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Sample records for cement dust exposure

  1. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.M.; Thomassen, Y.; Fechter-Rink, E.; Kromhout, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective- A case study was carried out to assess cement dust exposure and its determinants among construction workers and for comparison among workers in cement and concrete production.Methods- Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed and samples were analysed for inhalable dust and

  2. Exposure to cement dust at a Portland cement factory and the risk of cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vestbo, J; Knudsen, K.M.; Raffn, E; Korsgaard, B; Rasmussen, F V

    1991-01-01

    The relation between exposure to cement dust and cancer was examined in a population of 546 cement workers and a reference population of 858 randomly sampled men of similar age and area of residence. In 1974 all men gave lifelong occupational and smoking histories; information on incidence of cancer in the period 1974-85 was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. No increased risk of overall cancer was found among cement workers. Among men with more than 20 years exposure to cement dust, 1...

  3. The Effect of Cement Dust Exposure on Haematological Parameters of Cement Factory workers in Nalagonda, Andhra Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guguloth, Mohan Rao.; Sambanaik, A.; srinivasnaik, L.; Mude, Jagadishnaik.

    2012-10-01

    This study was measured on haematological parameters in workers exposed to cement dust in order to test the the hypothesis and to identify a simple, readily available, cost effective screening test that could help in identifying the presence of disease, its severity, that Cement dust exposure may perturb these functions related to their workplace.Assesment of haematological parameters were performed in 100exposed workers occupationally exposed to cement dust and 50 matched unexposed controls with ages ranging from 20-35, 35-50, 50-65 years. The blood samples were taken from them and percentage of hemoglobin, Lymphocytes / monocytes count were analysed.The hemoglobin percentage of exposed workers were significantly lower(P<0.05).Lymphocytes/Monocytes counts of exposed workers was insignificant (P<0.05).These results suggest that long term occupational exposure to cement dust may perturb haemopoietic function.

  4. Effect of Duration of Exposure to Cement Dust on Respiratory Function of Non-Smoking Cement Mill Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al-Drees, Abdul Majeed; Al Masri, Abeer A.; Al Rouq, Fawzia; Azeem, Muhammad Abdul

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of long term exposure to cement dust on lung function in non-smoking cement mill workers. This is a cross-sectional study of respiratory functions. Spirometry was performed in 100 apparently healthy volunteers; 50 non-smoking cement mill workers and 50 non-smoking un-exposed subjects. Based on the duration of exposure, cement mill workers were divided into three groups, less than 5, 5–10 and greater than 10 years. All subjects were individually matched for age, height, weight, and socioeconomic status. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic spirometer. Significant reduction was observed in the mean values of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation in cement mill workers who had been working in the cement industry for more than 10 years compared to their matched un-exposed group. Lung functions in cement mill workers were significantly impaired and results show a long term duration response effect of years of exposure to cement dust on lung functions. PMID:23325026

  5. Effect of Duration of Exposure to Cement Dust on Respiratory Function of Non-Smoking Cement Mill Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia Al Rouq

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of long term exposure to cement dust on lung function in non-smoking cement mill workers. This is a cross-sectional study of respiratory functions. Spirometry was performed in 100 apparently healthy volunteers; 50 non-smoking cement mill workers and 50 non-smoking un-exposed subjects. Based on the duration of exposure, cement mill workers were divided into three groups, less than 5, 5–10 and greater than 10 years. All subjects were individually matched for age, height, weight, and socioeconomic status. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic spirometer. Significant reduction was observed in the mean values of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1, Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation in cement mill workers who had been working in the cement industry for more than 10 years compared to their matched un-exposed group. Lung functions in cement mill workers were significantly impaired and results show a long term duration response effect of years of exposure to cement dust on lung functions.

  6. Cement dust exposure and acute lung function: A cross shift study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moen Bente E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have been carried out on acute effects of cement dust exposure. This study is conducted to investigate the associations between current "total" dust exposure and acute respiratory symptoms and respiratory function among cement factory workers. Methods A combined cross-sectional and cross-shift study was conducted in Dire Dawa cement factory in Ethiopia. 40 exposed production workers from the crusher and packing sections and 20 controls from the guards were included. Personal "total" dust was measured in the workers' breathing zone and peak expiratory flow (PEF was measured for all selected workers before and after the shift. When the day shift ended, the acute respiratory symptoms experienced were scored and recorded on a five-point Likert scale using a modified respiratory symptom score questionnaire. Results The highest geometric mean dust exposure was found in the crusher section (38.6 mg/m3 followed by the packing section (18.5 mg/m3 and the guards (0.4 mg/m3. The highest prevalence of respiratory symptoms for the high exposed workers was stuffy nose (85% followed by shortness of breath (47% and "sneezing" (45%. PEF decreased significantly across the shift in the high exposed group. Multiple linear regression showed a significant negative association between the percentage cross-shift change in PEF and total dust exposure. The number of years of work in high-exposure sections and current smoking were also associated with cross-shift decrease in PEF. Conclusions Total cement dust exposure was related to acute respiratory symptoms and acute ventilatory effects. Implementing measures to control dust and providing adequate personal respiratory protective equipment for the production workers are highly recommended.

  7. Lung function and long-term exposure to cement dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F V; Borchsenius, L; Holstein, B;

    1977-01-01

    In a cross-sectional epidemiological survey a selected group of former and present cement factory workers and a random sample of the corresponding urban population underwent dynamic spirometry. Based upon life experience the subjects were grouped into four occupational categories. Three hundred and...... one men were grouped as cement factory workers, 649 were grouped as blue collar workers, 218 as white collar workers and 102 men had predominantly been occupied in farming, forestry and fishing. On the average the investigated men had spent more than 75% of their total occupational life in their main...

  8. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  9. Estimation of exposure to asbestos-cement dust on building sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedelsperger, K.; Woitowitz, H.J.; Krieger, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, about 1.2 million tons of asbestos are handled on building sites, for example, by roofers, carpenters and ventilation fitters. The objective of this study was to determine both the exposure to dust during the handling of asbestos-cement products on building sites and the possible resulting fibrogenic health hazard. In order to assess the tumour risk, this cross-sectional study should be enlarged to a longitudinal study. Dust measurements were made on about 40 building sites with four static and four personal dust samplers and a Tyndallometer. Evaluation was performed by infrared spectrography and light and scanning electron microscopy. Peak concentrations of more than 100 fibres/ml of length greater than 5 micrometers or about 80 mg/m3 fine dust were observed in the vicinity of the grinding machine. The asbestos content of the fine dust was about 10%. Scanning electron microscopy showed a wide variation of fibre lengths and diameters; a large proportion of fibres with diameters below 0.2 micrometers was found. Long-term, mean values and confidence intervals of the concentration of fine dust were calculated from the measurements. For example, the mean fine dust mass concentrations for roofers cutting corners of asbestos-cement sheets with the grinding machine amounted to 2.2 mg/m3 when the cutting was done in the open air at a fixed location. When cutting was performed on the roof, the mean fine dust mass concentration amounted to 1.8 mg/m3.

  10. X-ray findings in roofers with long-term exposure to asbestos cement fine dusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 404 roofers with long-term exposure of asbestos-cement fine dust we studied the possible fibrogenous effects on lung and pleura by chest radiographs. The standardfilm sets of the ILO U/C 1971 and ILO 80/BRD X-ray classification of pneumoconiosis were used. 410 non-asbestos-exposed craftsmen and workers of several industries served as control group. Roofers show in n = 58 cases (14,4%) significantly increased small irregular opacities of the size 's' and 't' with the profusion 1/0 (n = 53) and 1/1 (n = 5). Furthermore up to now, 3 cases of lung-cancer in our cohort have been occured. Our findings indicate the nessecity of further preventive measures on construction sites regarding the asbestos-cement problem. (orig.)

  11. X-ray findings in roofers with long-term exposure to asbestos cement fine dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauder, B.; Breuer, G.; Greven, U.; Woitowitz, R.H.; Roedelsperger, K.; Woitowitz, H.J.

    1982-11-01

    In 404 roofers with long-term exposure of asbestos-cement fine dust we studied the possible fibrogenous effects on lung and pleura by chest radiographs. The standardfilm sets of the ILO U/C 1971 and ILO 80/BRD X-ray classification of pneumoconiosis were used. 410 non-asbestos-exposed craftsmen and workers of several industries served as control group. Roofers show in n = 58 cases (14,4%) significantly increased small irregular opacities of the size 's' and 't' with the profusion 1/0 (n = 53) and 1/1 (n = 5). Furthermore up to now, 3 cases of lung-cancer in our cohort have occured. Our findings indicate the necessity of further preventive measures on construction sites regarding the asbestos-cement problem.

  12. [The effect of the length of exposure and smoking on respiratory function in workers exposed to asbestos-cement dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milardović-Sunjara, B; Kanceljak-Macan, B; Dujmov, I

    1991-01-01

    Respiratory function tests were performed in 110 workers who were occupationally exposed to asbestos-cement dust in the period from 7 to 34 years. Due to the results obtained, the following groups of patients were analysed according to years of asbestos-cement exposure and the habit of cigarette smoking. The analysis of the years of exposure to asbestos-cement dust revealed that the workers with the exposure longer than 16 years had significantly lower FVC and FEV1 (P less than 0.001) than the workers whose exposure was less than 16 years. In view of increasing age this deterioration proved to be significantly higher than it had been expected. Of all the subjects included in this study 7% of them were found to have a partial respiratory insufficiency. The phenomenon could not be explained either by the length of exposure or by the habit of cigarette smoking. In the smoking subjects with the longest exposure, a markedly lower SaHbO2 was found as compared to the smokers with the shortest exposure (P less than 0.05). PMID:1766985

  13. Thoracic dust exposure is associated with lung function decline in cement production workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordby, Karl-Christian; Notø, Hilde; Eduard, Wijnand; Skogstad, Marit; Fell, Anne Kristin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skare, Øivind; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Abderhalden, Rolf; Kongerud, Johny; Kjuus, Helge

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesised that exposure to workplace aerosols may lead to lung function impairment among cement production workers.Our study included 4966 workers in 24 cement production plants. Based on 6111 thoracic aerosol samples and information from questionnaires we estimated arithmetic mean exposure levels by plant and job type. Dynamic lung volumes were assessed by repeated spirometry testing during a mean follow-up time of 3.5 years (range 0.7-4.6 years). The outcomes considered were yearly change of dynamic lung volumes divided by the standing height squared or percentage of predicted values. Statistical modelling was performed using mixed model regression. Individual exposure was classified into quintile levels limited at 0.09, 0.89, 1.56, 2.25, 3.36, and 14.6 mg·m(-3), using the lowest quintile as the reference. Employees that worked in administration were included as a second comparison group.Exposure was associated with a reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory volume in 6 s and forced vital capacity. For FEV1 % predicted a yearly excess decline of 0.84 percentage points was found in the highest exposure quintile compared with the lowest.Exposure at the higher levels found in this study may lead to a decline in dynamic lung volumes. Exposure reduction is therefore warranted. PMID:27103386

  14. Development of an animal model, techniques, and an exposure system to study the effects of asbestos cement dust inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.; Dagle, G.E.; Cannon, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    An aerosol exposure system and procedures for delivering asbestos cement (AC) dust to the lungs of hamsters are described. Groups of hamsters were exposed to AC aerosol concentrations of 1 and 10 ..mu..g/liter, respectively, 3 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 3 and 6 months and were sacrificed for histopathologic examination. One subgroup from both the 1- and the 10-..mu..g/liter exposure group was withdrawn from exposure after 3 months and sacrified after a 3-month recovery period to determine whether or not some of the histologic changes might be reversible. There was an apparent dose--response relationship between AC exposure and the number of asbestos bodies and small randomly distributed foci of alveolar macrophages. No other treatment-related lesions were observed. The 3-month recovery period had no apparent effect.

  15. Asbestos cement dust inhalation by hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.; Dagle, G.E.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L. (Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (USA))

    1978-12-01

    Two groups of 96 male Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to respirable asbestos cement aerosol at concentrations of approximately 1 and approximately 10 micrograms/liter, respectively, 3 hours/day, 5 days/week. Average fiber counts ranged from 5 to about 120 fibers/cm3. Each group was randomly divided into six subgroups of 16 animals. The first subgroup was sacrificed after 3 months of exposure, the second after 6 months, and the third after 15 months. The fourth subgroup was withdrawn from exposure after 3 months, observed for an additional 3 months, and then sacrificed. The fifth and sixth subgroups were withdrawn after 3 and 6 months of exposure, respectively, and maintained for observation up to the 15-month exposure point of the third subgroup at which time all surviving animals were sacrificed. All other experimental procedures were similar to those delineated in a previous publication describing the development of an animal model, techniques, and an exposure system for asbestos cement dust inhalation. The asbestos cement exposures had no significant effect on body weight and mortality of the animals. Higher aerosol concentration and longer exposure times increased the number of macrophages and ferruginous bodies found in the lungs of the exposed animals. Recovery periods had no effect on the incidence of macrophages and ferruginous bodies. The incidence of very slight to slight fibrosis in the animals sacrificed after 15 months of exposure shows a significant (P less than 0.01) trend when the untreated control group and the 1 and 10 microgram/liter dose level groups are compared, indicating a dose-response relationship. Development of minimal fibrosis continued in animals withdrawn from exposure. No primary carcinomas of the lung and respiratory tract and no mesotheliomas were found.

  16. The Effect of Cement Dust on the Lung Function in a Cement Factory, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ferasati

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and its relationship to lung function at a Portland cement factory in Ilam, Iran. Lung function tests were carried out on 112 workers at the cement factory in 2008-09. Simultaneously 85 non exposed workers were used as control. Lung function tests were performed for all subjects. Additionally, total dust level was determined by the gravimetric method. Moreover, X-ray diffraction (XRD technique was performed to determine the SiO2 contents of the bulk samples. The arithmetic means (AM of personal total dust were higher in the crusher (27.49 mg/m3, packing (16.90 mg/m3, kiln (15.60 mg/m3, cement mill (13.07 mg/m3, raw mill (10.31 mg /m3 than in the maintenance (3.14 mg /m3, and administration (1.55 mg/m3. The geometrical mean (GM concentration was 12.12 mg/m3, which were considerably higher than occupational exposure limit (OEL of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH, which is 10 mg/m3. Based on the results, the probability of the long-term mean exposure exceeding to the OEL of 10 mg/m3 for total dust were higher in the kiln (100%, packing (100%, cement mill (90%, crusher (73%, raw mill (60% than in the maintenance (0%, and administration (2.3%. Ventiliatory function evaluation, as measured by the function parameters, showed that 35.7% of the exposed workers had abnormality in lung function compared with 5.7% of those unexposed. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that exposed workers compared to the unexposed groups showed significant reductions in Forced Expiratory Volume in one second percent (FEV1, Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, and FEV1/FVC (p< 0.05.

  17. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered. PMID:184524

  18. Utilization from Cement Kiln Dust in Removal of Acid Dyes

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    Mohamed E.S.I. Saraya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The growth of industries and day to day changes in human activities has resulted in an increase in the volume and complexity of wastewater to the environment. Textile industry is one of the most water consumers industries of Egypt, thus discharges large amounts of wastewater effluents during processing, especially, in the coloring and washing steps. Cement kiln dust is a solid waste in cement manufacturing. Approximately 2.5-3.0 (6-9% million tons of cement kiln dust is produced annually in Egypt and that cause significant environmental problems. Approach: This study aims to investigate removal of some acid dyes from aqueous solution using cement kiln dust and monitoring the dye in colored cement kiln dust. Solution with 0.4 g L-1 concentration was treated with cement kiln dust until the color of dye disappears. The colored cement kiln residue was separate by filtration and dried. The concentration of dye was measured before and after treatment by UV-Vis spectroscopy as well as after washing of colored residue. Also, the colored residue was investigated with, XRD, IR and DSC techniques as well as the loss on ignition at 450°C. Results: The results found that the cement kiln dust has the power to remove all existing acid dyes and the residue has the same color of dye. When colored residue was washed with water, there was no back diffusion of dye in to water. This may be mainly due to chemical reaction that took place between cement kiln dust and dye. Thus analysis such as IR, XRD and DSC are in agreement with these results. Conclusion: CKD is efficient in the processes of dye removal from aqueous solutions. The interaction between acid dye and CKD is fast (just minutes. So, we suggest using spent CKD for dye removal of waste water.

  19. Peach leaf responses to soil and cement dust pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletsika, Persefoni A; Nanos, George D; Stavroulakis, George G

    2015-10-01

    Dust pollution can negatively affect plant productivity in hot, dry and with high irradiance areas during summer. Soil or cement dust were applied on peach trees growing in a Mediterranean area with the above climatic characteristics. Soil and cement dust accumulation onto the leaves decreased the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) available to the leaves without causing any shade effect. Soil and mainly cement dust deposition onto the leaves decreased stomatal conductance, photosynthetic and transpiration rates, and water use efficiency due possibly to stomatal blockage and other leaf cellular effects. In early autumn, rain events removed soil dust and leaf functions partly recovered, while cement dust created a crust partially remaining onto the leaves and causing more permanent stress. Leaf characteristics were differentially affected by the two dusts studied due to their different hydraulic properties. Leaf total chlorophyll decreased and total phenol content increased with dust accumulation late in the summer compared to control leaves due to intense oxidative stress. The two dusts did not cause serious metal imbalances to the leaves, except of lower leaf K content. PMID:26054460

  20. Utilization from Cement Kiln Dust in Removal of Acid Dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed E.S.I. Saraya; Mahmoud E.S. Aboul-Fetouh

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The growth of industries and day to day changes in human activities has resulted in an increase in the volume and complexity of wastewater to the environment. Textile industry is one of the most water consumers industries of Egypt, thus discharges large amounts of wastewater effluents during processing, especially, in the coloring and washing steps. Cement kiln dust is a solid waste in cement manufacturing. Approximately 2.5-3.0 (6-9%) million tons of cement kiln dust is pr...

  1. Ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution in lichens exposed around a cement plant (SW Slovakia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Luca; Guttová, Anna; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Sorbo, Sergio; Basile, Adriana; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated the ecophysiological and ultrastructural effects of dust pollution from a cement industry in the lichen species Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina, which were exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, two quarries, and inhabited and agricultural sites in SW Slovakia. The results showed that dust deposition from quarrying activities and cement works at the cement mill (mainly enriched in Ca, Fe and Ti) significantly affected the photosynthetic apparatus of E. prunastri (sensitive to dust and habitat eutrophication), while X. parietina (tolerant to dust and habitat eutrophication) adapted to the new environment. The length of the exposure strongly affected the vitality of the mycobiont (measured as dehydrogenase activity) in transplanted lichens. Dust deposition led to ultrastructural alterations, including lipid droplets increase, swelling of cellular components, thylakoid degeneration and sometimes plasmolysis, which, on the whole, gave the cells an aged appearance. Photosynthetic parameters deserve further attention as potential indicators for monitoring early biological symptoms of the air pollution caused during cement production. PMID:26044142

  2. Nature, structure, and properties of asbestos cement dust

    OpenAIRE

    Baeten, J.; Helsen, J; Deruyttere, A

    1980-01-01

    ABSTRACT Total dust samples produced by machining three commercial asbestos-cement products (autoclaved sheet, non-autoclaved sheet, pipe) were examined for their dimensional, surface, and physicochemical characteristics. Microscopic inspection of dust fractions with different settling characteristics in air allowed determination of the simple dimensional features that apply to respirable fibres—that is, the true diameter, length, and aspect ratio and the coil diameter, coil length, and coil ...

  3. Saw Dust Ash as Partial Replacement for Cement in Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Raheem, A. A.; Olasunkanmi, B. S.; Folorunso, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    This research considered the use of saw dust ash as a pozzolan in the production of concrete. the study investigated the physical properties and chemical composition of saw dust ash (SDA) as well as the workability, and compressive strength properties of the concrete produced by replacing 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% by weight of ordinary Portland cement with SDA. Slump and compacting factor tests were carried out on the fresh concrete and compressive strength test on hardened concrete. The conc...

  4. Dust levels in an asbestos-cement factory: problem solving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, A.

    1986-01-01

    Isasbest Ltd., an asbestos-cement factory in Israel, has established dust-preventive measures, maintained high ecological and medical standards, and assisted afflicted workers suffering from asbestos-related diseases. The problems of the handling of asbestos and its relationship to health should be approached according to the conditions in each specific workplace so that reasonable solutions can be found for proper control.

  5. Respiratory Health among Cement Workers in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Zeyede K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known on dust exposure and respiratory health among cement cleaners. There are only a few follow-up studies on respiratory health among cement factory workers and also studies on acute effects of cement dust exposure are limited in numbers. Objective: This study aimed at assessing cement dust exposure and adverse respiratory health effects among Ethiopian cement production workers, with particular focus on cement cleaners. Method: The first paper was...

  6. Utilization coke dust as fuel in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilization of coke dust available from coal carbonization plants, as a fuel in the cement industry has been undertaken and discussed in this research paper. The parameters studied include physical and chemical evaluation of the coke dust and its economic feasibility/ suitability as fuel for the cement plants. Detailed studies have been carried out on the above referred parameters. In addition a comparative study has been done to access its suitability in comparison to other fuels especially imported coal. It has been found that the coke dust contained about 66% fixed carbon, 29% ash, 4% volatile matter, 1% moisture and 0.48% sulphur. It gross calorific value was found to be 5292 Kcal/kg. The detailed analysis of coke dust ash was also performed to determine as to how its constituents will compare with the cement constituents. Keeping in view the experimental results/ data generated on the coke dust, it has been concluded that it can be quite a good substitute for imported coal. In doing so a substantial financial saving can be achieved which ranges 40-45%. (author)

  7. Symptoms, ventilatory function, and environmental exposures in Portland cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Abrons, H L; Petersen, M R; Sanderson, W T; Engelberg, A L; Harber, P

    1988-01-01

    Data on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function were obtained for 2736 Portland cement plant workers and 755 controls. Personal dust samples contained a geometric mean concentration of 0.57 mg/m3 for respirable dust and 2.90 mg/m3 for total dust. Cement workers and controls had similar prevalences of symptoms, except that 5.4% of the cement workers had dyspnoea compared with 2.7% of the controls. The mean pulmonary function indices were similar for the two groups. Among cement plant worke...

  8. Cement kiln dust: a potential feed ingredient for livestock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    Cement kiln dust (composition given) from a manufacturing plant in Georgia stimulated growth and improved feed efficiencies of steers provided a basal complete diet formulated to satisfy all known requirements. Carcasses of steers fed kiln dust had more fat over the ribs and a higher marbling score than controls; organ wts. were not different from controls. Reticulorumen pH was increased from 6.21 to 6.80 by the dust and the pH values of the abomasal. small-intestinal, and cecal contents were also increased. The ration containing kiln dust was higher in Pb, As, and Se than the control diet. Kidneys and livers from all steers contained no As or Hg; their Cd content was not affected by diet; kidneys of dust-fed steers had elevated, high-normal levels of Pb, but Pb of the liver was not affected; Se levels of kidney were elevated by feeding the dust, but the basal ration was marginal in Se, and no signs of Se toxicity were observed.

  9. Research on performance of cement with kiln dust-activated coal gangue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun Mei Wang; Jing Wang; Li Rong Yang [Hebei University of Science and Technology, Tangshan (China)

    2009-07-01

    The setting times and strength of cement substituting kiln dust-activated coal gangue for part of clinker was tested. The performance of sulphate resistance and restraining alkali silica reaction (ASR) of cement with 30% kiln dust-activated coal gangue was studied. The results indicate: the setting times of cement mixed with kiln dust-activated coal gangue is delayed and the early strength and later strength of cement with 10% kiln dust-activated coal gangue is improved to some extent, but the strength is reduced with farther increasing the content of kiln dust-activated coal gangue that replaces clinker, and obviously decreased when content of kiln dust-activated coal gangue is 30%; the performance of resisting sulphate of cement with 30% kiln dust-activated coal gangue is better enhanced; ASR is restrained to some extent.

  10. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL THROUGH KILN RECYCLING BY-PASS DUST IN A CEMENT FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mohsenzadeh, J. Nouri, A. Ranjbar, M. Mohammadian Fazli, A. A. Babaie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a major problem in the industrial areas. Cement dust is one of the important environmental pollutants. In this study the possibility of dust recycling especially kiln dust which has significant importance regarding air pollution in the cement plant, was examined. Tehran cement factory is one of the most important Iranian factories which is located in Tehran. This factory produces high volume of pollutants that are released to in environment. The possibility of reusing of kiln by pass returned dust has been examined in this factory. Different percentages of kiln by-pass dust of this factory were added to products and outcomes of its presence in parameters such as chemical compound, granulation, primary and final catch time, volume expansion, consumed water and resistance of mortar were surveyed. The result indicated that by adding the amounts of 3-8 dust the mortar resistance increase, but adding more than 15%, the mortar resistance has been decreased. Survey in consumed water proved that adding dust to cement, the trend for consuming water is decreased. After dust addition dust, primary and final catch time were compared in different samples and data which showed decrease in dust added samples. Cements with dust added showed increase in auto clave expansion. Overally, results proved that, the best percentage rate of dust addition to the cement was 15%.

  11. Coal acid mine drainage treatment using cement kiln dust

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar Alberto Martínez; Jorge Iván Tobón; Juan Guillermo Morales

    2014-01-01

    Sulphurs are present in different rocks. During mining activities and the sulphur removal processes Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) may be produced, by sulphate ions (SO4 2-) in solution. AMDs are the main source of pollution from mining operations and in Colombia their discharge into natural bodies of water must comply with national environmental regulations (pH between 5 and 9). Cement Kiln Dust (CKD), with calcium carbonate as its main component, from a Cementos Argos S.A. plant was used to neutr...

  12. Non-occupational exposure to silica dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L J Bhagia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to silica occurs at workplaces in factories like quartz crushing facilities (silica flour milling, agate, ceramic, slate pencil, glass, stone quarries and mines, etc., Non-occupational exposure to silica dust can be from industrial sources in the vicinity of the industry as well as non-industrial sources. Recently, public concern regarding non-occupational or ambient exposure to crystalline silica has emerged making it important to gather information available on non-occupational exposures to silica dust and non-occupational silicosis. This paper reviews various non-occupational exposures reported in literature including some studies by the author. Methodology used in assessment of non-occupational exposures, standards for non-occupational exposures to silica dust and indirect estimation of cumulative risk % are also discussed.

  13. Partial Replacement of Cement with Marble Dust Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Ranjan Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The waste generated from the industries cause environmental problems. Hence the reuse of this waste material can be emphasized. MarbleDust Powder (MDP is a developing composite materialthatwillallow the concrèteindustry to optimisemateriel use, generateeconomicbenefits and build structures thatwillstrong, durable and sensitive to environnement. MDP is by-product obtained during the quarrying process from the parent marble rock; which contains high calcium oxide content of more than 50%. The potential use of MDP can be an ideal choice for substituting in a cementitious binder as the reactivity efficiency increases due to the presence of lime. In this research work, the waste MDP passing through 90 microns,has used for investigating of hardened concrete properties. Furthermore, the effect of different percentage replacement of MDP on the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength (indirect tensile strength&flexural strength has been observed. Inthis experimental study, the effect of MDP in concrete on strength ispresented. Five concrete mixtures containing 0%, 5%, 10%, and 20% MDP as cement replacement by weightbasis has been prepared. Water/cement ratio (0.43 was kept constant, in all the concretemixes. Compressive strength, split tensile strength & flexural strength of the concrete mixtures has been obtainedat 7 and 28 days. The results of the laboratory work showed thatreplacement of cement with MDP increase, upto 10% for compressive strength,&upto 15% for split tensilestrength &flexural strength of concrete.

  14. Cytogenetic damage and occupational exposure. I. Exposure to stone dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobti, R C; Bhardwaj, D K

    1991-10-01

    Cytogenetic investigations were carried out on 50 workers exposed to stone dust in a stone crusher industry and on 25 control subjects never exposed to such dust. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in exposed individuals was significantly higher than that in controls (P less than 0.01). The cytogenetic indices demonstrated a clear dependence on the working environment. The effect of smoking and/or alcoholic habits coupled with exposure to stone dust has also been investigated. The results indicate that the mutagenic risk in the working environment is probably associated with silica dust in the area. PMID:1655400

  15. Cytogenetic damage and occupational exposure. 1. Exposure to stone dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobti, R.C.; Bhardwaj, D.K. (Panjab Univ., Chandigarh (India))

    1991-10-01

    Cytogenetic investigations were carried out on 50 workers exposed to stone dust in a stone crusher industry and on 25 control subjects never exposed to such dust. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in exposed individuals was significantly higher than that in controls. The cytogenetic indices demonstrated a clear dependence on the working environment. The effect of smoking and/or alcoholic habits coupled with exposure to stone dust has also been investigated. The results indicate that the mutagenic risk in the working environment is probably associated with silica dust in the area.

  16. Effect of Heavy Metal Present in Cement Dust on Soil and Plants of Nokha (Bikaner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.(Mrs.Suruchi Gupta

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In Nokha(Bikaner cement industries emittes cement dust in nearby farmers fields. In these industries cement dust emitted contains traces of hexavalent chromium and lead well above permissible limit in area under investigation. However, cadmium and nickel were found below limits prescribed. To analyse heavy metals viz, Cr+6, lead, Cadmium and nickel one hundred and twenty samples were collected from four directions on surface and 20 cm depth, and analyzed on atomic absorption spectrophotometer. From the above study it is clear that in case of Sarvottam cement works only lead content was higher in all directions and depths than other two plants. At tiger and Nokha cement works contamination of lead was more over limited in the first 1 km except in east direction. Mobility of lead was relatively more on top soil than 20cm depth. Hexavalent chromium content in south western direction was more for Nokha cement. Whereas, it was more in east direction in case of tiger cement. This indicated influence of prevailing direction of wind on distribution of heavy metals present in cement dust.Heavy metal toxicity results in reduction in plant height, burning of leaf margins and tip, slow leaf growth and over all wilting of Prosopis cineraria, Pearlmillet and clusterbean plants, when this metal deposits in Human body results in genetic disorders. Electrostatic precipitator can be installed to reduce the cement dust emission.

  17. Individual asbestos exposure: smoking and mortality--a cohort study in the asbestos cement industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Neuberger, M.; Kundi, M

    1990-01-01

    A historical prospective cohort study comprised all persons employed from 1950 to 1981 for at least three years in the oldest asbestos cement factory in the world. From 2816 persons eligible for the study, record based estimates and measurements of dust and fibres and histories of smoking based on interviews were used to calculate individual exposures over time. After observation of 51,218 person-years and registration of 540 deaths, underlying causes of death for this cohort were compared wi...

  18. IMPACTS OF CEMENT DUST ON ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH: A SOCIOLOLOGICAL INQUIRY

    OpenAIRE

    Kshemaling S. Bhaskar; Sujata Mahadevappa

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to impacts of cement dust on environment and human health : a sociological inquiry. Effect of cement dust on chlorophyll was studied, mining projects often underestimate the potential health risks of mining projects. Hazardous substances and wastes in water, air, and soil can have serious, negative impacts on public health. The term ‘hazardous substances’is broad and includes all substances that can be harmful to people and/or the environm...

  19. Stabilization/solidification of selenium-impacted soils using Portland cement and cement kiln dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Grubb, Dennis G; Reilly, Trevor L

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes were utilized to immobilize selenium (Se) as selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) and selenate (SeO(4)(2-)). Artificially contaminated soils were prepared by individually spiking kaolinite, montmorillonite and dredged material (DM; an organic silt) with 1000 mg/kg of each selenium compound. After mellowing for 7 days, the Se-impacted soils were each stabilized with 5, 10 and 15% Type I/II Portland cement (P) and cement kiln dust (C) and then were cured for 7 and 28 days. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the S/S treatments. At 28 days curing, P doses of 10 and 15% produced five out of six TCLP-Se(IV) concentrations below 10mg/L, whereas only the 15% C in DM had a TCLP-Se(IV) concentration ettringite (Ca(6)Al(2)(SeO(4))(3)(OH)(12).26H(2)O), respectively. PMID:19339110

  20. Impact of cement dust pollution on Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Meliaceae): A potential bioindicator species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Lemos-Filho, José Pires; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-09-01

    Considering the impacts caused to vegetation in the vicinity of cement factories, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts of cement dust on the structural organization and physiological/biochemical traits of Cedrela fissilis leaflets, a woody species native to tropical America. Plants were exposed to 2.5 or 5 mg cm-2 cement dust applied to the leaf surface, to the soil or simultaneously to the leaf surface and the soil.. Leaves of shoot-treated plants exhibited chlorosis, marginal and inter veins necrosis, diminished thickness, epidermal cells less turgid, cellular collapse, obstructed stomata, senescence, rolling and some abscission. In few cases, individual death was recorded. Cement dust-treated plants also presented decreased amount of photosynthetic pigments and iron (Fe) and increase in calcium (Ca) levels. The cement crust formed in leaves surface blocked from 30 to 50% of the incoming light and reduced the stomatal conductance and the potential quantum yield of photosystem II. Control or soil-treated plants did not exhibit morphophysiological changes throughout the experiment. The activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase increased in leaves of plants upon treatment with 2.5 mg cm(-2) cement dust, independent of the site application. Overall, these results indicate that C. fissilis is highly sensitive to cement dust at the initial stage of development. PMID:27243585

  1. Characterization and utilization of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) as partial replacements of Portland cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Om Shervan

    The characteristics of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) and their effects as partial replacement of Portland Cement (PC) were studied in this research program. The cement industry is currently under pressure to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and solid by-products in the form of CKDs. The use of CKDs in concrete has the potential to substantially reduce the environmental impact of their disposal and create significant cost and energy savings to the cement industry. Studies have shown that CKDs can be used as a partial substitute of PC in a range of 5--15%, by mass. Although the use of CKDs is promising, there is very little understanding of their effects in CKD-PC blends. Previous studies provide variable and often conflicting results. The reasons for the inconsistent results are not obvious due to a lack of material characterization data. The characteristics of a CKD must be well-defined in order to understand its potential impact in concrete. The materials used in this study were two different types of PC (normal and moderate sulfate resistant) and seven CKDs. The CKDs used in this study were selected to provide a representation of those available in North America from the three major types of cement manufacturing processes: wet, long-dry, and preheater/precalciner. The CKDs have a wide range of chemical and physical composition based on different raw material sources and technologies. Two fillers (limestone powder and quartz powder) were also used to compare their effects to that of CKDs at an equivalent replacement of PC. The first objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive composition analysis of CKDs and compare their characteristics to PC. CKDs are unique materials that must be analyzed differently from PC for accurate chemical and physical analysis. The present study identifies the chemical and physical analytical methods that should be used for CKDs. The study also introduced a method to quantify the relative abundance of the different

  2. Asbestos exposure during renovation and demolition of asbestos-cement clad buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    External asbestos cement (AC) claddings become weathered after many years by the gradual loss of cement from exposed surfaces; as a result, loosely bound layers enriched with asbestos fibers are formed. Asbestos fibers on such weathered surfaces may be mixtures of chrysotile with amosite or crocidolite. Renovation and demolition of old AC clad buildings could cause asbestos fiber emission, but this has not been investigated in the past. The exposure of workers to asbestos dust during these operations and precautions to minimize exposure now have been investigated at several building sites. Asbestos dust concentrations during water jet cleaning or painting of weathered AC roofing were approximately 0.1 to 0.2 fibers per milliliter (f/mL). Limited results suggest that concentrations may be reduced substantially by avoiding abrasion of surfaces. Concentrations during AC roof replacement averaged approximately 0.1 f/mL and were reduced markedly by employing more careful work procedures. Asbestos dust concentrations during demolition by removal of whole sheets averaged 0.3 to 0.6 f/mL for roofs and less than 0.1 f/mL for walls, reflecting the significant differences in extent of weathering between these elements. Suppression of asbestos emissions from roof sheets by wetting or sealing of weathered surfaces was not predictable because of the occurrence of asbestos fibers in dust trapped under sheet laps.

  3. Biomonitoring spatial and temporal impact of atmospheric dust from a cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the spatial and temporal impact of dust-pollution in the vicinity of a cement industry, located in an area with dry climate. The spatial impact integrated over time was evaluated from the concentrations of Ca, Fe and Mg in in-situ Xanthoria parietina. The temporal pattern was assessed through one-month transplants of the lichen Ramalina canariensis. Four potential sources of atmospheric dust were evaluated: the limestone-quarry; the unpaved roads, the deposit area and the cement mill. Calcium concentration in lichens was considered the best cement-dust indicator. Different types of dust (clinker and grinded-limestone-dust) resulted in different time-patterns of Ca accumulation, which was also related with the different influence that wet and dry periods have in the lichen accumulation process. The dust pollution was found to be deposited locally and dependent on: the nature of dust particles and the volume and frequency of precipitation. - Biomonitoring Spatial and Temporal dust emissions in dry climates

  4. [Peculiarities of structure-function organization of microbial groups of soil contaminated by cement dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefurak, V P

    2001-01-01

    Long-term contamination of the forest soil by the cement dust leads to disturbances of stability of natural microbial groups, changes their quantitative and qualitative composition, results in substitution of some microbial associations by other ones. The intensive contamination of the soil by the effluents of cement integrated works, inhibits the intensity of nitrogen fixation processes and decay of the forest litter, development of micromycetes, results in the decrease of the length of mycelium and its biomass. PMID:11692672

  5. QUARRY DUST FINE POWDER AS SUBSTITUTE FOR ORDINARY PORTLAND CEMENT IN CONCRETE MIX

    OpenAIRE

    KARTINI, K.; HAMIDAH, M. S.; NORHANA, A. R.; NUR HANANI, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been done in the area of concrete technology to study the utilization of by-products and waste materials which can be used as a partial cement replacement in concrete production as well as identifying the benefits of these alternative materials as cement in concrete. Quarry dust as a by-product from crushing of coarse aggregates during quarrying activities has received considerable attention to enhance the properties of concrete. Thus, this paper reports the research c...

  6. Cross-shift study of acute respiratory effects in cement production workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Omid Aminian; Maryam Aslani; Khosro Sadeghniiat Haghighi

    2014-01-01

    Cement dust exposure is associated with increased respiratory impairment. As the major occupational hazard in the cement production industry is cement particles, our aim was to more thoroughly examine the acute effects of occupational exposure to cement dust on the respiratory system. A cross-shift study was conducted in a cement factory in Iran. 100 high exposed workers from production and packing sections and 100 low exposed from office workers were included. Environmental total dust was me...

  7. Elemental composition of cement Kiln dust, raw material and cement from a coal-fired cement factory using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement Kiln dust raw material, and cement samples collected from the coal-fired cement factory of Askale at Erzurum in Turkey were characterized with the standard addition method using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence techniques. An annular 100 mCi 241Am radioactive source emitting 59.5 keV photon and annular 50 mCi 55Fe radioactive source emitting 5.96 keV photon were used for excitation. Samples are prepared from powder sifted by a 300-mesh sieve. The characteristic K X-rays of the different elements were detected with a Si (Li) detector. The results are presented and discussed in this paper

  8. Dust exposure and respiratory health among Tanzanian coffee factory workers

    OpenAIRE

    Sakwari, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Exposure to organic dust may cause detrimental effects to the respiratory system of exposed workers. Organic dust is commonly contaminated with microbes and their derivatives such as bacteria and endotoxin, fungi, moulds and beta glucan. Few studies on exposure and health effects have been performed in primary coffee factories. The studies showed that processes in primary coffee factories cause emission of high dust levels. Work in coffee factories has been associated with res...

  9. Characterization of vapor phase mercury released from concrete processing with baghouse filter dust added cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hayes, Josh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Townsend, Timothy; Schert, John; Vinson, Tim; Deliz, Katherine; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude

    2014-02-18

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in cement processing and products has drawn intense attention due to its contribution to the ambient emission inventory. Feeding Hg-loaded coal fly ash to the cement kiln introduces additional Hg into the kiln's baghouse filter dust (BFD), and the practice of replacing 5% of cement with the Hg-loaded BFD by cement plants has recently raised environmental and occupational health concerns. The objective of this study was to determine Hg concentration and speciation in BFD as well as to investigate the release of vapor phase Hg from storing and processing BFD-added cement. The results showed that Hg content in the BFD from different seasons ranged from 0.91-1.44 mg/kg (ppm), with 62-73% as soluble inorganic Hg, while Hg in the other concrete constituents were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the BFD. Up to 21% of Hg loss was observed in the time-series study while storing the BFD in the open environment by the end of the seventh day. Real-time monitoring in the bench system indicated that high temperature and moisture can facilitate Hg release at the early stage. Ontario Hydro (OH) traps showed that total Hg emission from BFD is dictated by the air exchange surface area. In the bench simulation of concrete processing, only 0.4-0.5% of Hg escaped from mixing and curing BFD-added cement. A follow-up headspace study did not detect Hg release in the following 7 days. In summary, replacing 5% of cement with the BFD investigated in this study has minimal occupational health concerns for concrete workers, and proper storing and mixing of BFD with cement can minimize Hg emission burden for the cement plant. PMID:24444016

  10. Exposure to tobacco dust in primary tobacco-processing workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous workers are engaged in processing of tobacco in Iran and therefore, their exposures to tobacco dust are likely to be high. The aim of this study was to evaluate the workers' exposure to tobacco dust. Total dusts were collected within the workers' breathing zone using a Personal Air Sampler (PAS) and respirable dusts were measured using a real time monitor (Micro Dust Pro) with a particle size adapter in different parts of the factory. To weigh the filters a microbalance accurate to 5 decimal places was used. The mean total tobacco dust concentrations for personal exposure near breathing zone in this study was 9.32 mgm-3 that was lower than TLV recommended by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In contrast the mean respirable dust concentrations was 3.28 mgm-3 which is higher than Threshold Limit Value (TLV). Dust control methods such as good maintenance of existent dust emission control systems, insulation of dust sources and designing suitable local exhaust ventilation should be applied to maintain workers' health. (author)

  11. Feedback on Measured Dust Concentrations Reduces Exposure Levels Among Farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basinas, Ioannis; Sigsgaard, Torben; Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort;

    2016-01-01

    objective measurements has been limited. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether dust exposure can be reduced by providing feedback to the farmers concerning measurements of the exposure to dust in their farm. METHODS: The personal dust levels of farmers in 54 pig and 26 dairy cattle farms were evaluated in two...... quantified by means of linear mixed effect analysis with farm and worker id as random effects. Season, type of farming, and work tasks were treated as fixed effects. Changes in exposure over time were explored primarily at a farm level in models combined, as well as separate for pig and cattle farmers...

  12. Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, calcium, iron, manganese and chromium (VI) levels in Nigeria and United States of America cement dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbileje, J O; Sadagoparamanujam, V-M; Anetor, J I; Farombi, E O; Akinosun, O M; Okorodudu, A O

    2013-03-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relative abundance of heavy metals in cement dust from different cement dust factories in order to predict their possible roles in the severity of cement dust toxicity. The concentrations of total mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and chromium (VI) (Cr (VI)) levels in cement dust and clinker samples from Nigeria and cement dust sample from the United States of America (USA) were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAAS), while Zn and Ca were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS), and Cr (VI) by colorimetric method. Total Cu, Ni and Mn were significantly higher in cement dust sample from USA (pcement dust compared with Nigeria cement dust or clinker (pcement dust and clinker (pMercury was more in both Nigeria cement dust and clinker (pcement dust contain mixture of metals that are known human carcinogens and also have been implicated in other debilitating health conditions. Additionally, it revealed that metal content concentrations are factory dependent. This study appears to indicate the need for additional human studies relating the toxicity of these metals and their health impacts on cement factory workers. PMID:23261125

  13. On the Characterization of the Generation Rate and Size-Dependent Crystalline Silica Content of the Dust from Cutting Fiber Cement Siding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chaolong; Echt, Alan; Gressel, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    A laboratory testing system was developed to systematically characterize the dust generation rate and size-dependent crystalline silica content when cutting or shaping silica containing materials. The tests of cutting fiber cement siding in this system verify that it provides high test repeatability, making it suitable for the targeted characterizations. The mass-based size distributions obtained from a gravimetric-based instrument and a direct reading instrument both show bimodal lognormal distributions with a larger mode ~13 µm and another mode silica content in the airborne dusts, however, strongly depends on the amount of silica used in the respective product. It is also observed that the silica content in the airborne dust from cutting the four brands of fiber cement siding showed the same trend of an increase with the aerodynamic diameter of the dust, approaching the silica content levels found in their respective bulk samples. Combining the results for both the dust size distribution and size-dependent silica content, it is found that most of the respirable crystalline silica (RCS) resides in the dust ~2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter. These results would help guide the development of specific engineering control measures targeted at lowering workers' exposure to RCS while cutting fiber cement siding. With the high repeatability using the laboratory testing system, the dust generation rate could then be characterized under different operating conditions, and with the deployment of various engineering control measures. This would greatly facilitate the systematic evaluation of the control effectiveness and the selection of the optimal control solutions for field trials. PMID:26391971

  14. Exposure to flour dust in the occupational environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobnicka, Agata; Górny, Rafał L

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to flour dust can be found in the food industry and animal feed production. It may result in various adverse health outcomes from conjunctivitis to baker's asthma. In this paper, flour dust exposure in the above-mentioned occupational environments is characterized and its health effects are discussed. A peer-reviewed literature search was carried out and all available published materials were included if they provided information on the above-mentioned elements. The hitherto conducted studies show that different components of flour dust like enzymes, proteins and baker's additives can cause both non-allergic and allergic reactions among exposed workers. Moreover, the problem of exposure to cereal allergens present in flour dust can also be a concern for bakers' family members. Appreciating the importance of all these issues, the exposure assessment methods, hygienic standards and preventive measures are also addressed in this paper. PMID:26414680

  15. Acute pulmonary alveolar proteinosis due to exposure to cotton dust

    OpenAIRE

    Thind Gurcharan

    2009-01-01

    Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is rare but may occur in association with malignancy, certain infections, and exposure to inorganic or organic dust and some toxic fumes. This case report describes the second recorded case of PAP due to exposure to cotton dust. A 24-year-old man developed PAP after working as a spinner for eight years without respiratory protection. He was admitted as an emergency patient with very severe dyspnea for four months and cough for several years. Ches...

  16. Exposure to flour dust in the occupational environment

    OpenAIRE

    Stobnicka, Agata; Górny, Rafał L.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to flour dust can be found in the food industry and animal feed production. It may result in various adverse health outcomes from conjunctivitis to baker's asthma. In this paper, flour dust exposure in the above-mentioned occupational environments is characterized and its health effects are discussed. A peer-reviewed literature search was carried out and all available published materials were included if they provided information on the above-mentioned elements. The hitherto conducte...

  17. Dust occurring in the processing of asbestos cement as complex mixture of toxic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedelsperger, K.; Manke, J.; Brueckel, B.; Knecht, U.; Woitowitz, H.J.

    1982-10-01

    In a study on construction sites in Hessen asbestos cement fine and total dust mass concentrations were measured on 89 construction sites by static and personal sampling. For craftsmen themselves cutting with the grinding machine the mean fine dust mass concentration amounts to 1,8 mg/m/sup 3/ during roof coverings with corrugated sheets, 1,3 mg/m/sup 3/ during siding work, 2,8 mg/m/sup 3/ during installation of ventilation shafts and 1,8 mg/m/sup 3/ during installation of pipes. During fire insulation 1,5 mg/m/sup 3/ were reached without the grinding machine. The analysis of harmful components was performed by infrared spectroscopy, analytical electron microscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Asbestos fine dust mass concentration above the limit value (TRK) especially resulted from personal sampling during the use of the grinding machine and from operation within doors.

  18. Multielemental neutron activation analysis of fugitive dust particulates from cement factories in Central India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of occurence and concentration of trace elements in dust particulates from and around industrial establishments is essential to know the source of pollutants and athmosphere quality. Dust particulates from two cement factories in the central part of India were analyzed for 5 minor (Cl, Fe, K, Mg, Na) and 23 trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Eu, Ga, Hf, Hg, La, Mn, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Th, W and Zn) by INAA and RNAA techniques. Significant differences have been observed for some toxic trace elements at different locations. Mn content is particulary high in all the dust particulates. Urban particulate (SRM 1648) and Coal fly ash (SRM 163a) from NIST and Pond sediment (CRM No. 2) from NIES were also analyzed. The data have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of air quality at different locations inside the plant and two factories. (author) 35 refs.; 4 tabs

  19. Influence of the composition of cement kiln dust on its interaction with fly ash and slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaunsali, Piyush, E-mail: chaunsa2@illinois.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Peethamparan, Sulapha, E-mail: speetham@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Cement kiln dust (CKD), a by-product of the cement industry, contains significant amounts of alkali, free lime, chloride and sulfate. Wide variation reported in the chemical composition of CKDs limits their potential application as a sustainable binder component in concrete. In the current study, the performance of two different CKDs as components in a novel binder is evaluated. Several binders are developed by blending CKDs with fly ash or slag. Binders with 70% CKD were prepared at a water-to-binder ratio of 0.4, and heat-cured at 75 °C to accelerate the strength development. The hydration progress was monitored using X-ray diffraction, and morphological examination was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ettringite and calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) were identified as the main hydration products in the hardened binder system. Strength development of CKD-based binder was found to be significantly influenced by its free lime and sulfate contents. -- Highlights: •Interaction of cement kiln dust with fly ash and slag was explored. •CKD with higher free lime and sulfate content increased the strength of binder. •C-S-H like reaction gel with fibrillar morphology is observed in CKD-based binders.

  20. Chemical markers of occupational exposure to teak wood dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Mariella; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Lee, Taekhee; Barbero, Ana; Harper, Martin

    2014-06-01

    A novel high-performance liquid chromatographic/ultraviolet method was developed to detect lapachol (LP) and deoxylapachol (DLP) in wood dust as chemical markers of teak wood (a suspected human carcinogen). The specificity of this analysis was determined by noting the absence of LP and DLP in 12 other specimens of different woods belonging to the angiosperm family. The consistency was examined by analyzing teak from three different sources, where the percentages (wt/wt) of the chemicals ranged from 0.006 to 0.261 for LP and from 0.038 to 0.497 for DLP, respectively. Although the LP and DLP components of teak varied according to source, a very high correlation coefficient (r (2) > 0.98 always) was found between the content of the two markers in the bulk specimens and in bulk dust derived from them. The method was then applied to teak dust collected on polyvinylchloride filters from aerosol in an exposure chamber in the range of mass loadings between 0.03 and 3.65 mg, which corresponds to a dust exposure between 0.124 and 8.703 mg m(-3) for a sampling time of 2h. A field test was also carried out in a small factory where teak was used. A good correlation was confirmed between LP and DLP versus the dust collected on the filter in both cases. LP and DLP can be markers to estimate the true quantities of teak dust inhaled in a workplace with mixed wood dust, provided the results are matched to the content of LP and DLP in the bulk wood. LP and DLP have also been proposed as the agents responsible for allergic reaction to teak dust. Therefore, it would be useful to evaluate the exposure to these two substances even without a relationship to teak dust exposure. PMID:24671613

  1. Factors influencing dust exposure: finishing activities in drywall construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catherine E; Jones, Rachael M; Boelter, Fred W

    2011-05-01

    Sanding drywall joint compound is a dusty construction activity. We studied potential factors influencing exposure to respirable and total dust for sanders and bystanders in the area of drywall joint compound finishing in 17 test events within a room-scale isolation chamber. We found the air change rate to be negatively correlated with dust C(twa) both in the sander's personal breathing zone and surrounding area. We could not conclude that sanding tool type systematically influences dust C(twa), but the use of 80-grit abrasive was associated with the highest dust C(twa). We found respirable dusts were uniformly dispersed 1-8.2 m from sanding activities at a fixed location. As anticipated, both respirable and total dust C(twa) in the sander's personal breathing zone are higher than in the surrounding area. The respirable fraction of the total dust mass C(twa) was greater in the surrounding area than in the sander's personal breathing zone. Respirable dust concentrations measured in real time increased over the duration of sanding, exhibiting a temporal trend that is similar to that predicted by the well-mixed box model with contaminant removal by mechanical ventilation only, and continuous emission. Dust concentrations returned to pre-activity (background) levels 2-4 hr after cessation of the sanding activity. PMID:21491324

  2. Pneumoconiosis from Agricultural Dust Exposure among Young California Farmworkers

    OpenAIRE

    Schenker, Marc B.; Pinkerton, Kent E; Mitchell, Diane; Vallyathan, Val; Elvine-Kreis, Brenda; Green, Francis H. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Background Agricultural workers are exposed to airborne pollutants, including organic and inorganic (mineral) dusts. Objectives Lung autopsy specimens from consecutive coroner’s cases of Hispanic males in Fresno County, California, (n = 112) were obtained to determine whether mineral dust exposure in agricultural work leads to pneumoconiosis. Methods The left lung was fixed by inflation. We evaluated airway and parenchymal pathology using standardized diagnostic criteria and semiquantitative ...

  3. Lung oxidative response after acute coal dust exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal dust exposure can induce an acute alveolar and interstitial inflammation that can lead to chronic pulmonary diseases. The objective of this study was to describe the acute and later effects of acute coal dust exposure in lung parenchyma and the involvement of reactive oxygen species in coal dust effects. Forty-eight male Wistar rats (200-250 mg) were separated into four groups: 48 h, 7 days, 30 days, and 60 days after coal dust instillation. Gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.5 mL saline) was administered directly in the lungs of the treatment group by intratracheal instillation. Control animals received only saline solution (0.5 mL). Lipid peroxidation was determined by the quantity of thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS), oxidative damage to protein was obtained by the determination of carbonyl groups, the total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) was estimated by luminol chemoluminescence emission, catalase activity was measured by the rate of decrease in hydrogen peroxide, and superoxide dismutase activity was assayed by the inhibition of adrenaline autooxidation. Histological evaluation of coal dust-treated rats demonstrated an inflammatory infiltration after 48 h of the exposure. Initially, this was a cellular infiltration suggestive of lymphocyte infiltration with lymphoid hyperplasia that remained until 7 days after induction. This initial response was followed by a chronic inflammatory infiltration characterized by aggregates of macrophages 30 days after induction. This inflammatory response tended to resolve 60 days after induction, being similar to that of control animals. During both the acute and chronic phases of lung inflammation we observed a decrease in the TRAP in the lung of coal dust-exposed animals compared to that in control animals. We also observed an activation of superoxide dismutase 60 days after coal dust exposition. TBARS were increased 60 days after coal dust exposure and protein carbonyl groups increased at all

  4. Use of cement dust in the manufacture of vitrified sewer pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sherbiny, S A; Youssef, N F; Ibrahim, O A; Abadir, M F

    2004-01-01

    Waste by-pass cement dust was added in different percentages ranging from 2% to 10% to a standard mix for sewer pipes manufacture, as a substitute for expensive feldspar. It was found that a mix consisting of 45% kaolin, 36% ball clay, 9% grog and 10% by-pass dust and fired at a temperature of 1300 degrees C for 4 h yielded samples that meet the standards. It was possible to reach a water absorption of 4%, a modulus of rupture of 7.8 MPa and a resistance to acids and alkalis conforming with standard values. A test pipe was fabricated by vacuum extrusion using the suggested composition and was found to withstand a hydraulic pressure of 14 MPa for one minute without the appearance of any cracks. PMID:15219918

  5. Dust extraction from gas in cement kilns, using bag filters; Depoussierage des gaz de four cimentier par les filtres a manches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmegnies, M. [CALCIA, 78 - Guerville (France). Direction Technique

    1996-12-31

    After a review of regulations concerning cement plant emissions, the two main cement production techniques (dry and semi-dry processes) are described and the electrostatic and bag filter de-dusting techniques are compared. Examples of pilot applications of these techniques in two French cement plants are presented and operating results (performances, transient procedures, costs) are discussed

  6. Individual Effect Modifiers of Dust Exposure Effect on Cardiovascular Morbidity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Vodonos

    Full Text Available High concentrations of particulate matter (PM air pollution have been associated with death and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular morbidity. However, it is not clear a whether high levels of non-anthropogenic PM from dust storms constitute a health risk; and b whether these health risks are exacerbated in a particular demographic.This study comprised all patients above 18 years old admitted to Soroka University Medical Center (1000 bed tertiary hospital, Be'er-Sheva, Israel, 2001-2010 with a primary diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Data on meteorological parameters and PM10 (particulate matter <10 μm in aerodiameter were obtained from monitoring stations in the city of Be'er-Sheva. Data were analyzed using a case crossover analysis to examine the effect of dust exposure on hospitalization due to ACS and the interaction with co-morbidities and demographic factors.There were 16,734 hospitalizations due to ACS during the study period. The estimated odds of hospitalization due to ACS was significantly associated with PM10 during non dust storm days at the same day of the exposure (lag0; OR = 1.014 (95%CI 1.001-1.027 for a 10 μg/m3 increase, while a delayed response (lag1 was found during the dust storm days; OR = 1.007 (95%CI 1.002-1.012. The effect size for the dust exposure association was larger for older (above the age of 65, female or Bedouin patients.Exposure to non-anthropogenic PM is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Health risk associated dust exposure is gender and age specific with older women and Bedouin patients being the most vulnerable groups.

  7. Relation between lung function, exercise capacity, and exposure to asbestos cement.

    OpenAIRE

    Wollmer, P.; Eriksson, L.; Jonson, B.; Jakobsson, K; Albin, M; Skerfving, S; Welinder, H

    1987-01-01

    A group of 137 male workers with known exposure (mean 20 fibre years per millilitre) to asbestos cement who had symptoms or signs of pulmonary disease was studied together with a reference group of 49 healthy industrial workers with no exposure to asbestos. Lung function measurements were made at rest and during exercise. Evidence of lung fibrosis was found as well as of obstructive airways disease in the exposed group compared with the reference group. Asbestos cement exposure was related to...

  8. Acute pulmonary alveolar proteinosis due to exposure to cotton dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thind Gurcharan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is rare but may occur in association with malignancy, certain infections, and exposure to inorganic or organic dust and some toxic fumes. This case report describes the second recorded case of PAP due to exposure to cotton dust. A 24-year-old man developed PAP after working as a spinner for eight years without respiratory protection. He was admitted as an emergency patient with very severe dyspnea for four months and cough for several years. Chest X-ray showed bilateral diffuse alveolar consolidation. He died 16 days later, and a diagnosis of acute pulmonary alveolar proteinosis was made at autopsy. The histopathology demonstrated alveoli and respiratory bronchioles filled with characteristic periodic acid Schiff-positive material, which also revealed birefringent bodies of cotton dust under polarized light. Secondary PAP can be fatal and present with acute respiratory failure. The occupational history and characteristic pathology can alert clinicians to the diagnosis.

  9. Personal dust exposures at a food processing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Steven E; Conroy, Lorraine M; Forst, Linda S; Franke, John E; Wadden, Richard A; Hedeker, Donald R

    2006-01-01

    A field study was performed to quantify personal dust exposures at a food processing facility. A review of the literature shows very little exposure information in the food processing industry. The processing area consisted of a series of four rooms, connected by a closed-loop ventilation system, housed within a larger warehouse-type facility. Workers were exposed to various fruit and vegetable dusts during the grinding, sieving, mixing and packaging of freeze-dried or air-dried products. Eight two-hour periods were monitored over two days. Personal total suspended particulate samples were collected on 37 mm PVC filters with 5 microm pore size according to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 0500. The filters were analyzed gravimetrically. The two-hour task sampling personal dust exposures ranged from 0.33-103 mg/m3. For each worker, an eight-hour time weighted average (TWA) concentration was calculated, and these ranged from 3.08-59.8 mg/m3. Although there are no directly appropriate occupational exposure limits that may be used for comparison, we selected the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) for particulates not otherwise classified (PNOC) of 10 mg/m3 for inhalable particles. Neglecting the respiratory protection used, five out of eight of the worker time-weighted averages exceeded the TLV. It should be noted that the TLV is based on the inhalable fraction and in this study total suspended particulate was measured; additionally, the TLV is applicable for dusts that are insoluble or poorly soluble, and have low toxicity, which may have limited protective ability in this case due to the irritant nature of certain dusts (e.g., jalapeno peppers, aloe vera). Sieving resulted in significantly higher exposure than grinding and blending. Measuring area concentrations alone in this environment is not a sufficient method of estimating personal exposures due to work practices for some operations. PMID:16893837

  10. Exposure to dust and rat urinary aeroallergens in research establishments.

    OpenAIRE

    Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Gordon, S; Tee, R D; Venables, K. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Newman Taylor, A J

    1994-01-01

    As part of an epidemiological study rat urinary aeroallergen (RUA) and total dust concentrations were measured at three research establishments. Personal RUA measurements in nine exposure groups over a workshift showed highest exposure for animal technicians (geometric mean (GM) = 32.4 micrograms/m3) and lowest for workers in slide production and office (GM > or = 0.1 micrograms/m3). Except for slide production workers, contact with rats, their tissues, faeces, or urine comprised less than ha...

  11. Improved Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Dust and Selected Dust Constituents in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry from 1913 to 2005

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Aims The main purpose of the study was to assess and characterize the exposure to dust and selected dust constituents in the Norwegian silicon carbide industry from 1913 to 2005 and construct a retrospective job-exposure matrix for use in epidemiological studies. The dust constituents were selected based on their known or suspected lung carcinogenicity and presence in the SiC industry. Materials and methods An exposure assessment based on repeated random personal sampling within a p...

  12. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and aluminum dust exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.R.; Churg, A.M.; Hutcheon, M.; Lom, S.

    1984-08-01

    A 44-yr-old male presented shortness of breath, diffuse X-ray infiltrates, and physiologic evidence of a restrictive lung disease. Biopsy revealed pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The patient had worked for the previous 6 yr as an aluminum rail grinder in a very dusty environment. Analysis of his lung tissue revealed greater than 300 X 10(6) particles of aluminum/g dry lung; all of the particles appeared as spheres of less than 1 mu diameter. We believe that this case represents an example of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis induced by inhalation of aluminum particles; this finding confirms animal studies which suggest that proteinosis can be produced by very large doses of many types of finely divided mineral dust.

  13. Exposure to cotton dust in an experimental cardroom.

    OpenAIRE

    Haglind, P; Rylander, R

    1984-01-01

    Changes in respiratory function (FEV1) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) on nasal epithelium were studied in 68 students and 39 cotton mill workers in an experimental cardroom. The exposure was characterised by the vertical elutriator dust and endotoxin levels. A dose related decrease was found for FEV1 which was more pronounced in smoking workers. The thresholds for no FEV1 reaction were 0.58 mg/m3 dust and 0.17 micrograms/m3 endotoxin for students and 0.43 mg/m3 and 0.08 micrograms/m3...

  14. Oxidative stress and lung pathology following geogenic dust exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetham, M; DeWitt, J; Buck, B; Goossens, D; Teng, Y; Pollard, J; McLaurin, B; Gerads, R; Keil, D

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate markers of systemic oxidative stress and lung histopathology following subacute exposure to geogenic dust with varying heavy metal content collected from a natural setting prone to wind erosion and used heavily for off-road vehicle recreation. Adult female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to several concentrations of dust collected from seven different types of surfaces at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area in Clark County, Nevada, designated here as CBN 1-7. Dust representing each of the seven surface types, with an average median diameter of 4.2 μm, was selected and administered via oropharyngeal aspiration to mice at concentrations from 0.01 to 100 mg of dust kg(-1) of body weight. Exposures were given four times spaced a week apart over a 28 day period to mimic a month of weekend exposures. Lung pathology was evaluated while plasma markers of oxidative stress included levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and total glutathione. Overall, results of these assays to evaluate markers of oxidative stress indicate that no single CBN surface type was able to consistently induce markers of systemic oxidative stress at a particular dose or in a dose-response manner. All surface types were able to induce some level of lung inflammation, typically at the highest exposure levels. These data suggest that dust from the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area may present a potential health risk, but additional studies are necessary to characterize the full extent of health risks to humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26922875

  15. Assessing Metal Exposures in a Community near a Cement Plant in the Northeast U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Dong; Bank, Michael S.; Spengler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Cement production is a major source of metals and metalloids in the environment, while exposures to metals and metalloids may impact human health in the surrounding communities. We recruited 185 participants living in the vicinity of a cement plant in the northeast U.S., and measured the levels of aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in blood and Hg in hair samples from them. A questionnaire was used to assess potential sources of Hg exposure...

  16. QUARRY DUST FINE POWDER AS SUBSTITUTE FOR ORDINARY PORTLAND CEMENT IN CONCRETE MIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARTINI, K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tremendous efforts have been done in the area of concrete technology to study the utilization of by-products and waste materials which can be used as a partial cement replacement in concrete production as well as identifying the benefits of these alternative materials as cement in concrete. Quarry dust as a by-product from crushing of coarse aggregates during quarrying activities has received considerable attention to enhance the properties of concrete. Thus, this paper reports the research conducted on the suitability of quarry dust fine powder (QDFP as cementitious material in concrete. The performance in terms of its mechanical and durability index were evaluated on concrete composed of various w/b ratios (0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 for replacement level of 3%, 5%, 10% and 15%, and with the inclusion of superplasticizer (Sp to enhance the workability of concrete. The performance was measured at 7, 28, 60, 90 and 120 days of age. The results show that inclusion of QDFP did not enhance the compressive strength of concrete. Rebound number (RN for QDFPSp concrete made of 0.3 and 0.4 w/b ratios achieved good quality, while for those made of 0.5 and 0.6 w/b ratios, it falls under category poor and fair respectively. In terms of durability index performance, the QDFP concrete in higher proportion (up to 15% and with increasing w/b ratio from 0.3 to 0.6 increase the coefficient of permeability, while QDFP concrete can be considered as good concrete since the water absorption recorded below than 10% by mass.

  17. EXPOSURE TO SWINE HOUSING DUST MODULATES MACROPHAGE MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth J. Pender

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swine Confinement Facility (SCF dust consists of a complex mixture of feed grain particles, bacterial components, organic particulates and gases. When these particles are inhaled they deposit along the respiratory tract and mediate respiratory symptoms and disease in swine farmers and facility workers. Macrophages ingest and eliminate microbes and debris under chronic conditions; however, the role of macrophages in agricultural-related respiratory disease has not been fully elucidated. The goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that chronic exposure to SCF dust causes inflammation by modulating pulmonary protein levels and macrophage function. Balb/c mice were exposed to 5, 12.5 and 25% SCF Dust Extract (DE via nebulization 30 min/day five days a week, for eight weeks with weekends excluded. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF was collected and analyzed for protein concentration, leukocyte distribution and macrophage morphology. For comparison, THP-1 monocytic cells were exposed to 0.1-10% DE overnight and evaluated for phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species production. Repeated exposure to DE via nebulizer caused a significant increase in protein concentration and inflammatory cell number, namely macrophages, in a dose-dependent manner within the lung as compared to controls. Macrophages with pseudopods and vacuoles were the most abundant leukocytes within BALF of mice exposed to DE. Similarly, in vitro studies with 10% DE treated THP-1 cells revealed enhanced phagocytosis (p<0.05, pseudopodia and vacuolization following exposure to compared to control cells. In addition, there were time- and dose-dependent increases of intracellular ROS production by THP-1 cells exposed to 5 and 10% DE compared to control (p<0.01. These findings indicate repeated, long-term inhalation of swine confinement facility dust may mediate chronic airway and lung inflammation through modulation of protein concentration and macrophage function. The aerosolized dust

  18. Respiratory effects of occupational exposure to tobacco dust.

    OpenAIRE

    Viegi, G.; P. L. Paggiaro; Begliomini, E; Vaghetti, E; Paoletti, P; Giuntini, C

    1986-01-01

    Few investigations of the respiratory effects of occupational exposure to tobacco dust have been carried out and the threshold limit value has not well been established. A cross sectional survey on a sample of 223 male and female workers at a cigar and cigarette factory in Lucca (Tuscany) showed a significantly higher prevalence of wheezing, attacks of shortness of breath with wheezing, dyspnoea, and rhinitis than in a reference population. A trend towards a decrease in forced end expiratory ...

  19. Personal exposure to airborne dust and microorganisms in agricultural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shu-An; Adhikari, Atin; Grinshpun, Sergey A; McKay, Roy; Shukla, Rakesh; Reponen, Tiina

    2006-03-01

    Airborne dust and microorganisms are associated with respiratory diseases and increased mortality and morbidity. Farmers are at high risk of exposure to both of these hazards. Very limited information, however, is available on the combined exposures to both hazards on different types of farms. Moreover, most of the previous studies have measured the mass concentration of particles ignoring the particle size. In this study, farmers' exposure to airborne dust and microorganisms was studied using our newly developed personal sampling system. Particle number concentration and size distribution were measured with an optical particle counter. Simultaneously, particles were collected on a filter and analyzed for microorganisms. The field measurements were conducted in animal confinements (swine, poultry, and dairy) and during grain harvesting (corn and soybean). The results show the following average concentrations on the workers' breathing zone: 1.7 x 10(6) to 2.9 x 10(7) particles/m(3) for total dust, 0.9 x 10(3) to 3.9 x 10(4) spores/m(3) for total fungal spores, 0.3 x 10(3) to 3.6 x 10(4)CFU/m(3) for culturable fungal spores, 0.3 x 10(4) to 3.3 x 10(8) CFU/m(3) for culturable bacteria, and limit of detection (LOD) to 2.8 x 10(3) CFU/m(3) for culturable actinomycetes in animal confinements. The respective concentrations were 4.4 x 10(6) to 5.8 x 10(7) particles/m(3), 3.4 x 10(4) to 6.1 x 10(6) spores/m(3), 8.2 x 10(4) to 7.4 x 10(6) CFU/m(3), 0.4 x 10(5) to 1.4 x 10(6) CFU/m(3), and LOD to 2.6 x 10(4) CFU/m(3) during grain harvesting. The highest contribution of large particles (3-10 microm) in total particles was found during grain harvesting, whereas the size distribution was dominated by smaller particles (particles between 2-10 microm was found to be fungal spores. The results indicate that an increase in the concentration of large dust particles (2-10 microm) during grain harvesting was partially attributed to the increase in the concentration of the fungal spores

  20. Phytoextraction of chloride from a cement kiln dust (CKD) contaminated landfill with Phragmites australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, Kaitlin; Rutter, Allison; Cumming, Robert; Zeeb, Barbara A

    2016-05-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is a globally produced by-product from cement manufacturing that is stockpiled or landfilled. Elevated concentrations of chloride pose toxic threats to plants and aquatic communities, as the anion is highly mobile in water and can leach into surrounding water sources. Re-vegetation and in situ phytoextraction of chloride from a CKD landfill in Bath, ON, Canada, was investigated with the resident invasive species Phragmites australis (haplotype M). Existing stands of P. australis were transplanted from the perimeter of the site into the highest areas of contamination (5.9×10(3)μg/g). Accumulation in the shoots of P. australis was quantified over one growing season by collecting samples from the site on a bi-weekly basis and analyzing for chloride. Concentrations decreased significantly from early May (24±2.2×10(3)μg/g) until mid-June (15±2.5×10(3)μg/g), and then remained stable from June to August. Shoot chloride accumulation was not significantly affected by water level fluctuations at the site, however elevated potassium concentrations in the soil may have contributed to uptake. Based on shoot chloride accumulation and total biomass, it was determined that phytoextraction from the CKD landfill can remove 65±4kg/km(2) of chloride per season. Based on this extraction rate, removal of chloride present in the highly contaminated top 10cm of soil can be achieved in 3-9years. This is the first study to apply phytotechnologies at a CKD landfill, and to successfully demonstrate in situ phytoextraction of chloride. PMID:26597371

  1. Determination of Vanadium, Tin and Mercury in Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Cement Dust Samples by Direct Current Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindy, Kamal T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution study applies direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES) to samples of total suspended particulate matter collected in two industrial areas and one residential area, and cement dust collected near major cement factories. These samples were analyzed for vanadium, tin, and mercury. The results indicate the…

  2. Survival in cohorts of asbestos cement workers and controls.

    OpenAIRE

    Albin, M; Horstmann, V; Jakobsson, K; Welinder, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To measure the impact on survival of being exposed to asbestos cement dust. METHODS: Survival of 866 asbestos cement workers and 755 controls was studied with Cox's proportional hazards regression models with age as the basic time variable. The effect of cumulative exposure up to the age of 40 was investigated in an internal analysis of 635 asbestos cement workers who had dose estimates. RESULTS: The death risk was higher for the asbestos cement workers than for the controls with ...

  3. Assessing Metal Exposures in a Community near a Cement Plant in the Northeast U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement production is a major source of metals and metalloids in the environment, while exposures to metals and metalloids may impact human health in the surrounding communities. We recruited 185 participants living in the vicinity of a cement plant in the northeast U.S., and measured the levels of aluminum (Al, arsenic (As, cadmium (Cd, lead (Pb, mercury (Hg, and selenium (Se in blood and Hg in hair samples from them. A questionnaire was used to assess potential sources of Hg exposure. Multivariate regressions and spatial analyses were performed to evaluate the relative importance of different routes of exposures. The metal concentrations in blood or hair samples of our study participants were comparable to the U.S. general or regional population. Smoking contributed significantly to Cd and Pb exposures, and seafood consumption contributed significantly to Hg and As exposures, while variables related to the cement plant were not significantly associated with metal concentrations. Our results suggest that our study population was not at elevated health risk due to metal exposures, and that the contribution of the cement plant to metal exposures in the surrounding community was minimal.

  4. Assessing metal exposures in a community near a cement plant in the Northeast U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhao; Bank, Michael S; Spengler, John D

    2015-01-01

    Cement production is a major source of metals and metalloids in the environment, while exposures to metals and metalloids may impact human health in the surrounding communities. We recruited 185 participants living in the vicinity of a cement plant in the northeast U.S., and measured the levels of aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in blood and Hg in hair samples from them. A questionnaire was used to assess potential sources of Hg exposure. Multivariate regressions and spatial analyses were performed to evaluate the relative importance of different routes of exposures. The metal concentrations in blood or hair samples of our study participants were comparable to the U.S. general or regional population. Smoking contributed significantly to Cd and Pb exposures, and seafood consumption contributed significantly to Hg and As exposures, while variables related to the cement plant were not significantly associated with metal concentrations. Our results suggest that our study population was not at elevated health risk due to metal exposures, and that the contribution of the cement plant to metal exposures in the surrounding community was minimal. PMID:25607604

  5. Comparative performance of cement kiln dust and activated carbon in removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Refaey, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the performance of cement kiln dust (CKD) as industrial byproduct and commercially activated carbon (AC) as adsorbent derived from agricultural waste for the removal of cadmium (Cd(2+)) from aqueous solutions. CKD and AC were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface areas demonstrate the differences of physicochemical properties. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted for various intervals extended to 96 h at 20, 25 and 30°C to investigate the efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd(2+). CKD expressed high affinity for removal of Cd(2+) and was not affected by temperature, while AC was significantly affected, which reflects dissimilarity in the retention mechanisms defendant in CKD and those pursued by AC. The results were explained by changes of FTIR and SEM images before and after sorption experiments. The suggestion is that electrostatic ion exchange and complex reactions are the main mechanisms for Cd(2+) removal. The kinetic data were evaluated by fractional power, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model was found to correlate with the experimental data well. These results revealed that CKD can be used as a cost-effective and efficient sorbent for Cd(2+) removal in comparison with AC. PMID:27054742

  6. FTIR spectroscopic features of γ-ray influence on new cement kiln dust based glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddeek, Yasser B.; Mohamed, Gehan Y.; Shokry Hassan, H.; Mostafa, A. M. A.; Abd elfadeel, G.

    2015-08-01

    A harmful environmental problem such as cement kiln dust (CKD) was considered as a source of CaO and SiO2, which are useful oxides for the glass industry. So, Na2O, B2O3, Bi2O3, PbO and CKD were used to fabricate new borate based glasses. The structure of the prepared glasses was studied by FTIR before and after gamma irradiation at doses up to 120 kGy. Analysis of FTIR before irradiation revealed that CKD split the characteristic broad band of the vibrations of BO3 structural units into two bands and created two effective ranges of concentrations which were confirmed by N4 calculations. After gamma irradiation, the intensity of the FTIR bands decreased and the structure of glass was weakened when 0 ≤ CKD ≤ 23.5 mol% as a result of energy transferred by gamma rays. Increasing CKD beyond this limit created bridging oxygens, more covalent bonds and interlinked the structural groups of the glass network which may resist the irradiation effects. The glass containing 32 mol% of CKD showed higher resistance for radiation effects which was attributed to its strong covalent bonds and to [BiO6] and [PbO6] structural units.

  7. The Lunar Environment: Determining the Health Effects of Exposure to Moon Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen

    2007-01-01

    The moon's surface is covered with a thin layer of fine, charged, reactive dust capable of layer of fine, charged, reactive dust capable of capable of entering habitats and vehicle compartments, where it can result in crewmember health problems. NASA formed the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to study the effects of exposure to Lunar Dust on human health. To date, no scientifically defensible toxicological studies have been performed on lunar dusts, specifically the determination of exposure limits and their affect on human health. The multi-center LADTAG (Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicology center LADTAG (Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicology Advisory Group) was formed in response to the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Office s (OCHMO) request to develop recommendations for defining risk (OCHMO) request to develop recommendations for defining risk defining risk criteria for human lunar dust exposure.

  8. Personal Exposure to Dust and Endotoxin in Robusta and Arabica Coffee Processing Factories in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Sakwari, Gloria; Mamuya, Simon H D; Bråtveit, Magne; Larsson, Lennart; Pehrson, Christina; Moen, Bente E

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Endotoxin exposure associated with organic dust exposure has been studied in several industries. Coffee cherries that are dried directly after harvest may differ in dust and endotoxin emissions to those that are peeled and washed before drying. The aim of this study was to measure personal total dust and endotoxin levels and to evaluate their determinants of exposure in coffee processing factories.Methods: Using Sidekick Casella pumps at a flow rate of 2l/min, total ...

  9. Dust exposure and respiratory health problems in a labour-intensive coal mine in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mamuya, Simon H. D.

    2006-01-01

    Dust exposure and respiratory health problems were studied among randomly selected workers in a coal mine in Tanzania. The aim of the study was to assess the personal respirable dust and quartz exposure and the prevalence of respiratory problems and to present recommendations on how to improve the situation. An epidemiological cross-sectional study was carried out at the Kiwira Coal Mine in Tanzania. Dust exposure was measured during two periods in 2003 and 2004. In total, 2...

  10. Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-12-21

    Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance

  11. Modeling responses to respiratory house dust mite exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Elizabeth C; Fattouh, Ramzi; Johnson, Jill R; Llop-Guevara, Alba; Jordana, Manel

    2007-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) is the most pervasive indoor aeroallergen source worldwide. Allergens derived from HDM are associated with sensitization and allergic asthma. Allergic asthma is an immunologically driven disease characterized by a Th2-polarized immune response, eosinophilic inflammation, airway hyperreactivity, and remodeling. Animal models of asthma utilizing ovalbumin (OVA) exposure have afforded us considerable insight with respect to the mediators and cell types involved in allergic airway inflammation. However, OVA preparations and HDM are two vastly different materials. This chapter is specifically concerned with modeling responses to HDM exposure in mice. These studies have furnished new information and unlocked new lines of inquiry regarding biological responses to common aeroallergens. The complexity of HDM as an allergen source, with its plethora of protein and nonprotein immunogenic components, may influence the mechanisms underlying sensitization, inflammation and remodeling. Here, we will discuss this issue, along with giving critical thought to the use of experimental models. PMID:17684332

  12. Pulmonary functional and morphological damage after exposure to tripoli dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mariana Nascimento; Schmidt, Aline Cunha; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Faffe, Débora Souza; Zin, Walter Araujo

    2014-06-01

    Tripoli is a microcrystalline siliceous rock used to polish metals and precious stones. Its inhalation has been associated with increased prevalence of breathing complaints and pneumoconiosis. However, its acute human exposure has not been so far studied. We aimed at evaluating the putative mechanical, morphological, biochemical and inflammatory lung damage in mice acutely exposed to Tripoli dust. BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups: In control group (CTRL, n=6) animals received intratracheally (i.t.) 0.9% NaCl (50μl), while Tripoli group (TRIP, n=15) received 20mg of Tripoli powder diluted in 50μL of saline i.t. The experiments were done 15 days later. TRIP mice showed higher pulmonary mechanical impedance, polymorphonuclear cells, TNF-α, IL1-β and IL-6 than CTRL. TRIP presented granulomatous nodules containing collagenous fibers that occupied 35% of the lung tissue area. In conclusion, acute exposure to Tripoli dust triggered important lung damage in mice lungs that if found in human workers could trigger severe illness. PMID:24582717

  13. Relevancy of human exposure via house dust to the contaminants lead and asbestos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen AG; Lijzen JPA; SIR; LER

    2004-01-01

    The present report addresses the issues whether house dust is likely to contribute substantially to the exposure of humans, in particular for the contaminants lead and asbestos. House dust consists for 30-70% of soil material, indicating that contaminated soil can lead to contaminated house dust. It

  14. Longitudinal lung function decline and wood dust exposure in the furniture industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, G.; Schluenssen, V.; Schaumburg, I.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between change in lung function and cumulative exposure to wood dust. In total, 1,112 woodworkers (927 males, 185 females) and 235 reference workers (104 males, 185 females) participated in a 6-yr longitudinal study. Forced expiratory...... volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), height and weight were measured, and questionnaire data on respiratory symptoms, wood dust exposure and smoking habits were collected. Cumulative inhalable wood dust exposure was assessed using a study-specific job exposure matrix and exposure...

  15. Longitudinal lung function decline and wood dust exposure in the furniture industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Gitte; Schlünssen, V; Schaumburg, I;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between change in lung function and cumulative exposure to wood dust. In total, 1,112 woodworkers (927 males, 185 females) and 235 reference workers (104 males, 185 females) participated in a 6-yr longitudinal study. Forced expiratory...... volume in one second (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC), height and weight were measured, and questionnaire data on respiratory symptoms, wood dust exposure and smoking habits were collected. Cumulative inhalable wood dust exposure was assessed using a study-specific job exposure matrix and exposure...

  16. Respiratory Symptoms and Dust Exposure Among Male Workers in Small-Scale Wood Industries in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Rongo, L.M.B.; Besselink, A.V.; Douwes, J; Barten, F.J.M.H.; Msamanga, G I; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Demers, P.A.; Heederik, D.

    2002-01-01

    Few studies have assessed respiratory symptoms and dust exposure levels in small-scale wood industry workers in Africa. We interviewed 546 workers exposed to wood dust and 565 control subjects using a respiratory health questionnaire. Inhalable dust measurements were collected for 106 workers. The dust exposure was high, and job title–based geometric mean exposure levels ranged from 2.9 to 22.8 mg/m3 . Prevalence of respiratory symptoms in the previous 12 months was significantly higher in th...

  17. Building an industry-wide occupational exposure database for respirable mineral dust - experiences from the IMA dust monitoring programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houba, Remko; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Jongen, Richard; Kromhout, Hans

    2009-02-01

    Building an industry-wide database with exposure measurements of respirable mineral dust is a challenging operation. The Industrial Minerals Association (IMA-Europe) took the initiative to create an exposure database filled with data from a prospective and ongoing dust monitoring programme that was launched in 2000. More than 20 industrial mineral companies have been collecting exposure data following a common protocol since then. Recently in 2007 ArboUnie and IRAS evaluated the quality of the collected exposure data for data collected up to winter 2005/2006. The data evaluated was collected in 11 sampling campaigns by 24 companies at 84 different worksites and considered about 8,500 respirable dust measurements and 7,500 respirable crystalline silica. In the quality assurance exercise four criteria were used to evaluate the existing measurement data: personal exposure measurements, unique worker identity, sampling duration not longer than one shift and availability of a limit of detection. Review of existing exposure data in the IMA dust monitoring programme database showed that 58% of collected respirable dust measurements and 62% of collected respirable quartz could be regarded as 'good quality data' meeting the four criteria mentioned above. Only one third of the measurement data included repeated measurements (within a sampling campaign) that would allow advanced statistical analysis incorporating estimates of within- and between-worker variability in exposure to respirable mineral dust. This data came from 7 companies comprising measurements from 23 sites. Problematic data was collected in some specific countries and to a large extent this was due to local practices and legislation (e.g. allowing 40-h time weighted averages). It was concluded that the potential of this unique industry-wide exposure database is very high, but that considerable improvements can be made. At the end of 2006 relatively small but essential changes were made in the dust monitoring

  18. Exposure to cobalt chromium dust and lung disorders in dental technicians.

    OpenAIRE

    Seldén, A. I.; Persson, B; Bornberger-Dankvardt, S. I.; Winström, L. E.; Bodin, L S

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Dental technician's pneumoconiosis is a dust-induced fibrotic lung disease of fairly recent origin. This study was carried out to estimate its occurrence in Sweden. METHODS--Thirty seven dental technicians in central and south eastern Sweden with at least five years of exposure to dust from cobalt chromium molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, identified by postal survey, agreed to undergo chest radiography and assessment of lung function and exposure to inorganic dust. RESULTS--Six subject...

  19. Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie E.

    2015-01-01

    Crew members can be directly exposed to celestial dust in several ways. After crew members perform extravehicular activities (EVAs), they may introduce into the habitat dust that will have collected on spacesuits and boots. Cleaning of the suits between EVAs and changing of the Environmental Control Life Support System filters are other operations that could result in direct exposure to celestial dusts. In addition, if the spacesuits used in exploration missions abrade the skin, as current EVA suits have, then contact with these wounds would provide a source of exposure. Further, if celestial dusts gain access to a suit's interior, as was the case during the Apollo missions, the dust could serve as an additional source of abrasions or enhance suit-induced injuries. When a crew leaves the surface of a celestial body and returns to microgravity, the dust that is introduced into the return vehicle will "float," thus increasing the opportunity for ocular and respiratory injury. Because the features of the respirable fraction of lunar dusts indicate they could be toxic to humans, NASA conducted several studies utilizing lunar dust simulants and authentic lunar dust to determine the unique properties of lunar dust that affect physiology, assess the dermal and ocular irritancy of the dust, and establish a permissible exposure limit for episodic exposure to airborne lunar dust during missions that would involve no more than 6 months stay on the lunar surface. Studies, with authentic lunar soils from both highland (Apollo 16) and mare (Apollo17) regions demonstrated that the lunar soil is highly abrasive to a high fidelity model of human skin. Studies of lunar dust returned during the Apollo 14 mission from an area of the moon in which the soils were comprised of mineral constituents from both major geological regions (highlands and mares regions) demonstrated only minimal ocular irritancy, and pulmonary toxicity that was less than the highly toxic terrestrial crystalline

  20. Human exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) via house dust in Korea: Implication to exposure pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhexi; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Shoeib, Mahiba; Oh, Jeong-Eun; Park, Jong-Eun

    2016-05-15

    A wide range of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), including fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), perfluorooctane sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs), perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs), and perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs), were measured in fifteen house dust and two nonresidential indoor dust of Korea. Total concentrations of PFASs in house dust ranged from 29.9 to 97.6 ng g(-1), with a dominance of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), followed by 8:2 FTOH, N-Ethyl perfluorooctane sulfonamidoethanol (EtFOSE), perfluoroctanoic acid (PFOA). In a typical exposure scenario, the estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of total PFASs via house dust ingestion were 2.83 ng d(-1) for toddlers and 1.13 ng d(-1) for adults, which were within the range of the mean EDIs reported from several countries. For PFOA and PFOS exposure via house dust ingestion, indirect exposure (via precursors) was a minor contributor, accounting for 5% and 12%, respectively. An aggregated exposure (hereafter, overall-EDIs) of PFOA and PFOS occurring via all pathways, estimated using data compiled from the literature, were 53.6 and 14.8 ng d(-1) for toddlers, and 20.5 and 40.6 ng d(-1) for adults, respectively, in a typical scenario. These overall-EDIs corresponded to 82% (PFOA) and 92% (PFOS) of a pharmacokinetic model-based EDIs estimated from adults' serum data. Direct dietary exposure was a major contributor (>89% of overall-EDI) to PFOS in both toddlers and adults, and PFOA in toddlers. As for PFOA exposure of adults, however direct exposure via tap water drinking (37%) and indirect exposure via inhalation (22%) were as important as direct dietary exposure (41%). House dust-ingested exposure (direct+indirect) was responsible for 5% (PFOS in toddlers) and house-dust ingestion was a minor contributor in this study, but should not be ignored for toddlers' PFOS exposure due to its significance in the worst-case scenario. PMID:26933964

  1. Removal of lead by using Raschig rings manufactured with mixture of cement kiln dust, zeolite and bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, A; Afshin, H; Behsaz, H

    2012-07-15

    The present investigation is a follow-up of study on manufacturing Raschig ring for removal of lead from aqueous solution. The mixtures were formulated using cement kiln dust, zeolite, and bentonite, normally used as natural adsorbents in the industrial scale, according to mixture design algorithm and response surface method. The pastes were prepared by addition of 28.0wt.% de-ionized water, containing 0.1wt.% carboxymethyl cellulose, with mixed powders. The adsorbents were fabricated by extrusion of the pastes in Raschig ring form and calcination at 500°C after drying in oven. The effects of starting materials on the mechanical behavior of rings were studied from view point of mixture design algorithm to optimize the adsorbent composition. This method demonstrated to yield valuable information on the effects of used materials on mechanical characteristics. The study concluded that the strength, reliability and sorption capacity of ring can be simultaneously optimized by the addition of 47.5wt.% cement kiln dust, 32.5wt.% zeolite, and 20.0wt.% bentonite. In the next part of work, the sorption kinetics was investigated. The kinetic study indicated that the modified model can successfully correlate the sorption data. The equilibrium result showed the possibility of lead immobilization by fabricated rings. PMID:22608209

  2. Levels of dust-radiation exposure of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summed up data on the history of uranium mining in Bulgaria and 'hidden energy' levels of decay 222Rn products in the main sites of uranium mining for 1958 until its closure in 1992 are reported. In 1947 the first plant for enriched uranium ore was commissioned. In the end of 1990 about 9200 workers were employed at uranium mining and ore processing. For the whole period the number of employees was 35000 - 50000. Systematic control on the pathogenic factors as gamma radiation, surface contamination with natural radionuclides, dust loading, respiratory dust fraction and its content, including free silica dioxide. The 222Rn concentration was determined until 1976. Analyzing of its decay products began from 1972 and just from 1976 - control on levels of 'hidden' energy from the total α-decay of the short-living radon daughter products. Without any central ventilation in underground sites air concentration of 222Rn had been as high as 380 - 500 kBq/m3 till 1958. Underground worker exposure had been between 1.1x105MeV/l and 3.6x105 MeV/l or 3-8 times above the level allowed (0.4x105 MeV/l). Values of 6.6x105 MeV/l had been measured at some work-places or the annual allowed exposure had been reached only for two work shifts. These data were among the basic arguments of the regulation stipulating 5-year length of service and 45 retiring age for uranium miners. Taking into account the additional chemical risk factors causing fatal lung cancer development with minimum latency period of five years the National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection (NRRP) jointly with the Ministry of Health launched a decree providing for competent health monitoring of all persons having been employed at uranium mining and milling. Professional risk reduction among former uranium miners is possible in collaboration with other health monitoring and rehabilitation national centres apart from the NCRRP

  3. Risk assessment of bioaccessible organochlorine pesticides exposure via indoor and outdoor dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Min-Juan; Wu, Fu-Yong; Kang, Yuan; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-10-01

    Dust, enriched by dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), was defined as a new route of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) exposure, especially for children. Chemical analyses showed the medians of ∑OCPs were 171 (outdoor) and 520 (indoor) μg kg-1 in Guangzhou (GZ) while 130 (outdoor) and 115 (indoor) μg kg-1 in Hong Kong (HK). Significantly higher accumulative effect of OCPs occurred in the size fractions of risk evaluation. Different cytotoxic effects on human hepatocellular live carcinoma cell (HepG2) and human skin keratinocyte cell line (KERTr) were found for extracts of indoor dust and outdoor dust from different functional areas. For total exposure (dust and food), OCPs intake via dust was low for adults (accounting for 0.16-3.78% of total exposure), while for children it was high (8.16-24.4% of total exposure). Non-carcinogenic OCPs exposure via dust was safe for adults; however DDT and Dieldrin exposure for children was higher than Reference Dose (RfD). The cancer risk related to indoor dust exposure for GZ and HK was moderate, below 10-4, while 42% of residences in GZ should be of concern (10-5). However, when bioaccessible OCPs used, daily intake and health risk were found to be greatly lower than the estimates without considering bioaccessibility.

  4. Carpet-dust chemicals as measures of exposure: Implications of variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead Todd P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in using chemicals measured in carpet dust as indicators of chemical exposures. However, investigators have rarely sampled dust repeatedly from the same households and therefore little is known about the variability of chemical levels that exist within and between households in dust samples. Results We analyzed 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 6 polychlorinated biphenyls, and nicotine in 68 carpet-dust samples from 21 households in agricultural communities of Fresno County, California collected from 2003-2005. Chemical concentrations (ng per g dust ranged from Conclusions Our findings suggest that attenuation bias should be relatively modest when using these semi-volatile carpet-dust chemicals as exposure surrogates in epidemiologic studies.

  5. Evaluation of Dust Exposure among the Workers in Agricultural Industries in North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Krishna N; Patil, Mahesh R

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to quantify dust exposure among the workers in four different industrial settings: rice mills, flour mills, oil mills, and tea factories and to compare the obtained data with the permissible exposure limit (PEL) of Indian Union Ministry of Labour as well as to compare the dust exposure across activities and seasons. RespiCon(TM) particle sampler was used for collecting dust concentration in the breathing zone of the workers. In total, 149 workers participated in the study and 204 samples were collected. Samples were collected in the vicinity of different processing operations. Samples in the rice mills were collected for two consecutive years in two seasons; however samples from other industries were collected for 1 year. The results indicate that geometric mean (GM) of dust exposure was significantly (P workers are exposed to higher level of respirable dust as compared to the PEL, while total dust exposure to all the workers were higher than the PEL; thus, immediate reduction of dust exposure among the workers is necessary for preventing respiratory system impairment. PMID:26324828

  6. Exposure to inhalable dust and endotoxin among Danish livestock farmers: results from the SUS cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Basinas, I.; Sigsgaard, T.; Heederik, D; Takai, H.; Omland, O; Andersen, N. T.; Wouters, I.M.; Bonlokke, J.H.; Kromhout, H; V. Schlünssen

    2012-01-01

    Studies on personal dust and endotoxin concentrations among animal farmers have been either small or limited to a few sectors in their investigations. The present study aimed to provide comparable information on the levels and variability of exposure to personal dust and endotoxin in different types of animal farmers. 507 personal inhalable dust samples were collected from 327 farmers employed in 54 pig, 26 dairy, 3 poultry, and 3 mink farms in Denmark. Measurements in pig and dairy farmers w...

  7. Cancer Mortality and Incidence in Cement Industry Workers in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Kim, Tae-Woo; Jang, Seung Hee; Ryu, Hyang-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Cement contains hexavalent chromium, which is a human carcinogen. However, its effect on cancer seems inconclusive in epidemiologic studies. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to elucidate the association between dust exposure in the cement industry and cancer occurrence. Methods The cohorts consisted of male workers in 6 Portland cement factories in Korea. Study subjects were classified into five groups by job: quarry, production, maintenance, laboratory, and office wo...

  8. Sensory and other neurogenic effects of exposures to airborne office dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, L.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Attermann, J.

    This Danish Office Dust Experiment investigated the response of 24 healthy non-sensitive adult subjects to exposure to normal office dust in the air (7 μg m -3 clean air, 136 and 390 μg m -3 TSP). The dust had no major identifiable specific reactive components. The exposure duration was 5 1/4 h and was arranged in a climate chamber in controlled atmospheric conditions. Measurements were made acutely at exposure onset, subacutely at exposure end and next day (late). As secondary aims the time course and threshold of any observed effect of the exposures, and the characteristics of any hyperresponding subgroup were investigated. In a questionnaire with 36 questions the dust exposures caused increased acute, subacute and late perceptions of reduced air quality, acute and subacute increased odor intensity, acute eye irritation, acute and late heavy head, subacute feeling of perspiration, and subacute general irritation. Cough increased subacutely during exposures. In addition, a performance test showed effects of dust exposures which also affected "Mood Scale" ratings. No effect was seen on an addition test for distraction, and objective measurements of skin humidity. The overall conclusion of the study is that healthy subjects without hypersensitivity reactions seem to respond to airborne house dust. The responses are both subjective sensory reactions and other neurogenic effects even at exposure levels within the range found in normal buildings. Some of the effects appeared acutely and decreased through adaptation while others increased during prolonged exposure and remained for more than 17 h after the exposure ended. The findings may indicate for this type of dust a threshold level for the dose-response relationships below 140 μg m -3.

  9. The Distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 Dust Particles Diameter in Airborne at the Cement Factory Neighboring Area, Citeureup - Bogor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution analysis in PM10 and PM2.5 dust particle diameter has been carried out at residence area around the cement factory, Citeureup - Bogor to estimate deposition of dust particles that is accepted by public. The dust particles were sampled at the dwellings by using a cascade impactor on four wind directions and 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius from the Plant one as the center of the cement factory at Citeureup - Bogor. Measurements at the north direction were the Gunung Putri, Kranggan, Bojong Nangka villages, and Gunung Putri dwellings. The south directions were Tarikolot and Pasir Mukti villages. The west directions were guest house, Puspanegara, Puspasari, and Citatah villages. The northwest directions were Puspanegara, Gunung Putri, Puspasari, and Kranggan villages. The analysis result showed that the diameter distribution of PM10 dust particles at outdoor is ranging from 0.4 to 4.7 μm, and has the weight percentage is high in average approximate 17.91 % of total dust weight on 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius. The distributions of indoor PM2.5 dust particles diameter show a stable 12.27 % weight percentage of total dust weight from 0.4 to 2.1 μm. (author)

  10. Occupational Exposure to Dust in Open Pit Mining. A Short Review.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Matos; João Santos Baptista; Miguel Tato Diogo

    2012-01-01

    A literature review concerning the scientific knowledge of all the key factors related to respirable crystalline silica dust exposure was conducted and a chronological evolution of the state-of-the-art knowledge that can respond to questions raised by the development of the work done in quarries and opencast mines is presented, based on bibliographic research. Findings assert that exposure to silica dust is the most frequent and dangerous hazard in open pit mining. Some aspects meet consensus...

  11. Radiological changes in asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, K; Strömberg, U; Albin, M; Welinder, H; Hagmar, L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore associations between exposure to asbestos cement dust and radiographic findings in lung parenchyma and pleura. METHODS--Radiographs from 174 blue collar workers and 29 white collar workers from an asbestos cement plant formed one part of the study. Progression of small opacities was further studied in those 124 blue collar workers, for whom two radiographs taken after the end of employment were available. The median readings from five readers who used the full ILO 1980 c...

  12. Real-time measurement of dust in the workplace using video exposure monitoring: Farming to pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time, photometric, portable dust monitors have been employed for video exposure monitoring (VEM) to measure and highlight dust levels generated by work activities, illustrate dust control techniques, and demonstrate good practice. Two workplaces, presenting different challenges for measurement, were used to illustrate the capabilities of VEM: (a) poultry farming activities and (b) powder transfer operations in a pharmaceutical company. For the poultry farm work, the real-time monitors were calibrated with respect to the respirable and inhalable dust concentrations using cyclone and IOM reference samplers respectively. Different rankings of exposure for typical activities were found on the small farm studied here compared to previous exposure measurements at larger poultry farms: these were mainly attributed to the different scales of operation. Large variations in the ratios of respirable, inhalable and real-time monitor TWA concentrations of poultry farm dust for various activities were found. This has implications for the calibration of light-scattering dust monitors with respect to inhalable dust concentration. In the pharmaceutical application, the effectiveness of a curtain barrier for dust control when dispensing powder in a downflow booth was rapidly demonstrated.

  13. Trends in wood dust inhalation exposure in the UK, 1985-2005.

    OpenAIRE

    Galea, K.S.; van Tongeren, M; Sleeuwenhoek, A.J.; While, D; Graham, M.; Bolton, A.; Kromhout, H; Cherrie, J W

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Wood dust data held in the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) National Exposure DataBase (NEDB) were reviewed to investigate the long-term changes in inhalation exposure from 1985 to 2005. In addition, follow-up sampling measurements were obtained from selected companies where exposure measurements had been collected prior to 1994, thereby providing a follow-up period of at least 10 years, to determine whether changes in exposure levels had occurred, with key staff being interviewe...

  14. Measuring Dust Exposure with the Thermal Precipitator in Collieries and Foundries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, S. A.

    1959-01-01

    The standard thermal precipitator has been modified for field surveys of airborne dust exposure so as to make it more portable. A microprojector is used when assessing the samples and for coal-mine dusts the counts are restricted to the range 0·5 to 5 microns. In industrial environments the dust concentration appears to vary with a standard deviation of more than 50% of the mean. Part of this variability is due to errors of the thermal precipitator. The standard error of a count of a sample is about 10% to 15% in practical work and the combined effect of this and other errors is that the standard error of a single result is about 15%. However, in practice this can be neglected since the dust concentration itself is so variable. A more important source of error is the bias, due to overlapping among the particles on the cover glasses. The count may give a serious underestimate of the number of airborne particles if high sample densities are used. The product of average concentration and duration of exposure is probably a good index of the dose of dust retained in a man's lungs. The duration of exposure is measured by a simple time study made at the same time as the concentration is measured. Samples are taken near workers chosen at random to give unbiased estimates of the dust exposure. Ideally successive samples are taken alongside different workers. However, in a survey at a colliery it was not possible to do this and each day had to be spent with one collier. The mean dust exposure of the coal-getters was 2,860 particle-hours per shift, of those on stone work 2,250 particle-hours per shift, and the remainder had a mean dust exposure of 1,010 particle-hours per shift. In a survey at a steel works successive samples could be taken alongside different workers. It was found that the dustiness was unrelated to the apparently dusty processes and as the dust was very fine it was suspected that it was the normal atmospheric pollution of the neighbourhood. This was

  15. Advanced dust control techniques in cement industry electrostatic precipitator - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case study deal with the current day problem of pollution by industrial zones in Pakistan with emphasis on the cement Industry which has been proved to be the second revenue generating hub after textile sector of the Pakistan. A pilot study into the identification and available removal Techniques of particulates from the exhaust of a cement plant clinker cooler was carried out. The objective of this work was to study the performance of the each technique in detail in the removal of a particulate with a wide range of sizes, under different operational conditions and to compare the results for collection efficiency with predictions by available theoretical models. A brief and comprehensive discussion regarding design, construction and bottlenecks of each tool has been discussed to fully ascertain it's scope and usability. First part of the study identifies the various pollutants being emitted from the chimney of a specific cement plant in Pakistan and while last portion deals with the ways to curtail these pollutants. (author)

  16. Occupational exposure to poultry dust and effects on the respiratory system in workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, S; Faísca, V M; Dias, H; Clérigo, A; Carolino, E; Viegas, C

    2013-01-01

    Farmers are occupationally exposed to many respiratory hazards at work and display higher rates of asthma and respiratory symptoms than other workers. Dust is one of the components present in poultry production that increases risk of adverse respiratory disease occurrence. Dust originates from poultry residues, molds, and feathers and is biologically active as it contains microorganisms. Exposure to dust is known to produce a variety of clinical responses, including asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic airways obstructive disease (COPD), allergic alveolitis, and organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS). A study was developed to determine particle contamination in seven poultry farms and correlate this with prevalence rate of respiratory defects and record by means of a questionnaire the presence of clinical symptoms associated with asthma and other allergy diseases by European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Poultry farm dust contamination was found to contain higher concentrations of particulate matter (PM) PM5 and PM10. Prevalence rate of obstructive pulmonary disorders was higher in individuals with longer exposure regardless of smoking status. In addition, a high prevalence for asthmatic (42.5%) and nasal (51.1%) symptoms was noted in poultry workers. Data thus show that poultry farm workers are more prone to suffer from respiratory ailments and this may be attributed to higher concentrations of PM found in the dust. Intervention programs aimed at reducing exposure to dust will ameliorate occupational working conditions and enhance the health of workers. PMID:23514065

  17. An analysis of employee exposure to organic dust at large-scale composting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational health implications from exposure to dust, endotoxin and 1-3 β Glucan at commercial composting sites are uncertain. This study aims to establish employee exposure levels to inhalable and respirable dust, endotoxin and 1-3 β Glucan during various operational practices in the composting process. Personal samples were collected and the inhalable and respirable dust fractions were determined by gravimetric analysis. Endotoxin concentrations were determined using a Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL). 1-3 β Glucan levels were estimated using a specific blocking agent to establish the contribution that these compounds gave to the original endotoxin assay. Employees' exposure to dust was found to be generally lower than the levels stipulated in the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) 2002 (as amended), (median inhalable fraction 1.08 mg/m3, min 0.25 mg/m3 max 10.80 mg/m3, median respirable fraction 0.05 mg/m3, min 0.02 mg/m3, max 1.49 mg/m3). Determination of the biological component of the dust showed that employees' exposures to endotoxin were elevated (median 31.5 EU/m3, min 2.00 EU/m3, max 1741.78 EU/m3), particularly when waste was agitated (median 175.0 EU/m3, min 2.03 EU/m3, max 1741.78 EU/m3). Eight out of 32 (25%) of the personal exposure data for endotoxin exceeded the 200 EU/m3 temporary legal limit adopted in the Netherlands and thirteen out of 32 (40.6%) exceeded the suggested 50 EU/m3 guidance level suggested to protect workers from respiratory health effects. A significant correlation was observed between employee inhalable dust exposure and personal endotoxin concentration (r = 0.728, p<0.05) and also personal endotoxin exposure and 1-3 β Glucan concentration (r = 0.817, p<0.05). Further work is needed to explore the possibility of using inhalable dust concentration as a predictor for personal endotoxin exposure. The general dust levels stipulated in the COSHH Regulations 2002 (as amended) are inadequate for

  18. Effects of exposure to slate dust in North Wales.

    OpenAIRE

    Glover, J. R.; Bevan, C; Cotes, J E; Elwood, P C; Hodges, N. G.; Kell, R L; Lowe, C. R.; McDermott, M; Oldham, P D

    1980-01-01

    In a study of slate workers in four areas in North Wales 725 workers and ex-workers who had been exposed to slate and to no other dust were seen, together with 530 men from the same area who had never been exposed to any dust. Evidence of pneumoconiosis was found in one-third of the slate workers, and 10% had degrees of pneumoconiosis that would attract compensation (category 2 or higher). The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was high, and there was evidence of an effect of both simple and ...

  19. Dust and flour aeroallergen exposure in flour mills and bakeries.

    OpenAIRE

    Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Sandiford, C P; Lowson, D.; Tee, R D; Venables, K. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Newman Taylor, A J

    1994-01-01

    As part of an epidemiological study among workers exposed to flour total dust and flour aeroallergen concentrations were measured with personal samplers over a workshift in three large bakeries and four flour mills and packing stations. In the bakeries geometric means for total dust concentrations ranged from 0.4 mg/m3 in the bread wrapping area up to 6.4 mg/m3 at the dough brake. The flour aeroallergen concentrations ranged from 45.5 micrograms/m3 in the bread wrapping area up to 252.0 micro...

  20. K-ras mutations in sinonasal cancers in relation to wood dust exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer in the sinonasal tract is rare, but persons who have been occupationally exposed to wood dust have a substantially increased risk. It has been estimated that approximately 3.6 million workers are exposed to inhalable wood dust in EU. In previous small studies of this cancer, ras mutations were suggested to be related to wood dust exposure, but these studies were too limited to detect statistically significant associations. We examined 174 cases of sinonasal cancer diagnosed in Denmark in the period from 1991 to 2001. To ensure uniformity, all histological diagnoses were carefully reviewed pathologically before inclusion. Paraffin embedded tumour samples from 58 adenocarcinomas, 109 squamous cell carcinomas and 7 other carcinomas were analysed for K-ras codon 12, 13 and 61 point mutations by restriction fragment length polymorphisms and direct sequencing. Information on occupational exposure to wood dust and to potential confounders was obtained from telephone interviews and from registry data. Among the patients in this study, exposure to wood dust was associated with a 21-fold increased risk of having an adenocarcinoma than a squamous cell carcinoma compared to unexposed [OR = 21.0, CI = 8.0–55.0]. K-ras was mutated in 13% of the adenocarcinomas (seven patients) and in 1% of squamous cell carcinomas (one patient). Of these eight mutations, five mutations were located in the codon 12. The exact sequence change of remaining three could not be identified unambiguously. Among the five identified mutations, the G→A transition was the most common, and it was present in tumour tissue from two wood dust exposed adenocarcinoma patients and one patient with unknown exposure. Previously published studies of sinonasal cancer also identify the GGT → GAT transition as the most common and often related to wood dust exposure. Patients exposed to wood dust seemed more likely to develop adenocarcinoma compared to squamous cell carcinomas. K-ras mutations were detected

  1. Occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in wood dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, C. K.; Schüpfer, P.; Boiteux, P.

    2009-02-01

    Sino-nasal cancer (SNC) represents approximately 3% of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (ORL) cancers. Adenocarcinoma SNC is an acknowledged occupational disease affecting certain specialized workers such as joiners and cabinetmakers. The high proportion of woodworkers contracting a SNC, subjected to an estimated risk 50 to 100 times higher than that affecting the general population, has suggested various study paths to possible causes such as tannin in hardwood, formaldehyde in plywood and benzo(a)pyrene produced by wood when overheated by cutting tools. It is acknowledged that tannin does not cause cancer to workers exposed to tea dust. Apart from being an irritant, formaldehyde is also classified as carcinogenic. The path involving carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by overheated wood is attractive. In this study, we measured the particle size and PAHs content in dust emitted by the processing of wood in an experimental chamber, and in field situation. Quantification of 16 PAHs is carried out by capillary GC-ion trap Mass Spectrometric analysis (GC-MS). The materials tested are rough fir tree, oak, impregnated polyurethane (PU) oak. The wood dust contains carcinogenic PAHs at the level of μg.g-1 or ppm. During sanding operations, the PU varnish-impregnated wood produces 100 times more PAHs in dust than the unfinished wood.

  2. Occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in wood dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, C K; Schuepfer, P; Boiteux, P, E-mail: chuynh@hospvd.c [Institute for Work and Health, rue du Bugnon 21, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-02-01

    Sino-nasal cancer (SNC) represents approximately 3% of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (ORL) cancers. Adenocarcinoma SNC is an acknowledged occupational disease affecting certain specialized workers such as joiners and cabinetmakers. The high proportion of woodworkers contracting a SNC, subjected to an estimated risk 50 to 100 times higher than that affecting the general population, has suggested various study paths to possible causes such as tannin in hardwood, formaldehyde in plywood and benzo(a)pyrene produced by wood when overheated by cutting tools. It is acknowledged that tannin does not cause cancer to workers exposed to tea dust. Apart from being an irritant, formaldehyde is also classified as carcinogenic. The path involving carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by overheated wood is attractive. In this study, we measured the particle size and PAHs content in dust emitted by the processing of wood in an experimental chamber, and in field situation. Quantification of 16 PAHs is carried out by capillary GC-ion trap Mass Spectrometric analysis (GC-MS). The materials tested are rough fir tree, oak, impregnated polyurethane (PU) oak. The wood dust contains carcinogenic PAHs at the level of mug.g{sup -1} or ppm. During sanding operations, the PU varnish-impregnated wood produces 100 times more PAHs in dust than the unfinished wood.

  3. Occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in wood dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sino-nasal cancer (SNC) represents approximately 3% of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (ORL) cancers. Adenocarcinoma SNC is an acknowledged occupational disease affecting certain specialized workers such as joiners and cabinetmakers. The high proportion of woodworkers contracting a SNC, subjected to an estimated risk 50 to 100 times higher than that affecting the general population, has suggested various study paths to possible causes such as tannin in hardwood, formaldehyde in plywood and benzo(a)pyrene produced by wood when overheated by cutting tools. It is acknowledged that tannin does not cause cancer to workers exposed to tea dust. Apart from being an irritant, formaldehyde is also classified as carcinogenic. The path involving carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by overheated wood is attractive. In this study, we measured the particle size and PAHs content in dust emitted by the processing of wood in an experimental chamber, and in field situation. Quantification of 16 PAHs is carried out by capillary GC-ion trap Mass Spectrometric analysis (GC-MS). The materials tested are rough fir tree, oak, impregnated polyurethane (PU) oak. The wood dust contains carcinogenic PAHs at the level of μg.g-1 or ppm. During sanding operations, the PU varnish-impregnated wood produces 100 times more PAHs in dust than the unfinished wood.

  4. Evaluating portland cement concrete degradation by sulphate exposure through artificial neural networks modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concrete is durable if it has accomplished the desired service life in the environment in which it is exposed. The durability of concrete materials can be limited as a result of adverse performance of its cement-paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either chemical or physical attack. Among other aggressive chemical exposures, the sulphate attack is an important concern. Water, soils and gases, which contain sulphate, represent a potential threat to the durability of concrete structures. Sulphate attack in concrete leads to the conversion of the hydration products of cement to ettringite, gypsum, and other phases, and also it leads to the destabilization of the primary strength generating calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. The formation of ettringite and gypsum is common in cementitious systems exposed to most types of sulphate solutions. The present work presents the application of the neural networks for estimating deterioration of various concrete mixtures due to exposure to sulphate solutions. A neural networks model was constructed, trained and tested using the available database. In general, artificial neural networks could be successfully used in function approximation problems in order to approach the data generation function. Once data generation function is known, artificial neural network structure is tested using data not presented to the network during training. This paper is intent to provide the technical requirements related to the production of a durable concrete to be used in the structures of the Brazilian near-surface repository of radioactive wastes. (author)

  5. Evaluating portland cement concrete degradation by sulphate exposure through artificial neural networks modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Douglas Nunes de; Bourguignon, Lucas Gabriel Garcia; Tolentino, Evandro, E-mail: tolentino@timoteo.cefetmg.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Timoteo, MG (Brazil); Costa, Rodrigo Moyses, E-mail: rodrigo@moyses.com.br [Universidade de Itauna, Itauna, MG (Brazil); Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A concrete is durable if it has accomplished the desired service life in the environment in which it is exposed. The durability of concrete materials can be limited as a result of adverse performance of its cement-paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either chemical or physical attack. Among other aggressive chemical exposures, the sulphate attack is an important concern. Water, soils and gases, which contain sulphate, represent a potential threat to the durability of concrete structures. Sulphate attack in concrete leads to the conversion of the hydration products of cement to ettringite, gypsum, and other phases, and also it leads to the destabilization of the primary strength generating calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. The formation of ettringite and gypsum is common in cementitious systems exposed to most types of sulphate solutions. The present work presents the application of the neural networks for estimating deterioration of various concrete mixtures due to exposure to sulphate solutions. A neural networks model was constructed, trained and tested using the available database. In general, artificial neural networks could be successfully used in function approximation problems in order to approach the data generation function. Once data generation function is known, artificial neural network structure is tested using data not presented to the network during training. This paper is intent to provide the technical requirements related to the production of a durable concrete to be used in the structures of the Brazilian near-surface repository of radioactive wastes. (author)

  6. Dust exposure during small-scale mining in Tanzania: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E; Mashalla, Yohana J S; Maalim, Hatua

    2003-04-01

    Small-scale mining in developing countries is generally labour-intensive and carried out with low levels of mechanization. In the Mererani area in the northern part of Tanzania, there are about 15000 underground miners who are constantly subjected to a poor working environment. Gemstones are found at depths down to 500 m. The objectives of this pilot study were to monitor the exposure to dust during work processes, which are typical of small-scale mining in developing countries, and to make a rough estimation of whether there is a risk of chronic pulmonary diseases for the workers. Personal sampling of respirable dust (n = 15) and 'total' dust (n = 5) was carried out during three consecutive days in one mine, which had a total of 50 workers in two shifts. Sampling started immediately before the miners entered the shaft, and lasted until they reappeared at the mine entrance after 5-8 h. The median crystalline silica content and the combustible content of the respirable dust samples were 14.2 and 5.5%, respectively. When drilling, blasting and shovelling were carried out, the exposure measurements showed high median levels of respirable dust (15.5 mg/m(3)), respirable crystalline silica (2.4 mg/m(3)), respirable combustible dust (1.5 mg/m(3)) and 'total' dust (28.4 mg/m(3)). When only shovelling and loading of sacks took place, the median exposures to respirable dust and respirable crystalline silica were 4.3 and 1.1 mg/m(3). This study shows that the exposure to respirable crystalline silica was high during underground small-scale mining. In the absence of personal protective equipment, the miners in the Mererani area are presumably at a high risk of developing chronic silicosis. PMID:12639837

  7. Quantitative Risk Assessment for Lung Cancer from Exposure to Metal Ore Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FUHUA; JINGXIPENG; 等

    1992-01-01

    To quantitatively assess risk for lung cancer of metal miners,a historical cohort study was conducted.The cohort consisted of 1113 miners who were employed to underground work for at least 12 months between January 1,1960and December,12,1974,According to the records or dust concentration,a cumulative dust dose of each miner in the cohort was estimated.There wer 162 deaths in total and 45 deaths from lung cancer with a SMR of 2184,The SMR for lung cancer increased from 1019 for those with cumulative dust of less than 500mg-year to 2469 for those with the dose of greater than 4500mg-year.Furthermore,the risk in the highest category of combined cumulative dust dose and cigarette smoking was 46-fold greater than the lowest category of dust dose and smoking.This study showed that there was an exposure-response relationship between metal ore dust and lung cancer,and an interaction of lung cancer between smoking and metal ore dust exposure.

  8. Dose related acute irritant symptom responses to occupational exposure to sodium borate dusts.

    OpenAIRE

    X. Hu; Wegman, D H; Eisen, E A; Woskie, S R; Smith, R G

    1992-01-01

    A repeated measurement design was employed in the study of acute symptoms of eye and respiratory tract irritation resulting from occupational exposure to sodium borate dusts. The symptom assessment of the 79 exposed and 27 unexposed subjects comprised interviews before the shift began and then at regular hourly intervals for the next six hours of the shift, four days in a row. Exposures were monitored concurrently with a personal real time aerosol monitor. Two different exposure profiles, a d...

  9. Occupational Exposure to Crystalline Silica Dust in the United States, 1988–2003

    OpenAIRE

    Yassin, Abdiaziz; Yebesi, Francis; Tingle, Rex

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were a) to summarize measurements of airborne (respirable) crystalline silica dust exposure levels among U.S. workers, b) to provide an update of the 1990 Stewart and Rice report on airborne silica exposure levels in high-risk industries and occupations with data for the time period 1988–2003, c) to estimate the number of workers potentially exposed to silica in industries that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspected for high exposure leve...

  10. Physico-mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Irradiated Particle boards Based on Wood flour/ Polyethylene/Cement Kiln Dust Impregnated with Unsaturated Polyester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle boards were fabricated by mixing wood flour (WF), low density polyethylene (LDPE) and cement kiln dust (CKD) under hot pressure; and then impregnated in unsaturated polyester resin. These impregnated particle boards were subjected to various doses of electron beam irradiation up to 50 kGy. The physico-mechanical properties were characterized in terms of flexural strength, impact strength, water absorption, thickness swelling, and the thermal stability. The results showed that the partial replacement of wood flour with cement kiln dust up to 20% by weight improved the values of flexural strength, and impact strength. However, the water absorption percentage and thickness swelling values decreased with increasing the CKD ratio up to 40%. Furthermore, the treatment with electron beam irradiation doses improved the physico-mechanical properties of the impregnated particle boards up to 50 kGy. The improved results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  11. Exposure to dust mixtures containing free crystalline silica and mineral fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to dust mixture containing at the same time respirable mineral fibres and free crystalline silica may occur in Poland in mines and in the Lower Silesia plants processing mineral raw materials as well as in all plants which use asbestos products and MMMF. Workposts where thermal insulation is exchange with possible phase transformations during operations under conditions of high temperature, expose particularly complex problems. In the work environment of this kind, dust concentration of free crystalline silica becomes important but not sufficient criterion for evaluating working conditions and it may be misleading. A range of studies indispensable for the proper evaluation of exposure to dust, covering together with measurement of dust and SiO2 concentrations, determination of the mineral composition of dust, was developed. It was also found that the acceptable level of risk for neoplastic disease, namely 10(-3) can be attained in the work environment only if the concentration ranges from 0.05 to 0.1 f/cm3, that is equal to 20% of MAC value which is now binding in Poland. Cancer risk (lung cancer and mesothelioma jointly) during a 20-year exposure to concentrations equal to present MAC values should be estimated as about 10(-2) what indicates that risk is too high and it is necessary to diminish MAC values for asbestos dust. (author). 17 refs, 3 tabs

  12. Exposure to organophosphate and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants via indoor dust and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbaz, D; van Velzen, M J M; Hallner, E; Zwinderman, A H; Wickman, M; Leonards, P E G; van Ree, R; van Rijt, L S

    2016-06-01

    Although the ubiquitous detection of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) in indoor dust has raised health concerns, only very few epidemiological studies have assessed their impact on human health. Inhalation of dust is one of the exposure routes of FRs, especially in children and can be hazardous for the respiratory health. Moreover, PFRs are structurally similar to organophosphate pesticides, which have been associated with allergic asthma. Thus, we investigated whether the concentrations of PFRs and PBDEs in indoor dust are associated with the development of childhood asthma. We selected 110 children who developed asthma at 4 or at 8 years old and 110 matched controls from a large prospective birth cohort (BAMSE - Barn, Allergy, Milieu Stockholm Epidemiology). We analyzed the concentrations of 7 PFRs and 21 PBDEs in dust collected around 2 months after birth from the mother's mattress. The abundance rank in dust was as follows: TBOEP⪢TPHP>mmp-TMPP>EHDPHP~TDCIPP>TCEP~TCIPP~BDE-209⪢BDE-99>BDE-47>BDE-153>BDE-183>BDE-100. There was no positive association between the FRs in mattress dust and the development of childhood asthma. In contrast, dust collected from mattresses of the mothers of children who would develop asthma contained significant lower levels of TPHP and mmp-TMPP. This study provides data on a wide range of PFRs and PBDEs in dust samples and development of asthma in children. PMID:25952720

  13. Chemical Markers of Occupational Exposure to Teak Wood Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Carrieri, Mariella; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Lee, Taekhee; Barbero, Ana; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A novel high-performance liquid chromatographic/ultraviolet method was developed to detect lapachol (LP) and deoxylapachol (DLP) in wood dust as chemical markers of teak wood (a suspected human carcinogen). The specificity of this analysis was determined by noting the absence of LP and DLP in 12 other specimens of different woods belonging to the angiosperm family. The consistency was examined by analyzing teak from three different sources, where the percentages (wt/wt) of the chemicals range...

  14. Monitoring and reducing exposure of infants to pollutants in house dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, John W; Wallace, Lance A; Camann, David E; Dickey, Philip; Gilbert, Steven G; Lewis, Robert G; Takaro, Tim K

    2009-01-01

    The health risks to babies from pollutants in house dust may be 100 times greater than for adults. The young ingest more dust and are up to ten times more vulnerable to such exposures. House dust is the main exposure source for infants to allergens, lead, and PBDEs, as well as a major source of exposure to pesticides, PAHs, Gram-negative bacteria, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, phthalates, phenols, and other EDCs, mutagens, and carcinogens. Median or upper percentile concentrations in house dust of lead and several pesticides and PAHs may exceed health-based standards in North America. Early contact with pollutants among the very young is associated with higher rates of chronic illness such as asthma, loss of intelligence, ADHD, and cancer in children and adults. The potential of infants, who live in areas with soil contaminated by automotive and industrial emissions, can be given more protection by improved home cleaning and hand washing. Babies who live in houses built before 1978 have a prospective need for protection against lead exposures; homes built before 1940 have even higher lead exposure risks. The concentration of pollutants in house dust may be 2-32 times higher than that found in the soil near a house. Reducing infant exposures, at this critical time in their development, may reduce lifetime health costs, improve early learning, and increase adult productivity. Some interventions show a very rapid payback. Two large studies provide evidence that home visits to reduce the exposure of children with poorly controlled asthma triggers may return more than 100% on investment in 1 yr in reduced health costs. The tools provided to families during home visits, designed to reduce dust exposures, included vacuum cleaners with dirt finders and HEPA filtration, allergy control bedding covers, high-quality door mats, and HEPA air filters. Infants receive their highest exposure to pollutants in dust at home, where they spend the most time, and where the family has the

  15. Variability of particle size-specific fractions of personal coal mine dust exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, N S; Hewett, P; Robins, T G; Haney, R

    1995-03-01

    This study estimated the ratio of the tracheo-bronchial dust fraction to the fraction collected by a respirable dust sampler for a variety of job classifications found in conventional, continuous, and longwall coal mining sections. The ratios could then be applied in epidemiologic studies to existing respirable dust measurements to estimate thoracic mass concentrations for evaluation of the relative importance of the respirable and thoracic dust fractions to obstructive lung disease. Data collected include particle size distributions from four U.S. underground coal mines using eight-stage personal cascade impactors. A total of 180 samples were examined by mine, occupation and occupations grouped by proximity to the mine face, and by mining technology. Several fractions--that collected by the 10-mm nylon cyclone, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists respirable and thoracic particulate mass fractions, and the estimated alveolar and tracheo-bronchial deposition fractions--were estimated. These were not significantly different when grouped by occupation, by proximity of work to the mine face, or by the type of mining technology in use. Distributions from one mine varied from the others, perhaps because it used diesel equipment in the haulage ways, which contributed to the fine aerosol fractions. Results suggest that although the tracheo-bronchial dust fraction may contribute to the development of obstructive lung disease, occupation-specific tracheo-bronchial dust fractions are not likely to produce stronger exposure-response estimates than the historically collected respirable dust concentrations. PMID:7717269

  16. [Professional exposure to hardwood dusts in a group of Sicilian joiners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacca, G; Provenzani, A; Mangiapane, N; Verso, M G; Picciotto, D

    2007-01-01

    Wood is a system of vegetable tissues chemically formed by biopolymers (90-99%) and phenolic substances, alkaloids, glucosides and saponins (1-10%). There are two botanical groups of wood: hardwood and softwood. Aim of present study was the research of possible work related diseases with professional exposure to hardwood about 25 joiners of Palermo in 2006; in fact wood dust inhalation is very dangerous for workers health because it is cancerogenous for nasal and paranasal sinus (1 IARC). We studied beech and fraxinus dusts (hardwood) and mahogany and teak dusts (exotic hardwood) in the environmental air of joiners during wood cutting and finishing touch. We also analysed exposed workers registry to know joiners duties, exposure values to wood dust, inhalatory exposure, wood type, chemical components, individual protection safety devices, environmental protection means. Then we examined workers medical case and risk histories. At the end we noticed that particle material in environmental air was regular according law reference values (D.Lgs. 66/2000: TLV-TWA 5 mg/m3); but although environmental dust values were normal, we found nasal haemorrhages in 3 workers and vasomotory headache in other 3; we also diagnosed one paranasal sinus polypus and then irritative contact dermatitis in 3 workers. So there is an answer: "can current TLV-TWA be protective and sure? And can it guarantee health of hardwood exposed workers?". PMID:18409853

  17. Biomonitoring Study of Heavy Metals in Blood from a Cement Factory Based Community

    OpenAIRE

    Bank M.S.; Spengler J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of cement factory pollution, emissions, and kiln dust on contaminant exposure in human populations, including school environments, in close proximity to these point sources. In Ravena, New York, USA and vicinity, environmental pollution from a local cement plant is considered significant and substantial according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxic Release Inventory, published in 2006, 2007, and 2010. We hypothesized that cement facto...

  18. Alcohol Exposure Alters Mouse Lung Inflammation in Response to Inhaled Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Poole

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol exposure is associated with increased lung infections and decreased mucociliary clearance. Occupational workers exposed to dusts from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs are at risk for developing chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Agricultural worker co-exposure to alcohol and organic dust has been established, although little research has been conducted on the combination effects of alcohol and organic dusts on the lung. Previously, we have shown in a mouse model that exposure to hog dust extract (HDE collected from a CAFO results in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC, elevated lavage fluid cytokines/chemokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6, and the development of significant lung pathology. Because alcohol blocks airway epithelial cell release of IL-6 in vitro, we hypothesized that alcohol exposure would alter mouse lung inflammatory responses to HDE. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were fed 20% alcohol or water ad libitum for 6 weeks and treated with 12.5% HDE by intranasal inhalation method daily during the final three weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, tracheas and lungs were collected. HDE stimulated a 2–4 fold increase in lung and tracheal PKCε (epsilon activity in mice, but no such increase in PKCε activity was observed in dust-exposed mice fed alcohol. Similarly, alcohol-fed mice demonstrated significantly less IL-6 in lung lavage in response to dust than that observed in control mice instilled with HDE. TNFα levels were also inhibited in the alcohol and HDE-exposed mouse lung tissue as compared to the HDE only exposed group. HDE-induced lung inflammatory aggregates clearly present in the tissue from HDE only exposed animals were not visually detectable in the HDE/alcohol co-exposure group. Statistically significant weight reductions and 20% mortality were also observed in the mice co-exposed to HDE and alcohol. These data suggest that alcohol exposure depresses the ability

  19. Effects of grain dust exposure and smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D J; Graham, B L; Li, K Y; Froh, F; Barnett, G D; Dosman, J A

    1983-02-01

    In four groups of individually-matched subjects (nonsmoking grain workers, smoking grain workers, nonsmoking community controls, and smoking community controls) we measured pulmonary function variables from the spirogram, from the maximal expiratory flow-volume curve breathing air and helium, and from the single breath nitrogen test as well as symptom prevalences from a questionnaire in order to assess the relative effects of smoking and occupational exposure to grain dust in Saskatchewan country grain elevators. There were similar increased prevalences of respiratory symptoms and reductions in pulmonary function associated with either grain dust exposure or smoking, but the effects of smoking were slightly more pronounced. The combined effects of grain dust and smoking on lung function appeared to be additive except in the least exposed workers (five years or less) where a synergistic effect was observed in tests of peripheral airways dysfunction. PMID:6834161

  20. Asbestos lung burden and asbestosis after occupational and environmental exposure in an asbestos cement manufacturing area: a necropsy study

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, C; Mollo, F.; Paoletti, L.; BELLIS, D.; P. Bernardi; Betta, P.; Botta, M; Falchi, M.; Ivaldi, C; Pavesi, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The largest Italian asbestos cement factory had been active in Casale Monferrato until 1986: in previous studies a substantial increase in the incidence of pleural mesothelioma was found among residents without occupational exposure to asbestos. To estimate exposure to asbestos in the population, this study evaluated the presence of histological asbestosis and the lung burden of asbestos fibres (AFs) and asbestos bodies (ABs). METHODS: The study comprises the consecutive seri...

  1. Middle East Desert Dust Exposure: Health Risks from Metals and Microbial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    In the Middle East, dust and sand storms are a persistent problem and can deliver significant amounts of micro-particulates via inhalation into the mouth, nasal pharynx, & lungs due to the fine size and abundance of these micro-particulates. The chronic and acute health risks of this dust inhalation have not been well studied nor has the dust been effectively characterized as to its chemical composition, mineral content, or microbial flora. Scientific experiments were designed to study the Kuwaiti and Iraqi dust as to its physical, chemical, and biological characteristics and for its potential to cause adverse health effects. First, dust samples from different locations were collected and processed and exposure data collected. Initial chemical and physical characterization of each sample including particle size distribution and inorganic analysis was conducted, followed by characterization of biologic flora of the dust, including bacteria, fungi and viruses. Data indicates that the mineralized dust is composed of calcium carbonate over a matrix of metallic silicate nanocrystals containing a variety of trace and heavy metals constituting ~3 % of the PM10 particles by weight, of which ~1% is bioaccessible aluminum and reactive iron, each. The particles also consist of ~1% bioavailable aluminum and reactive iron each. Microbial analysis reveals a significant biodiversity of bacterial, fungi, and viruses of which ~30% are known pathogens. Of the microbes identified, several have hemolytic properties and most have significant antibiotic resistance. Viral analysis indicates a tremendous amount of virons with a large percent of RNA viruses. The level of total suspended particle mass at PM 10 along with environmental & physiological conditions present constitute an excessive exposure to micro-particulates including PM 2.5 and the potential for adverse health effects. Reported data on cell culture and animal studies have indicated a high level of toxicity to these dust

  2. 2-methylanthraquinone as a marker of occupational exposure to teak wood dust in boatyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Giampaolo; Carrieri, Mariella; Scapellato, Maria Luisa; Parvoli, Giorgio; Ferrara, Daniela; Rella, Rocco; Sturaro, Alberto; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista

    2009-01-01

    A new gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method was developed to detect 2-methylanthraquinone (2-MeA) in wood dust. 2-MeA is present in teak wood (a suspected human carcinogen) but not in oak, beech, mahogany, birch, ash or pine. The method involved collection of workplace dust on filters and extraction of 2-MeA with methanol and GC/MS analysis. The method was tested on teak wood dust samples (n = 43) collected on polyvinylchloride membrane filters during various work operations in four small factories making furniture and fittings for leisure craft and boatyards (air teak wood dust concentration: range 0.32-14.32 mg m(-3)). A high correlation coefficient for the content of 2-MeA versus teak dust was obtained (logarithmic correlation: y = 1.5308x + 0.0998, r = 0.9215). Determination of airborne 2-MeA is a useful technique to confirm occupational exposure to teak wood dust. PMID:18977849

  3. Phthalates in dormitory and house dust of northern Chinese cities: Occurrence, human exposure, and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Ling; Song, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Ma, Wan-Li; Gao, Chong-Jing; Li, Jia; Huo, Chun-Yan; Mohammed, Mohammed O A; Liu, Li-Yan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-09-15

    Phthalates are widely used chemicals in household products, which severely affect human health. However, there were limited studies emphasized on young adults' exposure to phthalates in dormitories. In this study, seven phthalates were extracted from indoor dust that collected in university dormitories in Harbin, Shenyang, and Baoding, in the north of China. Dust samples were also collected in houses in Harbin for comparison. The total concentrations of phthalates in dormitory dust in Harbin and Shenyang samples were significantly higher than those in Baoding samples. The total geometric mean concentration of phthalates in dormitory dust in Harbin was lower than in house dust. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was the most abundant phthalate in both dormitory and house dust. The daily intakes of the total phthalates, carcinogenic risk (CR) of DEHP, hazard index (HI) of di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and DEHP were estimated, the median values for all students in dormitories were lower than adults who live in the houses. Monte Carlo simulation was applied to predict the human exposure risk of phthalates. HI of DiBP, DBP, and DEHP was predicted according to the reference doses (RfD) provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.EPA) and the reference doses for anti-androgenicity (RfD AA) developed by Kortenkamp and Faust. The results indicated that the risks of some students had exceeded the limitation, however, the measured results were not exceeded the limitation. Risk quotients (RQ) of DEHP were predicted based on China specific No Significant Risk Level (NSRL) and Maximum Allowable Dose Level (MADL). The predicted results of CR and RQ of DEHP suggested that DEHP could pose a health risk through intake of indoor dust. PMID:27186877

  4. Chest radiological findings in pakistani cement mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest radiological findings in Pakistani cement mill workers Even in the 21st century, in developing countries millions of people work daily in dusty environments. They are exposed to different types of health hazards namely, fumes, gases and dust, which are risk factors for developing occupational diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform chest radiology to determine the occupational hazards of cement dust on the lungs of cement mill workers. This study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Hamdard University Karachi, Pakistan, during the period June to August 2000. In this study 50, apparently healthy volunteer male cement mill workers were randomly selected with an average of 13 years exposure with age ranging from 20-60 years. They were matched with 50, healthy male control subjects in terms of age, height, weight and socioeconomic status. Both groups met with exclusion criteria as per standard. Radiology was performed by Trophy radiology. Results: The present study demonstrated 12% of cases with interstitial lung disease and 2% of cases with pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. Conclusion: Exposure to cement dust causes interstitial lung disease, pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. (author)

  5. Leukaemia among uranium miners - late effects of exposure to uranium dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with on recent observations among Czech uranium miners by 1999. Results of leukaemia study in a cohort of nearly 10 000 uranium miners based on 29 observed cases show significant association to chronic exposure. The largest contribution is from the uranium dust. Although there are estimates to the red bone marrow, it seems to be more practical to use a model based on modified duration of exposure, where non-hewer exposure are accounted by 50%. The evaluation of leukaemia subtypes is limited by low numbers. More accurate results can be expected in an extended follow-up or by pooling several studies. (authors)

  6. [Indoor dust as a pathway of human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Struciński, Paweł; Hernik, Agnieszka; Czaja, Katarzyna; Korcz, Wojciech; Minorczyk, Maria; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2012-01-01

    The brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) belong to a class of synthetic, additive brominated flame retardants (BFRs). PBDEs are used to reduce the flammability of commercial and household products such as textiles, various plastic polymers, furnishing foam, and electronic equipment. People spend a large percentage of their life-time indoors at home, in offices and cars, etc, providing many opportunities for lengthy exposure to PBDEs from residential settings and commercial products in an indoor environment. In recent time, the foodstuffs, mainly food of animal origin, have been indicated as the main pathway of human exposure to PBDEs. However, many studies have shown that the indoor environment, mainly indoor dust, can be also a significant source of exposure to PBDEs, especially for younger children (toddlers) because of their behavioral patterns, eg. putting fingers, toys, and other items in their mouth. Numerous studies show that the median intakes of PBDEs via dust for adult range from 1.41 to 277 ng x day(-1) is lower than that via food which range from 135 to 333 ng x day-', while the median intake of these compounds via indoor dust for children range from 101 to 404 ng x day(-1) is much higher than via food: 77-190 ng x day(-1). The congener pattern observed in the indoor dust is different to that found in food. The indoor dust is dominated by the congener BDE-209 vs. food where the most dominated congeners are BDE-47 and BDE-99. Human exposure to PBDEs and other brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is widely widespread throughout the world and it depends on a country range of usage, production and legislation concerning these chemicals as well as a citizen's behavior. Generally, human exposure has been found higher in North America than in Europe and Asia. Within European countries the significant highest concentrations in dust have been found in the United Kingdom. It should be noted that many uncertainty factors such as personal habits, dietary preferences

  7. Dust exposure and chronic respiratory symptoms among coffee curing workers in Kilimanjaro: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakwari Gloria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffee processing causes organic dust exposure which may lead to development of respiratory symptoms. Previous studies have mainly focused on workers involved in roasting coffee in importing countries. This study was carried out to determine total dust exposure and respiratory health of workers in Tanzanian primary coffee-processing factories. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 79 workers in two coffee factories, and among 73 control workers in a beverage factory. Personal samples of total dust (n = 45 from the coffee factories and n = 19 from the control factory were collected throughout the working shift from the breathing zone of the workers. A questionnaire with modified questions from the American Thoracic Society questionnaire was used to assess chronic respiratory symptoms. Differences between groups were tested by using independent t-tests and Chi square tests. Poisson Regression Model was used to estimate prevalence ratio, adjusting for age, smoking, presence of previous lung diseases and years worked in dusty factories. Results All participants were male. The coffee workers had a mean age of 40 years and were older than the controls (31 years. Personal total dust exposure in the coffee factories were significantly higher than in the control factory (geometric mean (GM 1.23 mg/m3, geometric standard deviation (GSD (0.8 vs. 0.21(2.4 mg/m3. Coffee workers had significantly higher prevalence than controls for cough with sputum (23% vs. 10%; Prevalence ratio (PR; 2.5, 95% CI 1.0 - 5.9 and chest tightness (27% vs. 13%; PR; 2.4, 95% CI 1.1 - 5.2. The prevalence of morning cough, cough with and without sputum for 4 days or more in a week was also higher among coffee workers than among controls. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Workers exposed to coffee dust reported more respiratory symptoms than did the controls. This might relate to their exposure to coffee dust

  8. Impact of Direct Soil Exposures from Airborne Dust and Geophagy on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F. Sing

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over evolutionary time humans have developed a complex biological relationship with soils. Here we describe modes of soil exposure and their biological implications. We consider two types of soil exposure, the first being the continuous exposure to airborne soil, and the second being dietary ingestion of soils, or geophagy. It may be assumed that airborne dust and ingestion of soil have influenced the evolution of particular DNA sequences which control biological systems that enable individual organisms to take advantage of, adapt to and/or protect against exposures to soil materials. We review the potential for soil exposure as an environmental source of epigenetic signals which may influence the function of our genome in determining health and disease.

  9. Lung fibrosis and exposure to wood dusts: Two cases report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Riccò

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing evidence suggests that idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF occurs more often in subjects previously exposed to wood dusts than in non-exposed subjects. Here we report 2 cases of the IPF among workers prolongedly exposed to high levels of hardwood dusts. Case report: The case No. 1: An 83 year-old male former smoker, retired joiner developed mild dyspnoea and chronic dry cough over the period preceding the examination. Pulmonary function tests (PFT identified a mild restrictive pattern and diffusion capacity for carbon dioxide (CO2 that was severely impaired (57% of predicted value. High resolution computer tomography (HRCT identified bilateral, subpleural basal reticular opacities in honeycombing, without any nodules or ground-glass opacities. The case No. 2: A 73 year-old male retired joiner, never smoker, presented a 3-year history of progressive breathlessness and non-productive cough in mild hypoxemia. Pulmonary function tests suggested a moderate restrictive pattern in severely impaired diffusion capacity for CO2 (54% of predicted value. High resolution computer tomography identified diffuse peripheral reticular opacities and honeycombing of lower fields, with apico-basilar gradient. Both cases received diagnosis of the idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Discussion: The pulmonary fibrosis is a common feature of several diseases and may be induced by inflammatory disorders following inhalation of organic and inorganic dusts (e.g., asbestos, silica, and several reports suggest that many cases of the IPF may be in fact secondary to occupational dust exposure as in the case reports we present here. Conclusions: Occupational exposure to wood dusts may be a risk factor for the IPF. Unfortunately, exposure reconstruction is frequently inconsistent and anamnesis often misses other causes of the pulmonary fibrosis (e.g., extrinsic allergic alveolitis. Med Pr 2015;66(5:739–747

  10. Effects of mask fitness and worker education on the prevention of occupational dust exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishide,Tadashi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available To decrease the incidence of pneumoconiosis, we examined dust protective mask performance and its relation to pulmonary function as well as the effects of worker education on the proper wearing of masks. One hundred and seventy-eight workers from 15 factories subject to dust exposure participated in this study. All participants were interviewed to obtain relevant personal information and underwent both a mask leakage and a pulmonary function test. The mask leakage was expressed as a percentage, with under 10% leakage indicating that the dust protective mask worked efficiently. In addition, 23 workers from 2 factories were educated on how to wear masks properly. The average mask leakage was 24.3%, and 58% of workers wore ineffective masks. Though pulmonary function was almost normal, the percent vital capacity (%VC tended to be lower depending on the mask leakage. Mask education, which was very easy and took only a short time, dramatically decreased average mask leakage from 32.1% to 10.5% (p0.001. Educating workers to wear masks properly might prevent the worsening of pulmonary function in response to dust exposure. Appropriate mask fitness by education could be useful in preventing the development of pneumoconiosis.

  11. Examination of exposure to dust, heavy metals and ionizing radiation from radionuclides in dusts of the Johanngeorgenstadt vein ore deposit of WISMUT company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities at the Johanngeorgenstadt site are to characterize the dusts accrued for their nuclide-specific radioactivity and mass concentrations, their amounts of hazardous materials, and their grain size distributions. The sedimentation behaviour of the dusts is examined in the return air from the borehole at various velocities of air. The results are taken as a basis for establishment of a job-related exposure matrix for risk assessments with regard to induction of extra-pulmonary cancer. (DG)

  12. Inflammatory and Remodeling Events in Asthma with Chronic Exposure to House Dust Mites: A Murine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Joong Hyun; Kim, Chi Hong; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Seung Joon; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Young Kyoon; Kim, Kwan Hyoung; Moon, Hwa Sik; Song, Jeong Sup; Park, Sung Hak; Kwon, Soon Seog

    2007-01-01

    Although animal models with ovalbumin have been used to study chronic asthma, there are difficulties in inducing recurrence as well as in maintaining chronic inflammation in this system. Using a murine model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced bronchial asthma, we examined the airway remodeling process in response to the chronic exposure to HDM. During the seventh and twelfth weeks of study, HDM were inhaled through the nose for three consecutive days and airway responsiveness was measured. Twen...

  13. Medical Geology in the Middle East: Potential Health Risks from Mineralized Dust Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, M. B.; Fredrickson, H. L.; Bednar, A. J.; Fannin, H. B.; Griffin, D. W.; Sobecki, T. M.

    2012-04-01

    In the Middle East, dust and sand storms are a persistent problem delivering significant amounts of mineralized particulates via inhalation into the mouth, nasal pharynx, and lungs. The health risks of this dust inhalation are presently being studied but accurate characterization as to the potential health effects is still lacking. Experiments were designed to study the chemical composition, mineral content, and microbial flora of Kuwaiti and Iraqi dust particles for the potential to cause adverse human health effects both acute and chronic. Multiple site samples were collected and chemical and physical characterization including particle size distribution and inorganic analysis was conducted, followed by analysis and identification of biologic flora to include bacteria, fungi and viruses. Additionally, PM10 exposure data was collected hourly over a 12 day period (>10,000 ug/m3). Data indicates that the mineralized dust is composed of calcium carbonate and magnesium sulfate coating over a precipitated matrix of metallic silicate nanocrystals of various forms containing a variety of trace and heavy metals constituting ~3 % of the particles by weight. This includes ~ 1% by weight bioaccessible aluminum and reactive iron with the remaining 1% a mixture of bioaccessible trace and heavy metals. Microbial analysis reveals a significant biodiversity of bacteria of which ~25 % are known pathogens. Of the microbes identified, several have hemolytic properties and most have significant antibiotic resistance. Viral analysis indicates a tremendous amount of virons with a large percent of RNA viruses. The level of total suspended particle mass at PM10 constitutes an excessive exposure micro-particulates including PM 2.5 (~1,0000 ug/m3). Reported data on cell culture and animal studies have indicated a high level of toxicity to these dust particles. Taken together, these data suggest that at the level of dust exposure commonly found in the Middle East (i.e., Iraq, Kuwait, and

  14. Emphysema and pulmonary impairment in coal miners: Quantitative relationship with dust exposure and cigarette smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuempel, E. D.; Vallyathan, V.; Green, F. H. Y.

    2009-02-01

    Coal miners have been shown to be at increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases including emphysema. The objective of this study was to determine whether lifetime cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust is a significant predictor of developing emphysema at a clinically-relevant level of severity by the end of life, after controlling for cigarette smoking and other covariates. Clinically-relevant emphysema severity was determined from the association between individuals' lung function during life (forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV1, as a percentage of predicted normal values) and emphysema severity at autopsy (as the proportion of lung tissue affected). In a logistic regression model, cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust was a statistically significant predictor of developing clinically-relevant emphysema severity, among both ever-smokers and never-smokers. The odds ratio for developing emphysema associated with FEV1 <80% at the cohort mean cumulative coal dust exposure (87 mg/m3 x yr) was 2.30 (1.46-3.64, 95% confidence limits), and at the cohort mean cigarette smoking (among smokers: 42 pack-years) was 1.95 (1.39-2.79).

  15. Emphysema and pulmonary impairment in coal miners: quantitative relationship with dust exposure and cigarette smoking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.D. Kuempel; V. Vallyathan; F.H.Y. Green [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Coal miners have been shown to be at increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases including emphysema. The objective of this study was to determine whether lifetime cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust is a significant predictor of developing emphysema at a clinically-relevant level of severity by the end of life, after controlling for cigarette smoking and other covariates. Clinically-relevant emphysema severity was determined from the association between individuals' lung function during life (forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV{sub 1}, as a percentage of predicted normal values) and emphysema severity at autopsy (as the proportion of lung tissue affected). In a logistic regression model, cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust was a statistically significant predictor of developing clinically-relevant emphysema severity, among both ever-smokers and never-smokers. The odds ratio for developing emphysema associated with FEV1 <80% at the cohort mean cumulative coal dust exposure (87 mg/m{sup 3} x yr) was 2.30 (1.46-3.64, 95% confidence limits), and at the cohort mean cigarette smoking (among smokers: 42 pack-years) was 1.95 (1.39-2.79). 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Investigation into the use of cement kiln dust in high density sludge (HDS) treatment of acid mine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential to replace lime with cement kiln dust (CKD) in high density sludge (HDS) treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD). The bench-scale study used two water samples: AMD sampled from a lead-zinc mine with high concentrations of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and arsenic (As) (Fe/Zn-AMD) and a synthetic AMD solution (Syn-AMD) spiked with ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3). Arsenic was found to be significantly reduced with CKD-HDS treatment of Fe/Zn-AMD compared to lime-HDS treatment, to concentrations below the stringent mine effluent discharge regulation of 0.10 mg As/L (i.e., 0.04 ± 0.02 mg/L). Both CKD- and lime-HDS treatment of the two AMD samples resulted in settled water Fe concentrations above the stringent discharge guideline of 0.3 mg Fe/L. CKD addition in the HDS process also resulted in high settled water turbidity, above typical discharge guidelines of 15 mg TSS/L. CKD-HDS treatment was found to result in significantly improved settled solids (i.e., sludge) quality compared to that generated in the lime-HDS process. HDS treatment with CKD resulted in 25-88% lower sludge volume indices, 2 to 9 times higher % wet solids, and 10 to 20 times higher % dry solids compared to lime addition. XRD and XPS testing indicated that CKD-HDS sludge consisted of mainly CaCO3 and SiO2 with Fe(3+) precipitates attached at particle surfaces. XRD and XPS testing of the lime-HDS generated sludge showed that it consisted of non-crystalline Fe oxides typical of sludge formed from precipitates with a high water concentration. Increased sedimentation rates were also found for CKD (1.3 cm/s) compared to lime (0.3 cm/s). The increased solids loading with CKD addition compared to lime addition in the HDS process was suggested to both promote surface complexation of metal precipitates with insoluble CKD particles and increase compression effects during Type IV sedimentation. These mechanisms collectively contributed to the reduced water content of

  17. Trace metals in resuspended fraction of settled bus dust and assessment of non-occupational exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tingting; Gao, Peng; Jia, Liming; Chen, Xin; Lu, Binyu; Yang, Longhai; Feng, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Trace metals (TMs) within urban public transportation systems have rarely been studied and information on related health risks is scant. This study measured TM (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, nickel, zinc, copper and lead) concentrations in resuspended fractions of settled bus dust in Harbin, China, and estimated the exposure and health risks. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) for commuters was estimated for TM exposures. The average concentration of total TMs was 559μg/g (ranges from 312 to 787) among 45 bus routes in Harbin. The hazard quotient of three selected commuter groups increased in the following order: teenagersdermal contact>inhalation. PMID:27128506

  18. Cause-specific mortality in British coal workers and exposure to respirable dust and quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian G Miller; Laura MacCalman [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    In the 1950s the Pneumoconiosis Field Research (PFR) programme was set up to study the health of British coal workers. Studies included regular health surveys, an intensive characterisation of workers' individual exposures, and entry to a cohort followed up to the present for cause-specific mortality. This study reports on analyses of cause-specific mortality in a cohort of almost 18?000 men from 10 British collieries. External analyses used standardised mortality ratios (SMRs), comparing observed mortality with reference rates from the regions in which the collieries were situated. Causes investigated include lung and stomach cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular endpoints. Internal analyses used Cox regression models with time-dependent exposures adjusting for the confounding effects of age, smoking, cohort entry date and regional differences in population mortality rates. Several causes showed evidence of a healthy worker effect early in the follow-up, with a deficit in the SMR diminishing over time. For most of the causes there was a significant excess in the latter part of follow-up. Internal analyses found evidence of an association between increased risks of lung cancer and increased quartz exposure, particularly at a lag of 15 years. Risks of mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease showed increases with increased exposure to respirable dust. This paper adds to the evidence on the long-term effects of exposure to coalmine dust on mortality from respiratory diseases.

  19. Cause-specific mortality in British coal workers and exposure to respirable dust and quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.G.; MacCalman, L. [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    In the 1950s the Pneumoconiosis Field Research (PFR) programme was set up to study the health of British coal workers. Studies included regular health surveys, an intensive characterisation of workers' individual exposures, and entry to a cohort followed up to the present for cause-specific mortality. This study reports on analyses of cause-specific mortality in a cohort of almost 18 000 men from 10 British collieries. External analyses used standardised mortality ratios (SMRs), comparing observed mortality with reference rates from the regions in which the collieries were situated. Causes investigated include lung and stomach cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular endpoints. Internal analyses used Cox regression models with time-dependent exposures adjusting for the confounding effects of age, smoking, cohort entry date and regional differences in population mortality rates. Several causes showed evidence of a healthy worker effect early in the follow-up, with a deficit in the SMR diminishing over time. For most of the causes there was a significant excess in the latter part of follow-up. Internal analyses found evidence of an association between increased risks of lung cancer and increased quartz exposure, particularly at a lag of 15 years. Risks of mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease showed increases with increased exposure to respirable dust. This paper adds to the evidence on the long-term effects of exposure to coalmine dust on mortality from respiratory diseases.

  20. Occurrence of bisphenol A in indoor dust from two locations in the eastern United States and implications for human exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Sudan N; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, which are used in many consumer products. Sources of human exposures to BPA include packaged and canned food products, indoor air, and dust ingestion. Information on the relative contributions of the pathways to BPA exposures is limited. In this study, we measured concentrations BPA in indoor dust collected from two locations in the Eastern United States and evaluated the contribution of dust to total BPA exposures. BPA was found in 95% of the dust samples analyzed (n = 56) at concentrations ranging from <0.5 to 10,200 ng/g (mean 843; median 422). The median values for BPA intake by way of the ingestion of dust by adults and toddlers were calculated to be 0.35 and 5.63 ng/kg body weight/day. These estimated exposure doses of BPA through dust ingestion are of the same order of magnitude as the recently reported low concentrations that induced health effects in laboratory animal studies. The contribution of dust to total human BPA intake was estimated to be <1%, however, suggesting that dietary intake is the predominant source of exposures in humans. PMID:21221962

  1. Brominated and organophosphate flame retardants in indoor dust of Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadeem; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Ismail, Iqbal Mohammad Ibrahim; Malarvannan, Govindan; Kadi, Mohammad W; Albar, Hussain Mohammed Salem; Rehan, Mohammad; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Different flame retardants (FRs) namely polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), emerging brominated/chlorinated flame retardants (Br/Cl FRs), and organophosphate FRs (OPFRs) were analyzed in cars, air conditioner (AC) filters and floor dust of different households from Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). To the best of our knowledge, this is first study in literature reporting emerging Br/Cl FRs and OPFRs in AC filter dust and also first to report on their occurrence in dust from KSA. Chlorinated alkyl phosphate, penta-BDEs, BDE-209, and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were the major chemicals in dust samples from all microenvironments. ΣOPFRs occurred at median concentrations (ng/g dust) of 15,400, 10,500, and 3750 in AC filter, car and house floor dust, respectively. For all analyzed chemicals, relatively lower levels were observed in floor dust than car and AC filter dust. The profiles of FRs in car dust were different from AC filter and floor dust, which reflected their wider application as FR and plasticizer in variety of household and commercial products. For toddlers, assuming high dust intake and 95th percentile concentrations, the computed exposure estimation for BDE-99 was higher than RfD values. PMID:27343946

  2. Characterization of human exposure to mineral sands dust in a brazilian village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to characterize human exposure to mineral dust particles using PIXE (Particle Induced X rays Emission) and 252Cf-PDMS (Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry) techniques. The dust particles were generated during the separation process of mineral sands to obtain rutile, ilmenite, zircon and monazite concentrates. The aerosol samples were collected at the village and during the process to concentrate ilmenite. A cascade impactor with six stages was used to collect mineral dust particles with aerodynamic diameter in the range of 0.64 to 19.4 μm. The particles impacted on each stage of the cascade impactor were analyzed by PIXE (Particle Induced X ray Emission) and the elemental mass concentration and the MMAD (Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter) were determined. Employing the 252Cf-PDMS technique the chemical compound present in aerosols particles and in urine samples were identified. The mass spectra (252Cf-PDMS technique) of dust samples showed the presence of the thorium silicate, thorite and zircon in the fine fraction of aerosol. The 252Cf-PDMS technique was, also, used to characterize urine sample from a inhabitant of the village. The results show that Buena village inhabitants inhale mineral sands dust particles. Based on the results from the lichen samples it could be concluded that at least during the last 15 years the inhabitants of the village have been exposed to monazite particles. Results suggest that the there is natural source of aerosol particles containing 226Ra and 210Pb (probably the swamp) besides the mineral sands dust. (author)

  3. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kei E Fujimura; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A.; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C.; Boushey, Homer A.; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Lynch, Susan V.

    2013-01-01

    Early-life exposure to dogs is protective against allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct milieu of house dust microbial exposures. Here, we show that mice exposed to dog-associated house dust are protected against airway allergen challenge. These animals exhibit reduced Th2 cytokine production, fewer activated T cells, and a distinct gut microbiome composition, highly enriched for Lactobacillus johnsonii, which itself can confer airway protection when or...

  4. Colorectal cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in asbestos cement and cement workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiologically visible parenchymal changes (small opacities >= 1/0;ILO 1980 classification) were present in 20% of a sample of workers (N=174), employed for 20 years (median) in an asbestos cement plant. Exposure-response relationships were found, after controlling for age and smoking habits. In a sample of asbestos cement workers with symptoms and signs suggestive of pulmonary disease (N=33), increased lung density measured by x-ray computed tomography, and reduced static lung volumes and lung compliance was found. In a cohort of asbestos cement workers (N=1.929) with an estimated median exposure of 1.2 fibres/ml, the mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease was increased in comparison to a regional reference cohort (N=1.233). A two-to three-fold increase of non-malignant respiratory mortality was noted among workers employed for more than a decade in the asbestos cement plant, compared to cement workers (N=1.526), who in their turn did not experience and increased risk compared to the general population. In the cohorts of asbestos cement and cement workers, there was a tow-to three-fold increased incidence of cancer in the right part of the colon, compared to the general population as well as to external reference cohorts of other industrial workers (N=3.965) and fishermen (N=8.092). A causal relation with the exposure to mineral dust and fibres was supported by the findings of higher risk estimated in subgroups with high cumulated asbestos doses or longer duration of cement work. The incidence of cancer in the left part of the colon was not increased. Morbidity data, but not mortality data, disclosed the subsite-specific risk pattern. Both asbestos cement workers and cement workers has an increased incidence of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, and with the fishermen. The risk was, however, of the same magnitude among the other industrial workers. 181 refs

  5. Occupational asthma caused by exposure to ash wood dust (Fraxinus americana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, J L; Cartier, A

    1989-04-01

    A 63 year old man reported rhinitis and asthma, which occurred only at work where he was exposed to ash wood dust. Monitoring of peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) and bronchial responsiveness to histamine when off work and at work showed increased variation of PEFR at work but no significant changes in nonspecific bronchial responsiveness assessed by the provocation concentration producing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20). Specific inhalation challenges were carried out in a special challenge room with ash wood dust. During the exposure for only 3 minutes, the mean concentration of particles was 3 mg-m3 and about 50% of particles had a diameter less than 10 mu. An immediate bronchospastic reaction was documented. Antibodies to a human serum albumin (HSA) ash wood conjugate were not significantly increased. PMID:2661261

  6. Progressive massive fibrosis developing after brief coal dust exposure: evaluation with CT scanning and radionuclide angiocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T J; Raval, B; Ahmad, D

    1980-01-01

    Two patients are described who developed progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) after exposure to coal dust for only four and seven years, respectively, in Belgian coal mines in the post-war period. It seems likely from consideration of epidemiological data that these men were exposed to massive concentrations of coal dust during their time in the mines. In one patient in a computerized tomography scan clearly showed the extent of the PMF and brought out the degree of calcification in the center of the masses. Radionuclide angiocardiographic evaluation showed depressed right ventricular function which is probably a result of pulmonary hypertension, and also showed marked distortion of the pulmonary vascular bed. It is believed that these are the first reported instances of CT scanning and radionuclide angiocardiography in this condition. PMID:7354409

  7. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mikania laevigata Extract on DNA Damage Caused by Acute Coal Dust Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, T.P.; Heuser, V.D.; Tavares, P.; Leffa, D.D.; da Silva, G.A.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.R.T.; Pinho, R.A.; Streck, E.L.; Andrade,V.M. [University of Extremo Catarinense, Criciuma, SC (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    We report data on the possible antigenotoxic activity of Mikania laevigata extract (MLE) after acute intratracheal instillation of coal dust using the comet assay in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and liver cells and the micronucleus test in peripheral blood of Wistar rats. The animals were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution (groups 1 and 2) or MLE (100 mg/kg) (groups 3 and 4). On day 15, the animals were anesthetized with ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (20 mg/kg), and gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.3 mL saline) (groups 2 and 4) or saline solution (0.3 mL) (groups 1 and 3) was administered directly in the lung by intratracheal administration. Fifteen days after coal dust or saline instillation, the animals were sacrificed, and the femur, liver, and peripheral blood were removed. The results showed a general increase in the DNA damage values at 8 hours for all treatment groups, probably related to surgical procedures that had stressed the animals. Also, liver cells from rats treated with coal dust, pretreated or not with MLE, showed statistically higher comet assay values compared to the control group at 14 days after exposure. These results could be expected because the liver metabolizes a variety of organic compounds to more polar by-products. On the other hand, the micronucleus assay results did not show significant differences among groups. Therefore, our data do not support the antimutagenic activity of M. laevigata as a modulator of DNA damage after acute coal dust instillation.

  8. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Belanger, Kathleen [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Triche, Elizabeth W. [Brown University, Department of Community Health/Epidemiology, Providence, RI (United States); Bracken, Michael B. [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Beckett, William S. [Mount Auburn Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Cambridge, MA (United States); Leaderer, Brian P. [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 {mu}g/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 {mu}g/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for {>=}10.0 {mu}g/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  9. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 μg/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 μg/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for ≥10.0 μg/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  10. Toxicological effect of long-term exposure to mixed dust containing radiothorium rare earth on workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the toxicological effects of long-term exposure to mixed dust containing radiothorium rare earth on workers. Methods: Single cell gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA comet length of peripheral blood lymphocytes, and then to evaluate the DNA damage degree according to the comet length. The lymphocyte cell method was used to examine the micronucleus formation rate of peripheral blood lymphocyte. Lung function instrumental MiCROSPRO HI-198 was used to determine the lung ventilation function. Result: For exposure group and control group, the average values of comet length were (40.2±4.14) μm and (39.5±2.54) μm, respectively, while the frequency of micronucleus formation were [(2.71±2.04) x 0.1]% and [(0.79±0.91) x 0.1]%. The lung fraction barrier formation were 70.9% and 64.9%, which means the exposure group was higher than that of control. Conclusions: Mine mixed dust containing radiothorium rare earth may have certain toxicology effects on the professional workers. (authors)

  11. Coal dust exposures in the longwall mines of New South Wales, Australia: a respiratory risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizil, G.V.; Donoghue, A.M. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). Minerals Industrial Safety & Health Center

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of personal respirable coal dust measurements recorded by the Joint Coal Board in the underground longwall mines of New South Wales from 1985 to 1999. A description of the longwall mining process is given. In the study, 11 829 measurements from 33 mines were analysed and the results given for each occupation, for seven occupational groups, for individual de-identified mines and for each year of study. The mean respirable coal dust concentration for all jobs was 1.51 mg/m{sup 3} (SD 1.08 mg/m{sup 3}). Only 6.9% of the measurements exceeded the Australian exposure standard of 3 mg/m{sup 3}. Published exposure-response relationships were used to predict the prevalence of progressive massive fibrosis and the mean loss of FEV1, after a working lifetime (40 years) of exposure to the mean observed concentration of 1.5 mg/m{sup 3}. Prevalences of 1.3 and 2.9% were predicted, based on data from the UK and the USA, respectively. The mean loss of FEV1 was estimated to be 73.7 ml.

  12. Assessing exposure risk for dust storm events-associated lung function decrement in asthmatics and implications for control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Liao, Chung-Min

    2013-04-01

    Asian dust storms (ADS) events are seasonally-based meteorological phenomena that exacerbate chronic respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess human health risk from airborne dust exposure during ADS events in Taiwan. A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed based on exposure and experimental data to quantify ADS events induced lung function decrement. The study reanalyzed experimental data from aerosol challenge in asthmatic individuals to construct the dose-response relationship between inhaled dust aerosol dose and decreasing percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1). An empirical lung deposition model was used to predict deposition fraction for size specific dust aerosols in pulmonary regions. The toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models were used to simulate dust aerosols binding kinetics in lung airway in that %FEV1 change was also predicted. The mask respirators were applied to control the inhaled dose under dust aerosols exposure. Our results found that only 2% probability the mild ADS events were likely to cause %FEV1 decrement higher than 5%. There were 50% probability of decreasing %FEV1 exceeding 16.9, 18.9, and 7.1% in north, center, and south Taiwan under severe ADS events, respectively. Our result implicates that the use of activated carbon of mask respirators has the best efficacy for reducing inhaled dust aerosol dose, by which the %FEV1 decrement can be reduced up to less than 1%.

  13. A case control study of lung cancer and exposure to chrysotile and amphibole at a slovenian asbestos-cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodic Fikfak, M; Kriebel, D; Quinn, M M; Eisen, E A; Wegman, D H

    2007-04-01

    A lung cancer case-control study was conducted in a Slovenian asbestos-cement factory for which unusually good records of asbestos exposures were available. The cohort consisted of all 6714 workers employed at the Salonit Anhovo factory after 31 December 1946 who worked there for at least one day between 1964 and 1994. Fifty-eight histologically confirmed cases of primary lung cancer and 290 controls were selected from the cohort. Working life exposure histories to amphibole and chrysotile forms of asbestos were estimated separately. Airborne asbestos concentrations were low. For example, the arithmetic mean exposure to all forms of asbestos in the highest exposure period (1947-1971) was 1.2 f/cm(3). Chrysotile asbestos made up about 90% of this exposure (mean 1.1 f/cm(3)), whereas amphibole accounted for 10% (0.1 f/cm(3)). Comparing those above and below the 90 percentile of cumulative exposure, the odds ratios for all asbestos, chrysotile and amphibole were 1.5, 1.6 and 2.0, respectively, but confidence intervals were wide. There are only a few asbestos-lung cancer studies with high-quality exposure data and exposures in this low range. Though imprecise, the findings are important to the ongoing debate about asbestos risks. PMID:17351264

  14. Induction of vascular remodeling in the lung by chronic house dust mite exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydell-Törmänen, Kristina; Johnson, Jill R; Fattouh, Ramzi; Jordana, Manel; Erjefält, Jonas S

    2008-07-01

    Structural changes to the lung are associated with chronic asthma. In addition to alterations to the airway wall, asthma is associated with vascular modifications, although this aspect of remodeling is poorly understood. We sought to evaluate the character and kinetics of vascular remodeling in response to chronic aeroallergen exposure. Because many ovalbumin-driven models used to investigate allergic airway disease do so in the absence of persistent airway inflammation, we used a protocol of chronic respiratory exposure to house dust mite extract (HDME), which has been shown to induce persistent airway inflammation consistent with that seen in humans with asthma. Mice were exposed to HDME intranasally for 7 or 20 consecutive weeks, and resolution of the inflammatory and remodeling response to allergen was investigated 4 weeks after the end of a 7-week exposure protocol. Measures of vascular remodeling, including total collagen deposition, procollagen I production, endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation, smooth muscle area, and presence of myofibroblasts, were investigated histologically in lung vessels of different sizes and locations. We observed an increase in total collagen content, which did not resolve upon cessation of allergen exposure. Other parameters were significantly increased after 7 and/or 20 weeks of allergen exposure but returned to baseline after allergen withdrawal. We conclude that respiratory HDME exposure induces airway remodeling and pulmonary vascular remodeling, and, in accordance with airway remodeling, some components of these structural changes may be irreversible. PMID:18314535

  15. Cancer risk assessment of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via indoor and outdoor dust based on probit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuan; Shao, Dingding; Li, Ning; Yang, Gelin; Zhang, Qiuyun; Zeng, Lixuan; Luo, Jiwen; Zhong, Wenfeng

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor dust and outdoor dust including road and window dust around the traffic road in Hunan Province, China, were sampled and detected. The ∑PAHs in indoor dust ranged from 5007-24,236 ng g(-1), with a median of 14,049 ng g(-1). The ∑PAHs in road dust ranged from 3644-12,875 ng g(-1), with a median of 10,559 ng g(-1). The ∑PAHs in window dust ranged from 803-12,590 ng g(-1), with a median of 5459 ng g(-1). Similar pattern of PAHs was observed in road and window dust except in H3W and H4W samples, which was dominated by naphthalene (Nap), benzo(b+k)fluoranthene (B(b+k)F), phenanthrene (Phe), and fluorine (Fle). Indoor dust showed slightly different PAHs profiles, which was dominated by Nap, fluoranthene (Fla) and Phe. Risk assessment indicated that dermal contact and dust ingestion exposure pathways were more important than the inhalation pathway. Cancer risk of PAHs via dust varied from 2.73 × 10(-8)-8.04 × 10(-6), with a median of 2.06 × 10(-6) for children, and from 2 × 10(-8)-5.89 × 10(-6), with a median of 1.52 × 10(-6) for adult. Probit model showed that 76 and 71 % of samples in the sampling area would result in the risk of children and adult exposure to PAHs via dust higher than the acceptable level (1 × 10(-6)), respectively. PMID:25233919

  16. [Occupational lung diseases caused by exposure to chrysotile asbestos dust and the preventive measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliukhin, A E; Burmistrova, T B

    2014-01-01

    To reveal major principles in system of occupational lung diseases prevention among workers engaged into extraction and usage of chrysotile asbestos, the authors specified main criteria for diagnosis of asbestos-related pulmonary diseases and signs of exposure to chrysotile dust, with identification of risk groups for occupational diseases development. The authors formulated main principles of prevention and rehabilitation for workers with asbestos-related pulmonary diseases. Special attention was paid to harmonization of all medical and technical measures aimed at prevention and liquidation of occupational asbestos-related diseases. PMID:25282798

  17. Shifted T-cell polarisation after agricultural dust exposure in mice and men

    OpenAIRE

    Robbe, P; Spierenburg, E. A. J.; Draijer, C.; Brandsma, C.A.; Telenga, E.; van Oosterhout, A.J.M.; Van Den Berge, M; Luinge, M.; Melgert, B.N.; Heederik, D; Timens, W.; Wouters, I.M.; Hylkema, M. N.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: A low prevalence of asthma and atopy has been shown in farmers and agricultural workers. However, in these workers, a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms has been reported, in which T helper 1 (Th1) and/or Th17 responses may play a role. AIM: We investigated the effect of exposure to dust extracts (DEs) from different farms on airway inflammation and T-cell polarisation in a mouse model and assessed T-cell polarisation in agricultural workers from the same farms. METHODS: DEs...

  18. Occupational dust exposure and smoking. Different effects on forced expiration and slope of the alveolar plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, F V

    1985-02-01

    Indices of forced expiration (FEV1 and MEF25-75) were compared with the slope of Phase III of the single breath nitrogen test (%N2/1) in 1270 men, who, based on life occupational histories, were categorized as cement factory workers, blue or white collar workers, and farmers. The slope of Phase III was successfully determined in 1182 men. Irrespective of occupational category, the FEV1 and MEF was lower in present smokers than in ex-smokers, who in turn had lower values than never-smokers. With corresponding smoking habits, white collar workers showed on average higher values of FEV1 and MEF than the blue collar workers, the cement-exposed men and the farm workers. The slope of Phase III varied with smoking habits in a similar way, and among present smokers, the same occupational gradient was evident. However, no effect of occupation on the slope of Phase III could be traced in ex-smokers and never-smokers. It is concluded that the response of the lung to occupational exposure may differ from that of tobacco smoking. The combined use of indices from the forced expirogram and the slope of Phase III could yield valuable information in the study of occupational respiratory diseases. PMID:3972021

  19. Development and evaluation of a semi-empirical two-zone dust exposure model for a dusty construction trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachael M; Simmons, Catherine; Boelter, Fred

    2011-06-01

    Drywall finishing is a dusty construction activity. We describe a mathematical model that predicts the time-weighted average concentration of respirable and total dusts in the personal breathing zone of the sander, and in the area surrounding joint compound sanding activities. The model represents spatial variation in dust concentrations using two-zones, and temporal variation using an exponential function. Interzone flux and the relationships between respirable and total dusts are described using empirical factors. For model evaluation, we measured dust concentrations in two field studies, including three workers from a commercial contracting crew, and one unskilled worker. Data from the field studies confirm that the model assumptions and parameterization are reasonable and thus validate the modeling approach. Predicted dust C(twa) were in concordance with measured values for the contracting crew, but under estimated measured values for the unskilled worker. Further characterization of skill-related exposure factors is indicated. PMID:21534081

  20. Emphysema and pulmonary impairment in coal miners: Quantitative relationship with dust exposure and cigarette smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal miners have been shown to be at increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases including emphysema. The objective of this study was to determine whether lifetime cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust is a significant predictor of developing emphysema at a clinically-relevant level of severity by the end of life, after controlling for cigarette smoking and other covariates. Clinically-relevant emphysema severity was determined from the association between individuals' lung function during life (forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV1, as a percentage of predicted normal values) and emphysema severity at autopsy (as the proportion of lung tissue affected). In a logistic regression model, cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust was a statistically significant predictor of developing clinically-relevant emphysema severity, among both ever-smokers and never-smokers. The odds ratio for developing emphysema associated with FEV1 3 x yr) was 2.30 (1.46-3.64, 95% confidence limits), and at the cohort mean cigarette smoking (among smokers: 42 pack-years) was 1.95 (1.39-2.79).

  1. Organic dust toxic syndrome at a grass seed plant caused by exposure to high concentrations of bioaerosols

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Anne M.; Tendal, Kira; Schlünssen, Vivi; Heltberg, Ivar

    2012-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of sudden health problems in workers at a Danish grass seed plant after exposure to a particularly dusty lot of grass seeds. The seeds are called problematic seeds. The association between development of organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS) and the handling of grass seeds causing exposure was assessed in a four-step model: (i) identification of exposure source, (ii) characterization of the emission of bioaerosols from the problematic and reference seeds, (iii) personal a...

  2. A GM-CSF/IL-33 Pathway Facilitates Allergic Airway Responses to Sub-Threshold House Dust Mite Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Alba Llop-Guevara; Chu, Derek K.; Walker, Tina D; Susanna Goncharova; Ramzi Fattouh; Silver, Jonathan S.; Cheryl Lynn Moore; Xie, Juliana L.; Paul M O'Byrne; Anthony J. Coyle; Roland Kolbeck; Humbles, Alison A.; Martin R Stämpfli; Manel Jordana

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We ...

  3. The exposure-response relationship for mesothelioma among asbestos-cement factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, M M

    1990-12-01

    Forty-five deaths from mesothelioma have occurred among production workers in an asbestos-cement factory. This analysis examines the fit of the cubic residence time model to the incidence of mesothelioma using a case-control method proposed by de Klerk and colleagues. The cubic residence time model was found to provide a good description of the data. PMID:2097820

  4. Asbestos, cement, and cancer in the right part of the colon.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, K; Albin, M; Hagmar, L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The aim was to investigate associations between exposure to mineral fibres and dust, and cancer in subsites within the large bowel. DESIGN--Pooled retrospective cohort studies. SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS--Blue collar workers, employed for at least one year in different trades; asbestos cement or cement workers (n = 2507), other industrial workers (n = 3965), and fishermen (n = 8092). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs, national reference rates) were calculated fo...

  5. Influence of radon-daughter exposure rate and uranium ore dust concentration on occurrence of lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groups of male SPF Wistar rats were exposed concurrently to several levels of radon daughters and uranium ore dust to study the effect of these variables on pulmonary disease states. Clinical pathology data at 1 yr postexposure indicate no significant differences among exposed animals when compared with controls. Preliminary histopathologic data suggest a trend toward increasing lung tumor risk as the exposure rate is decreased (constant total dose), but the differences are not statistically significant at the 0.05 level. A similar trend occurs with decrease in ore dust concentration (except for the 2560-WLM exposure group), but these differences are also not significant at the 0.05 level. The tumor risk is significantly (0.05 level) increased as the exposure level increases from approximately 320 and 640 WLM to 2560 WLM at the high ore dust concentration

  6. From dust to dose: Effects of forest disturbance on increased inhalation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecosystem disturbances that remove vegetation and disturb surface soils are major causes of excessive soil erosion and can result in accelerated transport of soils contaminated with hazardous materials. Accelerated wind erosion in disturbed lands that are contaminated is of particular concern because of potential increased inhalation exposure, yet measurements regarding these relationships are lacking. The importance of this was highlighted when, in May of 2000, the Cerro Grande fire burned over roughly 30% of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), mostly in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest, and through areas with soils containing contaminants, particularly excess depleted and natural uranium. Additionally, post-fire thinning was performed in burned and unburned forests on about 25% of LANL land. The first goal of this study was to assess the potential for increased inhalation dose from uranium contaminated soils via wind-driven resuspension of soil following the Cerro Grande Fire and subsequent forest thinning. This was done through analysis of post-disturbance measurements of uranium air concentrations and their relationships with wind velocity and seasonal vegetation cover. We found a 14% average increase in uranium air concentrations at LANL perimeter locations after the fire, and the greatest air concentrations occurred during the months of April-June when wind velocities are highest, no snow cover, and low vegetation cover. The second goal was to develop a methodology to assess the relative contribution of each disturbance type towards increasing public and worker exposure to these resuspended soils. Measurements of wind-driven dust flux in severely burned, moderately burned, thinned, and unburned/unthinned forest areas were used to assess horizontal dust flux (HDF) in these areas. Using empirically derived relationships between measurements of HDF and respirible dust, coupled with onsite uranium soil concentrations, we estimate relative increases in

  7. Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in resuspendable fraction of settled bus dust and its implications for human exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This preliminary study measured Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations in the resuspendable fraction of settled dust on 39 bus lines, to evaluate the impact of engine type (gasoline and compressed natural gas) on exposure for commuters and drivers. Benzo(b)fluoranthene(BbF) was the predominant PAH in resuspendable fraction of settled bus dust. The concentration of total PAHs was 92.90 ± 116.00 μg/g (range: 0.57–410) in gasoline buses and 3.97 ± 1.81 (range: 2.01–9.47) in compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. Based on Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) equivalent concentrations for the sum of 16 PAHs, the average daily dose (ADD) via dust ingestion and dermal contact was calculated. The ADD of PAHs was higher for commuters and drivers in gasoline-powered buses than in buses using CNG buses. For both short and long duration journeys, young commuters were exposed to higher levels of PAHs via dust ingestion and dermal contact than adult commuters. - Highlights: • Resuspendable fraction of settled dust from microenvironment of buses in Harbin monitored for PAHs exposure assessment. • Higher levels of PAHs pollutants at gasoline-powered buses than at compressed natural gas-powered buses. • Non-occupational and occupational exposures in the microenvironment of buses are assessed. - Occupational and non-occupational exposure to PAHs from the microenvironment of bus

  8. Continuous exposure to house dust mite elicits chronic airway inflammation and structural remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill R; Wiley, Ryan E; Fattouh, Ramzi; Swirski, Filip K; Gajewska, Beata U; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, José-Carlos; Ellis, Russ; Inman, Mark D; Jordana, Manel

    2004-02-01

    It is now fully appreciated that asthma is a disease of a chronic nature resulting from intermittent or continued aeroallergen exposure leading to airway inflammation. To investigate responses to continuous antigen exposure, mice were exposed to either house dust mite extract (HDM) or ovalbumin intranasally for five consecutive days, followed by 2 days of rest, for up to seven consecutive weeks. Continuous exposure to HDM, unlike ovalbumin, elicited severe and persistent eosinophilic airway inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an accumulation of CD4+ lymphocytes in the lung with elevated expression of inducible costimulator a marker of T cell activation, and of T1/ST2, a marker of helper T Type 2 effector cells. We also detected increased and sustained production of helper T cell Type 2-associated cytokines by splenocytes of HDM-exposed mice on in vitro HDM recall. Histologic analysis of the lung showed evidence of airway remodeling in mice exposed to HDM, with goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, and peribronchial accumulation of contractile tissue. In addition, HDM-exposed mice demonstrated severe airway hyperreactivity to methacholine. Finally, these responses were studied for up to 9 weeks after cessation of HDM exposure. We observed that whereas airway inflammation resolved fully, the remodeling changes did not resolve and airway hyperreactivity resolved only partly. PMID:14597485

  9. Evaluation of the Webler-Brown model for estimating tetrachloroethylene exposure from vinyl-lined asbestos-cement pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeren Timothy C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From May 1968 through March 1980, vinyl-lined asbestos-cement (VL/AC water distribution pipes were installed in New England to avoid taste and odor problems associated with asbestos-cement pipes. The vinyl resin was applied to the inner pipe surface in a solution of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE. Substantial amounts of PCE remained in the liner and subsequently leached into public drinking water supplies. Methods Once aware of the leaching problem and prior to remediation (April-November 1980, Massachusetts regulators collected drinking water samples from VL/AC pipes to determine the extent and severity of the PCE contamination. This study compares newly obtained historical records of PCE concentrations in water samples (n = 88 with concentrations estimated using an exposure model employed in epidemiologic studies on the cancer risk associated with PCE-contaminated drinking water. The exposure model was developed by Webler and Brown to estimate the mass of PCE delivered to subjects' residences. Results The mean and median measured PCE concentrations in the water samples were 66 and 0.5 μg/L, respectively, and the range extended from non-detectable to 2432 μg/L. The model-generated concentration estimates and water sample concentrations were moderately correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.48, p Conclusion PCE concentration estimates generated using the Webler-Brown model were moderately correlated with measured water concentrations. The present analysis suggests that the exposure assessment process used in prior epidemiological studies could be improved with more accurate characterization of water flow. This study illustrates one method of validating an exposure model in an epidemiological study when historical measurements are not available.

  10. Lung function reduction and chronic respiratory symptoms among workers in the cement industry: a follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeleke Zeyede K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are only a few follow-up studies of respiratory function among cement workers. The main aims of this study were to measure total dust exposure, to examine chronic respiratory symptoms and changes in lung function among cement factory workers and controls that were followed for one year. Methods The study was conducted in two cement factories in Ethiopia. Totally, 262 personal measurements of total dust among 105 randomly selected workers were performed. Samples of total dust were collected on 37-mm cellulose acetate filters placed in closed faced Millipore-cassettes. Totally 127 workers; 56 cleaners, 44 cement production workers and 27 controls were randomly selected from two factories and examined for lung function and interviewed for chronic respiratory symptoms in 2009. Of these, 91 workers; 38 cement cleaners (mean age 32 years, 33 cement production workers (36 years and 20 controls (38 years were examined with the same measurements in 2010. Results Total geometric mean dust exposure among cleaners was 432 mg/m3. The fraction of samples exceeding the Threshold Limit Value (TLV of 10 mg/m3 for the cleaners varied from 84-97% in the four departments. The levels were considerably lower among the production workers (GM = 8.2 mg/m3, but still 48% exceeded 10 mg/m3. The prevalence of all the chronic respiratory symptoms among both cleaners and production workers was significantly higher than among the controls. Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1 and FEV1/Forced Vital Capacity (FEV1/FVC were significantly reduced from 2009 to 2010 among the cleaners (p Conclusions The high prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and reduction in lung function is probably associated with high cement dust exposure. Preventive measures are needed to reduce the dust exposure.

  11. Traffic signatures in suspended dust at pedestrian levels in semiarid zones: Implications for human exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Figueroa, Diana; González-Grijalva, Belem; Del Río-Salas, Rafael; Coimbra, Rute; Ochoa-Landin, Lucas; Moreno-Rodríguez, Verónica

    2016-08-01

    Deeper knowledge on dust suspension processes along semiarid zones is critical for understanding potential impacts on human health. Hermosillo city, located in the heart of the Sonoran Desert was chosen to evaluate such impacts. A one-year survey of Total Suspended Particulate Matter (TSPM) was conducted at two different heights (pedestrian and rooftop level). The minimum values of TSPM were reported during monsoon season and winter. Maximum values showed a bimodal distribution, with major peaks associated with increase and decrease of temperature, as well as decreasing humidity. Concentrations of TSPM were significantly exceeded at pedestrian level (∼44% of analyzed days) when compared to roof level (∼18% of analyzed days). Metal concentrations of As, Pb, Cu, Sb, Be, Mg, Ni, and Co were higher at pedestrian level than at roof level. Pixel counting and interpretations based on scanning electron microscopy of dust filters showed a higher percentage of fine particulate fractions at pedestrian level. These fractions occur mainly as metal-enriched agglomerates resembling coarser particles. According to worldwide guidelines, particulate matter sampling should be conducted by monitoring particle sizes equal and inferior to PM10. However, this work suggests that such procedures may compromise risk assessment in semiarid environments, where coarse particles act as main carriers for emergent contaminants related to traffic. This effect is especially concerning at pedestrian level, leading to an underestimation of potential impacts of human exposure. This study brings forward novel aspects that are of relevance for those concerned with dust suspension processes across semiarid regions and related impact on human health.

  12. Cotton Dust Exposure and Respiratory Disorders among Textile Workers at a Textile Company in the Southern Part of Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Antoine Vikkey; Lokossou, Virgil K; Schlünssen, Vivi; Agodokpessi, Gildas; Sigsgaard, Torben; Fayomi, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The textile industry sector occupies a prominent place in the economy of Benin. It exposes workers to several occupational risks, including exposure to cotton dust. To assess the effect of exposure to cotton dust on the health of workers, this study was initiated and conducted in a Beninese cotton industry company. The objective of the study was to evaluate the respiratory disorders among the textile workers exposed to cotton dust and the cross-sectional study involved 656 subjects exposed to cotton dust and 113 non-exposed subjects. The methods used are mainly based on a survey using a questionnaire of organic dust designed by the International Commission of Occupational Health (ICOH); and on the measures of lung function parameters (FEV₁ and FVC). The main results of the different analyzes revealed that subjects exposed to cotton dust have more respiratory symptoms than unexposed subjects (36.9% vs. 21.2%). The prevalence of chronic cough, expectorations, dyspnoea, asthma and chronic bronchitis are 16.8%, 9.8%, 17.3%, 2.6%, and 5.9% respectively among the exposed versus 2.6%, 0.8%, 16.8%, 0% and 0.8% among the unexposed subjects. The prevalence of byssinosis is 44.01%.The prevalence of symptoms is dependent on the sector of activity and the age of the subject. These results should encourage medical interventions and technical prevention especially since the textile industry occupies an important place in the Benin's economy. PMID:27618081

  13. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kezik, Julie M., E-mail: julie.colburn@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Hill, Melissa E., E-mail: melissa.hill@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tsai, Eling, E-mail: tsai.umiami@gmail.com [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Li, De-Wei, E-mail: DeWei.Li@ct.gov [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Leaderer, Brian P., E-mail: brian.leaderer@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens

  14. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 μg/g and Can f 1>1.2 μg/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 μg/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 μg/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: ► Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. ► Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. ► Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma

  15. Assessment of airborne exposure to endotoxin and pyrogenic active dust using electrostatic dustfall collectors (EDCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebers, Verena; van Kampen, Vera; Bünger, Jürgen; Düser, Maria; Stubel, Heike; Brüning, Thomas; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Passive airborne dust sampling using electrostatic dustfall collectors (EDCs) is one possibility especially for long sampling periods. In this study, EDCs were deposited in living rooms of private households and in social rooms of composting plants. The aim of the study was to determine whether endotoxin and pyrogenic activity are measurable using EDCs. In all extracts, endotoxin (via Limulus amebocyte lysate [LAL] assay) and pyrogenic activity (interleukin [IL]-1β release via whole blood assay) were detectable. In addition, the monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1; CCL-2) as a secondary proinflammatory marker was measured with whole blood assay. Endotoxin activity and proinflammatory/pyrogenic activity of EDC extracts from social rooms in composting plants were higher compared to extracts obtained from EDCs in private household rooms. A significant correlation between LAL assay and whole blood assay was detectable. In conclusion, EDC sampling is an applicable method to evaluate settled dust from airborne bioaerosols displaying a longer period of exposure. The extraction of EDC without Tween enables one to measure endotoxin as well as proinflammatory/pyrogenic activity using the same sample for parallel detection and more reliable characterization of the airborne bioaerosol contamination. PMID:22686309

  16. Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis in a South African pottery. 2. Pneumoconiosis and factors influencing reading of radiological opacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, D; Steinberg, M; Becker, P J; Solomon, A

    1992-07-01

    A cross sectional radiological survey of workers exposed to pottery dust during the manufacture of wall tiles and bathroom fittings was conducted in a South African factory. Roughly one third of workers with 15 or more years of service in high dust sections of the factory had pneumoconiosis. Previously undiagnosed advanced cases, including two with progressive massive fibrosis, were working in dusty occupations. A firm diagnosis of potters' pneumoconiosis was made in 11 of the 358 workers radiographed; all had served more than 10 years suggesting that radiography of workers with more than 10 years service would be a successful case finding strategy in South Africa. A combination of rounded and irregular opacities was the most common radiological finding in the workers with pneumoconiosis (55%). Three readers reported on the chest radiographs, and all found an association between small radiological opacities, which were usually irregular or a combination of irregular and rounded, and exposure to pottery dust. The occurrence of irregular radiological opacities in workers exposed to pottery dust deserves further study. The least experienced reader significantly associated age with small opacities when duration of service (years) was used to measure exposure to dust. Sex was not an important predictor of radiological changes consistent with pneumoconiosis. Breast shadows were not an important cause of false positive readings and participating women did not develop pneumoconiosis after less exposure than men. PMID:1637706

  17. Leukemia Among Uranium Miners-Late Effluents of Exposure to Uranium Dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports recent observations among Czech uranium miners. The study includes two groups of underground miners exposed in periods 1948-63 and 1968-88. A total of 9960 workers have been followed to the end of 1999 representing 267 thousands person-years. By the end of 1999, a total of 29 cases of leukemia were observed. the standardized mortality ratio is 1.31, 90% CI: 0.88-1.88. In relation to cumulated exposure to radon progeny, no statistical association is seen (p=0.172), but the trend with duration of underground work is significant (p=0.015). These contrasting results suggest that the risk of leukemia is probably related to other components in the underground environment. On the basis of the ICRP respiratory tract and biokinetic models using extrapolation of measurements of long lived radionuclides from uranium dust and external gamma radiation in Czech uranium mines since the 1970s, annual dose to the red bone marrow were estimated in the range 10-30 mSv. About 2/3 of the total dose for jobs involving drilling is due to inhalation of uranium and its decay products with ore dust, about 1/4 is due to gamma radiation, and only 5% of the dose is from radon and its progeny. The risk coefficient (Excess relative risk per sievert) corresponding to these estimates is ERR/Sv=7.1 (90% CL: 3.6-13.9). The dose estimates are subject to a considerable uncertainty. Therefore, in the absence of more exact estimates, is its more practical to assess the risk using only duration of exposure modified according to job category. As the red bone marrow estimates for hewers are about two-fold, the modification consists in according only half of the year for job categories other than hewer. Using this approach, the ERR per year is 0.15 (90% CI:0.08-027). (Author) 9 refs

  18. Exposure to airborne microorganisms, dust and endotoxin during processing of peppermint and chamomile herbs on farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skórska, Czesława; Sitkowska, Jolanta; Krysińska-Traczyk, Ewa; Cholewa, Grazyna; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    cultivating peppermint are exposed during processing of this herb to large concentrations of airborne microorganisms, dust and endotoxin posing a risk of work-related respiratory disease. The exposure to bioaerosols during processing of chamomile is lower; nevertheless, peak values create a respiratory risk for exposed farmers. PMID:16457486

  19. A Comparison of "Total Dust" and Inhalable Personal Sampling for Beryllium Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Colleen M. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

    2012-05-09

    In 2009, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) reduced the Beryllium (Be) 8-hr Time Weighted Average Threshold Limit Value (TLV-TWA) from 2.0 μg/m3 to 0.05 μg/m3 with an inhalable 'I' designation in accordance with ACGIH's particle size-selective criterion for inhalable mass. Currently, per the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is following the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 2.0 μg/m3 as an 8-hr TWA, which is also the 2005 ACGIH TLV-TWA, and an Action Level (AL) of 0.2 μg/m3 and sampling is performed using the 37mm (total dust) sampling method. Since DOE is considering adopting the newer 2009 TLV guidelines, the goal of this study was to determine if the current method of sampling using the 37mm (total dust) sampler would produce results that are comparable to what would be measured using the IOM (inhalable) sampler specific to the application of high energy explosive work at LLNL's remote experimental test facility at Site 300. Side-by-side personal sampling using the two samplers was performed over an approximately two-week period during chamber re-entry and cleanup procedures following detonation of an explosive assembly containing Beryllium (Be). The average ratio of personal sampling results for the IOM (inhalable) vs. 37-mm (total dust) sampler was 1.1:1 with a P-value of 0.62, indicating that there was no statistically significant difference in the performance of the two samplers. Therefore, for the type of activity monitored during this study, the 37-mm sampling cassette would be considered a suitable alternative to the IOM sampler for collecting inhalable particulate matter, which is important given the many practical and economic advantages that it presents. However, similar comparison studies would be necessary for this conclusion to be

  20. Structural Evaluation and Performance of Portland Cement Concretes After Exposure to High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tolentino

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the "residual" thermal conductivity of Portland cement concretes (with characteristic compressive strength at 28 days, f ck, of 20 MPa and 50 MPa at room temperature after heat-treating at 180 °C, 300 °C and 600 °C. The description of the geometry of the structure was carried out using mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen sorption. The results showed a decreasing tendency of residual thermal conductivity, which we attributed to heat-induced concrete degradation. Furthermore, the results from mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen sorption tests showed that a coarser pore structure is produced with the raise of heat-treatment temperatures.

  1. Structural Evaluation and Performance of Portland Cement Concretes After Exposure to High Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Evandro Tolentino; Fernando S. Lameiras; Abdias M. Gomes; Cláudio A. Rigo da Silva; Wander L. Vasconcelos

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the "residual" thermal conductivity of Portland cement concretes (with characteristic compressive strength at 28 days, f ck, of 20 MPa and 50 MPa) at room temperature after heat-treating at 180 °C, 300 °C and 600 °C. The description of the geometry of the structure was carried out using mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen sorption. The results showed a decreasing tendency of residual thermal conductivity, which we attributed to heat-induced concrete degradation. Furthermor...

  2. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ergun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED light-curing units (LCUs have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time and 40 s (100% exposure time. After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x10(4 per well and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. RESULTS: Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively. For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical

  3. Association between occupational history of exposure to tobacco dust and risk of carcinoma cervix: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy among women in India. There is thus a need to identify unexplored risk factors such as occupational exposure to tobacco dust to justify its increasing trend so as to recommend suitable preventive measures. Aims: The aim was to study the association between occupational exposure to tobacco dust with development of carcinoma cervix. Settings and Design: Case-control study done in two tertiary care hospitals in Mangalore. Methodology: 239 histologically confirmed new cases of cervical cancer and the equivalent number of age-matched controls from 2011 to 2012 were interviewed about occupational history of beedi rolling and related factors. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test, unpaired t-test, logistic regression. Results: Exposure rate to tobacco dust following beedi rolling was 63 (26.4% among cases and 38 (15.9% among controls (P = 0.005, odds ratio [OR] =1.893. The latent period from occupational exposure of tobacco dust subsequent to beedi rolling and development of cervical cancer was found to be 26.5 ± 8.5 years. Adjusted OR of beedi rolling with development of cervical cancer was found to be 1.913 (P = 0.005 after controlling the confounding effect of tobacco usage and was 1.618 (P = 0.225 after controlling the effects of all confounders. Three-quarters of beedi rollers were working in conditions of inadequate ventilation and hardy anybody used face mask during work. About a quarter of participants underwent voluntary screening for cervical cancer. Conclusion: Occupational exposure to tobacco dust was found to be associated with risk of developing cervical cancer. Measures to promote awareness, timely screening of this disease along with the improvement in working conditions is required for improving the health status of beedi rollers and to minimize the incidence of carcinoma cervix in the community.

  4. Exposure assessment to airborne endotoxin, dust, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in open style swine houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C W; Chung, H; Huang, C F; Su, H J

    2001-08-01

    Information is limited for the exposure levels of airborne hazardous substances in swine feed buildings that are not completely enclosed. Open-style breeding, growing and finishing swine houses in six farms in subtropical Taiwan were studied for the airborne concentrations of endotoxin, dust, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. The air in the farrowing and nursery stalls as partially enclosed was also simultaneously evaluated. Three selected gases and airborne dusts were quantified respectively by using Drager diffusion tubes and a filter-weighing method. Endotoxin was analyzed by the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay. Average concentration of airborne total endotoxin among piggeries was between 36.8 and 298 EU/m(3), while that for respirable endotoxin was 14.1-129 EU/m(3). Mean concentration of total dust was between 0.15 and 0.34 mg/m(3), with average level of respirable dust of 0.14 mg/m(3). The respective concentrations of NH3, CO2 and H2S were less than 5 ppm, 600-895 ppm and less than 0.2 ppm. Airborne concentrations of total dust and endotoxin in the nursery house were higher than in the other types of swine houses. The finishing house presented the highest exposure risk to NH3, CO2 and H2S. Employees working in the finishing stalls were also exposed to the highest airborne levels of respirable endotoxin and dust. On the other hand, the air of the breeding units was the least contaminated in terms of airborne endotoxin, dust, NH3, CO2 and H2S. The airborne concentrations of substances measured in the present study were all lower than most of published studies conducted in mainly enclosed swine buildings. Distinct characteristics, including maintaining swine houses in an open status and frequent spraying water inside the stalls, significantly reduce accumulation of gases and airborne particulates. PMID:11513795

  5. Assessing human exposure to aluminium, chromium and vanadium through outdoor dust ingestion in the Bassin Minier de Provence, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A P; Patinha, C; Noack, Y; Robert, S; Dias, A C

    2014-04-01

    The Western part of the "Bassin Minier de Provence", a former coal mining area, is still occupied by old polluting industries such as a coal-fired power plant and an alumina factory. The identified pollution sources that raise more concern in the population are the emission of gases and dusts, as well as the storage of raw and transformed materials. In 2011, a preliminary survey was carried out in the area as the first step to an exposure and health risk-assessment study. This first survey intends to assess human exposure through ingestion and health risk associated with potentially harmful elements (PHEs) in ground-level dusts collected in recreational areas used by children. Dust samples were taken at 19 sites distributed across the study area, depending on the location of public parks, public gardens, playgrounds and schools. Pseudo-total concentrations of 53 elements were determined by ICP-MS. Bioaccessible concentrations were estimated using the unified bioaccessibility method. This study presents the results obtained for Al, V and Cr, which seem to be related with industry and show similar distribution patterns. PHEs presumably related to traffic or other urban pollution sources are not discussed in this study. The highest total concentrations occur in dusts near the alumina plant that have significant amounts of Al mineral phases (gibbsite and alumina). However, in these dusts only small fractions of the elements under study are in bioaccessible forms. The highest bioaccessible fractions occur in dusts collected near the coal-fired power plant. Further investigation is required to assess potential pathways of exposure and health risk in this area. PMID:23990126

  6. A survey of cyclic and linear siloxanes in indoor dust and their implications for human exposures in twelve countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tri Manh; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Minh, Tu Binh; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-05-01

    Siloxanes are used widely in a variety of consumer products, including cosmetics, personal care products, medical and electrical devices, cookware, and building materials. Nevertheless, little is known on the occurrence of siloxanes in indoor dust. In this survey, five cyclic (D3-D7) and 11 linear (L4-L14) siloxanes were determined in 310 indoor dust samples collected from 12 countries. Dust samples collected from Greece contained the highest concentrations of total cyclic siloxanes (TCSi), ranging from 118 to 25,100ng/g (median: 1380), and total linear siloxanes (TLSi), ranging from 129 to 4990ng/g (median: 772). The median total siloxane (TSi) concentrations in dust samples from 12 countries were in the following decreasing order: Greece (2970ng/g), Kuwait (2400), South Korea (1810), Japan (1500), the USA (1220), China (1070), Romania (538), Colombia (230), Vietnam (206), Saudi Arabia (132), India (116), and Pakistan (68.3). TLSi concentrations as high as 42,800ng/g (Kuwait) and TCSi concentrations as high as 25,000ng/g (Greece) were found in indoor dust samples. Among the 16 siloxanes determined, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) was found at the highest concentration in dust samples from all countries, except for Japan and South Korea, with a predominance of L11; Kuwait, with L10; and Pakistan and Romania, with L12. The composition profiles of 16 siloxanes in dust samples varied by country. TCSi accounted for a major proportion of TSi concentrations in dust collected from Colombia (90%), India (80%) and Saudi Arabia (70%), whereas TLSi predominated in samples collected from Japan (89%), Kuwait (85%), and South Korea (78%). Based on the measured median TSi concentrations in indoor dust, we estimated human exposure doses through indoor dust ingestion for various age groups. The exposure doses ranged from 0.27 to 11.9ng/kg-bw/d for toddlers and 0.06 to 2.48ng/kg-bw/d for adults. PMID:25749636

  7. Exposure of U.S. Children to Residential Dust Lead, 1999–2004: I. Housing and Demographic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Gaitens, Joanna M.; Dixon, Sherry L.; Jacobs, David E.; Nagaraja, Jyothi; Strauss, Warren; Wilson, Jonathan W.; Ashley, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Lead-contaminated house dust is a major source of lead exposure for children in the United States. In 1999–2004, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected dust lead (PbD) loading samples from the homes of children 12–60 months of age. Objectives In this study we aimed to compare national PbD levels with existing health-based standards and to identify housing and demographic factors associated with floor and windowsill PbD. Methods We used NHANES PbD da...

  8. Dust, Endotoxin, Fungi, and Bacteria Exposure as Determined by Work Task, Season, and Type of Plant in a Flower Greenhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing, Trine; Madsen, Anne Mette; Basinas, Ioannis;

    2015-01-01

    extracted from the greenhouse electronic task logging system. Associations between log-transformed exposure outcomes, season, and work tasks were examined in linear mixed-effects regression with worker identity as random effect. RESULTS: Measured concentrations ranged between 0.04 and 2.41mg m(-3) for......BACKGROUND: Greenhouse workers are exposed to dust, endotoxin, fungi, and bacteria potentially causing airway inflammation as well as systemic symptoms. Knowledge about determinants of exposure is a prerequisite for efficient prevention through knowledge-based reduction in exposure. The objective...... of this study was to assess the occupational exposure in a flower greenhouse and to investigate the impact of work tasks on the intensity and variability in exposure. METHODS: Seventy-six personal full-shift exposure measurements were performed on 38 employees in a Danish flower greenhouse producing...

  9. Metal concentration and bioaccessibility in different particle sizes of dust and aerosols to refine metal exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goix, Sylvaine; Uzu, Gaëlle; Oliva, Priscia; Barraza, Fiorella; Calas, Aude; Castet, Sylvie; Point, David; Masbou, Jeremy; Duprey, Jean-Louis; Huayta, Carlos; Chincheros, Jaime; Gardon, Jacques

    2016-11-01

    Refined exposure assessments were realized for children, 7-9yrs, in the mining/smelting city of Oruro, Bolivia. Aerosols (PM>2.5, PM1-2.5, PM0.4-1 and PM0.5) and dust (separated in different particle size fractions: 2000-200μm, 200-50μm, 50-20μm, 20-2μm and assessed considering actual external exposure (i.e. exposure pathways: metals inhaled and ingested) and simulated internal exposure (i.e., complex estimation using gastric and lung bioaccessibility, deposition and clearance of particles in lungs). Significant differences between external and simulated internal exposure were attributed to dissemblances in gastric and lung bioaccessibilities, as well as metal distribution within particle size range, revealing the importance of both parameters in exposure assessment. PMID:27344256

  10. Job categories and their effect on exposure to fungal alpha-amylase and inhalable dust in the U.K. baking industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, Joanne; Beckett, Paul; Griffin, Peter; Evans, Paul; Sams, Craig; Roff, Martin; Curran, Andrew D

    2003-01-01

    Enzymes in flour improver, in particular fungal alpha-amylase, are known to be a significant cause of respiratory allergy in the baking industry. This study measured total inhalable dust and fungal alpha-amylase exposures in U.K. bakeries, mills, and a flour improver production and packing facility and determined whether assignment of job description could identify individuals with the highest exposures to fungal alpha-amylase and inhalable dust. A total of 117 personal samples were taken for workers in 19 bakeries, 2 mills, and a flour improver production and packing facility and were analyzed using a monoclonal based immunoassay. Occupational hygiene surveys were undertaken for each site to assign job description and identify individuals who worked directly with flour improvers. Analysis of exposure data identified that mixers and weighers from large bakeries had the highest exposures to both inhalable dust and fungal alpha-amylase among the different categories of bakery workers (p<.01). Currently, the maximum exposure limit for flour dust in the United Kingdom is 10 mg/m(3) (8-hour time-weighted average reference period). In this study 25% of the total dust results for bakers exceeded 10 mg/m(3), and interestingly, 63% of the individuals with exposure levels exceeding 10 mg/m(3) were weighers and mixers. Individuals who worked directly with flour improvers were exposed to higher levels of both inhalable dust and fungal alpha-amylase (p<.01) than those who were not directly handling these products. Before sensitive immunoassays were utilized for the detection of specific inhalable allergens, gravimetric analysis was often used as a surrogate. There was a weak relationship between inhalable dust and fungal alpha-amylase exposures; however, inhalable dust levels could not be used to predict amylase exposures, which highlights the importance of measuring both inhalable dust and fungal alpha-amylase exposures. PMID:12908861

  11. Occupational Exposure to Respirable Dust, Respirable Crystalline Silica and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions in the London Tunnelling Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Karen S; Mair, Craig; Alexander, Carla; de Vocht, Frank; van Tongeren, Martie

    2016-03-01

    Personal 8-h shift exposure to respirable dust, diesel engine exhaust emissions (DEEE) (as respirable elemental carbon), and respirable crystalline silica of workers involved in constructing an underground metro railway tunnel was assessed. Black carbon (BC) concentrations were also assessed using a MicroAeth AE51. During sprayed concrete lining (SCL) activities in the tunnel, the geometric mean (GM) respirable dust exposure level was 0.91mg m(-3), with the highest exposure measured on a back-up sprayer (3.20mg m(-3)). The GM respirable crystalline silica concentration for SCL workers was 0.03mg m(-3), with the highest measurement also for the back-up sprayer (0.24mg m(-3)). During tunnel boring machine (TBM) activities, the GM respirable dust concentration was 0.54mg m(-3). The GM respirable elemental carbon concentration for all the TBM operators was 18 µg m(-3); with the highest concentration measured on a segment lifter. The BC concentrations were higher in the SCL environment in comparison to the TBM environment (daily GM 18-54 µg m(-3) versus 3-6 µg m(-3)). This small-scale monitoring campaign provides additional personal data on exposures experienced by underground tunnel construction workers. PMID:26403363

  12. 海排灰的氯盐含量对三灰结合料微观机理影响研究%Study of Influence of Content of Chloride and Salt in Sea-Removed Dust on Microcosmic Mechanism for Binder of Cement-Lime-Fly Ash(3 dusts)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁炜; 包龙生; 于玲

    2009-01-01

    Study of microcosmic mechanism of '3 dusts' binder hydrated product, based on sea-removed dust, has revealed influence of chlorid ion on thrength of subbase materials. Study results show that cement and lime have consolidating effect on chloride ion in sea removed dust. Adequate amount of chloride ion in sea removed dust is helpful to subbase.%对基于海排灰的三灰结合料水化产物的微观机理进行研究,揭示氯离子对底基层材料强度形成的影响.研究表明:水泥、石灰材料对海排灰中的氯离子有固化作用,海排灰中适量的氯离子对底基层材料有益.

  13. Estimating the radiation burden to patients in dispensary for occupational exposure to fibrogenic dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation burden from radiodiagnostic examinations during repeated hospitalizations was evaluated for patients who have been subject to dispensary care for occupational exposure to fibrogenic dust. The cumulative dose equivalent was estimated in a group of 50 patients for all the years of observation. The method of retrospective cohort study based on medical documentation was used to obtain particularly data on the number and type of X-ray pictures made during the hospitalizations. Based on direct dosimetric measurements during skiagraphic examinations and tomographic examination of individual layers of the lungs in some patients of the cohort and in dosimetric measurements on a phantom, the following values of the effective equivalent per picture were obtained: 0.07 mSv for a distance X-ray picture of the lungs, and 0.7 mSv for a picture of one tomographic layer of the lungs. The annual and average annual effective dose equivalents received during repeated hospitalizations were derived for each patient. These values made it possible to estimate the effective dose equivalent of groups constituting the cohort followed. Groups with pneumoconiosis disease, evaluated as an occupational disease, and groups of persons followed for longer periods of time or persons with another serious general disease receive about twice the all-state average of the effective dose equivalent from radiodiagnostic examinations. This increase may be ascribed predominantly to tomographic examinations of the lungs. (author). 5 tabs., 5 refs

  14. Occupational dust exposure and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma risk in a population-based case–control study conducted in the greater Boston area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head and neck cancers account for an estimated 549,000 global cancer diagnoses each year. While tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and HPV16 infection are considered to be the major risk factors for this disease, occupational risk factors, including exposure to asbestos, have also been described, although dust exposures other than asbestos have been historically understudied. We have investigated the relationship between occupational exposures to five types of dusts, including sawdust, concrete dust, leather dust, metal dust, and chimney soot, and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) in the greater Boston area. We report findings from a population-based case–control study involving 951 incident HNSCC cases and 1193 controls, frequency matched on age (±3 years), sex, and town/neighborhood of residence. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between occupational exposure to each type of dust and HNSCC, overall and by primary tumor site. After adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking, alcohol consumption, education, and HPV16 serology, laryngeal carcinoma risk increased for each decade of occupational exposure to sawdust (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.3) and metal dust (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.4); and HNSCC risk increased for each decade of occupational leather dust exposure (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.9). We have provided evidence for an association between occupational sawdust and metal dust and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and leather dust and HNSCC, with increasing risk with longer duration at the exposed occupation

  15. Exposure to rubber fume and rubber process dust in the general rubber goods, tyre manufacturing and retread industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dost, A A; Redman, D; Cox, G

    2000-08-01

    This study assesses the current patterns and levels of exposure to rubber fume and rubber process dust in the British rubber industry and compares and contrasts the data obtained from the general rubber goods (GRG), retread tire (RT) and new tire (NT) sectors. A total of 179 rubber companies were visited and data were obtained from 52 general rubber goods, 29 retread tire and 7 new tire manufacturers. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire and included a walk-through inspection of the workplace to assess the extent of use of control measures and the nature of work practices being employed. The most recent (predominantly 1995-97) exposure monitoring data for rubber fume and rubber process dust were obtained from these companies; no additional sampling was conducted for the purpose of this study. In addition to the assessment of exposure data, evaluation of occupational hygiene reports for the quality of information and advice was also carried out.A comparison of the median exposures for processes showed that the order of exposure to rubber fume (E, in mg m(-3)) is: E(moulding) (0.40) approximately E(extrusion) (0.33)>E(milling) (0.18) for GRG; E(press) (0. 32)>E(extrusion) (0.19)>E(autoclave) (0.10) for RT; and E(press) (0. 22) approximately E(all other) (0.22) for NT. The order of exposure to rubber fume between sectors was E(GRG) (0.40)>E(RT) (0.32)>E(NT) (0.22). Median exposures to rubber process dust in the GRG was E(weighing) (4.2)>E(mixing) (1.2) approximately E(milling) (0.8) approximately E(extrusion) (0.8) and no significant difference (P=0. 31) between GRG and NT sectors. The findings compare well with the study carried out in the Netherlands [Kromhout et al. (1994), Annals of Occupational Hygiene 38(1), 3-22], and it is suggested that the factors governing the significant differences noted between the three sectors relate principally to the production and task functions and also to the extent of controls employed. Evaluation of occupational

  16. Exposure of bakery and pastry apprentices to airborne flour dust using PM2.5 and PM10 personal samplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris Christophe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes exposure levels of bakery and pastry apprentices to flour dust, a known risk factor of occupational asthma. Methods Questionnaires on work activity were completed by 286 students. Among them, 34 performed a series of two personal exposure measurements using a PM2.5 and PM10 personal sampler during a complete work shift, one during a cold ("winter" period, and the other during a hot ("summer" period. Results Bakery apprentices experience greater average PM2.5 and PM10 exposures than pastry apprentices (p 10 values among bakers = 1.10 mg.m-3 [standard deviation: 0.83] than in summer (0.63 mg.m-3 [0.36]. While complying with current European occupational limit values, these exposures exceed the ACGIH recommendations set to prevent sensitization to flour dust (0.5 mg.m-3. Over half the facilities had no ventilation system. Conclusion Young bakery apprentices incur substantial exposure to known airways allergens, a situation that might elicit early induction of airways inflammation.

  17. The influence of occupational exposure to pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, diesel exhaust, metal dust, metal fumes, and mineral oil on prostate cancer: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Boers, D; Zeegers, M.; Swaen, G; Kant, I.; van den Brandt, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the relation between exposure to pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), diesel exhaust, metal dust, metal fumes, and mineral oil in relation to prostate cancer incidence in a large prospective study.

  18. Occurrence of Respiratory Symptoms Resulting from Exposure to House Dust Mites in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Maugeri, Umberto; Zembala, Marek; Hajto, Barbara; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Jacek, Ryszard; Sowa, Agata; Perera, Frederica P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the distribution of house dust mite (HDM) allergens within homes of three-year-old children, to identify factors responsible for its variation and to test the hypothesis whether the content of HDM allergens exceeding 2 [mu]g/g dust may be regarded as a risk level of sensitization possibly affecting respiratory…

  19. Children's phthalate intakes and resultant cumulative exposures estimated from urine compared with estimates from dust ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption in their homes and daycare centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.; Langer, Sarka; Callesen, Michael; Toftum, Jørn; Clausen, Geo

    2013-01-01

    . For each child the intake attributable to exposures in the indoor environment via dust ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption were estimated from the phthalate levels in the dust collected from the child's home and daycare center. Based on the urine samples, DEHP had the highest total daily......'s total intake of certain phthalates. Such exposures, by themselves, may lead to intakes exceeding current limit values....

  20. Colorectal cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in asbestos cement and cement workers. Studies on mortality, cancer morbidity, and radiographical changes in lung parenchyma and pleura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsson, K.

    1993-09-01

    Radiologically visible parenchymal changes (small opacities >= 1/0;ILO 1980 classification) were present in 20% of a sample of workers (N=174), employed for 20 years (median) in an asbestos cement plant. Exposure-response relationships were found, after controlling for age and smoking habits. In a sample of asbestos cement workers with symptoms and signs suggestive of pulmonary disease (N=33), increased lung density measured by x-ray computed tomography, and reduced static lung volumes and lung compliance was found. In a cohort of asbestos cement workers (N=1.929) with an estimated median exposure of 1.2 fibres/ml, the mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease was increased in comparison to a regional reference cohort (N=1.233). A two-to three-fold increase of non-malignant respiratory mortality was noted among workers employed for more than a decade in the asbestos cement plant, compared to cement workers (N=1.526), who in their turn did not experience and increased risk compared to the general population. In the cohorts of asbestos cement and cement workers, there was a tow-to three-fold increased incidence of cancer in the right part of the colon, compared to the general population as well as to external reference cohorts of other industrial workers (N=3.965) and fishermen (N=8.092). A causal relation with the exposure to mineral dust and fibres was supported by the findings of higher risk estimated in subgroups with high cumulated asbestos doses or longer duration of cement work. The incidence of cancer in the left part of the colon was not increased. Morbidity data, but not mortality data, disclosed the subsite-specific risk pattern. Both asbestos cement workers and cement workers has an increased incidence of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, and with the fishermen. The risk was, however, of the same magnitude among the other industrial workers. 181 refs.

  1. Spatiotemporal analysis and human exposure assessment on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air, settled house dust, and diet: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuning; Harrad, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    This review summarizes the published literature on the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in indoor air, settled house dust, and food, and highlights geographical and temporal trends in indoor PAH contamination. In both indoor air and dust, ΣPAH concentrations in North America have decreased over the past 30 years with a halving time of 6.7±1.9years in indoor air and 5.0±2.3 years in indoor dust. In contrast, indoor PAH concentrations in Asia have remained steady. Concentrations of ΣPAH in indoor air are significantly (pAmerica. In studies recording both vapor and particulate phases, the global average concentration in indoor air of ΣPAH excluding naphthalene is between 7 and 14,300 ng/m(3). Over a similar period, the average ΣPAH concentration in house dust ranges between 127 to 115,817ng/g. Indoor/outdoor ratios of atmospheric concentrations of ΣPAH have declined globally with a half-life of 6.3±2.3 years. While indoor/outdoor ratios for benzo[a]pyrene toxicity equivalents (BaPeq) declined in North America with a half-life of 12.2±3.2 years, no significant decline was observed when data from all regions were considered. Comparison of the global database, revealed that I/O ratios for ΣPAH (average=4.3±1.3), exceeded significantly those of BaPeq (average=1.7±0.4) in the same samples. The significant decline in global I/O ratios suggests that indoor sources of PAH have been controlled more effectively than outdoor sources. Moreover, the significantly higher I/O ratios for ΣPAH compared to BaPeq, imply that indoor sources of PAH emit proportionally more of the less carcinogenic PAH than outdoor sources. Dietary exposure to PAH ranges from 137 to 55,000 ng/day. Definitive spatiotemporal trends in dietary exposure were precluded due to relatively small number of relevant studies. However, although reported in only one study, PAH concentrations in Chinese diets exceeded those in diet from other parts of the world, a pattern consistent with

  2. Lung fibrosis and exposure to wood dusts: Two cases report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Riccò

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing evidence suggests that idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) occurs more often in subjects previously exposed to wood dusts than in non-exposed subjects. Here we report 2 cases of the IPF among workers prolongedly exposed to high levels of hardwood dusts. Case report: The case No. 1: An 83 year-old male former smoker, retired joiner developed mild dyspnoea and chronic dry cough over the period preceding the examination. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) identified a mild r...

  3. Potential for childhood lead poisoning in the inner cities of Australia due to exposure to lead in soil dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents evidence demonstrating that the historical use of leaded gasoline and lead (Pb) in exterior paints in Australia has contaminated urban soils in the older inner suburbs of large cities such as Sydney and Melbourne. While significant attention has been focused on Pb poisoning in mining and smelting towns in Australia, relatively little research has focused on exposure to Pb originating from inner-city soil dust and its potential for childhood Pb exposures. Due to a lack of systematic blood lead (PbB) screening and geochemical soil Pb mapping in the inner cities of Australia, the risks from environmental Pb exposure remain unconstrained within urban population centres. - Previous use of Pb in gasoline and Pb in exterior paints in Australia has contaminated urban soils in the older inner suburbs of large cities and the risks remain unconstrained.

  4. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  5. Evaluation of the Webler-Brown model for estimating tetrachloroethylene exposure from vinyl-lined asbestos-cement pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Heeren Timothy C; Webster Thomas F; Gallagher Lisa E; Aschengrau Ann; Spence Lisa A; Ozonoff David M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background From May 1968 through March 1980, vinyl-lined asbestos-cement (VL/AC) water distribution pipes were installed in New England to avoid taste and odor problems associated with asbestos-cement pipes. The vinyl resin was applied to the inner pipe surface in a solution of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE). Substantial amounts of PCE remained in the liner and subsequently leached into public drinking water supplies. Methods Once aware of the leaching problem and prior...

  6. A study of pulmonary function test among tea garden factory workers in relation to exposure of tea dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birinchi Kartik Das

    2015-10-01

    Results: The investigator is interested to test whether there were significant differences between parameters of PFT among the study and control group. For this purpose student t test has been applied and significant differences were found in all the parameters of PFT as P < 0.01. Conclusions: Exposure to tea dust affects the lung volumes and flow rates, thereby causing increased prevalence of respiratory, allergic symptoms and significant degree of airway obstruction. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(10.000: 2686-2693

  7. Pulmonary function in smelter workers. [Relationship between SO/sub 2/ and dust exposure and pulmonary function in copper smelter workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebowitz, M.D.; Burton, A.; Kaltenborn, W.

    1979-04-01

    A study of 430 smelter workers with one or more pulmonary function tests was performed. Of the total, 244 had two or more pulmonary function tests. This study could not demonstrate consistently significant relationships between pulmonary function and exposure to SO/sub 2/ or dust. Consistent differences could not be demonstrated between pulmonary function and years of work in the smelter, after controlling for age and smoking. Consistent differences in symptoms could not be seen in relation to exposure or duration of employment in the smelter. Thus, this study could not demonstrate consistent effects of SO/sub 2/ or dust exposure in pulmonary function.

  8. Immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological profile of health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust from sand dunes at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Deborah; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; Eggers, Margaret; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; DeWitt, Jamie

    2016-01-15

    Exposure to geogenic particulate matter (PM) comprised of mineral particles has been linked to human health effects. However, very little data exist on health effects associated with geogenic dust exposure in natural settings. Therefore, we characterized particulate matter size, metal chemistry, and health effects of dust collected from the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a popular off-road vehicle area located near Las Vegas, NV. Adult female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to several concentrations of mineral dust collected from active and vegetated sand dunes in NDRA. Dust samples (median diameter: 4.4 μm) were suspended in phosphate-buffered saline and delivered at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 mg dust/kg body weight by oropharyngeal aspiration. ICP-MS analyses of total dissolution of the dust resulted in aluminum (55,090 μg/g), vanadium (70 μg/g), chromium (33 μg/g), manganese (511 μg/g), iron (21,600 μg/g), cobalt (9.4 μg/g), copper (69 μg/g), zinc (79 μg/g), arsenic (62 μg/g), strontium (620 μg/g), cesium (13 μg/g), lead 25 μg/g) and uranium (4.7 μg/g). Arsenic was present only as As(V). Mice received four exposures, once/week over 28-days to mimic a month of weekend exposures. Descriptive and functional assays to assess immunotoxicity and neurotoxicity were performed 24 h after the final exposure. The primary observation was that 0.1 to 100 mg/kg of this sand dune derived dust dose-responsively reduced antigen-specific IgM antibody responses, suggesting that dust from this area of NDRA may present a potential health risk. PMID:26644169

  9. Health effects following long-term exposure to thorium dusts. A fourteen-year follow-up study in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fourteen-year follow-up study was carried out at Baiyan Obo Rare-earth Iron Mine in China. It has been operating for forty one years. It's ore contains ThO2 at a percentage of 0.04. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible health effects of 2903 dust-inhaled miners following long-term exposure to thorium dusts. An electrostatic collection system was used to measure the exhaled thoron activity of each examinee, through simple calculation, each examinee's thorium lung burden obtained. Health status was ascertained through questionnaire, physical examination and clinical laboratory tests. An epidemiological study on the mortality rates of lung cancers of the dust-inhaled miners and internal controls was also carried out. Results showed that the highest thorium lung burden for 1158 measurements of 638 miners was at a value of 11.11 Bq, one tenth of the maximum thorium lung burden. In a ten-year investigation on the four haematological parameters and four hepatic parameters of 638 exposed miners, no adverse effects were observed. The incidence of severe breathlessness, lung function tests, pneumoconiosis of stage O+ and the concentration of ceruloplasmin in the serum of high thorium lung burden group are much higher than that of low thorium lung burden group. However, owing to the concentration of SiO2 (10%) are much higher than that of the ThO2 (0.04%) in the dust, the disorders of respiratory tract are mainly due to the fibrogenic effects of SiO2, Epidemiology study showed that both the SMRs of the dust-inhaled miners and the dust-free miners are all greater than one (5.15 vs. 2.30). The SMR of the dust miners was much higher than that of the controls. However, there was no statistic significant difference between these two SMRs (X2=3.75 P>0.05). This means that the high SMR of the dust-inhaled miners was not solely due to the long-term inhaled thorium and short-lived thoron daughters. Because of very high percentage of smokers (- 80%) among both the

  10. Human lead (Pb) exposure via dust from different land use settings of Pakistan: A case study from two urban mountainous cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Khalid, Ramsha; Bostan, Nazish; Saqib, Zafeer; Mohmand, Jawad; Rehan, Mohammad; Ali, Nadeem; Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A; Shen, Heqing

    2016-07-01

    The current study aims to determine the dust-borne lead (Pb) levels into outdoor dust, which were collected from the areas nearby the cities/districts of Islamabad and Swat in Pakistan. In general dust samples from all land use settings (industrial, urban and rural) showed significantly higher (pdust ingestion is one of the major routes of human exposure for lead. Hazard Index (HI) values, calculated for both adult and children populations, were above unity in industrial and urban areas, indicating serious health risks especially to the children populations. PMID:27129063

  11. Cellulosic building insulation versus mineral wool, fiberglass or perlite: installer's exposure by inhalation of fibers, dust, endotoxin and fire-retardant additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breum, N O; Schneider, T; Jørgensen, O; Valdbjørn Rasmussen, T; Skibstrup Eriksen, S

    2003-11-01

    A task-specific exposure matrix was designed for workers installing building insulation materials. A priori, a matrix element was defined by type of task (installer or helper), type of work area (attic spaces or wall cavities) and type of insulation material (slabs from mineral wool, fiberglass or flax; loose-fill cellulosic material or perlite). In the laboratory a mock-up (full scale) of a one-family house was used for simulated installation of insulation materials (four replicates per matrix element). Personal exposure to dust and fibers was measured. The dust was analyzed for content of endotoxin and some trace elements (boron and aluminum) from fire-retardant or mold-resistant additives. Fibers were characterized as WHO fibers or non-WHO fibers. In support of the exposure matrix, the dustiness of all the materials was measured in a rotating drum tester. For installers in attic spaces, risk of exposure was low for inhalation of dust and WHO fibers from slab materials of mineral wool or fiberglass. Slab materials from flax may cause high risk of exposure to endotoxin. The risk of exposure by inhalation of dust from loose-fill materials was high for installers in attic spaces and for some of the materials risk of exposure was high for boron and aluminum. Exposure by inhalation of cellulosic WHO fibers was high but little is known about the health effects and a risk assessment is not possible. For the insulation of walls, the risk of installers' exposure by inhalation of dust and fibers was low for the slab materials, while a high risk was observed for loose-fill materials. The exposure to WHO fibers was positively correlated to the dust exposure. A dust level of 6.1 mg/m3 was shown to be useful as a proxy for screening exposure to WHO fibers in excess of 10(6) fibers/m3. In the rotating drum, slabs of insulation material from mineral wool or fiberglass were tested as not dusty. Cellulosic loose-fill materials were tested as very dusty, and perlite proved to be

  12. Occurrence of phthalate diesters (phthalates), p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens), bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) and their derivatives in indoor dust from Vietnam: Implications for exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tri Manh; Minh, Tu Binh; Kumosani, Taha A; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-02-01

    Phthalate diesters (phthalates), esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens), and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) are used in personal care products, food packages, household products, or pharmaceuticals. These compounds possess endocrine-disrupting potentials and have been reported to occur in the environment. Nevertheless, no previous studies have reported the occurrence of these compounds in indoor dust from Vietnam. In this study, nine phthalates, six parabens, and four BADGEs were determined in indoor dust samples collected from Hanoi, Hatinh, Hungyen, and Thaibinh, in Vietnam. Total concentrations of phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs in indoor dust ranged from 3440 to 106,000 ng/g (median: 22,600 ng/g), 40-840 ng/g (median: 123 ng/g), and 23 to 1750 ng/g (median: 184 ng/g), respectively. Based on the measured median concentration of phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs in indoor dust, we estimated human exposure doses to these compounds through indoor dust ingestion for various age groups. The exposure doses to phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs decreased with age and ranged from 19.4 to 90.4 ng/kg-bw/d, 0.113-0.528 ng/kg-bw/d, and 0.158-0.736 ng/kg-bw/d, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence and human exposure of phthalates, parabens, and BADGEs in indoor dust from Vietnam. PMID:26498104

  13. Utilizing TEMPO surface estimates to determine changes in emissions, community exposure and environmental impacts from cement kilns across North America using alternative fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, M. J.; Gibson, M. D.; Asamany, E.

    2015-12-01

    community exposure research in NA. The application of the new NASA TEMPO satellite to track the dispersion of SO2, PM2.5 and NO2 in plumes and secondary O3 and aerosol formation downwind of cement kilns opens up an exciting new avenue of air pollution research in NA.

  14. Hygroscopic water uptake and dry/wet cycling compared with normal water exposure of cemented waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable water uptake, formation of free liquid and leaching of activity may take place if cemented waste materials containing soluble salts are exposed to high humidity air. Another feature of importance for the structural stability of some materials is cyclic variations between water saturation and dry-out periods. The phenomena have been investigated on a laboratory scale using simulated waste in the form of cemented sodium nitrate or ion-exchange resins. Spherical samples are found to be valuable for simultaneous determination of the leaching of major components, mainly sodium, and the water uptake and swelling obtained from weight-increase measurements for the samples weighed in air and immersed in water

  15. Pesticides in household dust and soil: exposure pathways for children of agricultural families.

    OpenAIRE

    Simcox, N J; Fenske, R A; Wolz, S A; Lee, I C; Kalman, D A

    1995-01-01

    Child of agriculture families are likely to be exposed to agricultural chemicals, even if they are not involved in farm activities. This study was designed to determine whether such children are exposed to higher levels of pesticides than children whose parents are not involved in agriculture and whose homes are not close to farms. Household dust and soil samples were collected in children's play areas from 59 residences in eastern Washington State (26 farming, 22 farmworker, and 11 nonfarmin...

  16. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Chu, Derek K; Walker, Tina D; Goncharova, Susanna; Fattouh, Ramzi; Silver, Jonathan S; Moore, Cheryl Lynn; Xie, Juliana L; O'Byrne, Paul M; Coyle, Anthony J; Kolbeck, Roland; Humbles, Alison A; Stämpfli, Martin R; Jordana, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+) DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway. PMID:24551140

  17. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Llop-Guevara

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM, we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+ DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway.

  18. Dust exposure, eye redness, eye cytology and mucous membrane irritation in a tobacco industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Pedersen, O.F.

    1989-01-01

    could not be explained by differences in tobacco smoking, sex, age, sleeping habits or use of glasses. Irritation of lips and upper airways as reported by questionnaire were more common in tobacco workers than in referents. In conclusion the tobacco workers, more often than the referents, had complaints......In a study of 75 workers employed in a tobacco factory producing cheroots we measured cellular contents of tear fluid, redness of eyes, discomfort, total (0–5.7 mg/m3) and respirable dust in the breathing zone and total ambient dust by stationary sampling (0.08–1.0 mg/m3). A matched group of 50...... office workers in a telephone company (total ambient dust concentration between 0.08–0.13 mg/m3) was similarly examined as referents. We found a difference between the two companies with regard to cell counts, with tobacco workers having the largest numbers except for lymphocytes. Among tobacco workers...

  19. Risk evaluation and exposure control of mineral dust containing free crystalline silica: a study case at a quarry in the Recife Metropolitan Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Mario; Kohlman Rabbani, E; Barkokébas Junior, Beda; Lago, Eliane

    2012-01-01

    During the production of aggregates at quarry sites, elevated quantities of micro-particulate mineral dust are produced in all stages of the process. This dust contains appreciable amounts of free crystalline silica in a variety of forms which, if maintained suspended in the air in the work environment, expose the workers to the risk of developing occupational silicosis, which causes reduced ability to work and potential shortening of lifespan. This study was conducted to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate workers' exposure to mineral dust containing free crystalline silica at a midsized quarry in the Recife metropolitan area, in the State of Pernambuco. It involved evaluation of the industrial process, collection and analysis of representative dust samples, and interviews with the management team of the company with the intent to assess the compliance of the company with Regulatory Standard (NR) 22--Occupational safety and health in mining. In order to assist the company in managing risks related to dust exposure, three protocols were developed, implemented and made available, the first based on NR 22, from which the company was also given an economic safety indicator, the second based on the recommendations and requirements of Fundacentro to implement a Respiratory Protection Program and, finally, an assessment protocol with respect to the guidelines of the International Labor Organization to implement a health and safety management system. This study also showed the inadequacy of the formula for calculating tolerance limits in Brazilian legislation when compared with the more strict internationally accepted control parameters. From the laboratory results, unhealthy conditions at the quarry site were confirmed and technical and administrative measures were suggested to reduce and control dust exposure at acceptable levels, such as the implementation of an occupational health and safety management system, integrated with other management systems. From these

  20. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  1. Risk assessment of non-dietary exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via house PM2.5, TSP and dust and the implications from human hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Min-juan; Chan, Chuen-Yu; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the cancer risk due to non-dietary PAHs exposure in home environment (inhalation and ingestion), exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of PM2.5, total suspend particles (TSP) and dust in homes at two urban centers of Pearl River Delta were assessed. House PM2.5 bound PAHs in Guangzhou (GZ) ranged from 10.0 to 61.9 ng m-3 and 0.72 to 8.15 ng m-3 in Hong Kong (HK). PAH profiles found in PM2.5, TSP and dust were different than that in hair (dominated by Nap and Phe). Pyr and Flu in house dust significantly correlated with that in hair (r = 0.69; 0.55, p houses of GZ (10-5-10-4) were significantly higher than those of HK (10-6-10-5), which were also significantly higher than the cancer risks associated with house dust intake (10-7-10-5) in GZ. PAHs exposure via non-dietary route (PM2.5 and dust) was found to be 1-3 times higher than fish consumption for children and contributed to 52-76% of total PAHs intake for children and 24-50% for adults in GZ.

  2. Health effects of exposure to thyme dust in a group of thyme growing farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golec, Marcin; Skórska, Czesława; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    Medical examinations were performed in a group of 47 thyme farmers from eastern Poland while threshing thyme (Thymus vulgaris). As a reference group 63 urban dwellers were examined not exposed to organic dusts. The examinations included an interview concerning the occurrence of respiratory disorders and work-related symptoms, physical examination, lung function tests, skin prick tests with four microbial allergens and agar-gel precipitation tests with 12 antigens. 63.8% of thyme handling farmers reported occurrence of work-related symptoms while threshing thyme. The most common complaints were: blocking of the nose (reported by 18 farmers--38.3%), dry cough (14 persons--29.8%) and general weakness (13 persons--27.7%). The mean spirometric values in the farmers group were within a normal range and did not show a significant post-work decline. The farmers showed positive skin reactions to microbial antigens in the range of 4.3-14.9%, and a frequency of positive precipitin reactions 0-56.5%. The reference group responded to most allergens with a significantly lower frequency of positive results compared to the examined group. In conclusion, thyme farmers engaged in threshing this herb represent a group of elevated professional risk because of high incidence of work-related symptoms and common occurrence of positive skin and precipitin reactions to bacterial and fungal allergens associated with organic dust. PMID:15314984

  3. Long-term exposure to silica dust and risk of total and cause-specific mortality in Chinese workers: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human exposure to silica dust is very common in both working and living environments. However, the potential long-term health effects have not been well established across different exposure situations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied 74,040 workers who worked at 29 metal mines and pottery factories in China for 1 y or more between January 1, 1960, and December 31, 1974, with follow-up until December 31, 2003 (median follow-up of 33 y. We estimated the cumulative silica dust exposure (CDE for each worker by linking work history to a job-exposure matrix. We calculated standardized mortality ratios for underlying causes of death based on Chinese national mortality rates. Hazard ratios (HRs for selected causes of death associated with CDE were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. The population attributable risks were estimated based on the prevalence of workers with silica dust exposure and HRs. The number of deaths attributable to silica dust exposure among Chinese workers was then calculated using the population attributable risk and the national mortality rate. We observed 19,516 deaths during 2,306,428 person-years of follow-up. Mortality from all causes was higher among workers exposed to silica dust than among non-exposed workers (993 versus 551 per 100,000 person-years. We observed significant positive exposure-response relationships between CDE (measured in milligrams/cubic meter-years, i.e., the sum of silica dust concentrations multiplied by the years of silica exposure and mortality from all causes (HR 1.026, 95% confidence interval 1.023-1.029, respiratory diseases (1.069, 1.064-1.074, respiratory tuberculosis (1.065, 1.059-1.071, and cardiovascular disease (1.031, 1.025-1.036. Significantly elevated standardized mortality ratios were observed for all causes (1.06, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.11, ischemic heart disease (1.65, 1.35-1.99, and pneumoconiosis (11.01, 7.67-14.95 among workers exposed to

  4. Pulmonary exposure to particles from diesel exhaust, urban dust or single-walled carbon nanotubes and oxidatively damaged DNA and vascular function in apoE(-/-)mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lise K; Jantzen, Kim; Sheykhzade, Majid;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study compared the oxidative stress level and vasomotor dysfunction after exposure to urban dust, diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). DEP and SWCNT increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured endothelial cells and...... acellullarly, whereas the exposure to urban dust did not generate ROS. ApoE(-/-) mice, which were exposed twice to 0.5 mg/kg of the particles by intratracheal instillation, had unaltered acetylcholine-elicited vasorelaxation in aorta segments. There was unaltered pulmonary expression level of Vcam-1, Icam-1......, Hmox-1 and Ogg1. The levels of oxidatively damaged DNA were unchanged in lung tissue. The exposure to SWCNT significantly increased the expression of Ccl-2 in the lung tissue of the mice. The exposure to DEP and SWCNT was associated with elevated ROS production in cultured cells, whereas intratracheal...

  5. Respirable coal dust exposure and respiratory symptoms in South-African coal miners: A comparison of current and ex-miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, R.N.; Robins, T.G.; Seixas, N.; Lalloo, U.G.; Becklake, M. [University of KwaZuluNatal, Congella (South Africa). Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine

    2006-06-15

    Dose-response associations between respirable dust exposure and respiratory symptoms and between symptoms and spirometry outcomes among currently employed and formerly employed South-African coal miners were investigated. Work histories, interviews, and spirometry and cumulative exposure were assessed among 684 current and 212 ex-miners. Results: Lower prevalences of symptoms were found among employed compared with ex-miners. Associations with increasing exposure for symptoms of phlegm and past history of tuberculosis were observed, whereas other symptom prevalences were higher in the higher exposure categories. Symptomatic ex-miners exhibited lower lung-function compared to the nonsymptomatic. Compared with published data, symptoms rates were low in current miners but high in ex-miners. Although explanations could include the low prevalence of smoking and/or reporting/selection bias, a 'Survivor' and/or a 'hire' effect is more likely, resulting in an underestimation of the dust-related effect.

  6. Comparative Risks of Cancer from Drywall Finishing Based on Stochastic Modeling of Cumulative Exposures to Respirable Dusts and Chrysotile Asbestos Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelter, Fred W; Xia, Yulin; Dell, Linda

    2015-05-01

    Sanding joint compounds is a dusty activity and exposures are not well characterized. Until the mid 1970s, asbestos-containing joint compounds were used by some people such that sanding could emit dust and asbestos fibers. We estimated the distribution of 8-h TWA concentrations and cumulative exposures to respirable dusts and chrysotile asbestos fibers for four worker groups: (1) drywall specialists, (2) generalists, (3) tradespersons who are bystanders to drywall finishing, and (4) do-it-yourselfers (DIYers). Data collected through a survey of experienced contractors, direct field observations, and literature were used to develop prototypical exposure scenarios for each worker group. To these exposure scenarios, we applied a previously developed semi-empirical mathematical model that predicts area as well as personal breathing zone respirable dust concentrations. An empirical factor was used to estimate chrysotile fiber concentrations from respirable dust concentrations. On a task basis, we found mean 8-h TWA concentrations of respirable dust and chrysotile fibers are numerically highest for specialists, followed by generalists, DIYers, and bystander tradespersons; these concentrations are estimated to be in excess of the respective current but not historical Threshold Limit Values. Due to differences in frequency of activities, annual cumulative exposures are highest for specialists, followed by generalists, bystander tradespersons, and DIYers. Cumulative exposure estimates for chrysotile fibers from drywall finishing are expected to result in few, if any, mesothelioma or excess lung cancer deaths according to recently published risk assessments. Given the dustiness of drywall finishing, we recommend diligence in the use of readily available source controls. PMID:25428276

  7. Substrate-enzyme characteristics after derangements of biological combustion processes. Estimations of organism's long term exposure to uranium ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    peroxidation/ antioxidant defense were studied. Stages of glycolysis were monitored via enzymatic measuring the activity ratio between oxidized and reduced forms of lactate dehydrogenase as well as a concentration of lactate and pyruvate. Dynamics of Krebs cycle was assessed via variations in isocitric acid and malate content as well as activity of four dehydrogenases in citric acid cycle. Derangements in lipid peroxidation/ antioxidant defense were appraised via dynamics of malonic dialdehyde and superoxide dismutase activity. Preliminary analysis of obtained results showed in cytosol the vast majority of rat viscera concentration figures of analyzed metabolites change in different ways. At ultralow dose exposure adaptive increase of certain metabolites synthesis were detected and duration of such response was maximal. With increasing the duration of uranium dust exposure this pattern is gone. In organs of excretory system the opposite trend in quantitative figures found out in earlier terms of inhalation priming. Possible mechanisms of observed changes are discussed.

  8. The comparison between sulfate salt weathering of portland cement paste and calcium sulfoaluminate cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zanqun; Deng, Dehua; De Schutter, Geert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the damage performances of sulfate salt weathering of Portland cement paste and calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement paste were compared according to authors' previous studies. It was found that the evaporation zone of speciments partially immersed in 10% Na2SO4 solution were both severely deteriorated for Portland cement and CSA cement. However, the differences were more significant: (1) the CSA cement paste were damaged just after 7 days exposure compared to the 5 months expos...

  9. Associations of allergic sensitization and clinical phenotypes with innate immune response genes polymorphisms are modified by house dust mite allergen exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Kurowski, Marcin; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, Barbara; Wardzyńska, Aleksandra; Kowalski, Marek L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphisms within innate immunity genes are associated with allergic phenotypes but results are variable. These associations were not analyzed with respect to allergen exposure. We investigated associations of TLR and CD14 polymorphisms with allergy phenotypes in the context of house dust mite (HDM) exposure. Material and methods Children, aged 12-16 years (n=326), were recruited from downtown and rural locations and assessed by allergist. Skin prick tests, total and HDM-speci...

  10. Exposure to airborne microorganisms, dust and endotoxin during flax scutching on farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysińska-Traczyk, Ewa; Skórska, Czesława; Prazmo, Zofia; Sitkowska, Jolanta; Cholewa, Grazyna; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    Microbiological air sampling was performed on 5 flax farms located in eastern Poland. Air samples for determination of the concentrations of microorganisms, dust and endotoxin were collected in barns during machine scutching of flax stems by the farmers. The concentrations of mesophilic bacteria ranged from 203.5-698.8 x 10(3) cfu/m3, of Gram-negative bacteria from 27.2-123.4 x 10(3) cfu/m3, of thermophilic actinomycetes from 0.5-2.6 x 10(3) cfu/m3, and of fungi from 23.4-99.8 x 10(3) cfu/m3. The concentrations of total airborne microorganisms (bacteria + fungi) were within a range of 245.0-741.0 x 10(3) cfu/m3. The values of the respirable fraction of total airborne microflora on the examined farms were between 45.5-98.3%. Corynebacteria (irregular Gram-positive rods, mostly Corynebacterium spp.) were dominant at all sampling sites, forming 46.8-67.8% of the total airborne microflora. Among Gram-negative bacteria, the most numerous species was Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Erwinia herbicola, Enterobacter agglomerans), known to have strong endotoxic and allergenic properties. Among fungi, the allergenic species Alternaria alternata prevailed. Altogether, 25 species or genera of bacteria and 10 species or genera of fungi were identified in the farm air during flax scutching; of these, 11 and 6 species or genera respectively were reported as having allergenic and/or immunotoxic properties. The concentrations of airborne dust ranged within 43.7-648.1 mg/m3 (median 93.6 mg/m3), exceeding on all farms the Polish OEL value of 4 mg/m3. The concentrations of airborne endotoxin ranged within 16.9-172.1 microg/m3 (median 30.0 microg/m3), exceeding at all sampling sites the suggested OEL value of 0.2 microg/m). In conclusion, flax farmers performing machine scutching of flax could be exposed to large concentrations of airborne microorganisms, dust and endotoxin, posing a risk of work-related respiratory disease. PMID:15627342

  11. Clearance of 59Fe3O4 particles from the lung of rats during exposure to coal mine dust and diesel exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in rats were performed to investigate the influence of diesel/coal dust exposure on lung clearance of inert tracer particles. Four groups of 80 rats each were exposed as follows: (1) Coal mine dust, 2 mg/m3; (2) Diesel exhaust, 2 mg/m3); (3) Coal mine dust (1 mg/m3) plus diesel exhaust (1 mg/m3); (4) Filtered air (control). The exposure was for 7 hours per day, 5 days per week for a period of 6 months. Two months after commencement of the study, all animals were exposed in nose only exposure units to 59Fe3O4 dust for 2 hours. Lungs of serially killed animals were excised and their 59Fe activity measured. Biological half lives of long term clearance of Fe3O4 from the lung were 47 days (controls), 42 days (coal), 43 days (coal/diesel) and 37 days (diesel). 59Fe3O4 retention on day 120 was significantly lower in all exposure groups as compared to controls, with the diesel group showing the lowest retention (3O4 retention of day 1 was not significantly different between the groups. 11 references

  12. A survey of occupational exposure to inhalable wood dust among workers in small- and medium-scale wood-processing enterprises in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalew, Eyasu; Gebre, Yonas; De Wael, Karolien

    2015-03-01

    A study of wood dust exposure in 20 small- and medium-scale wood-processing enterprises was performed in Ethiopia. Sampling was conducted daily from January to June, 2013 and a total of 360 samples from 113 workers were collected with Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) personal samplers. Eight-hour time-weighted average exposure to wood dust ranged from 0.24 to 23.3mg m(-3) with a geometric mean (GM) of 6.82mg m(-3) and a geometric standard deviation of 1.82. Although Ethiopia did not have any defined standard of Occupational Exposure Limit for wood dust exposure, 71% of the measurements exceeded the limit of 5mg m(-3) set by the European Union (EU). Higher than the EU exposure limit was measured while workers perform sanding and sawing activities with a GM of 9.72 and 7.60mg m(-3), respectively. In conclusion, wood workers in the small- and medium-scale enterprises are at a higher risk of developing different respiratory health problems with continuous exposure trends. PMID:25349370

  13. Intranasal exposure of mice to house dust mite elicits allergic airway inflammation via a GM-CSF-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Elizabeth C; Fattouh, Ramzi; Wattie, Jennifer; Inman, Mark D; Goncharova, Susanna; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, José-Carlos; Jordana, Manel

    2004-11-15

    It is now well established that passive exposure to inhaled OVA leads to a state of immunological tolerance. Therefore, to elicit allergic sensitization, researchers have been compelled to devise alternative strategies, such as the systemic delivery of OVA in the context of powerful adjuvants, which are alien to the way humans are exposed and sensitized to allergens. The objectives of these studies were to investigate immune-inflammatory responses to intranasal delivery of a purified house dust mite (HDM) extract and to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in this process. HDM was delivered to BALB/c mice daily for 10 days. After the last exposure, mice were killed, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, and samples were obtained. Expression/production of Th2-associated molecules in the lymph nodes, lung, and spleen were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively. Using this exposure protocol, exposure to HDM alone generated Th2 sensitization based on the expression/production of Th2 effector molecules and airway eosinophilic inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated expansion and activation of APCs in the lung and an influx of activated Th2 effector cells. Moreover, this inflammation was accompanied by airways hyper-responsiveness and a robust memory-driven immune response. Finally, administration of anti-GM-CSF-neutralizing Abs markedly reduced immune-inflammatory responses in both lung and spleen. Thus, intranasal delivery of HDM results in Th2 sensitization and airway eosinophilic inflammation that appear to be mediated, at least in part, by endogenous GM-CSF production. PMID:15528378

  14. Neutralisation of interleukin-13 in mice prevents airway pathology caused by chronic exposure to house dust mite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L Tomlinson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repeated exposure to inhaled allergen can cause airway inflammation, remodeling and dysfunction that manifests as the symptoms of allergic asthma. We have investigated the role of the cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13 in the generation and persistence of airway cellular inflammation, bronchial remodeling and deterioration in airway function in a model of allergic asthma caused by chronic exposure to the aeroallergen House Dust Mite (HDM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were exposed to HDM via the intranasal route for 4 consecutive days per week for up to 8 consecutive weeks. Mice were treated either prophylactically or therapeutically with a potent neutralising anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody (mAb administered subcutaneously (s.c.. Airway cellular inflammation was assessed by flow cytometry, peribronchial collagen deposition by histocytochemistry and airway hyperreactivity (AHR by invasive measurement of lung resistance (R(L and dynamic compliance (C(dyn. Both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with an anti-IL-13 mAb significantly inhibited (P<0.05 the generation and maintenance of chronic HDM-induced airway cellular inflammation, peribronchial collagen deposition, epithelial goblet cell upregulation. AHR to inhaled methacholine was reversed by prophylactic but not therapeutic treatment with anti-IL-13 mAb. Both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with anti-IL-13 mAb significantly reversed (P<0.05 the increase in baseline R(L and the decrease in baseline C(dyn caused by chronic exposure to inhaled HDM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that in a model of allergic lung disease driven by chronic exposure to a clinically relevant aeroallergen, IL-13 plays a significant role in the generation and persistence of airway inflammation, remodeling and dysfunction.

  15. Effects of inhaled asbestos, asbestos plus cigarette smoke, asbestos-cement and talc baby powder in hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic exposure of hamsters to chrysotile asbestos resulted in severe asbestosis in all animals and in increased mortality; concomitant exposure to cigarette smoke did not affect type or severity of asbestotic lesions. Chronic exposure to asbestos-cement dust increased the number of macrophages and ferruginous bodies. Exposure to talc baby powder caused no significant changes. Deposition of talc particles in the lungs was demonstrated by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and by a study with neutron-activated talc. No malignant tumours were observed in any of these studies.

  16. Increased mortality in COPD among construction workers exposed to inorganic dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, I A; Torén, K; Eriksson, K; Hedlund, U; Nilsson, T; Flodin, R; Järvholm, B

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if occupational exposure to dust, fumes or gases, especially among never-smokers, increased the mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cohort of 317,629 Swedish male construction workers was followed from 1971 to 1999. Exposure to inorganic dust (asbestos, man-made mineral fibres, dust from cement, concrete and quartz), gases and irritants (epoxy resins, isocyanates and organic solvents), fumes (asphalt fumes, diesel exhaust and metal fumes), and wood dust was based on a job-exposure matrix. An internal control group with "unexposed" construction workers was used, and the analyses were adjusted for age and smoking. When all subjects were analysed, there was an increased mortality from COPD among those with any airborne exposure (relative risk 1.12 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.22)). In a Poisson regression model, including smoking, age and the major exposure groups, exposure to inorganic dust was associated with an increased risk (hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (95% CI 1.06-1.14)), especially among never-smokers (HR 2.30 (95% CI 1.07-4.96)). The fraction of COPD among the exposed attributable to any airborne exposure was estimated as 10.7% overall and 52.6% among never-smokers. In conclusion, occupational exposure among construction workers increases mortality due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even among never-smokers. PMID:15065829

  17. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including an...... overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  18. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L. [University Extremo Catarinense, Criciuma (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  19. Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in central air-conditioner filter dust and relevance of non-dietary exposure in occupational indoor environments in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous in the indoor environment owing to their use in consumer products and various studies around the world have found higher concentrations indoors than outdoors. Central air conditioner (A/C) systems have been widely used in many workplaces, therefore, studying of PBDEs in central A/C filter dust is useful to better understand the occurrences and health implications of PBDEs in indoor environments. The present study examined the occurrence of PBDEs in central A/C filter dust collected from various workplaces (n = 20) in Thessaloniki, Greece. The sum concentrations of 21 target congeners (∑21PBDE) in A/C dust ranged between 84 and 4062 ng g−1 with a median value of 1092 ng g−1, while BDE-209 was found to be the most abundant BDE congener. The daily intake via dust ingestion of PBDEs estimated for the employees of the occupational settings ranged from 3 to 45 ng day−1 (median 12 ng day−1). - Highlights: • PBDEs were investigated in dust of A/C filters in occupational settings in Thessaloniki, Greece. • BDE-209 was found to be the most abundant BDE congener. • High levels of PBDEs were found in a newspaper building, internet cafes and electronic shops. • PBDEs were attributable to the extensive presence and/or usage of electronic devices. • Exposure of employees to PBDEs via indoor dust ingestion was estimated at 12 ng day−1. - PBDEs were for the first time measured in dust from central A/C filters in workplaces of Greece and their concentrations were used to estimate the non-dietary human exposure

  20. Health effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dusts from arsenic-rich sediment at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area, Las Vegas, NV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Jamie; Buck, Brenda; Goossens, Dirk; Hu, Qing; Chow, Rebecca; David, Winnie; Young, Sharon; Teng, Yuanxin; Leetham-Spencer, Mallory; Murphy, Lacey; Pollard, James; McLaurin, Brett; Gerads, Russell; Keil, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Geogenic dust from arid environments is a possible inhalation hazard for humans, especially when using off-road vehicles that generate significant dust. This study focused on immunotoxicological and neurotoxicological effects following subacute exposure to geogenic dust generated from sediments in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area near Las Vegas, Nevada that are particularly high in arsenic; the naturally-occurring arsenic concentrations in these surficial sediments ranged from 4.8 to 346μg/g. Dust samples from sediments used in this study had a median diameter of 4.5μm and also were a complex mixture of naturally-occurring metals, including aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, strontium, cesium, lead, uranium, and arsenic. Adult female B6C3F1 mice exposed via oropharyngeal aspiration to 0.01 to 100mg dust/kg body weight, four times, a week apart, for 28days, were evaluated 24h after the last exposure. Peripheral eosinophils were increased at all concentrations, serum creatinine was dose responsively increased beginning at 1.0mg/kg/day, and blood urea nitrogen was decreased at 10 and 100mg/kg/day. Antigen-specific IgM responses and natural killer cell activity were dose-responsively suppressed at 0.1mg/kg/day and above. Splenic CD4+CD25+ T cells were decreased at 0.01, 0.1, 10, and 100mg/kg/day. Antibodies against MBP, NF-68, and GFAP were selectively reduced. A no observed adverse effect level of 0.01mg/kg/day and a lowest observed adverse effect level of 0.1mg/kg/day were determined from IgM responses and natural killer cell activity, indicating that exposure to this dust, under conditions similar to our design, could affect these responses. PMID:27221630

  1. Spatial distribution of dust-bound trace elements in Pakistan and their implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Kanwal, Ayesha; Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Sohail, Mohammad; Ullah, Rizwan; Ali, Syeda Maria; Alamdar, Ambreen; Ali, Nadeem; Fasola, Mauro; Shen, Heqing

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to assess the spatial patterns of selected dust-borne trace elements alongside the river Indus Pakistan, their relation with anthropogenic and natural sources, and the potential risk posed to human health. The studied elements were found in descending concentrations: Mn, Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cr, Co, and Cd. The Index of Geo-accumulation indicated that pollution of trace metals were higher in lower Indus plains than on mountain areas. In general, the toxic elements Cr, Mn, Co and Ni exhibited altitudinal trends (P < 0.05). The few exceptions to this trend were the higher values for all studied elements from the northern wet mountainous zone (low lying Himalaya). Spatial PCA/FA highlighted that the sources of different trace elements were zone specific, thus pointing to both geological influences and anthropogenic activities. The Hazard Index for Co and for Mn in children exceeded the value of 1 only in the riverine delta zone and in the southern low lying zone, whereas the Hazard Index for Pb was above the bench mark for both children and adults (with few exceptions) in all regions, thus indicating potential non-carcinogenic health risks. These results will contribute towards the environmental management of trace metal(s) with potential risk for human health throughout Pakistan. PMID:26901073

  2. Biomonitoring Study of Heavy Metals in Blood from a Cement Factory Based Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bank M.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of cement factory pollution, emissions, and kiln dust on contaminant exposure in human populations, including school environments, in close proximity to these point sources. In Ravena, New York, USA and vicinity, environmental pollution from a local cement plant is considered significant and substantial according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxic Release Inventory, published in 2006, 2007, and 2010. We hypothesized that cement factory based communities, such as the one in Ravena, NY, may be differentially exposed to heavy metals, including mercury, via dust, soil, and air in addition to any contributions from fish consumption, dental amalgams, smoking habits, and occupational exposures, etc. Here we report measurements of several heavy metals in blood (Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Se and Al and, for comparative purposes, total mercury in hair from a local (six-mile radius population of Caucasian adults and children. We also report and synthesize local atmospheric emissions inventory information and new indoor air data (NYSERDA, 2011 from the local school which is situated directly across the street (within 750 feet from the cement factory and quarry. In addition, to our human and environmental heavy metal results we also discuss scientific outreach coordination, and public health action opportunities that will likely have wide applicability for other community and environmental health studies confronting similar pollution issues.

  3. [Sinonasal carcinoma and exposure to wood and leather dust: analysis of 36 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, M; Mariotti, L; Staffolani, S; Strafella, E; Carlucci, C; Pasquini, E; Tarchini, P; Re, M; Santarelli, L

    2012-01-01

    In order to define the best strategies of prevention and diagnosis of sinonasal cancer, the aim of our study was the investigation of the etiological and prognostic factors related to 36 cases. The enrolled cases were composed mostly of men working in the footwear industry, with a mean age of 63.7 years and mean exposure of 34.6 years. The period between the start of exposure and the appearance of the neoplasm was of 44.6 years, the time between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis was of 10.8 months. Our results suggest that a diagnosis within 6 months after the onset of symptoms is associated with a lower tumor stage, a better survival and to a lower rate of recurrence. Nasal obstruction (58.3%) and epistaxis (52.7%) are the main initial symptoms. In order to obtain an early diagnosis, in addition to periodic clinical controls, a proper information of workers is required. PMID:23405730

  4. Steel dust in the New York City subway system as a source of manganese, chromium, and iron exposures for transit workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillrud, Steven N; Grass, David; Ross, James M; Coulibaly, Drissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Epstein, David; Sax, Sonja N; Pederson, Dee; Johnson, David; Spengler, John D; Kinney, Patrick L; Simpson, H James; Brandt-Rauf, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 reflected increasing concern about potential effects of low-level airborne metal exposure on a wide array of illnesses. Here we summarize results demonstrating that the New York City (NYC) subway system provides an important microenvironment for metal exposures for NYC commuters and subway workers and also describe an ongoing pilot study of NYC transit workers' exposure to steel dust. Results from the TEACH (Toxic Exposure Assessment, a Columbia and Harvard) study in 1999 of 41 high-school students strongly suggest that elevated levels of iron, manganese, and chromium in personal air samples were due to exposure to steel dust in the NYC subway. Airborne concentrations of these three metals associated with fine particulate matter were observed to be more than 100 times greater in the subway environment than in home indoor or outdoor settings in NYC. While there are currently no known health effects at the airborne levels observed in the subway system, the primary aim of the ongoing pilot study is to ascertain whether the levels of these metals in the subway air affect concentrations of these metals or related metabolites in the blood or urine of exposed transit workers, who due to their job activities could plausibly have appreciably higher exposures than typical commuters. The study design involves recruitment of 40 transit workers representing a large range in expected exposures to steel dust, the collection of personal air samples of fine particulate matter, and the collection of blood and urine samples from each monitored transit worker. PMID:15738337

  5. Occurence of the phthalate esters in soil and street dust samples from the Novi Sad city area, Serbia, and the influence on the children's and adults' exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrbić, Biljana D; Ji, Yaqin; Đurišić-Mladenović, Nataša; Zhao, Jie

    2016-07-15

    This is the first study reporting the presence of 6 phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in 60 composite soil and street dust samples collected in the urban zone of Novi Sad, the second largest city in Serbia. The results were further used to assess children's and adults' PAEs nondietary daily intakes (DIs) through incidental soil and dust ingestion and/or dermal absorption. The study could be regarded as the important baseline for future monitoring of PAEs in the urban environments, particularly as it contributes to the rare data on PAEs occurence in the street dust. All 6 PAEs were detected in every analyzed soil and street dust samples from 0.0002mgkg(-1) to 4.82mgkg(-1), with the highest level obtained for di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which was the most dominant PAE (70-96%). The highest total PAEs (Σ6PAEs) contents in soil (2.12mgkg(-1)) and street dust (5.45mgkg(-1)) samples were obtained for the samples from city parks. In all soil samples, Σ6PAEs exceeded the soil sustainable quality limit sets by the relevant Serbian Regulation, but were much lower than the limit requiring remediation measures. Concerning the estimated DIs, children were more susceptible to PAEs intake than adults regardless of the exposure routes. All the estimated DIs values were far below the known reference values. PMID:27039030

  6. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Davorin Matanović; Gracijan Krklec

    1994-01-01

    During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures) and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production...

  7. Prevalence and Determinants of Mucous Membrane Irritations in a Community Near a Cement Factory in Zambia: A Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmy Nkhama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to cement dust has been associated with deleterious health effects in humans. This study investigated whether residing near a cement factory increases the risk of irritations to the mucous membranes of the eyes and respiratory system. A cross sectional study was conducted in Freedom Compound, a community bordering a cement factory in Chilanga, Zambia and a control community, Bauleni, located 18 km from the cement plant. A modified American Thoracic Society questionnaire was administered to 225 and 198 respondents aged 15–59 years from Freedom and Bauleni, respectively, to capture symptoms of the irritations. Respondents from Freedom Compound, were more likely to experience the irritations; adjusted ORs 2.50 (95% CI: 1.65, 3.79, 4.36 (95% CI (2.96, 6.55 and 1.94 (95% CI (1.19, 3.18 for eye, nose and sinus membrane irritations respectively. Cohort panel studies to determine associations of cement emissions to mucous membrane irritations and respiratory symptoms, coupled with field characterization of the exposure are needed to assess whether the excess prevalence of symptoms of mucous membrane irritations observed in Freedom compound are due to emissions from the cement factory.

  8. Assessment on the occupational exposure of urban public bus drivers to bioaccessible trace metals through resuspended fraction of settled bus dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Peng [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150090 (China); Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Liu, Sa [Environmental Health Sciences Division, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-7360 (United States); Ye, Wenyuan [Department of Chemical Engineering, KU Leuven, Willem de Croylaan 46, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Lin, Nan; Meng, Ping [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150090 (China); Feng, Yujie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150090 (China); Zhang, Zhaohan; Cui, Fuyi; Lu, Binyu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 73 Huanghe Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150090 (China); Xing, Baoshan [Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Limited information is available on the bioaccessible fraction of trace metals in the resuspended fraction of settled bus dust in order to estimate bus drivers ' occupational exposure. In this study, 45 resuspended fraction of settled dust samples were collected from gasoline and compressed natural gas (CNG) powered buses and analyzed for trace metals and their fraction concentrations using a three-step sequential extraction procedure. Experimental results showed that zinc (Zn) had the greatest bioaccessible fraction, recorded as an average of 608.53 mg/kg, followed in order of decreasing concentration by 129.80 mg/kg lead (Pb), 56.77 mg/kg copper (Cu), 34.03 mg/kg chromium (Cr), 22.05 mg/kg nickel (Ni), 13.17 mg/kg arsenic (As) and 2.77 mg/kg cadmium (Cd). Among the three settled bus dust exposure pathways, ingestion was the main route. Total exposure hazard index (HIt) for non-carcinogenic effect trace metals was lower than the safety level of 1. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) for drivers was estimated for trace metal exposure. Pb and Ni presented relatively high potential risks in the non-carcinogenic and potentially carcinogenic health assessment for all drivers. ILCR was in the range of 1.84E − 05 to 7.37E − 05 and 1.74E − 05 to 6.95E − 05 for gasoline and CNG buses, respectively. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Ni had relatively higher bioaccessibility and mobility in the resuspended fraction of settled bus dust. • Bioaccessible metal concentrations were higher in gasoline-fueled buses than those in CNG-fueled buses. • The carcinogenic risk probabilities to drivers were around the acceptable level.

  9. Assessment on the occupational exposure of urban public bus drivers to bioaccessible trace metals through resuspended fraction of settled bus dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited information is available on the bioaccessible fraction of trace metals in the resuspended fraction of settled bus dust in order to estimate bus drivers ' occupational exposure. In this study, 45 resuspended fraction of settled dust samples were collected from gasoline and compressed natural gas (CNG) powered buses and analyzed for trace metals and their fraction concentrations using a three-step sequential extraction procedure. Experimental results showed that zinc (Zn) had the greatest bioaccessible fraction, recorded as an average of 608.53 mg/kg, followed in order of decreasing concentration by 129.80 mg/kg lead (Pb), 56.77 mg/kg copper (Cu), 34.03 mg/kg chromium (Cr), 22.05 mg/kg nickel (Ni), 13.17 mg/kg arsenic (As) and 2.77 mg/kg cadmium (Cd). Among the three settled bus dust exposure pathways, ingestion was the main route. Total exposure hazard index (HIt) for non-carcinogenic effect trace metals was lower than the safety level of 1. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) for drivers was estimated for trace metal exposure. Pb and Ni presented relatively high potential risks in the non-carcinogenic and potentially carcinogenic health assessment for all drivers. ILCR was in the range of 1.84E − 05 to 7.37E − 05 and 1.74E − 05 to 6.95E − 05 for gasoline and CNG buses, respectively. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Ni had relatively higher bioaccessibility and mobility in the resuspended fraction of settled bus dust. • Bioaccessible metal concentrations were higher in gasoline-fueled buses than those in CNG-fueled buses. • The carcinogenic risk probabilities to drivers were around the acceptable level

  10. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.; Glasser, Fred P.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements are...

  11. Associations between human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants via diet and indoor dust, and internal dose: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell, Lindsay; Glinianaia, Svetlana V; Rankin, Judith; Rose, Martin; Fernandes, Alwyn; Harrad, Stuart; Pless-Mulolli, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify and appraise the current international evidence of associations between concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in humans and their indoor dusts and food. We systematically searched Medline, Embase, Web of Science and Scopus (up to Jan 2015), using a comprehensive list of keywords, for English-language studies published in peer-reviewed journals. We extracted information on study design, quality, participants, sample collection methods, adjustments for potential confounders and correlations between PBDE concentrations in internal and external matrices. Of 131 potential articles, 17 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the narrative synthesis. We concluded that three key factors influenced correlations between external and internal PBDE exposure; half-life of individual congeners in the human body; proximity and interaction between PBDE source and study subject; and time of study relative to phase out of PBDE technical products. Internal dose of Penta-BDE technical mix congeners generally correlated strongly with dust. The exception was BDE-153 which is known to have higher persistence in human tissues. Despite the low bioaccessibility and short half-life of BDE-209, its high loading in dusts gave strong correlations with body burden where measured. Correlations between PBDE concentrations in duplicate diet and body burden were not apparent from the included studies. Whether dust or diet is the primary exposure source for an individual is tied to the loading of PBDE in dust or food items and the amounts ingested. Simple recommendations such as more frequent hand washing may reduce PBDE body burden. PMID:27066981

  12. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE DETERMINATION TO ‎SILICA DUST IN AN IRON-STONE ORE AND ‎COMPARISON WITH STANDARD

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollah Gholami; Mohammad Javad Fani; Nasrin Sadeghi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Dust is one of the significant factors which cause occupational respiratory diseases ‎among workers. ‎Objective: The main purpose of this study was to determine the dust concentration, its silica ‎percentage and comparison with standard.‎Method: This cross-sectional study was carried out at one of iron-stone ores in Southern ‎Khorasan province. Air dust sampling was done using the NIOSH 7500 method and personal ‎sampling pump with the cyclone in 52 stations in different situatio...

  13. Dust exposure and pneumoconiosis in a South African pottery. 2. Pneumoconiosis and factors influencing reading of radiological opacities.

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, D; Steinberg, M; P. J. Becker; Solomon, A

    1992-01-01

    A cross sectional radiological survey of workers exposed to pottery dust during the manufacture of wall tiles and bathroom fittings was conducted in a South African factory. Roughly one third of workers with 15 or more years of service in high dust sections of the factory had pneumoconiosis. Previously undiagnosed advanced cases, including two with progressive massive fibrosis, were working in dusty occupations. A firm diagnosis of potters' pneumoconiosis was made in 11 of the 358 workers rad...

  14. Evaluation of the fate and pathological response in the lung and pleura of brake dust alone and in combination with added chrysotile compared to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to provide an understanding of the biokinetics and potential toxicology in the lung and pleura following inhalation of brake dust following short term exposure in rats. The deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake-dust derived from brake pads manufactured with chrysotile were evaluated in comparison to the amphibole, crocidolite asbestos. Rats were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day for 5 days to either brake-dust obtained by sanding of brake-drums manufactured with chrysotile, a mixture of chrysotile and the brake-dust or crocidolite asbestos. The chrysotile fibers were relatively biosoluble whereas the crocidolite asbestos fibers persisted through the life-time of the animal. This was reflected in the lung and the pleura where no significant pathological response was observed at any time point in the brake dust or chrysotile/brake dust exposure groups through 365 days post exposure. In contrast, crocidolite asbestos produced a rapid inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma and the pleura, inducing a significant increase in fibrotic response in both of these compartments. Crocidolite fibers were observed embedded in the diaphragm with activated mesothelial cells immediately after cessation of exposure. While no chrysotile fibers were found in the mediastinal lymph nodes, crocidolite fibers of up to 35 μm were observed. These results provide support that brake-dust derived from chrysotile containing brake drums would not initiate a pathological response in the lung or the pleural cavity following short term inhalation. - Highlights: • Evaluated brake dust w/wo added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos. • Persistence, translocation, pathological response in the lung and pleural cavity. • Chrysotile cleared rapidly from the lung while the crocidolite asbestos persisted. • No significant pathology in lung or pleural cavity observed at any time point in the brake-dust groups. • Crocidolite quickly

  15. Evaluation of the fate and pathological response in the lung and pleura of brake dust alone and in combination with added chrysotile compared to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.M., E-mail: davidb@itox.ch [Consultant in Toxicology, Geneva (Switzerland); Rogers, R.A., E-mail: rarogers5@yahoo.com [Rogers Imaging, Needham, MA (United States); Sepulveda, R. [Rogers Imaging, Needham, MA (United States); Kunzendorf, P., E-mail: Peter.Kunzendorf@GSA-Ratingen.de [GSA Gesellschaft für Schadstoffanalytik mbH, Ratingen (Germany); Bellmann, B. [Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Ernst, H., E-mail: Heinrich.ernst@item.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Creutzenberg, O. [Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Phillips, J.I., E-mail: jim.phillips@nioh.nhls.ac.za [National Institute for Occupational Health, National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg South Africa and Department of Biomedical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to provide an understanding of the biokinetics and potential toxicology in the lung and pleura following inhalation of brake dust following short term exposure in rats. The deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake-dust derived from brake pads manufactured with chrysotile were evaluated in comparison to the amphibole, crocidolite asbestos. Rats were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day for 5 days to either brake-dust obtained by sanding of brake-drums manufactured with chrysotile, a mixture of chrysotile and the brake-dust or crocidolite asbestos. The chrysotile fibers were relatively biosoluble whereas the crocidolite asbestos fibers persisted through the life-time of the animal. This was reflected in the lung and the pleura where no significant pathological response was observed at any time point in the brake dust or chrysotile/brake dust exposure groups through 365 days post exposure. In contrast, crocidolite asbestos produced a rapid inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma and the pleura, inducing a significant increase in fibrotic response in both of these compartments. Crocidolite fibers were observed embedded in the diaphragm with activated mesothelial cells immediately after cessation of exposure. While no chrysotile fibers were found in the mediastinal lymph nodes, crocidolite fibers of up to 35 μm were observed. These results provide support that brake-dust derived from chrysotile containing brake drums would not initiate a pathological response in the lung or the pleural cavity following short term inhalation. - Highlights: • Evaluated brake dust w/wo added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos. • Persistence, translocation, pathological response in the lung and pleural cavity. • Chrysotile cleared rapidly from the lung while the crocidolite asbestos persisted. • No significant pathology in lung or pleural cavity observed at any time point in the brake-dust groups. • Crocidolite quickly

  16. N-Acetylcysteine and deferoxamine reduce pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation in rats after coal dust exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinho, R.A.; Silveira, P.C.L.; Silva, L.A.; Streck, E.L.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Moreira, J.C.F.

    2005-11-01

    Coal dust inhalation induces oxidative damage and inflammatory infiltration on lung parenchyma. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) administered alone or in combination with deferoxamine (DFX), significantly reduced the inflammatory infiltration and oxidative damage in the lungs of rats exposed to coal dust. Forty-two male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were exposed to the coal dust (3 mg/0.5 mL saline, 3 days/week, for 3 weeks) by intratracheal instillation. The animals were randomly divided into three groups: saline 0.9% (n = 8), supplemented with NAC (20 mg/kg of body weight/day, intraperitoneal injection (i.p.)) (n = 8), and supplemented with NAC (20 mg/kg of body weight/day, i.p.) plus DFX (20 mg/kg of body weight/week) (n = 8). Control animals received only saline solution (0.5 mL). Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total cell number were determined in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We determined lipid peroxidation and oxidative protein damage parameters and catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in the lungs of animals. Intratracheal instillation of coal dust in the lungs of rats led to an inflammatory response and induced significant oxidative damage. The administration of NAC alone or in association with DFX reduced the inflammatory response and the oxidative stress parameters in rats exposed to coal dust.

  17. Predicted risk of childhood allergy, asthma, and reported symptoms using measured phthalate exposure in dust and urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, N.-Y.; Lee, C.-C.; Wang, J.-Y.; Li, Y.-C.; Chang, H.-W.; Chen, C.-Y.; Bornehag, C.-G.; Wu, P.-C.; Sundell, Jan; Su, H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    The associated risk of phthalate exposure, both parent compounds in the home and their metabolites in urine, to childhood allergic and respiratory morbidity, after adjusting for exposures of indoor pollutants, especially bioaerosols, was comprehensively assessed. Levels of five phthalates in...

  18. Histological type of lung carcinoma in asbestos cement workers and matched controls.

    OpenAIRE

    L. Johansson; Albin, M; Jakobsson, K; Mikoczy, Z

    1992-01-01

    Histological types of lung carcinoma were examined in a case series of workers exposed to asbestos cement dust (n = 29) and matched controls (n = 87). The proportion of adenocarcinomas was 31% among the exposed subjects and 15% among the controls (mid-p = 0.05). Among workers with high exposure the proportion of adenocarcinoma was even higher (45%, 5/11; mid-p = 0.03). The proportion of peripheral tumours tended to be higher among exposed cases than controls (24 v 12%, mid-p = 0.12). Lobe of ...

  19. Quartz and respirable dust in the Dutch construction industry: A baseline exposure assessment as part of a multidimensional intervention approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurssen, E. van; Pronk, A.; Spaan, S.; Goede, H.; Tielemans, E.; Heederik, D.; Meijster, T.

    2014-01-01

    Quartz exposure can cause several respiratory health effects. Although quartz exposure has been described in several observational workplace studies, well-designed intervention studies that investigate the effect of control strategies are lacking. Tis article describes a baseline exposure study that

  20. Assessment of Swine Worker Exposures to Dust and Endotoxin during Hog Load-Out and Power Washing

    OpenAIRE

    O’Shaughnessy, Patrick; Peters, Thomas; Donham, Kelley; Taylor, Craig; Altmaier, Ralph; Kelly, Kevin, Dr

    2012-01-01

    Field measurements of personal and area dust and endotoxin concentrations were obtained while agricultural workers performed two work tasks that have been previously unreported: hog load-out and swine building power washing. Hog load-out involves moving hogs from their pens in finishing buildings into a truck for transport to a meat processor. High pressure power washing is conducted for sanitation purposes after a building has been emptied of hogs to remove surface and floor debris. This deb...

  1. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  2. PCB-containing wood floor finish is a likely source of elevated PCBs in residents' blood, household air and dust: a case study of exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seryak Liesel M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are persistent pollutants identified worldwide as human blood and breast milk contaminants. Because they bioaccumulate, consumption of meat, fish, and dairy products predicts human blood concentrations. PCBs were also used widely in building materials, including caulks and paints, but few studies have evaluated the contribution of these exposures to body burden. Methods In an earlier study, we detected PCBs in indoor air in 31% of 120 homes on Cape Cod, MA. Two of the homes had much higher concentrations than the rest, so we retested to verify the initial finding, evaluate blood PCB concentrations of residents, and identify the PCB source. Results Air and dust concentrations remained elevated over 5 years between initial and follow-up sampling. Blood serum concentrations of PCBs in residents of the homes were generally elevated above the 95th percentile of a representative sample of the US population. Serum concentrations in residents and air and dust concentrations were especially high in a home where a resident reported use of PCB-containing floor finish in the past, and where the floor of one room was sanded and refinished just prior to sample collection. Conclusion This case-study suggests that PCB residues in homes may be more significant contributors to overall exposure than diet for some people, and that use of a commercially-available PCB-containing wood floor finish in residences during the 1950s and 1960s is an overlooked but potentially important source of current PCB exposure in the general population.

  3. Respiratory tract mortality in cement workers: a proportionate mortality study

    OpenAIRE

    Rachiotis George; Drivas Spyros; Kostikas Konstantinos; Makropoulos Vasilios; Hadjichristodoulou Christos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The evidence regarding the association between lung cancer and occupational exposure to cement is controversial. This study investigated causes of deaths from cancer of respiratory tract among cement workers. Methods The deaths of the Greek Cement Workers Compensation Scheme were analyzed covering the period 1969-1998. All respiratory, lung, laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer proportionate mortality were calculated for cement production, maintenance, and office workers i...

  4. In Utero exposure to genistein enhanced intranasal house dust mite allergen-induced respiratory sensitization in young adult B6C3F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tai L; Meng, Andrew H

    2016-06-24

    Despite many hypothesized benefits of dietary isoflavone genistein (GEN) deriving from soy-based products, questions surrounding GEN's developmental immunotoxic effects are increasing. To understand how in utero GEN exposure may modulate postnatal respiratory sensitization, we conducted a time course study using a common household allergen (house dust mites: HDM; 10μg/mouse) following intranasal instillation, a physiological route of allergen exposure. GEN was administered to dams by gavage from gestational day 14 to parturition at a physiologically relevant dose (20mg/kg bw). Female and male offspring were sensitized with HDM allergens beginning about one month prior to sacrifice followed by challenges with three weekly doses of HDM extracts, and they were euthanized at day 3 following the final HDM exposure at four different time points (postnatal day (PND) 80, 120, 160, and 200). In utero GEN combined with postnatal HDM exposures (GEN+HDM) increased total IgE production in both young female and male B6C3F1 offspring (e.g., PND 80 in females and PND 120 in males). Increased antigen-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b levels were also observed at various time points in both female and male offspring. In addition, increases in macrophage number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both female and male GEN+HDM offspring at PND 80 and PND 120, respectively, were observed when compared to the vehicle group. For T cells, an increase over the vehicle in female GEN+HDM offspring was observed at PND 80. Due to similar patterns of increases, it seems likely that GEN+HDM-induced increases in total IgE and macrophages are related. Overall, in utero GEN plus later-life HDM exposures exert increases in total IgE and HDM-specific IgG production as well as macrophage recruitments to the lung in young adult mice. PMID:27113705

  5. Pollution and Prevention of Pb during Cement Calcination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Emission pollution and prevention measures of Pb during cement calcination were discussed. The content of Pb and the variation of composition were explored by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and X-ray diffraction. The results show that a number of Pb emits during cement calcination, F and C1 promote the emission of Pb, and Pb is enriched in kiln dust. The smaller the particle of kiln dust, the higher the content of Pb. When utilizing the raw materials with a high content of Pb, a more efficient dust collector should be used and the kiln dust should be used as the addition of cement. Pb in clinker is enriched in the intermediate phase. The reduction of silica modulus is useful to increase the solidification content of Pb in clinker. The solidification content of Pb in calcium sulphoaluminate mineral is higher than that in calcium aluminate mineral.

  6. Exposure profiles and source identifications for workers exposed to crystalline silica during a municipal waste incinerator relining period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, respirable crystalline silica exposures to furnace relining workers of 7 exposure groups were assessed by conducting personal respirable dust samplings. All possible pollutant sources were identified for each exposure group through field observations, and bulk samples were randomly collected from each identified pollutant source. All collected samples were analyzed for their tridymite, cristobalite, and quartz contents by using the X-ray diffraction method. Results show that quartz was the only detectable crystalline silica content. We found that the resultant respirable quartz exposure levels presented in sequence for the 7 exposure groups (sand blasting > bottom ash cleaning > wall demolishing > relining > others > grid repairing > scaffold establishing) were different from that of the corresponding respirable dust exposure levels (bottom ash cleaning > wall demolishing > sand blasting > relining > grid repairing > scaffold establishing > others). 87.3-100% of workers' respirable quartz exposures of the 7 exposure groups exceeded the TLV-TWA (0.025 mg m-3) indicating appropriate control strategies should be taken immediately. By comparing the fractions of quartz contained in personal respirable dust samples with that contained in all possible pollutant sources for each exposure group, this study identified main pollutant sources for each exposure group as: bottom ash cleaning and scaffold establishing: bottom ash; sand blasting: blasting sand; wall demolishing: refractory cement + wall ash; wall relining: refractory brick; grid repairing: wall ash + refractory cement; grid repairing: wall ash + refractory cement; others: blasting sand + bottom ash. Finally, effective control strategies were proposed for exposure reduction by using above information together with our field observations

  7. Performance of 1,000 and 1800 CFM HEPA filters on long exposure to low atmospheric dust loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative tests are in progress to determine the performance characteristics of European-design HEPA filters compared to US-design units made with the same filter paper. European filters are being operated at their rated capacity of 1,800 cfm and at 1,000 cfm. The US-design unit is operated at 1,000 cfm. Filters, installed on the roof of a 15-story building, are continuously exposed to an atmospheric dust aerosol of low concentration and small particle size. Plans are to continue these tests over a period of two or more years. Early results confirm that 1,800 cfm rated filters will have a very slow rate of pressure increase when operated at 1,000 cfm and an extended service life

  8. Comparing South African occupational exposure limits for pesticides, metals, dusts and fibres with those of developed countries / Jason Peter Viljoen

    OpenAIRE

    Viljoen, Jason Peter

    2014-01-01

    The ever-changing industrial processes which are becoming more globalised as well as the merging of markets in different economies, led to an increased focus on the health and safety of workers in the industries and the mining sector over the past decades. Occupational exposure limits (OELs) have been used for more than half a century as a risk management tool for the prevention of work-related illnesses which may arise from the exposure to a wide variety of hazardous chemical substances in t...

  9. Exposure to Phthalate Emitted from Vinyl Flooring and Sorbed to Interior Surfaces, Dust, Airborne Particles and Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an urgent need to characterize potential risk to human health and the environment that arises from the manufacture and use of tens of thousands of chemicals. Computational tools and approaches for characterizing and prioritizing exposure are required: to provide input f...

  10. Combined basal cell carcinoma and Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the scrotum in a patient with occupational exposure to coal tar and dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izikson, L.; Vanderpool, J.; Brodsky, G.; Mihm, M.C.; Zembowicz, A. [Harvard University, Boston, MA (US). Massachusetts General Hospital

    2004-09-01

    The patient was a 77-year-old male former smoker, with history of several basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in sun-protected areas around the waistline, who presented with another small ulceration on the anterior right upper scrotum near the base of the penis. BCC was suspected clinically and the lesion was treated with cryosurgery. The tumor recurred, became raised, and began to bleed. An excisional biopsy was performed. It showed nodular BCC surrounded by a cellular proliferation of round histiocytic cells with convoluted, lobulated and reniform nuclei and abundant cytoplasm . The patient had no history of exposure to ionizing radiation, chemotherapy, immunosuppressive medications, prior lymphoma or other malignancy. However, he spent 4 years on a ship loading coal into the furnace of a steam engine, during which he slept in adjacent quarters that were covered with coal dust. Additionally, he had a several-year history of occupational skin exposure to machine oil, oil refinery waste, sulfur waste, hydraulic fluid, and asbestos. He also reported a history of nude sunbathing. The scrotal lesion was re-excised and the patient remains disease-free more than 1 year after the diagnosis.

  11. Concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in house hold dust from various countries. Inhalation a potential route of human exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoedin, A. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA (United States); Paepke, O. [ERGO Research, Hamburg (Germany); McGahee III, E. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA (US)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are congeners of a class of environmental contaminants that have been present in the environment for decades. PBDEs were first identified in the River Viskan in Sweden and have since then been recognized as an environmental contaminant with a global distribution as shown by the detection of this compound class in aquatic and terrestrial environments in Europe and North America. However, PBDEs will still be present in consumer products sold prior to the phase out of pentaBDE and octaBDE for decades to come. Hence it is of utmost importance to identify the exposure routes to humans especially in the Unites States where much higher levels of PBDEs have been observed in people. An average level of 34 ng/g lipid has been observed in human serum pools collected in 2002 and values in the range of 2.9-272 ng lipid (average 41ng/g lipid) have been observed in human milk. This can be contrasted to levels observed in Swedish milk pools (2.3 ng/g lipid) collected in 1997. Human exposure to persistent chemicals like polychlorinated biphenyls has traditionally been considered to be mainly through food consumption. Other direct exposure routes such as inhalation and/or dermal exposure are only of quantitatively more importance in the case of occupational exposures. However, this may or may not be true for PBDEs which are still being used in the modern indoor environment. This is further supported by the relatively low concentrations recently reported in foodstuffs sampled in the United States.

  12. Trabalho rural, exposição a poeiras e sintomas respiratórios entre agricultores Farm work, dust exposure and respiratory symptoms among farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neice Müller Xavier Faria

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: As condições ambientais do trabalho rural, em especial a exposição às poeiras orgânicas e minerais, têm sido associadas ao aumento de doenças respiratórias. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a prevalência de sintomas respiratórios entre agricultores e sua associação com fatores de risco ocupacionais. MÉTODOS: Estudo de delineamento transversal com 1.379 agricultores, de Antônio Prado e Ipê, na Serra Gaúcha, em 1996. Foram coletados dados sobre características sociodemográficas e produção agrícola, bem como a exposição a poeiras orgânicas e minerais. Os sintomas respiratórios foram aferidos por meio de questionário da American Thoracic Society-Division of Lung Disease modificado. Foi realizada análise de regressão logística múltipla, controlada para fatores de confusão. RESULTADOS: A maioria (52% dos entrevistados trabalhava em atividades com exposição intensa a poeiras. Os trabalhadores de estabelecimentos com melhores indicadores econômicos referiram menor freqüência de sintomas respiratórios do que os demais agricultores. Os avicultores relataram maior prevalência de sintomas de doença respiratória crônica (OR=1,60; IC 95%: 1,05-2,42. Os agricultores com exposição intensa a poeiras apresentaram uma elevação de mais de 70% no risco de sintomas de asma (OR=1,71; IC 95%: 1,10-2,67, como também de doença respiratória crônica (OR=1,77; IC 95%: 1,25-2,50. CONCLUSÕES: Os trabalhadores rurais apresentaram grande exposição ocupacional a poeiras orgânicas e minerais. Agricultores expostos a concentrações mais elevadas, como os avicultores, tiveram maior risco de apresentar sintomas respiratórios relacionados ao trabalho. Recomenda-se a implementação de programas de proteção respiratória, principalmente para os trabalhadores envolvidos com a produção de aves.OBJECTIVE: Environmental working conditions in rural areas, notably exposure to organic and mineral dusts, have been

  13. 不同胶凝材料的精细混凝土高温后力学性能%MECHANICAL PROPERTY OF FINE GRAINED CONCRETE WITH DIFFERENT CEMENTING MATERIAL AFTER EXPOSURE TO HIGH-TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈玲华; 王激扬; 徐世烺; 付晔

    2015-01-01

    为了改善用于纤维编织网增强混凝土基体材料的精细混凝土的耐高温性能,该文进行了120个40mim×40mm×160mm棱柱体的高温后抗折强度试验和240个40mm×40mm×40mm立方体的高温后抗压强度试验.考察了不同胶凝材料对精细混凝土试件高温后力学性能的影响,包括外掺纳米材料以及以高铝水泥作为主要胶凝材料的影响.结果表明:体积掺量为1.5%和3.0%纳米SiO2气凝胶粉末未能改善精细混凝十的耐高温性能,质量掺量为5.0%纳米陶瓷粉在目标温度TR=800℃时使基体混凝土的抗压和抗折强度分别提高84.2%和120.9%.当TR=800℃时,采用高铝水泥作为主要胶凝材料的试件力学性能均比普通精细混凝土试件大幅提高;各组掺入活性粉末的高铝水泥混凝土试件在TR=800℃时,相对抗压和抗折强度均比未掺活性粉末时有所提高.%To improve the high temperature resistance of fine grained concrete for textile reinforced concrete matrices,120 prism specimens (40mm×40mm×160mm) for flexural tests and 240 cube specimens (40mm×40mm×40mm) were prepared in this paper for compressive strength tests after exposure to high temperature.The effects of different cementing materials on mechanical properties of fine grained concrete were studied,including the effect of nanomaterial admixtures and the use of alumina cement as main cementing material.The results show that nanometer SiO2 aerogel powder cannot improve the high temperature resistance of fine grained concrete when volume fraction is 1.5% or 3.0%.Nanosized ceramic powder with quality content of 5.0% can improve the residual compressive and flexural strength of fine grained concrete by 84.2% and 120.9%,respectively,over that of concrete without nanosized ceramic powder at 800℃.When TR=800℃,mechanical properties of specimens with alumina cement as the main cementing material increase greatly compared with ordinary fine grained

  14. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Misra; Renu Mathur

    2007-06-01

    The scope of magnesium oxychloride (MOC) cement in concrete works has been evaluated. MOC cement concrete compositions of varying strengths having good placing and finishing characteristics were prepared and investigated for their compressive and flexural strengths, -values, abrasion resistance etc. The durability of MOC concrete compositions against extreme environmental conditions viz. heating–cooling, freezing–thawing, wetting–drying and penetration and deposition of salts etc were investigated. The results reveal that MOC concrete has high compressive strength associated with high flexural strength and the ratio of compressive to flexural strength varies between 6 and 8. The elastic moduli of the compositions studied are found to be 23–85 GPa and the abrasion losses between 0.11 and 0.20%. While alternate heating–cooling cycles have no adverse effect on MOC concrete, it can be made durable against freezing–thawing and the excessive exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution of the same concentration.

  15. Radioactive dust sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report is the second of a five part series on the technical evaluation of a number of dust monitoring instruments and the characterization of Long-Lived Radioactive Dust (LLRD). The data reported here pertain to an experimental study conducted under laboratory controlled conditions in a Long-Lived Radioactive Dust Test Facility (LLRDTF) designed for this purpose. This study was carried out with a twofold purpose in mind, namely, for the characterization of dust and LLRD, and for the evaluation of a variety of monitoring instruments, including cascade impactors, optical particle counters, nylon cyclones, open face filter samplers, and α-particle personal dosimeters, the latter normally used for α-particle radiation exposure purposes. Several non-radioactive and radioactive dusts were characterized. The non-radioactive dusts were SiC, Al2O3, talcum powder, corn starch and flour, while uranium tailings were used as a radioactive dust. Clear differences in instrument performance were observed for the various measurements made

  16. Characterisation of cement plant emissions in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, E.; Munlafalioglu, I.; Tiris, M.; Pekin, A.V. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1998-08-01

    In cement plants in Turkey CO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions were measured using standard measurement techniques and equipment. Emission factors are calculated by dividing the emission rates by capacity of production at the time of measurements for each plant. The results of this study show that the dominant emissions from cement production in Turkey is CO followed by NO{sub 2}, dust and SO{sub 2} in decreasing order. National averages for the emission factors are calculated and compared to international emission factors. On average the Turkish dust emission factor is higher than the German factor, however NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emission factors are lower in Turkey. 7 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Exposure to soil, house dust and decaying plants increases gut microbial diversity and decreases serum immunoglobulin E levels in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dongrui; Zhang, Honglin; Bai, Zhimao; Zhang, Aidi; Bai, Futian; Luo, Xing; Hou, Yue; Ding, Xiao; Sun, Beili; Sun, Xiao; Ma, Ning; Wang, Cuifen; Dai, Xiaoniu; Lu, Zuhong

    2016-05-01

    To assess the impact of sanitation of a living environment on gut microbiota and development of the immune system, we raised BALB/c mice under three distinct environmental conditions: a specific pathogen-free animal room (SPF), a general animal room (XZ) and a farmhouse (JD). All other variables like diet, age, genetic background, physiological status and original gut microbiota were controlled for in the three groups. Using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we found that each mouse group had a specific structure of the gut microbial community. Groups JD and XZ harboured a significantly more diverse and richer gut microbiota than did group SPF. Bacteroidetes were significantly more abundant in groups XZ and JD than in group SPF, whereas Firmicutes showed the inverse pattern. Total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were significantly lower in groups XZ and JD than in group SPF. There were no significant differences in gut microbiota diversity and serum IgE concentration between groups JD and XZ, but we found higher abundance of dominant genera in the gut microflora of group JD. We conclude that exposure to soil, house dust and decaying plant material enhances gut microbial diversity and innate immunity. Our results seem to provide new evidence supporting the hygiene hypothesis. PMID:25958920

  18. First report on the uptake of automobile catalyst emitted palladium by European eels (Anguilla anguilla) following experimental exposure to road dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sures, B; Zimmermann, S; Messerschmidt, J; von Bohlen, A; Alt, F

    2001-01-01

    Following the introduction of automobile catalysts in the middle of the 1980s in Germany there is an increasing emission of the platinum-group-metals platinum, palladium (Pd) and rhodium. Still, it remains unclear if these metals are bioavailable for aquatic animals and to which extent they become accumulated by the aquatic biosphere. Because of analytical problems in detecting Pd in small biological samples the present investigation concentrates on the bioavailability of this metal. To answer the question of a Pd uptake by aquatic organisms experimental studies were conducted with European eels maintained in water containing road dust at a concentration of 10 kg/100 l. Following an exposure period of four weeks, samples of liver and kidney were analysed by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis after co-precipitation of Pd with mercury. These experiments revealed an uptake of traffic related Pd by European eels which showed a mean liver Pd concentration of 0.18 +/- 0.05 ng/g (wet wt.), whereas the Pd concentration in the kidney ranged below the detection limit. Thus, in this study we can demonstrate for the first time that automobile catalyst emitted Pd is bioavailable for aquatic animals. PMID:11428142

  19. Review of technologies for mercury removal from flue gas from cement production processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a pollutant of concern and mercury emissions from cement plants are under environmental regulation. After coal-fired power plants, mercury emissions from cement and mineral production are the second largest anthropogenic sources. Compared to fuels, cement raw materials are the major...... sources of mercury in the cement kiln flue gas. Cement plants are quite different from power plants and waste incinerators regarding the flue gas composition, temperature, residence time, and material circulation. Cement kiln systems have some inherent ability to retain mercury in the solid materials due...... to the adsorption of mercury on the solids in the cold zone. However, recirculation of the kiln dust to the kiln will cause release of the captured mercury. The mercury chemistry in cement kiln systems is complicated and knowledge obtained from power plants and incinerators cannot be directly applied in cement...

  20. Lead and other elements in house dust of Japanese residences – Source of lead and health risks due to metal exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The levels of 25 elements in house dust collected from 100 general Japanese residences were measured. Factor analysis was applied on the multi-element data to explore source of Pb (median concentration 49.1 mg/kg) in house dust. Six factors were extracted and Pb was found to have great loading on the fifth factor with Sb and Sn, suggesting solder (Sn), and plastic and metals (Sb) may be the sources of Pb in the house dust of Japanese residences. No significant loading was found on soil-related factors indicating non-significant contribution of Pb in track-in soil. Seven heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn) were found in house dust at >10 times more condensed than crustal abundance. Health risk of these elements to children via the ingestion of house dust was estimated based on the comparison with tolerable daily intake and found to be non-significant for most of the elements. - Highlights: • Multi-element analysis was carried out for house dust from households in Japan. • Factor analysis was applied on the multivariate data set. • The abundance of lead had a close relationship with antimony and tin in house dust. • Health risk of heavy metals in house dust for children was not serious. - Major source of Pb in house dust of Japanese residences was not track-in soil but unknown materials that contain Pb and Sb and/or Sn

  1. Health assessment for Northwestern States Portland Cement Company, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Region 7. CERCLIS No. IAD980852461. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-27

    The Northwestern States Portland Cement Company (NWSPCC) NPL site is situated in the northern section of Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. The major concern at the site is contaminated surface water and ground water as a result of contact with waste cement kiln dust in the West Quarry. On-site surface water and ground water are contaminated with lead, sodium, sulfates, and reflects high pH. The waste kiln dust is in contact with both the surficial and Devonian aquifers on site; hence, there is a potential for contamination of the Devonian aquifer off-site. Potential exposure pathways of concern include ingestion of contaminated ground water; accidental ingestion and dermal contact with contaminated surface water, and accidental ingestion and dermal contact with contaminated soils and sediment; and inhalation of entrained dust. Under current conditions the NWSPCC NPL site poses no apparent public health hazard. However, potential risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to on-site and off-site hazardous substances exists in the future if the site is not remediated. The site is currently under remediation to mitigate the potential risk.

  2. Environmental health survey in asbestos cement sheets manufacturing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari F; Bihari V; Rastogi S; Ashquin M; Ahmad I

    2007-01-01

    About 673 small-scale asbestos mining and milling facilities and 33 large - scale asbestos manufacturing plants, (17 asbestos-cement product manufacturing plants and 16 other than asbestos-cement product plants) are situated in India. The present study reveals the exposure of commercial asbestos (chrysotile) in the occupational as well as ambient air environment of the asbestos-cement (AC) sheets industry using membrane filter method of Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). The fibre concentratio...

  3. Dioxin-related compounds in house dust from New York State: Occurrence, in vitro toxic evaluation and implications for indoor exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analysed sulphuric-acid-treated extracts of house dust from New York State with DR-CALUX assay and HRGC-HRMS to elucidate the total dioxin-like (DL) activities, the occurrence of various dioxin-related compounds (DRCs), including PBDD/Fs, and their toxic contribution. The DL activities were 30–8000, median 210 pg CALUX-TEQ/g. PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs and DL-PCBs were detected with a large variation in concentrations (0.12–80, 0.33–150, 0.46–35, medians 1.7, 2.1 and 5.6 ng/g, respectively) and profiles, indicating the existence of multiple contamination sources in homes. PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs and DL-PCBs with known potency theoretically contributed <1%–130%, <1%–21% and <1%–6.8%, respectively, of the measured CALUX-TEQs. These results and those from DR-CALUX assays with fractionated dust extracts indicated that a substantial portion of the CALUX-TEQs could be caused by unknown dust contaminants. Considering that the DRC intake from indoor dust ingestion can be significant, identification of unknown DL contaminants in indoor dust is necessary. -- Highlights: •First investigation of dioxin-like (DL) activities and PBDFs in American house dust. •Large variations in the CALUX-TEQ levels and DRC concentrations in dust. •Significant contribution of PBDFs to the total WHO-TEQ levels in dust. •Unknown contaminants may contribute considerably to the DL activities in dust. •Dust ingestion may increase the risk of dioxin-related adverse effects for children. -- PBDFs—degradation products of PBDEs—and unknown contaminants contributed significantly to the dioxin-like activities in New York house dust

  4. Influence of the cement production aerotechnogenic emissions on the filtration properties of the soil

    OpenAIRE

    O. Iziumova

    2015-01-01

    The results of investigations over the filtration properties of ash-laden black soil under the cement production pollution emissions have been given. The general tendencies in formation of the quantitative characteristics of the soil filtration properties estimated by filtration coefficient under cement dust pollution have been clarified.

  5. Nasal cancer and occupational exposures. Preliminary report of a joint Nordic case-referent study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernberg, S; Collan, Y; Degerth, R;

    1983-01-01

    exposure showed a connection with adenocarcinoma. Softwood dust exposure alone was associated with epidermoid and anaplastic carcinomas. No associations were found for a number of exposures, including agricultural chemicals, textile dust, asbestos, quartz dust, organic solvents, and leather work. Possible...

  6. Size-distribution of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other organic source markers in the surroundings of a cement plant powered with alternative fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Soberón, Francisco; van Drooge, Barend L; Rovira, Joaquim; Grimalt, Joan O; Nadal, Martí; Domingo, José L; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2016-04-15

    The distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and molecular tracer organic compounds for biomass combustion, traffic emissions, soil dust, and secondary aerosol processing have been studied in three fractions of ambient air particulate matter (PM10, 2.5, and 1) collected in the vicinity of a cement plant. PAH concentrations were used to estimate the carcinogenic risks in humans. Combustion related compounds, including PAHs, and those from secondary aerosol processing, predominated in the finest (PMlaw. Exposure and inhalation carcinogenic risks from total PAHs were below the EPA threshold of acceptable risk (1·10(-6)). PMID:26859698

  7. Neutralization of TSLP inhibits airway remodeling in a murine model of allergic asthma induced by chronic exposure to house dust mite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang-Gui Chen

    Full Text Available Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. However, the initiating factor that links airway inflammation to remodeling is unknown. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, an epithelium-derived cytokine, can strongly activate lung dendritic cells (DCs through the TSLP-TSLPR and OX40L-OX40 signaling pathways to promote Th2 differentiation. To determine whether TSLP is the underlying trigger of airway remodeling in chronic allergen-induced asthma, we induced allergic airway inflammation in mice by intranasal administration of house dust mite (HDM extracts for up to 5 consecutive weeks. We showed that repeated respiratory exposure to HDM caused significant airway eosinophilic inflammation, peribronchial collagen deposition, goblet cell hyperplasia, and airway hyperreactivity (AHR to methacholine. These effects were accompanied with a salient Th2 response that was characterized by the upregulation of Th2-typed cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, as well as the transcription factor GATA-3. Moreover, the levels of TSLP and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 were also increased in the airway. We further demonstrated, using the chronic HDM-induced asthma model, that the inhibition of Th2 responses via neutralization of TSLP with an anti-TSLP mAb reversed airway inflammation, prevented structural alterations, and decreased AHR to methacholine and TGF-β1 level. These results suggest that TSLP plays a pivotal role in the initiation and persistence of airway inflammation and remodeling in the context of chronic allergic asthma.

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  9. Laying district heat pipelines with asbestos cement jackets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitz, H.

    1981-02-01

    The author surveys the practical knowledge of asbestos cement jackets gathered throughout 20 years of laying practice. He points out defects resulting from faulty laying and advises on their possible elimination. In conclusion he gives his opinion on the subject of asbestos dust.

  10. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project

  11. Impacts of cement industries on environment and control measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilization of cement as building material is gaining more importance. Cement industries around the world are contributing in global and as well as local pollution. In Pakistan most of the cement industries are constructed in remote areas without any proper environmental impact assessment. Unawareness of peoples toward sustainable environment and due to lack of job opportunities, dwellers are demanding employment rather than clean environment from title-holder of the industry. Air pollution caused by cement industries is harmful to the human's health, spoils and erodes building surface, corrodes metals, weakens textiles, deteriorates atmospheric visibility, affects plant life and leads to ecological imbalances. To investigate environmental impact of cement industries in Pakistan, environmental conditions around and inside the five cement industries in the vicinity of Taxila city are studied. To inspect the whole scenario, air pollution control devices in these industries were also examined in detail. These industries are using Electrostatic Precipitators and Baghouses to control air pollution (dust particulates). Proper caring of these equipment is necessary for better results. Detailed study shows that emissions from their stacks and dust particulates are causing problems. Health consultants in study area are much worry about the health of workers and environmental degradation in the vicinity of these industries. The comparison of air pollution control devices shows that Baghouses are environmental friendly. Considering the field conditions it is also concluded that involvement of government and environmental pollution control agencies is much more necessary. (author)

  12. Biological effects: asbestos-cement manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, H

    1994-08-01

    Fourteen cohorts of asbestos-cement workers have been studied. These studies have demonstrated exposure-response relationships for lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis. For lung cancer, relatively consistent results have been observed, with risk two-fold or less in 13 of the 14 cohorts. Among New Orleans workers, excess risk was restricted to those with X-ray evidence of asbestosis. Workers employed at least 21 years but without X-ray abnormalities, experienced no elevated risk, while those with small opacities (1/0 or higher) had substantially elevated risk (SMR > 400). Exposures in these two groups had been similar. These results suggest that asbestosis may be a necessary precursor for asbestos-induced lung cancer; if so, then the no-threshold model for lung cancer risk is inappropriate since there is general agreement that very low exposures will not result in radiologically detectable lung fibrosis. Further data on this potential link are needed. As in other industries, mesothelioma risk was strongly related to amphibole exposure, especially to crocidolite in asbestos-cement pipe manufacture. A cluster of cases has recently been reported in a family amosite-cement business. Among New Orleans workers, risk of asbestosis was related to cumulative exposure but there was little evidence of risk below 30 f ml-1-years. Progression of asbestosis in these workers was slow, related to past cumulative exposure and not related to lung function decline. Asbestosis risk is therefore not likely to develop in workers under current controlled exposure conditions. PMID:7978975

  13. Characteristics of mercury cycling in the cement production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai; Wu, Qingru; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-25

    The mercury cycling caused by dust shuttling significantly increases the atmospheric emissions from cement production. A comprehensive understanding of this mercury cycling can promote the development of mercury emission control technologies. In this study, the characteristics of mercury cycling in the cement production process were first investigated. Furthermore, the mercury enrichment and effects of dust treatment were evaluated based on the field tests conducted in two Chinese cement plants. The mercury cycling between the kiln system and the raw mill system was the most important aspect and contributed 57-73% to the total amount of mercury emitted from the kiln system. Mercury emitted from the kiln system with flue gas was enriched as high as 3.4-8.8 times in the two tested plants compared to the amount of mercury in the raw materials and coal due to mercury cycling. The mercury enrichment can be significantly affected by the proportion of mercury cycled back to the kiln system. The effects of dust treatment were evaluated, and dust treatment can efficiently reduce approximately 31-70% of atmospheric mercury emissions in the two plants. The reduction proportion approximately linearly decreased with the proportion of mercury removed from the collected dust. PMID:26448491

  14. Health risk assessment of migrant workers' exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls in air and dust in an e-waste recycling area in China: Indication for a new wealth gap in environmental rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Hu, Jinxing; Lin, Wei; Wang, Ning; Li, Cheng; Luo, Peng; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Wang, Wenbo; Su, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yindong; Huang, Ronglang; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Migrant workers who work and live in polluted environment are a special vulnerable group in the accelerating pace of urbanization and industrialization in China. In the electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area, for example, migrant workers' exposure to pollutants, such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), is the result of an informal e-waste recycling process. A village in an electronic waste recycling area where migrant workers gather was surveyed. The migrant workers' daily routines were simulated according to the three-space transition: work place-on the road-home. Indoor air and dust in the migrant workers' houses and workplaces and the ambient air on the roads were sampled. The PCB levels of the air and dust in the places corresponding to the migrant workers are higher than those for local residents. The migrant workers have health risks from PCBs that are 3.8 times greater than those of local residents. This is not only caused by the exposure at work but also by their activity patterns and the environmental conditions of their dwellings. These results revealed the reason for the health risk difference between the migrant workers and local residents, and it also indicated that lifestyle and economic status are important factors that are often ignored compared to occupational exposure. PMID:26641519

  15. EFFECT OF LIMESTONE CRUSHER DUST CONTENT ON SOME PROPERTIES OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    EREN, Özgür; Yılmaz, Zeka

    2009-01-01

    Limestone crusher dust is used as filler material for cement or concrete depending on the chemical composition. This dust is composed of particles which pass 75 mm BS sieve. The influence of limestone crusher dust content in aggregate on the properties of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) is not known very well yet. In order to analyze the change in the properties of SFRC, some laboratory tests have been undertaken. During these studies, crusher dust partially replaced the aggreg...

  16. Occurrence of Hexabromocyclododecane in soil and road dust from mixed-land-use areas of Shanghai, China, and its implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Hong; Han, Tao; Xu, Gang; Zang, Chao; Li, Yi-Jie; Sun, Rui; Xu, Ben-Tuo; Sun, Yan; Chen, Fen-Fen; Tang, Liang

    2016-07-15

    Herein, the occurrence of three Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) diastereoisomers in soil and road dust from the mixed-land-use areas in Shanghai was investigated. The total concentrations of HBCDDs (∑HBCDDs) in soil ranged from 0.30 to 249ngg(-1)dw, with a median level of 5.14ngg(-1)dw. For the road dust samples, the ΣHBCDD concentrations varied from 4.11 to 508ngg(-1)dw, with a median level of 23.4ngg(-1)dw. The levels of HBCDDs varied in different mixed-land-use areas. In soil, the levels of HBCDDs increased in the following sequence: residential area & agricultural area (R&A)dust were A&Idust samples were significantly higher than those of α-HBCDD in the soil. For soil, the portion of α-HBCDD increased in the following sequence: R&Idust was R&Cdust from R&C and R&I were found, which suggested that they may share similar sources in these regions. On the basis of the HBCDD concentrations of road dust and soil, the contributions of ingestion, dermal contact absorption and inhalation intake to total estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were estimated. The highest total EDIs of ∑HBCDDs (sum of ingestion, dermal contact absorption and inhalation intake) were 0.154, 7.5×10(-2)ngkg(-1)d(-1) for infants from road dust and soil in R&I, respectively. PMID:27065447

  17. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron

  18. Advanced cementation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  19. Radionuclides in house dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  20. The biokinetics of four 239Pu/241Am dioxide bearing dusts in the rat after inhalation: the implications for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the work described here were to provide an experimental basis for evaluating the committed effective dose equivalent per unit intake together with the ALI for four industrial oxide bearing dusts, and to assess the extent to which 241Am could be used for estimating the 239Pu content of the lung after an accidental intake of these materials. (author)

  1. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications. PMID:24734968

  2. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a...... > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  4. Long-Term Exposure to Silica Dust and Risk of Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in Chinese Workers: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weihong; Liu, Yuewei; Wang, Haijiao; Hnizdo, Eva; Sun, Yi; Su, Liangping; Zhang, Xiaokang; Weng, Shaofan; Bochmann, Frank; Hearl, Frank J.; Chen, Jingqiong; Wu, Tangchun

    2012-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Walk along most sandy beaches and you will be walking on millions of grains of crystalline silica, one of the commonest minerals on earth and a major ingredient in glass and in ceramic glazes. Silica is also used in the manufacture of building materials, in foundry castings, and for sandblasting, and respirable (breathable) crystalline silica particles are produced during quarrying and mining. Unfortunately, silica dust is not innocuous. Several serious diseases ar...

  5. Increased ventilation rate as way to reduce the exposure to house dust mites and improve the health of asthmatic children - an intervention design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spilak, Michal; Kolarik, Barbara; Gunnarsen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    both participants and paediatricians. Several physical and chemical parameters will be monitored including: air change rate, concentrations of different sizes of particles, air temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide concentration, number of house dust mites, and relevant allergens concentration......International field studies have documented that indoor air quality is unsatisfactory in many buildings. The overall hypothesis of this project is that improving the indoor environment in dwellings can improve health and reduce suffering from indoor related diseases such as allergy and asthma that...

  6. Assessment of cement durability in repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present research aimed at investigating the durability of cement paste under nuclear waste repository conditions using accelerated tests. Cement paste samples are examined after being exposed to the environmental conditions that are expected to prevail in the repository environment and the results are compared with those obtained with unexposed specimens or specimens exposed to reference conditions. The following exposure conditions were selected: a) Immersion in salt solution, distilled water, or kept in dry storage; b) Room temperature (20 C. degrees) or high temperature (60 C. degrees); c) Immersion time of 30 days or 60 days (not for dry storage); d) Irradiation to a dose of (400 kGy) or background radiation (0 kGy). After exposure to the stressing conditions, the effects of each factor on the cement paste samples were observed by changes in their characteristics. Compressive strength tests were performed on all samples and some of them were investigated in terms of changes in mineralogy by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). With the results obtained so far it was possible to point out the following conclusions. First, after a period of immersion in water, cement paste samples further hydrated and presented higher mechanical resistance, as expected. Secondly, dry storage did not allow a complete hydration as a consequence of pore water evaporation. High temperatures intensified this process and led to the ettringite decomposition to meta-ettringite. Thirdly, higher temperature accelerated hydration kinetics and promoted higher mechanical resistance in samples kept under immersion. Fourthly, the irradiation dose applied was unable to change the mineralogy of cement paste samples and fifthly, no statistically significant differences were observed between 30 or 60 days exposure time, for the test conditions

  7. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic rhinitis - dust ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are said to have a dust allergy. ...

  8. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphalt; Pavement ... The substances in asphalt that can be harmful are: Hydrocarbons Industrial glues Industrial solvents Tar ... Asphalt is found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for ...

  9. Immune Alterations in Rats Exposed to Airborne Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Quiriarte, Heather; Nelman, Mayra; Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Sams, Clarence

    2014-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Very little is known regarding the toxicity of lunar dust on human physiology. This study assessed the toxicity of airborne lunar dust exposure in rats on pulmonary and systemic immune parameters.

  10. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyers Valerie E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind’s limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Methods Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm, reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles Results In vitro testing indicated minimal irritancy potential based on the time required to reduce cell viability by 50% (ET50. Follow-up testing using the Draize standard protocol confirmed that the lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Conclusions Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance.

  11. Do cement nanoparticles exist in space ?

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2014-01-01

    The calcium-silicate-hydrate is used to model properties of cement on Earth. We study cementitious nanoparticles and propose these structures as components of cosmic dust grains. Quantum density functional theory methods are applied for the calculation of infrared spectra of Ca4Si4O14H4, Ca6Si3O13H2, and Ca12Si6O26H4 clusters. We find bands distributed over the near, mid and far-infrared region. A specific calcium-silicate-hydrate spectral feature at 14 microns, together with the bands at 10 and 18 microns which exist for other silicates as well, could be used for a detection of cosmic cement. We compare calculated bands with the 14 microns features in the spectra of HD 45677, HD 44179, and IRC+10420 which were observed by Infrared Space Observatory and classified as remaining. High abundance of oxygen atoms in cementitious nanoparticles could partially explain observed depletion of this element from the interstellar medium into dust grains.

  12. Respirable quartz hazard associated with coal mine roof bolter dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, G.J.; Beck, T.W.; Listak, J.M. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PQ (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Pneumoconiosis has been reported to be increasing among underground coal miners in the Southern Appalachian Region. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conducted a study to examine the particle size distribution and quartz content of dust generated by the installation of roof bolts in mines. Forty-six bulk samples of roof bolting machine pre-cleaner cyclone dump dust and collector box dust were collected from 26 underground coal mines. Real-time and integrated airborne respirable dust concentrations were measured on 3 mining sections in 2 mines. The real-time airborne dust concentrations profiles were examined to identify any concentration changes that might be associated with pre-cleaner cyclone dust discharge events. The study showed that bolter dust is a potential inhalation hazard due to the fraction of dust less than 10 {mu}m in size, and the quartz content of the dust. The pre-cleaner cyclone dust was significantly larger than the collector box dust, indicating that the pre-cleaner functioned properly in removing the larger dust size fraction from the airstream. However, the pre-cleaner dust still contained a substantial amount of respirable dust. It was concluded that in order to maintain the effectiveness of a roof bolter dust collector, periodic removal of dust is required. Appropriate work procedures and equipment are necessary to minimize exposure during this cleaning task. 13 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  13. AIR POLLUTION AND LUNG CAPACITY OF PEOPLE LIVING AROUND THE CEMENT INDUSTRY, INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin Azizi Jayadipraja; Anwar Daud; Alimuddin Hamzah Assegaf; Maming

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds: A cement industry is one of anthropogenic sources of air pollution. In polluting the air, the industry creates some dust particles, nitrogen oxide (NO2), sulfur oxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO). Research Purpose: The research aimed at finding out the ambient air quality around a cement industry and relating it with the lung capacity of people living around the area. Methodology: This was a cross sectional studies by measuring the ambient air quality in the morning, noo...

  14. House dust in seven Danish offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, L.; Schneider, T.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Larsen, L.; Norn, S.; Jørgensen, O.

    Floor dust from Danish offices was collected and analyzed. The dust was to be used in an exposure experiment. The dust was analyzed to show the composition of the dust which can be a source of airborne dust indoors. About 11 kg of dust from vacuum cleaner bags from seven Danish office buildings with about 1047 occupants (12 751 m 2) was processed according to a standardized procedure yielding 5.5 kg of processed bulk dust. The bulk dust contained 130.000-160.000 CFU g -1 microorganisms and 71.000-90.000 CFU g -1 microfungi. The content of culturable microfungi was 65-123 CFU 30 g -1 dust. The content of endotoxins ranged from 5.06-7.24 EU g -1 (1.45 ng g -1 to 1.01 ng g -1). Allergens (ng g -1) were from 147-159 (Mite), 395-746 (dog) and 103-330 (cat). The macro molecular organic compounds (the MOD-content) varied from 7.8-9.8 mg g -1. The threshold of release of histamine from basophil leukocytes provoked by the bulk dust was between 0.3 and 1.0 mg ml -1. The water content was 2% (WGT) and the organic fraction 33%. 6.5-5.9% (dry) was water soluble. The fiber content was less than 0.2-1.5% (WGT) and the desorbable VOCs was 176-319 μg g -1. Most of the VOC were aldehydes. However, softeners for plastic (DBP and DEHP) were present. The chemical composition includes human and animal skin fragments, paper fibers, glass wool, wood and textilefibers and inorganic and metal particles. The sizes ranged from 0.001-1 mm and the average specific density was 1.0 g m -3. The bulk dust was resuspended and injected into an exposure chamber. The airborne dust was sampled and analyzed to illustrate the exposures that can result from sedimented dirt and dust. The airborne dust resulting from the bulk dust reached concentrations ranging from 0.26-0.75 mg m -3 in average contained 300-170 CFU m -3. The organic fraction was from 55-70% and the water content about 2.5% (WGT). The content of the dust was compared to the similar results reported in the literature and its toxic potency is

  15. THE MAIN CULPRIT IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS - HOUSE DUST OR HOUSE DUST MITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis especially perennial type makes life miserable for the patient. House dust mite is one of the major players causing it. This study is to compare the allergen i n city of house dust mite versus house dust and evaluate any cross - allergenicity between them. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study in a tertiary referral hospital. MATERIALS & METHODS: Forty patients of allergic rhinitis and well matched controls were subjected to intradermal skin tests to house dust and house dust mite allergen. The skin tests were graded as per standard norms and the responses matched after correlating with different parameters. Statistical analysis was done and the results evaluated. RESULTS: House dust mite was the main allergen, as compared to house dust, responsible for causing allergic rhinitis. The allergen reactivity potential of house dust mite was significantly more as compared to house dust. And, as such there was no statistically significant cross - allergenicity between the two groups. CONCLUSION: House dust mite rather than house dust is the main culprit in causing allergic rhinitis. Hence, precautionary and preventive measures to control the exposure to house dust mite can be undertaken

  16. Occupational Exposures and Chronic Airflow Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Dimich-Ward

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent literature was reviewed to evaluate whether chronic airflow limitation is associated with occupational exposures to dusts. Only those studies that controlled for the effects of smoking were included. There is compelling evidence that exposure to inorganic dusts, such as from coal and hardrock mining or asbestos, are associated with the development of chronic airflow limitation, independently of pneumoconiosis. Nonsmoking gold miners are particularly at high risk of airflow obstruction and emphysema. Findings from studies of organic dusts, such as exposures to wood, cotton, grain or other agricultural dusts, or to mixed dust exposures, were less consistent but tended to show positive dose-response associations. In the majority of studies, no statistical interaction was shown between dust exposures and smoking; however, the effects of the dust exposures were often more pronounced. An occupational history should be considered, in addition to a smoking history, as an integral part of an investigation of chronic airflow limitation in a patient.

  17. Airborne exposures and risk of gastric cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Krister; Jansson, Catarina; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Adami, Johanna; Boffetta, Paolo; Lagergren, Jesper

    2007-05-01

    There is an unexplained male predominance among patients with gastric cancer, and many carcinogens are found in male-dominated dusty occupations. However, the relation between occupational exposures and risk of gastric cancer remains unclear. To investigate whether airborne occupational exposures might influence the risk of noncardia gastric cancer, we used a large, prospective cohort study of male Swedish construction workers. These workers were, during the period 1971-1993, regularly invited to health examinations by a nationwide occupational health service organization. Data on job titles and other variables were collected through self-administered questionnaires and forms completed by the health organization's staff. Industrial hygienists assessed 12 specific airborne occupational exposures for 200 job titles. Gastric cancer, death or emigration occurring during follow-up in 1971-2002 were identified by linkage to the Swedish registers of Cancer, Causes of Death and Total Population, respectively. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for attained age, tobacco smoking, calendar period and body mass, were derived from Cox regression. Among 256,357 cohort members, contributing 5,378,012 person-years at risk, 948 noncardia gastric cancers were identified. Increased risk of this tumor was found among workers exposed to cement dust (IRR 1.5 [95% CI 1.1-2.1]), quartz dust (IRR 1.3 [95% CI 1.0-1.7]) and diesel exhaust (IRR 1.4 [95% CI 1.1-1.9]). Dose-response relations were observed for these exposures. No consistent positive associations were found regarding exposure to asbestos, asphalt fumes, concrete dust, epoxy resins, isocyanates, metal fumes, mineral fibers, organic solvents or wood dust. In conclusion, this study provides some support to the hypothesis that specific airborne exposures increase the risk of noncardia gastric cancer. PMID:17266028

  18. Dust pollution solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-09-15

    Cimbria Moduflex is a leading manufacturer of dust-free loading chutes and accessories to the bulk handling industry. The Moduflex chute of modular construction can precisely match customer needs. Dust Control Technology recently launched its DustBoss DB-45 which controls airborne particles and surface dust with low water usage. DustScan Ltd., provides a range of equipment for nuisance and PM10 dust monitoring. Donaldson Torit supplies the Torit PowerCore dust collector. 1 photo.

  19. Ferruginous bodies and pulmonary fibrosis in dead low to moderately exposed asbestos cement workers: histological examination.

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, L. G.; Albin, M P; Jakobsson, K. M.; Welinder, H E; Ranstam, P J; Attewell, R G

    1987-01-01

    Histological slides from the lungs of 89 dead asbestos cement workers have been examined with respect to ferruginous bodies and fibrosis. The results have been compared with individually matched controls with no known exposure to asbestos, and related to asbestos exposure, expressed as duration of exposure and cumulative asbestos dose, and smoking habits. The asbestos cement workers studied had been employed for on average 15 years, with a mean cumulative dose of 26 fibre-years per ml (f-y/ml...

  20. Passive dust collectors for assessing airborne microbial material

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Rachel I.; Tian, Yilin; Taylor, John W; Bruns, Thomas D.; Hyvärinen, Anne; Täubel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Settled airborne dust is used as a surrogate for airborne exposure in studies that explore indoor microbes. In order to determine whether detecting differences in dust environments would depend on the sampler type, we compared different passive, settled dust sampling approaches with respect to displaying qualitative and quantitative aspects of the bacterial and fungal indoor microbiota. Results Settled dust sampling approaches—utilizing plastic petri dishes, TefTex material, and el...

  1. Nepheline rock dust pneumoconiosis: a report of 2 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of nepheline rock dust pneumoconiosis are presented. Radiologically, this is seen as a diffuse increase in interstitial lung markings, lymphadenopathy air-space disease, and atelectasis secondary to extrinsic compression by enlarged hilar lymph nodes. Major differential diagnoses include carcinoma of the lung, sarcoidosis, and interstitial lung disease caused by other inorganic dusts. Nepheline rock dust pneumoconiosis should be considered when the above radiological changes are observed and an occupational exposure to inorganic dust is documented

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  3. Update on respiratory disease from coal mine and silica dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.; Velho, V. [Cooks City Hospital, Chicago, IL (USA)

    2002-12-01

    Excessive exposure to coal, coal mine, and silica dust causes a variety of pathological responses in susceptible hosts, including pulmonary fibrosis or pneumoconiosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their resultant restrictive, obstructive, or mixed pattern pulmonary function impairments. For many years, much of the discussion on the respiratory health effects of exposure to these dusts was restricted to the fibrosing pulmonary tissue reactions in response to retained dust. It excluded other reactions of the pulmonary parenchyma and airways to the dust, which are extremely important, and can result in significant impairment in sensitive individuals. This article discusses the broad spectrum of pulmonary toxicity to these inorganic dusts, clinical evaluation, and management of patients with respiratory disease from dust exposure, as well as the association between silica exposure and an increased risk of pulmonary malignancy.

  4. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  5. A cohort study on mortality among wives of workers in the asbestos cement industry in Casale Monferrato, Italy.

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, C; Terracini, B; Ivaldi, C; Botta, M; Budel, P; Mancini, A; Zanetti, R.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates mortality from cancer and other diseases in a cohort of wives of asbestos cement workers in Casale Monferrato (northwest Italy). After the exclusion of women with an occupational record in the asbestos cement industry, the cohort comprised 1964 women. Their domestic exposure was estimated according to their husbands' periods of employment in the plant: 1740 had a period of domestic exposure whereas the remaining 224 married an asbestos cement worker only after he defini...

  6. 住宅室内降尘中邻苯二甲酸酯污染特征及暴露评价%Pollution characteristics of phthalate esters derived from household dust and exposure assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王夫美; 陈丽; 焦姣; 张雷波; 姬亚芹; 白志鹏; 张利文; 孙增荣

    2012-01-01

    The 26 indoor dust samples from 13 households were collected during winter and summer in Tianjin. Using CH2C12 and ultrasonic extraction for extraction and separation, gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was applied to analyze DMP, DEP, DBP, BBP, DEHP, DOP. And then the pollution characteristics and assessment of human exposure to phthalate esters from indoor dust were studied. The results were as followed: The concentration for DEHP was the highest, and then came DBP in household dust in winter and summer, collectively accounting for more than 80% of the total concentrations in the samples. In winter, the concentrations of ∑ PAEs were from 1.498 to 32.587 μg/g, the average concentration was (6.772±8.154) μg/g; While in summer, ranging from 1.981 to 40.041 μg/g and (13.406±12.911) μg/g, respectively. The PAEs concentrations in household dust varied significantly, which were higher in summer than those in winter. The total exposures of PAEs (DBP, DEHP, DEP, BBP) for children and adults in summer were higher than those in winter, and also through the mouth than the skin. The exposures of phthalate esters for children were about 10 times higher than those for adults. For adults and children, the highest exposure of PAEs (DBP, DEHP, DEP, BBP) were both found in summer. The PAEs pollution in indoor dust and human exposure in Tianjin were lightly less than in Germany and USA; And in the same level with 6 Chinese cities for total exposure, except DEHP. The importance of young children's exposure to PAEs in indoor environment should be paid more attention.%利用CH2Cl2和超声对天津市13户家庭住宅冬季和夏季26个室内降尘样品中6种邻苯二甲酸酯(DMP、DEP、DBP、BBP、DEHP、DOP)进行提取分离,并采用气相色谱-质谱定量分析,研究了邻苯二甲酸酯污染变化特征和暴露风险.结果表明,冬夏两季,室内降尘样品均以DEHP浓度最大,DBP第二,且DBP和DEHP之和占ΣPAEs的比例达到80.0

  7. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  8. Lunar Dust Separation for Toxicology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalex, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, crewmembers were briefly exposed to dust in the lunar module, brought in after extravehicular activity. When the lunar ascent module returned to micro-gravity, the dust that had settled on the floor now floated into the air, causing eye discomfort and occasional respiratory symptoms. Because our goal is to set an exposure standard for 6 months of episodic exposure to lunar dust for crew on the lunar surface, these brief exposures of a few days are not conclusive. Based on experience with industrial minerals such as sandblasting quartz, an exposure of several months may cause serious damage, while a short exposure may cause none. The detailed characteristics of sub-micrometer lunar dust are only poorly known, and this is the size range of particles that are of greatest concern. We have developed a method for extracting respirable dust (<2.5 micron) from Apollo lunar soils. This method meets stringent requirements that the soil must be kept dry, exposed only to pure nitrogen, and must conserve and recover the maximum amount of both respirable dust and coarser soil. In addition, we have developed a method for grinding coarser lunar soil to produce sufficient respirable soil for animal toxicity testing while preserving the freshly exposed grain surfaces in a pristine state.

  9. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  10. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  11. Measures for emission reduction in asbestos-cement industry and methods for emission and immission measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, U.

    Emissions of asbestos fine dust connected with asbestos cement are possible during: production, processing in plants, installing at the construction site and weathering of products. Main sources for possible emissions during production are: supply of asbestos, diffuse sources, exhaust air from filter units, and waste disposal. In former times the asbestos bags reached the plant rather damaged but today the asbestos is supplied in a pressed state, in dust-tight plastic bags piled up on palettes without damage.

  12. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  13. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  14. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  15. Sawdust-clay-cement-plastic composite prepared by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new material of sawdust-clay-cement-plastic composite has been prepared by impregnation of unsaturated polyester resin with different parts of styrene and methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomers into the void space of completely dried and molded specimens followed by exposure to Co-60 gamma radiation to induce graft copolymerization of the impregnated monomers onto the sawdust-clay-cement matrix. For each monomer mixture, suitable impregnation time and the radiation dose has been determined. High compression strength and bending modulus of specimens show that this material is comparable with high strength concrete. The hydration of sawdust-clay-cement matrix after molding for 1 up to 28 days shows that hydration products which deposited within the pore-spaces, decrease the porosity of the composite. The effect of the polymer loading content, as affected by the porosity, on mechanical properties is more effective than hardening of cement portion after hydration

  16. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment. PMID:25828411

  17. Measurement of nicotine in household dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure

  18. THE MEASUREMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF WOOD DUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosario Proto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the woodworking industry presents many issues in terms of occupational health and safety. This study on exposure to wood dust could contribute to the realization of a prevention model in order to limit exposure to carcinogenic agents to the worker. The sampling methodology illustrated the analysis of dust emissions from the woodworking machinery in operation throughout the various processing cycles. The quantitative and qualitative assessment of exposure was performed using two different methodologies. The levels of wood dust were determined according to EN indications and sampling was conducted using IOM and Cyclon personal samplers. The qualitative research of wood dust was performed using an advanced laser air particle counter. This allowed the number of particles present to be counted in real time. The results obtained allowed for an accurate assessment of the quality of the dust emitted inside the workplace during the various processing phases. The study highlighted the distribution of air particles within the different size classes, the exact number of both thin and ultra-thin dusts, and confirmed the high concentration of thin dust particles which can be very harmful to humans.

  19. Produktie van cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit JRK; Coenen PWHG; Matthijsen AJCM; LAE; TAUW

    1995-01-01

    This document on cement production has been published within the SPIN project. In this project information has been collected on industrial plants or industrial processes to afford support to governmental policy on emission reduction. This document contains information on the processes, emission sou

  20. Pulmonary retention of coal dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, P.E.; Gibb, F.R.; Beiter, H.; Amato, F.; Yuile, C.; Kilpper, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of this study were: to determine, quantitatively, coal dust retention times in the dog lung; to test the appropriateness of a pulmonary retention model which incorporates first order rate coefficients obtained from in vitro and in vivo experiments on neutron-activated coal; to acquire a temporal description of the pulmonary disposition of the retained coal dust, and to compare the behavior of two different Pennsylvania coals in the foregoing regards. The principal findings include: retention half-times for both coals of approximately 2 years following single, hour-long exposures; a vivid association of the retained coal dust with the pulmonic lymphatics; and a general validation of the retention model.

  1. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  2. Role of Substrate on Quartz Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, J. R.; Winslow, D.; Onasch, C.

    2010-12-01

    Quartz cementation in quartz aggregates has been experimentally investigated. The starting material was disaggregated detrital quartz grains from the well-sorted, mature St. Peter Sandstone. The ‘as-is’ grains have patches of iron oxide coatings and some have euhedral overgrowths that contain iron oxide dust rims. In addition a set of experiments was run using grains that were cleaned by soaking in sodium hydrosulfite and sodium bisulfate solutions to remove exposed iron oxide coatings. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (≈30 mg) to provide a source of silica for the quartz cement, AlCl3 powder (≈3 mg) to provide a tracer for Cathodoluminescence (CL) identification of cement formed during the experiment, 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (≈25 mg) to increase the silica solubility and to better mimic oil field brines, and the natural quartz grains (100-130 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in Au capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 250°C to 450°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 8 weeks. After the experiments, the samples were vacuum impregnated with a low viscosity epoxy containing a blue dye. After curing, the sample charge was sawn in half along its long axis and one half was polished (to 1 micron diamond paste) for analysis. The nature and amount of quartz cement in the samples were determined by a combination of CL, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Photomosaics of the samples were created and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement formed during the experiment was easily recognized from the quartz grains (and previous overgrowths) by the difference in luminescence. The results indicate the amorphous silica powder provides a ready source for silica for quartz cementation due to its greater solubility than the quartz. The cementation rates are rapid (>14% cement formed in 2 weeks at 450°C and >7% in 8 weeks at 250°C). Compared to

  3. Study on Strength of Innovative Mortar Synthesis with Epoxy Resin, Fly Ash and Quarry Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sudheer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Generally, mortar is a uniform combination of Fine aggregate and cement. In this study an innovative concept adopts to synthesis a hybrid mortar with Epoxy resin, Fly ash and quarry dust which are replacing the fine aggregate and cement. The alternative materials are preferably waste products such as quarry dust and fly ash in order to moderate the cost of mortar. The main objective of this work is to study the compressive strength of mortar cubes by various combinations of cement and fine aggregate replaced by Epoxy resin, fly ash, and quarry dust at the age of 7 days. The results of mortarmade with cement replaced with 20%, 25%, and 30% (w/w of Epoxy resin, and fine aggregate replaced by (0% QD - 100% FA (100% QD - 0% FA and (70% QD - 30% FA of quarry dust and fly ash were compared with conventional mortar cubes. It was observed that all mortar cubes made with Epoxy resin, fly ash, and quarry dust had found to have a compressive strength of more than 150% when compared to compressive strength with normal cement of OPC53 grade at the age of 7 days (Approx.35.5Mpa

  4. Space Environmental Testing of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mackey, P. J.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M .R.; Yim, H.; Delaune, P. B.; Clements, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration missions to Mars and the moon may be jeopardized by dust that will adhere to surfaces of (a) Optical systems, viewports and solar panels, (b) Thermal radiators, (c) Instrumentation, and (d) Spacesuits. We have developed an active dust mitigation technology, the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, a multilayer coating that can remove dust and also prevents its accumulation Extensive testing in simulated laboratory environments and on a reduced gravity flight shows that high dust removal performance can be achieved Long duration exposure to the space environment as part of the MISSE-X payload will validate the technology for lunar missions.

  5. Coal acid mine drainage treatment using cement kiln dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Alberto Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Los sulfuros están presentes en distintas rocas. Durante las actividades mineras y el proceso de remoción de sulfuros se pueden producir Drenajes Ácidos de Minería (DAM, con iones de sulfato (SO4-2. Los DAMs son fuente de polución en las actividades mineras y en Colombia su descarga en los cuerpos de agua debe cumplir las regulaciones nacionales (pH entre 5 y 9. Polvo de horno cementero (CKD, con carbonato de calcio principalmente, de una planta de Cementos Argos S.A. fue usado para neutralizar un DAM generado en la biodesulfurización de carbón. Los DAMs neutralizados tuvieron pHs entre 7,72 y 8,05 y la eliminación de sulfatos entre 67% a 70%. El precipitado se secó y analizó para determinar su composición química y mineralógica. Se encontró humedad entre 69% y 81%; yeso con un 50% de pureza aproximadamente y carbonato de calcio. Esta composición lo hace adecuado para uso en la producción de cemento.

  6. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Immunologic responses to inhaled cotton dust.

    OpenAIRE

    Salvaggio, J E; O'Neil, C E; Butcher, B T

    1986-01-01

    Byssinosis, a respiratory disease of workers on cotton, flax, and soft hemp, is classically characterized as shortness of breath, cough, and chest tightness on Mondays or the first day of return to work after a time off. Exposure to these vegetable dusts can also result in other respiratory diseases, and the term cotton dust-induced respiratory disease (CDIRD) is introduced. Although clinically characterized for more than a century, the underlying pathogenesis of CDIRD remains obscure. An all...

  8. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    Patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process suffer from severe hearing loss caused by lack of continuity of the ossicular chain. This study is a retrospective evaluation of the hearing results using two different surgical procedures. Since January 1993, 12 consecutive patients with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those in a group of 20 historical controls who underwent surgery in 1991 and 1992 using incus autograft interposition. Among the 12 index patients, 7 (58%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 3 there was no difference and in 2 a slight decline. Among the 20 controls, 14 (70%) achieved improvement in PTA of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy to perform, presents less risk of damage to the stapes and cochlea, requires less extensive surgery and does not exclude other surgical methods in cases of reoperation. PMID:10909000

  9. Prevalence of and relationship between rhinoconjunctivitis and lower airway diseases in compost workers with current or former exposure to organic dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hoffmeyer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. The relationship between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma is well characterized. However, it remains unknown whether an association exists between symptoms of upper and lower airway diseases and occupational bioaerosol exposure beyond the scope of allergy. [b]materials and methods[/b]. The current cross-sectional study focuses on 190 current and 59 former compost workers exposed to bioaerosols. Work-related symptoms indicative of conjunctivitis, rhinitis and lower airway irritation were assessed and compared with 38 non-exposed control subjects. Allergic asthma was diagnosed using a calculated score, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD was spirometrically determined. [b]results.[/b] 12 current, 8 former and 5 non-exposed subjects were diagnosed with allergic asthma and excluded from further analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models suggested that cough and chronic bronchitis in current compost workers were associated with eye irritation (OR 2.75 (0.93–8.07; OR 7.22 (1.12–46.5. Chronic bronchitis in former workers was strongly associated with work-related eye irritation (OR 38.6 (1.33- >1000 and nose irritation (OR 25.0 (1.21–513. [b]conclusions[/b]. After excluding allergic asthmatics, there was no evidence that eye or nose irritation was due to an underlying atopic disease, but rather to non-allergic mucous membrane irritation syndrome. Therefore, the higher incidence of chronic bronchitis in former compost workers may reflect a chronic irritative process triggered by exposure to bioaerosols.

  10. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications

  11. Random ionic mobility on blended cements exposed to aggressive environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the partial replacement of cement by pozzolanic admixtures generally leads to modifications in the diffusion rates of harmful ions. Recent research has centred on obtaining new pozzolanic materials from industrial waste and industrial by-products and on the way that such products can influence the performance of blended cements. This paper reports the behaviour of cements blended with calcined paper sludge (CPS) admixtures under exposure to two different field conditions: sea water and cyclic changes in temperature and humidity. Cement mortars were prepared with 0% and 10% paper sludge calcined at 700 deg. C. The penetration of ions within the microstructure of cement matrices was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyser (SEM/EDX) analytical techniques. The results show that ionic mobility varies substantially according to the type of exposure and the presence of the calcined paper sludge. The incorporation of 10% CPS is shown to assist the retention and diffusion of the ions.

  12. Random ionic mobility on blended cements exposed to aggressive environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Rosario, E-mail: rosario.garcia@uam.es [Departamento de Geologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rubio, Virginia [Departamento de Geografia, Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, Universidad Autonoma, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vegas, Inigo [Labein-Tecnalia, 48160 Derio, Vizcaya (Spain); Frias, Moises [Instituto Eduardo Torroja, CSIC, c/ Serrano Galvache, 4, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    It is known that the partial replacement of cement by pozzolanic admixtures generally leads to modifications in the diffusion rates of harmful ions. Recent research has centred on obtaining new pozzolanic materials from industrial waste and industrial by-products and on the way that such products can influence the performance of blended cements. This paper reports the behaviour of cements blended with calcined paper sludge (CPS) admixtures under exposure to two different field conditions: sea water and cyclic changes in temperature and humidity. Cement mortars were prepared with 0% and 10% paper sludge calcined at 700 deg. C. The penetration of ions within the microstructure of cement matrices was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyser (SEM/EDX) analytical techniques. The results show that ionic mobility varies substantially according to the type of exposure and the presence of the calcined paper sludge. The incorporation of 10% CPS is shown to assist the retention and diffusion of the ions.

  13. Toxicity of lunar dust

    OpenAIRE

    Linnarsson, Dag; Carpenter, James; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L.; Loftus, David J.; Prisk, G. Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M.; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowle...

  14. [Haemotoxicity of dental luting cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, A; Welker, D

    1989-06-01

    A glass ionomer luting cement (AquaCem) shows a relatively low haemolytic activity in comparison with two zinc phosphate cements. Especially the initial irritation by this cement is smaller. Although it is possible that AquaCem particularly, in unfavourable cases, may damage the pulpa dentin system; this is due to the slowly decrease of the haemolytic activity with increasing of the probes. We found that Adhesor showed in dependence of the batches a varying quality. PMID:2626769

  15. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  16. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE AND COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Else Toft

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common disease. The main risk factor is smoking although 15% of the COPD cases are expected to be preventable if the occupational exposures from vapour, gas, dust, and fume were eliminated; the population attributable fraction (PAF). The thesis...... addresses the association between occupational exposure and COPD in a population-based cohort of Danes aged 45-84-years. 4717 participants were included at baseline and 2624 at the four year follow-up. COPD was defined by spirometry and the occupational exposure was based on specialist defined jobs and...... questionnaires. The main occupational exposure was organic dust and 49% reported no lifetime occupational exposure. The results suggest occupational exposures to be associated to COPD also in never smokers and women. We found an exposure-response relation in the cross sectional analyses. The results are in...

  17. Mechanisms of mineral dust-induced emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churg, A.; Zay, K.; Li, K. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Pathology

    1997-09-01

    Mineral dust exposure can result in emphysema and chronic airflow obstruction. It is postulated that dust-induced emphysema has a pathogenesis similar to that in cigarette smoke-induced emphysema, namely, excess release of proteolytic enzymes from dust-evoked inflammatory cells, and inactivation of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) by dust-catalyzed formation of oxidants. To test this theory the authors examined the antiproteolytic activity of A1AT exposed to quartz in vitro and found that it was decreased in a dose-response fashion. Catalase prevented this effect, which suggested that it was mediated by quartz-generated hydrogen peroxide. A variety of dusts could oxidize methionine to methionine sulfoxide in vitro, using either pure amino acid or whole protein. The relative order of activity was coal {gt} quartz {gt} titanium dioxide. Lastly, a new high-performance liquid chromoatgraphy technique was used to demonstrate that quartz, coal, and titanium dioxide produced connective tissue breakdown in rat lungs, as determined by the appearance of desmosine and hydroxyproline in lavage fluid after dust instillation. On a particle-for-particle basis, the order of dust potency was similar to that for methionine oxidation. Connective tissue breakdown was associated with elevations of both polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages in lavage fluid, and it is unclear whether one or both of these types of inflammatory cell mediates this process. These observations support the theory that dust-induced emphysema and smoke-induced emphysema occur through similar mechanisms.

  18. Photon attenuation characteristics of barium enriched cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear radiations are widely used in several applications of nuclear sciences, medicine and industry. In the design and construction of installations housing high intensity radioactive sources and other radiation generating equipment, a variety of shielding materials are used to minimise the exposure to the individuals. Among the materials used, lead is best known for radiation shielding due to its high density and atomic number. However, in construction of radiation facilities, lead in the form of bricks or slabs cannot be substituted for cement as building material. As an alternative, barium enriched cement, which apart from better compressive strength, smoother surface finish and high abrasive resistance, offers adequate shielding to gamma radiations. In the present work, attenuation properties of commercial as well as barium enriched cements have been studied and compared with that of lead for photons of 662 and 1250 keV emitted from 137Cs and 60Co, respectively. Although photon attenuation data can be obtained by mixture rule theoretically, it is necessary to determine this data experimentally before use

  19. Dust Studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D L; Litnovsky, A; West, W P; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D; Brezinsek, S; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hollmann, E M; Huber, A; Hyatt, A W; Krasheninnikov, S I; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Pigarov, A Y; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Smirnov, R D; Sharpe, J P; Solomon, W M; Watkins, J G; Wong, C C

    2009-02-17

    Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. Submicron sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd:Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of Type I edge localized modes (ELMs). Larger size (0.005-1 mm diameter) dust is observed by optical imaging, showing elevated dust levels after entry vents. Inverse dependence of the dust velocity on the inferred dust size is found from the imaging data. Direct heating of the dust particles by the neutral beam injection (NBI) and acceleration of dust particles by the plasma flows are observed. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust. Large flakes or debris falling into the plasma may result in a disruption. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by introducing micron-size dust in plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with {approx}30 mg of dust is introduced in the lower divertor and exposed to high-power ELMing H-mode discharges with strike points swept across the divertor floor. After a brief exposure ({approx}0.1 s) at the outer strike point, part of the dust is injected into the plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase of the radiated power. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1-45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in discharges heated with neutral beam injection (NBI) power of 1.4 MW. At the given configuration of the launch, the dust did not penetrate the core plasma and only moderately perturbed the edge plasma, as evidenced by an increase of the edge carbon content.

  20. Dust Studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. Submicron sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd:Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of Type I edge localized modes (ELMs). Larger size (0.005-1 mm diameter) dust is observed by optical imaging, showing elevated dust levels after entry vents. Inverse dependence of the dust velocity on the inferred dust size is found from the imaging data. Direct heating of the dust particles by the neutral beam injection (NBI) and acceleration of dust particles by the plasma flows are observed. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust. Large flakes or debris falling into the plasma may result in a disruption. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by introducing micron-size dust in plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with ∼30 mg of dust is introduced in the lower divertor and exposed to high-power ELMing H-mode discharges with strike points swept across the divertor floor. After a brief exposure (∼0.1 s) at the outer strike point, part of the dust is injected into the plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase of the radiated power. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1-45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in discharges heated with neutral beam injection (NBI) power of 1.4 MW. At the given configuration of the launch, the dust did not penetrate the core plasma and only moderately perturbed the edge plasma, as evidenced by an increase of the edge carbon content.

  1. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  2. Possibilities of Pelletizing and Briquetting of Dusts from Castings Grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pribulová

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Foundry dust can be divided into three groups: metallic dust with Fe content over 70%, mixed dust with Fe or SiO2 content between 10 –70% and sand wastes with minimum content of SiO2 about 70%. Dust from castings grinding with high Fe content (87.9% is still landfillin Slovakia. The aim of experiments with dust from grinding has been to find the cheapest way of dust agglomeration with minimumamount of binder because of melting in the electric induction furnace. The dust was pelletized and briquetted and as binders bentonite, water glass and cement were used. Briquettes made from dust from grinding with addition of water glass got compression strength after three months on the air about 82 kPa. Briquettes with addition of water glass were melted together with cast iron in electric induction furnace. Yield of metal from briquettes was around 80% and slag quantity around 4% (without briquettes the slag quantity was 1.4%.

  3. Compacting of fly dusts from cupola and electric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baricová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling and utilization of dust waste is important not only from the point of view of its usage as an alternative source of raw materials, but regarding the environmental problems also. Dust emissions arise from thermal and chemical or physical processes and mechanical actions. Two kinds of fl y dusts from cupola furnaces (hot and cold blast cupola furnace and fl y dust from electric arc furnace were used by experiments. They were pelletized only with addition of water and briquetted with diff erent addition of water glass, bentonite and cement. Quality of briquettes was tested by compression – strength test and by break down test in green state, after drying and afterstoring (1 month.

  4. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  5. Deconstruction of the asbestos cement roof of the central market in Alicante difficulties in the practical application of RD 396/2006 (works with risk of exposure to asbestos); Deconstruccion de la cubierta de asbesto-cemento del Mercado Central de Abastos de Alicante. Dificultades en la aplicacion practica del RD 396/2006 (trabajos con riesgo de exposicion al amianto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent Perez, C. D.

    2010-07-01

    The project and the works described below mainly deal with the deconstruction of the current asbestos-cement roof of the Central Market in Alicante in order to replace it with another roof of zinc diamond scales, similar to the original which was implementation in 1921 when the building went into service. These works were necessary to avoid the causes (and consequences) that generate the appearance of rainwater infiltration, as was described in an earlier report that was done in 2006, also drafted by the undersigned technicians. The article shows the difficulty of the practical application of RD 396/2006 (minimum health and safety requirements for works with risks of exposure to asbestos) in a case of a certain complexity such as this, especially in areas such as economic (rising costs), technical (increasing difficulty of implementation), and the total duration of the work (total time extension due to interference with other trades). (Author) 14 refs.

  6. Evaluation of oxidative stress and DNA damage in cement and tannery workers in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhosary, Naema; Maklad, Aisha; Soliman, Eman; El-Ashmawy, Nahla; Oreby, Merfat

    2014-04-01

    In Egypt, workers have potentially high exposure levels to chromium (VI) in the cement production and construction industry and to chromium (III) in the leather tanning industry. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of chromium exposure on lipoperoxidation, thiol antioxidants and DNA in cement and tannery workers. This study was conducted on 65 adult male volunteers. These subjects were divided into three groups: Group I (control group); 23 normal healthy volunteers, Group II; 22 cement workers and Group III; 20 tannery workers. All participants were subjected to thorough history, clinical examination and laboratory determination of total blood and urinary chromium, plasma malondialdehyde and total thiol in plasma and assessment of oxidative DNA damage through p53 overexpression. About one third of cement and tannery workers had severe skin and chest manifestations and severe nasal manifestations were observed in 22.7% and 20% of cement and tannery workers, respectively. The blood and urinary Cr and plasma malondialdehyde levels of cement and tannery were significantly higher than control group. Additionally, there was a significant increase of total thiol in control group compared to exposed groups. About half of cement and one third of tannery groups expressed high grade of p53 expression. The blood chromium revealed significant negative correlation with thiol, but, positive correlation with malondialdehyde and p53 expression. Cement and tannery workers should be subjected to frequent clinical examination and blood or urine chromium analysis level to keep guard against its toxic consequences. PMID:24617565

  7. Modeling and Remote Sensing for a Dust/Health Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigg, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne desert dust is a human health problem in much of the world. While controlling emissions from arid lands is problematic, advances in remote sensing and modeling have matured sufficiently to reduce risks of exposure. Active dust sources are identified and monitored from space-based platforms and from modeled back-trajectories. Satellite-based sensors detect and monitor airborne dust crossing oceans and circling the globe. High-resolution dust forecasts and simulations over the U.S. southwest have been successfully demonstrated. Operational dust forecast systems could warn of intercontinental dust movements and potential dust exposure hazards on spatial scales of a few kilometers and on time scales sufficient for planning and avoiding risks. This paper will show how the World Meteorological Organization's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System could coordinate international collaboration for a worldwide Dust/Health Early Warning System modeled after the decades-long success of the international Famine Early Warning System.

  8. Coal mine dust as a benchmark for standards for other poorly soluble dusts. Partial Position Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.G.; Cowie, H.A.; Soutar, C.A. [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    An extensive programme of research provides the legacy of an atypically comprehensive database on the respiratory health and exposure experienced by thousands of coalminers, collected at intervals during their working life. The development of generic standards for poorly soluble dusts would be greatly aided if health risks quantified for coal dust were a good surrogate for those of other low toxicity dusts. The authors compared the published effects of low toxicity mineral dust exposures on lung function (FEV1) in four occupational groups (talc workers, coal miners, PVC workers and heavy clay workers), with some additional investigation of respiratory symptoms, standardising units and refitting comparable regression models where necessary. Coalminers and talc workers had similar exposure levels on average. PVC workers had lower average exposure levels, but this may have been due, at least in part, to an underestimation of cumulative dust exposure in this population. Coalminers showed a decline of 0.19 standardised units of FEV1 for each 100 units increase in dust exposure, 0.26 standardised units in talc workers and 0.66 units in PVC workers. Relative risks of reporting symptoms were very similar for coalminers and heavy clay workers, but could not be calculated for talc or PVC workers. Allowing for possible underestimation of the PVC exposures, these risks of respiratory ill health were clearly of the same orders of magnitude in the occupations studied. Further more detailed cross- sectional or longitudinal analyses on the coalminers' data sets are thus likely to be informative about risks of dusty exposures in other industries. 11 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Davis; B.W.N. Fitzpatrick; J.P. Sharpe; A.A. Haasz

    2008-04-01

    The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.

  10. House dust mite control measures for asthma: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. We performed a systematic review of the randomized trials that had assessed the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma, and had compared active interventions with placebo or no...

  11. On Dust Charging Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.; Tsintsadze, Levan N.

    2008-01-01

    A general derivation of the charging equation of a dust grain is presented, and indicated where and when it can be used. A problem of linear fluctuations of charges on the surface of the dust grain is discussed.

  12. House dust mite control measures for asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite...... antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library (last searches Nov 2007), reference lists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in people with asthma known to be sensitive to house dust mites......), the standardised mean difference was 0.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.10 to 0.10). There were no statistically significant differences either in number of patients improved (relative risk 1.01, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.27), asthma symptom scores (standardised mean difference -0.04, 95% CI -0.15 to 0...

  13. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  14. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  15. Microwave assisted preparation of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) for orthopedic applications: A novel solution to the exothermicity problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two interesting features of this paper. First, we report herein a novel microwave assisted technique to prepare phosphate based orthopedic cements, which do not generate any exothermicity during setting. The exothermic reactions during the setting of phosphate cements can cause tissue damage during the administration of injectable compositions and hence a solution to the problem is sought via microwave processing. This solution through microwave exposure is based on a phenomenon that microwave irradiation can remove all water molecules from the alkaline earth phosphate cement paste to temporarily stop the setting reaction while preserving the active precursor phase in the formulation. The setting reaction can be initiated a second time by adding aqueous medium, but without any exothermicity. Second, a special emphasis is placed on using this technique to synthesize magnesium phosphate cements for orthopedic applications with their enhanced mechanical properties and possible uses as drug and protein delivery vehicles. The as-synthesized cements were evaluated for the occurrences of exothermic reactions, setting times, presence of Mg-phosphate phases, compressive strength levels, microstructural features before and after soaking in (simulated body fluid) SBF, and in vitro cytocompatibility responses. The major results show that exposure to microwaves solves the exothermicity problem, while simultaneously improving the mechanical performance of hardened cements and reducing the setting times. As expected, the cements are also found to be cytocompatible. Finally, it is observed that this process can be applied to calcium phosphate cements system (CPCs) as well. Based on the results, this microwave exposure provides a novel technique for the processing of injectable phosphate bone cement compositions. - Highlights: • A microwave assisted system for bone cement manufacturing • A solution to exothermicity problem of acid–base reaction based bone cement

  16. Dusts and Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ABOUT DUSTS AND MOLDS? Tiny dust particles and mold spores can be inhaled into the lungs. Dusts that come from a living source (“organic dusts”) such as hair, bedding, hay, grain, silage, and dried urine and feces are most dangerous. ...

  17. Development of dust recycling system and dust cleaner in pipe during vitrification of simulated non-radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For utilizing vitrification to treat low and intermediate level waste, industrial pilot plant was designed and constructed in October 1999 at Daejeon, Korea through the joint research program among NETEC, MOBIS and SGN. More than 70 tests were performed on simulated IER, DAW etc. including key nuclide surrogate(Cs, Co); this plant has been shown to vitrify the target waste effectively and safely, however, some dust are generated from the HTF(High Temperature Filter) as a secondary waste. In case of long term operation, it is also concerned that pipe plugging can be occurred due to deposited dust in cooling pipe namely, connecting pipe between CCM(Cold Crucible Melter) and HTF. In this regard, we have developed the special complementary system of the off-gas treatment system to recycle the dust from HTF to CCM and to remove the interior dust of cooling pipe. Main concept of the dust recycling is to feed the dust to the CCM as a slurry state; this system is regarded as of an important position in the viewpoint of volume reduction, waste disposal cost and glass melt control in CCM. The role of DRS(Dust Recycling System) is to recycle the major glass components and key nuclides; this system is served to lower glass viscosity and increase waste solubility by recycling B, Na, Li components into glass melt and also to re-entrain and incorporate into glass melt like Cs, Co. Therefore dust recycling is helpful to control the molten glass; it is unnecessary to consider a separate dust treatment system like a cementation equipment. The effects of Dust Cleaner are to prevent the pipe plugging due to dust and to treat the deposited dust by raking the dust into CCM. During the pilot vitrification test, overall performance assessment was successfully performed; DRS and Dust Cleaner are found to be useful and effective for recycling the dust from HTF and also removing the dust in cooling pipe. The obtained operational data and operational experiences will be used as a basis of the

  18. Interactions between chloride and cement-paste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberon, Fabien; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique; Zanni, Hélène; Bresson, Bruno; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Malosse, Lucie; Gan, Zehong

    2005-02-01

    The durability of cement-based materials with respect to exterior aggressions is one of the current priorities in civil engineering. Depending on their use, the cement-based materials can be exposed to different types of aggressive environments. For instance, damages to concrete structures in contact with a saline environment (sea water on bridges, deicing salts on roads, etc.) are of utmost importance. Upon exposure to saline water, Cl- ions penetrate into the structures and subsequently lead to reinforcement corrosion. Chloride attack is often combined with other aggressive influences such as temperature (e.g., freezing) or the ingress of other ions (e.g., sulfates in sea water). We therefore aim to explore the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on the structural chemistry of cement paste. Existing studies about reinforcement corrosion by chloride have focused on the penetration of Cl- ions and the comparison between "free" ions (water-soluble ions) and bound ones. However, little is known about the fixation mechanisms, the localization of Cl in the cement matrix and the structural interaction between Cl and the silicate and aluminate hydrate phases present in cement paste. We present here results of a multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance study on the fixation of chloride in the hydration products and the characterization of new phases potentially appearing due to chloride ingress. PMID:15833625

  19. New directions: Mineral dust and ozone - Heterogeneous chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, S.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols, the tiny solid or liquid particles suspended in air and produced from natural sources and anthropogenic activities, continue to contribute the largest uncertainty to radiative forcing (IPCC, 2013). Aerosol particles give rise to radiative forcing directly through scattering and absorption of solar and infrared radiation in the atmosphere. Aerosols also give rise to indirect radiative forcing by modifying the cloud optical properties and lifetimes. Among the aerosol species mineral dust and black carbon cause a warming (positive forcing) while sulphate and sea salt cause a cooling (negative forcing) of the Earth-atmosphere system. In tropics and sub-tropics mineral dust is a major contributor to aerosol loading and optical thickness. The global source strength of dust aerosol varies significantly on spatial and temporal scales. The source regions of dust are mainly deserts, dry lake beds, and semi-arid regions, in addition to drier regions where vegetation has been reduced or soil surfaces that are disturbed by man made activities. Anthropogenic activities mainly related to agriculture such as harvesting, ploughing, overgrazing, and cement production and transport also produce mineral dust. An estimated 2500 terragram (Tg, 1012 g) of mineral dust is emitted into the atmosphere per year, and dominates the aerosol mass over continental regions in south Asia and China accounting for ∼35% of the total aerosol mass (IPCC, 2013). In India, dust is prevalent throughout the north and western India during the year and peaks during premonsoon season.

  20. Health assessment for Northwestern States Portland Cement Company, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Region 10. CERCLIS No. IAD980852461. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-29

    The West Quarry Site/Northwestern States Portland Cement Company is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the National Priority Lists (NPL). The site is a 150-acre old abandoned quarry (including kiln dust deposits and the flooded portion which contains contaminated water), located in the western portion of approximately 250 acres of land owned by the Northwestern States Portland Cement Company. Ten monitoring wells were installed at various locations surrounding the site at depths ranging from 14 to 60.6 feet; wells north of the site were located between the pond and Calmus Creek. In July 1987, 1 groundwater sample from each monitoring well, was analyzed for sulfates, total metals, dissolved metals and pH (E E/FIT). Arsenic and lead were quantitatively identified in some of the samples. The site is considered to be of public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from potential exposure to hazardous substances via soil, surface water, groundwater, and air.

  1. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  2. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I- and IO3- species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and Eh of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  3. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Akbar-zadeh Baghban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used inrestorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate(HEMA molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and mayaffect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a largesurface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontictreatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of tworesin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvardusing rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internaldiameter 5-mm, height 2-mm were made and divided into three groups. Each group wasfilled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, PanaviaF2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequentlycultured in 6-well plates of 5×105 cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay(ELISA and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay,the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure.Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significantdifference (HSD Tukey tests.Results: This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the differenttime intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals.After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweekintervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showedthat cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (p<0.005, cytotoxicityincreased significantly in the Rely X Plus group with time (p<0.001, and the

  4. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  5. Martian and Asteroid Dusts as Toxicological Risks for Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    As the lunar dust toxicity project winds down, our attention is drawn to the potential toxicity of dust present at the surface of more distant celestial objects. Lunar dust has proven to be surprisingly toxic to the respiratory systems of test animals, so one might expect dust from other celestial bodies to hold toxicological surprises for us. At this point all one can do is consider what should be known about these dusts to characterize their toxicity, and then ask to what extent that information is known. In an ideal world it might be possible to suggest an exposure standard based on the known properties of a celestial dust without direct testing of the dust in laboratory animals. Factors known to affect the toxicity of mineral dusts under some conditions include the following: particle size distribution, particle shape/porosity, mineralogical properties (crystalline vs. amorphous), chemical properties and composition, and surface reactivity. Data from a recent Japanese mission to the S-type asteroid Itokawa revealed some surprises about the dust found there, given that there is only a very week gravitational field to hold the dust on the surface. On Mars the reddish-brown dust is widely distributed by global dust storms and by local clusters of dust devils. Past surface probes have revealed some of the properties of dust found there. Contemporary data from Curiosity and other surface probes will be weighed against the data needed to set a defensible safe exposure limit. Gaps will emerge.

  6. Dust exposure, pneumoconiosis, and mortality of coalminers.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, B. G.; Jacobsen, M.

    1985-01-01

    General mortality in approximately 25 000 British coalminers over 22 year periods ending in 1980 was 13% lower on average than in English and Welsh men in the same regions of Britain. There were significant within region variations between collieries, and standardised mortality ratios increased during the later years of the follow up, approaching or slightly exceeding 100 in most of the 20 coalmines studied. Age specific comparisons of 22 year survival rates were made in subgroups. Relative r...

  7. Cementing porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadachkoria, D

    2009-12-01

    The clinical success of fixed prosthodontic restorations can be complex and involve multifaceted procedures. Preparation design, oral hygiene/micro flora, mechanical forces, and restorative materials are only a few of the factors which contribute to overall success. One key factor to success is choosing the proper cement. Popular use of cements for PFM crowns has shifted from zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements to resin-reinforced glass ionomer, or RRGI, cements. This change has been rapid and profound. Dental cements have always been less than ideal materials, but this is shift to the relatively new RRGI category justified. Resin-reinforced glass ionomer (RRGI) cements appear to be better than zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements when placing porcelain-to-metal crowns. RRGI cements, such as RelyX Luting, Fuji Plus and Vitremer Luting Cement, satisfy more of the ideal characteristics of PFM cementation than any other previous cement. Expansion of all three cements has not caused any apparent problems with the cements when used with PFM or metal crowns, but these cements, however, should be avoided when cementing all-ceramic crowns. PMID:20090144

  8. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  9. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted for...... the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability in...

  10. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  11. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels of Cements and Cement Composites in the Slovak Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Eštoková; Lenka Palaščáková

    2013-01-01

    The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices) of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in t...

  12. Assessment of the compatibility of wood and plastic with cement for their recycling in cement composites

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, André De; Caldeira, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The compatibility between maritime pine wood and cement, and between plastic (LDPE) and cement, was assessed for the recycling of wood and plastic in cement composites. Temperature vs. time profiles of cement setting were registered and compatibility indices were calculated. Results indicate that recycling of plastics in plastic-cement composites does not pose any questions regarding chemical compatibility. However, maritime pine hinders cement setting in some extent. So, in or...

  13. Lung cancer among asbestos cement workers. A Swedish cohort study and a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohlson, C G; Hogstedt, C

    1985-01-01

    A cohort study of 1176 Swedish asbestos cement workers did not indicate any asbestos related excess mortality. Possible explanations of the negative outcome are relatively low exposure levels and the predominant use of chrysotile in production. Such a tentative conclusion is supported by a review of five mortality studies of workers exposed to asbestos cement that report considerable differences in relative risks for lung cancer. These differences could be explained by various degrees of cumu...

  14. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  15. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  16. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  17. Continuous respirable mine dust monitor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, B.K.; Williams, K.L.; Stein, S.W. [and others

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published the Report of the Coal Mine Respirable Dust Task Group, Review of the Program to Control Respirable Coal Mine Dust in the United States. As one of its recommendations, the report called for the accelerated development of two mine dust monitors: (1) a fixed-site monitor capable of providing continuous information on dust levels to the miner, mine operator, and to MSHA, if necessary, and (2) a personal sampling device capable of providing both a short-term personal exposure measurement as well as a full-shift measurement. In response to this recommendation, the U.S. Bureau of Mines initiated the development of a fixed-site machine-mounted continuous respirable dust monitor. The technology chosen for monitor development is the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co., Inc. tapered element oscillating microbalance. Laboratory and in-mine tests have indicated that, with modification, this sensor can meet the humidity and vibration requirements for underground coal mine use. The U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Research Center (DOE-PRC) is continuing that effort by developing prototypes of a continuous dust monitor based on this technology. These prototypes are being evaluated in underground coal mines as they become available. This effort, conducted as a joint venture with MSHA, is nearing completion with every promise of success.

  18. Mortality of workers employed in two asbestos cement manufacturing plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, J. M.; Weill, H; Hammad, Y Y

    1987-01-01

    In a study of the mortality experience of 6931 employees of two New Orleans asbestos cement products manufacturing plants over 95% were traced. Chrysotile was the primary fibre used in both plants. Plant 1 also used small amounts of amosite and, later, crocidolite irregularly whereas plant 2 used crocidolite steadily in pipe production. Previously reported exposure concentration estimates were revised, based on additional air sampling data and re-evaluation of these data. Workers in the two p...

  19. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission

  20. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A; Verdonschot, Nico

    2010-11-16

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface at various load levels in terms of plastic displacement and crack formation. Two FEA models were created, which were based on micro-computed tomography data of two physical cement-bone interface specimens. These models were subjected to tensile fatigue loads with four different magnitudes. Three deformation modes of the cement were considered: 'only creep', 'only damage' or 'creep and damage'. The interfacial plastic deformation, the crack reduction as a result of creep and the interfacial stresses in the bone were monitored. The results demonstrate that, although some models failed early, the majority of plastic displacement was caused by fatigue damage, rather than cement creep. However, cement creep does decrease the crack formation in the cement up to 20%. Finally, while cement creep hardly influences the stress levels in the bone, fatigue damage of the cement considerably increases the stress levels in the bone. We conclude that at low load levels the plastic displacement is mainly caused by creep. At moderate to high load levels, however, the plastic displacement is dominated by fatigue damage and is hardly affected by creep, although creep reduced the number of cracks in moderate to high load region. PMID:20692663

  1. Dust studies in DIII-D and TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of naturally occurring and artificially introduced carbon dust are conducted in DIII-D and TEXTOR. Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER by contributing to tritium inventory rise and leading to radiological and explosion hazards. In DIII-D, dust does not present operational concerns except immediately after entry vents. In the first 2 - 3 plasma discharges after an entry vent cameras detect thousands of dust particles per discharge. After a few days of operations (∼ 70 discharges) dust levels are reduced to a few observed events per discharge. Energetic plasma disruptions produce significant amounts of dust. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for the estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. Submicron sized dust is routinely observed using Mie scattering from a Nd:Yag laser. The source is strongly correlated with the presence of Type I ELMs. Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust is studied in DIII-D and TEXTOR by injecting micron-size dust in plasma discharges. In DIII-D, a sample holder filled with ∼ 30 mg of dust is introduced in the lower divertor and exposed to high-power lower single-null ELMing H-mode discharges with strike points swept across the divertor floor. After a brief exposure (∼ 0.1 s) at the outer strike point, part of the dust is injected into the plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3 and resulting in a twofold increase of the radiated power. Individual dust particles are observed moving at velocities of 10 - 100 m/s, predominantly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the drag force from the deuteron flow and in agreement with modelling by the 3D DustT code. In TEXTOR, instrumented dust holders with 1 - 45 mg of dust are exposed in the scrape-off layer 0-2 cm radially outside of the last closed flux surface in neutral beam heated discharges (NBI power of 1.4 MW). Dust is launched either in the beginning of the

  2. Cementation of Loose Sand Particles based on Bio-cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Hui; QIAN Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Loose sand particles could be cemented to sandstone by bio-cement (microbial induced magnesium carbonate). The bio-sandstone was firstly prepared, and then the compressive strength and the porosity of the sandstone cemented by microbial induced magnesium carbonate were tested to characterize the cementation effectiveness. In addition, the formed mineral composition and the microstructure of bio-sandstone were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results show that the feasibility of binding loose sand particles using microbial induced magnesium carbonate precipitation is available and the acquired compressive strength of bio-sandstone can be excellent at certain ages. Moreover, the compressive strength and the porosity could be improved with the increase of microbial induced magnesium carbonate content. XRD results indicate that the morphology of magnesium carbonate induced by microbe appears as needles and SEM results show that the cementation of loose sand particles to sandstone mainly relies on the microbial induced formation of magnesium carbonate precipitation around individual particles and at particle-particle contacts.

  3. Effect of mattress and pillow encasings on children with asthma and house dust mite allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne; Høst, Arne; Niklassen, Ulla; Hansen, Lars G; Nielsen, Frank; Pedersen, Søren; Osterballe, Ole; Veggerby, Chris; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2003-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergy is a frequent cause of allergic asthma in children. Reduction of exposure seems to be the most logical way to treat these patients.......House dust mite (HDM) allergy is a frequent cause of allergic asthma in children. Reduction of exposure seems to be the most logical way to treat these patients....

  4. "Kicking Up Some Dust": An Experimental Investigation Relating Lunar Dust Erosive Wear to Solar Power Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpagazehe, Jeremiah N.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    2013-01-01

    The exhaust from retrograde rockets fired by spacecraft landing on the Moon can accelerate lunar dust particles to high velocities. Information obtained from NASA's Apollo 12 mission confirmed that these high-speed dust particles can erode nearby structures. This erosive wear damage can affect the performance of optical components such as solar concentrators. Solar concentrators are objects which collect sunlight over large areas and focus the light into smaller areas for purposes such as heating and energy production. In this work, laboratory-scale solar concentrators were constructed and subjected to erosive wear by the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant. The concentrators were focused on a photovoltaic cell and the degradation in electrical power due to the erosive wear was measured. It was observed that even moderate exposure to erosive wear from lunar dust simulant resulted in a 40 percent reduction in power production from the solar concentrators.

  5. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  6. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 8 May 2002) The Science This image, centered near 50.0 S and 17.7 W displays dust devil tracks on the surface. Most of the lighter portions of the image likely have a thin veneer of dust settled on the surface. As a dust devil passes over the surface, it acts as a vacuum and picks up the dust, leaving the darker substrate exposed. In this image there is a general trend of many of the tracks running from east to west or west to east, indicating the general wind direction. There is often no general trend present in dust devil tracks seen in other images. The track patterns are quite ephemeral and can completely change or even disappear over the course of a few months. Dust devils are one of the mechanisms that Mars uses to constantly pump dust into the ubiquitously dusty atmosphere. This atmospheric dust is one of the main driving forces of the present Martian climate. The Story Vrrrrooooooooom. Think of a tornado, the cartoon Tasmanian devil, or any number of vacuum commercials that powerfully suck up swirls of dust and dirt. That's pretty much what it's like on the surface of Mars a lot of the time. Whirlpools of wind called

  7. Environmental impact assessment of 3000 tons per day (TDP) cement plant - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental impact study was carried out for a 3000 tpd cement plant to be located in Attock district. The plant will employ electrostatic precipitators to keep dust emissions belong 50 mg/Nm/sup 3/. Field survey was conducted to study the environmental condition of the area. pollutant dispersion modelling was used to assess So/sub 2/, Nox and Total Suspended Particulates (TSP) concentrations. The impacts of project on physical and human environment were considered and necessary mitigation measures recommended. (author)

  8. Case study: improvement of performance of cement industry rotary kilns by using a solid radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present report, residence time distribution (RTD) of the cement blended raw meal has been determined by the use of 7,4x108 Bq (20 mCi) of La 40 as a dust radioactive tracer in the chemical form of La2O3. Five scintillation detector were installed alongside the kiln. Analysis and interpretation of response curves were made to draw conclusions about the improvement of the rotary kiln performance

  9. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage

  10. Intraoperative monitoring for safety of total hip arthroplasty using third-generation cementing technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zi-jian; ZHANG Ke; YANG Hong; LIU Yan; L(U) Jing-qiao

    2009-01-01

    Background Controversies on the safety of the cement application between cemented and uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) have been existing for decades. The purpose of this study was to observe the changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and oxygen pressure (PaO2) during cemented THA, and to evaluate the intraoperative safety of using the third-generation cementing technique and investigate whether the intraoperative risk is higher in acute femoral neck fracture patients than non-traumatic patients. Methods Forty-two patients who underwent cemented THA between November 2005 and September 2007 were prospectively included in this study. The third-generation cementing technique as vacuum mixing and pulsatile lavage was used strictly. The MAP and HR were monitored and documented during each operation. Blood gas analysis was performed at exposure, cup implantation, stem implantation and wound closure. MAP, HR and PaO2 were compared between pre- and post-cement application. Comparisons of MAP, HR and PaO2 between patients with acute femoral neck fracture and non-traumatic patiens were performed as well. Results No intraoperative cardiopulmonary complication occurred in these cases. No obvious changes were observed in MAP, HR and PaO2 after cement application. There was no significant difference in MAP, HR and PaO2 between acute femoral fracture patients (18 patients) and non-traumatic patients (24 patients).Conclusions The results of this study suggested that the invasive blood pressure monitoring and blood gas analysis are essential for patients undergoing cemented THA, especially for patients with femoral neck fracture. The third-generation cementing technique is safe to use in THA.

  11. Morphological and mineralogical forms of technogenic magnetic particles in industrial dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiera, T.; Jabłońska, M.; Strzyszcz, Z.; Rachwal, M.

    2011-08-01

    The morphology, mineralogy, and magnetic properties of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) were analysed in four kinds of industrial dust produced during high temperature technological processes of different branches of industry (lignite and hard coal burning, cement production, coke production). The study was carried out by means of magnetic susceptibility measurement, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and thermomagnetic analysis. To assess the total content of the magnetic fraction in bulk dust samples, mass specific magnetic susceptibility (χ) was measured and then a physical separation of magnetic particles (mostly of technogenic origin) was conducted. The dusts revealed high diversity of the χ value, which was dependent on the magnetic particles' concentration and mineralogical composition. Significant differences in the magnetic mineralogy of dusts coming from different branches of industry were observed. In fly ashes from coal combustion, spherical forms (typical ferromagnetic spherules) of magnetite, magnesioferrite, and maghemite were mostly observed. In dusts after lignite combustion a higher content of antiferromagnetic hematite and maghemite was observed due to the lower temperature of lignite combustion. In cement dusts a large variety of iron minerals were observed including magnetite, maghemite, hematite, ferrites, and goethite. The characteristic mineral forms for cement dusts were Ca-ferrites and co-occurrence of calcite, anhydrite, gypsum, and bassanite with a magnetic mineral fraction. The magnetic fraction produced by the coke industry was mostly in the form of tightly compacted aggregates with well-formed crystal structures where ferromagnetic pyrrhotite was characteristic feature. The TMPs could be distinctive for pollution source identification and serve as a tracer of dust origin and (if found in topsoil) identification of soil pollution sources.

  12. Seepage/Cement Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) pertaining to this task defines the work scopes and objectives for development of various submodels for the Physical and Chemical Environment Abstraction Model for TSPA-LA. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) for this specific task establishes that an evaluation be performed of the chemical reactions between seepage that has entered the drift and concrete which might be used in the repository emplacement drifts. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) then states that the potential effects of these water/grout reactions on chemical conditions in the drift be assessed factoring in the influence of carbonation and the relatively small amount of grout. This task is also directed at: (1) developing a conceptualization of important cement/seepage interactions and potential impacts on EBS performance, (2) performing a screening analysis to assess the importance of cement/seepage interactions. As the work progresses and evolves on other studies, specifically the Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment (P andCE) Model (in progress), many of the issues associated with items 1 and 2, above, will be assessed. Such issues include: (1) Describing the mineralogy of the specified cementitious grout and its evolution over time. (2) Describing the composition of the water before contacting the grout. (3) Developing reasonable upper-bound estimates for the composition of water contacting grout, emphasizing pH and concentrations for anions such as sulfate. (4) Evaluating the equilibration of cement-influenced water with backfill and gas-phase CO2. (5) Developing reasonable-bound estimates for flow rate of affected water into the drift. The concept of estimating an ''upper-bound'' range for reaction between the grout and the seepage, particularly in terms of pH is based on equilibrium being established between the seepage and the grout. For example, this analysis can be based on equilibrium being established as

  13. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models. PMID:18774136

  14. Characterization of cement paste as engineered barrier of borehole repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of axial rupture by compression of cylindrical cement paste samples are presented. This is part of a research on cement paste behavior aiming at investigating the durability of cementitious materials in the environment of repositories for radioactive waste. Portland cement paste is intended to be used as a backfill in a deep borehole for disposal of sealed radiation sources which concept is under development. The service life of the engineered barrier materials plays an important role in the long term safety of such facilities. Accelerated tests in laboratory are being used to evaluate the performance of cement paste under the temperature expected at some hundred meters below grade, under exposure to the radiation emitted by the sources, and under the attack of aggressive chemicals dissolved in the groundwater, during the millennia necessary for the decay of the most active and long-lived radionuclides present in the waste. The large variability in results of mechanical strength as measured by axial compression of cylindrical samples is the subject of this short communication. (author)

  15. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  16. Retention of Root Canal Posts: Effect of Cement Film Thickness, Luting Cement, and Post Pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Flury, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc...

  17. [Antimicrobial activity of orthodontic band cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavic, J; Arriagada, M; Elgueta, J; García, C

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of enamel decalcification and caries beneath orthodontic bands, has indicated the need for a new enamel binding adhesive orthodontic cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, in vitro, on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus, acidophillus, of three materials used to cements the orthodontic bands. The cements studied were: Zinc phosphate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, and Policarboxylate cement. Thirty petri plates were seeded with S. mutans, and thirty with L. acidophillus; on each plate three pellet were placed, one of each cement studied. Petri plates were incubated under microaerophilic conditions at 37 C, and checked at 72 hrs. for Streptococcus, mutans, and four days for Lactobacillus acidophillus to evaluate the inhibition zone. The results were tabulated for each material. It was demonstrated that exists important variations in the antimicrobial properties of the materials studied, as in the microbial sensitivity to these cements. PMID:2135908

  18. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał A. Glinicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement—ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  19. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  20. Cement Sheath Integrity During Thermal Cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Jesús De

    2015-01-01

    In the construction process of oil and gas wells, primary cementing constitutes a critical procedure of placing a cement sheath in the annulus between casing and formation, or between the casing strings. The main purpose is to provide mechanical stability to the wellbore and to ensure zonal isolation through the entire well service lifetime. Failures to achieve a proper primary cementing, and to ensure long-term sealing capabilities of the cement sheath, may severely limit the abi...

  1. Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

  2. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  3. Effective dust control systems on concrete dowel drilling machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echt, Alan S; Sanderson, Wayne T; Mead, Kenneth R; Feng, H Amy; Farwick, Daniel R; Farwick, Dawn Ramsey

    2016-09-01

    Rotary-type percussion dowel drilling machines, which drill horizontal holes in concrete pavement, have been documented to produce respirable crystalline silica concentrations above recommended exposure criteria. This places operators at potential risk for developing health effects from exposure. United States manufacturers of these machines offer optional dust control systems. The effectiveness of the dust control systems to reduce respirable dust concentrations on two types of drilling machines was evaluated under controlled conditions with the machines operating inside large tent structures in an effort to eliminate secondary exposure sources not related to the dowel-drilling operation. Area air samples were collected at breathing zone height at three locations around each machine. Through equal numbers of sampling rounds with the control systems randomly selected to be on or off, the control systems were found to significantly reduce respirable dust concentrations from a geometric mean of 54 mg per cubic meter to 3.0 mg per cubic meter on one machine and 57 mg per cubic meter to 5.3 mg per cubic meter on the other machine. This research shows that the dust control systems can dramatically reduce respirable dust concentrations by over 90% under controlled conditions. However, these systems need to be evaluated under actual work conditions to determine their effectiveness in reducing worker exposures to crystalline silica below hazardous levels. PMID:27074062

  4. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well

  5. PERFORMANCE OF PULVERIZED SLAG-SUBSTITUTED CEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The Portland cement is equivalently substituted by slag micropowders with various specific areas. The workability,activity and acid-corrosion resistance of the slag-substituted cements are investigated,the activation of gypsum is discussed,also the porosity and pore distribution of mortars of the slag micropowders cement are determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  6. The hydration of reactive cement-in-polymer dispersions studied by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of two novel cement-in-polymer (c/p) dispersions, namely cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) and cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol) upon exposure to water at room temperature was investigated by a combination of various NMR methods. The swelling, cracking, and the water ingress were monitored non-destructively using 1H single point imaging. The hydration of the cement matrix was investigated using 29Si NMR whilst 13C CPMAS NMR spectra allowed the quantification of the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction of poly(vinyl acetate) into poly(vinyl alcohol). The polymer controls the rate of water ingress and swelling which in turn determines the behaviour of the c/p dispersions upon exposure to water. For the cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol), the rates of water ingress and swelling are much faster than the hydration of the clinker whilst for the cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) the slow rates of the two processes allow the formation of a cementious matrix which assures the stability of the sample.

  7. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yufei Yang; Jingchuan Xue; Qifei Huang

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, ...

  8. Performance of Periwinkle Shell Ash Blended Cement Concrete Exposed to Magnesium Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umoh A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the compressive strength of periwinkle shell ash (PSA blended cement concrete in magnesium sulphate medium. Specimens were prepared from designed characteristics strength of 25 MPa. The cement replacement with PSA ranged between 0 and 40% by volume. A total of 180 cube specimens were cast and cured in water. At 28 days curing, 45 specimens each were transferred into magnesium sulphate of 1%, 3%, and 5% solution, while others were continuously cured in water and tested at 62, 92, and 152 days. The results revealed a higher loss in compressive strength with the control mix, and that it increases with increased in MgSO4 concentration and exposure period, whereas, the attack on the PSA blended cement concrete was less and the least value recorded by 10% PSA content. Therefore, the study concluded that the optimum percentage replacement of cement with 10% PSA could mitigate magnesium sulphate attack.

  9. Dust Temperatures in the Galactic Center Lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchilla-Garcia, Luis G.; Morris, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic Center Lobe (GCL), located toward positive latitudes above the Galactic center and extending to a distance of ~150 pc, is apparently a bubble of hot gas that is manifested at all wavelengths from radio to X-rays. In mid- to far-infrared dust emission, the GCL shows several superposed, elongated structures oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane. Among them are the dust ridge centered on AFGL5376 and another defining the Double Helix Nebula (DHN). Using temperature maps constructed from a combination of archival WISE and SPITZER data, we have found that these features exhibit dramatic spatial variations in their dust temperatures, with the DHN and the AFGL5376 ridge being much warmer, and therefore substantially brighter in the 20 - 25 µm range, than several other linear features. Furthermore, the cooler linear structures tend to have rather constant dust temperatures, in sharp contrast to the highly variable emission within the warmer features. We will summarize the implications of these results for the nature of the dust heating sources. The candidate heating mechanisms are direct photon heating by stars in the central cluster, thermal heating by exposure to a hot coronal gas, and the impact of ions driven by magnetosonic waves or shocks.

  10. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, S; Maniar, A; Suganya, O M

    2015-11-01

    In this study, Wood Ash (WA) prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength) of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45) and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20%) including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper. PMID:26644928

  11. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chowdhury

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Wood Ash (WA prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45 and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20% including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM, strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper.

  12. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español Why are dust storms a concern? A dust storm is a moving ... on Human Health (US Geological Survey) Chemicals in Dust Storms Are these chemicals in MY community? Particulate Matter ...

  13. 'Nuisance Dust' - a Case for Recalibration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datson, Hugh; Marker, Brian

    2013-04-01

    This paper considers the case for a review and recalibration of limit values and acceptability criteria for 'nuisance dust', a widely encountered but poorly defined and regulated aspect of particulate matter pollution. Specific dust fractions such as PM10 and asbestiforms are well characterised and have limit values enshrined in legislation. National, and international, limit values for acceptable concentrations of PM10 and other fractions of particulate matter have been defined and agreed. In the United Kingdom (UK), these apply to both public and workplace exposures. By contrast, there is no standard definition or universal criteria against which acceptable levels for 'nuisance dust' can be assessed. This has implications for land-use planning and resource utilisation. Without meaningful limit values, inappropriate development might take place too near to residential dwellings or land containing economically important mineral resources may be effectively sterilised. Furthermore, the expression 'nuisance dust' is unhelpful in that 'nuisance' has a specific meaning in environmental law whilst 'nuisance dust' is often taken to mean 'generally visible particulate matter'. As such, it is associated with the social and broader environmental impacts of particulate matter. PM10 concentrations are usually expressed as a mass concentration over time. These can be determined using a range of techniques. While results from different instruments are generally comparable, data obtained from alternative methods for measuring 'nuisance dust' are rarely interchangeable. In the UK, many of the methods typically used are derived from approaches developed under the HMIP (Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution) regime in the 1960s onwards. Typical methods for 'nuisance dust' sampling focus on measurement of dust mass (from the weight of dust collected in an open container over time) or dust soiling (from loss of reflectance and or obscuration of a surface discoloured by dust over

  14. Biomonitoring with epiphytic lichens as a complementary method for the study of mercury contamination near a cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubič Mlakar, Tanja; Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Jeran, Zvonka; Vuk, Tomaž; Mrak, Tanja; Fajon, Vesna

    2011-10-01

    The study was focused on understanding the mercury contamination caused by a cement plant. Active and passive biomonitoring with epiphytic lichens was combined with other instrumental measurements of mercury emissions, mercury concentrations in raw materials, elemental mercury concentrations in air, quantities of dust deposits, temperatures, precipitation and other measurements from the cement plant's regular monitoring programme. Active biomonitoring with transplanted lichens Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf was performed at seven of the most representative sites around the cement plant and one distant reference site for periods of 3, 6 and 12 months. In situ lichens of different species were collected at the beginning of the monitoring period at the same sites. Mercury speciation of the plant exhaust gas showed that the main form of emitted mercury is reactive gaseous mercury Hg²⁺, which is specific for cement plants. Elemental mercury in air was measured in different meteorological conditions using a portable mercury detector. Concentrations in air were relatively low (on average below 10 ng m⁻³). In situ lichens showed Hg concentrations comparable to lichens taken from the background area for transplantation, indicating that the local pollution is not severe. Transplanted lichens showed an increase of mercury, especially at one site near the cement plant. A correlation between precipitation and Hg uptake was not found probably due to a rather uniform rainfall in individual periods. Dust deposits did not influence Hg uptake significantly. Lichens vitality was affected over longer biomonitoring periods, probably due to some elements in dust particles, their alkalinity and the influence of other emissions. Mercury uptake measured in vital transplanted lichens was in a good correlation with the working hours (i.e. emitted Hg quantity) of the kiln. The study showed that selected lichens could be used to detect low to moderate Hg emissions from a cement plant

  15. Thoughts on the Current Cement Industry Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhihe

    2003-01-01

    According to the analysis of cement capacity andits relations with macro economy running index, the mainreasons for the present rapid development of cement capacityare the rapid development of economy and the shot up ofwhole society fixed asset investment. According to the presentspeed of economy development, cement still enjoys a po-tential increase, So here has not been an overall excessivepopularity of cement industry. The best way to prevent lowlevel repeated construction is to promote the development ofnew dry- process cement as well as try to get rid of blindness.

  16. Methods to assess airborne concentrations of cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, M

    1987-01-01

    Assessment of concentrations of airborne cotton dust in the factory is necessary to determine adherence to applicable Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) on a day-to-day basis, as well as for investigatory studies of an epidemiological nature. The latter are required on an ongoing basis to determine the adequacy of PELs to prevent disease in the exposed population. A strategy of sampling includes considerations of the numbers of samples to be obtained for statistical validity and the locations of samples. Current practice is to obtain more "personal samples" of exposure wherever possible, but with regard to cotton dust, instrumentation is not available for such sampling. In the U.S., the vertical elutriator is the instrument of choice for determining the concentrations of cotton dust in air. Results are expressed as milligrams of airborne particulate (cotton dust) per cubic meter. PMID:3434562

  17. Special recipe for cement solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABB Atom's MOSS is a compact, mobile system for immobilizing radwaste in cement. Various ''recipes'' have been developed to meet stringent end product requirements. A version of MOSS, described here, was delivered to Borssele last year and has completed two solidification campaigns to date. (author)

  18. Effect of temporary cements on the shear bond strength of luting cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiori-Júnior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, by shear bond strength (SBS testing, the influence of different types of temporary cements on the final cementation using conventional and self-etching resin-based luting cements. Material and Methods: Forty human teeth divided in two halves were assigned to 8 groups (n=10: I and V (no temporary cementation; II and VI: Ca(OH2-based cement; III and VII: zinc oxide (ZO-based cement; IV and VIII: ZO-eugenol (ZOE-based cement. Final cementation was done with RelyX ARC cement (groups I to IV and RelyX Unicem cement (groups V to VIII. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Means were (MPa: I - 3.80 (±1.481; II - 5.24 (±2.297; III - 6.98 (±1.885; IV - 6.54 (±1.459; V - 5.22 (±2.465; VI - 4.48 (±1.705; VII - 6.29 (±2.280; VIII - 2.47 (±2.076. Comparison of the groups that had the same temporary cementation (Groups II and VI; III and VII; IV and VIII showed statistically significant difference (p0.05 for the different luting cements (RelyX TM ARC and RelyX TM Unicem. The groups that had no temporary cementation (Groups I and V did not differ significantly from each other either (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: When temporary cementation was done with ZO- or ZOE-based cements and final cementation was done with RelyX ARC, there was an increase in the SBS compared to the control. In the groups cemented with RelyX Unicem, however, the use of a ZOE-based temporary cement affected negatively the SBS of the luting agent used for final cementation.

  19. Respiratory allergy caused by house dust mites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Linneberg, Allan; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg;

    2015-01-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is a major perennial allergen source and a significant cause of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. However, awareness of the condition remains generally low. This review assesses the links between exposure to HDM, development of the allergic response, and pathologic...... consequences in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We investigate the epidemiology of HDM allergy to explore the interaction between mites and human subjects at the population, individual, and molecular levels. Core and recent publications were identified by using "house dust mite" as a key search...... the literature confound estimates, indicating the need for greater standardization in epidemiologic research. Exposure to allergens depends on multiple ecological strata, including climate and mite microhabitats within the domestic environment, with the latter providing opportunity for intervention...

  20. Dust torus around Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Antal; Horanyi, Mihaly

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of small dust particles generated via the continuous micrometeoroid bombardment of the Martian moons. In addition to Mar's oblateness, we also consider the radiation pressure perturbation that is complicated by the planet's eccentric orbit and tilted rotational axis. Considering the production rates and the lifetimes of dust grains, we show that particles from Deimos with radii of about 15 micrometers are expected to dominate the population of a permanently present and tilted dust torus. This torus has an estimated peak number density of approximately equals 5 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm and an optical depth of approximately equals 4 x 10(exp -8).

  1. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  2. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Hjuler, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used as the...... sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... capacity (Xr). This shows that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  3. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  4. Determinants of Agricultural Pesticide Concentrations in Carpet Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Gunier, Robert B.; Ward, Mary H.; Airola, Matthew; Bell, Erin M.; Colt, Joanne; Nishioka, Marcia; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy; Rull, Rudolph P.; Hertz, Andrew; Metayer, Catherine; Nuckols, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Residential proximity to agricultural pesticide applications has been used as a surrogate for exposure in epidemiologic studies, although little is known about the relationship with levels of pesticides in homes. Objective: We identified determinants of concentrations of agricultural pesticides in dust. Methods: We collected samples of carpet dust and mapped crops within 1,250 m of 89 residences in California. We measured concentrations of seven pesticides used extensively in agri...

  5. Bronchoalveolar lavage in pulmonary mycotoxicosis (organic dust toxic syndrome).

    OpenAIRE

    Lecours, R; Laviolette, M.; Cormier, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of pulmonary mycotoxicosis (organic dust toxic syndrome) are described in which bronchoalveolar lavage was undertaken during the acute phase and after recovery. Both cases occurred after exposure to mould dust in a silo in the course of removing the top mouldy layer of silage or oats at the start of unloading. The workers suffered an acute febrile illness accompanied by cough and dyspnoea. One patient had impaired ventilatory function and both had arterial desaturation in the acute ...

  6. Dust and human health: Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that exposure to fine particulate matter may increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. Until recently, population health related studies examining the effects of particulate matter on human health generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from natural sources. This chapter provides an overview of naturally occurring inorganic mineral dust research and associated human health ailments and some of the challenges in elucidating the etiological mechanisms responsible.

  7. Dust mite (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease ...

  8. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  9. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  10. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  11. Migration of Interplanetary Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.; Taylor, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    We numerically investigate the migration of dust particles with initial orbits close to those of the numbered asteroids, observed trans-Neptunian objects, and Comet Encke. The fraction of silicate asteroidal particles that collided with the Earth during their lifetime varied from 1.1% for 100 micron particles to 0.008% for 1 micron particles. Almost all asteroidal particles with diameter d>4 microns collided with the Sun. The peaks in the migrating asteroidal dust particles' semi-major axis d...

  12. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  13. The cement recycling of the earthquake disaster debris by Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tremendous quantity of earthquake disaster debris and tsunami sediment was resulted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd., a Sumitomo Osaka Cement subsidiary, was the first cement industry company to receive and process such waste materials outside of their usual prefecture area, while the company is performing their treatment and recycling services locally in Hachinohe City and Aomori Prefecture. This report provides an explanation about the recycling mechanism of waste materials and by-products in cement manufacturing process, and introduces an example of actual achievements for the disaster debris treatment by utilizing the cement recycling technologies at the Hachinohe Cement Plant. (author)

  14. Test of dust scattering caused by dumpling of concrete materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviors of dust at the disposal of low-level radioactive concrete waste were investigated for making an estimation of exposure dose of the workers who inhale a contaminated dust in the air. Dust concentration and it's particle size in the air caused by the dumping test of mock concrete materials were measured. The concrete dusts scatter usually by grinding, cutting, and blasting of a lump of concrete. Three test concrete samples of different sizes, such as particulate (crushed stone), broken concrete (small pieces of about 5 mm - 20 cm), and broken concrete (large pieces of about 30 cm) were used in the dumping test. Concentrations of suspended and respirable dust (< 10 μm) in the air were measured by digital aerosol monitors and dust samplers which were located at 4 - 10 m distant from a dropping center. A testing house was built for avoiding from the effects of environment, such as wind direction and wind velocity. The test samples were dropped on the surface of steel plate from about 1 meter height at a low and a high wind condition. In case of the particulate test sample, the dropping height and the wind velocity affected to the dust concentration in the air. The dust scattering was largely suppressed by the uses of water sprinkling, suppression sheet and wet test sample. (Suetake, M.)

  15. An aerosol generator for the resuspension of cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyel, D A; Ellakkani, M; Alarie, Y; Karol, M

    1984-12-01

    An aerosol generator, the Pitt 3 model, was designed, fabricated, and characterized for the resuspension of inhalable particles from bulk cotton dust. The generator was constructed around a loudspeaker whose energy is transferred into an air column through latex rubber dams. This action tumbles the bulk dust, and small particles are loosened which can then be carried out of the column with the air passing through it. Thirty to forty grams of bulk cotton dust produced a stable aerosol concentration for at least 90 min. The maximum output of about 100 mg/m3 can be reduced to lower concentrations by adding dilution air. In one application, the generator produced a stable aerosol cloud in the range of 2 to 30 mg/m3 with a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of about 3 microns and a geometric standard deviation (sigma g) of about 1.5. In another application the concentration in an animal exposure chamber was kept at 20.8 mg/m3 with an MMAD = 2.5 microns and a sigma g = 1.8 for over 6 months. The Pitt 3 generator proved to be trouble-free and produced large amounts of inhalable particles from bulk cotton dust. The generator was also used to generate dust clouds from silica powder, fly ash, and cellulose dust. The only requirement for successful resuspension of any dust with this generator is the presence of small particles in the bulk feed dust. PMID:6506079

  16. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves

  17. The application of the AERMOD model in the environmental health to identify the dispersion area of total suspended particulate from cement industry stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Azizi Jayadipraja

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: AERMOD model can show potential exposure area from cement industry. It needs serious efforts to prevent and minimize the impact to public health. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2044-2049

  18. CO2 reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing, wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 microD. Analyses of 50: 50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings. PMID:19544912

  19. Pleural mesothelioma incidence in the population resident close to an asbestos-cement industry located in an Italian polluted site

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia, Fazzo; Menegozzo, Simona; Soggiu, Maria Eleonora; De Santis, Marco; Santoro, Michele; Cozza, Valentina; Brangi, Amelia; Menegozzo, Massimo; Comba, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The industrial area of "Bagnoli Coroglio" in Naples municipality was defined as a "polluted site of national concern for remediation" in 2000. A steel and a cement plants and an asbestos-cement (Eternit) and a chemical industries operated in the area. AIMS. To estimate pleural mesothelioma incidence in the districts of Naples around the industrial area. METHODS. The area potentially affected by the industrial emissions was identified by modelling; environmental asbestos exposure w...

  20. A novel in situ method for sampling urban soil dust: Particle size distribution, trace metal concentrations, and stable lead isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a novel in situ sampling method was utilized to investigate the concentrations of trace metals and Pb isotope compositions among different particle size fractions in soil dust, bulk surface soil, and corresponding road dust samples collected within an urban environment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the feasibility of using soil dust samples to determine trace metal contamination and potential risks in urban areas in comparison with related bulk surface soil and road dust. The results of total metal loadings and Pb isotope ratios revealed that soil dust is more sensitive than bulk surface soil to anthropogenic contamination in urban areas. The new in situ method is effective at collecting different particle size fractions of soil dust from the surface of urban soils, and that soil dust is a critical indicator of anthropogenic contamination and potential human exposure in urban settings. -- Highlights: ► A novel in situ sampling method for soil dust was proposed. ► Different particle size fractions of soil dust and bulk soil were studied. ► Soil dust is critical for understanding anthropogenic pollution in urban areas. ► Soil dust can be useful to estimate potential human exposure. -- Soil dust collected by a novel in situ sampling method can provide critical information about contamination and potential human exposure in urban environments

  1. Molecular mechanisms of dust-induced toxicity in human corneal epithelial cells: Water and organic extract of office and house dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; Liu, Rong-Yan; Sun, Hong-Jie; Han, Yong-He; He, Rui-Wen; Cui, Xin-Yi; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-01-01

    Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells are continually exposed to dust in the air, which may cause corneal epithelium damage. Both water and organic soluble contaminants in dust may contribute to cytotoxicity in HCE cells, however, the associated toxicity mechanisms are not fully elucidated. In this study, indoor dust from residential houses and commercial offices in Nanjing, China was collected and the effects of organic and water soluble fraction of dust on primary HCE cells were examined. The concentrations of heavy metals in the dust and dust extracts were determined by ICP-MS and PAHs by GC-MS, with office dust having greater concentrations of heavy metals and PAHs than house dust. Based on LC50, organic extract was more toxic than water extract, and office dust was more toxic than house dust. Accordingly, the organic extracts induced more ROS, malondialdehyde, and 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine and higher expression of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8), and AhR inducible genes (CYP1A1, and CYP1B1) than water extracts (pdust presented greater suppression of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity than those of house dust. In addition, exposure to dust extracts activated NF-κB signal pathway except water extract of house dust. The results suggested that both water and organic soluble fractions of dust caused cytotoxicity, oxidative damage, inflammatory response, and activation of AhR inducible genes, with organic extracts having higher potential to induce adverse effects on primary HCE cells. The results based on primary HCE cells demonstrated the importance of reducing contaminants in indoor dust to reduce their adverse impacts on human eyes. PMID:27131017

  2. Carbonation on ternary cement systems

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Ramírez, Sagrario; Fernández Carrasco, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    The main hydration reaction product in the ternary system fly ash, calcium sulphate and calcium aluminate cement (40/20/40) at 20°C is a hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate compound, an AFt phase slightly different from “traditional ettringite”. The carbonation of ettringite develops gypsum but in this case rapidcreekite is formed. For the first time it has been observed that carbonation of the mentioned calcium sulfoaluminate compound (AFt), an hydrated calcium sulphate carbonated phase (Ca2(SO4...

  3. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU; B.SAI DOONDI; N. M .V .VAMSI KRISHNA; K.Prasanthi

    2013-01-01

    India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green hous...

  4. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Taratuta V. D.; Belokur K. A.; Serga G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  5. Study on alveolar macrophage injure caused by uranium dust and its protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dog's alveolar microphage (AM) obtained by lavage was cultured in vitro. The effects of uranium dust, quartz dust on peroxidation of AM and the effects of magnoliavinin C and VE on bio-membrane was observed. In addition the anti-oxidation effect of VE on the whole body was observed by means of experimental silicosis caused by single dust exposure to trachea. The results demonstrate that two kinds of dust all can induce membrane lipid peroxidation, magnoliavinin C and VE have marked anti-oxidation effect. The administration of VE in vivo demonstrates that VE has effect of inhibiting membrane unsaturated fatty acid peroxidation induced by these two kinds of dust in the ears stage of dust exposure and blocking the chain reaction of free radical so as to retard the pathological developing for silicosis. However it's effect is less than the combining effect of VE and phosphohydroxypipe quinoline. (6 tabs., 12 figs.)

  6. Characterisation of cemented/bituminized LAW and MAW waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of work for characterising low and medium activity waste products, investigations were carried out to determine the release of radioactivity from binding waste in given accidents, such as mechanical and thermal loading for the operating phase of a final store. The effects of mechanical loads on MAW cement products and the effects of thermal laods on MAW cement and MAW bitumen products were examined. The release of fine dust reaching the lungs, with a particle size of ≤10 μm from a 200 litre roller seam cement binder with a maximum mechanical load of 3x105 Nm covering the accident case is about 1.5 g and therefore corresponds to ≅ 10-4% of the total radio-activity inventory for homogeneous products. With thermal loading (60 minute oil fire, 8000C) ≅ 10-3% of the radioactivity inventory is released via the release of water from the waste binder. The activity release of MAW bitumen products containing NaNO3 (175 litre drum) with thermal load is considerably higher, as due to the NaNO3 content of the products, after an induction period of about 20 minutes there is an exothermal reaction between the bitumen and the NaNO3, which leads to burning of the bitumen with considerable aerosol formation. The Na losses are about 32% and the Pu losses, derived from the results of laboratory experiments with samples containing Eu and Pu and samples containing Eu on the original size, are only 15% maximum, even with complete burn up. It was shown for all the investigations with samples of the original size that the effects of the load cases considered can be reduced or completely avoided by additional packing (concrete shielding). (orig./RB)

  7. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Peng, R. D. [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Y. H. [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ye, M. F.; Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  8. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green house gases (i.e., CO and CO2 and also saves lot of money in the long run process. A small amount of these gases in environment can cause major problems over time. Use of white cement in composite pavement design where there is heavy traffic loads are acting as well as number of vehicles are more such as junctions, bus stops, check posts etc., can perform better and acts asenvironment friendly. Its light colour reflects more than bituminous pavement so that it can be easily identified and avoid accidents to some extent. White cement helps to lower the average bus stop, junction temperature providing comfort to the people because it has high solar reflectance there by reducing “urban heat island” effect. In addition to this it has some more advantages which increase the sustainability, durability and workability of the pavements.

  9. A BIOPHYSIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SETTLED LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY HOUSING DUSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carresse Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels and composition of agricultural dusts are influenced by animal species, production strategy, housing type and ventilation efficiency. Agricultural dust within animal houses is complex and consists of feed particles, microbes and their products, dander, fecal matter, gases, metals and other organic and inorganic components. Livestock and poultry production facilities may be categorized as confinement, semi-confinement or pasture-based. Characterization of animal husbandry building dust will provide insight into understanding exposures experienced by animals, workers and farm visitors. The goal was to characterize biophysiochemical features of livestock dusts from swine, small ruminant, equine, poultry and cattle husbandry units. Settled dust samples were collected from livestock and poultry housing units at the University Farm and other livestock farms across the state. Morphological features were determined by electron microscopy and gravimetry. Biochemical evaluation consisted of pH determination and trace metal detection via mass spectrometry. Biological assessment centered on bacterial characterization via selective media, DNA analysis and endotoxin quantitation. Morphological analyses revealed higher levels of respirable and thoracic particles in poultry, swine, small ruminant and equine units compared to the dairy unit (p<0.01. Dusts were slightly acidic with the exception of the NCAT small ruminant unit (p<0.05. Dust endotoxin levels were consistent and bacterial species detected include Listeria and Escherichia coli. These findings suggest animal husbandry buildings harbor higher levels of smaller respirable and thoracic dust particles compared to inhalable particles. This information may be helpful in understanding dust exposures experienced by animals, farmers and agricultural workers.

  10. Pulmonary and Systemic Immune Response to Chronic Lunar Dust Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Quiriarte, Heather; Nelman, Mayra; Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Sams, Clarence

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to millennia of meteorite impact with virtually no erosive effects, the surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of ultra-fine, reactive Lunar dust. Very little is known regarding the toxicity of Lunar dust on human physiology. Given the size and electrostatic characteristics of Lunar dust, countermeasures to ensure non-exposure of astronauts will be difficult. To ensure astronaut safety during any future prolonged Lunar missions, it is necessary to establish the effect of chronic pulmonary Lunar dust exposure on all physiological systems. Methods: This study assessed the toxicity of airborne lunar dust exposure in rats on pulmonary and system immune system parameters. Rats were exposed to 0, 20.8, or 60.8 mg/m3 of lunar dust (6h/d; 5d/wk) for up to 13 weeks. Sacrifices occurred after exposure durations of 1day, 7 days, 4 weeks and 13 weeks post-exposure, when both blood and lung lavage fluid were collected for analysis. Lavage and blood assays included leukocyte distribution by flow cytometry, electron/fluorescent microscopy, and cytokine concentration. Cytokine production profiles following mitogenic stimulation were performed on whole blood only. Results: Untreated lavage fluid was comprised primarily of pulmonary macrophages. Lunar dust inhalation resulted in an influx of neutrophils and lymphocytes. Although the percentage of lymphocytes increased, the T cell CD4:CD8 ratio was unchanged. Cytokine analysis of the lavage fluid showed increased levels of IL-1b and TNFa. These alterations generally persisted through the 13 week sampling. Blood analysis showed few systemic effects from the lunar dust inhalation. By week 4, the peripheral granulocyte percentage was elevated in the treated rats. Plasma cytokine levels were unchanged in all treated rats compared to controls. Peripheral blood analysis showed an increased granulocyte percentage and altered cytokine production profiles consisting of increased in IL-1b and IL-6, and decreased IL-2

  11. Cement replacement materials. Properties, durability, sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar [Amirkabir Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Concrete Technology Center

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this book is to present the latest findings in the properties and application of Supplementary Cementing Materials and blended cements currently used in the world in concrete. Sustainability is an important issue all over the world. Carbon dioxide emission has been a serious problem in the world due to the greenhouse effect. Today many countries agreed to reduce the emission of CO2. Many phases of cement and concrete technology can affect sustainability. Cement and concrete industry is responsible for the production of 7% carbon dioxide of the total world CO2 emission. The use of supplementary cementing materials (SCM), design of concrete mixtures with optimum content of cement and enhancement of concrete durability are the main issues towards sustainability in concrete industry.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Radivoje D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the characteristics of different types of luting cements (zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer and resin based composite cement using scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis and microleakage for the quality range of materials. Dental cements were mixed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and formed with posts in dental root canals of extracted teeth. The quality of cement was determined by SEM observation on horizontal sectioned roots with fixed posts according to specific pore and marginal gap diameter. The microleakage was measured on specimens immersed in Lofler (methylene blue solution. The mean values of the maximal diameter of pores, marginal gaps and microleakage of conventional cements are remarkably larger in comparison with composite luting agents. In conclusion, the quality and efficiency of composite luting agents in comparison with conventional cements are more successful in protecting the interior of tooth from penetration of oral fluids, bacteria and bacterial toxins into unprotected dentine.

  13. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantin Sobolev

    2003-01-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecologi...

  14. Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 11, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1979-06-01

    In a one month shake-down test at East Mesa, 32 cement formulations were exposed to flowing brine at 150/sup 0/C and 95 psig. Based upon the results from this test, 15 formulations were selected for evaluation in a 2 year test. Experimental work indicates that none of the cements under consideration cause severe corrosion to steel casing. Compared with the possible corrosive attack on the steel casing by the geothermal environment, the corrosive effects of the cement are minimal. A promising cementing composition has been sent to the National Bureau of Standards for additional tests, and at least one more composition will be submitted. Pumpability tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate several formulations that are pumpable for at least 2 hr at 316/sup 0/C. Polymer concrete samples containing 50 wt% styrene - 35 wt% acrylonitrile - 5 wt% acrylamide - 10 wt% divinyl benzene have not shown any reduction in strength after exposure to 25% brine at 240/sup 0/C for 8 months. This is the highest strength formulation to date and is the first formulation that has not exhibited any strength reduction after brine exposure. Strengths of 204 MPa and 162 MPa were measured at 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, respectively, after 8 months in brine.

  15. Characterization of cement-based ancient building materials in support of repository seal materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancient mortars and plasters collected from Greek and Cypriot structures dating to about 5500 BC have been investigated because of their remarkable durability. The characteristics and performance of these and other ancient cementitious materials have been considered in the light of providing information on longevity of concrete materials for sealing nuclear waste geological repositories. The matrices of these composite materials have been characterized and classified into four categories: (1) gypsum cements; (2) hydraulic hydrated lime and hydrated-lime cements; (3) hydraulic aluminous and ferruginous hydrated-lime cements (+- siliceous components); and (4) pozzolana/hydrated-lime cements. Most of the materials investigated, including linings of ore-washing basins and cisterns used to hold water, are in categories (2) and (3). The aggregates used included carbonates, sandstones, shales, schists, volcanic and pyroclastic rocks, and ore minerals, many of which represent host rock types of stratigraphic components of a salt repository. Numerous methods were used to characterize the materials chemically, mineralogically, and microstructurally and to elucidate aspects of both the technology that produced them and their response to the environmental exposure throughout their centuries of existence. Their remarkable properties are the result of a combination of chemical (mineralogical) and microstructural factors. Durability was found to be affected by matrix mineralogy, particle size and porosity, and aggregate type, grading, and proportioning, as well as method of placement and exposure conditions. Similar factors govern the potential for durability of modern portland cement-containing materials, which are candidates for repository sealing. 29 references, 29 figures, 6 tables

  16. Global Cement Industry: Competitive and Institutional Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Selim, Tarek; Salem, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The cement industry is a capital intensive, energy consuming, and vital industry for sustaining infrastructure of nations. The international cement market –while constituting a small share of world industry output—has been growing at an increasing rate relative to local production in recent years. Attempts to protect the environment in developed countries –especially Europe—have caused cement production plants to shift to countries with less stringent environmental regulations. Along with con...

  17. Characterization of cement composites with mineral additives

    OpenAIRE

    Korat, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral dissertation is aimed at characterizing cement composites with mineral additives representing the industrial waste material (fly ash, granulated blast furnace slag and biomass fly ash). Their usage can replace high cement shares in individual cases and is, however, favourable due to the production costs reduction and environment burden decrease, including the decreased emission of greenhouse gases as well as lower energy use. Cement composites (in fresh or hardened state)...

  18. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and am...

  19. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  20. Preserved aragonite cements in Miocene coral reefs: a record of Messinian salinity crises in Mediterranean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, M.; Prezbindowski, D.R.

    1985-02-01

    Layers of fibrous aragonite cement up to 2 cm thick, developed on aragonitic corals and micritic cements, occur in outcrops of Miocene coral reefs in western Sicily. These aragonitic fabrics show only minor amounts of corrosion after subaerial exposure for at least 3 m.y. Their preservation is attributed to encasement by subsequent gypsum cements. Although these botryoidal, banded aragonite cements are strontium-rich (7000 ppm) and resemble modern marine examples, they were precipitated in secondarily enlarged pores that formed during erosional episodes. Multiple cycles of enrichment in oxygen and carbon stable isotopes are recorded in the aragonite cement layers. The delta/sup 18/O values of these cycles range from -0.9 to +6.8 per thousand, whereas the delta/sup 13/C values range from +0.6 to +3.8 per thousand (PDB). These cyclic variations, indicated by isotopic data together with the petrology of the cements, are believed to record major changes in salinity, temperature, and organic productivity of the Mediterranean waters during the Miocene-Pliocene transition. These Messinian reefs were subaerially exposed and later onlapped by the upper evaporite unit with multiple cycles of marine hypersaline carbonate and evaporite deposition separated by periods of erosion. Aragonite cements formed in the enlarged cavities of the lower Messinian reefs during time of deposition of the upper evaporite and recorded the changes in Mediterranean water chemistry. This cementation is believed to have continued into the early Pliocene when colder Atlantic waters invaded the Mediterranean, ending reef growth and evaporite deposition.