite deposits will tend to plug the fracture and keep water from entering. The effectiveness of such plugging needs to be studied more. It`s possible that the plugged fractures are more impermeable than the original concrete/grout. The long-term performance of concrete/grout barriers will be determined by its chemistry, not its mechanical properties.

  20. Prediction of critical grout parameters: critical flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste disposal is rapidly becoming one of the most important technological endeavors of our time and fixation of waste in cement-based materials is an important part of the endeavor. Investigations of given wastes are usually individually conducted and reported. In this study, data obtained from investigation of critical flow rates for three distinctly different wastes are correlated with apparent viscosity data via a single empirical equation. Critical flow rate, which is an important variable in waste grout work, is defined as the flow rate at which a grout must be pumped through a reference pipe to obtain turbulent flow. It is important that the grout flow be turbulent since laminar flow allows caking on pipe walls and causes eventual plugging. The three wastes used in this study can be characterized as containing: (1) high nitrate, carbonate, and sulfate; (2) high phosphate; and (3) high fluoride, ammonium, and suspended solids waste. The measurements of apparent viscosity (grouts are non-Newtonian fluids) and other measurements to obtain data to calculate the critical flow rates were made using a Fann-Direct Reading Viscometer, Model 35A

  1. The effect of using different sources of dry materials on waste-form grout properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reference grout formulation had been developed for a liquid low-level radioactive waste using the following dry materials: ground limestone, ground granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement. The effect of varying the sources of these dry materials was tested. Two limestones, two fly ashes, two cements, and eight slags were tested. Varying the source of dry materials significantly affected the grout properties, but only the 28-d free-standing liquid varied outside of the preferred range. A statistical technique, Tukey's paired comparison, can be used to ascertain whether a given combination of dry materials resulted in grout properties significantly different from those of other combinations of dry materials. (author)

  2. Development of grout formulations for 106-AN waste: Mixture-experiment results and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty potential ingredients were identified for use in developing a 106-AN grout formulation, and 18 were subsequently obtained and tested. Four ingredients-Type II-LA (moderate heat of hydration) Portland cement, Class F fly ash, attapulgite 150 drilling clay, and ground air-cooled blast-furnace slag (GABFS) were selected for developing the 106-AN grout formulations. A mixture experiment was designed and conducted around the following formulation: 2.5 lb of cement per gallon, 1.2 lb of fly ash per gallon, 0.8 lb of attapulgite per gallon, and 3.5 lb of GABFS per gallon. Reduced empirical models were generated from the results of the mixture experiment. These models were used to recommend several grout formulations for 106-AN. Westinghouse Hanford Company selected one of these formulations to be verified for use with 106-AN and a backup formulation in case problems arise with the first choice

  3. GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2011-08-30

    The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation

  4. A THERMAL MODEL OF THE IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE AS GROUT IN CONCRETE VAULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadday, M

    2008-10-27

    Salt solution will be mixed with cement and flyash/slag to form a grout which will be immobilized in above ground concrete vaults. The curing process is exothermic, and a transient thermal model of the pouring and curing process is herein described. A peak temperature limit of 85 C for the curing grout restricts the rate at which it can be poured into a vault. The model is used to optimize the pouring.

  5. Review of results from SKB R and D on grouting technology for sealing the rock, years 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order identify the current state of the art and developments needs, SKB assembled a group of experts from universities and other research organisations. Internal plans were written for the subprojects 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', 'Mechanisms that control the spreading of grout in jointed rock' and 'Cement based grouting material'. Later internal plans for the subprojects 'Demands on grouting' and 'Stabilising and sealing effect of pre-grouting' were written. The aims, which were set for the different subprojects, were in short, to summarise the technological advances, establish a method for rock characterisation from a grouting point of view, develop conceptual and numerical models for simulation of the grouting course, characterise grout in a relevant way, develop understanding and theoretical know-how of durability and chemical influence, identify and develop a number of grouting materials for different situations, develop a specification of requirements for grouting and to verify the theories in laboratory. In the subproject 'Demands on grouting' a literature review was carried out. One important conclusion from the study is that the concept is not very well dealt with in the literature. SKB are currently investigating the prerequisites for the construction of the deep repository. One part of that work is to further specify demands on maximum allowed volume of leakage water for the repository as a whole and also for each part of the deep repository. In the subproject 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', the possibilities of using hydraulic tests for predictions and design have been studied. The idea of this study was to investigate correspondences and deviations to increase the understanding of what is measured in a water-loss measurement. One can draw the conclusion that hydraulic tests are useful when describing the fracture geometry. Numerical modelling and experiments indicate that the specific capacity, Q/Δh, (flow

  6. Use of Strontium Isotopes to Quantify Interaction of Water With Coal Combustion Byproducts in an Abandoned, Partially Grouted Coal Mine, West Virginia, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, B. L.; Stewart, B. W.; Kim, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Omega Coal Mine, West Virginia, was actively mined until the late 1980s. Subsequently, water filled the mine void and acid discharges developed along the mine perimeter. The mine was partially grouted in 1998 by injecting coal combustion byproducts (CCB) mixed with cement in an attempt to reduce the acid discharge and stabilize the ground surface. Discharge continued after grouting, including from the grouted portions of the mine. In this study, discharge chemistry and strontium (Sr) isotope ratios were determined to identify and quantify the extent of interaction between mine waters and the CCB material used to grout the abandoned mine. Eight sampling sites were monitored around the downdip perimeter of the mine. In general, the major and trace element chemistry of the discharges was not sufficient to distinguish between discharges that interacted with grout and those that did not. Elements that showed the most separation include potassium and arsenic, both of which were elevated in the waters that interacted with CCB grout. In contrast, strontium isotope ratios were capable of delineating discharges that were clearly from grouted portions of the mine vs. those that were derived from non-grouted areas. Discharges that bypassed the grouted portions had 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.7151 to 0.7159, while two discharges that interacted with grout had ratios in the range of 0.7140 to 0.7146. The water treatment system inlet, which receives both grouted and ungrouted discharges, yielded intermediate isotope ratios. Leaching experiments on CCB grout, coal, and surrounding floor and roof rocks are consistent with the isotopic trends observed in the discharges. Based on these results, waters that interacted with grout received 30-40% of their strontium from the CCB grout material, suggesting that leaching of CCB is a significant contributor to discharge chemistry.

  7. Pressurized grout applications in fractured tuff for containment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently under study by the Department of Energy are the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ash-flow deposits under Yucca mountain at the Nevada test site. Of interest at this site is the potential for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the unsaturated zone of the densely welded portions of the tuffs. These studies include the performance-assessment of barriers and seals for boreholes, ramps, drifts and shafts at the Yucca mountain site. In-situ tests on standard Type II Portland cement and microfine cement as grout materials have been performed on a similar rock type to Yucca Mountain's near Superior Arizona. The tests were performed in a vertical borehole drilled in highly fractured and densely welded tuff (brown unit of Apache Leap) through a series of pressurized grout applications. Packer flow tests prior to and after each grout application measure the effectiveness of the grout application in reducing the permeability of the rock surrounding the borehole. Overall the grout applications have reduced the permeability of the test hole by three orders of magnitude. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Stiffness of Grouted Soils by Using Elastic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Mo Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement grouted soils, which consist of particulate soil media and cementation agents, have been widely used for the improvement of the strength and stiffness of weak ground and for the prevention of the leakage of ground water. The strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson’s ratio of grouted soils have been determined by classical destructive methods. However, the performance of grouted soils depends on several parameters such as the distribution of particle size of the particulate soil media, grouting pressure, curing time, curing method, and ground water flow. In this study, elastic wave velocities are used to estimate the strength and elastic modulus, which are generally obtained by classical strength tests. Nondestructive tests by using elastic waves at small strain are conducted before and during classical strength tests at large strain. The test results are compared to identify correlations between the elastic wave velocity measured at small strain and strength and stiffness measured at large strain. The test results show that the strength and stiffness have exponential relationship with elastic wave velocities. This study demonstrates that nondestructive methods by using elastic waves may significantly improve the strength and stiffness evaluation processes of grouted soils.

  9. Evaluation of compressive strength and stiffness of grouted soils by using elastic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Mo; Kim, Jong-Sun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-01-01

    Cement grouted soils, which consist of particulate soil media and cementation agents, have been widely used for the improvement of the strength and stiffness of weak ground and for the prevention of the leakage of ground water. The strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of grouted soils have been determined by classical destructive methods. However, the performance of grouted soils depends on several parameters such as the distribution of particle size of the particulate soil media, grouting pressure, curing time, curing method, and ground water flow. In this study, elastic wave velocities are used to estimate the strength and elastic modulus, which are generally obtained by classical strength tests. Nondestructive tests by using elastic waves at small strain are conducted before and during classical strength tests at large strain. The test results are compared to identify correlations between the elastic wave velocity measured at small strain and strength and stiffness measured at large strain. The test results show that the strength and stiffness have exponential relationship with elastic wave velocities. This study demonstrates that nondestructive methods by using elastic waves may significantly improve the strength and stiffness evaluation processes of grouted soils. PMID:25025082

  10. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC's Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula

  11. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  12. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) will provide permanent disposal for approximately 43 Mgal of radioactive liquid waste currently being stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. The first step in permanent disposal is accomplished by solidifying the low-level liquid waste with cementitious dry materials. The resulting grout is cast within underground vaults. This report on the GTF contains information on the following: Hanford Site Maps, road evaluation for the grout treatment facility, Department of Ecology certificate of non-designation for centralia fly ash, double-shell tank waste compositional modeling, laboratory analysis reports for double-shell tank waste, stored in tanks 241-AN-103, 241-AN-106, and 241-AW-101, grout vault heat transfer results for M-106 grout formulation, test results for extraction procedure toxicity testing, test results for toxicity testing of double-shell tank grout, pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste, characterization of simulated low-level waste grout produced in a pilot-scale test, description of the procedure for sampling nonaging waste storage tanks, description of laboratory procedures, grout campaign waste composition verification, variability in properties of grouted phosphate/sulfate N-reactor waste, engineering drawings, description of operating procedures, equipment list--transportable grout equipment, grout treatment facility--tank integrity assessment plan, long-term effects of waste solutions on concrete and reinforcing steel, vendor information, grout disposal facilities construction quality assurance plan, and flexible membrane liner/waste compatibility test results

  13. Application of Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology in the Anomaly Detection of Shaft Lining in Grouting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunde Piao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rupture of the shaft lining caused by grouting has seriously undermined the safety in coal mining. Based on BOTDR distributed optical fiber sensing technology, this paper studied the layout method of optical fiber sensors and the anomaly detection method of the deformation and obtained the evolution law of shaft deformation triggered by grouting. The research results showed that the bonding problem of optical fiber sensors in damp environment could be effectively solved, by applying the binder consisting of sodium silicate and cement. Through BOTDR-based deformation detection, the real-time deformation of the shaft lining caused by grouting was immediately spotted. By comparing the respective strain of shaft lining deformation and concrete deformation, the risk range of shaft lining grouting was identified. With the additional strain increment of the shaft lining triggered by each process of grouting, the saturated condition of grouting volume in strata was analyzed, providing an important technical insight into the field construction and the safety of the shaft lining.

  14. Characterization of double-shell slurry feed grout produced in a pilot-scale test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current plans for disposal of the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes at Hanford, Washington include grouting. Grout disposal in this context is the process of mixing low-level liquid waste with cementitious powders. and pumping the resultant slurry to near-surface, underground concrete vaults. Once the slurry is in the vaults. the hydration reactions that occur result in the formation of a highly impermeable solid product that binds and encapsulates the radioactive and hazardous constituents. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operates the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Pacific Northwest Laboratory(a) (PNL) provides support to the Grout Disposal Program through laboratory support activities, radioactive grout leach testing. performance assessments, and pilot-scale tests. A pilot-scale test was conducted in November 1988 using a simulated Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) waste. The main objective of the pilot-scale test was to demonstrate the processability of a DSSF grout formulation that was developed using laboratory equipment and to provide information on scale-up. The dry blend used in this test included 47 wt% class F fly ash, 47 wt% blast furnace slag, and 6 wt% type I/II portland cement. The dry blend was mixed with the simulated waste at a ratio of 9 lb/gal and pumped to a 2800-gal, insulated tank at about 10.4 gpm. Samples of simulated DSSF waste. dry blend, grout slurry, and cured grout were obtained during and after the pilot-scale test for testing and product characterization. Major conclusions of these activities are included

  15. Results of bentonite grouting experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bentonite grouting, which will not solidify, is mainly expected to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of underground water in the expected damage zone by filling the fractures or cracks, so the evaluation of the degree of hydraulic conductivity, stability and the improvement area becomes important. The study and basic experiments for sealing of the adits have been promoted, up to now, from the aspects of the characteristics and long term stability of candidate materials, and design and construction (Pusch et al., 1987; Tanai and Masuda, 1991). However, in Japan, the application examples of clay type materials for grouting are extremely few and is limited to the construction experience of the national oil underground storage at Kuji (Miyanaga and Ebara, 1993), with the exception of some test cases (Boergesson et al., 1991) from overseas. This report summarize basic characteristics of the clay type material relevant to the hydraulic conductivity, from the result of the clay grouting experiment conducted at the rock site. (author)

  16. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS and T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D and D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement groupt (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel cotnains significantly less aluminum based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation during fill

  17. Experimental Study of Contaminant Release from Reducing Grout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabalan, R. T.; Alexander, G. W.; Waiting, D. J.; Barr, C. S.

    2013-07-01

    A column experiment was conducted to study the release behavior of technetium, uranium, and selenium initially sequestered in reducing grout similar in composition to Savannah River Site (SRS) saltstone, a cementitious waste form made by mixing salt solution from SRS liquid waste storage tanks with a dry mix containing blast furnace slag, fly ash, and Portland cement. The data suggest that uranium was retained in the grout possibly as a CaUO4 phase, whereas most of the selenium was released. Technetium release initially was relatively constant, and then increased significantly after 26 pore volumes. The increase in technetium release was slightly delayed relative to the observed Eh increase. The system Eh-pH started under conditions in which technetium solubility is low, constrained by Tc3O4 solubility, but eventually transitioned into the stability field of the pertechnetate ion. The delay in technetium release relative to the Eh increase was possibly due to slow oxidation of technetium at depth within the grout particles, which in turn was likely controlled by O2 diffusion into the particles. In contrast to technetium and uranium, selenium release was not solubility limited and selenium likely was present in the pore solution initially as a HSe- species.

  18. Experimental study of contaminant release from reducing grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A column experiment was conducted to study the release behavior of technetium, uranium, and selenium initially sequestered in reducing grout similar in composition to Savannah River Site (SRS) saltstone, a cementitious waste form made by mixing salt solution from SRS liquid waste storage tanks with a dry mix containing blast furnace slag, fly ash, and Portland cement. The data suggest that uranium was retained in the grout possibly as a CaUO4 phase, whereas most of the selenium was released. Technetium release initially was relatively constant, and then increased significantly after 26 pore volumes. The increase in technetium release was slightly delayed relative to the observed Eh increase. The system Eh-pH started under conditions in which technetium solubility is low, constrained by Tc3O4 solubility, but eventually transitioned into the stability field of the pertechnetate ion. The delay in technetium release relative to the Eh increase was possibly due to slow oxidation of technetium at depth within the grout particles, which in turn was likely controlled by O2 diffusion into the particles. In contrast to technetium and uranium, selenium release was not solubility limited and selenium likely was present in the pore solution initially as a HSe- species. (authors)

  19. Grouted Connections with Shear Keys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Jørgensen, M. B.; Damkilde, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element model in the software package ABAQUS in which a reliable analysis of grouted pile-to-sleeve connections with shear keys is the particular purpose. The model is calibrated to experimental results and a consistent set of input parameters is estimated so that dif......This paper presents a finite element model in the software package ABAQUS in which a reliable analysis of grouted pile-to-sleeve connections with shear keys is the particular purpose. The model is calibrated to experimental results and a consistent set of input parameters is estimated so...

  20. In-situ grouting of the low-level radioactive waste disposal silos at ORNL's Solid Waste Storage Area Six

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), one method of solid low-level radioactive waste disposal has been disposed of in below-grade cylindrical concrete silos. Located in Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6), each silo measures 8 ft in diameter and 20 ft deep. Present day operations involve loading the silos with low-level radioactive waste and grouting the remaining void space with a particulate grout of low viscosity. Initial operations involving the disposal of wastes into the below-grade silos did not include the grouting process. Grouting was stated as a standard practice (in late 1988) after discovering that ∼75% of the silos accumulated water in the bottom of the silos in the ∼2 years after capping. Silo water (leachate) contained a wide range of types and concentrations of radionuclides. The migration of contaminated leachate out of the silo into adjoining soil and groundwater was considered to be a serious environmental concern. This report describes how a specially designed particulate-base grout was used to grout 54 silos previously filled with low-level radioactive waste. Grouting involved three steps: (1) silo preparation, (2) formulation and preparation of the grout mixture, and (3) injection of the grout into the silos. Thirty-five of the 54 silos grouted were equipped with a 3-in.-diam Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) pipe used to monitor water levels in the silos. A method for rupturing the bottom section of these PVC wells was developed so that grout could be pumped to the bottom of those silos. Holes (2-in. diam) were drilled through the ∼18 in. thick concrete to fill the remaining 19 wells without the PVC monitoring wells. The formulation of grout injected into the silos was based on a Portland Type I cement, flyash, sand, and silica fume admixture. Compressive strength of grout delivered to SWSA6 during grouting operations averaged 1,808 lb/in2 with a bulk density of 3,549 lb/yd3

  1. 垃圾土地基灌浆处理试验%Grouting improvement of foundation of municipal solid waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海; 施建勇; 陈继东; 艾英钵; 张坤勇

    2011-01-01

    Based on the in-situ grouting tests, the mass fraction of cement was analyzed by boring samples of municipal solid waste after cement grouting. The cement was uniformly distributed over the foundation of municipal solid waste, and the mass fraction of cement reached 10% after the first grouting and increased to 25% after the socond grouting. Through the strength tests on laboratory cement-waste samples after curing of 28 days. the stress-strain relation of the cement-wate samples exhibited hardening characteristics even when the dosage of cement reached 25 % and the curing age was 60 days, and the cement-waste samples were loose and not consolidated. The static load tests on the foundation of municipal solid waste before and after grouting indicated that the bearing properties of the foundation of municipal solid waste cotld he improved by grouting, and the bearing capacity was obviously raised. However, the failure mode of the foundation of municipal solid waste after the second grouting was brittle becauso of the restricted in-situ curing conditions.%通过现场灌浆试验,钻取灌浆处理后的水泥垃圾土样进行水泥质量分数的分析试验,得到一次灌浆能使水泥浆在垃圾土地基中较均匀分布,水泥质量分数达到约10%,二次灌浆能增加水泥质量分数约25%的结果.经过室内水泥垃圾土样28 d养护强度试验,发现即使水泥掺入量达到25%、养护60d,得到的应力应变曲线仍呈硬化型,水泥垃圾土仍是松散体,没有形成固结体.灌浆前后垃圾土地基的静载荷试验表明,灌浆能明显改善垃圾土地基的承载特性,提高地基的承载力,但由于垃圾填埋场现场养护条件限制,二次灌浆后垃圾土地基的破坏表现为脆性特征.

  2. Grouted Pile and Its Bearing Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The grouting method applied in bored pile is an improvement to the conventional bored pile. Load tests have proved that grouting under the bored pile tip is an effective method to enhance the bearing capacity of the pile and to reduce the pile settlement. In this paper, the grouting technology is described and pile-load test results are discussed. In order to put the grouting method into design practice, the authors analyze the working mechanism of soil compaction. And, based on the theory of cavities expansion in soil mass, approximate formulae are proposed for estimating the bearing capacity of the grouted pile. The theoretical prediction agrees well with the load test results.

  3. Cementitious Grout for Closing SRS High Level Waste Tanks - 12315

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. Ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks will also be filled to the extent practical. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and to be chemically reducing with a reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400. Grouts with this chemistry stabilize potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  4. Degree of saturation effect on the grout-soil interface shear strength of soil nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the grouted soil nailing system, the bonding strength of cement grout-soil interface offers the required resistance to maintain the stability of whole structure. In practice, soil nailing applications are often placed at unsaturated conditions, such as soil slopes, shallow foundations, retaining walls and pavement structures. In these cases, the water content in the soil nail zone may increase or decrease due to rain water or dry weather, and even cannot become saturated during their design service life. In this study, the effect of water content (degree of saturation on the shear strength of interface between cement grout and sand are experimentally investigated by means of direct shear test. Meanwhile the water retention curve was determined and interface microstructure was observed. Experimental results show that the shear strength of interface changes non-monotonously with degree of saturation when the interface was prepared, due to the non-monotonousness of the cohesiveness between soil particles. The less the cohesiveness between sand particles, the more grout was observed been penetrated into the voids, and thus the larger the interface shear stress.

  5. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This task is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34,000 liters of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. The grout was also completely contained within the two trenches as no grout constituents were observed in the 12 perimeter ground water monitoring wells. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over polyacrylate grout because of its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty of controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization process in the presence of potassium ferricyanide. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 115 years in the test soil. However, this calculated value is likely to be conservatively low because microbial degradation of the grout set accelerator or residual monomer may be contributing most to the measured microbial respiration. Addition work, using 14C-labeled acrylate and acrylamide grouts, is being carried out to more accurately estimate the grouts' microbiological half-life

  6. Kaolinitic clay-based grouting demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative Kaolinitic Clay-Based Grouting Demonstration was performed under the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP), funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by the EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of the technology was to demonstrate the effectiveness of kaolinitic clay-based grouting in reducing/eliminating infiltration of surface and shallow groundwater through fractured bedrock into underground mine workings. In 1993, the Mike Horse Mine was selected as a demonstration site for the field implementation and evaluation of the grouting technology. The mine portal discharge ranged between 114 to 454 liters per minute (30 to 120 gpm) of water containing iron, zinc, manganese, and cadmium at levels exceeding the National Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Levels. The grout formulation was designed by the developer Morrison Knudsen Corporation/Spetstamponazhgeologia (MK/STG), in May 1994. Grout injection was performed by Hayward Baker, Inc. under the directive of MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE-TA) during fall of 1994. The grout was injected into directionally-drilled grout holes to form a grout curtain at the project site. Post grout observations suggest the grout was successful in reducing the infiltration of the surface and shallow groundwater from entering the underground mine workings. The proceeding paper describes the demonstration and technology used to form the subsurface barrier in the fracture system

  7. In Situ Grouting of Liquid Waste Disposal Trenches and Experimental Reactor Fuel Disposal Wells at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early to mid-1960's, liquid low-level wastes (LLLW) generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were disposed of in specially-constructed, gravel-filled trenches within the Melton Valley watershed at the lab. The initial selected remedy for Trenches 5 and 7 was in situ vitrification; however, an amendment to the record of decision changed the remedy to in situ grouting of the trenches. The work was accomplished by filling the void space within the crushed stone section of each trench with cementitious grout. The contaminated soil surrounding the trenches (1-m perimeter) was then grouted with acrylamide grout. At the HRE fuel wells, a 1-m ring of soil surrounding the fuel wells was grouted with acrylamide. The results of the hydraulic conductivity tests ranged from 4.74 x 10-6 to 3.60 x 10-7 cm/sec, values that were well below the 1 x 10-5 cm/sec design criterion. In summary: The ISG Project was conducted to decrease hydraulic conductivity and thereby decrease water flow and contaminate migration from the area of the trenches. The initial remedy for Trenches 5 and 7 in the Melton Valley ROD was for in situ vitrification of the trench matrix. The remedy was changed to in situ grouting of the trenches and HRE fuel wells through an amendment to the ROD after moisture was found in the trenches. The grouting of the trenches was accomplished by filling the void space within the crushed stone section of each trench with cementitious grout. The contaminated soil surrounding the trenches (1-m perimeter) was then grouted with acrylamide grout to further reduce water infiltration. Soil backfill above each of the seven HRE fuel wells was removed to a depth of approximately 1 m by augering, and the soils were replaced with a cement plug to prevent water infiltration from migrating down the original borehole. Soil surrounding the fuel wells was then grouted with acrylamide to ensure water infiltration through the HRE fuel wells is prevented. A summary of the quantities used

  8. Experimental study of the interaction between low-pH grout and gneiss from ONKALO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouting of water-conducting fractures with low-alkali cement is foreseen for the potential future repository for spent nuclear fuel in Finland (ONKALO site). Results from a previous modeling study showed a quick (2 days) sealing of porosity at the grout-rock interface due to the precipitation of C-S-H (also C-A-S-H) and ettringite. The spatial extent of this alteration and sealing of the rock was in the order of a few tens of micrometers. Following on these results, experiments were designed to observe this possible effect of the low-pH grout on the rock (migmatitic gneiss). A series of centimetric rock cubes were placed in contact with the low-pH grout. After different times (4 - 19 days), electron microprobe analyses (EMP) were carried out to evaluate any variation in the original rock composition. The results show that contact between the low-pH cementitious grout and gneiss from ONKALO did not induce any alteration in the rock, at least at the scale of the EMP observations (micrometers to tens of micrometers). The low porosity of the bulk rock (1%) compared to the porosity used in the previous calculations (5%; zone of increased porosity near fractures), together with the large reactive surface areas used in the calculations (all surfaces assumed to be in contact with water), are probably the cause of the apparent discrepancy between model results and observations (lack of alteration). (orig.)

  9. Field application of innovative grouting agents for in situ stabilization of buried waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, G.G.; Farnsworth, R.K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents field applications for two innovative grouting agents that were used to in situ stabilize buried waste sites, via jet grouting. The two grouting agents include paraffin and a proprietary iron oxide based cement grout called TECT. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The field demonstrations were performed at the INEL in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit, which is adjacent to the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). At the RWMC, 56,000 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste is co-mingled with over 170,000 m{sup 3} of soil in shallow land burial. Improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final disposition of this waste. Using jet-grouting technology to inject these materials into the pore spaces of buried waste sites results in the creation of buried monolithic waste forms that simultaneously protect the waste from subsidence, while eliminating the migratory potential of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in the waste.

  10. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  11. Grout quality and its impact on guided ultrasonic waves in grouted rock bolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D. H. Steve; Cheng, Jiulong; Yue, Renjie; Sun, Xiaoyun

    2010-10-01

    Rock bolts are widely used in mining and geotechnical engineering as ground anchorage. The supporting capacity of grouted rock bolts depends greatly on the grout quality in rocks. Measurement of the grout quality in the field is an outstanding issue. In an effort to develop a non-destructive method for estimating the grout quality of grouted rock bolts, the characteristics of guided ultrasonic waves are investigated in this paper. Particular attention is paid to the effects of grout quality on group wave velocity and attenuation. Issues associated to grout quality and bolt failure are also discussed. To simulate the in-situ condition, several specimens were prepared using 20 mm diameter rebar. Each specimen was grouted in a 200 mm diameter concrete cylinder, which was designed with different compressive strength. A large number of tests were conducted on these specimens using ultrasonic waves with frequencies from 10 to 100 kHz. The effects of air content and compressive strength of the grout on attenuation and group velocity of ultrasonic waves in the grouted rock bolts were studied. The results showed large influence from the grout strength and air content and demonstrated the potential for using ultrasonic waves to test grout quality.

  12. Fatigue Life of High Performance Grout in Dry and Wet Environment for Wind Turbine Grouted Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2011-01-01

    The cementitious material in grouted connections of offshore monopile wind turbine structures is subjected to very high oscillating service stresses. The fatigue capacity of the grout therefore becomes essential to the performance and service life of the grouted connection. In the present work...

  13. Grouting for Pile Foundation Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Stoel, A.E.C.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the use of grouting methods for pile foundation improvement, a generic term that is used here to define both foundation renovation (increasing the bearing capacity of a pile foundation that has insufficient bearing capacity) and foundation protection (safeguarding the piles of the foundation against possible damage resulting from underground construction activities in the vicinity). A full-scale test, of which the general set-up and consistency check ar...

  14. Jet-Grouting Constructed Laminar Diaphragms

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    The high cost of digging and hauling contaminated soil has made enclosure of the contaminated soil an alternative to prevent contamination of ground water and adjacent sites. The jet-grouting method uses special grout nozzles to create a grout sheet of controlled width and thickness from each drilled grout hole. This sheet is commonly 100 mm. to 150 mm. in thickness, 2 to 3 meters in width, and of any desired length. The width of the sheet in one pass can go up to 6 meters. Actual lateral soi...

  15. Low-pressure, single-point grout injection for tank heel sludge mixing and in-situ immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes tests conducted in an approximately 9-ft diameter test tank situated outside the 336 building in Hanford's 300 area. The tests were performed to measure the ability of jets of grout slurry to mobilize and mix simulated tank sludge. The technique is intended for in situ immobilization of tank waste heels. The current approach uses a single, rotated, larger-diameter nozzle driven at lower pressure. Due to the larger diameter, the potential for plugging is reduced and the effective radius around an injection point over which the jet is effective in mobilizing sludge from the tank bottom can be made larger. A total of three grout injection tests were conducted in a 9-ft diameter tank. In each case, a 2-in. layer of kaolin clay paste was placed on a dry tank floor to simulate a sludge heel. The clay was covered with 4 inches of water. The grout slurry, consisting of Portland cement, class F fly ash, and eater, was prepared and delivered by an offsite vendor. In the third test, the sludge in half of the tank was replaced by a layer of 20x50 mesh zeolite, and bentonite clay was added to the grout formulation. After injection, the grout was allowed to set and then the entire grout monolith was manually broken up and excavated using a jack hammer. Intact pieces of clay were visually apparent due to a sharp color contrast between the grout and clay. Remaining clay deposits were collected and weighed and suspended clay pieces within the monolith were photographed. The mobilization performance of the grout jets exceeded expectations

  16. Grout Analysis for EC and CC Calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstrom, L.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-01-06

    The EC and CC calorimeters roll on Two parallel hardened steel ways which reside on the top of the D0 platform's center beam. The ways will be grouted to the center beam once their correct elevation has been established. The purpose of this report is to evaluate and compare three different epoxy grouts and their properties for this application.

  17. Casestudy of stabilization of structural-unstable soilsusing grouting ОПЫТ ЗАКРЕПЛЕНИЯ СТРУКТУРНО-НЕУСТОЙЧИВЫХ ГРУНТОВ ЦЕМЕНТАЦИЕЙ

    OpenAIRE

    Golovanov Aleksandr Mikhailovich; Pashkov Valeriy Ivanovich; Revo Galina Algirdasovna; Pashkov Deputy Director; Nerchinskiy Oleg Vladimirovich; Turenko Chief Engineer

    2013-01-01

    More than 20 years ago, Rostov-based Promstroyniiproekt Institute (Research and Development Institute for Industrial Engineering), backed by Geotechnika group of companies and other organizations, commenced using cement grouting to stabilize soil as part of foundation soils of buildings. It has turned out that consolidation of water saturated by clay accelerates grouting and assures higher strength than the silicification method. The article describes a new method of grouting and a case study...

  18. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) will provide permanent disposal for approximately 43 Mgal of low-level radioactive liquid waste currently being stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. The first step in permanent disposal is accomplished by solidifying the liquid waste with cementitious dry materials. The resulting grout is cast within underground vaults. This report on the GTF contains information on the following: Geologic data, hydrologic data, groundwater monitoring program, information, detection monitoring program, groundwater characterization drawings, building emergency plan--grout treatment facility, response action plan for grout treatment facility, Hanford Facility contingency plan, training course descriptions, overview of the Hanford Facility Grout Performance, assessment, bland use and zoning map, waste minimization plan, cover design engineering report, and clay liners (ADMIXTURES) in semiarid environments

  19. The assessment of borehole cement sealing characteristics by acoustic waveform analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acoustic waveform analysis has been used to provide a quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of cement grouting for sealing three adjacent boreholes drilled at Harwell, Oxon, as part of a research programme into the disposal of radioactive wastes into argillaceous formations. Results indicate that bonding at cement/casing and cement/formation interfaces would be inadequate for sealing a radioactive waste repository and the use of a backfilling material such as bentonite is advocated. (U.K.)

  20. Compensation Grouting in Sand: Experiments, Field Experiences and Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezuijen, A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on experimental research on compensation grouting in sand. It is investigated in model tests, how the shape of the grout bodies made during injection depends on the grout properties, the density of the sand and the way the tubes are installed. The shape of the grout body affects

  1. Design for rock grouting based on analysis of grout penetration. Verification using Aespoe HRL data and parameter analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouting as a method to reduce the inflow of water into underground facilities will be important in both the construction and operation of the deep repository. SKB has been studying grouting design based on characterization of fractured rock and prediction of grout spread. However, as in other Scandinavian tunnels, stop criteria have been empirically set so that grouting is completed when the grout flow is less than a certain value at maximum pressure or the grout take is above a certain value. Since empirically based stop criteria are determined without a theoretical basis and are not related to grout penetration, the grouting result may be inadequate or uneconomical. In order to permit the choice of adequate and cost-effective grouting methods, stop criteria can be designed based on a theoretical analysis of grout penetration. The relationship between grout penetration and grouting time has been studied at the Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. Based on these studies, the theory has been further developed in order to apply to real grouting work. Another aspect is using the developed method for parameter analysis. The purpose of parameter analysis is to evaluate the influence of different grouting parameters on the result. Since the grouting strategy is composed of many different components, the selection of a grouting method is complex. Even if the theoretically most suitable grouting method is selected, it is difficult to carry out grouting exactly as planned because grouting parameters such as grout properties can easily vary during the grouting operation. In addition, knowing the parameters precisely beforehand is impossible because there are uncertainties inherent in the rock mass. Therefore, it is important to asses the effects of variations in grouting parameters. The parameter analysis can serve as a guide in choosing an effective grouting method. The objectives of this report are to: Further develop the theory concerning

  2. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  3. Time-lapse electrical resistivity investigations for imaging the grouting injection in shallow subsurface cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Park, Samgyu; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  4. Hanford site grout disposal vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) completed processing and disposal of an initial 3,800 m3 of radioactive waste from the Hanford site's double-shell tanks (DSTs) on July 11, 1989. For the first time in the Hanford site's 46-yr history, tank wastes resulting from weapons-grade plutonium production were moved out of liquid storage and converted into a solid for environmentally safe disposal. In addition to the 3,800 m3 of nonhazardous, low-level waste processed in 1988 and 1989, ∼ 163,000 m3 of mixed waste will be treated for disposal between 1992 and 2013. These low-level wastes are radioactive, concentrated salt solutions classified as hazardous by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and dangerous by the Washington State Department of Ecology. As feed for the grouting process they contain ∼ 11% sodium nitrate, 6% sodium hydroxide, 5% sodium nitrite, 3% sodium aluminate, 1% sodium phosphate, 0.5% sodium chloride, and 73% water. Many radionuclides are present, although 137Cs contributes more than 99% of the 0.3 Ci/l activity. From a long-term performance assessment standpoint, nitrate, 99Tc, and 129I are the primary contaminants of concern

  5. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  6. Field-scale permeation testing of jet-grouted buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducted field-scale hydraulic conductivity testing of simulated buried waste sites with improved confinement. The improved confinement was achieved by jet grouting the buried waste, thus creating solid monoliths. The hydraulic conductivity of the monoliths was determined using both the packer technique and the falling head method. The testing was performed on simulated buried waste sites utilizing a variety of encapsulating grouts, including high-sulfate-resistant Portland cement, TECT, (a proprietary iron oxide cement) and molten paraffin. By creating monoliths using in-situ jet grouting of encapsulating materials, the waste is simultaneously protected from subsidence and contained against further migration of contaminants. At the INEL alone there is 56,000 m3 of buried transuranic waste commingled with 170,000--224,000 m3 of soil in shallow land burial. One of the options for this buried waste is to improve the confinement and leave it in place for final disposal. Knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity for these monoliths is important for decision-makers. The packer tests involved coring the monolith, sealing off positions within the core with inflatable packers, applying pressurized water to the matrix behind the seal, and observing the water flow rate. The falling head tests were performed in full-scale 3-m-diameter, 3-m-high field-scale permeameters. In these permeameters, both water inflow and outflow were measured and equated to a hydraulic conductivity

  7. Shaft Grouting HATS2A Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Strøm, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I have been following 5 grouting rounds at Cyberport shaft and 4 grouting rounds at Sandy Bay shaft.There were some communication problems between the grouting team and the geologists, resulting in missing water inflow measurements.The rock quality was very poor (Q-value 0.1 – 1), with coarse ash tuff as the most common rock mass in Cyberport, and rhyolitic tuff as the most common rock mass in Sandy Bay. The Q-values were below 1, with Cyberport just a bit higher than Sandy Bay...

  8. ASSESSMENT OF DEFORMATION AND STRENGTH OF SOILS STRENGTHENED BY CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainov Mihail Petrovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently there are few studies of deformation and strength properties of loose soils strengthened by cementing. Based on the data of already arranged grout curtains it was determined that in cemented gravel-pebble soil there are 7...9 % of cement, which is less than in concrete. To assess deformation and strength of such soils it is possible to use the data of tests conducted by other authors, where the effect of cement contents on sand-cement mix properties was studied. Analysis of experimental data showed that cemented soil may be identified with concrete only with high content of cement (more than 10 %. At cement content 7...9 % in soil the strength deformation of cemented soil varies to a small extent. Its deformation becomes 2-3 times less. It greatly depends on compression stresses. The formulae are proposed which permit assessing the effect of compression and cement content on deformation of cemented soil. It is shown that strength of cemented soil is less than that even of the weakest concrete. It has a sufficiently high cohesion, but the friction angle is approximately the same as that of the initial soil.

  9. Analysis of cement superplasticizers and grinding aids a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This literature survey reviews the methods for analysis of cement plasticizers and organic grounding aids in cement solutions in preparation of grouts/concrete and methods for determination of plasticizers and grinding aids in groundwater conditions. The survey focuses on three different types of superplasticizers: sulphonated naphthalene condensates, sulphonated melamine condensates and polycarboxylates. There are various organic grinding aids, such as alkanolamines, glycols or phenolic compounds, used in the cement industry. This review is concerned with the following compounds: triethylenetetramine, tetraethylenepentamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, triisopropanolamine, ethyleneglycol, diethyleneglycol, aminoethylethanolamine, hydroxyethyl diethylenetriamine and phenol. (orig.)

  10. Pressure grouting of fractured basalt flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a field trial of pressure grouting in basalt and presents the results of subsequent coring and permeability measurements. The trial shows that hydraulic conductivity of fractured basalt bedrock can be significantly reduced by pressure injection of cementitious materials. The effectiveness of the pressure grout procedure was evaluated by measuring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock. The extent of grout penetration was determined by analyzing postgrout injection drilling chips for the presence of a tracer in the grout and also by examining cores of the treated basalt. Downhole radar mapping indicated major lava flow patterns and follow water movement during a surface infiltration test. A site called Box Canyon, which is northwest of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), was chosen for the study because its surface outcrop geology is similar to the underlying bedrock fracture system at the INEL's Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC)

  11. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Hyun, S. [Mercer Univ., Macon, GA (United States)

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  12. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here

  13. Strength of Mock-up Trial Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on samples taken and cast during the execution of a mock-up trial placement of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 on January 21, 2009.......The present report describes tests carried out on samples taken and cast during the execution of a mock-up trial placement of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 on January 21, 2009....

  14. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) will provide permanent disposal for approximately 43 Mgal of radioactive liquid waste currently being stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. The first step in permanent disposal is accomplished by solidifying the liquid waste with cementitious dry materials. The resulting grout is cast within underground vaults. This report on the GTF contains information on the following: Vault design, run-on/run-off control design, and asphalt compatibility with 90-degree celsius double-shell slurry feed

  15. Grout Treatment Facility waste feed acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes criteria for the acceptance of grout waste feed to provide assurance that the final grout form produced by the Grout Disposal Facility (GDF) will meet the regulatory, design, product, and process requirements. Contained in the report is an evaluation of the regulatory requirements associated with the grout disposal option along with a description of the waste currently stored on the site. An evaluation of the heat generation requirements for the waste feed stream is presented. This evaluation includes the heat resulting from the grout curing process as well as heat associated with the radiolytic decay of the radioisotopes present. Limits for individual elements as well as limits for classes of materials such as organics, sulfates, etc. are presented in Table 1-1. These values are based on regulatory, heat generation, and compositional limits to assure the integrity of the final grout products. Some compositional limits such as heavy metals will require Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing to demonstrate regulatory compliance

  16. Effectiveness of fracture sealing with bentonite grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite is known to have an extremely low permeability and a self-healing ability. It has therefore been selected as a major sealing component in several repository concepts. Bentonite grouts have the following advantages, (1) small particle size, can be injected into small fractures or voids, (2) suitable water absorption properties, can produce gels at low concentrations, and (3) stable physical and chemical properties, may have considerable longevity. Bentonite fracture grouting tests are performed on a model made of circular acrylic plates with outer diameter of 30 cm and central injection hole of 2.5 cm diameter. Suspension with bentonite concentration of 15% to 31% have been injected into fractures with apertures of 9 to 90 microns under injection pressures less than 0.6 MPa. Grouting reduces the hydraulic conductivities of the fractures from the 10-1 to the 10-5 cm/s level. When the suspension is thin enough and the fracture is very small, channeling develops in the grouted fractures. Preliminary results indicate that the permeability of a grouted fracture does not increase with time in more than 125 days. The flow properties of bentonite suspensions, viscosity, shear stress, yield stress and gelation, are investigated. Water flow through ungrouted fractures and movement of water in bentonite grout are studies. The physical stability or bleeding capacity of bentonite suspensions is determined. 122 refs., 56 figs., 10 tabs

  17. Grouting of uranium mill tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program of remedial action was initiated for a number of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. These piles result from mining and processing of uranium ores to meet the nation's defense and nuclear power needs and represent a potential hazard to health and the environment. Possible remedial actions include the application of covers to reduce radon emissions and airborne transport of the tailings, liners to prevent groundwater contamination by leachates from the piles, physical or chemical stabilization of the tailings, or moving the piles to remote locations. Conventional installation of liners would require excavation of the piles to emplace the liner; however, utilization of grouting techniques, such as those used in civil engineering to stabilize soils, might be a potential method of producing a liner without excavation. Laboratory studies on groutability of uranium mill tailings were conducted using samples from three abandoned piles and employing a number of particulate and chemical grouts. These studies indicate that it is possible to alter the permeability of the tailings from ambient values of 10-3 cm/s to values approaching 10-7 cm/s using silicate grouts and to 10-8 cm/s using acrylamide and acrylate grouts. An evaluation of grouting techniques, equipment required, and costs associated with grouting were also conducted and are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  18. 一种特殊的碳酸盐沉积及其环境意义 ——“贵州乌江渡水电站灌浆帷幕老化问题的研究”中的发现%A SPECIAL KIND OF CARBONATE DEPOSIT AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE ——FINDINGS FROM THE STUDY “ON THE AGING OF CEMENT-GROUTING CURTAINS AT WUJIANGDU HYDROPOWER STATION OF GUIZHOU”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘再华

    2001-01-01

    通过水化学、碳稳定同位素和碳酸盐沉积物沉积速率的对比分析,发现在贵州乌江渡坝址灌浆廊道中存在两种不同类型的碳酸盐沉积物,即:放CO2型和吸CO2型。前者如通常岩溶洞穴中所见,是天然条件下岩溶作用的产物;而后者则很特殊,它是灌浆帷幕和混凝土发生碳酸盐化的结果。由于碳酸盐化时自大气迅速吸入CO2,使得廊道中CO2浓度降低,并每年可产生高达10 cm的碳酸盐沉积物。考虑到世界范围内水泥的大量使用,水泥或混凝土碳酸盐化的环境意义,即在全球碳循环的研究中对大气CO2沉降的贡献是不容忽视的。据初步估算,该碳贡献量每年约1亿t左右。%Based on the analyses and comparisons of water chemistry, stablecarbon isotopes and deposition rates of carbonate deposits, the author found that there are two kinds of carbonate deposits in the tunnels at Wujiangdu dam-site, Guizhou, China, i.e., the CO2-outgassing type and the CO2-absorbing type. The former is natural, as observed in normal karst caves, and the product of karst processes under natural conditions. The latter, however, is special, resulting from the carbonation of a cement-grouting curtain and concrete. Due to the quick absorption of CO2 from the surrounding atmosphere, which is evidenced by the low CO2 content in the air and the high deposition rate of carbonate deposits(as high as 10 cm/a) in the tunnels, the contribution of the carbonation process to the sink of CO2 in the atmosphere is important, being in the order of magnitude of 108tons carbon per year,and should be taken into account in the study of the global carbon cycle because of the use of cement in large quantity in the world.

  19. Behavior of Radionuclides and RCRA Elements in Tank Backfill Grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One approach to decommissioning emptied high-level waste tanks is to backfill them with grout. Because of the long lives and high toxicity of some of the contaminants, the chemical behavior of the contaminants in the grout need to be understood, especially as the grout ages and weathers over long times. In this paper, the sequestration of technetium and iodine in contact with two grout formulations, and their component materials, is discussed. Preliminary results are presented of experiments examining the solubility of actinides in contact with the grouts as pH is lowered and carbonate content increased, representing conditions of a weathered grout system. (authors)

  20. New Grouting Technology in Subgrade and Pavement Engineering%路基路面工程中的注浆新技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何长明; 赵炼恒; 李亮

    2011-01-01

    介绍沥青路面浅层注浆加固基层及新旧路基结合部预埋柔性管两种注浆新技术,提出其适用范围、施工工艺及注浆效果的检验。对比分析注浆检测结果表明:对水泥路面注浆能很好地治理路面面板脱空,沥青路面基层补强注浆能提高沥青路面基层的整体强度,在新旧路基结合部预埋柔性管注浆能显著降低路基的差异沉降。%Two new technologies of shallow grouting on asphalt pavement for subgrade reinforcement and embedding flexible pipe in the junction between new and old roadbeds are introduced in this paper.Then their application scope,construction process and grouting effect inspection are separately put forward.Through comparison of grouting results,it is shown that grouting on cement pavement can better prevent hollowing of cement slab;grouting on asphalt pavement can improve the overall strength of subgrade;embedding flexible pipe in the junction between new and old roadbeds can significantly reduce the differential settlement of subgrade.

  1. Retention of clay-solidified grouting curtain to Cd2+,Pb2+ and Hg2+ in landfill of municipal solid waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张可能; 陈永贵; 邓飞跃; 田庆余

    2004-01-01

    The effects of components and their ratio of grouts on anti-seepage capability of clay-solidified grouting curtain and its permeability of heavy metal cations were investigated by permeating experiments, using reactive solute transport model to study the permeation of heavy metals (Cd2+ , Pb2+ and Hg2+ ). The study of permeating for different mixture ratios of cement and clay indicates that hydraulic conductivity of clay-solidified grouting curtain with different ratios of solid to liquid or with the same ratio of solid to liquid but with different ratios of cement to clay is changed. The laboratory simulation test results also show that precipitates produced in heavy metal cation migration process in curtain block up water flowing passage which makes the hydraulic conductivity of the solution-permeated curtain decrease with the leakage time. The permeation velocities for different heavy metal cations vary with ionic concentration, exchange capacity and ion radius etc. The test results indicate that the permeation rapidity order of heavy metals cations in clay-solidified grouting curtain is Hg2+ >Pb2+ in the same experimental circumstance. In addition, permeability for different mixture ratios and antisepsis capabilities of clay-solidified grouting curtain were studied in tests.

  2. Method for constructing a lined underground cavity by underreaming, grouting, and boring through the grouting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W.H.

    1971-02-02

    A method is described for constructing a lined underground cavity. The process includes the steps of securing a casing in a borehole by grouting, underreaming the casing, filling the underreamed region with additional grouting, and then drilling through and underreaming the added grouting, thereby forming a room having a lining formed of the grouting. By using a structurally strong grouting that is impervious to water, the resulting room is waterproof and is suitable for on-site storage of an atomic device and its associated equipment prior to an underground atomic event. Such cavities also have other uses; for example, the cavities may be made very deep and used for storage of various fluids such as natural gas storage. (5 claims)

  3. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  4. Grout Treatment Facility Land Disposal Restriction Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes management plans directed to result in the land disposal of grouted wastes at the Hanford Grout Facilities in compliance with Federal, State of Washington, and Department of Energy land disposal restrictions. 9 refs., 1 fig

  5. Mechanical Properties of High Cementitious Grout (I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

     The present report describes tests carried out on the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500, marked WMG 7145 FP, developed by BASF Construction Materials and designed for use in grouted connections of offshore windmill foundations....

  6. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term performance of the grout disposal system for Phosphate/Sulfate Waste (PSW) was analyzed. PSW is a low-level liquid generated by activities associated with N Reactor operations. The waste will be mixed with dry solids and permanently disposed of as a cementitious grout in sub-surface concrete vaults at Hanford's 200-East Area. Two categories of scenarios were analyzed that could cause humans to be exposed to radionuclides and chemicals from the grouted waste: contaminated groundwater and direct intrusion. In the groundwater scenario, contaminants are released from the buried grout monoliths, then eventually transported via the groundwater to the Columbia River. As modeled, the contaminants are assumed to leach out of the monoliths at a constant rate over a 10,000-year period. The other category of exposure involves intruders who inadvertently contact the waste directly, either by drilling, excavating, or gardening. Long-term impacts that could result from disposal of PSW grout were expressed in terms of incremental increases of (1) chemical concentrations in the groundwater and surface waters, and (2) radiation doses. None of the calculated impacts exceeded the corresponding regulatory limits set by Washington State, Department of Energy, or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  7. Effects of grouting, shotcreting and concrete leachates on backfill geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of concrete to seal open fractures (grouting) and to impermeabilise the deposition tunnels (shotcreting) has been envisaged in the construction of a high level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository according to SKB designs. Nevertheless, the geochemical effect of using concrete in the repository is not fully understood. Concrete degradation due to the interaction with groundwater can affect the performance of other repository barriers, such as the backfill material used for sealing the deposition tunnels. One of the main effects of concrete degradation is the generation of alkaline plumes. For this reason, SKB is currently planning to use a type of concrete whose degradation result in lower pH values than those developed with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). In order to assess the long-term geochemical effect of including low-pH concrete elements in a HLNW repository, we performed a 2D reactive-transport model of a backfilled deposition tunnel that intersects a hydraulic conductive fracture which has been partially grouted. An additional case has been modelled where part of the deposition tunnel walls were covered with a shotcrete layer. The modelling results predict the development of a high-alkalinity plume, larger in the case of considering a grouted fracture, accompanied by the precipitation of CSH-phases in the fracture. However, the effect on the backfill material is only significant if concrete is in contact with the backfill (shotcrete case). In order to conduct these models, and considering that at the beginning of the present work there was not a specific composition for such a low-pH concrete, its composition has been assumed in order to meet the expected geochemical evolution of concrete degradation according to SKB expectations. This is a pH of pore water of around 11 and the degradation of CSH phases resulting in a source for Ca and Si into the system. For this reason, jennite and tobermorite have been selected, although it is known that jennite is

  8. Effects of grouting, shotcreting and concrete leachates on backfill geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Miguel; Arcos, David; Duro, Lara [Enviros Consulting, Valldoreix, Barc elona (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    The use of concrete to seal open fractures (grouting) and to impermeabilise the deposition tunnels (shotcreting) has been envisaged in the construction of a high level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository according to SKB designs. Nevertheless, the geochemical effect of using concrete in the repository is not fully understood. Concrete degradation due to the interaction with groundwater can affect the performance of other repository barriers, such as the backfill material used for sealing the deposition tunnels. One of the main effects of concrete degradation is the generation of alkaline plumes. For this reason, SKB is currently planning to use a type of concrete whose degradation result in lower pH values than those developed with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). In order to assess the long-term geochemical effect of including low-pH concrete elements in a HLNW repository, we performed a 2D reactive-transport model of a backfilled deposition tunnel that intersects a hydraulic conductive fracture which has been partially grouted. An additional case has been modelled where part of the deposition tunnel walls were covered with a shotcrete layer. The modelling results predict the development of a high-alkalinity plume, larger in the case of considering a grouted fracture, accompanied by the precipitation of CSH-phases in the fracture. However, the effect on the backfill material is only significant if concrete is in contact with the backfill (shotcrete case). In order to conduct these models, and considering that at the beginning of the present work there was not a specific composition for such a low-pH concrete, its composition has been assumed in order to meet the expected geochemical evolution of concrete degradation according to SKB expectations. This is a pH of pore water of around 11 and the degradation of CSH phases resulting in a source for Ca and Si into the system. For this reason, jennite and tobermorite have been selected, although it is known that jennite is

  9. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Davorin Matanović; Gracijan Krklec

    1994-01-01

    During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures) and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production...

  10. Re-grouting of Maroon Dam foundation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palassi, M. [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Sharghi, A. [JTMA Co., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The Maroon dam, built on the Maroon River in the Khoozestan province (southwest) of Iran, has a height of 176 metres and a 1.2 billion cubic metre reservoir. It is one of the largest embankment dams in Iran. A number of unpredicted inflows of water into tunnels and other underground openings occurred during the first impoundment of the Maroon dam. Impoundment was halted and the reservoir was emptied to correct the problem. This paper reviews the measures that were implemented during the remediation process, and presented an evaluation of the effectiveness of the process. The foundation treatment involved placing concrete in the caverns, constructing a concrete lining, and extending the grout curtain. The grouting procedure was also described. The overall effectiveness of the concrete work and grouting resulted in a reduction in leakage from 8.5 cubic metres per second to a more acceptable 10 litres per second. 8 figs.

  11. Comparison of Permeability and Groutability of Ostur Dam Site Rock Mass for Grout Curtain Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghiyeh, S. M.; Hashemi, M.; Ajalloeian, R.

    2013-03-01

    The focus of this study is the empirical hydromechanical behaviour of the Ostur dam site rock mass. The area surrounding the dam mostly consists of diorite and andesite, with primary fractures and hydrothermal veins. The hydromechanical behaviour of the rocks was determined using 500 water pressure tests at 5-m intervals. The hydrothermal veins and 2,739 discontinuities were studied and mapped along the dam axis. As a result, it was possible to design an optimum grout curtain for the dam axis. The empirical hydromechanical behaviour of the rock was studied to determine water flow and grout pressurised flow during the field tests that were conducted on two representative A-series grouting operation boreholes (one borehole for each abutment). The secondary permeability index (SPI), Lugeon value (LU), rock quality designation (RQD) and cement take (CT) values are presented and compared in this article. It is concluded that permeability and groutability are mostly controlled by the specifications and characteristics of the veins, especially in shallow areas and lower depths. A procedure is proposed based on a comparison of the trends in the RQD-SPI and LU-CT, and it is suggested that the areas with diverging trends require no treatment and that those with converging trends require heavy treatment. Additional complementary studies that were conducted during the construction stage have validated these results.

  12. “水力压裂”技术在基岩帷幕灌浆中的应用%Application of hydraulic fracturing technology in base rock curtain grouting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘畅; 蔡斌

    2013-01-01

    In view of the back slurry returning thick frequently seen during high dam anti-seepage curtain grout-ing,it is suggested to adopt the hydraulic fracturing technology that has been widely applied in energy mining in-dustry in base rock curtain grouting. Cementing slurry may loss water and return thick due to slight cracks devel-oped in the rock in case of traditional cement grouting. Artificial cracks with controllable range and width can pre-vent the inherent shortage of fine cement or chemical grouting,which is a new idea for curtain grouting.%针对高坝防渗帷幕施工中常见的“回浆返浓”现象,提出将能源开采行业广泛应用的“水力压裂”造缝技术引入到基岩帷幕灌浆中。利用范围、宽度可控的人造裂缝解决了传统水泥灌浆时由于岩石隐微裂缝发育造成的浆液清水失水,水泥颗粒剩余返浓情况,避免了细水泥、化学灌浆施工的固有缺陷,为帷幕灌浆施工提供了一种新思路。

  13. Investigation of Hardened Filling Grout Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

     Suzlon Wind Energy A/S requested on August 28, 2007 an investigation of 2 samples of a hardened filling grout to be carried out, comprising drilling and strength determination of 4 test cylinders, and description of the surface characteristics of the samples....... Suzlon Wind Energy A/S requested on August 28, 2007 an investigation of 2 samples of a hardened filling grout to be carried out, comprising drilling and strength determination of 4 test cylinders, and description of the surface characteristics of the samples....

  14. In-situ grouting of shallow landfill radioactive waste trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses how a backfilled trench containing low-level radioactive waste was grouted with a particulate grout. The accessible void volume of the waste zone was estimated to be 20% or 28 m3, but 30.6 m3 of grout was infected into the trench. Part of the grout forced a path outside the trench. The water permeation into the trench from monitoring wells was reduced by two orders of magnitude. The grout costs only $0.055/L; but most of the cost was in manpower, 1220 man-hours for this demonstration

  15. Research on method of pressure grouting piling of driven tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dianqi PAN; Zupei ZHANG; Diancai PAN; Yong CHEN; Maosen TAN

    2006-01-01

    The pressure grouting pile of driven tube can improve the load bearing capacity of the single pile from the mechanism of pressure grouting pile of driven tube. On the basis of analyzing the mechanism, the authors designed the machines and tools of pressure grouting, determined the operating manufacture and technology parameter on the pressure grouting secondly. The result shows that the pressure grouting pile of driven tube not only changes the pile type but also reduce the length of the pile and its engineering cost, it enhances the load bearing capacity of single pile an the same time.

  16. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  17. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  18. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Grouts for Wastewater Collection Systems, Separation Systems Consultants Inc., GST3 Grout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Municipalities are discovering rapid degradation of infrastructures in wastewater collection and treatment facilities due to infiltration of leaking water from the surrounding environments. Rehabilitation of these facilities by in situ methods, including the use of grouting, is u...

  19. Operational and long-term performance assessment for Hanford grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy and Rockwell Hanford Operations are preparing for the construction of a Transportable Grout Facility to immobilize selected radioactive liquid wastes now stored at Hanford. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is supporting the program by developing initial grout formulations for the facility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is verifying the required operational characteristics of the grout formulation and evaluating the long-term performance of the grouted waste form. Preliminary assessments of the operational characteristics of the grout formulation show that the grout meets established criteria. Preliminary performance assessments indicate that the grouted waste form will provide long-term environmental protection. A series of laboratory and field tests are planned and ongoing to verify these assessments

  20. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs

  1. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: September 1990 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Osborne, S.C.; Francis, C.L.; Scott, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) is the most widely used technology for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % ASTM Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. The blend is mixed with 106-AN waste at a ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents progress made to date on efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.

  2. Grout Treatment Facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) is an existing treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit located in the 200 East Area and the adjacent 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid mixed waste (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. The GTF consists of the following: The 241-AP-02D and 241-AP-04D waste pump pits and transfer piping; Dry Materials Facility (DMF); Grout Disposal Facility (GDF), consisting of the disposal vault and support and monitoring equipment; and Grout Processing Facility (GPF) and Westinghouse Hanford Company on the draft Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit and may not be read to conflict with those comments. The Grout Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application consists of both a Part A and a Part B permit application. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this TSD unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The Part B consists of 15 chapters addressing the organization and content of the Part B checklist prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987). For ease of reference, the checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow chapter headings and subheadings

  3. Some experiences with epoxy resin grouting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, H R

    1980-07-01

    Epoxy resin systems are used in tiling and grouting in the construction industry. Because of the nature of the application, skin contact is the primary hazard. The most prevalent reaction was reddening of the forearms, followed by whole body reddening and loss of appetite, these latter two being associated with smoking while applying the resin. PMID:7415974

  4. Crack Formation in Grouted Annular Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the present analysis is to identify the reason for extensive crack formation which occurred during an annulus grouting performance test, to evaluate possible consequences of the cracking, and to recommend measures to be taken in order to avoid similar problems in the future....

  5. PENGENALAN STABILISASI TANAH DENGAN JET GROUTING

    OpenAIRE

    Indrastono Dwi Atmanto

    2013-01-01

    Due to restriction of land availability it is frequently we have to build constructions on soft or low bearingcapacity soils, so that soil stabilization must be applied in order to increase its properties. There are manytechniques of soil stabilization, where its applicability depends on many factors regarding appropriateengineering judgement. This paper presents the soil stabilization method by jet grouting, including its theory andpractice.

  6. Experimental study of tile grout material behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kumpová, I. (Ivana); Kloiber, M. (Michal); Ševčík, R. (Radek); Kytýř, D. (Daniel)

    2014-01-01

    Study provides preliminary results of experimental study of tile grout material behavior. Experiments were performed with the use of microCT, three point bending test and methods for chemical analysis. It was proven that material behave very elastic and the suitability of the combination of used methods.

  7. Assessing the effects of insufficient rebar and missing grout in grouted rock bolts using guided ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Zou, D. H.

    2012-04-01

    One of the challenges in field monitoring of grouted rock bolts, which normally have a short exposed end, is to detect the defects of the bolt or grout. In this paper, grouted rock bolts are studied using guided ultrasonic waves. Numerical modeling for grouted rock bolts is performed to assess the effects of insufficient rebar and missing grout. The numerical results are verified with laboratory tests on rock bolt samples. With introduction of correction factors at the reflection end, the results indicate that it is practically possible to identify insufficient rebar and grout defects with guided ultrasonic signals received at the exposed end. It also indicates that with the attenuation and wave velocity of guided waves, defective rock bolts with insufficient rebar length or missing grout in the ground can be detected with reasonable accuracy.

  8. 基于流体时变性的隧道劈裂注浆机理研究%Fracture grouting mechanism in tunnels based on time-dependent behaviors of grout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙锋; 张顶立; 陈铁林

    2011-01-01

    水泥复合浆液流变参数的时变性对注浆扩散范围计算值影响很大.基于宾汉体流变方程和平板裂缝理想平面流模型,推导了考虑流体时变性的土体劈裂注浆扩散半径计算公式.由公式可知,土体劈裂压力、裂隙宽度、浆液流速、流变参数的时变性是影响扩散半径的重要因素.计算分析了劈裂注浆过程中劈裂压力随缝隙宽度的变化以及流变参数对扩散半径的影响规律.结果表明,忽略流体时变性注浆扩散半径计算值明显偏大,会给注浆工程设计带来隐患.结合厦门机场路隧道全风化花岗岩地层注浆试验,发现水泥复合浆液劈裂注浆加固效果良好,扩散半径理论计算值基本符合工程实际;研究成果对风化花岗岩地层劈裂注浆的设计和施工具有一定的指导意义.%The theological parameters of cement-based grout is time-dependent, which has an important influence on building grout diffusion model.Based on the assumption of Bingham fluid and narrow plate model of grouting diffusion, a formula for calculating the diffusion radius in soil is developed considering the time-varying behaviors of grout.It shows that the grouting diffusion radius of Bingham fluid is related to the grouting pressure difference, gap width, flow velocity and time-dependent behaviors of theological parameters.The law of fracture pressure of grouting is affected by the gap width notably, and the theological parameters of grout play a key role in computing the diffusion radius.So it is unreasonable to neglect the time-dependent behaviors of grout in computing the diffusion radius.Based on the grouting tests on strong-weathered granite tunnel in Xiamen Airport, the application of the formula of grouting diffusion has proved to be successful in practice.Furthermore, some available results are gained, beneficial to the design and construction of fracture grouting in strong-weathered granite.

  9. Effectiveness of grouting experiments of anti-seepage curtain in reservoir area of Zhongliang No.1 Hydropower Station%中梁一级电站库区防渗帷幕灌浆试验效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭第; 王伟

    2011-01-01

    中梁一级电站库区工程地质条件复杂,为获取符合工程地质条件的灌浆工艺和灌浆技术措施,选择代表性试验区进行帷幕灌浆试验.灌浆试验段布设双排帷幕灌浆孔,分3序钻灌,采用孔口封闭、自上而下分段灌浆方法;采用C20混凝土回灌溶洞,水泥砂浆充填较大裂隙;选用水泥-水玻璃浆液、水泥-粉煤灰浆液与水泥-氯化钙浆液处理泥砂碎石层.压水试验检测结果表明,地层经灌浆处理后渗透性能得到很大改善,但检查孔有5段透水率超过设计要求,试验成果未达到预定目标,灌浆试验孔孔排距很难保证把所有的渗漏通道全部堵住.建议在吃浆量大的地方和地层破碎带进行加密灌浆处理.通过试验证实灌浆工艺可行,试验区采用混凝土回填溶洞和水泥-水玻璃浆液灌注泥砂碎石层效果较好,水玻璃添加量以质量分数3%为宜.%Based on the complex engineering geological conditions in the reservoir area of Zhongliang No. 1 Hydropower Station, representative experimental area was selected for curtain grouting experiment in order to get suitable grouting technology and measures. Double-row curtain grouting holes were set up in the experimental segment and drilled by means of three steps by employing the segmental grouting method of closing the holes and grouting from top to bottom. Meanwhile, C20 concrete was employed to backfill the cavity, and cement mortar was adopted to fill larger fissures. The mud-sand fractured-rock layer was treated by use of cement-silicate grout, cement-fly ash grout and cement-calcium chloride grout. Through checking the water pressure tests, the permeability of the soil stratum was greatly improved after grouting treatment. However, the permeability of five segments exceeded the design requirements, which was concentrated in one segment. The experimental results did not reach the expected goal. The distance between rows of grouting experimental

  10. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out to investigate acoustic emission as a monitor of corrosion and degradation of wasteforms where the waste is potentially reactive metal. Electronic monitoring equipment has been designed, built and tested to allow long-term monitoring of a number of waste packages simultaneously. Acoustic monitoring experiments were made on a range of 1 litre cemented Magnox and aluminium samples cast into canisters comparing the acoustic events with hydrogen gas evolution rates and electrochemical corrosion rates. The attenuation of the acoustic signals by the cement grout under a range of conditions has been studied to determine the volume of wasteform that can be satisfactorily monitored by one transducer. The final phase of the programme monitored the acoustic events from full size (200 litre) cemented, inactive, simulated aluminium swarf wastepackages prepared at the AEA waste cementation plant at Winfrith. (Author)

  11. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  12. Review of results from SKB R and D on grouting technology for sealing the rock, years 1996-2000; Oeversikt av resuItat fraan SKB:s FoU inom injekteringsteknik foer bergtaetning aaren 1996-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, A. (ed.) [Swedpower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Eklund, D. [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Eriksson, Magnus [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. Soil and Rock Mechanics; Fransson, Aasa [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Inst. of Geology; Hansson, Paer [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Lagerblad, B. [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Lindblom, U. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Geotechnical Engineering; Wilen, P. [Swedpower AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    In order identify the current state of the art and developments needs, SKB assembled a group of experts from universities and other research organisations. Internal plans were written for the subprojects 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', 'Mechanisms that control the spreading of grout in jointed rock' and 'Cement based grouting material'. Later internal plans for the subprojects 'Demands on grouting' and 'Stabilising and sealing effect of pre-grouting' were written. The aims, which were set for the different subprojects, were in short, to summarise the technological advances, establish a method for rock characterisation from a grouting point of view, develop conceptual and numerical models for simulation of the grouting course, characterise grout in a relevant way, develop understanding and theoretical know-how of durability and chemical influence, identify and develop a number of grouting materials for different situations, develop a specification of requirements for grouting and to verify the theories in laboratory. In the subproject 'Demands on grouting' a literature review was carried out. One important conclusion from the study is that the concept is not very well dealt with in the literature. SKB are currently investigating the prerequisites for the construction of the deep repository. One part of that work is to further specify demands on maximum allowed volume of leakage water for the repository as a whole and also for each part of the deep repository. In the subproject 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', the possibilities of using hydraulic tests for predictions and design have been studied. The idea of this study was to investigate correspondences and deviations to increase the understanding of what is measured in a water-loss measurement. One can draw the conclusion that hydraulic tests are useful when describing the fracture geometry. Numerical modelling

  13. On the Micro Fracture Rock Grouting Water Plugging Material%浅谈微裂隙岩体注浆堵水材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶泽源; 王源

    2014-01-01

    The grouting material is an important link of water engineering, especially plays a decisive role in the rock fractured zone grouting engineering. This paper mainly introduces the performance characteristics of two grouting materials commonly used in water shutoff at home and abroad:urea formaldehyde resin slurry fine cement grout and chemical grout.%注浆材料主要是注浆堵水工程中一个重要的环节,尤其是在岩体裂隙发育带注浆堵水工程中起到了决定性的作用。本文主要说明了目前国内外常用的注浆材料成分,介绍了两种微裂隙注浆堵水中常用到的注浆材料:超细水泥浆液和化学浆液中的脲醛树脂浆液的性能特点。

  14. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  15. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  16. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  17. Study on the characteristics of grout permeation based on cylindrical diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen-gang LI; Wen ZHAO; Yun-sheng HUANG; Yun-xia LEI; Long-mei YU

    2013-01-01

    Permeation grouting is widely applied for its low grouting pressure and minor disturbance to the stratum in grouting engineering,especially in engineering with strict requirements on ground settlement.However,permeation grouting theory lags behind compared with other engineering disciplines,and the theoretical formulas now available cannot accurately be used to guide grouting engineering design and predict the cost and effects of grouting due to many factors affecting grout permeation in stratum.In this study,permeation grouting experiment devices were independently manufactured with the characteristics of easily controlling grouting pressure,simulating sandy strata grout,and detecting grouting effect.Using a uniform design,the sand consolidation agent,as grouting material,its spread in Shenyang sandy strata was tested with these experiment devices.The quantitative relations between grouting factors (grouting pressure,strata parameters,water-sand consolidation agent ratio)and grouting effects (grout spread radius,gell strength,grout amount) are obtained with regression analysis,and the influence degree of grouting factors on grouting effects is studied.

  18. Prediction of ground surface displacement caused by grouting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭风琪; 刘晓潭; 童无期; 单智

    2015-01-01

    Ground surface displacement caused by grouting was calculated with stochastic medium theory. Ground surface displacement was assumed to be caused by the cavity expansion of grouting, slurry seepage, and slurry contraction. A prediction method of ground surface displacement was developed. The reliability of the presented method was validated through a comparison between theoretical results and results from engineering practice. Results show that the present method is effective. The effect of parameters on uplift displacement was illustrated under different grouting conditions. Through analysis, it can be known that the ground surface uplift is mainly caused by osmosis of slurry and the primary influence angle of stratum βdetermines the influence range of surface uplift. Besides, the results show that ground surface uplift displacement decreases notably with increasing depth of the grouting cavity but it increases with increasing diffusion radius of grout and increasing grouting pressure.

  19. Grouted jetted precast concrete sheet piles: Method, experiments, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, GH; Yue, ZQ; Liu, DF; He, FR

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces an innovative technology - grouted jetted precast concrete piling - that increases the efficiency of piling operations in coastal regions. The technology includes the following steps: (i) casting concrete piles factory-designed especially for jetting and grouting; (ii) jetting to drive the concrete piles with a crane on a floating ship or platform into soil; and (iii) grouting to enhance the sheet pile connections and to increase the pile bearing capacity. This technolog...

  20. Modelling of Jet Grouting and its interactions with surrounding soils

    OpenAIRE

    Gesto Beiroa, José Manuel; Gens Solé, Antonio; Arroyo Alvarez de Toledo, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    The versatility of Jet-Grouting as a soil improvement technique has made this procedure to be widely used in geotechnical engineering practice. In this work we discuss some aspects related to the THMC coupling phenomena that may arise when the Jet-Grouting technique is employed. Namely, we describe some basic constitutive models that may be appropriate to simulate the response of the surrounding soils and that of the Jet-Grouted soil itself while those interactions take place.

  1. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to grout and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT ampersand E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT ampersand E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the

  2. Rock mass response during high pressure grouting

    OpenAIRE

    Gothäll, Rikard

    2006-01-01

    The sealing of hard jointed rock by grouting involves several complicated mechanical systems. The result is a complex coupled system of hydro- logical and mechanical precesses. In order to determine the higher order effects of the resulting system the fracture deformations must be assessed. This requires a model that mimics the mechanical behaviour of not only fractures under normal load but also the entire rock mass system. This model indicates that there are two dominant regimes involved; a...

  3. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tong-Chun

    2004-08-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerization reaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reaction kinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time of calcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and an example is provided to verify the proposed formula. PMID:15236477

  4. PENGENALAN STABILISASI TANAH DENGAN JET GROUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrastono Dwi Atmanto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to restriction of land availability it is frequently we have to build constructions on soft or low bearingcapacity soils, so that soil stabilization must be applied in order to increase its properties. There are manytechniques of soil stabilization, where its applicability depends on many factors regarding appropriateengineering judgement. This paper presents the soil stabilization method by jet grouting, including its theory andpractice.

  5. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩同春

    2004-01-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerization reaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reaction kinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time of calcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and an example is provided to verify the proposed formula.

  6. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩同春

    2004-01-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerizationreaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reactionkinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time ofcalcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and anexample is provided to verify the proposed formula.

  7. Pressured Grouting Method (PGM) in Pile Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴兴序; 于志强; 王旭

    2002-01-01

    Application of pressured grouting method (PGM) in pile engineering can tackle problems encountered during construction of bored piles. Bearing capacity of piles can be increased through compaction of subsoils around piles. This paper reports research efforts of this technique by the pile research team in Southwest Jiaotong University in last decade with respect to the construction process, test findings, and primary research conclusions. The social-economical benefits of this method and application market in pile engineering are also analyzed.

  8. Investigation on geochemical influence of grout material on groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducted a contract study with Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) called 'The project for Grouting Technology Development' since 2008. As a part of the study, the monitoring of groundwater chemistry in a pre-grouted area has been carried out for three and half years after pre-grouting in Mizunami URL. The results suggested that the chemical compositions in groundwater affected by pre-grouting were recovered and the period to recover is evaluated about two years around an underground opening. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the Performance of Grouting Materials for Saturated Riprap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four types of grout were developed to evaluate the effect of grouting of saturated riprap layers on ground water flow. The developed types of grout are divided into a quick-setting type and a general-type, and also into high and low viscosities. A number of grout tests were performed in a model acrylic chamber, 0.4 m in diameter and 2.0 m in length, for visual observation of injection. To reproduce the field flow condition of the saturated riprap layers (approach flow, the grout tests were carried out at 0 cm/s and 100 cm/s for the flow speed and 10 L/min for the grout injection speed after installing a flow injection opening on the lower part of the chamber. Based on the results of the grout tests, the injection of each grout in the saturated riprap layers was examined to find out the most effective grout.

  10. Evaluation of the Performance of Grouting Materials for Saturated Riprap

    OpenAIRE

    Daehyeon Kim; Sinkyu Jung; Kyungsub Cha

    2013-01-01

    In this study, four types of grout were developed to evaluate the effect of grouting of saturated riprap layers on ground water flow. The developed types of grout are divided into a quick-setting type and a general-type, and also into high and low viscosities. A number of grout tests were performed in a model acrylic chamber, 0.4 m in diameter and 2.0 m in length, for visual observation of injection. To reproduce the field flow condition of the saturated riprap layers (approach flow), the gro...

  11. Fly ash grouts for remediation of acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering investigation into the use of electric utility wastes for grouting acidic mine spoil resulting from coal extraction has been undertaken. Laboratory investigations into the physical and chemical properties of various grout mixtures and grouted spoil materials are underway. Grout mixtures are placed in columns and permeated with distilled water. The hydraulic conductivity of the grout was measured. The effect of the high alkaline ashes on the acidic drainage is of particular interest. This series of experiments provided information so that the most favorable grout (low hydraulic conductivity and high alkalinity) could be selected for injection into acidic spoil material. Both standard combustion and fluidized bed ashes were tested. Grout mixtures include ashes, scrubber sludge, lime, bentonite and/or kaolinite. Permeabilities of the mixtures averaged approximately 1.OE-4 cm/sec. A second series of laboratory experiments consists of grouting large diameter drums of acidic spoil with the fly ash grouts. The drums have been constructed and filled with acidic spoil material. The ungrouted infiltration rates have been determined and the resulting effluents chemically analyzed

  12. Grout performance in support of in situ grouting of the TH4 tank sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R.D.; Kauschinger, J.L.; Spence, R.D.

    1999-04-01

    The cold demonstration test proved that less water was required to pump the in situ grout formulation than had been previously tested in the laboratory. The previous in situ grout formulation was restandardized with the same relative amounts of dry blend ingredients, albeit adding a fluidized admixture, but specifying less water for the slurry mix that must by pumped through the nozzles at high pressure. Also, the target GAAT tank for demonstrating this is situ grouting technique has been shifted to Tank TH4. A chemical surrogate sludge for TH4 was developed and tested in the laboratory, meeting expectations for leach resistance and strenght at 35 wt % sludge loading. It addition, a sample of hot TH4 sludge was also tested at 35 wt % sludge loading and proved to have superior strength and leach resistance compared with the surrogate test.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION HANFORD GROUT LYSIMETER FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, G. A.

    1984-06-01

    The Hanford Grout Lysimeter Facility (HGLF) will be constructed to test the leaching and migration of radioactive and nonradioactive tracers embedded in a solidification agent (grout) under actual burial conditions in Hanford soil. Three different water treatment rates will be used: natural precipitation, 4 times and 8 times natural precipitation. Six lysimeters will be assembled. Each unit will measure 6 feet in diameter, 25 feet deep. Their construction and instrumentation will be performed during June-July, 1984 by J. A. Jones Construction Company and/or their subcontractor. The routine monitoring will be performed by Battelle staff over a 5.5 year period beginning in November 1984. The total estimated project cost will be approximately $200,000. The only anticipated environmental impact from this project will be a temporary nuisance-type local dust problem during the construction phase. This will not be a detriment to the environment. The results of dose calculations indicate that dose rates from the grouted waste cans will be quite low when the cans are covered by a meter or more of earth. Dose rates at or near the surface of the individual cans are not high enough to preclude their handling. The facility area will be fenced, posted as a radiation zone and operated under a radiation work procedure.

  14. Bone cement/layered double hydroxide nanocomposites as potential biomaterials for joint implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusetti, Govinda; Misra, Nira; Singh, Vakil; Kushwaha, R K; Maiti, Pralay

    2012-12-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate)-based bone cement and layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanocomposites have been used as a grouting material for total joint arthroplasty. Few weight percentage of nanoLDH was uniformly dispersed in the bone cement matrix to have adequate interaction with matrix polymer. Mechanical strength, stiffness, toughness, and fatigue resistance of the nanocomposites are found to be higher than that of pure bone cement. Nanocomposites are thermally stable as compared to pristine bone cement. Direct mixing of the nanoLDH without any organic solvent makes these nanocomposites biocompatible. Biocompatibility was evaluated and compared with that of commercial bone cement by measuring hydrophilic nature, hemolysis assay, thrombosis assay, and deposition of apatite in simulated body fluid immersion. Finally, the viability of human osteoblast cells on the above developed nanocomposites was testified for actual biocompatibility. The experiment showed better cell growth in nanocomposites as compared to pure bone cement. Thus, these nanocomposites are found to be better grouting material than bone cement. PMID:22733710

  15. Immobilisation of shredded waste in a cement matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work covered in the period of this report was aimed at proving the infilling capabilities of waste packages containing shredded paper and plastic simulant waste material held in a basket. The programme required the production of 200 and 500 litre packages and a demonstration that infilling could be attained to give a minimum of voidage in the completed cemented product. The procurement, testing and fitting of level detectors was an important part of this work to demonstrate a means of controlling the process to prevent overfilling of the packages. Evaluation of full-scale cemented products was required to confirm previously reported properties of density and homogeneity in packages produced by the reference encapsulation process and to demonstrate package integrity under sea-disposal conditions. A standard feedstock for the continuity of a long-term programme was required. Such a product, based on an analysis of arisings from plutonium gloveboxes, was produced in bulk and characterised. The previously observed movement of waste during infilling, due to its low density compared with that of the infill grout, required further assessment. During the period, 200, 400 and 500 litre drums required for future active infilling trials were modified and despatched to AERE Harwell for waste loading. These drums were fitted with level detectors and with grout spreader troughs which had been identified during the development programme. A prototype automated Grout Infill Test Rig designed by BNF plc was delivered to Winfrith towards the end of the period for practical assessment trials. (author)

  16. PHYSICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF LABORATORY PREPARED SALTSTONE GROUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.; Cozzi, A.; Edwards, T.

    2014-05-05

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) built two new Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU), SDU 3 and SDU 5, in 2013. The variable frequency drive (VFD) for the grout transfer hose pump tripped due to high current demand by the motor during the initial radioactive saltstone transfer to SDU 5B on 12/5/2013. This was not observed during clean cap processing on July 5, 2013 to SDU 3A, which is a slightly longer distance from the SPF than is SDU 5B. Saltstone Design Authority (SDA) is evaluating the grout pump performance and capabilities to transfer the grout processed in SPF to SDU 3/5. To assist in this evaluation, grout physical properties are required. At this time, there are no rheological data from the actual SPF so the properties of laboratory prepared samples using simulated salt solution or Tank 50 salt solution will be measured. The physical properties of grout prepared in the laboratory with de-ionized water (DI) and salt solutions were obtained at 0.60 and 0.59 water to premix (W/P) ratios, respectively. The yield stress of the DI grout was greater than any salt grout. The plastic viscosity of the DI grout was lower than all of the salt grouts (including salt grout with admixture). When these physical data were used to determine the pressure drop and fluid horsepower for steady state conditions, the salt grouts without admixture addition required a higher pressure drop and higher fluid horsepower to transport. When 0.00076 g Daratard 17/g premix was added, both the pressure drop and fluid horsepower were below that of the DI grout. Higher concentrations of Daratard 17 further reduced the pressure drop and fluid horsepower. The uncertainty in the single point Bingham Plastic parameters is + 4% of the reported values and is the bounding uncertainty. Two different mechanical agitator mixing protocols were followed for the simulant salt grout, one having a total mixing time of three minutes and the other having a time of 10 minutes. The Bingham Plastic parameters

  17. Evaluation of two new grouts for constructing subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of laboratory and field tests to evaluate two new grout materials for creating low-permeability barriers in unconsolidated soils. The grout materials of interest are a particulate grout developed in Germany, consisting of a naturally occurring wax (montan wax), water, and bentonite, and a glyoxal-modified sodium silicate chemical grout developed in France. The test program assesses the suitability of the grout for creating subsurface containment barriers in contaminated soils over a range of soil and contaminant conditions. Laboratory activities are described that evaluated permeability reductions achieved by grout placement within a range of soil types and assessed the compatibility of the grouts with a variety of waste forms. A series of single-borehole injection tests are described that were conducted at the Mixed Waste Landfill Integration Demonstration site at Sandia National Laboratories to evaluate the grout performance and permeation distances under field-scale conditions. Injection and monitoring methods are described, and the results of the single-borehole tests are reviewed

  18. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Guy G.; Weidner, Jerry R.; Farnsworth, Richard K.; Gardner, Bradley M.; Jessmore, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

  19. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste

  20. Silicate grout curtains behaviour for the protection of coastal aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elektorowicz, M.; Chifrina, R.; Hesnawi, R. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour of silicate grout with different reagents (ethylacetate - formamide SA and calcium chloride SC) in pure silica sand and natural soils from coastal areas containing organic matter, clayey soil and silica sand. The grouted specimens were tested with simulated fresh and salt water. The setting process during chemical grouting in the soil and sand was studied. The grouting of soil and sand with SA caused a transfer to the environment of some compounds: sodium formate, sodium acetate, ammonia and part of the initial ethylacetate and formamide. This process had a tendency to decrease for approximately 4 months. The stability of specimens was low. The grouting of soil and sand with SC caused no significant contamination of the environment. The increase of pH of environmental water was even less than with SA grouting. Also, the stability of specimens is higher in comparison with SA grouting. Salt water protected the specimens grouted with SA and SC from destruction and prevented contamination.

  1. Fatigue Life of High Performance Grout for Wind Turbine Grouted Connection in Wet or Dry Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.; Westhof, Luc; Yde, Elo;

    at varying levels of cyclic frequency and load. The fatigue tests were performed in two series: one with the specimens in air and one with the specimens submerged in water during the test. The fatigue life of the grout, in terms of the number of cycles to failure, was found to be significantly shorter when...

  2. Expansion control for cementation of incinerated ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose of radioactive incinerated ash waste. A small amount of metallic Al, which was not oxidized in the incineration, existed in the ash. When such ash was mixed with a cement material and water, alkaline components in the ash and the cement were dissolved in the mixing water and then metallic Al reaction with the alkaline compounds resulted in generation of H2. Because the H2 generation began immediately just after the mixing, H2 bubbles pushed up the mixed grout material and an expanded solidified form was obtained. The expansion leads to lowering the strength of the solidified form and making harmful void. In this study, we tried to control H2 generation from the reaction of metallic Al in the cementation by means of following two methods, one was a method to let metallic Al react prior to the cementation and the other was a method to add an expansion inhibitor that made an oxide film on the surface of metallic Al. In the pre-treatment, the ash was soaked in water in order to let metallic Al react with it, and then the ash with the immersion solution was dried at 105 Celsius degrees. The pre-treated ash was mixed with an ordinary portland cement and water. The inhibitor of lithium nitrite, sodium nitrite, phosphoric acid, or potassium dihydrogen phosphate was added at the mixing process. The solidified forms prepared using the pre-treated ash and lithium nitrite were not expanded. Phosphoric acid and sodium nitrite were effective for expansion control, but potassium dihydrogen phosphate did not work. (authors)

  3. Experimental study on the mechanism of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure safety and efficiency of construction and operation of repositories, rock fractures need to be grouted where they intersect the facility. Cement-based grouting materials that have been used extensively in the past may, however, react with the groundwater and produce hyperalkaline leachate. A possible solution for this issue is use of alternative material. Ethanol/Bentonite Slurry Grouting is another approach to minimize the long-term permeability of rock fractures. The slurry has high fluidity for the case of the ethanol concentration in the liquid phase being 60%. The viscosity of the slurry with bentonite content of 0.4 Mg/m'3 was measured for conditions of the shear rate ranging from 0.1 to 1000 1/s. The viscosity of the slurry changed dramatically between the ethanol concentrations of 60 to 40%, behaving as a non-Newtonian fluid. In order to investigate when the ethanol content of the slurry becomes low enough to achieve sufficient viscosity in rock fractures, an Ethanol Diffusion Test with experimental openings was carried out in the laboratory. Extrapolation of the measured minimum time for the filled slurry to reach the desirable low concentration of ethanol lead to the estimated minimum time ranging from 0.1 hours to 0.7 hours for a 0.2 mm aperture. These facts suggest that the injected slurry flows through the openings of fractures during the early period of injection and, later, as its ethanol content decreases, slurrys viscosity increases sufficiently so that the openings can be blocked. (author)

  4. Approval condition in application of bentonite grouting to the radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to understand the flow properties and the permeability of bentonite grout added NaCl by the laboratory tests, and to clarify the approval condition of bentonite as materials. The viscosity of the bentonite suspension was measured under the weight ratio of water and bentonite (W/B) is 6 to 20. The suspension of which W/B is smaller than 10 is difficult to inject into the rock joints, because the viscosity is higher than the thickest cement milk on dam grouting. When the necessary permeability of the clay grout is assumed to be 10-7 (cm/sec), the W/B becomes 10 or less. Then, when we add NaCl to the suspension of which W/B is 6, the viscosity decreases as the amount of NaCl increases. The injectable viscosity is achieved by adding NaCl as the proportion of water to NaCl is 1 to 40. Next, the permeability of the bentonite suspension that added NaCl was examined by the falling head permeability test. It was found that the initial permeability 10-6 (cm/sec) decreased to 10-8∼10-9 (cm/sec) by the test of the sample of 'B:W:NaCl=20:20:1' for 10 days. From these results, the suspension to inject into the rock joints can be made by adding NaCl. And it was clarified that the groundwater permeation to the suspension causes the decrease of the permeability. In addition, the bentonite is swelling according to the infiltration of underground water, the persistence in the suppression effect of diffusion and stability to erosion can be expected. (author)

  5. Low-pH injection grout for deep repositories. Summary report from a co-operation project between NUMO (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of standard cementitious material creates pulses of pH in the magnitude of 12-13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental and also unnecessarily complicates the safety analysis of the repository. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis. Also, according to current understanding, the use of low-pH cement (pH = 11) will not disturb the functioning of the bentonite, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. A result of the project is that there are both low-pH cementitious material for grouting larger fractures (= 100 μm) and non-cementitious material for grouting smaller fractures (< 100 μm) that will, after further optimisation work, be recommended for grouting of deep repositories. This project concentrated on the technical development of properties for the low pH grouts. Long-term safety and environmental aspects and durability of materials were preliminarily considered. Continued evaluations have to be carried out. Five systems, e.g. material combinations, were studied in the project: 1. Ordinary Portland Cement + Silica Fume. 'OPC+SF' denotes a binder system that is based mainly on OPC+SF. SF was used in a few commercial forms. The OPC used in this system was mainly UF16 and in some cases Rheocem 900 or white cement. 2. Blast furnace slag. 'Slag' denotes an OPC activated slag based system. Alkali and water glass activation were not examined, because of long-term safety reasons. OPC used in this system was rapid hardening Portland cement. 3. Super sulphate cement. 'SSC' is a slag-based system activated with gypsum and OPC. The OPC used was rapid hardening Portland cement and the gypsum was a very fine grained slurry product. 4. Low-Alkali Cement 'LAC' was introduced to the project by NUMO as a product, ground to fixed fineness by the producer. Neither the mineral composition nor fineness, were modified in the present

  6. Low-pH injection grout for deep repositories. Summary report from a co-operation project between NUMO (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Anders [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sievaenen, Ursula [JP-Suoraplan Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-06-01

    The use of standard cementitious material creates pulses of pH in the magnitude of 12-13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental and also unnecessarily complicates the safety analysis of the repository. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis. Also, according to current understanding, the use of low-pH cement (pH = 11) will not disturb the functioning of the bentonite, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. A result of the project is that there are both low-pH cementitious material for grouting larger fractures (= 100 {mu}m) and non-cementitious material for grouting smaller fractures (< 100 {mu}m) that will, after further optimisation work, be recommended for grouting of deep repositories. This project concentrated on the technical development of properties for the low pH grouts. Long-term safety and environmental aspects and durability of materials were preliminarily considered. Continued evaluations have to be carried out. Five systems, e.g. material combinations, were studied in the project: 1. Ordinary Portland Cement + Silica Fume. 'OPC+SF' denotes a binder system that is based mainly on OPC+SF. SF was used in a few commercial forms. The OPC used in this system was mainly UF16 and in some cases Rheocem 900 or white cement. 2. Blast furnace slag. 'Slag' denotes an OPC activated slag based system. Alkali and water glass activation were not examined, because of long-term safety reasons. OPC used in this system was rapid hardening Portland cement. 3. Super sulphate cement. 'SSC' is a slag-based system activated with gypsum and OPC. The OPC used was rapid hardening Portland cement and the gypsum was a very fine grained slurry product. 4. Low-Alkali Cement 'LAC' was introduced to the project by NUMO as a product, ground to fixed fineness by the producer. Neither the mineral composition nor

  7. Removal of Pb2+ and Cd2+ by adsorption on clay-solidified grouting curtain for waste landfills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-gui; ZHANG Ke-neng; ZOU Yin-sheng; DENG Fei-yue

    2006-01-01

    Pb2+ and Cd2+ in leachate were adsorbed on clay-solidified grouting curtain for waste landfills with equilibrium experiment. The cation exchange capacity was determined with ammonium acetate. And the concentration of heavy metal cations in leachate was determined with atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Their equilibrium isotherms were measured, and the experimental isotherm data were analyzed by using Freundlich and Langmuir models. The results show that the adsorption capacities of the heavy metal cations are closely related to the compositions of clay-solidified grouting curtain, and the maximum adsorption appears at the ratio of cement to clay of 2: 4 in the experimental conditions. At their maximum adsorption and pH 5.0, the adsorption capacities of Pb2+ and Cd2+ are 16.19 mg/g and 1.21 mg/g. The competitive adsorption coefficients indicate that the adsorption of clay-solidified grouting curtain for Pb2+ is stronger than that for Cd2+. The adsorption process conforms to Freundlich's model with related coefficient higher than 0. 996.

  8. Relationship Between Flowability And Tank Closure Grout Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Hay, M. S.

    2012-10-08

    After completion of waste removal and chemical cleaning operations, Tanks 5-F and 6-F await final closure. The project will proceed with completing operational closure by stabilizing the tanks with grout. Savannah River Remediation's (SRR) experience with grouting Tanks 18-F and 19-F showed that slump-flow values were correlated with flow/spread inside these tanks. Less mounding was observed when using grouts with higher slump-flow. Therefore, SRNL was requested to evaluate the relationship between flowability and cured properties to determine whether the slump-flow maximum spread of Mix LP#8-16 could be increased from 28 inches to 30 inches without impacting the grout quality. A request was also made to evaluate increasing the drop height from 5 feet to 10 feet with the objective of enhancing the flow inside the tank by imparting more kinetic energy to the placement. Based on a review of the grout property data for Mix LP#8-16 collected from Tank 18-F and 19-F quality control samples, the upper limit for slump-flow measured per ASTM C 1611 can be increased from 28 to 30 inches without affecting grout quality. However, testing should be performed prior to increasing the drop height from 5 to 10 feet or observations should be made during initial filling operations to determine whether segregation occurs as a function of drop heights between 5 and 10 feet. Segregation will negatively impact grout quality. Additionally, increasing the delivery rate of grout into Tanks 5-F and 6-F by using a higher capacity concrete/grout pump will result in better grout spread/flow inside the tanks.

  9. Relationship Between Flowability And Tank Closure Grout Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After completion of waste removal and chemical cleaning operations, Tanks 5-F and 6-F await final closure. The project will proceed with completing operational closure by stabilizing the tanks with grout. Savannah River Remediation's (SRR) experience with grouting Tanks 18-F and 19-F showed that slump-flow values were correlated with flow/spread inside these tanks. Less mounding was observed when using grouts with higher slump-flow. Therefore, SRNL was requested to evaluate the relationship between flowability and cured properties to determine whether the slump-flow maximum spread of Mix LP no. 8-16 could be increased from 28 inches to 30 inches without impacting the grout quality. A request was also made to evaluate increasing the drop height from 5 feet to 10 feet with the objective of enhancing the flow inside the tank by imparting more kinetic energy to the placement. Based on a review of the grout property data for Mix LP no. 8-16 collected from Tank 18-F and 19-F quality control samples, the upper limit for slump-flow measured per ASTM C 1611 can be increased from 28 to 30 inches without affecting grout quality. However, testing should be performed prior to increasing the drop height from 5 to 10 feet or observations should be made during initial filling operations to determine whether segregation occurs as a function of drop heights between 5 and 10 feet. Segregation will negatively impact grout quality. Additionally, increasing the delivery rate of grout into Tanks 5-F and 6-F by using a higher capacity concrete/grout pump will result in better grout spread/flow inside the tanks

  10. Non-linear degradation model of cement barriers in a borehole repository for disused radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharbieh, Heidar K., E-mail: heidar.gharbieh@tu-clausthal.de [Institute of Disposal Research, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Cota, Stela, E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Narrow diameter borehole facilities (a few tens of centimeters), like the BOSS concept developed by the IAEA, provide a safe and cost effective disposal option for radioactive waste and particularly disused sources. The BOSS concept (borehole disposal of sealed radioactive sources) comprises a multi-barrier system of cement grout and stainless steel components. In order to predict the long-time performance of the cement barriers as an input of a future safety assessment under the specific hydrochemical and hydrological conditions, a non-linear degradation model was developed in this work. With the assistance of the program 'PHREEQC' it describes the change of the porosity and the hydraulic conductivity with time, which also let to conclusions concerning the change of the sorption capacity of the cement grout. This work includes the theoretical approach and illustrates the non-liner degradation by means of an exemplary water composition found in the saturated zone and the dimensions of the backfill made of cement grout representing a barrier of the BOSS borehole facility. (author)

  11. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  12. MODELING ANALYSIS FOR GROUT HOPPER WASTE TANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2012-01-04

    The Saltstone facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout nuclear waste slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The primary objective of the work was to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns were estimated by a Lagrangian integration technique along

  13. Control of structurization processes in wood-cement systems at fixed pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotina, Natalia; Gorlenko, Nikolay; Sarkisov, Yuriy; Naumova, Ludmila; Minakova, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a study of structurization processes in the wood-cement systemmixed with the buffer solutions and the improvement of service properties of products produced therefrom. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray phase analysis, and pH measurements show that structurization processes in wood-cement systems depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, the behavior of hydration, neutralization, and polycondensation reactions with the formation of polymer products including those with cement grout components and functional groups of wood. It is shown that phosphate buffer solutions used for mixing wood-cement compositions improve their strength properties and reduce water absorption. The optimum acidity of the buffered medium for service properties of the wood-cement systemis pH = 4.8.

  14. Environmental assessment for the grouting and near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive phosphate/sulfate wastes from N Reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Environmental Assessment (EA) on the grouting and near-surface disposal of phosphate/sulfate wastes from N-Reactor operations at the Hanford Site has been prepared. The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required. The proposed action is to solidify the two-component, liquid low-level radioactive wastes generated during N-Reactor operations by mixing the waste with cementitious dry materials (cement, flyash, and clays) to form a grout slurry. The grout slurry would be pumped to preconstructed, covered vaults located at a near-surface disposal site in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The grout slurry would solidify into monoliths in the vaults, and, subsequent to solidification, the vaults would be covered with 5 meters of soil. The vault disposal will be designed to meet all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. Construction is projected to begin in fiscal year 1987, and operations are scheduled to begin in FY 1988

  15. Clay-based grout injection in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the sealing of an underground disposal facilities for the high-level radioactive waste, a concept of the clay grouting in the sealing of the underground facilities applied to the hard rock is summarized, based on the results of clay grouting experiments Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has performed. JNC performed the clay grouting experiments in-situ of the hard rock. In the experiments, clay grout slurry was injected to the fractures on the floor of the test tunnel and to the excavated damage zone around the key cut off the excavated damage zone along the tunnel. Through the results of these experiments, the injected grout slurry to the target excavated damage zone area improved the hydraulic conductivity of the target area using the injection boreholes opened from the wall of the tunnel. Regarding the adequate design of the clay grouting in the hard rock, information of the fracture characterization (scale and distribution), distribution of the excavated damage zone (hydraulic characteristics), selection of the clay material, injection technique, target area of the injection of the grout (position and region) and so on is required. (author)

  16. Effects of Ground Conditions on Microbial Cementation in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of ground conditions on microbial cementation in cohesionless soils. Since the method of microbial cementation is still at the experimental stage, for its practical use in the field, a number of laboratory experiments are required for the quantification of microbial cementation under various ground conditions, such as relative densities, relative compactions and particle size distributions. In this study, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of microbial cementation in treated sands and silts, an experiment was performed for different relative densities of silica sands, for different relative compactions of silts and for different particle size distributions of weathered soils sampled from the field. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and mapping analyses were implemented for the quantification of the levels of microbial cementations for sand, silt and weathered soil specimens. Based on the test results, a considerable microbial cementation was estimated depending on the soil conditions; therefore, an implementation of this new type of bio-grouting on a weak foundation may be possible to increase the strength and stiffness of weak ground.

  17. R20 programme: Development of rock grouting design, techniques and procedures for ONKALO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posiva Oy constructs an underground research facility ONKALO at Olkiluoto in Eurajoki. ONKALO is planned to be a part of the deep repository for the high level nuclear waste. Posiva Oy set up R20-programme for the years 2006-2008, with the target of having an acceptable grouting methodology in ONKALO. The programme was divided into three projects and the work and results of Technique-project is presented in this report. The implementation of the results (grouting design and execution) was outlined from the project. That work is under the responsibility of construction of the ONKALO-project. The Grouting Technique -project (INKE) studied the grouting experiences obtained from the first 2 km of the ONKALO access tunnel, searched for suitable grouting design approaches, carried out two grouting tests and one pilot grouting test with colloidal silica in ONKALO, analysed the expected grouting conditions in deep rock from the grouting point of view, studied the feasibility of so called optimal design solution in the expected grouting conditions. Based on these studies recommendations concerning the grouting design, design solutions for different rock conditions, grouting procedures, grouting stop criteria, the characterisation methods for grouting purposes, grouting materials and grouting work performance are presented. Swedish Time Stop Grouting, also named Grouting Time-Method was selected to be studied and used in this project and it was further developed. This work compiles the outcome of the project subtasks and presents the recommendations for developing the grouting in ONKALO. The key conclusion of this work are: (1) Grouting Time-method (time stop grouting) alone is not enough to be used as a grouting stop criterion due to the uncertainties related to the source parameters (fracture characteristics, rheological properties of grouts); these cause too high uncertainties when proving the sealing result via the grouting time, (2) due to the uncertainties related to

  18. Predictive permeability model of extensional faults in crystalline and metamorphic rocks; verification by pre-grouting in two sub-sea tunnels, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganerød, Guri Venvik; Braathen, Alvar; Willemoes-Wissing, Bjørn

    2008-08-01

    This paper link quantitative fault zone descriptions, qualitative fracture and fault rock properties, and engineering data in the study of the permeability structure of fault zones. Datasets include scan-lines, drill cores and cement pre-grouting from two sub-sea tunnels in gneissic and granitic rocks, from which systematic pre-grouting volumes can be used to analyse the in-site relative permeability both in host rocks and fault zones. Major extensional faults intersected by the tunnels reveal common fault rocks surrounding intensively fractured rock lenses in the core. Fracture frequencies in these lenses can reach 100 fractures/metre (f/m). In the bounding damage zones, networks of fracture sets make up an inner zone of fairly high frequency (20-30 f/m) of fault-parallel, long fractures connected by shorter fractures. An outer zone has lower frequencies (rock volume into sub-zones characterized by distinct structural style and permeability, with a background level and three fault related sub-zones (fault core, inner damage zone, and outer damage zone). Injection data shows that the background sub-zone commonly can be injected with less than 0.05 m 3 cement per metre tunnel (commonly not injected), whereas the fault core has permeability characteristics nearly as low as the outer damage zone, represented by 0.1-0.2 m 3 cement per metre tunnel, with occasional peaks towards 0.5 m 3. The maximum of cement injection lies in the inner damage zone, marginal to the fault core, with 0.3-0.7 m 3 cement per metre tunnel, locally exceeding 1 m 3. This gives a relative relationship for cement injection of approximately 1:2:1 between fault core, inner damage zone, and outer damage zone of extensional fault zones in crystalline and metamorphic rocks.

  19. Evaluation of batch mixing equipment for producing cement-based radioactive waste hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the general criteria needed to evaluate processing equipment for producing grouts to serve as radioactive waste hosts. An equipment evaluation procedure is also defined by establishing a systematic approach to numerical scoring of equipment performance against specific selection criteria. As an example, this procedure is then used to evaluate cement-mixing equipment for the proposed Process Experimental Pilot Plant. 2 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  20. The Effect of Polymer-Cement Stabilization on the Unconfined Compressive Strength of Liquefiable Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Ateş

    2013-01-01

    Soil stabilization has been widely used as an alternative to substitute the lack of suitable material on site. The use of nontraditional chemical stabilizers in soil improvement is growing daily. In this study a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of waterborne polymer on unconfined compression strength and to study the effect of cement grout on pre-venting of liquefiable sandy soils. The laboratory tests were performed including grain size of sandy soil, unit weight, ...

  1. Biogrouting compared to jet grouting: environmental (LCA) and economical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suer, Pascal; Hallberg, Niklas; Carlsson, Christel; Bendz, David; Holm, Goran

    2009-03-01

    In order to predict consequences of replacing jet grouting with biogrouting, and identify major contributors to the cost of both technologies, a large road project in Stockholm, Sweden, was used as a case study. Jet grouting had been used to seal the contact between sheet piling and bedrock, biogrouting for the same function was computed. A comparative environmental and economical assessment was carried out using life cycle assessment (LCA). The results show that biogrouting was cheaper than jet grouting and would have had lower environmental impact. The major difference was the transport and use of heavier equipment for jet grouting. Biogrouting also used less water and produced less landfilled waste. However, the production of urea and CaCl(2) for biogrouting required much energy. PMID:19184701

  2. CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS FORMULATION FOR A COOLING COIL GROUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Erich Hansen, E

    2008-05-23

    The Tank Closure and Technology Development Groups are developing a strategy for closing the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Two Type IV tanks, 17 and 20 in the F-Area Tank Farm, have been successfully filled with grout. Type IV tanks at SRS do not contain cooling coils; on the other hand, the majority of the tanks (Type I, II, III and IIIA) do contain cooling coils. The current concept for closing tanks equipped with cooling coils is to pump grout into the cooling coils to prevent pathways for infiltrating water after tank closure. This task addresses the use of grout to fill intact cooling coils present in most of the remaining HLW tanks on Site. The overall task was divided into two phases. Phase 1 focused on the development of a grout formulation (mix design) suitable for filling the HLW tank cooling coils. Phase 2 will be a large-scale demonstration of the filling of simulated cooling coils under field conditions using the cooling coil grout mix design recommended from Phase 1. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1, the development of the cooling coil grout formulation. A grout formulation is recommended for the full scale testing at Clemson Environmental Technology Laboratory (CETL) that is composed by mass of 90% Masterflow (MF) 816 (a commercially available cable grout) and 10% blast furnace slag, with a water to cementitious material (MF 816 + slag) ratio of 0.33. This formulation produces a grout that meets the fresh and cured grout requirements detailed in the Task Technical Plan (2). The grout showed excellent workability under continuous mixing with minimal change in rheology. An alternative formulation using 90% MF 1341 and 10% blast furnace slag with a water to cementitious material ratio of 0.29 is also acceptable and generates less heat per gram than the MF 816 plus slag mix. However this MF 1341 mix has a higher plastic viscosity than the MF 816 mix due to the presence of sand in the MF 1341 cable grout and a

  3. Development of the Use of Alternative Cements for the Treatment of Intermediate Level Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes initial development studies undertaken to investigate the potential use of alternative, non ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based encapsulation matrices to treat historic legacy wastes within the UK's Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) inventory. Currently these wastes are encapsulated in composite OPC cement systems based on high replacement with blast furnace slag of pulverised fuel ash. However, the high alkalinity of these cements can lead to high corrosion rates with reactive metals found in some wastes releasing hydrogen and forming expansive corrosion products. This paper therefore details preliminary results from studies on two commercial products, calcium sulfo-aluminate (CSA) and magnesium phosphate (MP) cement which react with a different hydration chemistry, and which may allow wastes containing these metals to be encapsulated with lower reactivity. The results indicate that grouts can be formulated from both cements over a range of water contents and reactant ratios that have significantly improved fluidity in comparison to typical OPC cements. All designed mixes set in 24 hours with zero bleed and the pH values in the plastic state were in the range 10-11 for CSA and 5-7 for MP cements. In addition, a marked reduction in aluminium corrosion rate has been observed in both types of cements compared to a composite OPC system. These results therefore provide encouragement that both cement types can provide a possible alternative to OPC in the immobilisation of reactive wastes, however further investigation is needed. (authors)

  4. 水平注浆在盾构隧道接收洞口中的应用%Application of horizontal grouting method in receipt well of shield-driven tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘广仁; 曹会清; 杜伟; 尹昆仑; 郝永杰

    2013-01-01

    以某泥水平衡式盾构接收洞口地层加固工程为例,对盾构隧道接收洞口周边土体加固技术进行研究.通过对比分析地面垂直注浆、高压旋喷和水平注浆等加固方案的优缺点,择优选择水平注浆加固工艺.介绍了根据实际地质情况优化注浆孔位的平面布置,井壁钻孔与埋设孔口管工艺,注浆孔口管的使用方法及注浆工艺与参数等.通过井壁预留孔检查注浆固结情况,效果良好,有效防止了涌水、涌砂及倒灌等,可为后续盾构机顺利进洞提供保障.实践表明:水平注浆工艺有效缩短了施工时间,对于砂卵石层有较好的可操作性和可灌入性,提高了地层固结的成功率.%Taking the reinforced engineering of receipt well in cement-water balance type shield-driven tunnel as an example, the paper researches the reinforcement technology for the soil around the receipt well. By comparing and different reinforcement schemes, such as surface vertical grouting, high-pressure rotary jet grouting, and horizontal grouting, etc, the reinforcement process of horizontal grouting was selected. The plane arrangement of grouting location was determined and optimized according to actual geological condition, process in well wall bore and buried borehole orifice-pipe, method of grouting orifice pipe and grouting process and parameters, etc. Grouting consolidation situation was checked out through preserved bores of well wall. Results showed that this method had a sound project effectiveness, preventing the water burst, sand gushing, back flushing, etc, which can provide protection to the operation of subsequent shield machines. Practices prove that the horizontal grouting method can shorten the construction time, have better operability and grouting ability for sand and gravel layer, and have improved the success rate of formation consolidation.

  5. Real Time Grouting Control Method. Development and application using Aespoe HRL data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spread of grout is governed by a number of complex relations. The desired results, such as grout penetration and sealing of fractures, cannot be directly measured during the grouting process. This means that the issue of how or when the injection of grout should be stopped cannot be answered by simple rules of thumb. This is also the background to the great variety of empirical rules used in the grouting sector worldwide. The research during recent years has given a better understanding of the water-bearing structures of the rock mass as well as analytical solutions. In this report the methodology has been further studied and a method for design and control of rock grouting has been proposed. The concept of what we call the 'Real Time Grouting Control Method' is to calculate the grout penetration and control grouting in real time by applying the development of the theories for grout spread. Our intention is to combine our method with a computerized logging tool to acquire an active tool in order to be able to govern the grout spread in real time during the grouting operation. The objectives of this report are: to further develop the theory concerning the relationship between grout penetration and grouting time to describe the real course of grouting, to establish the concept of 'Real Time Grouting Control Method' for design and control for rock grouting based on the developed theory, and to verify the concept by using the field data from the grouting experiment at the 450 m level in the Aespoe HRL. In this report, the approximations and analysis of dimensionality have been checked and further developments of the theory with respect to varying grouting pressure, time-dependent grout properties, changing grout mixes, and changing the flow dimension of the fracture have been carried out. The concept of 'Real Time Grouting Control Method' has been described in order to calculate the grout penetration and to control grouting in real time by applying developed

  6. Test Research on Grouting in Sand and Gravel Layer%某级配砂砾石灌浆试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦鹏飞; 符平; 王春; 彭忠红

    2014-01-01

    In the water conservancy project and other constructions ,the grouting in sand and gravel layer is of great im-portance and value .The grouting is invisible ,the sand and gravel layer is complex and uncertainty ,and the diffusion ra-dius of cement slurry and the concretion strength are unpredictable .The particle gradation attempted for the sand and gravel layer widely distributed in the northwest and southwest in China ,and the cement grouting tests with different pro-portion and different component were carried out in laboratory .The results indicate that the diffusion radius of the cement slurry is increased with the water cement ratio increased ,which is closely related with its physical-mechanical properties ;the concretion strength is decreased with the water cement ratio increased .The concretion strength is dispersed widely due to the complexity of the inner structure in the sand and gravel layer .The test results could be used as a reference in site grouting construction .%在工程兴建中对砂砾石层进行灌浆加固处理具有非常重要的意义。灌浆工程是隐蔽工程,砂砾石地层形态又复杂多变,在砂砾石层灌浆浆液的扩散半径及结石体强度等灌浆效果方面存在较大的不可预测性。对我国西北、西南地区广泛分布的砂砾石层进行了颗粒试配,并在实验室内开展了不同配比、不同组分的水泥灌浆试验研究。试验结果表明:水泥浆液的扩散半径基本上随水灰比的增加而增大,与浆液自身的物理力学性质密切相关;砂料结石体的抗压强度随水灰比的增加而减小,但是由于砂石料的内部结构极其复杂,使得试样的抗压强度离散性极大。试验所得结果可初步指导现场灌浆施工。

  7. Study on Optimal Grouting Timing for Controlling Uplift Deformation of a Super High Arch Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng; Zhu, Xiaoxu; Li, Qingbin; Liu, Hongyuan; Yu, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    A grouting model is developed for use during the grouting of the complex foundation of a super high arch dam. The purpose as to determine the optimal grouting timing and appropriate grouting pressure involved in controlling the uplift deformation of the dam. The model determines the optimal grouting time as the height of the arch dam increases with the concrete pouring, by checking the tensile stresses in the dam against standard specifications. The appropriate grouting pressures are given on the basis of the actual grouting pressures monitored during the upstream riverbed foundation grouting. An engineering procedure, applying the model, was then proposed and used during foundation grouting under the toe block of the Xiluodu super high-arch dam in south-western China. The quality of the foundation grouting was evaluated against the results from pressurized water permeability tests, acoustic wave velocity tests, elastic modulus tests and panoramic photographing of the rockmass on completion of the foundation grouting. The results indicated that the proposed grouting model can be applied to effectively reduce the uplift deformation and associated cracking risk for super high arch dams, and it can be concluded that the proposed engineering grouting procedure is a valuable tool for improving foundation grouting under the toe blocks of a super high arch dam.

  8. Influence Mechanism of Grouting on Mechanical Characteristics of Rock Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Jixun; Shu Jiaqing; Ren Xuhua; Ren Hongyun

    2013-01-01

    Grouting technology has been widely used in all fields of geotechnical and civil engineering. Prospective engineering objectives including reinforcement of rock mass and groundwater leakage treatment can be achieved by grouting which will change the mechanical parameters of rock mass such as strength, elastic modulus, and coefficient of permeability. In this paper, rock mass is assumed as a composite material consisting of rock particles and random microcracks initially. Since part or all of ...

  9. Extraction of Contaminated Soil Using High Pressure Jet Grouting

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Removal of contaminated soil underneath existing structures causes settlement. There is a need for a remediation technology that eliminates this problem. The jet grouting by the triple rod system can be combined with an on site remediation technology (e.g., soil washing). Jet grouting was developed primarily for underpinning and/or excavation support. The benefits of this technology lie in the future reduction of structural settlement, and site access flexibility.

  10. The physical model for research of behavior of grouting mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajovsky, Radovan; Pies, Martin; Lossmann, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with description of physical model designed for verification of behavior of grouting mixtures when applied below underground water level. Described physical model has been set up to determine propagation of grouting mixture in a given environment. Extension of grouting in this environment is based on measurement of humidity and temperature with the use of combined sensors located within preinstalled special measurement probes around grouting needle. Humidity was measured by combined capacity sensor DTH-1010, temperature was gathered by a NTC thermistor. Humidity sensors measured time when grouting mixture reached sensor location point. NTC thermistors measured temperature changes in time starting from initial of injection. This helped to develop 3D map showing the distribution of grouting mixture through the environment. Accomplishment of this particular measurement was carried out by a designed primary measurement module capable of connecting 4 humidity and temperature sensors. This module also takes care of converting these physical signals into unified analogue signals consequently brought to the input terminals of analogue input of programmable automation controller (PAC) WinPAC-8441. This controller ensures the measurement itself, archiving and visualization of all data. Detail description of a complex measurement system and evaluation in form of 3D animations and graphs is supposed to be in a full paper.

  11. Biological toxicity evaluation of Hanford Site waste grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 50 years of operation of the Hanford Site of the US Department of Energy near Richland, Washington. These wastes are currently stored onsite in single- and double-shell carbon steel tanks. To effectively handle and treat these wastes, their degree of toxicity must be determined. The disposal of the low-level radioactive liquid portion of the wastes involves mixing the wastes with pozzolanic blends to form grout. Potential environmental hazards posed by grouts are largely unknown. Biological evaluation of grout toxicity is needed to provide information on the potential risks of animal and plant exposure to the grouts. The fish, rat, and Microtox toxicity tests described herein indicate that the grouts formed from Formulations I and 2 are nonhazardous and nondangerous. Using the Microtox solid-phase protocol, both soluble and insoluble organic and inorganic toxicants in the grouts can be detected. This protocol may be used for rapid screening of environmental pollutants and toxicants

  12. Data report on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Small-Scale Seal Performance Test, Series F grouting experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, E.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dale, T.F.; Van Pelt, R.S. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-03-01

    SSSPT-F was designed to evaluate sealing materials at WIPP. It demonstrated: (1) the ability to practically and consistently produce ultrafine cementitious grout at the grouting site, (2) successful, consistent, and efficient injection and permeation of the grout into fractured rock at the repository horizon, (3) ability of the grout to penetrate and seal microfractures, (4) procedures and equipment used to inject the grout. Also techniques to assess the effectiveness of the grout in reducing the gas transmissivity of the fractured rock were evaluated. These included gas-flow/tracer testing, post-grout coring, pre- and post-grout downhole televiewer logging, slab displacement measurements, and increased loading on jacks during grout injection. Pre- and post-grout diamond drill core was obtained for use in ongoing evaluations of grouting effectiveness, degradation, and compatibility. Diamond drill equipment invented for this test successfully prevented drill cuttings from plugging fractures in grout injection holes.

  13. Data report on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Small-Scale Seal Performance Test, Series F grouting experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SSSPT-F was designed to evaluate sealing materials at WIPP. It demonstrated: (1) the ability to practically and consistently produce ultrafine cementitious grout at the grouting site, (2) successful, consistent, and efficient injection and permeation of the grout into fractured rock at the repository horizon, (3) ability of the grout to penetrate and seal microfractures, (4) procedures and equipment used to inject the grout. Also techniques to assess the effectiveness of the grout in reducing the gas transmissivity of the fractured rock were evaluated. These included gas-flow/tracer testing, post-grout coring, pre- and post-grout downhole televiewer logging, slab displacement measurements, and increased loading on jacks during grout injection. Pre- and post-grout diamond drill core was obtained for use in ongoing evaluations of grouting effectiveness, degradation, and compatibility. Diamond drill equipment invented for this test successfully prevented drill cuttings from plugging fractures in grout injection holes

  14. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Grouts for Wastewater Collection Systems, Warren Environmental, Inc. 301-04 Epoxy Grout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Municipalities are discovering rapid degradation of infrastructures in wastewater collection and treatment facilities due to infiltration of leaking water from the surrounding environments. Rehabilitation of these facilities by in situ methods, including the use of grouting, is u...

  15. Preliminary investigation on the chemical response of cementitious grouts used for borehole sealing in geologically stored CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoukos, Konstantinos; Hall, Matthew; Rochelle, Christopher; Milodowski, Antoni; Rigby, Sean

    2014-05-01

    The successful geological storage of CO2 in underground reservoirs aims to immobilize the injected CO2 stream in the form of secondary minerals through reaction with primary minerals or pore fluids in the host rock formations. Injection wells and other boreholes within the reservoir represent a major potential pathway for CO2 to leak back to the surface. Therefore, the stability of well seals is a critical factor for the risk assessment of existing and the design of new CO2 injection wells. Cement-based grouts emplaced within the steel borehole liner, and between the liner and the rock formation, must seal the well against leakage, both during the CO2 injection stage and for a significant time after well abandonment, to allow for the CO2 to be immobilized though rock-water interaction in the reservoir. The injected super-critical CO2 (scCO2) experiences temperatures up to 180oC and pressures at depths greater than 800m, and when dissolved in rock formation waters create chemically reactive species that could impact the stability of cement seals. In an attempt to evaluate the impact of scCO2-saturated fluids in class G oilfield grouts, batch experiments at 80bar and 60oC/ 120oC were carried for pure cement and cement-steel cylindrical samples immersed in a realistic formation porewater composition. Destructive and healing features were observed by means of backscattered scanning electron microscopy (BSE) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) elemental mapping; both phenomena were evident in Ca leaching from, and deposition on, the surface of the samples, respectively. Structural cement components like Si appear to have retained their original particle-like shape in the regions affected by the CO2 in the 60oC experiments, but their preservation at 120oC is vaguer. The liberation of Ca2+ from the hydrated cement particles (indicated by local decrease of the Ca/Si ratio), and the reactions with the incoming carbonate/bicarbonate anions seem to evolve

  16. Plastic zone analysis and support optimization of shallow roadway with weakly cemented soft strata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jihua; Wang Lianguo; Li Qinghai; Zhu Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Based on a shallow roadway with weakly cemented soft strata in western China, this paper studies the range and degree of plastic zones in soft strata roadways with weak cementation. Geological radars were used to monitor the loose range and level of surrounding rocks. A mechanical model of weakly cemented roadway was established, including granular material based on the measured results. The model was then used to determine the plastic zone radium. The predicted results agree well with measured results which provide valuable theoretical references for the analysis of surrounding rock stability and support reinforcing design of weakly cemented roadways. Finally, a combined supporting scheme of whole sec-tion bolting and grouting was proposed based on the original supporting scheme. It is proved that this support plan can effectively control the deformation and plastic zone expansion of the roadway sur-rounding rock and thus ensure the long-term stable and safe mining.

  17. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUTS AND VAULT CONCRETES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, K; John Harbour, J; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-11-25

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone. Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement (dry premix) to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of three types of saltstone and two vault concretes. The saltstone formulations included saltstone premix batched with (1) Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), (2) Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60), and (3) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) salt simulant (w/pm 0.60). The vault concrete formulations tested included the Vault 1/4 concrete and two variations of the Vault 2 concrete (Mix 1 and Mix 2). Wet properties measured for the saltstone formulations included yield stress, plastic viscosity, wet unit weight, bleed water volume, gel time, set time, and heat of hydration. Hydraulic and physical properties measured on the cured saltstone and concrete samples included saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention, compressive strength, porosity, particle density, and dry bulk density. These properties

  18. Laboratory evaluation of performance and durability of polymer grouts for subsurface hydraulic/diffusion barriers. Informal report, October 1993--May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminated soils, buried waste and leaking underground storage tanks pose a threat to the environment through contaminant transport. One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier. Subsurface barriers increase the performance of waste disposal sites by providing a low permeability layer that can reduce percolation water migration into the waste site, minimize surface transport of contaminants, and reduce migration of volatile species. Also, a barrier can be constructed to envelop the site or plume completely, there by containing the contaminants and the potential leakage. Portland cement grout curtains have been used for barriers around waste sites. However, large castings of hydraulic cements result invariably in cracking due to shrinkage, thermal stresses induced by the hydration reactions, and wet-dry cycling prevalent at and sites. Therefore, improved, low permeability, high integrity materials are under investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Development, Integrated Demonstrations and Programs. The binders chosen for characterization include: an acrylic, a vinylester styrene, bitumen, a polyester styrene, furfuryl alcohol, and sulfur polymer cement. These materials cover broad ranges of chemical and physical durability, performance, viscosity, and cost. This report details the results of laboratory formulation, testing, and characterization of several innovative polymer grouts. An appendix containing a database of the barrier materials is at the end of this report

  19. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Wayne W; Bucher, Jerome I; Shuh, David K; Edelstein, Norman M

    2005-10-15

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to stabilize nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U. S. Department of Energy. Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs because of the high solubility and mobility of Tc(VII), pertechnetate (TcO4-), the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively stabilize 99Tc if they contain additives that chemically reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. The 99Tc leach rate of reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much lower than that for CWFs that contain TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure studies showed that Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be of concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, referred to as "permeable samples", the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were sealed in cuvettes made of polystyrene, which has a relatively large O2 diffusion coefficient. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as a Tc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The EXAFS data is consistent with a structure consisting of triangular clusters of Tc(IV) centers linked together through a combination of disulfide and sulfide bridges as in MoS3. From the EXAFS model, the stoichiometry of TcSx is TC3S10, which is presumably the compound generally referred to as "Tc2S7". The TcSX initially present in the permeable samples was steadily

  20. Rock grouting. Current competence and development for the final repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmelin, Ann (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE)); Brantberger, Martin (Ramboell (SE)); Eriksson, Magnus (Vattenfall Power Consultant (SE)); Gustafson, Gunnar (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (SE)); Stille, Haakan (Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-06-15

    The report aims at presenting the overall state of grouting competence and development relating to the final repository and at motivating and giving detail to the grouting sections presented in the 2007 version of the overall SKB report 'Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste' that is presented to the government every three years. The report offers suggestions for principles for planning, design and execution of grouting and describes the further work thought to be necessary in order to meet the requirements of the final repository, that are currently given as working premises. This report does not aim to, and cannot, describe the grouting processes in detail. For details of current concepts, experience and development work, a list of references is provided. In Chapter 2, the task of sealing the underground repository is examined and an overall approach presented. Although the requirements related to this task are preliminary, it is made evident that they concern both the actual grouting results and the process leading to the achievement of these results. Chapter 3 is a conceptual description of grouting and the factors that govern the spreading of grout in the rock mass. It is intended as an introduction to Chapters 4-6, which describe the state of grouting competence and the tools available for the sealing of the final repository facility. Both common practice and cutting-edge research are dealt with in these chapters, mainly relying on references where available. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on the system consisting of the fundamental components the rock mass, the grout materials and the grouting technology, and how these system components interact whilst, in Chapter 6, the rock/grout technical system is viewed in a brief organizational context. Based on the requirements on results and the overall grouting process on the one hand and the current competence in grouting theory and

  1. Rock grouting. Current competence and development for the final repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report aims at presenting the overall state of grouting competence and development relating to the final repository and at motivating and giving detail to the grouting sections presented in the 2007 version of the overall SKB report 'Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste' that is presented to the government every three years. The report offers suggestions for principles for planning, design and execution of grouting and describes the further work thought to be necessary in order to meet the requirements of the final repository, that are currently given as working premises. This report does not aim to, and cannot, describe the grouting processes in detail. For details of current concepts, experience and development work, a list of references is provided. In Chapter 2, the task of sealing the underground repository is examined and an overall approach presented. Although the requirements related to this task are preliminary, it is made evident that they concern both the actual grouting results and the process leading to the achievement of these results. Chapter 3 is a conceptual description of grouting and the factors that govern the spreading of grout in the rock mass. It is intended as an introduction to Chapters 4-6, which describe the state of grouting competence and the tools available for the sealing of the final repository facility. Both common practice and cutting-edge research are dealt with in these chapters, mainly relying on references where available. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on the system consisting of the fundamental components the rock mass, the grout materials and the grouting technology, and how these system components interact whilst, in Chapter 6, the rock/grout technical system is viewed in a brief organizational context. Based on the requirements on results and the overall grouting process on the one hand and the current competence in grouting theory and practice on the

  2. Ultrasonic test application in geothermal heat exchangers and civil works to monitor the grout integrity (TUC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrone, Giuseppe; Comina, Cesare; Giuliani, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The working of a vertical geothermal probe, realized with a pipe U-tubes of high-density-polyethylene (HDPE) inserted in a grouted boreholes, is linked to the possibility to exchange heat with the surrounding soil. The concrete material useful for the borehole heat exchangers allows to satisfy a double purpose: sealing the polyethylene pipes from groundwater in the event of loss and increasing the thermal properties of the whole probe to provide a greater interaction with the underground. If this operation is not performed properly, the complete system may not satisfy the required heat demand, even with a well dimensioned installation, wasting the value of the entire carried out work. This paper offers to a wide group of professional actors a possible ultrasonic method of a draft and economically sustainable investigation for the identification of defects that could be present in the cementation realized inside a geothermal probe, but also in the realization of sonic piles. The instrument used for this type of test (TUC - Test Ultrasonic Cementation) has been designed and tested by the technicians of AG3, a Spin Off Company of Torino University, in collaboration with 3DM Electric and PASI companies, then subjected to patenting procedure (Patent Pending TO2011A000036). The main innovative feature of this approach has been the miniaturization of the equipment, able to investigate the geothermal probes with U-tubes with standard dimension (the maximum overall dimensions of the instruments detectors is 26 mm), maintaining a sampling rate appropriate to investigate the cementation and the early centimetres of the surrounding soil. The processing of the recorded data was performed by a dedicated Matlab software. In the first part of the article is presented the calibration process, that it was carried out through ad hoc creation of two situations likely to be investigated, while in the second part the paper reports the results obtained by the application of the TUC

  3. Low-pH injection grout for deep repositories. Summary report from a co-operation project between NUMO (Japan), Posiva (Finland) and SKB (Sweden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Anders [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sievaenen, Ursula [JP-Suoraplan Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2005-06-01

    The use of standard cementitious material creates pulses of pH in the magnitude of 12-13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental and also unnecessarily complicates the safety analysis of the repository. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis. Also, according to current understanding, the use of low-pH cement (pH = 11) will not disturb the functioning of the bentonite, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. A result of the project is that there are both low-pH cementitious material for grouting larger fractures (= 100 {mu}m) and non-cementitious material for grouting smaller fractures (< 100 {mu}m) that will, after further optimisation work, be recommended for grouting of deep repositories. This project concentrated on the technical development of properties for the low pH grouts. Long-term safety and environmental aspects and durability of materials were preliminarily considered. Continued evaluations have to be carried out. Five systems, e.g. material combinations, were studied in the project: 1. Ordinary Portland Cement + Silica Fume. 'OPC+SF' denotes a binder system that is based mainly on OPC+SF. SF was used in a few commercial forms. The OPC used in this system was mainly UF16 and in some cases Rheocem 900 or white cement. 2. Blast furnace slag. 'Slag' denotes an OPC activated slag based system. Alkali and water glass activation were not examined, because of long-term safety reasons. OPC used in this system was rapid hardening Portland cement. 3. Super sulphate cement. 'SSC' is a slag-based system activated with gypsum and OPC. The OPC used was rapid hardening Portland cement and the gypsum was a very fine grained slurry product. 4. Low-Alkali Cement 'LAC' was introduced to the project by NUMO as a product, ground to fixed fineness by the producer. Neither the mineral composition nor

  4. Florida Sinkholes and Grout Injection Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Hunt Griffith II

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Florida has a major problem when it comes to sinkholes. These sinkholes can become very hazardous to people, homes, and to the landscape as a whole. Florida sits on a carbonate platform which is highly indicative of sinkholes. There are three main types of sinkholes which occur in Florida: dissolution, cover subsidence, and cover collapse. I will compare these types of sinkholes to the underlying formation beneath Florida to see if there is a connection between the types of sinkholes that occur. I will also create a 3D model of grout injection stabilization and calculate its volume to compare to the actual volume placed under the house. This information will help inform and bring attention to the problem in Florida and in turn, may help alleviate the problem if we can understand what causes these sinkholes. The 3D model may help engineering companies become more efficient in predicting the projected amount of volume to stabilize a house that may be in danger.

  5. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid mixed wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations

  6. Grout Treatment Facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, a permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations. This volume contains 14 Appendices. Topics include Engineering Drawings, Maps, Roads, Toxicity Testing, and Pilot-Scale Testing

  7. Study on the grouting reinforcement pretreatment of plastic drainage pipe trenchless rehabilitation%塑料排水管道非开挖修复注浆加固预处理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王和平; 周利

    2015-01-01

    针对出现变形和严重破裂等缺陷的塑料排水管道在非开挖修复时可能引起管周砂土坍塌的问题,提出了管内修复前采用水泥-水玻璃浆液注浆的方法进行土体加固。通过试验,研究了水泥-水玻璃浆液的配合比、初凝时间、终凝时间和注浆结实体渗透半径,给出了浆液的最佳配比、注浆孔的布置建议以及土体加固的注意事项,为塑料排水管道非开挖修复的注浆加固预处理提供参考。%To solve the problems of sand collapsing around the pipeline in its trenceless rehabili-tation caused by the defects of the plastic such as deformation and serious ruptures,the method of reinforce the pipe by cement-sodium silicate grout before its rehabilitation was put forward. Through experiments,this paper studied the proportioning,initial setting time,final setting time and the consolidated solid body seeped radius of cement and sodium silicate grout;in addition,the optimal grout proportioning,grouting holes arrangement and key points of soil reinforcement were also proposed.This paper might provide reference for the grouting reinforcement pretreatment of drainage pipe trenchless rehabilitation.

  8. STUDI EKSPERIMENTAL KARAKTERISTIK TIANG PASIR GROUTING UNTUK PERKUATAN TANAH LEMPUNG KEPASIRAN

    OpenAIRE

    Lawalenna Samang; Bakri Muhiddin, Achmad; Ardy Arsyad; Ariningsih Suprapti

    2014-01-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji karakteristik sifat fisik dan mekanis tanah lempung kepasiran, tanah pasir dan sifat mekanis tiang pasir grouting dan mengetahui besarnya kapasitas dukung yang terjadi pada tiang pasir grouting akibat pengaruh tanah lempung kepasiran disekitarnya serta mengevaluasi pola deformasi sistem pondasi tiang pasir grouting guna perbaikan kekuatan daya dukung tanah lempung kepasiran. Pengujian karakteristik tanah pasir dan tiang pasir grouting menggunakan standar...

  9. High-Performance Grouting Mortar Based on Mineral Admixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on high-performance grouting mortar is reported. The common mortar was modified by mineral admixtures such as gypsum, bauxite, and alunite. The effects of mineral admixtures on the fluidity, setting time, expansion, strength, and other properties of mortar were evaluated experimentally. The microstructure of the modified mortar was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Moreover, the expansive performance and strength of the grouting mortar were verified by anchor pullout test. The results show that the best conditions for gypsum-bauxite grouting mortar are as follows: a water-to-binder ratio of 0.3, a mineral admixture content of ~15%, and a molar ratio K of 2. The ultimate bearing capacity of the gypsum-bauxite grouting mortar anchor increased by 39.6% compared to the common mortar anchor. The gypsum-bauxite grouting mortar has good fluidity, quick-setting, microexpansion, early strength, and high strength performances.

  10. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  11. Performance Impact of Fast Flow Paths Through Grout Monoliths Used for Radioactive Waste Disposal - 13224

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empty HLW handling and storage tanks at SRS and INL contain residual radioactivity; these tanks are being stabilized with cementitious grout during closure operations. The US NRC directed the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRAR) to develop physical analogs of cementitious grout monoliths to investigate their potential to form fast flow pathways such as macro-cracks, separations between grout lifts, and annuli around pipes, supports, and along tank walls. CNWRA developed and tested 15 55-gal-drum-scale specimens and 2 larger specimens of tank-filling cementitious grout, and 9 specimens of pipe-filling grout. These experiments demonstrated that the size of fast flow pathways that develop and the peak temperatures attained during hydration are proportional to the scale of the specimen, and that annular apertures and bulk grout permeability generally increased with time post-placement. Cracks developed overnight following placement of each grout lift in the largest specimen, but developed more slowly in smaller specimens, perhaps due to a ∼20 deg. C difference in peak temperatures, which influence the thermal gradients that can induce cracking. Plastic and drying shrinkage commonly led to poor grout-to-metal and grout-to-grout bonding. Cracks, annular gaps, and grout flow lobe seams transmitted fluids during injection testing. Macro-scale flow pathways such as these are not readily observed in bench-scale specimens of cementitious tank grout. (authors)

  12. Measurement of rock mass deformation with grouted coaxial antenna cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, C. H.; Su, M. B.; O'Connor, K.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques presented herein show how reflected voltage pulses from coaxial antenna cable grouted in rock masses can be employed to quantify the type and magnitude of rock mass deformation. This measurement is similar to that obtained from a combined full profile extensometer (to measure local extension) and inclinometer (to measure local shearing). Rock mass movements deform the grouted cable, which locally changes cable capacitance and thereby the reflected wave form of the voltage pulse. Thus, by monitoring changes in these reflection signatures, it is possible to monitor rock mass deformation. This paper presents laboratory measurements necessary to quantitatively interpret the reflected voltage signatures. Cables were sheared and extended to correlate measured cable deformation with reflected voltage signals. Laboratory testing included development of grout mixtures with optimum properties for field installation and performance of a TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry) monitoring system. Finally, the interpretive techniques developed through laboratory measurements were applied to previously collected field data to extract hitherto unrealized information.

  13. Liquid return from gas pressurization of grouted waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to force pore liquids out of a simulated waste grout matrix using air pressure was measured. Specimens cured under various conditions were placed in a permeameter and subjected to increasing air pressure. The pressure was held constant for 24 hours and then stepped up until either liquid was released or 150 psi was reached. One specimen was taken to 190 psi with no liquid release. Permeability to simulated tank waste was then measured. Compressive strength was measured following these tests. This data is to assess the amount of fluid that might be released from grouted waste resulting from the buildup of radiolytically generated hydrogen and other gasses within the waste form matrix. A plot of the unconfined compressive strength versus breakthrough pressures identifies a region of ''good'' grout, which will resist liquid release

  14. Performance of Grouted Splice Sleeve Connector under Tensile Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The grouted splice sleeve connector system takes advantage of the bond-slip resistance of the grout and the mechanical gripping of reinforcement bars to provide resistance to tensile force. In this system, grout acts as a load-transferring medium and bonding material between the bars and sleeve. This study adopted the end-to-end rebars connection method to investigate the effect of development length and sleeve diameter on the bonding performance of the sleeve connector. The end-to-end method refers to the condition where reinforcement bars are inserted into the sleeve from both ends and meet at the centre before grout is filled. Eight specimens of grouted splice sleeve connector were tested under tensile load to determine their performance. The sleeve connector was designed using 5 mm thick circular hollow section (CHS steel pipe and consisted of one external and two internal sleeves. The tensile test results show that connectors with a smaller external and internal sleeve diameter appear to provide better bonding performance. Three types of failure were observed in this research, which are bar fracture (outside the sleeve, bar pullout, and internal sleeve pullout. With reference to these failure types, the development length of 200 mm is the optimum value due to its bar fracture type, which indicates that the tensile capacity of the connector is higher than the reinforcement bar. It is found that the performance of the grouted splice sleeve connector is influenced by the development length of the reinforcement bar and the diameter of the sleeve.

  15. The study on bentonite slurry grout with ethanol for fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to propose the grouting material and method for fractured rock masses. So experimental study is executed in order to grasp that the properties of grouting material is stable and impermeable. In this study, experiments of hydraulic test and grouting injection test are performed on bentonite slurry mixes in the laboratory. From the results of the tests, a mixer of ethanol and bentonite is found to be very suitable for a grouting material. Also, dynamic grouting method is able to inject the concentrated bentonite slurry in the fractured aperture. (author)

  16. Study on the mechanism of seepage flow in the grouting for multiple fractured model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of study is to improve the grouting method for fractured rock masses. In this paper, the results on the fundamental phenomenon for grasping the properties of grouting injection and seepage flow are discussed. The case of grouting stage is studied about the multiple hydraulic fractured apertures in the injected borehole. So the theory on the mechanism is constructed, and experiment is executed in order to verify the availability of the theory. From the results, it is shown that Bernoulli's law is able to prove the behavior of the grouting. And the theoretical evaluation is executed on the experiential procedure of the grouting. (author)

  17. Chemical and biological toxicity assessment of simulated Hanford site low-level waste grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defining the potential damage to the biosphere associated with exposure to low-level waste grouting operations at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is difficult and controversial. Combined chemical and biological assessment of grout toxicity is needed to provide information on the potential risks of animal and plant exposure to the grouts. This paper will identify and predict the chemical components of the grout that will have the greatest potential of causing deleterious effects on fish and wildlife indigenous to the Hanford Site. This paper will also determine whether the current grout technology is adequate in controlling toxicant and pollutant releases for regulatory compliance

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  19. 工业废渣注浆材料的抗溶蚀性能%CORROSION RESISTANCE PERFORMANCE OF GROUTING MATERIALS MANUFACTURED FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡曙光; 王红喜; 张高展; 丁庆军

    2007-01-01

    针对水玻璃-水泥(soluble glass-cement,SC)注浆材料在地层加固过程中抗水溶蚀性能差和工业废渣得不到有效利用等问题,用工业废渣完全取代SC注浆材料中的水泥制备出水玻璃-工业废渣(矿渣、钢渣、粉煤灰)(soluble glass-activated industrial residue slag,SAS)注浆材料.模拟淡水侵蚀环境,对SAS和SC两体系注浆材料进行了水溶蚀试验研究,结果表明SAS系列抗水溶蚀性能优于SC系列的.在水溶蚀作用180d条件下,SAS注浆材料的强度无损失,而SC系列结石体强度损失率达50%;SAS系列的Si溶出量、溶出物质总量和电导率等都低于SC系列的.压汞法、X射线衍射、扫描电镜测试结果也表明:SAS具有致密的微观结构和低溶解度的水化产物,从微观层次证明了SAS系列注浆材料的高抗水溶蚀性能.%At the present,most industrial residues are used without taking full advantage of their properties,and some are disposed of without being used.A way to utilize industrial residues in double solution grouts is studied by entirely replacing portland cement.Two series of grouting materials including soluble glass-activated industrial residue slag (SAS) and soluble glass-cement (SC) were prepared.SAS and SC were dipped into the distilled water that simulated the water leaching environment.The hardened paste strengths,the amount of dissolved Si and total dissolved solids (TDS) and electric conductivity (EC) in water erosion of the grouts were tested.The compressive strength of the SAS series as grouting materials did not decrease cuing in water for 180 d.However the compressive strength of the SC series grouting materials had about 50% loss at the age of 180 d.The values of the leaching parameters,for example,the amount of dissolved Si,EC and TDS,in the distilled water leaching the SAS series grouting material,were all less than in the distilled water leaching the SC series grouting materials.This indicates that the leaching

  20. Cement degradation and the alteration of host rocks. Studies within the Grimsel Test Site Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Cement is a major component of the engineered barrier system in proposed underground repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Cement grouting of highly-conductive fractures in the vicinity of such repositories is also planned. The interaction between the hyperalkaline solutions derived from the degradation of cement and the rocks hosting such repositories may change the physical and chemical properties of the host rocks. The HPF project (Hyperalkaline Plume in Fractured Rock; ANDRA-FR-, DOE-USA-, JAEA-JP-, NAGRA-CH-, POSIVA-FI-, SKB-SE-) studied the alteration of a fractured granite due to the circulation of a synthetic high-pH solution. A significant decrease in fracture permeability was observed both in the laboratory (core infiltration experiment; decimeter scale) and in the Grimsel Test Site (circulation along a fracture; meter scale), despite the relatively minor mineralogical alteration. Coupling of mineralogical alteration and permeability changes was incorporated into reactive transport modeling of the experiments. The hydration and degradation of cement are being explicitly incorporated into the new LCS (Long-Term Cement Studies; JAEA-JP-, NAGRA-CH-, NDA-GB-, POSIVA-FI-) project at Grimsel. New laboratory and field experiments including a cement source are being designed. Reactive transport modeling of the degradation of cement, causing the formation of hyperalkaline solutions and the alteration of the host rock, will be an essential part of the experiment.

  1. Development of grouting technologies for geological disposal of high level waste in Japan (2). Selection of grout materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the construction of an underground facility for the geological disposal of high level waste, it is important to limit the ingress of high pressure groundwaters to ensure site safety during the emplacement of buffer materials and waste canisters in the disposal tunnels and galleries. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed three candidate grout materials with consideration to the long-term chemical compatibility with other facility components. Reported here are the necessary selection criteria for grout materials to fulfill their intended purpose with special emphasis on the determination procedure of design hydrological fracture aperture. (author)

  2. Rheological behaviour of hydraulic lime-based grouts. Shear-time and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, Ana; Henriques, Fernando M. A.; Cidade, M. T.

    2013-05-01

    This paper deals with the coupled effect of temperature and fly ash (FA) addition on rheological behaviour of natural hydraulic lime (NHL5) based grouts, currently used in masonry consolidation. The use of a grout injection technique for masonry consolidation may lead to an increase of hydrostatic pressure and lead to structural damage. This means that the thixotropic effects become self-evident in grout design. It was shown that there is a relation between the structuration rate of each grout and the pressure that occurs inside masonry during its consolidation. According to the results, it seems also that there is a grout threshold temperature ( T limit) that separates a domain where the grout build-up structure area is almost constant, from another where flocculation area starts to increase significantly. We believe that in the first region the thixotropic effects are almost isolated from the irreversible effects (due to hydration). For the NHL5 based grout T limit=20 °C and for the grout with NHL5+15 % of FA T limit=15 °C. Grouts' characterization based on maximum resisting time, structuration rate and on the analysis of the hydraulic lime grout behaviour tested at different shear rates was performed using a shear thinning model and assuming that the structure is shear- and time-dependent. The goal is to use this methodology during mix proportioning and design for masonry injection purpose. The tested grout compositions were optimized compositions obtained in previous research using the design of experiments method.

  3. Improvement of engineering properties of liquefied soil using Bio-VegeGrout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lab tests were carried out in order to analyze and investigate the liquefaction behavior of marine deposit soil which was placed in the region of LCCT, Sepang. The soil was found exposed to liquefaction. Step to improvise the soil was to inject Biovege grout into the soil sample. Soil sample was prepared with three different grout amount, 10%, 25% and 50%. The relation between percentage of Biovege grout injected and soil improvement were observed and recorded. The void ratio and the permeability of the soil sample decreased with increasing grout percentage. The soil becomes stiffer as the amount of grout used increase. The results obtained indicate, higher amount of grout injection reflects better soil improvement in term of cohesion, friction angle, shear stress and void ratio. The Biovege grout increases the resistance of soil against liquefaction

  4. Geoelectric response of porous media in water and grout injection processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙强; 刘盛东; 姜春露; 王勃

    2014-01-01

    Significant changes in spontaneous potential and exciting currents are observed during water and grout injection in a simulated porous media. Obvious correlations between the seepage flow field and the electric field in the porous media are identified. In this work, a detailed experimental study of geoelectric field variation occurring in water migration was reported by analyzing water and grout injection processes in a simulated porous media. The spontaneous potential varies linearly with the thickness of unsaturated porous media. Very interestingly, the spontaneous potential generated in the second grout injection exhibits some“memory”of previous grouting paths. The decreases in spontaneous potential observed during grout injection is very probably due to that the spontaneous potential variations are primarily caused by electro-filtration potential, as indicated by the far larger viscosity of grout compared to that of water. The geoelectric response can be utilized to effectively identify the grouting paths in water-bearing rocks.

  5. Development of grouting technologies for geological disposal of high level waste in Japan (3). In-situ grout injection tests in Grimsel Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the application procedure of grout injection modeling to the plan, design and execution of an in-situ grout injection demonstration test carried out at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland. Both the grout injection model and demonstration test were co-developed using fracture geometry and hydraulic characteristics data obtained from drilling six observation boreholes over the course of three years. Based on the results of the demonstration test, the implications for the design and construction of grouting in the context of building a geologic repository are considered. (author)

  6. Development of grouting technologies for geological disposal of high level waste in Japan. 3. Numerical simulation for grout injection using equivalent continuum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, to simulate the grout injection process, the 3-D numerical model based on equivalent continuum approach was developed. The viscosity measurement for silica sol was performed to measure the time-dependent viscosity. The developed numerical model was applied to the planned in-situ grout injection tests at Grimsel test site (GTS), Switzerland. The rock type is fractured granite and the equivalent porous media was created from the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) based on the fracture data obtained from the observation boreholes. The preliminary simulation was carried out to determine the suitable grout injection pressure and investigate the arrival distance of grout from injection boreholes. (author)

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project

  8. Grouting applications in civil engineering. Volume I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive description of grouting applications in civil engineering is presented that can serve as a basis for the selection of grouting methods in the borehole sealing problem. The breadth and depth of the study was assured by conducting the main part of the review, the collection and evaluation of information, without specifically considering the borehole sealing problem (but naturally incorporating any aspect of civil engineering applications that could be of potential use). Grouting is very much an art and not a science. In most cases, it is a trial and error procedure where an inexpensive method is initially tried and then a more expensive one is used until the desired results are obtained. Once a desired effect is obtained, it is difficult to credit any one procedure with the success because the results are due to the summation of all the methods used. In many cases, the method that proves successful reflects a small abnormality in the ground or structure rather than its overall characteristics. Hence, successful grouting relies heavily on good engineering judgement and experience, and not on a basic set of standard correlations or equations. 800 references

  9. Large volume grouting solidification and disposal of ILLW in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume grouting solidification and disposal process for treating intermediate-level liquid waste (ILLW) in near-surface has been developed in China. The ILLW comes from the Lanzhou Reprocessing Plant. This process has been demonstrated by the cold test with simulated waste, and this project is now under implementation on the basis of design and construction

  10. Multipoint Grout Injection System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), radioactive waste contained in the 16 cylindrical Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAATs) must retrieved so the tanks can be closed. In many cases, removing the small amounts of sludge that remain in the tank after the bulk of the waste is retrieved is extremely costly and provides little benefit from site health and environmental standpoints. The Tanks Focus Area is working with ORR's M and I contractor (Bechtel-Jacobs), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Ground Environmental Services to demonstrate the application of multi-point-injection (MPI) grout emplacement technology for horizontal cylindrical tanks during a cold demonstration in FY99. GAAT TH-4 has been identified as the tank to be used for the hot demonstration in FY00. Evaluation efforts continue on the effect of slag on strength performance of the grout to be used in TH-4 tank closure. The site must find out what level of slag can be accommodated in the grout while maintaining strength performance requirements. Other efforts in support of the utilization of MPI TM technology in large-scale waste tanks will continue. Also, ORR is collaborating with SRS to evaluate the use this technology to support grouting of the Old Burial Ground tanks at SRS

  11. Evaluation tests for colloidal silica for use in grouting applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal silica (CS) is a low-viscosity chemical grout that can be injected to form an impermeable barrier in the subsurface. Such a barrier was proposed to be placed under a disused unlined retention basin at the Savannah River site. Specifications for the CS grout were included in the bid package, including performance tests. The product must meet requirements of low viscosity, low permeability when gelled, and controllable gel time both in vitro and in situ. Bidders submitted samples for evaluation, and this paper describes the tests that were conducted and presents typical results. Gel time in soil was assessed by injection tests in packed-soil columns and the monitoring of gelling in the columns. Injection tests were designed to ensure that grout injection would not be impeded by rapid gellation caused by contact with soil. The requirement was that the injection pressure during 2 h of injection be less than 2.5 times as great as the injection pressure without gelling. Gelling of the grout in the soil columns was monitored by repeated falling-head tests that showed that mobility decreased to zero during the prescribed time for gelling in situ

  12. Fatigue Behaviour of High Performance Cementitious Grout Masterflow 9500

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes the fatigue behaviour of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 subjected to cyclic loading, in air as well as submerged in water, at various frequencies and levels of maximum stress. Part of the results were also reported in [1] together with other mechanical...

  13. Factors affecting the leachability of caesium and strontium from cemented simulant evaporator wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach rates of stable cesium and strontium from a range of simulated evaporator waste/cement formulations have been determined. Important factors in plant operation are assessed for their effect on leach rates. Increasing the curing time and lowering the water/cement ratio has been shown to reduce leach rates by up to a factor of four. Incorporation of additives such as clays and supplementary cementatious materials can reduce leach rates by up to three orders magnitude, and coating the surface of the waste form with a neat cement grout can reduce the cesium leach rate by up to four orders of magnitude. The effects of permeability of the matrix and its cesium absorption capacity on the leach rates have been analysed qualitatively. (U.K.)

  14. Analyses and field tests of the hydraulic performance of cement grout borehole seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three tests are presented and analyzed in detail for determining the hydraulic properties of borehole seals as applicable to disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Two consist of monitoring the rate of injection of water at constant pressure into an injection zone at one end of a seal and monitoring the collection rate or rate of flow into a free-draining collection zone at the other end. The third test is performed by shutting in the collection zone and monitoring the buildup in hydraulic head. One-dimensional and axisymmetric three-dimensional flow models are presented for analyzing test results. In the one-dimensional models, the seal is assumed to be a homogeneous and isotropic porous medium, and the rock is assumed to be impermeable. In the axisymmetric models, the seal and the surrounding rock mass are taken as homogeneous and isotropic porous media. The equation for saturated, confined ground-water flow is assumed to apply. The hydraulic properties of the seal are expressed by its hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. In the axisymmetric models, the conductivity and specific storage of the rock mass are included in the formulation. A fourth test, a tracer travel-time test, is presented as a means for detecting any high-velocity flow path through or around the seal. Detailed and specific recommendations are given for conducting borehole seal tests. In principle, these methods also should be applicable to testing shaft seals and tunnel dams. In practice, complications will be encountered for the implementation of the tests on a much larger scale, but these complications should be resolvable. 154 refs., 79 figs., 38 tabs

  15. A dual mode imaging array for damage detection in grout structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; EL-Batanouny, Mohamed; Ziehl, Paul; Zhao, Liuxian

    2013-04-01

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of the cement-based materials, the ultrasonic waves in concrete exhibit highly scattering and attenuation, leading to the difficulty of concrete damaged detection. This paper presents a dual mode ultrasonic array imaging methodology that can map damage using Rayleigh surface waves and permanently installed piezoelectric sensors. The dual mode sensing integrates passive acoustic emission and active ultrasonic wave inspection. When a crack is developing, acoustic emission (AE) occurs and the disturbance can propagate outwards along the structure surface. A novel AE source imaging algorithm has been developed to detect and locate the AE source. Once the AE source is located, the sensor array switches to its active mode. For active sensing, one sensor in the array is used to generate Rayleigh wave for interrogation, while all the others are used as the wave receivers. All the sensory data are processed by the active ultrasonic array imaging algorithm. The proof-of-concept testing was performed on a grout specimen with representative dimensions. The passive array imaging algorithm was able to locate the AE source simulated by pencil lead break while active sensing imaging was able to detect the damage simulated by a hole. The duel mode imaging method is promising and economically beneficial for solving a key source localization problem in damage detection on large concrete structures.

  16. Grouting design based on characterization of the fractured rock. Presentation and demonstration of a methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design methodology presented in this document is based on an approach that considers the individual fractures. The observations and analyses made during production enable the design to adapt to the encountered conditions. The document is based on previously published material and overview flow charts are used to show the different steps. Parts of or the full methodology has been applied for a number of tunneling experiments and projects. SKB projects in the Aespoe tunnel include a pillar experiment and pre-grouting of a 70 meter long tunnel (TASQ). Further, for Hallandsas railway tunnel (Skaane south Sweden), a field pre-grouting experiment and design and post-grouting of a section of 133 meters have been made. For the Nygard railway tunnel (north of Goeteborg, Sweden), design and grouting of a section of 86 meters (pre-grouting) and 60 meters (post-grouting) have been performed. Finally, grouting work at the Tornskog tunnel (Stockholm, Sweden) included design and grouting along a 100 meter long section of one of the two tunnel tubes. Of importance to consider when doing a design and evaluating the result are: - The identification of the extent of the grouting needed based on inflow requirements and estimates of tunnel inflow before grouting. - The selection of grout and performance of grouting materials including penetration ability and length. The penetration length is important for the fan geometry design. - The ungrouted compared to the grouted and excavated rock mass conditions: estimates of tunnel inflow and (if available) measured inflows after grouting and excavation. Identify if possible explanations for deviations. For the Hallandsas, Nygard and Tornskog tunnel sections, the use of a Pareto distribution and the estimate of tunnel inflow identified a need for sealing small aperture fractures (< 50 - 100 μm) to meet the inflow requirements. The tunneling projects show that using the hydraulic aperture as a basis for selection of grout is a good

  17. A Real-Time Analysis and Feedback System for Quality Control of Dam Foundation Grouting Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, D. H.; Yan, F. G.; Li, M. C.; Huang, C. X.; Fan, K.; Tang, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Real-time analysis and feedback systems play a vital role in obtaining good results from grouting processes. However, when there are intense construction schedules and complex geological structures, it is difficult for existing systems to provide to site engineers, prior to the borehole construction, prompt and accurate feedback, such as detailed geological information about grouting boreholes, which limits the use of such systems in practical applications. This paper proposes combining a three-dimensional (3D) geological model with real-time data collection technology in a system for both monitoring grouting, and providing analysis and feedback. This integrated grouting model, which comprises the geological model, the grouting borehole model and the grouting parameter database set, can be coupled and associated dynamically with grouting data. Additionally, the following methods are applied in this system: real-time grouting data processing and a monitoring alarm, prediction and visualization of geological conditions, forecasting of rock uplift, and visualization analysis of grouting parameters. The application of this system in Hydropower Project A, China is used as a case study. The predictions of geological conditions are closely matched with the actual situation, and this system can be used to monitor construction processes remotely and to help site engineers to design reasonable construction plans, optimize layouts for grouting boreholes and adjust construction measures.

  18. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  19. Development of grouting technologies for geological disposal of high level waste in Japan. 1. Preliminary study for in-situ grout injection test in crystalline rock mass test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouting technology is fundamental to the safe and efficient construction of underground facilities for the geological disposal of High Level Waste in Japan. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been developing grouting materials and technologies with consideration to the long term chemical interactions between the grout material and the natural barrier rock mass. An in-situ grout injection test has been carried out at the Grimsel Test Site to optimize grouting design. This report is for the in-situ grout injection test plan and the result of the preliminary study. (author)

  20. Development of a cement-polymer close-coupled subsurface barrier technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project was to further develop close-coupled barrier technology for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and chemically resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of issues concerning barriers and barrier materials to a pilot-scale, multiple individual column injections at Sandia National Labs (SNL) to full scale demonstration. The feasibility of this barrier concept was successfully proven in a full scale ''cold site'' demonstration at Hanford, WA. Consequently, a full scale deployment of the technology was conducted at an actual environmental restoration site at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Long Island, NY. This paper discusses the installation and performance of a technology deployment implemented at OU-1 an Environmental Restoration Site located at BNL

  1. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  2. Revised Methodology for Determining Cesium-137 Content of HN-200 Grout Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHELOR, J.L.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this technical paper is to examine the accuracy of the existing method of determining the Cs-137 content of HN-200 grout containers and compare that accuracy to the accuracy attainable by other methods of measurement. The methods of measurement to be compared include: Contact measurements on a grouted container (existing method); Measurements at 5 feet from the surface of a grouted container; Measurements at 10 feet from a grouted container; Measurements on contact with the surface of an ungrouted container; Measurements at 5 feet from the surface of an ungrouted container; and Measurements at 10 feet from the surface of an ungrouted container. Once the most accurate and useable method is determined, the precepts for an operating procedure will be provided for determining the Cs-137 content of newly generated and future HN-200 grout containers as well as the grouted legacy containers currently stored in B Cell.

  3. APPLICATION OF TIME-VARYING VISCOUS GROUT IN GRAVEL- FOUNDATION ANTI-SEEPAGE TREATMENT*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Peng-da; LI Lu; TANG Ju; WANG Dao-zeng

    2011-01-01

    The time-varying viscosity of common grout and the controllable grout are measured with a rotation viscometer in experiments. The time-varying viscosity of grout is analyzed according to the characteristics in the process of anti-seepage treatment for gravel foundation. The principle of effective stress for porous medium is applied to analyzes the fluid-structure coupling in grouting. In the consideration of coupling physical variables, dynamic models of porosity, permeability and viscosity are constructed.The difiusion radius can thus be defined by the foundational porosity. The distribution of holes in field experiments is designed according to the diffusion radius of grout. Then, the permeability test is designed to verify the grout effect. The calculated diffusion radius coincides with experimental results, and the permeability meets the requirements of the project, which is valuable for the anti-seepage treatment in gravel foundation.

  4. Cold gap grout formulation for waste containment at DOE site, Hanford, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that WES developed a grout to be used as a cold (non-radioactive) cap or void-fill material between the solidified low-level waste and the cover blocks of near-surface disposal vaults at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Facility. The project consisted of formulation and evaluation of candidate grout, followed by a physical scale-model test to verify grout performance under project-specific conditions and provide data to verify numerical models of stresses and isotherms inside the Hanford demonstration vault. Evaluation of unhardened grout included segregation, bleed, flow, and working time. For hardened grout, strength, volume stability, thermal heat rise, and geochemical compatibility with surrogate wasteform grout were examined

  5. Experimental Study on Post Grouting Bearing Capacity of Large Diameter Bored Piles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Duanduan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post grouting can improve the inherent defects such as the formation of the mud cake at pile side and the sediment at pile end in the process of bored pile construction. Thus post grouting has been widely used in Engineering. The purpose of this paper is to research the influences of post grouting to pile bearing capacity more systematically and intuitively. Combined with the static load test of four test piles in Weihe River Bridge test area of new airport highway in Xi’an, the bearing capacity and settlement of routine piles and post grouting piles are comparatively analyzed. The test results show that under the same geological condition, post grouting can improve the properties of pile tip and pile shaft soil of bored piles significantly, enhance the ultimate resistance, improve the ultimate bearing capacity and reduce the pile tip settlement. Then post grouting can aim to optimize pile foundation.

  6. Characteristics of thermally-enhanced bentonite grouts for geothermal heat exchanger in South Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chulho; LEE; Kangja; LEE; Hangseok; CHOI; Hyo-Pum; CHOI

    2010-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and viscosity of bentonite grouts have been evaluated and compared each other to determine the suitability of these materials for backfilling vertical boreholes of ground heat exchangers.Seven bentonite grouts from different product sources were considered in this paper.Two additives,silica sand and graphite were added in bentonite grouts to enhance thermal performance.The bentonite grouts indicate that both the thermal conductivity and the viscosity increase with the content of silica sand and graphite.Therefore,it is recommended to select cautiously the amount of silica sand and graphite considering not only thermal conductivity but also viscosity for the optimum condition of backfilling.Finally,the effect of salinity in the pore water on the change of swelling potential of the bentonite-based grouts has been quantitatively evaluated to show the feasibility of bentonite grouts in the coastal area.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  8. The use of alkali-activated fly ash grouts for the remediation of AMD from underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation for a field demonstration, laboratory studies were conducted using several fly ash grout formulations to determine the optimum grout for an underground mine environment. This paper discusses the portion of the overall project designed to examine grout-acid mine drainage (AMD) interactions including neutralization, leaching and armoring of the grouts. Leaching tests were performed to study the effects of fly ash grout on AMD, including the effects of armoring. The goal of this project is to study the feasibility of in-situ acid mine drainage treatment by injecting alkali-activated fly ash grout into an underground mine

  9. Parameters Optimization of Curtain Grouting Reinforcement Cycle in Yonglian Tunnel and Its Application

    OpenAIRE

    Qingsong Zhang; Peng Li; Gang Wang; Shucai Li; Xiao Zhang; Qianqing Zhang; Qian Wang; Jianguo Liu

    2015-01-01

    For practical purposes, the curtain grouting method is an effective method to treat geological disasters and can be used to improve the strength and permeability resistance of surrounding rock. Selection of the optimal parameters of grouting reinforcement cycle especially reinforcement cycle thickness is one of the most interesting areas of research in curtain grouting designs. Based on the fluid-structure interaction theory and orthogonal analysis method, the influence of reinforcement cycle...

  10. Study of Pumping Pressure and Stop Criteria in Grouting of Rock Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghoobi Rafi, Jalaleddin

    2014-01-01

    Today practice of grouting is based on empirical approaches in that, pumping pressure and stop criteria are determined by benchmarking similar projects. Considering a maximum limit for grouting pressure would allow applying a relatively high pressure that may lead to jacking of the fracture or even uplift of the rock mass. On the other hand, keeping the pressure lower than the overburden, in order to avoid any deformation, will prolong grouting process. Determination of pumping pressure is mo...

  11. Choice of grouting method for jointed hard rock based on sealing time predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmalm, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This thesis concerns subjects related to the choice of agrouting method in a jointed hard rock mass. By calculating thetotal sealing time to reach the requested sealing level,different grouting methods could be compared and the mostfavourable chosen. A methodology, to calculate the sealing time for differentgrouting methods in different rock masses has been developed.Five main activities are included in the methodology; drilling,grouting, waiting, probing and re-grouting, which to differingde...

  12. Experimental Test Plan for Grouting H-3 Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan K. Herbst

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 4400 cubic meters of solid high-level waste called calcine are stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Under the Idaho Cleanup Project, dual disposal paths are being investigated. The first path includes calcine retrieval, package "as-is", and ship to the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The second path involves treatment of the calcine with such methods as vitrification or grouting. This test plan outlines the hot bench scale tests to grout actual calcine and verify that the waste form properties meet the waste acceptance criteria. This is a necessary sequential step in the process of qualifying a new waste form for repository acceptance. The archive H-3 calcine samples at the Contaminated Equipment Maintenance Building attached to New Waste Calcining Facility will be used in these tests at the Remote Analytical Laboratory. The tests are scheduled for the second quarter of fiscal year 2007.

  13. Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout

  14. Chemical Grouting Lost-Circulation Zones with Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansure, A.J.; Westmoreland, J.J.

    1999-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing polyurethane foam as a chemical grout for lost circulation zones. In past work polyurethane foam was tried with limited success in laboratory tests and GDO sponsored field tests. Goals were that the foam expanded significantly and harden to a chillable firmness quickly. Since that earlier work there have been improvements in polyurethane chemistry and the causes of the failures of previous tests have been identified. Recent success in applying pure solution grouts (proper classification of polyurethane--Naudts) in boreholes encourages reevaluating its use to control lost circulation. These successes include conformance control in the oil patch (e.g. Ng) and darn remediation projects (Bruce et al.). In civil engineering, polyurethane is becoming the material of choice for sealing boreholes with large voids and high inflows, conditions associated with the worst lost circulation problems. Demonstration of a delivery mechanism is yet to be done in a geothermal borehole.

  15. Numerical Simulations of Settlement of Jet Grouting Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juzwa Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the comparison of results of numerical analyses of interaction between group of jet grouting columns and subsoil. The analyses were conducted for single column and groups of three, seven and nine columns. The simulations are based on experimental research in real scale which were carried out by authors. The final goal for the research is an estimation of an influence of interaction between columns working in a group.

  16. Expected performances for mosaic-grouting monitoring by GPR

    OpenAIRE

    DEROBERT, X; Cote, P.; DELINIKOLAS, N; MILTIADOU FEZANS, A

    2004-01-01

    Due to the 1999 Athens earthquake, both the masonry structure and the mosaics of the Katholikon of Dafni's Monastery have suffered severe damages. In order to design the appropriate intervention scheme for mosaic conservation, first for the detection and mapping of delaminated mosaic's areas, and second for the monitoring the movement of the grout during infection, using a non-destructive testing such as ground penetrating radar, presents a great interest. Two experimental studies have been r...

  17. High-Performance Grouting Mortar Based on Mineral Admixtures

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A study on high-performance grouting mortar is reported. The common mortar was modified by mineral admixtures such as gypsum, bauxite, and alunite. The effects of mineral admixtures on the fluidity, setting time, expansion, strength, and other properties of mortar were evaluated experimentally. The microstructure of the modified mortar was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Moreover, the expansive performance and strength of th...

  18. Mosaic-grouting monitoring by ground penetrating radar

    OpenAIRE

    Cote, P.; DEROBERT, X; DELINIKOLAS, N; MINOS, N; MILTIADOU FEZANS, A

    2004-01-01

    Due to the 1999 Athens earthquake, both the masonry structure and the mosaics of the Katholikon of Dafni's Monastery have suffered severe damages. In order to design the appropriate intervention scheme for mosaic conservation, first for the detection and mapping of delaminated mosaic's areas, and second for the monitoring the movement of the grout during infection, using a non-destructive testing such as ground penetrating radar, presents a great interest. Two experimental studies have been r...

  19. Radiolytic and thermal generation of gases from Hanford grout samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, D.; Jonah, C.D.; Kapoor, S.; Matheson, M.S.; Mulac, W.A.

    1993-10-01

    Gamma irradiation of WHC-supplied samples of grouted Tank 102-AP simulated nonradioactive waste has been carried out at three dose rates, 0.25, 0.63, and 130 krad/hr. The low dose rate corresponds to that in the actual grout vaults; with the high dose rate, doses equivalent to more than 40 years in the grout vault were achieved. An average G(H{sub 2}) = 0.047 molecules/100 eV was found, independent of dose rate. The rate of H2 production decreases above 80 Mrad. For other gases, G(N{sub 2}) = 0.12, G(O{sub 2}) = 0.026, G(N{sub 2}O) = 0.011 and G(CO) = 0.0042 at 130 krad/hr were determined. At lower dose rates, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} could not be measured because of interference by trapped air. The value of G(H{sub 2}) is higher than expected, suggesting segregation of water from nitrate and nitrite salts in the grout. The total pressure generated by the radiolysis at 130 krad/h has been independently measured, and total amounts of gases generated were calculated from this measurement. Good agreement between this measurement and the sum of all the gases that were independently determined was obtained. Therefore, the individual gas measurements account for most of the major components that are generated by the radiolysis. At 90 {degree}C, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O were generated at a rate that could be described by exponential formation of each of the gases. Gases measured at the lower temperatures were probably residual trapped gases. An as yet unknown product interfered with oxygen determinations at temperatures above ambient. The thermal results do not affect the radiolytic findings.

  20. Theoretical model and solution for the rheological problem of anchor-grouting a soft rock tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an analytical method for analysis of the soft rock tunnel, based on a model dividing soft rock tunnels into a region of anchor-grouting and a region of non-anchor-grouting surrounding rock. The Poynting-Thomson model and the Kelvin-Hooke model are applied to the region of non-anchor-grouting surrounding rock and the region of anchor-grouting, respectively. Stress expressions in the region of non-anchor-grouting surrounding rock and the region of anchor-grouting are obtained. Expanding the expression of displacements in the region of anchor-grouting into a Maclaurin series, and utilizing the cumulative displacement curve of the surrounding rock through observation, a theoretical model is set up. This model and its solution for the rheology problem of anchor-grouting a soft tunnel have been proved to be effective in practical engineering; according to the Mohr-Coulomb yield condition, a safe criterion for an anchor-grouting soft rock of a tunnel can be found

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON IMPROVEMENT OF DEFORMATION AND STRENGTH OF ROCK MASSES BY GROUT TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsuki, Shinji; Oyanagi, Satoshi; Yoshino, Naoto; Naruse, Takuya; Asakura, Toshihiro; Kikuchi, Kohkichi

    The purpose of consolidation grouting for dam foundation is to improve the permeability and mechanical properties of rock masses. For permeability, the grouting effect is usually confirmed by the permeability test at check holes. But for the change of mechanical properties, it has been difficult of confirmation. So, the mechanical improvement of foundation by grouting, like the changes of elasticity and strength, has not been considered in dam foundation design. In this study, an in-situ and laboratory tests were made in order to examine the grouting effect on mechanical properties of rock masses.

  2. Effects of curing time and frequency on ultrasonic wave velocity in grouted rock bolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenga, V.; Zou, D. H.; Zhang, C.

    2006-05-01

    Grouted rock bolts are widely used to reinforce excavated ground in mining and civil engineering structures. To date, opportunities for testing the quality of the grout in grouted rock bolts have been limited to the pull-out tests and the over-coring methods. Both these methods are destructive, time-consuming and costly. These deficiencies have fueled research into the use of ultrasonic methods for testing the quality of the grout in rock bolts. However, only partial success has been achieved in these efforts chiefly due to inadequate knowledge of the ultrasonic wave characteristics such as wave velocity in grouted rock bolts. This paper presents results of an experimental study into the effects of curing time and testing frequency on the velocity of ultrasonic waves propagating along rock bolts grouted in concrete. A substantial wave velocity decrease, as much as 47.7% at certain frequencies, was recorded in rock bolts grouted in fully cured concrete in comparison to non-grouted bolts. The results demonstrate the importance of optimizing the selection of test frequencies as well as suggesting the possibility of a new approach based on wave velocity decrease for testing the grout quality of rock bolts.

  3. Brief overview of the various families of grouts and their aplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandts, A.

    1989-04-01

    It is difficult to maintain an up-to-date overview of all the grouts presently used on the international market. Better grouts are continuously developed and more formulators are making their appearance. Consequently, it is difficult to clearly define all of the products in the industry. This topic has been the subject of numerous papers and textbooks. Most authors, however, only focus on their fields of interest: applications in geotechnical, or rehabilitation, or seepage control in civil engineering, oil or mining industry. There has been a limited transfer of technology from one field to the other because of the enormous differences in magnitude, site conditions and consequently the application techniques. The tools an engineer has are: his expertise in grouting and engineering background, equipment available or to be designed or modified to carry out a particular job, relevant data available from other sciences, and products with a variety of characteristics. This paper concentrates on product selection. The most suitable product for a particular project requires a good understanding of the general chemical and mechanical characteristics of the grout. The grouts have been classified into four categories for the purpose of this paper. There may be other methods of classification; however, this is only an attempt to help the industry with the selection of the most suitable grout for a given application. The four categories are: suspension grouts, chemical grouts, hot melts, and precipitation grouts. 1 fig.

  4. The thermal behaviour of three different auger pressure grouted piles used as heat exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Loveridge, F.; Olgun, C.G.; Brettmann, T.; Powrie, W.

    2014-01-01

    Three auger pressure grouted (APG) test piles were constructed at a site in Richmond, Texas. The piles were each equipped with two U-loops of heat transfer pipes so that they could function as pile heat exchangers. The piles were of two different diameters and used two different grouts, a standard APG grout and a thermally enhanced grout. Thermal response tests, where fluid heated at a constant rate is circulated through the pipe loops, were carried out on the three piles, utilising either ...

  5. Laboratory Evaluation of Underwater Grouting of CPP-603 Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, V.J.; Pao, J.H.; Demmer, R.L.; Tripp, J.L.

    2002-01-17

    A project is underway to deactivate a Fuel Storage Basin. The project specifies the requirements and identifies the tasks that will be performed for deactivation of the CPP- 603 building at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Fuel Receiving and Storage Building (CPP- 603) was originally used to receive and store spent nuclear fuel from various facilities. The area to undergo deactivation includes the three spent nuclear fuel storage basins and a transfer canal (1.5 million gallons of water storage). Deactivation operations at the task site include management of the hot storage boxes and generic fuel objects, removal of the fuel storage racks, basin sludge, water evaporation and basin grouting, and interior equipment, tanks, and associated components. This includes a study to develop a grout formulation and placement process for this deactivation project. Water will be allowed to passively evaporate to r educe the spread of contamination from the walls of the basin. The basins will be filled with grout, underwater, as the water evaporates to maintain the basin water at a safe level. The objective of the deactivation project is to eliminate potential exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials and eliminate potential safety hazards associated with the CPP-603 building.

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Underwater Grouting of CPP-603 Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Virgil James; Pao, Jenn Hai; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Tripp, Julia Lynn

    2002-02-01

    A project is underway to deactivate a Fuel Storage Basin. The project specifies the requirements and identifies the tasks that will be performed for deactivation of the CPP- 603 building at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Fuel Receiving and Storage Building (CPP- 603) was originally used to receive and store spent nuclear fuel from various facilities. The area to undergo deactivation includes the three spent nuclear fuel storage basins and a transfer canal (1.5 million gallons of water storage). Deactivation operations at the task site include management of the hot storage boxes and generic fuel objects, removal of the fuel storage racks, basin sludge, water evaporation and basin grouting, and interior equipment, tanks, and associated components. This includes a study to develop a grout formulation and placement process for this deactivation project. Water will be allowed to passively evaporate to reduce the spread of contamination from the walls of the basin. The basins will be filled with grout, underwater, as the water evaporates to maintain the basin water at a safe level. The objective of the deactivation project is to eliminate potential exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials and eliminate potential safety hazards associated with the CPP-603 building.

  7. ENGINEERING PROJECTS IN APPLYING GROUTING INTO OPTIMIZATION DESIGN OF FOUNDATION PLAN%灌浆法在地基基础方案优化设计中的工程实例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凯文

    2011-01-01

    采用硅酸盐水泥作为加固材料对地基灌浆加固,造价低、效果好.某群艺馆地基注浆充填加固,通过基础设计两种方案(即预制桩与灌浆充填加固后设计独立柱基)比选,综合选定地基处理方案,设计施工检测后,灌浆法对地基承载力的提高、减小不均匀沉降效果良好.某宿舍楼逆作法灌浆工程,通过基础设计两种方案(大开挖土层与灌浆法加固局部软弱层后基础浅埋)比选,采用灌浆法加固粉土、消除液化及地基不均匀沉降.%This paper takes two projects as examples, in which portland cement is used as the reinforcement material to make a consolidation over ground foundation by grouting.This has been proved that it has lower cost but better result. Example one is that Qunyi Art Museum used grouting to fill and consolidate its foundation. It has compared between two original plans for foundation design (precast pile and grouting after filling and consolidation to establish independent stylopodium), and the plan of foundation treatment has been chosen. In construction, it has been proved that grouting can improve bearing capacity of foundation soil and decrease differential settlement. In example two, grouting through topdown construction method has been applied to the building of one dormitory apartment. Similarly, two plans(deep excavating and grouting to reinforce partial weak stratum for shallow-embedded foundation) were compared, and grouting was used to consolidate floury soil, remove liquefaction and differential settlement of foundation.

  8. Dimensional stability of materials based on Portland cement at the early stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa Yandy, Angélica; Zerbino, Raúl L.; Giaccio, Graciela M.; Russo, Nélida A.; Duchowicz, Ricardo

    2014-09-01

    In this work two fiber optic sensing techniques are used to study the dimensional stability in fresh state of different cementitious materials. A conventional Portland cement mortar and two commercial grouts were selected. The measurements were performed by using a Bragg grating embedded in the material and a non-contact Fizeau interferometer. The first technique was applied in a horizontal sample scheme, and the second one, by using a vertical configuration. In addition, a mechanical length comparator was used in the first case in order to compare the results. The evolution with time of the dimensional changes of the samples and the analysis of the observed behavior are included.

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  10. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Hasan; Hanifi BİNİCİ

    1995-01-01

    Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, ce...

  11. Study on applicability of clay-based grout injection in the excavated damaged zone around the plug (TSX project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JNC has joined the international joint project, the TSX project, with AECL at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada. Full-scale sealing technologies are applied to an underground tunnel in the TSX project. Regarding clay grouting, which supports the performance of the clay plug, a grouting experiment in the Excavated Damaged Zone around the tunnel was performed in the TSX project. A pre-injection test was the trial for the development of the grouting procedure, and the injection test was to evaluate the grouting effectiveness of the grouting in the EDZ around the tunnel. The results of the experiments showed the efficiency injection concentration of the grout slurry was between 4.0 and 6.0wt%. Grouted EDZ had lower hydraulic conductivity than that before grouting. (author)

  12. A clay grouting technique for granitic rock adjacent to clay bulkhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, K.; Sugita, Y.; Fujita, T.; Martino, J. B.; Kozak, E. T.; Dixon, D. A.

    Excavation and re-distribution of the stress around the tunnel lead to the development of an excavation damage zone (EDZ). While the bulkheads are keyed into the rock wall of the tunnel to act as cut-offs for the EDZ of the tunnel, clay grouting was conducted around the clay bulkhead as an additional measure to interrupt the connectivity of EDZ at the bulkhead. Clay grouting is being tested to determine if it is an effective method to reduce the permeability of fractured rock. The grouting into the EDZ is difficult because many of the fractures in the EDZ are connected with the excavation surface and cannot be filled efficiently by pressurizing the grout slurry. Therefore, the in situ injection tests of the clay grouting technique for the EDZ adjacent to the clay bulkhead were conducted to demonstrate the clay grouting technique and to estimate the ability of clay grouting to reduce permeability in the EDZ. This paper presents the results of these tests. Three in situ tests of clay grouting were performed during the Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX), conducted at Canada’s Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in the granitic rock to demonstrate technologies for tunnel sealing at full-scale. First, a clay grouting trial was conducted at a trial key in the tunnel about 25 m above the TSX tunnel. Secondly, the two series of clay grouting were performed in the TSX tunnel, on the upstream face of the key prior to the installation of the seal material of the clay key and later on the downstream side of the bulkhead. The results of these tests indicated a reduction in the permeability of granitic rock around the holes after grouting.

  13. The effect of sulfate activation on the early age hydration of BFS:PC composite cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk; Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Milestone, N.B.

    2015-09-15

    Blast furnace slag/Portland cement composites are routinely used for immobilising intermediate level nuclear wastes in the UK. Using high cement replacement levels reduces hydration exotherm and lowers pH. Although a lower grout pH will be beneficial in reducing the corrosion of certain encapsulated reactive metals such as aluminium, the degree of slag reaction will also be lower which may result in the formation of less hydration products and which in turn may reduce the capacity to immobilise waste ions. Adding neutral salts such as calcium and sodium sulfate to the composite cement can potentially increase slag activation without significantly altering the pH of the cement matrix. Thus the corrosion of any encapsulated metals would not be affected. This paper describes some of the properties of a hydrated 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement matrix containing added sulfates of calcium and sodium. The findings show that all additives caused an increase in the amount of slag that reacted when cured for up to 28 days. This produced more material able to chemically bind waste ions. Activation with gypsum produced the highest rate of slag reaction.

  14. The effect of sulfate activation on the early age hydration of BFS:PC composite cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blast furnace slag/Portland cement composites are routinely used for immobilising intermediate level nuclear wastes in the UK. Using high cement replacement levels reduces hydration exotherm and lowers pH. Although a lower grout pH will be beneficial in reducing the corrosion of certain encapsulated reactive metals such as aluminium, the degree of slag reaction will also be lower which may result in the formation of less hydration products and which in turn may reduce the capacity to immobilise waste ions. Adding neutral salts such as calcium and sodium sulfate to the composite cement can potentially increase slag activation without significantly altering the pH of the cement matrix. Thus the corrosion of any encapsulated metals would not be affected. This paper describes some of the properties of a hydrated 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement matrix containing added sulfates of calcium and sodium. The findings show that all additives caused an increase in the amount of slag that reacted when cured for up to 28 days. This produced more material able to chemically bind waste ions. Activation with gypsum produced the highest rate of slag reaction

  15. Structural Health Monitoring of a Grouted Foundation Part for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Pedersen, B. j.;

    2013-01-01

    a structural health monitoring (SHM) method for detecting failures in a grouted connection. A finite element model representing different assumed damage stages of the grout connection is established and acceleration time series are simulated. A time series model based on the SHM method indicates that minor...

  16. Use of bacterial ureolysis for improved gelation of colloidal silica in rock grouting

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, Erica

    2013-04-01

    Low pH grouts that are capable of penetrating fine aperture fractures are increasingly being developed for use in engineering applications. One such grout is colloidal silica, which has an initial low viscosity and on destabilisation, typically using a saline solution, develops into a sol-gel. We propose here for the first time that bacterial ureolysis using Sporosarcina pasteurii can be used as an accelerator to destabilise colloidal silica in a much more controlled fashion than via saline solution alone. A number of different accelerators have been investigated in this study including sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ammonium chloride and bacterially-induced production of ammonium ions by ureolysis. For each accelerator, we experimentally determine the gel time and rate of gelation using viscosity measurements, and the shear strength of the grouts after 1 day and 7 days. We demonstrate that using bacterial ureolysis as a means of destabilising colloidal silica, leads to longer gel times than for the direct addition of a traditional chemical accelerator at the same concentration. In addition, for grouts with similar gel times we have illustrated that the bacterial grout has a higher rate of gelation and a higher final shear strength than a grout destabilised by a chemical accelerator. These results suggest that bacterial ureolysis could potentially be used in rock grouting to achieve longer gel times and hence greater penetration, while also maintaining sufficiently rapid gelation to minimise issues related to fingering and erosion of the fresh grout.

  17. Numerical simulation of attenuation and group velocity of guided ultrasonic wave in grouted rock bolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Zou, D. H.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, the guided ultrasonic wave propagating in grouted rock bolts was simulated with finite element method. An 800 mm partially grouted cylindrical rock bolt model was created. Dynamic input signals with frequency from 25 to 100 kHz were used to excite ultrasonic wave. The simulated waveform, group velocity and amplitude ratio matched well with the experimental results. This model made it possible to study the behaviour of the guided waves in the grouted bolt along its central axis. Analysis of the simulated results showed that the group velocity in grouted rock bolts is constant along the grouted length, and the boundary effect on the group velocity is negligible. This paper also presents methods to determine the attenuation coefficient from simulation and to determine the boundary effect on attenuation at the bolt ends. The analysis showed that the attenuation of the guided wave propagating inside the grouted bolts is similar to the theoretical solution in steel bar with infinite length. After correction for the boundary effects the grout length of a grouted rock bolt can be determined using the measured attenuation, with sufficient accuracy.

  18. An Approximate Analytical Solution for Grout Transport Modeling:A Case Study in Luling Mining, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Jia-zhong; GE Xiao-guang; ZHOU Nian-qing

    2008-01-01

    This case study describes the effects of a grouting process developed to decrease groundwater flow exiting from a ruptured mine ventilation shaft lining in Luling coal mine at Huaibei, China. The primary purpose of grouting at this site is to prevent groundwater flow into the mine from adjacent aquifers. The study supports a transport perspective to describe the miscible grout movement, and provides an approximate analytical method to determine grout concentration based on Wilson and Miller's (1978) model. This study shows hat the breakthrough curves (BTCs) established from the Wilson and Miller's model match the experimental BTCs obtained from test grouting performed at the site, and Rd a retardation factor of 1.1 is determined. The retardation factor and the BTC are subsequently used to guide the actual production grouting. The monitored result shows that the groundwater inflow at the disrupted ventilation well has been reduced by 47% after drilling and grouting just one borehole. The discharge rate was measured at no more than 4 m3/h after completion of four injection boreholes, which is about 13% of the 30 m3/h before grouting.

  19. Characterization of simulated low-level waste grout produced in a pilot-scale test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of a pilot-scale grout test were to determine the homogeneity of the grout produced under conditions similar to those planned for the TGF, to evaluate performance of candidate grout processing equipment for the TGF, and to evaluate properties of grout that was produced during continuous operation over an extended time period and cured in a large monolith. This report addresses the first and third objectives. Tests were conducted on pilot-scale grout slurry, simulated waste solution, dry solids blend samples, and cured grout samples. Grout slurry collected at two points during the pilot-scale test and slurry produced in the laboratory were characterized by measuring rheology, drainable liquid, and penetration resistance. Cured grout samples included samples collected during the pilot-scale test and cured in the laboratory, samples produced in the laboratory, samples obtained from tubes inserted into the monolith, and samples from cored sections of the monolith. Tests conducted on the cured samples included compressive strength, density, ultrasonic pulse velocity, leachability, and microstructural characterization. 10 refs., 12 figs., 16 tabs

  20. Heat transfer analyses for grout disposal of radioactive double-shell slurry and customer wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grout immobilization is being considered by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell Hanford) as a permanent disposal method for several radioactive waste streams. These include disposal of customer and double-shell slurry wastes in earthen trenches and in single-shell underground waste storage tanks. Heat transfer studies have previously been made to determine the maximum heat loading for grout disposal of various wastes under similar conditions, but a sensitivity analysis of temperature profiles to input parameters was needed. This document presents the results of heat transfer calculations for trenches containing grouted customer and double-shell slurry wastes and for in situ disposal of double-shell wastes in single-shell, domed concrete storage tanks. It discusses the conditions that lead to maximum grout temperatures of 2500F during the curing stage and 3500F thereafter and shows the dependence of these temperatures on input parameters such as soil and grout thermal conductivity, grout specific heat, waste loading, and disposal geometries. Transient heat transfer calculations were made using the HEATING6 computer code to predict temperature profiles in solidified low-level radioactive waste disposal scenarios at the Rockwell Hanford site. The calculations provide guidance for the development of safe, environmentally acceptable grout formulas for the Transportable Grout Facility. 11 refs

  1. Durability of particulate grouts: For isolation of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the years particulate grouts have been used for isolating low-concerns that over time and following exposure to adverse environmental conditions, durability of the grouts may become grossly affected and contamination of groundwater system may result. To address some of these problems, a detailed laboratory study was conducted to characterize the fabric and performance of particulate grouts. Before and after exposure to several wet-dry and freeze-thaw cycles, pore size distribution measurements via mercury intrusion porosimetry, unconfined compressive strength, permeability and pulse velocity tests were performed on the studied grouts. Prediction equations were developed for assessing grout durability. Formulation factors: water/solid ratio; mix composition, and interaction between these were found to have significant statistical effect on both wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability of the studied grouts. Fly ash in excess of 30% by weight of total solids present, was found to lower durability considerably. Addition of 7 grams of fiber to the high fly ash grout mix improved durability. Silica fume caused considerable reduction in pore sizes and initial grain in strength, but appear to lower durability particularly under wet-dry conditions. Latex, showed a potential for use as an additive for formulating durable grout mixes. Statistically based design procedures were developed to aid the waste management practitioner to select a range of formulation factors that will assure a desired magnitude of behavior over a specified service period

  2. GEOTECHNICAL ASPECTS OF BOTTOM SEALING EXISTING HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILLS BY INJECTION GROUTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary results are given of compatibility testing for various grouts with selected hazardous wastes. The testing is a part of an ongoing project to determine the geotechnical feasibility of utilizing selected grouts and state-of-the-art techniques in the bottom sealing of ex...

  3. Pilot-scale grout production using a simulated low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program under way at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of selected liquid radioactive wastes to a cementitious grout form for near-surface disposal. Grout slurry, consisting of a mixture of liquid waste and a solids blend, will be pumped to near-surface disposal vaults where it will harden, thereby immobilizing the waste. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been supporting the program through pilot-scale tests, performance assessments, and formulation verification activities. A pilot-scale test was conducted in July 1986 to assess the effectiveness of the grouting operations and to characterize grout produced with pilot-scale equipment and disposed of in a monolithic form. The objectives of the pilot-scale test were threefold: to determine the homogeneity of the grout produced under conditions similar to those planned for the GTF (grout treatment facility), to evaluate performance of candidate grout processing equipment for the GTF, and to evaluate properties of grout produced during continuous operation over an extended time period and cured in a large monolith

  4. Capacity and failure mechanism of laterally loaded jet-grouting reinforced piles: Field and numerical investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ben; WANG LiZhong; HONG Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the results of field and numerical investigations of lateral stiffness,capacity,and failure mechanisms for plain piles and reinforced concrete piles in soft clay.A plastic-damage model is used to simulate concrete piles and jet-grouting in the numerical analyses.The field study and numerical investigations show that by applying jet-grouting surrounding the upper 7.5D (D =pile diameter) of a pile,lateral stiffness and bearing capacity of the pile are increased by about 110% and 100%,respectively.This is partially because the jet-grouting increases the apparent diameter of the pile,so as to enlarge the extent of failure wedge and hence passive resistance in front of the reinforced pile.Moreover,the jet-grouting provides a circumferential confinement to the concrete pile,which suppresses development of tensile stress in the pile.Correspondingly,tension-induced plastic damage in the concrete pile is reduced,causing less degradation of stiffness and strength of the pile than that of a plain pile.Effectiveness of the circumferential confinement provided by the jet-grouting,however,diminishes once the grouting cracks because of the significant vertical and circumferential tensile stress near its mid-depth.The lateral capacity of the jet-grouting reinforced pile is,therefore,governed by mobilized passive resistance of soil and plastic damage of jet-grouting.

  5. Calculation method of composite foundation sedimentation of grouting pile with cover plate under embankment load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾长存; 洪昌地; 马文彬; 李雪平

    2008-01-01

    Grouting pile is a new soft soil foundation treatment method with characteristics such as no vibration, no noise, no soil compaction, light construction machines and quick construction velocity and so on. At present, study on reinforcement mechanism and design calculation method of composite foundation of grouting pile is initially started without design specifications, so it is usually required to draw on design specifications of stump pile when designing composite foundation of grouting pile while grouting pile has its characteristics and difference although reinforcement mechanisms and construction processes of two types of piles are similar. Sedimentation formula of composite foundation of grouting pile with cover plate is educed and a suitable deformation mode is proposed by aiming to deformation characteristics of composite foundation of grouting pile with cover plate under embankment load on basis of relevant sedimentation theories of composite foundation by combination of characteristics of composite foundation of grouting pile. The sedimentation calculation formula of grouting pile with cover plate under embankment load is educed according to balance relation of force and displacement coordination conditions by elastic theory and sedimentation calculation model established is validated by sedimentation monitoring documents of one expressway in China.

  6. Characterisation, design and execution of two grouting fans at 450 m level, Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmelin, Ann [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Magnus [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Fransson, Aasa [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    During June 2003 a grouting field experiment was carried out at Aespoe HRL, in connection with the construction of a tunnel (TASQ) for the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE). The tunnel is situated in connection to the elevator shaft landing at 450 m depth and runs in direction N/E. The grouting was carried out as part of the ordinary construction work, but was accompanied by extra investigations and analyses during operations and an active adaptation of a basic grouting design to the encountered conditions. The main objectives of this set-up were to Investigate what can be achieved with best available technology, material and knowledge under the current conditions, i.e. a relatively tight crystalline rock mass at great depth; Collect data and evaluate theories resulting from previous research projects on characterisation and predictions on grout spread; Collect data to further develop those above mentioned theories; Contribute to the achievement of good conditions at the experimental site for the pillar stability experiments. The characterization method is based on analyses of stepwise investigations consisting of investigations in an initially drilled core-drill hole followed by probe and grouting boreholes with pressure-build-up tests and measuring of inflow during drilling, all aiming at identifying the singular fractures that are to be sealed. The decision about grouting design is based on the successively up-dated rock description from the characterization and iterative selection and testing of grouting design and grout in a numeric model, resulting in an expected grout spread and sealing effect. Based on investigations and analysis of results from investigations of a core-drilled hole at the site, a basic design was set up, together with conditions for application. Probe boreholes covering the first anticipated fan gave substantially larger inflows than expected, and subsequently the design was changed. A first round was drilled and grouted, sealing

  7. Characterisation, design and execution of two grouting fans at 450 m level, Aespoe HRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During June 2003 a grouting field experiment was carried out at Aespoe HRL, in connection with the construction of a tunnel (TASQ) for the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE). The tunnel is situated in connection to the elevator shaft landing at 450 m depth and runs in direction N/E. The grouting was carried out as part of the ordinary construction work, but was accompanied by extra investigations and analyses during operations and an active adaptation of a basic grouting design to the encountered conditions. The main objectives of this set-up were to Investigate what can be achieved with best available technology, material and knowledge under the current conditions, i.e. a relatively tight crystalline rock mass at great depth; Collect data and evaluate theories resulting from previous research projects on characterisation and predictions on grout spread; Collect data to further develop those above mentioned theories; Contribute to the achievement of good conditions at the experimental site for the pillar stability experiments. The characterization method is based on analyses of stepwise investigations consisting of investigations in an initially drilled core-drill hole followed by probe and grouting boreholes with pressure-build-up tests and measuring of inflow during drilling, all aiming at identifying the singular fractures that are to be sealed. The decision about grouting design is based on the successively up-dated rock description from the characterization and iterative selection and testing of grouting design and grout in a numeric model, resulting in an expected grout spread and sealing effect. Based on investigations and analysis of results from investigations of a core-drilled hole at the site, a basic design was set up, together with conditions for application. Probe boreholes covering the first anticipated fan gave substantially larger inflows than expected, and subsequently the design was changed. A first round was drilled and grouted, sealing

  8. Experimental study on the compressive strength of grouted concrete block masonry based on nondestructive detection methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong-bin; LI Long-fei

    2009-01-01

    Existing nondestructive detection methods were adopted to test the compressive strength of grouted concrete block masonry, i.e. the rebound method, pulling-out method and core drilling method were employed to test the strength of block, mortar and grouted concrete, respectively. The suitability of these methods for the testing of strength of grouted concrete block masonry was discussed, and the comprehensive strength of block masonry was appraised by combining existing nondestructive or micro-destructive detection methods. The nondestructive detection test on 25 grouted concrete block masonry specimens was carried out. Experimental results show that these methods mentioned above are applicable for the strength detection of grouted concrete block masonry. Moreover, the formulas of compressive strength, detection methods and proposals are given as well.

  9. Bonding stress-slip constitutive behavior between bars and grout concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yi; LIU Ming; ZHOU Jing-hai; WANG Bing

    2009-01-01

    To establish bonding stress--slip constitutive model between bars and grout concrete, 13 test specimens were employed to study the bonding behavior and the force transfer of bars adhered to grout concrete. The bonding stress development of bars adhered to grout concrete was analyzed. The local bonding stress--slip curve was obtained. Based on the test results, a new bonding stress--slip constitutive model between bars and grout concrete was proposed. The results show that the maximum bonding stress is not influenced by the bar bond length, but it is strengthened when the splitting strength of grout concrete is increased. The model matches the experimental results well, and the regressing coefficient equals 1.7.

  10. Introducing aggregate into grouting material and its influence on load transfer of the rock bolting system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Chen; Ren Ting; Chris Cook

    2014-01-01

    A fully grouted bolt provides greater shear load capacity for transmitting the load from the rock to the bolt, and vice versa. When grout fills irregularities between the bolt and the rock, a keying effect is cre-ated to transfer the load to the bolt via shear resistance at the interface and within the grout. Previous research has revealed that the mechanical properties of the grout had a great impact on the load transfer capacity of the rock bolting system. This paper presents a method to enhance the rock bolting strength by introducing metal granules into the grouting material. Experimental results suggest that both the average peak load of pullout tests and the total energy absorption of the system will increase if some metal gran-ules are mixed into the resin.

  11. Treatment of Shuozhou-Huanghua Railway Subgrade Settlement Using High Pressure Jet Grouting Pile%用高压旋喷斜桩整治朔黄铁路路基下沉病害

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭龙龙; 邹正盛; 程克森

    2011-01-01

    The method, construction technical parameters and control parameters, and construction process of high pressure jet grouting pile for reinforcement of K65 + 490 ~ + 770 settled section of Shuozhou-Huanghua Railway are introduced in this paper. Through high pressure grouting, grout and soil are mixed well to form cement geogrid to improve shear strength and bearing capacity of subgrade soil and prevent settlement. It is shown from site observation and detection that subgrade settlement has been cured.%介绍朔黄铁路K65+490~+770路基下沉地段用高压旋喷斜桩加固的方法、施工技术参数和施工控制参数的确定以及施工工艺流程.通过对路堤进行高压注浆,其水泥浆、泥土经充分混合搅拌形成网格状水泥土骨架,从而达到提高路基土的抗剪强度、承载力和阻止路基下沉的目的.现场观测与检测表明,路基下沉病害得到了根治.

  12. Gamma irradiation test report of simulated grout specimens for gas generation/liquid advection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results from an irradiation test performed on four specimens of grout that were fabricated from synthetic Double Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) liquid waste. The objective was to investigate the radiolytic generation of gases and the potential for advective rejection of waste liquids from the grout matrix and to provide experimental information for the validation of the C-Cubed calculated model. It has been demonstrated that a number of gases can be formed within the grout due to radiolytic decomposition of various chemical components that make up the grout. This observation leads to the conjecture that the potential exists for the rejection of a portion of the 60 vol% free liquid from the grout matrix driven by pressurization by these gases. It was found that, for the specimen geometries used in this test series, and for peak radiation dose accumulation rates on the order of 4 to 60 times of the initial rate expected in the grout vaults (300 Rads/hr), no liquid rejection was observed from 2% to 35% of the target exposure expected in the grout vaults (1E+08 Rads). When the irradiation rate exceeded the projected grout vault dose rate by a factor of 200 a small amount of liquid rejection was observed from one of two specimens that had received 20% more than the goal exposure. Because of the differences in the magnitudes of the relative radiation field strengths between this study and an actual grout vault, it is concluded that the potential for liquid rejection by internal gas pressurization from presently configured grout waste forms is very low for the expected conditions

  13. Application of grouting technology in the boiler room maintenance%注浆技术在锅炉房维护中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘坤; 王琳琳

    2015-01-01

    针对伊新煤业锅炉房下方地基下沉,从采用黄土浆和水泥浆充填空洞区以控制沉降的角度出发,系统设计注浆充填工艺,保证了锅炉房使用安全,取得了显著的经济效益和社会效益。%In view of the beneath foundation of Yili Xinwen Mining Group Coal Industry boiler room sinking, this paper system designs of grouting process from the loess slurry and cement slurry iflling hole area in order to control the settlement and ensures the safe use of the boiler room, and has gained remarkable economic beneifts and social beneifts.

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  15. The Effect of Polymer-Cement Stabilization on the Unconfined Compressive Strength of Liquefiable Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ateş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil stabilization has been widely used as an alternative to substitute the lack of suitable material on site. The use of nontraditional chemical stabilizers in soil improvement is growing daily. In this study a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of waterborne polymer on unconfined compression strength and to study the effect of cement grout on pre-venting of liquefiable sandy soils. The laboratory tests were performed including grain size of sandy soil, unit weight, ultrasonic pulse velocity, and unconfined compressive strength test. The sand and various amounts of polymer (1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% and cement (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% were mixed with all of them into dough using mechanical kneader in laboratory conditions. Grouting experiment is performed with a cylindrical mould of  mm. The samples were subjected to unconfined compression tests to determine their strength after 7 and 14 days of curing. The results of the tests indicated that the waterborne polymer significantly improved the unconfined compression strength of sandy soils which have susceptibility of liquefaction.

  16. Estimation of deformation and stiffness of fractures close to tunnels using data from single-hole hydraulic testing and grouting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

    2010-05-01

    Sealing of tunnels in fractured rocks is commonly performed by pre- or post-excavation grouting. The grouting boreholes are frequently drilled close to the tunnel wall, an area where rock stresses can be low and fractures can more easily open up during grout pressurization. In this paper we suggest that data from hydraulic testing and grouting can be used to identify grout-induced fracture opening, to estimate fracture stiffness of such fractures, and to evaluate its impact on the grout performance. A conceptual model and a method are presented for estimating fracture stiffness. The method is demonstrated using grouting data from four pre-excavation grouting boreholes at a shallow tunnel (50 m) in Nygard, Sweden, and two post-excavation grouting boreholes at a deep tunnel (450 m) in Aespoe HRL, Sweden. The estimated stiffness of intersecting fractures for the boreholes at the shallow Nygard tunnel are low (2-5 GPa/m) and in agreement with literature data from field experiments at other fractured rock sites. Higher stiffness was obtained for the deeper tunnel boreholes at Aespoe which is reasonable considering that generally higher rock stresses are expected at greater depths. Our method of identifying and evaluating the properties and impact of deforming fractures might be most applicable when grouting takes place in boreholes adjacent to the tunnel wall, where local stresses might be low and where deforming (opening) fractures may take most of the grout.

  17. Automatic system of dam grouting in Tenjin dam construction works; Tenjin damu kensetsu koji ni okeru gurauchingu no jidoka system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanaga, K.

    1996-03-01

    Since construction management of grouting is controlled by many factors like operators` technical skill and experience, grouting quality is not expected to be good and random and deteriorated quality is feared. Reduction of random quality with different operating individuals and prevention of simple miss due to human errors are expected to be necessary factors to ensure stable quality. Automatic system for Tenjin dam`s grouting quality is developed and its outline is reported in this research study. Considering grouting system`s flow and system`s drawing, grouting automatic system`s summary is explained. Again present grouting automatic system is compared with past systems reported in literature. Then operating personnel cut down in automation of grouting, artificial miss prevention in automatic supplement judgement system, needed time reduction in supplement decision and labor saving are made it possible. Details of above mentioned points are illustrated clearly. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF DETERIORATED HISTORIC MASONRY STRUCTURES REINFORCED BY MICROBIAL GROUTING METHOD%劣化古建砖石砌体的微生物注浆加固试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨钻; 程晓辉

    2015-01-01

    微生物灌浆加固劣化砌体结构是在不适合使用石灰、水泥和环氧树脂等传统灌浆材料情况下,在被加固空腔内原位填充颗粒,使其作为加固材料的骨架,并通过注入微生物和胶凝溶液的方法,在填充颗粒孔隙内诱导生成碳酸钙、胶凝颗粒,形成具有一定强度的微生物砂浆体。通过微生物加固实验室简化模型与现场灌浆试验等方法相结合,对高强度微生物砂浆加固各类劣化砌体的方法进行优化研究,为微生物灌浆技术应用于高质量砖石砌体文物建筑加固提供了有益的经验。%Microbial grouting reinforcement to repair the deterioration of masonry structures involves injecting microorganisms and nutrient solution ( a cementation solution ) into existing granular system pores to induce the generated calcium carbonate cementation to form a microbial mortar of certain strength. Microbial grouting reinforcement is used when traditional grouting materials, such as lime, cement and epoxy, cannot be employed.The effects of the main factors on the strength formation of microbial mortar were systematically studied through the simplified laboratory and in-situ models.Thus, the methods for strengthening all sorts of deteriorated masonries by high-strength microbial mortar could be optimized, which would provide a basis for the using of microbial grouting technique in high-quality reinforcement of historical masonry buildings.

  20. 灌浆压力稳定性控制的流体力学模型研究%Study on fluid dynamics model under grouting pressure stability control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 张联志; 徐蒙

    2013-01-01

    根据水泥浆液的Navier-Stokes方程及连续性方程,采用特征线法建立了灌浆管道非定常流动的动态流体力学模型.其中包括划分网格,单管混合问题的特征线差分法等,将整个灌浆管路简化为一系列描述管道、设备、灌浆孔、调节阀的非线性代数方程组,并采用Newton-Raphson法进行了求解.基于该模型的GYPC控制系统可将波动的灌浆压力在短时间内调节控制在±0.02MPa范围内,表明该流体力学模型是合理与实用的.%According to Navier-Stokes(N-S) equation and the continuity equation of the cement slurry,The unsteady fluid dynamic model of grouting pipeline is established by the characteristic line method,including meshing,single mixed problem of the characteristic difference method etc.The grouting pipe is simplified as a series of nonlinear algebraic equations describing the pipelines,equipments,grouting holes and the adjusting valves,the Newton-Raphson method is used for solving the system of nonlinear algebraic equations.Grouting pressure fluctuations can be controlled quickly in the range of 0.02MPa by GYPC control system based on the fluid dynamics model,it is shown that the hydrodynamic model is reasonable and practical.

  1. A new method for real-time monitoring of grout spread through fractured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reducing water ingress into the Shaft at Dounreay is essential for the success of future intermediate level waste (ILW) recovery using the dry retrieval method. The reduction is being realised by forming an engineered barrier of ultrafine cementitious grout injected into the fractured rock surrounding the Shaft. Grout penetration of 6 m in <50μm fractures is being reliably achieved, with a pattern of repeated injections ultimately reducing rock mass permeability by up to three orders of magnitude. An extensive field trials period, involving over 200 grout mix designs and the construction of a full scale demonstration barrier, has yielded several new field techniques that improve the quality and reliability of cementitious grout injection for engineered barriers. In particular, a new method has been developed for tracking in real-time the spread of ultrafine cementitious grout through fractured rock and relating the injection characteristics to barrier design. Fieldwork by the multi-disciplinary international team included developing the injection and real-time monitoring techniques, pre- and post injection hydro-geological testing to quantify the magnitude and extent of changes in rock mass permeability, and correlation of grout spread with injection parameters to inform the main works grouting programme. (authors)

  2. Parameters Optimization of Curtain Grouting Reinforcement Cycle in Yonglian Tunnel and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For practical purposes, the curtain grouting method is an effective method to treat geological disasters and can be used to improve the strength and permeability resistance of surrounding rock. Selection of the optimal parameters of grouting reinforcement cycle especially reinforcement cycle thickness is one of the most interesting areas of research in curtain grouting designs. Based on the fluid-structure interaction theory and orthogonal analysis method, the influence of reinforcement cycle thickness, elastic modulus, and permeability on water inflow of tunnel after grouting and stability of surrounding rock was analyzed. As to the water inflow of tunnel after grouting used as performance evaluation index of grouting reinforcement cycle, it can be concluded that the permeability was the most important factor followed by reinforcement cycle thickness and elastic modulus. Furthermore, pore water pressure field, stress field, and plastic zone of surrounding rock were calculated by using COMSOL software under different conditions of reinforcement cycle thickness. It also can be concluded that the optimal thickness of reinforcement cycle and permeability can be adopted as 8 m and 1/100 of the surrounding rock permeability in the curtain grouting reinforcement cycle. The engineering case provides a reference for similar engineering.

  3. Acid mine drainage abatement using fluidized bed combustion ash grout after geophysical site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyritic coal refuse and pit cleanings buried in a 15-ha (37-acre) surface mine produce severe acid mine drainage (AMD). The pyritic material had been buried in discrete piles or pods in the backfill. The pods and the resulting contaminant plumes were initially defined using geophysical techniques and were confirmed by drilling. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash, mixed with water to form a grout, was used in different ways to isolate the pyritic material from water and oxygen. In the first approach, grout was pressure injected directly into the buried pods to fill the void spaces within the pods and to coat the pyritic materials with a cementitious layer. A second approach used the grout to divert water from specific areas. Pods which did not accept grout because of a clay matrix were isolated from percolating water with a cap and trench seal of the grout. The grout was also used in certain areas to blanket the clay pit floor since clays are believed to be a primary source of aluminum at this site. In certain areas, the AMD migrates downward though fractures in the pit floor to the groundwater table. Grout was injected along the fractures in some of these areas to seal them. This would inhibit further AMD migration toward one of the receiving streams. The initial postgrouting water quality data have been encouraging

  4. Bio-grout based on microbially induced sand solidification by means of asparaginase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Fu, Qing-Long; Zhang, Qiuzhuo; Achal, Varenyam; Kawasaki, Satoru

    2015-11-01

    Bio-grout, a new ground improvement method, has been recently developed to improve the mechanical properties, decrease the permeability of porous materials, reinforce or repair cementitious materials and modify the properties of soil or sand. Bio-grout production depends on microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP), which is driven mainly by an enzyme, urease. However, urease-based MICP process produces excessive ammonia, in addition to secondary pollution generated by urea that is used as substrate in it. In the present study, we reported asparaginase-based MICP process for sand bio-grout development using Bacillus megaterium, and results were also compared with urease-based bio-grouts. The asparaginase activity led to significantly less ammonia production compared to urease without compromising with desired properties of a novel grout. The UCS of bio-grout was obtained at 980 kPa, while the permeability was decreased substantially. The mineralogical composition of precipitated substance was identified as calcite using XRD and the crystal morphology was observed under SEM. The mass percentage of calcite in bio-grout was calculated by thermogravimetric analysis and XCT verified calcite precipitation in it. The results confirmed that biocalcification by means of bacterial asparaginase is a potential solution for geotechnical problems. The asparaginase-based MICP process could be of wider acceptance in future.

  5. Use of a Paraffin Based Grout to Stabilize Buried Beryllium and Other Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term durability of WAXFIXi, a paraffin based grout, was evaluated for in situ grouting of activated beryllium wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), a radioactive landfill at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The evaluation considered radiological and biological mechanisms that could degrade the grout using data from an extensive literature search and previous tests of in situ grouting at the INL. Conservative radioactive doses for WAXFIX were calculated from the ''hottest'' (i.e., highest-activity) Advanced Test Reactor beryllium block in the SDA.. These results indicate that WAXFIX would not experience extensive radiation damage for many hundreds of years. Calculation of radiation induced hydrogen generation in WAXFIX indicated that grout physical performance should not be reduced beyond the effects of radiation dose on the molecular structure. Degradation of a paraffin-based grout by microorganisms in the SDA is possible and perhaps likely, but the rate of degradation will be at a slower rate than found in the literature reviewed. The calculations showed the outer 0.46 m (18 in.) layer of each monolith, which represents the minimum expected distance to the beryllium block, was calculated to require 1,000 to 3,600 years to be consumed. The existing data and estimations of biodegradation and radiolysis rates for WAXFIX/paraffin do not indicate any immediate problems with the use of WAXFIX for grouting beryllium or other wastes in the SDA

  6. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs.

  7. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs

  8. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  9. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  10. Cement og politik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    as well as in the public sphere. Most of the extensive job creating measures he carried out as a minister for public works necessarily involved the use of great amounts of cement – the primary produce of F.L. Smidth & Co. Gunnar Larsen thus became an easy target for Communist propaganda, picturing him...... of the Soviet Union (including an F.L. Smidth & Co. cement plant in former Estonia). He spent the last 15 months of the occupation in Sweden and was arrested after having returned to Copenhagen in May, 1945. Although a Copenhagen city court prison sentence for economic collaboration was reversed, he had...

  11. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  12. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  13. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  14. Literature review of stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds and the implications for Hanford grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review was conducted on the stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Based on this literature, it is likely that the limestone-containing grout will not permanently immobilize VOCs and that no presently available additives can guarantee permanent immobilization. The Westinghouse hanford company grout may be fairly effective at retarding aqueous leaching of VOCs, and commercial additives can improve this performance. Significant VOC losses do occur during stabilization/solidification, and the high temperatures of the Westinghouse Hanford Company waste and grout should exacerbate this problem. In fact, these high temperatures raise doubts about the presence of VOCs in the double-shell tanks supernates

  15. Experimental Study on Post Grouting Bearing Capacity of Large Diameter Bored Piles

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Duanduan; Wang Longfei; Zhang Lipeng

    2015-01-01

    Post grouting can improve the inherent defects such as the formation of the mud cake at pile side and the sediment at pile end in the process of bored pile construction. Thus post grouting has been widely used in Engineering. The purpose of this paper is to research the influences of post grouting to pile bearing capacity more systematically and intuitively. Combined with the static load test of four test piles in Weihe River Bridge test area of new airport highway in Xi’an, the bearing capac...

  16. Discussion on the Influence of Various Technological Parameters on Jet Grouting Columns Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bzówka Joanna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most popular elements created by using jet grouting technology are columns. During designing such columns, it is a problem of estimating their shape and dimensions. The main factors that influence on columns geometry are soil characteristic and technological parameters. At the frame of Authors scientific research, following technological factors were taken into account: system of jet grouting, injection pressure, dimension of nozzles and rotation speed during injection. In the paper some results of the field tests of jet grouting columns are presented

  17. In situ grouting of a low-level radioactive waste trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shallow land burial trench containing low level radioactive waste was injected with a particulate grout to help control subsidence and radionuclide migration. The trench's accessible voids have been estimated at 20 vol %, and most of these voids appear to have been filled with grout. This injection was accomplished with a simple, labor intensive technique, and an inexperienced crew at an estimated cost of about $55,000. The grout costs $0.21/gal and 8081 gal was injected into the trench. 5 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Development of rock bolt grout and shotcrete for rock support and corrosion of steel in low-pH cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is foreseen that cementitious products will be utilized in the construction of the final repository. The use of conventional cementitious material creates pulses in the magnitude of pH 12.13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental mainly to impairment of bentonite functioning, but also to possibly enhanced dissolution of spent fuel and alteration of fracture filling materials. It also complicates the safety analysis of the repository, as the effect of a high pH-plume should be considered in the evaluation. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. In earlier studies it was found that shotcreting, standard casting and rock bolting with low-pH cement (pH . 11 in the leachate) should be possible without any major development work. This report summarizes the results of development work done during 2008 and 2009 in the fields of low-pH rock bolt grout, low-pH shotcrete and steel corrosion in low-pH concrete. Development of low-pH rock bolt grout mixes and laboratory testing of the selected grout was followed by installation of twenty rock bolts for rock support at Aspo HRL using the chosen low-pH grout. The operation was successful and the bolts and grout are subject to follow up the next ten years. Low-pH shotcrete for rock support was initially developed within the ESDRED project, which was an Integrated Project within the European Commission sixth framework for research and technological development. ESDRED is an abbreviation for Engineering Studies and Demonstrations of Repository Designs. ESDRED was executed from 1st February 2004 to 31st January 2009. The development of the mix design described in this report was based on the results from ESDRED. After laboratory testing of the chosen mix, it was field tested in niche NASA 0408A at Aspo HRL. Further, some areas in the TASS-tunnel were

  19. Development of rock bolt grout and shotcrete for rock support and corrosion of steel in low-pH cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Anders (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Vaellingby (Sweden)); Pettersson, Stig (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    It is foreseen that cementitious products will be utilized in the construction of the final repository. The use of conventional cementitious material creates pulses in the magnitude of pH 12.13 in the leachates and release alkalis. Such a high pH is detrimental mainly to impairment of bentonite functioning, but also to possibly enhanced dissolution of spent fuel and alteration of fracture filling materials. It also complicates the safety analysis of the repository, as the effect of a high pH-plume should be considered in the evaluation. As no reliable pH-plume models exist, the use of products giving a pH below 11 in the leachates facilitates the safety analysis, although limiting the amount of low-pH cement is recommended. In earlier studies it was found that shotcreting, standard casting and rock bolting with low-pH cement (pH . 11 in the leachate) should be possible without any major development work. This report summarizes the results of development work done during 2008 and 2009 in the fields of low-pH rock bolt grout, low-pH shotcrete and steel corrosion in low-pH concrete. Development of low-pH rock bolt grout mixes and laboratory testing of the selected grout was followed by installation of twenty rock bolts for rock support at Aspo HRL using the chosen low-pH grout. The operation was successful and the bolts and grout are subject to follow up the next ten years. Low-pH shotcrete for rock support was initially developed within the ESDRED project, which was an Integrated Project within the European Commission sixth framework for research and technological development. ESDRED is an abbreviation for Engineering Studies and Demonstrations of Repository Designs. ESDRED was executed from 1st February 2004 to 31st January 2009. The development of the mix design described in this report was based on the results from ESDRED. After laboratory testing of the chosen mix, it was field tested in niche NASA 0408A at Aspo HRL. Further, some areas in the TASS-tunnel were

  20. GROUT TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN 105-R DISASSEMBLY BASIN D AND E CANAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogle, R.; Collins, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2010-06-03

    The 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin Grout Placement Strategy Report (SRNL-TR-2009-00157) identifies various portions of the facility that will undergo an in-situ decommissioning process. The estimated residual radioactive contamination in the 105-R facility is shown in Figure 1. Cementitious grout formulations developed by SRNL are being used to immobilize and isolate the radioactive contamination in existing below grade portions of the 105-R building as shown by the gray-hatched area in Figure 2. A Zero Bleed flowable fill was formulated for both dry placement and for underwater placement. The first major area in the 105-R Disassembly Basin to undergo the grouting process was the D&E Canal and an underlying void space known as the Chase. Grout temperature data was needed to ensure that the grout mix design was on the correct grout curing trajectory to meet the material compressive strength requirement of 50 pounds per square inch. Initial grout temperature measurements were needed to confirm and optimize grout mix design fresh property characteristics; i.e. material strength, and set time. Grout curing temperature is an integrating fresh property characteristic that is used to estimate cementitious material strength in accordance with the Standard Practice for Estimating Concrete Strength by the Maturity Method, ASTM C 1074. The Maturity Method is used in the construction industry to estimate in-place strength of concrete to allow the start of critical construction activities; e.g. formwork removal, removal of cold weather protection, opening of roadways to traffic, etc. Applying this methodology provides an expeditious means to estimate in-place grout strength based on compressive strength laboratory results. The Maturity Method results define the relationship between strength-time and age-time that may be utilized in the field for estimating strength after a given time of placement. Maturation curves were developed under the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin

  1. Produktie van cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit JRK; Coenen PWHG; Matthijsen AJCM; LAE; TAUW

    1995-01-01

    This document on cement production has been published within the SPIN project. In this project information has been collected on industrial plants or industrial processes to afford support to governmental policy on emission reduction. This document contains information on the processes, emission sou

  2. Osteotransductive bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Boltong, M G; Khairoun, I; Ginebra, M P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPBCs) are osteotransductive, i.e. after implantation in bone they are transformed into new bone tissue. Furthermore, due to the fact that they are mouldable, their osteointegration is immediate. Their chemistry has been established previously. Some CPBCs contain amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and set by a sol-gel transition. The others are crystalline and can give as the reaction product dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), carbonated apatite (CA) or hydroxyapatite (HA). Mixed-type gypsum-DCPD cements are also described. In vivo rates of osteotransduction vary as follows: gypsum-DCPD > DCPD > CDHA approximately CA > HA. The osteotransduction of CDHA-type cements may be increased by adding dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP) and/or CaCO3 to the cement powder. CPBCs can be used for healing of bone defects, bone augmentation and bone reconstruction. Incorporation of drugs like antibiotics and bone morphogenetic protein is envisaged. Load-bearing applications are allowed for CHDA-type, CA-type and HA-type CPBCs as they have a higher compressive strength than human trabecular bone (10 MPa).

  3. Application of a sub-lattice model to predictions of cement hydrate chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incongruous dissolution of C-S-H gel is central to the performance of the chemical barrier in a deep geological disposal repository for nuclear wastes. Numerous thermodynamic models have been developed with which the dissolution of C-S-H gel may be simulated. One of the limitations in many of these models is their inflexibility in terms of incorporating additional chemical elements into the C-S-H gel structure. This paper reports the application of a sublattice model for C-S-H gel, allowing for example, substitution of alumina, sulphate or heavy metals into the structure. Comparisons are drawn between the sub-lattice representation and other models, illustrating the inherent flexibility of this approach. Examples are presented comparing the solubility of arsenic phases in the solid and aqueous solutions as calculated using the sub-lattice method. The partitioning of arsenic between solid and aqueous phases is explored over a range of activities and temperatures, ultimately bounded by the appearance of solubility limiting phases. Extending this approach to more realistic cement mineral assemblages introduces both stoichiometric hydrates and an additional solid solution representing hydro-garnet. Two cement types are used for the final examples; an ordinary Portland cement and a blended Portland-blast furnace slag, typical of a UK encapsulation grout. Simulations of their dissolution by percolating groundwater illustrate the influence of these cements in controlling the local chemical environment through their service life. (authors)

  4. Grouting techniques for the unfavorable geological conditions of Xiang'an subsea tunnel in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingli Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges during subsea tunnel construction is to seal the potential water inflow. The paper presents a case study of Xiang'an subsea tunnel in Xiamen, the first subsea tunnel in China. During its construction, different grades of weathered geomaterials were encountered, which was the challenging issue for this project. To deal with these unfavorable geological conditions, grouting was adopted as an important measure for ground treatment. The grouting mechanism is first illustrated by introducing a typical grouting process. Then the site-specific grouting techniques employed in the Xiang'an subsea tunnel are elaborated. By using this ground reinforcement technique, the tunneling safety of the Xiang'an subsea tunnel was guaranteed.

  5. RESEARCH ON THE SEROSITY DURING INJECTING CLAY GROUTS INTO THE OVERLYING ROCK STRATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨逾; 范学理; 杨伦; 赵德深; 刘文生

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the mechanism study of injecting clay grouts into overlying strata, the clay grouts are researched in greater detail from three aspects. The flowing state of clay grouts in the strata——the pattern of different direction flowing around a point source is advanced and the flowing equation is put forward which is correspond with experiment result, and the corresponding mechanical model is set up which has its formulistic study, and the function of clay grouts is also discussed after the water in it has been lost, at the same time the concept of similar rock in effective supporting zone is given. It would draw great positive inspiration from what studied in this paper for studying on drawing down the surface subsidence by injecting.

  6. Disposal of radioactive grouts into hydraulically fractured shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for permanent waste disposal has been in operation for nearly 20 years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this method, intermediate-level radioactive waste effluents in the form of a slurry containing hydraulic binders (grouts) are injected by means of fracturing into a deep underground formation (a nearly impervious shale formation) considered to be isolated from the surface. The composition of the grout is carefully chosen so that the slurry thus injected solidifies in situ, ensuring fixation of the waste and rendering this type of disposal final in character. This process - ''hydrofracture'' or ''shale fracturing'' - immobilizes the wastes directly in situ, in such a condition that is well removed from the biosphere. It is an inexpensive process that is particularly suited for the permanent disposal of large batches of certain types of wastes under specific conditions. Some sections of this report are concerned with the general aspects of the hydrofracture process. Other sections are site specific and discuss the development of the process at ORNL and the operating experience with the ORNL facility. Sections 2 and 3 are concerned with the general aspects of site selection and are not site specific. Sections 4, 5, 6 and 8 are concerned with operating experience at ORNL and are site specific. Section 7 (safety assessment) is based on ORNL experience, but the considerations that are discussed in this section have general application. Details of the operating experience with the process at ORNL and West Valley are given in Appendix 1. Appendix 2 is a brief treatment of the theory of fracture mechanics

  7. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect th

  8. Field lysimeter studies for performance evaluation of grouted Hanford defense wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, G.V.; Serne, R.J.; LeGore, V.L.

    1995-02-01

    The Grout Waste Test Facility (GWTF) consisted of four large field lysimeters designed to test the leaching and migration rates of grout-solidified low-level radioactive wastes generated by Hanford Site operations. Each lysimeter was an 8-m-deep by 2-media closed-bottom caisson that was placed in the ground such that the uppermost rim remained just above grade. Two of these lysimeters were used; the other two remained empty. The two lysimeters that were used (A-1 and B-1) were backfilled with a two-layer soil profile representative of the proposed grout disposal site. The proposed grout disposal site (termed the Grout Treatment Facility Landfill) is located immediately east of the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. This soil profile consisted of a coarse sand into which the grout waste forms were placed and covered by 4 m of a very fine sand. The A-1 lysimeter was backfilled in March 1985, with a grout-solidified phosphate/sulfate liquid waste from N Reactor decontamination and ion exchange resin regeneration. The B-1 lysimeter was backfilled in September 1985 and received a grout-solidified simulated cladding removal waste representative of waste generated from fuel reprocessing operations at the head end of the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) plant. Routine monitoring and leachate collection activities were conducted for over three years, terminating in January 1989. Drainage was collected sporadically between January 1989 and December 1992. Decontamination and decommissioning of these lysimeters during the summer of 1994, confirmed the presence of a 15 to 20-cm-long hairline crack in one of the bottom plate welds. This report discusses the design and construction of the GWTF, presents the routine data collected from this facility through January 1989 and subsequent data collected sporadically between 1989 and 1993, and provides a brief discussion concerning preliminary interpretation of the results.

  9. Applying "Real Time Grouting Control Method" in sedimentary rock with gotvand dam data

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghoobi Rafi, Jalaleddin

    2010-01-01

    “Real Time Grouting Control Method” is a pioneer idea informulating grouting works which provides possibility for monitoring groutingprocess in real time to optimize it to performance and cost. Currently this theoryhas been tested with data from tunnels in Stockholm. In this report the effort istesting the validity of this method in a kind of geology which is situated insouthwest of Iran. Data are taken from the Gotvand dam project which is underconstruction on Karoon River. To achieve this g...

  10. Evaluation of the Grouting Methodology used in the Stockholm City Line Project

    OpenAIRE

    Brynjolfsson, Brynjolfur

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Stockholm City Line project a grouting design was conducted and documentedduring the planning phase, based on theoretical grounds. This comprehensive design is the first of its kind for a tunneling project in Sweden. Due to the scale of the undertaking, the general design was ordered by the Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket) to apply for the pregrouting operations at the City Line’s rock tunnels. During the local design however, the grouting work developed differen...

  11. The grouting handbook a step-by-step guide for foundation design and machinery installation

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Donald M

    2013-01-01

    Minimize loss of revenue and the downtime of critical assets by avoiding foundation cracking, poor bonds, and initial alignment changes. After their successful introduction as a maintenance material, machinery grouts are now being used for equipment placement in new construction. While certainly suitable for both markets and applications, a successful installation depends on proper grout selection, application, foundation preparation, and forming methods. Therefore, guidelines on their uses and limitations are needed for engineers and maintenance personnel. Based on 45 years of field experi

  12. Grout and Glass Performance Maximizing the Loading of ORNL Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, M.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Spence, R.D.; Travis, J.R.

    1999-03-01

    Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization and solidification alternatives for radioactive and hazardous mixed wastes stored at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as a mixed-waste alternative disposal technology.

  13. CONSIDERATIONS FOR GROUT FORMULATIONS FOR FACILITY CLOSURES USING IN SITU STRATEGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, J.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.; Long, T.; Blankenship, J.; Hannah, G.; Stubblefield, R.; Szilagyi, A.

    2010-08-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting in situ closures (entombment) at a large number of facilities throughout the complex. Among the largest closure actions currently underway are the closures of the P and R Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. In these facilities, subgrade open spaces are being stabilized with grout; this ensures the long term structural integrity of the facilities and permanently immobilizes and isolates residual contamination. The large size and structural complexity of these facilities present a wide variety of challenges for the identification and selection of appropriate fill materials. Considerations for grout formulations must account for flowability, long term stability, set times, heat generation and interactions with materials within the structure. The large size and configuration of the facility necessitates that grout must be pumped from the exterior to the spaces to be filled, which requires that the material must retain a high degree of flowability to move through piping without clogging while achieving the required leveling properties at the pour site. Set times and curing properties must be controlled to meet operations schedules, while not generating sufficient heat to compromise the properties of the fill material. The properties of residual materials can result in additional requirements for grout formulations. If significant quantities of aluminum are present in the facility, common formulations of highly alkaline grouts may not be appropriate because of the potential for hydrogen generation with the resultant risks. SRS is developing specialized inorganic grout formulations that are designed to address this issue. One circum-neutral chemical grout formulation identified for initial consideration did not possess the proper chemical characteristics, having exceptionally short set times and high heat of hydration. Research efforts are directed toward developing grout formulations

  14. Grouting techniques for the unfavorable geological conditions of Xiang'an subsea tunnel in China

    OpenAIRE

    Dingli Zhang; Qian Fang; Haicheng Lou

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges during subsea tunnel construction is to seal the potential water inflow. The paper presents a case study of Xiang'an subsea tunnel in Xiamen, the first subsea tunnel in China. During its construction, different grades of weathered geomaterials were encountered, which was the challenging issue for this project. To deal with these unfavorable geological conditions, grouting was adopted as an important measure for ground treatment. The grouting mechanism is first illu...

  15. Finite Element Analysis on the Main Frame of Horizontal Type High-pressure Grouting Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhicheng Huang

    2012-01-01

    For understanding the stress, strain and dynamic characteristics and improving the stability of the main frame of the horizontal type high-pressure grouting machine, took a type of ceramics for daily use horizontal high pressure grouting machine’s main frame as the object of study, established its CAD model and then conducted finite element static analysis and modal analysis on it. Got the values and distribution of the stress and strain, obtained the first six order natural frequencies and t...

  16. CONSIDERATIONS FOR GROUT FORMULATIONS FOR FACILITY CLOSURES USING IN SITU STRATEGIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting in situ closures (entombment) at a large number of facilities throughout the complex. Among the largest closure actions currently underway are the closures of the P and R Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. In these facilities, subgrade open spaces are being stabilized with grout; this ensures the long term structural integrity of the facilities and permanently immobilizes and isolates residual contamination. The large size and structural complexity of these facilities present a wide variety of challenges for the identification and selection of appropriate fill materials. Considerations for grout formulations must account for flowability, long term stability, set times, heat generation and interactions with materials within the structure. The large size and configuration of the facility necessitates that grout must be pumped from the exterior to the spaces to be filled, which requires that the material must retain a high degree of flowability to move through piping without clogging while achieving the required leveling properties at the pour site. Set times and curing properties must be controlled to meet operations schedules, while not generating sufficient heat to compromise the properties of the fill material. The properties of residual materials can result in additional requirements for grout formulations. If significant quantities of aluminum are present in the facility, common formulations of highly alkaline grouts may not be appropriate because of the potential for hydrogen generation with the resultant risks. SRS is developing specialized inorganic grout formulations that are designed to address this issue. One circum-neutral chemical grout formulation identified for initial consideration did not possess the proper chemical characteristics, having exceptionally short set times and high heat of hydration. Research efforts are directed toward developing grout formulations

  17. Discussion on the Influence of Various Technological Parameters on Jet Grouting Columns Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Bzówka Joanna; Juzwa Anna; Wanik Konrad; Wanik Lidia; Żyrek Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    One of the most popular elements created by using jet grouting technology are columns. During designing such columns, it is a problem of estimating their shape and dimensions. The main factors that influence on columns geometry are soil characteristic and technological parameters. At the frame of Authors scientific research, following technological factors were taken into account: system of jet grouting, injection pressure, dimension of nozzles and rotation speed during injection. In the pape...

  18. Field lysimeter studies for performance evaluation of grouted Hanford defense wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grout Waste Test Facility (GWTF) consisted of four large field lysimeters designed to test the leaching and migration rates of grout-solidified low-level radioactive wastes generated by Hanford Site operations. Each lysimeter was an 8-m-deep by 2-media closed-bottom caisson that was placed in the ground such that the uppermost rim remained just above grade. Two of these lysimeters were used; the other two remained empty. The two lysimeters that were used (A-1 and B-1) were backfilled with a two-layer soil profile representative of the proposed grout disposal site. The proposed grout disposal site (termed the Grout Treatment Facility Landfill) is located immediately east of the Hanford Site's 200 East Area. This soil profile consisted of a coarse sand into which the grout waste forms were placed and covered by 4 m of a very fine sand. The A-1 lysimeter was backfilled in March 1985, with a grout-solidified phosphate/sulfate liquid waste from N Reactor decontamination and ion exchange resin regeneration. The B-1 lysimeter was backfilled in September 1985 and received a grout-solidified simulated cladding removal waste representative of waste generated from fuel reprocessing operations at the head end of the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) plant. Routine monitoring and leachate collection activities were conducted for over three years, terminating in January 1989. Drainage was collected sporadically between January 1989 and December 1992. Decontamination and decommissioning of these lysimeters during the summer of 1994, confirmed the presence of a 15 to 20-cm-long hairline crack in one of the bottom plate welds. This report discusses the design and construction of the GWTF, presents the routine data collected from this facility through January 1989 and subsequent data collected sporadically between 1989 and 1993, and provides a brief discussion concerning preliminary interpretation of the results

  19. Application of Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology in the Anomaly Detection of Shaft Lining in Grouting

    OpenAIRE

    Chunde Piao; Jun Yuan; Bin Shi; Haijun Lu; Guangqing Wei; Chunsheng Gu

    2015-01-01

    The rupture of the shaft lining caused by grouting has seriously undermined the safety in coal mining. Based on BOTDR distributed optical fiber sensing technology, this paper studied the layout method of optical fiber sensors and the anomaly detection method of the deformation and obtained the evolution law of shaft deformation triggered by grouting. The research results showed that the bonding problem of optical fiber sensors in damp environment could be effectively solved, by applying the b...

  20. Soil movements associated with compensation grouting during line 9 excavation in Barcelona: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Di Mariano, Alessandra; Gens Solé, Antonio; Mair, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes a case history -related to the Line 9 excavation in Barcelonawhere compensation grouting was initially proposed to minimize the movements of the buildings close to or directly above the tunnel alignment, some of which have piled foundations. Unexpectedly, the ground settlements due to the pre-conditioning stage of the compensation grouting became very significant leading to some light damage to one of the buildings. Eventually, the decision was taken to stop the treatme...

  1. POZZOLAN AND CEMENTS WITH POZZOLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KAPLAN

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Cement, one of the basic material of construction engineering, has an important place in view of strength and cost of structures. Cement consumption is increasing parallel to development of building construction sector. For cement producers, minimal cost is desired by using new and economical material sources. On the other hand, the controllers and contractors need cheaper, safer and higher strength materials. From this respect cement industry tends to use cement with pozzolan. In Türkiye, cement with pozzolan is produced by adding the pozzolan, which has a large reservoir in the country, in cement in sertain amount. However this type of cement is consumed in the construction sector, sortage of scientific investigation and speculative news on the subject.are worried the users and producers. In this paper, prior to an experimental study on the cements having pozzolan additive, historical development of pozzolan, reservoir of Turkiye, and comparison with portland cement is carried out. Advantages and disadvantages of pozzolan are also discussed in some points.

  2. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  3. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  4. Use of a Paraffin Based Grout to Stabilize Buried Beryllium and Other Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gretchen Matthern; Duane Hanson; Neal Yancey; Darrell Knudson

    2005-12-01

    The long term durability of WAXFIXi, a paraffin based grout, was evaluated for in situ grouting of activated beryllium wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), a radioactive landfill at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The evaluation considered radiological and biological mechanisms that could degrade the grout using data from an extensive literature search and previous tests of in situ grouting at the INL. Conservative radioactive doses for WAXFIX were calculated from the "hottest" (i.e., highest-activity) Advanced Test Reactor beryllium block in the SDA.. These results indicate that WAXFIX would not experience extensive radiation damage for many hundreds of years. Calculation of radiation induced hydrogen generation in WAXFIX indicated that grout physical performance should not be reduced beyond the effects of radiation dose on the molecular structure. Degradation of a paraffin-based grout by microorganisms in the SDA is possible and perhaps likely, but the rate of degradation will be at a slower rate than found in the literature reviewed. The calculations showed the outer 0.46 m (18 in.) layer of each monolith, which represents the minimum expected distance to the beryllium block, was calculated to require 1,000 to 3,600 years to be consumed. The existing data and estimations of biodegradation and radiolysis rates

  5. Jet Grouting. Control of execution and result parameters. Test fields - Experience in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article emphasizes the importance of Test Fields in project that includes the Jet Grouting technique. In particular, the Chilean experience is analyzed, where the Jet Grouting was first introduced by Pilots Terratest S. A. in the year 2010, only, only in 2011 the first project using jet columns was constructed. The versatilely of this technique allows its use in a wide variety of projects, for example, soil capacity improvement, settlement control, reduction of soil permeability and other environmental applications. Currently, the most common applications are underpinning existing foundations, ground improvement, lateral support of excavations, hydraulic barriers, slope stabilization, liquefaction control, among others. The Jet Grouting is one of the most demanding soil improvement technique and requires excellence in designing and execution engineers and other involved specialist. It is therefore essential to ensure exhaustive control to the execution and final parameters, in order to check that the product- Jet Grouting element-have the design properties, and implement modifications if necessary. Many authors strongly advises that if there is no comparable experience and even if there is, a Test Field of Jet Grouting elements has to be executed in site. This field consists in a nearby area with similar geotechnical conditions of the project, where Jet Grouting test columns will be constructed. This Test Field will allow selecting the most effective execution parameters and verifying that the final product has he correct design properties. (Author)

  6. Use of jet grouting to create a low permeability horizontal barrier below an incinerator ash landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, A.J.; Burke, G.K. [Hayward Baker Inc., Odenton, MD (United States); Deutsch, W.L. Jr. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., West Chester, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The City of Philadelphia`s Division of Aviation (DOA) has begun construction of a new commuter runway, designated as Runway 8-26, at the Philadelphia International Airport. A portion of this runway will be constructed over a former Superfund site known as the Enterprise Avenue Landfill, which for many years was used to dispose of solid waste incinerator ash and other hazardous materials. The site was clay capped in the 1980`s, but in order for the DOA to use the site, additional remediation was needed to meet US EPA final closure requirements. One component of the closure plan included installation of a low permeability horizontal barrier above a very thin (approximately 0.61 to 0.91 meters) natural clay stratum which underlies an approximately 1020 m{sup 2} area of the landfill footprint so as to insure that a minimum 1.52 meter thick low permeability barrier exists beneath the entire 150,000 m{sup 2} landfill. The new barrier was constructed using jet grouting techniques to achieve remote excavation and replacement of the bottom 0.91 meters of the waste mass with a low permeability grout. The grout was formulated to meet the low permeability, low elastic modulus and compressive strength requirements of the project design. This paper will discuss the advantages of using jet grouting for the work and details the development of the grout mixture, modeling of the grout zone under load, field construction techniques, performance monitoring and verification testing.

  7. Jet grouting for a groundwater cutoff wall in difficult glacial soil deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, R.F.; Pepe, F. Jr. [Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Jet grouting is being used as part of a groundwater cutoff wall system in a major New York City subway construction project to limit drawdowns in an adjacent PCB contamination plume. A circular test shaft of jet grout columns was conducted during the design phase to obtain wall installation parameters. The test program also included shaft wall mapping, and measurements of; inflows, piezometric levels, ground heave and temperature, and jet grout hydraulic conductivity. An axisymmetric finite element method groundwater model was established to back calculate the in-situ hydraulic conductivities of both the surrounding glacial soils and the jet grout walls by matching observed inflows and piezometric levels. The model also verified the use of packer permeability test as a tool in the field to evaluate the hydraulic conductivities of jet grout columns. Both the test program and analytic studies indicated that adjustments to the construction procedures would be required to obtain lower hydraulic conductivities of the jet grout walls for construction. A comparison is made with the conductivities estimated from the test program/analytic studies with those from the present construction.

  8. Structural model testing for prestressed concrete pressure vessels: a study of grouted vs nongrouted posttensioned prestressing tendon systems. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.

    1979-04-01

    Nongrouted tendons are predominantly used in this country as the prestressing system for prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) because they are more easily surveyed to detect reductions in prestressing level and distress such as results from corrosion. Grouted tendon systems, however, offer advantages which may make them cost-effective for PCPV applications. Literature was reviewed to (1) provide insight on the behavior of grouted tendon system, (2) establish performance histories for structures utilizing grouted tendons, (3) examine corrosion protection procedures for prestressing tendons, (4) identify arguments for and against using grouted tendons, and (5) aid in the development of the experimental investigation. The experimental investigation was divided into four phases: (1) grouted-nongrouted tendon behavior, (2) evaluation of selected new material systems, (3) bench-scale corrosion studies, and (4) preliminary evaluation of acoustic emission techniques for monitoring grouted tendons in PCPVs. The groutability of large tendon systems was also investigated.

  9. Structural model testing for prestressed concrete pressure vessels: a study of grouted vs nongrouted posttensioned prestressing tendon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nongrouted tendons are predominantly used in this country as the prestressing system for prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) because they are more easily surveyed to detect reductions in prestressing level and distress such as results from corrosion. Grouted tendon systems, however, offer advantages which may make them cost-effective for PCPV applications. Literature was reviewed to (1) provide insight on the behavior of grouted tendon system, (2) establish performance histories for structures utilizing grouted tendons, (3) examine corrosion protection procedures for prestressing tendons, (4) identify arguments for and against using grouted tendons, and (5) aid in the development of the experimental investigation. The experimental investigation was divided into four phases: (1) grouted-nongrouted tendon behavior, (2) evaluation of selected new material systems, (3) bench-scale corrosion studies, and (4) preliminary evaluation of acoustic emission techniques for monitoring grouted tendons in PCPVs. The groutability of large tendon systems was also investigated

  10. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Development of grouting technologies for geological disposal of high level waste in Japan (5). Numerical simulation for in-situ grout injection test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, to simulate the grout injection process, the 3-D numerical model based on equivalent continuum approach was developed. The developed numerical model was applied to the in-situ grout injection tests at Grimsel test site (GTS), Switzerland. The rock type is fractured granite and the equivalent porous media was created from the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) based on the fracture data obtained from the observation boreholes. The simulation results was compared with the ones obtained from in-situ measurements and show qualitatively good agreement. (author)

  12. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  13. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    Patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process suffer from severe hearing loss caused by lack of continuity of the ossicular chain. This study is a retrospective evaluation of the hearing results using two different surgical procedures. Since January 1993, 12 consecutive patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a group of 20 historical controls who underwent surgery in 1991 and 1992 using incus autograft interposition. Among the 12 index patients, 7 (58%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 3 there was no difference and in 2 a slight decline. Among the 20 controls, 14 (70%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy to perform, presents less risk of damage to the stapes and cochlea, requires less extensive surgery and does not exclude other surgical methods in cases of reoperation. PMID:10909000

  14. [Haemotoxicity of dental luting cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, A; Welker, D

    1989-06-01

    A glass ionomer luting cement (AquaCem) shows a relatively low haemolytic activity in comparison with two zinc phosphate cements. Especially the initial irritation by this cement is smaller. Although it is possible that AquaCem particularly, in unfavourable cases, may damage the pulpa dentin system; this is due to the slowly decrease of the haemolytic activity with increasing of the probes. We found that Adhesor showed in dependence of the batches a varying quality. PMID:2626769

  15. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  16. Study of evaluation for grouting effect in a borehole; Yakueki chunyu koka hyoka gijutsu ni okeru ichikosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H.; Matsuo, T. [Fukuoka Municipal Transportation Bureau, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Y.; Imanishi, H. [Osaka Soil Test, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    For the foundation improvement works by grouting in a borehole, evaluation of grouting effect is one of the most important management items. The grouting design and works are sometimes reconsidered depending on the evaluation of grouting effect during the test injection. The purpose of the evaluation of grouting effect is to grasp the range of improvement and consolidation after the injection, and to judge and estimate the strength and permeability of the consolidation part. This paper describes the judgment method of the strength using PS logging results and borehole televiewer (BHTV) logging results. The reflection intensity (Ir) by the BHTV logging increased after the grouting, which showed a same tendency as that using S-wave and P-wave velocities (Vs and Vp) before and after the grouting. This was considered to demonstrate the grouting effect. A relation was obtained between the Vs, Vp and Ir before and after the grouting, which was expressed by following equation. Ir=0.143{times}Vs-70=0.093{times}Vp-110. The relation with the dynamic elastic coefficient (Ed) was also obtained as follow; Ir=0.0013{times}Ed. 9 figs.

  17. Pre-excavation grouting design, results and evaluation of a gallery at great depth in Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-excavation grouting of shafts and galleries has been conducted during the construction of Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory in the aspect of safe works and reducing the discharge treatment of the water inflow. The grouting methodology has been simultaneously studied and developed as there is less experience of grouting in low conductive rock with high water pressure, especially in Japan. Ahead of excavating GL.-500 m gallery on the ventilation shaft side, grouting design was performed based on the estimation of water inflow by the pilot-boring investigations and the design was properly revised during the campaign. The gallery satisfied the inflow requirement with good sealing effect. (author)

  18. Variation of consolidated shape of sand during chemical grouting; Yakueki chunyu joken ni yoru suna no koketsu keijo no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H.; Kajima, M.; Yanagisawa, E. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1997-12-21

    In order to determine ideal grouting conditions, one must estimate how different variables such as grouting condition and ground depth affect the shape and volume of chemical grouts. The results presented in this study were drawn from 300 laboratory tests, which included repetitions to ensure accuracy. Both the height and diameter of the test specimens were held constant at 30cm. When both the overburden pressure and injection rate is high , it is possible to obtain a spherical shape similar to permeation grouts. However the overburden pressure is high (irrespective of gel time), the volume of the solidified shapes is decreased about 15% -25%. 21 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Respiratory Health among Cement Workers in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Zeyede K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known on dust exposure and respiratory health among cement cleaners. There are only a few follow-up studies on respiratory health among cement factory workers and also studies on acute effects of cement dust exposure are limited in numbers. Objective: This study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and adverse respiratory health effects among Ethiopian cement production workers, with particular focus on cement cleaners. Method: The first paper was...

  20. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved