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Sample records for cement content

  1. Portland cement concrete air content study.

    1987-04-20

    This study took the analysis of Portland cement concrete air content. Based on the information gathered, this study hold the results were : 1) air-entrained concrete was more durable than non-air entrained concrete all other factors being equal; 2) A...

  2. STOCHASTIC MODELING OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF PHOSPHORUS SLAG CONTENT CEMENT

    Ali Allahverdi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the common methods for quick determination of compressive strength as one of the most important properties for assessment of cement quality is to apply various modeling approaches. This study is aimed at finding a model for estimating the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements. For this purpose, the compressive strengths of chemically activated high phosphorus slag content cement prepared from phosphorus slag (80 wt.%, Portland cement (14 wt.% and a compound chemical activator containing sodium sulfate and anhydrite (6 wt.% were measured at various Blaine finenesses and curing times. Based on the obtained results, a primary stochastic model in terms of curing time and Blaine fineness has been developed. Then, another different dataset was used to incorporate composition variable including weight fractions of phosphorus slag, cement, and activator in the model. This model can be effectively used to predict the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements at various Blaine finenesses, curing times, and compositions.

  3. Determining the water-cement ratio, cement content, water content and degree of hydration of hardened cement paste: Method development and validation on paste samples

    Wong, H.S.; Buenfeld, N.R.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the initial cement content, water content and free water/cement ratio (w/c) of hardened cement-based materials made with Portland cements that have unknown mixture proportions and degree of hydration. This method first quantifies the composition of the hardened cement paste, i.e. the volumetric fractions of capillary pores, hydration products and unreacted cement, using high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) in the backscattered electron (BSE) mode and image analysis. From the obtained data and the volumetric increase of solids during cement hydration, we compute the initial free water content and cement content, hence the free w/c ratio. The same method can also be used to calculate the degree of hydration. The proposed method has the advantage that it is quantitative and does not require comparison with calibration graphs or reference samples made with the same materials and cured to the same degree of hydration as the tested sample. This paper reports the development, assumptions and limitations of the proposed method, and preliminary results from Portland cement pastes with a range of w/c ratios (0.25-0.50) and curing ages (3-90 days). We also discuss the extension of the technique to mortars and concretes, and samples made with blended cements.

  4. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents

    Dongliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content (Cv on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using Cv. The research reveals that when Cv is high (e.g., Cv = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as Cv increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When Cv is low (e.g., Cv = 0.01, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of Cv (the cementing agent content with c′ (the cohesion force of the sample and Δϕ′ (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  5. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents.

    Li, Dongliang; Liu, Xinrong; Liu, Xianshan

    2015-07-02

    Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08) under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa) were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content ( C v ) on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using C v . The research reveals that when C v is high (e.g., C v = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as C v increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When C v is low (e.g., C v = 0.01), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of C v (the cementing agent content) with c ' (the cohesion force of the sample) and Δϕ' (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance) is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  6. Shrinkage Module of Soil Samples with Different Cement Content

    Mohannad Sabry

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The differences in soil's body mass during shrinkage over time have changes in soil physical properties which provide an important reason to check the design of underground foundations in expansive soils. In this paper, a state-of-art of the soil heat stress-strain relationship prediction methods is checked using soil engineering laboratory experiments and Matlab R2013b numerical modelling. The shrinkage of soils with different cement content of (0%, 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% with the same water content of 20 percent in room temperature for 24 hours, are critically reviewed in terms of their predictive shrinkage along with their strengths and flexural behaviour. The review highlights the prediction methods present to determine the effect of heat stress on the shrinkage of soil samples with different cement content after classifying the soils into clay, silt and sand depending on their particle size using sieve and hydrometer experiments. The results of the soil engineering laboratory experiments showed that as the cement content increases, the shrinkage of soil decreases as a result of increased elasticity in soil. The numerical analysis using finite element method in Matlab R2013b shows that as the cement content increases the displacement in the soil sample decreases and that the soil sample with 8% cement content has more resistance to shrinkage and less displacement than the soil with 6% cement, which has less resistance to heat stresses and more displacement.

  7. Chromium content in human skin after in vitro application of ordinary cement and ferrous-sulphate-reduced cement

    Fullerton, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; Avnstorp, C

    1993-01-01

    The amount of chromium found in human skin after in vitro application of cement suspensions on full-thickness human skin in diffusion cells was investigated. Cement suspensions made from ordinary Portland cement or Portland cement with the chromate reduced with added ferrous sulphate were used....... The cement suspensions were either applied on the skin surface under occlusion for 48 h or applied repeatedly every 24 h for 96 h. No statistically significant difference in chromium content of skin layers between skin exposed to ordinary Portland cement, skin exposed to cement with added ferrous sulphate...... and unexposed skin was observed, despite a more permeable skin barrier at the alkaline pH of the cement suspensions, i.e., pH 12.5. Increased chromium levels in epidermis and dermis were seen when ordinary Portland cement was applied as a suspension with added sodium sulphate (20%) on the skin surface for 96 h...

  8. Development of low radio-activated cement. Characteristics of cement and clinker that decreased liquid phase content

    Ichitsubo, Koki

    2008-01-01

    Low radio-activated cement was developed by decreasing the parent elements of radionuclides in the materials. The characteristics of products, decreasing method of Na, Eu and Co in cement, design, tests, evaluation, and analysis of low radio-activated cement clinker are reported. In order to decrease the content of Na, Eu and Co, the raw materials have to include natural materials such as limestone and silica stone. The production method is the same as white cement. The low radio-activated cement produced by rotary kiln showed 4.9% C 3 A, 1.1% C 4 AF, 26.9% C 3 S and 61.0% C 2 S, which values were standardized by the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) of low temperature Portland cement. Another product that decreased a little more liquid phase content showed 4.0% C 3 A, 1.0% C 4 AF, 32.3% C 3 S and 56.5% C 2 S, which was standardized by JIS of sulfate resisting Portland cement. In the case of decommissioning reactor constructed by the low radio-activated cement, the whole amount of waste cement will be no more than the clearance level. (S.Y.)

  9. Cement content influence in rebar corrosion in carbonated mortars

    Américo, P. O.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The cement hydration products protect the concrete rebars of the reinforced concrete due to the production of Ca(OH2, NaOH, and KOH that, upon dissolving in the concrete s aqueous phase, generate a pH above 12.5. However, reinforced concrete structures are exposed to pollutant gases, such as, CO2 which upon penetrating the concrete, reacts with the alkaline components, consequently reducing the pH of the aqueous phase causing the loss of passivity by the rebar and as a consequence its corrosion when there is the presence of humidity and oxygen. The objective of the current paper is the analysis of the alkaline reserve influence, measured by the cement content, in the corrosion of rebars employing the polarization resistance technique for determining the corrosion intensity. Results for corrosion intensity of rebars embedded in prismatic mortar test specimens are produced with three cement content levels, with equal water/cement ratio. Cylindrical test specimens were also used for verification of the capillary absorption and the porosity by means of mercury porosymetry The results show that the initiation period is shorter and the corrosion intensity of the rebars is higher when the cement content is lower However, there is also an alteration in the microstructure upon altering the cement content, and far this reason one cannot conclude that the alkaline reserve alone is responsible for these results.

    Los productos de hidratación del cemento protegen las armaduras embebidas en el hormigón debido a la gran cantidad de Ca(OH2, NaOH y KOH disueltos en la fase acuosa del hormigón que proporcionan un pH mayor que 12,5. Sin embargo, las estructuras de hormigón armado están expuestas a los gases contaminantes como el CO2, que al penetrar en el hormigón reacciona con los compuestos alcalinos, se reduce el pH de la fase acuosa y provocan la despasivación de la armadura. Posteriormente, si hay

  10. Influence of particle packing density on the rheology of low cement content concrete

    Fennis-Huijben, S.A.A.M.; Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.; Den Uijl, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing concrete mixtures with regard to cement content is one of the most important solutions in sustainable concrete design. Workability o f these low cement content or ecological mixtures is very important. Eleven mortar mixtures are presented, which show how a higher packing density can be

  11. Arsenic content in Portland cement: A literature review

    Tenorio de Franca Talita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement (PC is a hydraulic binding material widely used in the building industry. The main interest in its use in dentistry is focused on a possible alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA because PC is less expensive and is widely available. In dentistry, PC has been used in dental procedures such as pulpotomy, pulp capping, repair of root perforation and root-end filling. The purpose of this article is review the dental literature about the PC, its composition with special attention to arsenic content, properties, and application in dentistry. A bibliographic research was performed in Bireme, PubMed, LILACS and Scopus data bases looking for national and international studies about the PC composition, properties and clinical use. It was observed that PC has favorable biological properties very similar to those of MTA. The PC has shown good cell proliferation induction with formation of a monolayer cell, satisfactory inflammatory response, inhibitory effect of prostaglandin and antimicrobial effect. Studies have shown that PC is not cytotoxic, stimulates the apposition of reparative dentin and permits cellular attachment and growth. Regarding arsenic presence, its levels and release are low. PC has physical, chemical and biological properties similar to MTA. Arsenic levels and release are low, therefore, unable to cause toxic effects.

  12. Arsenic content in Portland cement: a literature review.

    Tenório de Franca, Talita Ribeiro; da Silva, Raphaela Juvenal; Sedycias de Queiroz, Michellini; Aguiar, Carlos Menezes

    2010-01-01

    Portland cement (PC) is a hydraulic binding material widely used in the building industry. The main interest in its use in dentistry is focused on a possible alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) because PC is less expensive and is widely available. In dentistry, PC has been used in dental procedures such as pulpotomy, pulp capping, repair of root perforation and root-end filling. The purpose of this article is review the dental literature about the PC, its composition with special attention to arsenic content, properties, and application in dentistry. A bibliographic research was performed in Bireme, PubMed, LILACS and Scopus data bases looking for national and international studies about the PC composition, properties and clinical use. It was observed that PC has favorable biological properties very similar to those of MTA. The PC has shown good cell proliferation induction with formation of a monolayer cell, satisfactory inflammatory response, inhibitory effect of prostaglandin and antimicrobial effect. Studies have shown that PC is not cytotoxic, stimulates the apposition of reparative dentin and permits cellular attachment and growth. Regarding arsenic presence, its levels and release are low. PC has physical, chemical and biological properties similar to MTA. Arsenic levels and release are low, therefore, unable to cause toxic effects.

  13. Radionuclide content of local and imported cements used in Egypt

    Mahmoud, K R

    2007-01-01

    The activity concentrations of natural and artificial gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in local and imported cement have been investigated during the period from 2000 to 2003 using a 50% HPGe γ-spectroscopy system. The total numbers of local and imported samples were 29 and 8, respectively. The results showed a low activity concentration of 137 Cs in both the local and imported samples. The only exception was found in one imported Portland cement (2.8 ± 0.2 Bq kg -1 ) and one local blast furnace slag cement (1.9 ± 0.3 Bq kg -1 ). The average activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in local cement were 33 ± 17, 14 ± 2.4 and 45 ± 26 Bq kg -1 , respectively, whereas those in imported cement were 27 ± 7, 8 ± 7 and 134 ± 22 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The results showed that blast furnace slag cement contains the highest level of natural radioactivity, whereas white cement contains the lowest levels. The measured activity concentrations of the detected radionuclides were compared with other measurements carried out in Egypt and elsewhere. Radium-equivalent activities were also calculated to assess the radiation hazards arising from using such material in the construction of dwellings. Generally, the radium-equivalents of the analysed samples were smaller than the guideline limit of 370 Bq kg -1

  14. Wide-scale utilization of MSWI fly ashes in cement production and its impact on average heavy metal contents in cements: The case of Austria.

    Lederer, Jakob; Trinkel, Verena; Fellner, Johann

    2017-02-01

    A number of studies present the utilization of fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) in cement production as a recycling alternative to landfilling. While there is a lot of research on the impact of MSWI fly ashes utilization in cement production on the quality of concrete or the leaching of heavy metals, only a few studies have determined the resulting heavy metal content in cements caused by this MSWI fly ashes utilization. Making use of the case of Austria, this study (1) determines the total content of selected heavy metals in cements currently produced in the country, (2) designs a scenario and calculates the resulting heavy metal contents in cements assuming that all MSWI fly ashes from Austrian grate incinerators were used as secondary raw materials for Portland cement clinker production and (3) evaluates the legal recyclability of demolished concretes produced from MSWI fly ash amended cements based on their total heavy metal contents. To do so, data from literature and statistics are combined in a material flow analysis model to calculate the average total contents of heavy metals in cements and in the resulting concretes according to the above scenario. The resulting heavy metal contents are then compared (i) to their respective limit values for cements as defined in a new technical guideline in Austria (BMLFUW, 2016), and (ii) to their respective limit values for recycling materials from demolished concrete. Results show that MSWI fly ashes utilization increases the raw material input in cement production by only +0.9%, but the total contents of Cd by +310%, and Hg, Pb, and Zn by +70% to +170%. However these and other heavy metal contents are still below their respective limit values for Austrian cements. The same legal conformity counts for recycling material derived from concretes produced from the MSWI fly ash cements. However, if the MSWI fly ash ratio in all raw materials used for cement production were increased from 0.9% to 22

  15. The influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement

    Dongxu, L.; Xuequan, W.; Jinlin, S.; Yujiang, W.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the activation theory of alkali and sulfate, the influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement was studied by testing the strength, pore structure, hydrates, and microstructure, Test results show that compound admixtures can obviously improve the properties of high-content slag cement. The emphasis of the present research is two-fold: substituting gypsum with anhydrite and calcining gypsum. These both can improve early and later performance.

  16. Optimization of calcium chloride content on bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement

    Torkittikul, Pincha; Chaipanich, Arnon

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates the optimization of calcium chloride content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement. Calcium chloride was used as an addition of White Portland cement at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. Calcium chloride was dissolved in sterile distilled water and blended with White Portland cement using a water to cement ratio of 0.5. Analysis of the bioactivity and pH of white Portland cement pastes with calcium chloride added at various amounts was carried out in simulated body fluid. Setting time, density, compressive strength and volume of permeable voids were also investigated. The characteristics of cement pastes were examined by X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope linked to an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. The result indicated that the addition of calcium chloride could accelerate the hydration of white Portland cement, resulting in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength of the pastes. The compressive strength of all cement pastes with added calcium chloride was higher than that of the pure cement paste, and the addition of calcium chloride at 8 wt.% led to achieving the highest strength. Furthermore, white Portland cement pastes both with and without calcium chloride showed well-established bioactivity with respect to the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the material within 7 days following immersion in simulated body fluid; white Portland cement paste with added 3%CaCl 2 exhibited the best bioactivity. - Highlights: ► Optimization CaCl 2 content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties. ► CaCl 2 was used as an addition at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. ► CaCl 2 resulted in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength. ► Addition of 3%CaCl 2 exhibited the optimum formation of hydroxyapatite.

  17. LONG – TERM PROPERTIES OF CEMENT COMPOSITES WITH VARIOUS METAKAOLINITE CONTENT

    ĽUDOVÍT KRAJČI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The optimal temperature transformation of kaolin sand to metakaolin sand (MKS resulting in complete conversion of kaolinite to pozzolanic active metakaolinite (MK is 650°C in the time of 1 hour. To obtain information on mechanism of pozzolanic reaction in studied binary system, the cement pastes with two MKS at substitution level of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC with MKS by 10, 20 and 40 wt. % corresponding to 3.6 - 16.0 % MK content in pastes, were tested. Pozzolanic reaction of MK with hydrating OPC was clearly confirmed mainly by XRD and thermal analyses. This process accompanied with gradual reduction of Ca(OH2 content was the most intense in pastes with the highest MK contents (14.4 and 16.0 %. The decrease of micropore and total pore volume until MK content in paste of 7.2 % is measure of pore structure improvement specified as pore structure refinement. Until MK content of 8.0 % in paste, micropores portion with pore radius less than 10 nm rises and pore radius in the range between 10 and 100 nm declines. Resulted compressive strengths of related cement pastes with various MK content were comparable with strengths of pastes without MK. The obtained results confirmed that MKS can be used as promising additive in OPC to form prospective blended cements.

  18. Element Content of Surface and Underground Water Sources around a Cement Factory Site in Calabar, Nigeria

    Edmund Richard Egbe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cement production is associated with heavy metal emissions and environmental pollution by cement dust. The degree of contamination of drinking water sources by major and trace elements present in cement dust generated by united cement factory (UNICEM is still uncertain. This study estimated the element content of ground and surface water samples (hand-dug wells, boreholes and streams around the factory site to determine the impact of cement dust exposure on the water levels of these elements. Methods: This study was conducted at UNICEM at Mfamosing, Akamkpa local government area, Cross River State, Nigeria. Drinking water samples (5 from each location were collected from the cement factory quarry site camp, 3 surrounding communities and Calabar metropolis (45 km away from factory serving as control. The lead (Pb, copper (Cu, manganes (Mn, iron (Fe, cadmium (Cd, selenium (Se, chromium (Cr, zinc (Zn and arsenic (As levels of samples were determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and LSD post hoc at P = 0.05. Results: As and Pb content of samples from camp were above the WHO recommendations of 0.01mg/l and 0.01mg/l respectively. Chromium and cadmium content of all water samples were above and others below WHO recommendations. Water levels of Mn, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Ca and Si were significantly elevated (though below WHO recommendations in camp than other locations (P<0.05. Conclusion: Production of cement results in As, Pb, Cr and cd contamination of drinking water sources near the factory. Treatment of all drinking water sources is recommended before public use to avert deleterious health consequences.

  19. Properties of Non-Structural Concrete Made with Mixed Recycled Aggregates and Low Cement Content.

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; López, Martin; Jimenez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Sierra, María José

    2016-01-26

    In spite of not being legally accepted in most countries, mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) could be a suitable raw material for concrete manufacturing. The aims of this research were as follows: (i) to analyze the effect of the replacement ratio of natural coarse aggregates with MRA, the amount of ceramic particles in MRA, and the amount of cement, on the mechanical and physical properties of a non-structural concrete made with a low cement content; and (ii) to verify if it is possible to achieve a low-strength concrete that replaces a greater amount of natural aggregate with MRA and that has a low cement content. Two series of concrete mixes were manufactured using 180 and 200 kg/m³ of CEM II/A-V 42.5 R type Portland cement. Each series included seven concrete mixes: one with natural aggregates; two MRA with different ceramic particle contents; and one for each coarse aggregate replacement ratio (20%, 40%, and 100%). To study their properties, compressive and splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, density, porosity, water penetration, and sorptivity, tests were performed. The results confirmed that the main factors affecting the properties analyzed in this research are the amount of cement and the replacement ratio; the two MRAs used in this work presented a similar influence on the properties. A non-structural, low-strength concrete (15 MPa) with an MRA replacement ratio of up to 100% for 200 kg/m³ of cement was obtained. This type of concrete could be applied in the construction of ditches, sidewalks, and other similar civil works.

  20. Properties of Non-Structural Concrete Made with Mixed Recycled Aggregates and Low Cement Content

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; López, Martin; Jimenez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Sierra, María José

    2016-01-01

    In spite of not being legally accepted in most countries, mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) could be a suitable raw material for concrete manufacturing. The aims of this research were as follows: (i) to analyze the effect of the replacement ratio of natural coarse aggregates with MRA, the amount of ceramic particles in MRA, and the amount of cement, on the mechanical and physical properties of a non-structural concrete made with a low cement content; and (ii) to verify if it is possible to achieve a low-strength concrete that replaces a greater amount of natural aggregate with MRA and that has a low cement content. Two series of concrete mixes were manufactured using 180 and 200 kg/m3 of CEM II/A-V 42.5 R type Portland cement. Each series included seven concrete mixes: one with natural aggregates; two MRA with different ceramic particle contents; and one for each coarse aggregate replacement ratio (20%, 40%, and 100%). To study their properties, compressive and splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, density, porosity, water penetration, and sorptivity, tests were performed. The results confirmed that the main factors affecting the properties analyzed in this research are the amount of cement and the replacement ratio; the two MRAs used in this work presented a similar influence on the properties. A non-structural, low-strength concrete (15 MPa) with an MRA replacement ratio of up to 100% for 200 kg/m3 of cement was obtained. This type of concrete could be applied in the construction of ditches, sidewalks, and other similar civil works. PMID:28787874

  1. Influence of packing and dispersion of particles on the cement content of concretes

    B. L. DAMINELI

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to environmental issues, the concrete chain seeks to reduce CO2 emissions. However, growing demand from developing countries causes the increase of CO2 emissions in production to exceed decreases generated by industrial actions, such as improving kilns and clinker replacement. New strategies are important. Changes in the concrete formulation, making it more efficient, can help if these changes produce concrete with the same performance and lower cement consumption. In this regard, the improvement of packing and dispersion of particles increases this efficiency. The better the packing, the lower the volume of voids between particles, thereby requiring lower fluid content (water to permit flow. The dispersion of the particles also decreases the water content for the same fluidity. The less the water content, the smaller the water/cement (w/c ratio, and the greater the resistance. Thus, both strategies increase the efficiency by uncoupling obtaining fluidity from the water content. This study investigated the influence of packing and dispersion on the efficiency of cement use in concrete. The increase of packing and the complete dispersion of fine particles has been shown to improve efficiency, as measured by the ratio between binder consumption and compressive strength (the performance parameter used in most practical applications.

  2. Device for continuous radiometric determination of the calcium and iron content in raw slurry for cement

    Wasilewska, M.; Ostachowicz, J.; Lankosz, M.; Molodynska, W.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristic iron and calcium-K series were excited using a Cd-109 isotope source. In order to determine the calcium and iron content in dry slurry, the Compton-effect scattered radiation of the Cd-109 source in the sample was used. A numerical process was worked out which allowed the elimination of the influence of changing contents of iron and water on the results of the calcium content determinations, and a device for continuous radiometric determination of calcium and iron in raw slurry was designed and constructed. The device was installed in the cement plant 'Przyjazn' under technical measuring conditions and its applicability was tested. (orig./LH) [de

  3. Content of heavy metals and chemical composition of the hydraulic cement marketed in Costa Rica

    Venegas Padilla, Jimmy; Calderon Jimenez, Bryan; Sibaja Brenes, Jose Pablo; Salazar Delgado, Jorge; Rodriguez Castro, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The concentration of heavy metals, specifically lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and mercury (Hg), and also the chemical composition (CaO, SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 among others) were quantified of the hydraulic cement marketed in Costa Rica. The physical parameters of density and fineness confirmed the homogeneity of the samples to determinate accurately the content of the major components and heavy metals in the cements. The mineralogical constitution was determined by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Specifically, the cements showed a mass fraction in the range of (61.22 - 63.12) % of CaO, (18.10 - 26.14) % of SiO 2 , (3.70 - 6.05) % of Al 2 O 3 , (2.57 - 3.36) % Fe 2 O 3 and (0.60 - 4.09) % de MgO. Other components such as MgO, TiO 2 , K 2 O, P 2 O 5 , Na 2 O and Mn 2 O 3 were found on an average mass fraction lower than 1%. Moreover, using the ignition test results and assuming a complete decomposition of the limestone, it was possible to estimate (indirectly) the content of CaCO 3 and CaO given by the raw materials. The metal content of the heavy metals was determined using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS), Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (ETAAS), and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (CVAAS). The analysis demonstrated that the Pb in cements is present in different concentrations ranging the (2.45 ± 0.72) mg kg -1 to the (8.95 ± 1.34) mg kg -1 . Chromium (Cr) was presented in higher concentrations of (10.69 ± 0.92) mg kg-1. The Hg concentration was below 0.141 ± 0.021 mg kg -1 . In general terms, the hydraulic cements marketed and used in Costa Rica have a suitable chemical composition compared with some cements marketed in Germany. The results of the content of heavy metals presented in this study provide significant information for future studies in the area of toxicology, ecotoxicology, standardization and national regulation. (author) [es

  4. Relative permeability of fractured wellbore cement: an experimental investigation using electrical resistivity monitoring for moisture content

    Um, W.; Rod, K. A.; Strickland, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Permeability is a critical parameter needed to understand flow in subsurface environments; it is particularly important in deep subsurface reservoirs where multiphase fluid flow is common, such as carbon sequestration and geothermal reservoirs. Cement is used in the annulus of wellbores due to its low permeable properties to seal aquifers, reducing leaks to adjacent strata. Extreme subsurface environments of CO2 storage and geothermal production conditions will eventually reduce the cement integrity, propagating fracture networks and increasing the permeability for air and/or water. To date, there have been no reproducible experimental investigations of relative permeability in fractured wellbore cement published. To address this gap, we conducted a series of experiments using fractured Portland cement monoliths with increasing fracture networks. The monolith cylinder sides were jacketed with heavy-duty moisture-seal heat-shrink tubing, then fractured using shear force applied via a hydraulic press. Fractures were generated with different severity for each of three monoliths. Stainless steel endcaps were fixed to the monoliths using the same shrink-wrapped jacket. Fracture characteristics were determined using X-ray microtomography and image analysis. Flow controllers were used to control flow of water and air to supply continuous water or water plus air, both of which were delivered through the influent end cap. Effluent air flow was monitored using a flow meter, and water flow was measured gravimetrically. To monitor the effective saturation of the fractures, a RCON2 concrete bulk electrical resistivity test device was attached across both endcaps and a 0.1M NaNO3 brine was used as the transport fluid to improve resistivity measurements. Water content correlated to resistivity measurements with a r2 > 0.96. Data from the experiments was evaluated using two relative permeability models, the Corey-curve, often used for modeling relative permeability in porous media

  5. Corrosion potential: influence of moisture, water-cement ratio, chloride content and concrete cover

    M. H. F. Medeiros

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The method of measuring the corrosion potential is used as an electrochemical tool for helping the monitoring of the corrosion of reinforcements of concrete structures. As a criterion for evaluating results it is common to use intervals of corrosion potential and their correlation with corrosion probability, as precognizes ASTM C 876:2015. With this criterion, it is possible to establish an overview of the thermodynamic situation of corrosion in the structure or in the test specimen in laboratory. However, the method is influenced by several factors related with the concrete, the environment and with procedures adopted at the moment of executing the readings. Aiming to provide information to guide the technical and scientific environment regarding the right use of this type of non-destructive testing, the objective of this work is to evaluate some possible factors influencing the reading of corrosion potential, such as: moisture content of the concrete, water/cement ratio, thickness of the concrete cover and degree of contamination by chlorides. Results indicate that moisture and degree of contamination of the concrete by chloride ions had a tendency of making the corrosion potential more electronegative. Besides, it was verified that the influence of the cover is different for the case of contaminated concrete (1% of chlorides by mass of cement and not contaminated with chlorides: the influence of the thickness of the cover, in the case of concrete contaminated by chlorides, was inversely proportional, in other words, the greater the cover thickness is, the less electronegative the value of the corrosion potential will be. On the other hand, in cases of concretes without chlorides, the effect of the cover thickness in the readings or corrosion potential was irrelevant. All this information was proved with 95% of statistical significance.

  6. The effect of dolomite type and Al2O3 content on the phase composition in aluminous cements containing spinel

    R. Naghizadeh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of dolomite type and Al2O3 content on the phase composition in aluminous cements containing MA spinel is investigated. For this reason, the raw and calcined dolomites are used as raw materials along with calcined alumina in the preparation of the cement. Then, different compositions are prepared at 1350°C using the sintering method and their mineralogical compositions are investigated using the diffractometric technique. Also, their microstructures arre evaluated. The results indicate that raw materials used have great effect on the type and amount of formed phases in cement composition. Independently of the dolomite type used, a mixed phase product consisting of spinel accompanied by CA and CA2 is obtained. The content of CA phase in the cement composition is decreased with increasing of Al2O3 in the raw materials composition. On the other hand, the content of CA2 phase is increased with the addition of Al2O3. In addition, the results show that the formation of C12A7 is favored by use of calcined dolomite.

  7. Influence of HEMA content on the mechanical and bonding properties of experimental HEMA-added glass ionomer cements

    Ho-Nam Lim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of incrementally added uncured HEMA in experimental HEMA-added glass ionomer cement (HAGICs on the mechanical and shear bond strength (SBS of these materials. Increasing contents of uncured HEMA (10-50 wt.% were added to a commercial glass ionomer cement liquid (Fuji II, GC, Japan, and the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the resulting HAGICs were measured. The SBS to non-precious alloy, precious alloy, enamel and dentin was also determined after these surfaces were subjected to either airborne-particle abrasion (Aa or SiC abrasive paper grinding (Sp. Both strength properties of the HAGICs first increased and then decreased as the HEMA content increased, with a maximum value obtained when the HEMA content was 20% for the compressive strength and 40% for the tensile strength. The SBS was influenced by the HEMA content, the surface treatment, and the type of bonding surface (p<0.05. These results suggest that addition of an appropriate amount of HEMA to glass ionomer cement would increase diametral tensile strength as well as bond strength to alloys and teeth. These results also confirm that the optimal HEMA content ranged from 20 to 40% within the limitations of this experimental condition.

  8. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste with high content of borate salts

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    The report reviews the ways of optimization of cementation of boron-containing liquid radioactive waste. The most common way to hardening the low-level liquid radioactive waste (LRW) is the cementation. However, boron-containing liquid radioactive waste with low pH values cannot be cemented without alkaline additives, to neutralize acid forms of borate compounds. Cement setting without additives happens only on 14-56 days, the compounds have low strength, and hence an insufficient reliability of radionuclides fixation in the cement matrix. The alkaline additives increase the volume of the final cement compound which enhances financial and operational costs. In order to control the speed of hardening of cement solution with a boron-containing liquid radioactive waste and to remove the components that prevent hardening of cement solution, it is proposed an electromagnetic treatment of LRW in the vortex layer of ferromagnetic particles. The results of infrared spectroscopy show, that electromagnetic treatment of liquid radioactive waste changes the ionic forms of the borates and raises the pH due to the dissociation of the oxygen and hydrogen bonds in the aqueous solutions of the boron compounds. The various types of ferromagnetic activators of the vortex layer have been investigated, including the highly dispersed nano-powders and the magnetic phases of the iron oxides. It has been determined the technological parameters of the electromagnetic treatment of liquid radioactive waste and the subsequent cementation of this type of LRW. By using the method of scanning electron microscopy it has been shown, that the nano-particles of magnetic phases of the ferric oxides are involved in phase formation of hydro-aluminum-calcium ferrites in the early stages of hardening and improving strength of the cement compounds with liquid radioactive waste. (authors)

  9. The effect of grain size and cement content on index properties of weakly solidified artificial sandstones

    Atapour, Hadi; Mortazavi, Ali

    2018-04-01

    The effects of textural characteristics, especially grain size, on index properties of weakly solidified artificial sandstones are studied. For this purpose, a relatively large number of laboratory tests were carried out on artificial sandstones that were produced in the laboratory. The prepared samples represent fifteen sandstone types consisting of five different median grain sizes and three different cement contents. Indices rock properties including effective porosity, bulk density, point load strength index, and Schmidt hammer values (SHVs) were determined. Experimental results showed that the grain size has significant effects on index properties of weakly solidified sandstones. The porosity of samples is inversely related to the grain size and decreases linearly as grain size increases. While a direct relationship was observed between grain size and dry bulk density, as bulk density increased with increasing median grain size. Furthermore, it was observed that the point load strength index and SHV of samples increased as a result of grain size increase. These observations are indirectly related to the porosity decrease as a function of median grain size.

  10. Analysis of metal contents in Portland Type V and MTA-based cements.

    Dorileo, Maura Cristiane Gonçales Orçati; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Dalla Villa, Ricardo; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS), the concentration levels of 11 metals in Type V gray and structural white PC, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Bio. Samples, containing one gram of each tested cement, were prepared and transferred to a 100 mL Teflon tube with a mixture of 7.0 mL of nitric acid and 21 mL of hydrochloric acid. After the reaction, the mixture was filtered and then volumed to 50 mL of distilled water. For each metal, specific patterns were determined from universal standards. Arsenic quantification was performed by hydride generator. The analysis was performed five times and the data were statistically analyzed at 5% level of significance. Only the cadmium presented concentration levels of values lower than the quantification limit of the device. The AAS analysis showed increased levels of calcium, nickel, and zinc in structural white PC. Type V PC presented the greatest concentration levels of arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and manganese (P cements, and the lowest concentration levels were observed in Portland cements, while the highest were observed in ProRoot MTA. Both PC and MTA-based cements showed evidence of metals inclusion.

  11. The differential dieaway technique applied to the measurement of the fissile content of drums of cement encapsulated waste

    Swinhoe, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes calculations of the differential dieaway technique as applied to cement encapsulated waste. The main difference from previous applications of the technique are that only one detector position is used (diametrically opposite the neutron source) and the chamber walls are made of concrete. The results show that by rotating the drum the response to fissile material across the central plane of the drum can be made relatively uniform. The absolute size of the response is about 0.4. counts per minute per gram fissile for a neutron source of 10 8 neutrons per second. Problems of neutron and gamma background and water content are considered. (author)

  12. The Influence Of Loam Type And Cement Content On The Compressive Strength Of Rammed Earth

    Narloch P. L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a worldwide dynamic rise of interest in using soil as a construction material can be observed. This trend is evident in the rapid rise of the amount of standards that deal with soil techniques. In 2012 the number of standards was larger by one third than five years prior. To create a full standardization of the rammed earth technique it is necessary to take into account the diversity of used soil and stabilizing additives. The proportion of the components, the process of element production and the research methods must also be made uniform. The article describes the results of research on the compressive strength of rammed earth samples that differed from each other with regards to the type of loam used for the mixture and the amount of the stabilizer. The stabilizer used was Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The research and the analysis of the results were based on foreign publications, the New Zealand standard NZS 4298:1998, the American Standard NMAC14.7.4 and archival Polish Standards from the 1960’s that dealt with earth material.

  13. Bonding Characteristics of Macrosynthetic Fiber in Latex-Modified Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites as a Function of Carbon Nanotube Content

    Ji-Hong Jean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of carbon nanotube content (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% of the cement weight on the bonding properties of macrosynthetic fiber in latex-modified hybrid fiber cement-based composites (LMHFRCCs was evaluated. The slump value, compressive strength, and bonding strength were measured for each LMHFRCC. As the carbon nanotube content increased to 1.5%, the bonding properties of the macrosynthetic fiber improved. However, the bonding performance deteriorated at a carbon nanotube content of 2.0%. A decrease in the fluidity of the mix negatively affected the dispersion of the nanotubes in the LMHFRCCs. The addition of carbon nanotubes also affected the relative bonding strength independently of the improvement in compressive strength. Microscopic analysis of the macrosynthetic fiber surfaces was used to understand changes in the bonding behavior.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of diffusion and relaxation in hydrating white cement pastes of different water content

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Galvosas, Petrik; Geier, Oliver; Zimmermann, Christian; Dakkouri, Marwan; Karger, Jorg

    2001-01-01

    While the nuclear spin relaxation time changes in hydrating cement materials have been widely studied by various groups during the last 20 years, data on the self-diffusion behavior of the pore water during hydration of a cement paste are much scarcer. Taking advantage of improved spectrometer hardware for pulsed field gradient diffusometry and a specialized pulse sequence which is designed to compensate the detrimental effects of inner magnetic field gradients in the sample we have studied the water self-diffusion behavior in pastes prepared from white cement at various water/cement ratios. For the same mixtures, studies of the transverse spin relaxation behavior were also conducted. A comparison of the results from both techniques shows that the diffusion coefficient starts to decrease only much later than the relaxation times for all pastes studied. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  15. Analysis of heavy metal contents in gray and white MTA and 2 kinds of Portland cement: a preliminary study.

    Chang, Seok Woo; Shon, Won Jun; Lee, WooCheol; Kum, Kee Yeon; Baek, Seung Ho; Bae, Kwang Shik

    2010-04-01

    The levels of 10 heavy metals (arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc) in gray Portland cement (GPC), white Portland cement (WPC), gray MTA (GMTA), and white MTA (WMTA) were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). One gram of each material was digested with 80 degrees C "aqua-regia" (7 mL of 60% HNO3 and 21 mL of 35% HCl), filtered, and analyzed by ICP-AES. The analysis was performed 6 times and the data were analyzed statistically. Arsenic and lead concentrations were the highest in GPC (P cements (P Portland cement versus MTA, the differences in purity may be considered. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lunar cement

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  17. The influence of moisture content of sand on leach rates from cement and bitumen radioactive waste forms in a shallow ground repository

    Lovasic, Z.; Torok, J.; Buckley, L.P.

    1992-11-01

    Leaching rates from cement and bitumen-conditioned waste in contact with sand were determined with different water content of the sand up to and including saturation. A cylindrical waste form occupied one end of a column, with sand packed in the remainder. Axial radionuclide concentration profiles in the columns were determined several times during the experiment using an automated system consisting of a gamma spectrometer and an optical bench. The migration of 85 Sr, 137 Cs and 60 Co was determined from concentration profiles with time. The diffusion coefficient for 137 Cs in cement varied more than expected with the change of moisture content of sand. The leaching of bitumen waste forms is complex, and has poor reproducibility. When the water content of the sand was below 0.067 mL/mL, no leaching was determined from bitumen waste forms in all of the specimens except one. No clear relationship could be established between leach rate and the water content of sand above 0.18 mL/mL water content

  18. [Has application of the decree banning the use of cement with a high chromium VI content led to a reduction in occupational cement dermatitis in salaried workers in the construction industries?].

    Halioua, Bruno; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Crepy, Marie-Noëlle; Bouquiaux, Barbara; Assier, Haudrey; Billon, Stéphane; Chosidow, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Active employees in the construction industry are particularly exposed to occupational cement eczema (OCE) which affects the hands in 80 to 90% of cases. The importance of OCE in France and the impact of the application of decree n(o). 2005-577 on 26 May 2005 were estimated from data collected by the Occupational risks division of the French national health insurance fund for salaried workers (CNAMTS). This decree prohibits the placing on the market and use of cement (and preparations containing it) with a chromium VI content above 0.0002% in order to reduce its hazardousness. All cases of OCE reported to and recognized by the CNAMTS between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2008 among construction workers were selected. The following parameters were noted in each case: age, gender, industrial sector concerned, local French National health insurance agency, causal agent and the number of working days lost. The incidence per 100,000 salaried workers could be determined from the total number of salaried workers followed up by occupational medicine as well as those working in the construction industry. For the five years studied, 3698 cases of occupational eczema (OE) were reported in construction workers and this was 17.1% of the total number of cases of OE for all salaried employees (n=12.689). Cement was the causal agent most frequently involved in the construction sector (57.8%, 2139/3698). The annual incidence of OCE decreased from 37.8 to 21.1 new cases per 100,000 employees in the construction industry per year between 2004 and 2008. The total number of days lost from work due to OCE decreased by 39% during the study period. This descriptive study highlights the importance and socio-economic impact of OCE in the construction industry. Application of decree n(o). 2005-577 on 26 May 2005 may explain a reduction in OCE. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Cermet cements.

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  20. Effect of Slag Content and Hardening Accelerator Dosage on the Physico Mechanical Properties of Cement and Concrete

    Derabla, R.; Mokrani, I.; Benmalek, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Our contribution consists at the study of the effect of (0 %, 0.2 % and 0.34 %) dosage of an hardening accelerating plasticizer (Plastocrete 160, produced by Sika Aldjazair) on the properties of normal mortar and concretes prepared with portland cement artificial of Hadjar Soud cement factory (Skikda - Algeria) with addition of (10 % and 20 %) of granulated blast furnace slag finely crushed of the El Hadjar blast furnace (Annaba - Algeria). The tests are focused to the physical and mechanical characteristics of elaborated materials to knowing: setting time, porosity, water absorption capacity and the test of compressive strength at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results obtained show clearly the reliability of the additive used to accelerate the hardening and to obtain high strengths at early age, which increase by increasing of the additive dosage. For the slag, its low hydraulic capacity does not make it profitable than at the long term (beyond 28 days). (author)

  1. The influence of particle size and fluorine content of aluminosilicate glass on the glass ionomer cement properties.

    De Caluwé, T; Vercruysse, C W J; Fraeyman, S; Verbeeck, R M H

    2014-09-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are clinically accepted dental restorative materials mainly due to their direct chemical adhesion to both enamel and dentin and their ability to release fluoride. However, their mechanical properties are inferior compared to those of amalgam and composite. The aim of this study is to investigate if combinations of nano- and macrogranular glass with different compositions in a glass ionomer cement can improve the mechanical and physical properties. Glasses with the composition 4.5 SiO2-3 Al2O3-1.5 P2O5-(5-x) CaO-x CaF2 (x=0 and x=2) were prepared. Of each type of glass, particles with a median size of about 0.73 μm and 6.02 μm were made. The results show that the setting time of GIC decreases when macrogranular glass particles are replaced by nanogranular glass particles, whereas the compressive strength and Young's modulus, measured after 24 h setting, increase. The effects are more pronounced when the nanogranular glass particles contain fluoride. After thermocycling, compressive strength decreases for nearly all formulations, the effect being most pronounced for cements containing nanogranular glass particles. Hence, the strength of the GIC seems mainly determined by the macrogranular glass particles. Cumulative F--release decreases when the macrogranular glass particles with fluoride are replaced by nanogranular glass particles with(out) fluoride. The present study thus shows that replacing macro- by nanogranular glass particles with different compositions can lead to cements with approximately the same physical properties (e.g. setting time, consistency), but with different physicochemical (e.g. F--release, water-uptake) and initial mechanical properties. On the long term, the mechanical properties are mainly determined by the macrogranular glass particles. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  3. Effect of the strontium aluminate and hemihydrate contents on the properties of a calcium sulphoaluminate based cement

    Velazco, G.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of strontium aluminate (SrAl2O4 on the hydration process of a calcium sulphoaluminate (C4A3Ŝ cement was investigated. Cement pastes were prepared by mixing C4A3Ŝ , hemihydrate (CaSO4· ½H2O, CŜH0.5 and 0, 10 or 20wt% of SrAl2O4 (SrA. The amount of CŜH0.5 was 15, 20 or 25wt% based on the C4A3Ŝ quantity. The cement pastes were hydrated using water to cement ratios (w/c of 0.4 and 0.5. Samples were cured from 1 to 28 d. The compressive strength and setting time were evaluated and the hydration products were characterized. It was found that the setting time was delayed up to 42 min for the samples containing SrAl2O4 compared to samples without addition. The samples with 25wt% hemihydrate containing 20wt% SrAl2O4 developed the highest compressive strength (60 MPa after 28 d of curing. The main product after hydration was ettringite (C6AŜ3H32. The morphology of this phase consisted of thin needle-shaped crystals.Se investigó el efecto de la adición de aluminato de estroncio (SrAl2O4 sobre las propiedades de un cemento de sulfoaluminato de calcio (C4A3Ŝ. Se prepararon muestras mezclando C4A3Ŝ, hemihidrato (CaSO4· ½H2O, CŜH0.5 y 0, 10 o 20% e.p de SrAl2O4 (SrA. La cantidad de CŜH0.5 fue de 15, 20 o 25% e.p. basado en la cantidad de C4A3Ŝ. Las relaciones agua/cemento utilizadas fueron 0.4 y 0.5. Las muestras fueron curadas hasta 28 d. Se evaluó el tiempo de fraguado y la resistencia a la compresión. Los productos de hidratación se caracterizaron mediante DRX y MEB. El tiempo de fraguado se retardó hasta 42 minutos con la adición del SrAl2O4 comparado con las muestras sin adiciones. Las muestras con 25% e.p. de yeso y 20% e.p. de SrAl2O4 desarrollaron la mayor resistencia a la compresión alcanzando 60 MPa a 28 d de curado. Los análisis por MEB y DRX muestran como principal producto de hidratación a la etringita (C6AŜ3H32, cuya morfología se observa como cristales aciculares.

  4. Valorisation of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA with high quartz content as pozzolanic material in Portland cement mixtures

    A. M. Pereira

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement (OPC production is one of the most contaminating greenhouse gas producing activities. In order to reduce OPC consumption, several alternatives are being assessed, and the use of pozzolanic material is one of them. This paper presents study on the reactivity of sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA, a residue from sugarcane industry, as a pozzolanic material. In order to evaluate SCBA reactivity, it was mixed in pastes with hydrated lime and OPC, which were microstructurally characterised. These studies showed that SCBA presents some pozzolanic characteristics. Studies on mortars in which OPC was replaced by SCBA in the range 10–30% were also carried out. Replacement in the range 15–20% yielded the best behaviour in terms of compressive strength. Finally, it can be concluded this ash could be valorised despite its relative low pozzolanic reactivity.

  5. Development of cement material using inorganic additives

    Toyohara, Masumitsu; Satou, Tatsuaki; Wada, Mikio; Ishii, Tomoharu; Matsuo, Kazuaki.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic admixtures to enhance the fluidity of cement material was developed. These admixtures turned into easy to immobilize the miscellaneous radioactive waste using cement material. It was found that the ζ potential of cement particles was directly proportional to the content of the inorganic admixtures in cement paste and the particles of cement were dispersed at the high ζ potential. The condensed sodium phosphate, which was the main component of the inorganic admixtures, retarded the dissolution of Ca 2+ ion from the cement, and generated the colloids by incorporating dissolved Ca 2+ ion. The cement material containing the inorganic admixtures was found to have the same mechanical strength and adsorption potential of radionuclides in comparison to normal cement materials. It was confirmed that the cement material containing the inorganic admixture was effectively filled gaps of miscellaneous radioactive waste. (author)

  6. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  7. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  8. Cement Formation

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  9. Stability of reinforced cemented backfills

    Mitchell, R.J.; Stone, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mining with backfill has been the subject of several international meetings in recent years and a considerable research effort is being applied to improve both mining economics and ore recovery by using backfill for ground support. Classified mill tailings sands are the most commonly used backfill material but these fine sands must be stabilized before full ore pillar recovery can be achieved. Normal portland cement is generally used for stabilization but the high cost of cement prohibits high cement usage. This paper considers the use of reinforcements in cemented fill to reduce the cement usage. It is concluded that strong cemented layers at typical spacings of about 3 meters in a low cement content bulk fill can reinforce the fill and reduce the overall cement usage. Fibre reinforcements introduced into strong layers or into bulk fills are also known to be effective in reducing cement usage. Some development work is needed to produce the ideal type of anchored fibre in order to realize economic gains from fibre-reinforced fills

  10. compaction delay versus properties of cement-bound lateritic soil

    hp

    hour intervals on soil-cement mixes 3,5,8; and 1, 3, 5 percent cement contents by weight of dry soils, for ... stabilized soils were the Compaction test (Standard Proctor), the Unconfined Compressive. Strength .... Plastic limit (%). % passing BS ...

  11. A practical method for estimating maximum shear modulus of cemented sands using unconfined compressive strength

    Choo, Hyunwook; Nam, Hongyeop; Lee, Woojin

    2017-12-01

    The composition of naturally cemented deposits is very complicated; thus, estimating the maximum shear modulus (Gmax, or shear modulus at very small strains) of cemented sands using the previous empirical formulas is very difficult. The purpose of this experimental investigation is to evaluate the effects of particle size and cement type on the Gmax and unconfined compressive strength (qucs) of cemented sands, with the ultimate goal of estimating Gmax of cemented sands using qucs. Two sands were artificially cemented using Portland cement or gypsum under varying cement contents (2%-9%) and relative densities (30%-80%). Unconfined compression tests and bender element tests were performed, and the results from previous studies of two cemented sands were incorporated in this study. The results of this study demonstrate that the effect of particle size on the qucs and Gmax of four cemented sands is insignificant, and the variation of qucs and Gmax can be captured by the ratio between volume of void and volume of cement. qucs and Gmax of sand cemented with Portland cement are greater than those of sand cemented with gypsum. However, the relationship between qucs and Gmax of the cemented sand is not affected by the void ratio, cement type and cement content, revealing that Gmax of the complex naturally cemented soils with unknown in-situ void ratio, cement type and cement content can be estimated using qucs.

  12. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    -belite cement that contained medium C4A3 S¯ and C2S contents showed good dimensional stability, sulfate resistance, and compressive strength development and was considered the optimum phase composition for calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement in terms of comparable performance characteristics to portland cement. Furthermore, two calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers were successfully synthesized from natural and waste materials such as limestone, bauxite, flue gas desulfurization sludge, Class C fly ash, and fluidized bed ash proportioned to the optimum calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. Waste materials composed 30% and 41% of the raw ingredients. The two calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cements synthesized from natural and waste materials showed good dimensional stability, sulfate resistance, and compressive strength development, comparable to commercial portland cement.

  13. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  14. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  15. A cement based syntactic foam

    Li Guoqiang; Muthyala, Venkata D.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cement based syntactic foam core was proposed and experimentally investigated for composite sandwich structures. This was a multi-phase composite material with microballoon dispersed in a rubber latex toughened cement paste matrix. A trace amount of microfiber was also incorporated to increase the number of mechanisms for energy absorption and a small amount of nanoclay was added to improve the crystal structure of the hydrates. Three groups of cement based syntactic foams with varying cement content were investigated. A fourth group of specimens containing pure cement paste were also prepared as control. Each group contained 24 beam specimens. The total number of beam specimens was 96. The dimension of each beam was 30.5 cm x 5.1 cm x 1.5 cm. Twelve foam specimens from each group were wrapped with plain woven 7715 style glass fabric reinforced epoxy to prepare sandwich beams. Twelve cubic foam specimens, three from each group, with a side length of 5.1 cm, were also prepared. Three types of testing, low velocity impact test and four-point bending test on the beam specimens and compression test on the cubic specimens, were conducted to evaluate the impact energy dissipation, stress-strain behavior, and residual strength. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was also used to examine the energy dissipation mechanisms in the micro-length scale. It was found that the cement based syntactic foam has a higher capacity for dissipating impact energy with an insignificant reduction in strength as compared to the control cement paste core. When compared to a polymer based foam core having similar compositions, it was found that the cement based foam has a comparable energy dissipation capacity. The developed cement based syntactic foam would be a viable alternative for core materials in impact-tolerant composite sandwich structures

  16. Influence of Cements Containing Calcareous Fly Ash as a Main Component Properties of Fresh Cement Mixtures

    Gołaszewski, Jacek; Kostrzanowska-Siedlarz, Aleksandra; Ponikiewski, Tomasz; Miera, Patrycja

    2017-10-01

    The main goal of presented research was to examine usability of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) from technological point of view. In the paper the results of tests concerning the influence of CEM II and CEM IV cements containing fly ash (W) on rheological properties, air content, setting times and plastic shrinkage of mortars are presented and discussed. Moreover, compatibility of plasticizers with cements containing fly ash (W) was also studied. Additionally, setting time and hydration heat of cements containing calcareous fly ash (W) were determined. In a broader aspect, the research contributes to promulgation of the possibility of using calcareous fly ash (W) in cement and concrete technology, what greatly benefits the environment protection (utilization of waste fly ash). Calcareous fly ash can be used successfully as the main component of cement. Cements produced by blending with processed fly ash or cements produced by interginding are characterized by acceptable technological properties. In respect to CEM I cements, cements containing calcareous fly ash worsen workability, decrease air content, delay setting time of mixtures. Cements with calcareous fly ash show good compatibility with plasticizers.

  17. Pre-portland cements and geopolymers

    Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Perná, Ivana; Ertl, Z.; Miller, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-62 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : caementum * cement itious * calcareous cement Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 http://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2012_01/5_Hanzlicek.pdf

  18. Cement replacement materials. Properties, durability, sustainability

    Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the latest findings in the properties and application of Supplementary Cementing Materials and blended cements currently used in the world in concrete. Sustainability is an important issue all over the world. Carbon dioxide emission has been a serious problem in the world due to the greenhouse effect. Today many countries agreed to reduce the emission of CO2. Many phases of cement and concrete technology can affect sustainability. Cement and concrete industry is responsible for the production of 7% carbon dioxide of the total world CO2 emission. The use of supplementary cementing materials (SCM), design of concrete mixtures with optimum content of cement and enhancement of concrete durability are the main issues towards sustainability in concrete industry.

  19. Content

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...... curriculum, in higher education, and to generate analytical categories and criteria for selection of content, which can be used for systematic didactical reflection. The larger project also concerns reflection on and clarification of the concept of content, including the relation between content at the level......Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...

  20. Comparison of creep of the cement pastes included fly ash

    Padevět Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to comparison of creep of cement pastes containing fly ash admixture. The size of creep in time depends on the amount of components of the cement paste. Attention is paid to the content of classical fly ash in cement paste and its impact on the size of creep. The moisture of cement pastes is distinguished because it significantly affects the rheological properties of the material.

  1. An Experimental Study of Portland Cement and Superfine Cement Slurry Grouting in Loose Sand and Sandy Soil

    Weijing Yao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Grouting technology is widely applied in the fields of geotechnical engineering in infrastructure. Loose sand and sandy soil are common poor soils in tunnel and foundation treatments. It is necessary to use superfine cement slurry grouting in the micro-cracks of soil. The different effectiveness of Portland cement slurry and superfine cement slurry in sandy soil by the laboratory grouting experiment method were presented in this paper. The grouting situations of superfine cement slurry injected into sand and sandy soil were explored. The investigated parameters were the dry density, wet density, moisture content, internal friction angle, and cohesion force. The results show that the consolidation effect of superfine cement is better than that of Portland cement due to the small size of superfine cement particles. The superfine cement can diffuse into the sand by infiltration, extrusion, and splitting. When the water–cement ratio of superfine cement slurry is less than 2:1 grouting into loose sand, the dry and wet density decrease with the increase in the water–cement ratio, while the moisture content and cohesive force gradually increase. When the water–cement ratio of superfine cement slurry is 1:1 grouting into loose sand and sandy soil, the dry density, wet density, and cohesive force of loose sand are larger than those of sandy soil. The results of the experiment may be relevant for engineering applications.

  2. Frost Resistance and Permeability of Cement Stabilized Gravel used as Filling Material for Pearl-Chain Bridges

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2014-01-01

    several requirements on its moisture properties. In this paper the frost resistance, the liquid water permeability and the water vapour permeability of cement stabilized gravel are examined for two different cement contents. It is found that a small increase in cement content from 4% to 5% increases...... the 28-days compressive strength from 6.2 MPa to 12.3 MPa. The frost resistance of cement stabilized gravel with 5% cement content is better than for cement stabilized gravel with 4% cement content. The liquid water permeability coefficient and the water vapour permeability coefficient are significantly...

  3. INFLUENCE OF WINE ACID ON RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF WELL BORE CEMENT SLURRIES AND HARDENED CEMENT PROPERTIES

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of commercial types of domestic cements for use in cementing the deep wells is a process by which Yugoslav oil industry tends to solve problems of completion of those wells independently. In order to design a domestic, cheep and effective retarder, tests of applicability of wine acid on cement slurries have been carried out. Besides examining the necessary wine acid content to achieve desirable Theological properties, the influence of this additive on properties of hardened cement samples has been tested too (the paper is published in Croatian.

  4. Optimization of mix design by using superplasticized cement

    Khaskheli, G.B.; Kumar, A.; Umrani, A.N.

    2009-01-01

    Superplasticizers are high range water reducers which are capable of producing high-strength concrete with low permeability. Recently a cement factory in Sindh has launched SPC (Superplasticized Cement) which contains the required amount of superplasticizers. It is needed to investigate its performance compared to that of OPC (Ordinal-Y Portland Cement). This study is framed to optimize various strengths of structural concrete through the use of SPC of the cement factory. In total 288 cubes (6x6x6) were cast and tested for four different compressive strength of concrete (8000, 6000, 5000 and 4000 psi) manufactured with two brands of cement (OPC and SPC) of the cement factory and two different coarse aggregate sizes (40 and 20 mm) at three different curing ages (7,14 and 28 days). The effect on compressive strength of structural concrete was also observed by adopting 5 and 10% reduction in cement content of the superplasticized cement. Results have indicated that structural concrete made with superplasticized cement could give higher compressive strength than that of OPC at all the curing ages, and 10% saving in cement content could be achieved by using superplasticized cement. Structural concrete made with superplasticized cement could attain higher strength in a shorter period of time, and workability of structural concrete could be increased by using SPC. (author)

  5. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    Yufei Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO42, Ca3(AsO42, and Na2HAsO4.

  6. The effect of microsilica and refractory cement content on the properties of andalusite based Low Cement Castables used in aluminum casthouse O efeito do teor de microsílica e de cimento refratário nas propriedades de LCCs usados em moldagem de alumínio

    E. A. Firoozjaei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The bonding system in low cement castables is achieved by the use of calcium aluminate cement, microsilica and reactive alumina. The lime/silica ratio critically impacts the liquid phase formation at high temperatures and subsequently the corrosion resistance and the mechanical and physical properties of the refractory. In the current study, the effects of microsilica and cement contents on the corrosion resistance and the physical and mechanical properties of Andalusite Low Cement Castables (LCCs refractories were investigated. Alcoa Cup test was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the castables at 850 ºC and 1160 ºC. The study showed that an increase in the microsilica/cement ratio improves the physical and mechanical properties of the castable, but at the expense of the corrosion resistance. When a fixed amount of BaSO4 was added to the base refractory material, barium celsian along with glassy phase formation was observed to increase with the increase in the microsilica/cement ratio in the refractory. The presence of the glassy phases was noted to lower the positive effect of Ba-celsian formation on improving the corrosion resistance of the refractory. The observed results were validated using thermodynamic calculations which indicated that Ba-celsian phase was more resistant than Ca-anorthite for applications involving contact with molten aluminum.O sistema de ligantes em concretos de baixo cimento é produzido com o uso de cimento de aluminato de cálcio, microsílica e alumina reativa. A razão cálcia/sílica tem importância crucial na formação de fase líquida a altas temperaturas e posteriormente na resistência a corrosão e nas propriedades mecânicas e físicas do refratário. Neste trabalho foram investigados os efeitos do teor de microsílica e de cimento na resistência à corrosão e nas propriedades mecânicas e físicas de refratários de baixo teor de cimento Andalusita (LCC. O teste da Alcoa foi usado para

  7. Behaviour of soil-cement specimens in unconfined dynamic compression

    Davies, J.; Fendukly, L. M.

    1994-06-01

    The response of the cement-stabilized red marl to dynamic loading in compression has been investigated over a range of cement contents and curing times. Specimens were subjected to different stress levels below unconfined compressive strength, at a frequency of 5 Hz, and a fatigue relationship for the material was developed. The value of resilient modulus was found to be greater than the modulus of elasticity for the same cement content and curing time.

  8. Producing cement

    Stone, E G

    1923-09-12

    A process and apparatus are described for producing Portland cement in which pulverized shale is successively heated in a series of inclined rotary retorts having internal stirrers and oil gas outlets, which are connected to condensers. The partially treated shale is removed from the lowermost retort by a conveyor, then fed separately or conjointly into pipes and thence into a number of vertically disposed retorts. Each of these retorts may be fitted interiorly with vertical arranged conveyors which elevate the shale and discharge it over a lip, from whence it falls to the bottom of the retorts. The lower end of each casing is furnished with an adjustable discharge door through which the spent shale is fed to a hopper, thence into separate trucks. The oil gases generated in the retorts are exhausted through pipes to condensers. The spent shale is conveyed to a bin and mixed while hot with ground limestone. The admixed materials are then ground and fed to a rotary kiln which is fired by the incondensible gases derived from the oil gases obtained in the previous retorting of the shale. The calcined materials are then delivered from the rotary kiln to rotary coolers. The waste gases from the kiln are utilized for heating the retorts in which the ground shale is heated for the purpose of extracting therefrom the contained hydrocarbon oils and gases.

  9. The effects of cement-based and cement-ash-based mortar slabs on indoor air quality

    Krejcirikova, Barbora; Kolarik, Jakub; Wargocki, Pawel

    2018-01-01

    The effects of emissions from cement-based and cement-ash-based mortar slabs were studied. In the latter, 30% of the cement content had been replaced by sewage sludge ash. They were tested singly and together with either carpet or linoleum. The air exhausted from the chambers was assessed by means...... of odour intensity and chemical characterization of emissions. Odour intensity increased with the increased exposed area of the slabs. It did not differ significantly between cement-based or cement-ash-based mortar and neither did the chemical composition of the exhaust air. A significant sink effect...

  10. Correlating cement characteristics with rheology of paste

    Vikan, H.; Justnes, H.; Winnefeld, F.; Figi, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cement characteristics such as cement fineness and clinker composition on the 'flow resistance' measured as the area under the shear stress-shear rate flow curve has been investigated. Three different types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulphonate-formaldehyde condensate, polyether grafted polyacrylate, and lignosulphonate have been tested in this context on 6 different cements. The flow resistance correlated well with the cement characteristic (Blaine.{d.cC 3 A + [1 - d].C 3 S}) where the factor d represents relative reactivity of cubic C 3 A and C 3 S while cC 3 A and C 3 S represent the content of these minerals. It was found to be either a linear or exponential function of the combined cement characteristic depending on plasticizer type and dosage. The correlation was valid for a mix of pure cement and cement with fly ash, limestone filler (4%), as well as pastes with constant silica fume dosage, when the mineral contents were determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffractograms

  11. Asphalt cement poisoning

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  12. Radioactivity of bone cement

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  13. Ultrafine portland cement performance

    C. Argiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available By mixing several binder materials and additions with different degrees of fineness, the packing density of the final product may be improved. In this work, ultrafine cement and silica fume mixes were studied to optimize the properties of cement-based materials. This research was performed in mortars made of two types of cement (ultrafine Portland cement and common Portland cement and two types of silica fume with different particle-size distributions. Two Portland cement replacement ratios of 4% and 10% of silica fume were selected and added by means of a mechanical blending method. The results revealed that the effect of the finer silica fume mixed with the coarse cement enhances the mechanical properties and pore structure refinement at a later age. This improvement is somewhat lower in the case of ultrafine cement with silica fume.

  14. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  15. Contents

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  16. Solidification of liquid radioactive concentrates by fixation with cement

    Pekar, A.; Breza, M.; Timulak, J.; Krajc, T.

    1985-01-01

    In testing the technology of liquid radioactive wastes cementation, the effect was mainly studied of the content of boric acid and its salts on cement solidification, the effect of additives on radionuclide leachability and the effect of the salt content on the cementation product. On the basis of experimental work carried out on laboratory scale with model samples and samples of radioactive concentrate from the V-1 nuclear power plant, the following suitable composition of the cementation mixture was determined: 40% Portland cement, 40% zeolite containing material and 20% power plant ash. The most suitable ratio of liquid radioactive wastes and the cementation mixture is 0.5. As long as in such case the salt content of the concentrate ranges between 20 and 25%, the cementation product will have a maximum salt content of 10% and a leachability of the order of 10 -3 to 10 -4 g/cm 2 per day with a mechanical strength allowing safe handling. It was also found that the quality processing of the cement paste with degassing, e.g., by vibration, is more effective for the production of a pore-free cementation product than the application of various additives which are supposed to eliminate pore formation. (Z.M.)

  17. Absorption Characteristics of Cement Combination Concrete Containing Portland Cement, fly ash, and Metakaolin

    Folagbade S.O.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance to water penetration of cement combination concretes containing Portland cement (PC, fly ash (FA, and metakaolin (MK have been investigated at different water/cement (w/c ratios, 28-day strengths, and depths of water penetration using their material costs and embodied carbon-dioxide (eCO2 contents. Results revealed that, at equal w/c ratio, eCO2 content reduced with increasing content of FA and MK. MK contributed to the 28-day strengths more than FA. Compared with PC, FA reduced cost and increased the depth of water penetration, MK increased cost and reduced the depth of water penetration, and their ternary combinations become beneficial. At equal strengths and levels of resistance to water penetration, most of the cement combination concretes are more environmentally compatible and costlier than PC concrete. Only MK binary cement concretes with 10%MK content or more and ternary cement concretes at a total replacement level of 55% with 10%MK content or more have higher resistance to water penetration than PC concrete.

  18. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Callaghan Innovation, 69 Gracefield Road, PO Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Gordon, L.E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Geopolymer and Minerals Processing Group, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ko, S.-C. [Holcim Technology Ltd, Hagenholzstrasse 85, CH-8050 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  19. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.; Gordon, L.E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate a supersulfated cement for use as a nuclear waste encapsulant. • High powder fineness requires a high water content to satisfy flow requirements. • Heat generation during hydration is similar to a control cement paste. • Typical hydration products are formed resulting in a high potential for waste ion immobilisation. • Paste pH and aluminium corrosion is less than in a control cement paste. - Abstract: Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste

  20. Effect of Cement Type on Autogenous Deformation of Cement-Based Materials

    Pietro, Lura; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of non-evaporable water content, chemical shrinkage, autogenous deformation, internal relative humidity (RH), pore solution composition, and early-age elastic modulus are presented and discussed. All experiments were performed on Portland cement and blast-furnace slag...... (BFS) cement pastes. Self-desiccation shrinkage of the BFS cement paste was modeled based on the RH measurements, following the capillary-tension approach. The main findings of this study are: 1) self-desiccation shrinkage can be related to self-desiccation both for Portland and for BFS cement pastes......, taking into account the influence of the dissolved salts in the pore solution, 2) the BFS cement paste studied shows pronounced self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage, mainly caused by its very fine pore structure....

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  3. Strength properties of sandy soil-cement admixtures

    Sara Rios; António Joaquim Pereira Viana Da Fonseca

    2009-01-01

    This paper will focus on the sensitivity of strength and stiffness properties of silty-sands, from granitic residual soil, which can be converted to a highly improved material if stabilized with cement. The study of soil stabilization with cement demands to quantify the influence of the cement percentage, porosity and water content adopted in the admixing process for different stresses and physical states. Firstly, this influence was quantified in terms of the unconfined strength and maximum ...

  4. Effect of Cement Replacement with Carbide Waste on the Strength of Stabilized Clay Subgrade

    Muntohar A.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cement is commonly used for soil stabilization and many other ground improvement techniques. Cement is believed to be very good to improve the compressive and split-tensile strength of clay subgrades. In some application cement could be partly or fully replaced with carbide waste. This research is to study the effectiveness of the cement replacement and to find the maximum carbide waste content to be allowed for a clay subgrade. The quantities of cement replaced with the carbide waste were 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% by its mass. The results show that replacing the cement with carbide waste decreased both the compressive and split tensile strength. Replacing cement content with carbide waste reduced its ability for stabilization. The carbide waste content should be less than 70% of the cement to provide a sufficient stabilizing effect on a clay subgrade.

  5. Study on Cr(VI) Leaching from Cement and Cement Composites

    Palascakova, Lenka; Kanuchova, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on hexavalent chromium leaching from cement samples and cement composites containing silica fume and zeolite additions that were subjected to various leaching agents. The water-soluble Cr(VI) concentrations in cements ranged from 0.2 to 3.2 mg/kg and represented only 1.8% of the total chromium content. The presence of chromium compounds with both chromium oxidation states of III and VI was detected in the cement samples by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Leaching tests were performed in a Britton-Robinson buffer to simulate natural conditions and showed increased dissolution of Cr(VI) up to 6 mg/kg. The highest amount of leached hexavalent chromium was detected after leaching in HCl. The findings revealed that the leaching of chromium from cements was higher by 55–80% than that from the cement composites. A minimum concentration was observed for all cement samples when studying the relationship between the soluble Cr(VI) and the cement storage time. PMID:29690550

  6. Effect of Rice Husk Ash on Cement Stabilized Laterite

    Musa ALHASSAN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Laterite soil collected from Maikunkele area of Minna, classified as an A-7-6 on AASHTO classification, was stabilized with 2-8% cement by weight of the dry soil. Using British Standard Light (BSL compaction energy, the effect of Rice Husk Ash (RHA on the soil was investigated with respect to compaction characteristics, California Bearing Ratio (CBR and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS tests. Results obtained, indicate a general decrease in Maximum Dry Density (MDD and increase in Optimum Moisture Content (OMC, all with increase in RHA Content (2-8% at specified cement contents. There was also a tremendous improvement in the CBR and UCS with increase in the RHA content at specified cement contents to their peak values at between 4-6% RHA. The UCS values also improved with curing age. This indicates the potentials of using 4-6% RHA admixed with less cement contents for laterite soil stabilization.

  7. Concrete research using blended cements

    Butler, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete research increasingly involves the use of mixes containing one or more of the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), often in conjunction with chemical admixtures. The influence of materials is commonly evaluated on the basis of water/ cement or water/ binder ratio and SCM content as a percentage of total binder, with dosage level of chemical admixture varied to maintain workability. As a result, more than one variable is introduced at a time and the objectives of the research may not be achieved. The significance of water/ cement ratio and addition rates of admixtures are examined from a practical standpoint with suggestions for more appropriate means of evaluation of the influence of individual materials. Copyright (2001) The Australian Ceramic Society

  8. The density of cement phases

    Balonis, M.; Glasser, F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The densities of principal crystalline phases occurring in Portland cement are critically assessed and tabulated, in some cases with addition of new data. A reliable and self-consistent density set for crystalline phases was obtained by calculating densities from crystallographic data and unit cell contents. Independent laboratory work was undertaken to synthesize major AFm and AFt cement phases, determine their unit cell parameters and compare the results with those recorded in the literature. Parameters were refined from powder diffraction patterns using CELREF 2 software. A density value is presented for each phase, showing literature sources, in some cases describing limitations on the data, and the weighting attached to numerical values where an averaging process was used for accepted data. A brief discussion is made of the consequences of the packing of water to density changes in AFm and AFt structures.

  9. Laboratory Electrical Resistivity Studies on Cement Stabilized Soil

    Lokesh, K. N.; Jacob, Jinu Mary

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurement of freshly prepared uncured and cured soil-cement materials is done and the correlations between the factors controlling the performance of soil-cement and electrical resistivity are discussed in this paper. Conventional quality control of soil-cement quite often involves wastage of a lot of material, if it does not meet the strength criteria. In this study, it is observed that, in soil-cement, resistivity follows a similar trend as unconfined compressive strength, with increase in cement content and time of curing. Quantitative relations developed for predicting 7-day strength of soil-cement mix, using resistivity of the soil-cement samples at freshly prepared state, after 1-hour curing help to decide whether the soil-cement mix meets the desired strength and performance criteria. This offers the option of the soil-cement mix to be upgraded (possibly with additional cement) in its fresh state itself, if it does not fulfil the performance criteria, rather than wasting the material after hardening. PMID:28540364

  10. Chemical and physical properties of bone cement for vertebroplasty

    Po-Liang Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral compression fracture is the most common complication of osteoporosis. It may result in persistent severe pain and limited mobility, and significantly impacts the quality of life. Vertebroplasty involves a percutaneous injection of bone cement into the collapsed vertebrae by fluorescent guide. The most commonly used bone cement in percutaneous vertebroplasty is based on the polymerization of methylmethacrylate monomers to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA polymers. However, information on the properties of bone cement is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the clinical community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the physical properties of PMMA. The effects of altering the portions and contents of monomer liquid and polymer powders on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also discussed. This information will allow spine surgeons to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific clinical applications and improve safety.

  11. Hospital waste ashes in Portland cement mortars

    Genazzini, C.; Zerbino, R.; Ronco, A.; Batic, O.; Giaccio, G.

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, most concretes incorporate mineral additions such as pozzolans, fly ash, silica fume, blast furnace slag, and calcareous filler among others. Although the technological and economical benefits were the main reasons for the use of mineral additions, the prevention of environmental contamination by means of proper waste disposal becomes a priority. The chance of incorporating hospital waste ashes in Portland cement-based materials is presented here. Ash characterization was performed by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, radioactive material detection, and fineness and density tests. Conduction calorimetry and setting time tests were developed on pastes including ash contents from 0% to 100%. Mortars were prepared including ash contents up to 50% of cement. The results of setting time, temperature development, flexural and compressive strengths, water absorption, density, and leachability are analyzed. Results indicate that Portland cement systems could become an alternative for the disposal of this type of ashes

  12. Hydration characteristics and structure formation of cement pastes containing metakaolin

    Dvorkin Leonid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metakaolin (MK is one of the most effective mineral admixtures for cement-based composites. The deposits of kaolin clays are wide-spread in the world. Metakaolin is comparable to silica fume as an active mineral admixture for cement-based composites. In this paper, the rheological and mechanical properties of cement paste containing metakaolin are investigated. The effect of MK is more evident at “tight” hydration conditions within mixtures with low water-cement ratio, provided by application of superplasticizers. The cement is replaced with 0 to 15% metakaolin, and superplasticizer content ranged from 0 to 1.5% by weight of cementitious materials (i.e. cement and metakaolin. An equation is derived to describe the relationship between the metakaolin and superplasticizer content and consistency of pastes. There is a linear dependence between metakalolin content and water demand. Second-degree polynomial describe the influence of superplasticizer content. The application of SP and MK may produce cement-water suspensions with water-retaining capacity at 50-70% higher than control suspensions. The investigation of initial structure forming of cement pastes with SP-MK composite admixture indicates the extension of coagulation structure forming phase comparing to the pastes without additives. Crystallization stage was characterized by more intensive strengthening of the paste with SP-MK admixture comparing to the paste without admixtures and paste with SP. Results on the porosity parameters for hardened cement paste indicate a decrease in the average diameter of pores and refinement of pore structure in the presence of metakaolin. A finer pore structure associated with an increase in strength. X-ray analysis data reveal a growing number of small-crystalline low-alkaline calcium hydrosilicates and reducing portlandite content, when MK dosage increases. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM data confirm, that hardened cement paste containing MK has

  13. Advanced cementation concepts

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  14. Preparation of hydraulic cement

    1921-08-28

    A process for the preparation of hydraulic cement by the use of oil-shale residues is characterized in that the oil-shale refuse is mixed with granular basic blast-furnace slag and a small amount of portland cement and ground together.

  15. Low force cementation.

    Wilson, P R

    1996-07-01

    The marginal adaptation of full coverage restorations is adversely affected by the introduction of luting agents of various minimum film thicknesses during the cementation process. The increase in the marginal opening may have long-term detrimental effects on the health of both pulpal and periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of varying seating forces (2.5, 12.5, 25 N), venting, and cement types on post-cementation marginal elevation in cast crowns. A standardized cement space of 40 microns was provided between a machined gold crown and a stainless steel die. An occlusal vent was placed that could be opened or closed. The post-cementation crown elevation was measured, following the use of two commercially available capsulated dental cements (Phosphacap, and Ketac-cem Applicap). The results indicate that only the combination of Ketac-Cem Applicap and crown venting produced post-cementation crown elevation of less than 20 microns when 12.5 N seating force was used. Higher forces (25 N) and venting were required for comparable seating when using Phosphacap (19 microns). The amount of force required to allow maximum seating of cast crowns appears to be cement specific, and is reduced by effective venting procedures.

  16. Cementation process study

    Park, H.H.; Han, K.W.; Ahn, S.J.; Choi, K.S.; Lee, M.W.; Ryu, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the cementation process study, in 1984, design of the waste treatment simulator was finished for the first step. We can experience not only the operation of solidification system but the design and construction of comming large scale plant through the design of cementation process. (Author)

  17. Effect of olive waste (Husk on behavior of cement paste

    Sharaf Alkheder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jordan is a famous country in terms of olive trees agriculture that resulted in a mass production of olive oil products. The huge amounts of olive waste (husk that resulted from olives processing to produce olive oil represent an environmental challenge in the country. The idea in this paper comes to use olive waste as a partial replacement for Portland cement in cement paste to conserve the environment, reduce cement consumption and increase cost efficiency. The wastes were burned properly in an oven and maintained for 6 h until it was fully transformed into ashes. Then, the oven was turned off and ashes were allowed to cool. After cooling, the material passed sieve #200 were used. The sieved ashes were used in the cement mix as a partial cement replacement for making the mortar and cement paste. Normal consistency and setting time were determined as well as soundness, compressive strength. Results indicated that normal consistency of the cement pastes containing different percentage of olive waste is somehow lower than that of the ordinary cement paste and slightly decreases with increasing the percentage. The results also indicated that the compressive strength of hardened blended cement paste containing different percentages of olive waste slightly decrease with olive waste content at 3, 7, and 28 days.

  18. Applications of radioactive methods in cement concrete testing

    Dinakaran, M.; Vijayaraghavan, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Basic principles regarding the neutron moderation technique and the successful application of this technique for determining the moisture and cement content in hardened concrete are briefly discussed. Since fast neutrons are converted into slow thermal neutrons by elastic scattering in the presence of hydrogen nuclei, it is possible to determine the moisture content in hardened cement concrete using precalibrated relationships. Also since most of the hydrogenous matter in concrete pertains to non-fixed water and hydrated cement compounds, an analysis of slow neutron counts on a sample at different non-fixed moisture contents make the estimation of cement content possible using the mathematical relationship between cement content, degree of hydration and the equivalent moisture content. The method developed is quick, non-destructive, and repeatable at the same time giving better accuracy when compared to conventional chemical methods. Use was also made of gamma ray transmission method for determining the differential density at various depths in a cement concrete pavement making use of cores cut from the pavement. Further, development proposed for determination of density at different depths of pavement in situ is also discussed. (auth.)

  19. Personal exposure to inhalable cement dust among construction workers.

    Peters, Susan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Fechter-Rink, Edeltraud; Kromhout, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Objective- A case study was carried out to assess cement dust exposure and its determinants among construction workers and for comparison among workers in cement and concrete production.Methods- Full-shift personal exposure measurements were performed and samples were analysed for inhalable dust and its cement content. Exposure variability was modelled with linear mixed models.Results- Inhalable dust concentrations at the construction site ranged from 0.05 to 34 mg/m(3), with a mean of 1.0 mg/m(3). Average concentration for inhalable cement dust was 0.3 mg/m(3) (GM; range 0.02-17 mg/m(3)). Levels in the ready-mix and pre-cast concrete plants were on average 0.5 mg/m(3) (GM) for inhalable dust and 0.2 mg/m(3) (GM) for inhalable cement dust. Highest concentrations were measured in cement production, particularly during cleaning tasks (inhalable dust GM = 55 mg/m(3); inhalable cement dust GM = 33 mg/m(3)) at which point the workers wore personal protective equipment. Elemental measurements showed highest but very variable cement percentages in the cement plant and very low percentages during reinforcement work and pouring. Most likely other sources were contributing to dust concentrations, particularly at the construction site. Within job groups, temporal variability in exposure concentrations generally outweighed differences in average concentrations between workers. 'Using a broom', 'outdoor wind speed' and 'presence of rain' were overall the most influential factors affecting inhalable (cement) dust exposure.Conclusion- Job type appeared to be the main predictor of exposure to inhalable (cement) dust at the construction site. Inhalable dust concentrations in cement production plants, especially during cleaning tasks, are usually considerably higher than at the construction site.

  20. Feasibility of backfilling mines using cement kiln dust, fly ash, and cement blends

    Beltagui, Hoda; Sonebi, Mohammed; Maguire, K.; Taylor, Susan

    2018-01-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is an industrial by-product of the cement manufacturing process, the composition of which can vary widely. Recent years of using alternative fuels have resulted in higher chloride and alkali contents within CKDs; as such, this limits the applications in which CKDs can be utilised. Using a CKD containing a high free lime content of 29.5%, it is shown that this CKD is capable of activating pulverized fuel ash (PFA) due to its high alkalinity, which can be utilised in low ...

  1. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  2. Radioactive waste cementation

    Soriano B, A.

    1996-01-01

    This research was carried out to develop the most adequate technique to immobilize low and medium-activity radioactive waste. different brands of national cement were used, portland and pozzolanic cement. Prismatic and cylindrical test tubes were prepared with different water/cement (W/C) relationship. Additives such a as clay and bentonite were added in some other cases. Later, the properties of these test tubes were evaluated. Properties such as: mechanical resistance, immersion resistance, lixiviation and porosity resistance. Cement with the highest mechanical resistance values, 62,29 MPa was pozzolanic cement for a W/C relationship of 0,35. It must be mentioned that the other types of cements reached a mechanical resistance over 10 MPa, a value indicated by the international standards for transportation and storage of low and medium-activity radioactive waste at a superficial level. However, in the case of immersion resistance, Sol cement (portland type I) with a W/C relationship of 0,35 reached a compression resistance over 61,92 MPa; as in the previous cases, the other cements reached a mechanical resistance > 10 MPa. Regarding porosity, working with W/C relationships = 0,35 0,40 and 0,45, without additives and with additives, the percentage of porosity found for all cements is lower than 40% percentage indicated by international standards. With regard to the lixiviation test, pozzolanic cement best retained Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60, and increased its advantages when bentonite was added, obtaining a lixiviation rate of 2,02 x E-6 cm/day. Sol cement also improved its properties when bentonite was added and obtained a lixiviation rate of 2,84 x E-6 cm/day for Cesium-137. However, Cobalt-60 is almost completely retained with the 3 types of cement with or without additives, reaching the limits indicated by the international standards for the lixiviation rate of beta-gamma emitter < 5,00E-4 cm/day. Characterizing the final product involves the knowledge of its

  3. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  4. Use of petroleum code as fuel in the cement industry

    Nawaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Cement industry is a very energy intensive industry. Each ton of cement produced requires 60 to 130 kilograms of fuel oil or an equivalent fuelling amount also requires an average 110 kWh of electricity as well over 40% of total production cost is the energy requirements in the cement industry (i.2). Normally oil, gas or coal is fired in cement kilns as traditional fuels. However use of waste, both as alternative fuels and raw materials is now common practice in many cement companies. Many different types of wastes are burnt today in cement kilns like used tyres, rubber, paper waste, waste oils, waste wood, paper sludge, sewage, animal meal and animal remains (i,4). The choice of fuel for the purpose is normally based on price and availability considering different properties of the fuel as energy contents, ash contents, moisture and volatiles contents. Petcoke is not yet produced in any petroleum refinery in Pakistan but it is abundantly available in the market worldwide as it is obtained as a waste product during the refining processes. The purpose of the current research is to figure out the suitability of petroleum coke as a fuel for cement industry both on technical and economic basis. (author)

  5. Development of a degradable cement of calcium phosphate and calcium sulfate composite for bone reconstruction

    Guo, H; Wei, J; Liu, C S

    2006-01-01

    A new type of composite bone cement was prepared and investigated by adding calcium sulfate (CS) to calcium phosphate cement (CPC). This composite cement can be handled as a paste and easily shaped into any contour, which can set within 5-20 min, the setting time largely depending on the liquid-solid (L/S) ratio; adding CS to CPC had little effect on the setting time of the composite cements. No obvious temperature increase and pH change were observed during setting and immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The compressive strength of the cement decreased with an increase in the content of CS. The degradation rate of the composite cements increased with time when the CS content was more than 20 wt%. Calcium deficient apatite could form on the surface of the composite cement because the release of calcium into SBF from the dissolution of CS and the apatite of the cement induced the new apatite formation; increasing the content of CS in the composite could improve the bioactivity of the composite cements. The results suggested that composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent degradability and suitable mechanical strength and bioactivity, which shows promising prospects for development as a clinical cement

  6. the Danish cement industry

    la Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Møllgård, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We test econometrically whether the sole Danish producer of cement holds a dominant position in the Danish market for (grey) cement. In import penetration tests, we find that its pricing and quantity decisions are independent of import price and quantity, implying that it can act to a considerable extent independently of its competitors. We also test whether it can act independently of its customers and find that its demand is inelastic with respect to its price. It thus holds a dominant posi...

  7. Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone intended for efficient paving materials

    Grishina, A.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the growth of load on automotive roads, modern transportation engineering is in need of efficient paving materials. Runways and most advanced highways require Portland cement concretes. This makes important the studies directed to improvement of binders for such concretes. In the present work some peculiarities of the process of Portland cement hydration and early setting of cement stone with barium hydrosilicate sol were examined. It was found that the admixture of said sol leads to a shift in the induction period to later times without significant change in its duration. The admixture of a modifier with nanoscale barium hydrosilicates increases the degree of hydration of the cement clinker minerals and changes the phase composition of the hydration products; in particular, the content of portlandite and tricalcium silicate decreases, while the amount of ettringite increases. Changes in the hydration processes of Portland cement and early setting of cement stone that are caused by the nanoscale barium hydrosilicates, allow to forecast positive technological effects both at the stage of manufacturing and at the stage of operation. In particular, the formwork age can be reduced, turnover of molds can be increased, formation of secondary ettringite and corrosion of the first type can be eliminated.

  8. Sustainable Blended Cements-Influences of Packing Density on Cement Paste Chemical Efficiency.

    Knop, Yaniv; Peled, Alva

    2018-04-18

    This paper addresses the development of blended cements with reduced clinker amount by partial replacement of the clinker with more environmentally-friendly material (e.g., limestone powders). This development can lead to more sustainable cements with reduced greenhouse gas emission and energy consumption during their production. The reduced clicker content was based on improved particle packing density and surface area of the cement powder by using three different limestone particle diameters: smaller (7 µm, 3 µm) or larger (70 µm, 53 µm) than the clinker particles, or having a similar size (23 µm). The effects of the different limestone particle sizes on the chemical reactivity of the blended cement were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), loss on ignition (LOI), isothermal calorimetry, and the water demand for reaching normal consistency. It was found that by blending the original cement with limestone, the hydration process and the reactivity of the limestone itself were increased by the increased surface area of the limestone particles. However, the carbonation reaction was decreased with the increased packing density of the blended cement with limestone, having various sizes.

  9. Prediction of chloride ingress and binding in cement paste

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Nielsen, Erik Pram; Herforth, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work on an analytical model for predicting the ingress rate of chlorides in cement-based materials. An integral part of this is a thermodynamic model for predicting the phase equilibria in hydrated Portland cement. The model’s ability to predict chloride binding...... in Portland cement pastes at any content of chloride, alkalis, sulfates and carbonate was verified experimentally and found to be equally valid when applied to other data in the literature. The thermodynamic model for predicting the phase equilibria in hydrated Portland cement was introduced into an existing...... Finite Difference Model for the ingress of chlorides into concrete which takes into account its multi-component nature. The “composite theory” was then used to predict the diffusivity of each ion based on the phase assemblage present in the hydrated Portland cement paste. Agreement was found between...

  10. Effect of mechanical activation of fly ash added to Moroccan Portland cement

    Ez-zaki H.

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of grinding fly ash on the physico-chemical and mechanical properties of fly ash blended CPJ45 cement. The addition of the fly ash particles to the grinder leads respectively to the breakage of the particles and to reduce the agglomeration effect in the balls of cement grinder. Fly ash milling was found to improve particles fineness, and increase the silica and alumina content in the cement. Furthermore, milled fly ash blended cements show higher compressive strength compared to unmilled fly ash blended cements, due to improved fly ash reactivity through their mechanical activation.

  11. Radiobiological waste treatment-ashing treatment and immobilization with cement

    Shengtao, Feng; Li, Gong; Li, Cheng; Benli, Wang; Lihong, Wang [China Inst. for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the study on the treatment of radioactive biological waste in the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP). The possibility of radiobiological waste treatment was investigated by using a RAF-3 type rapid ashing apparatus together with the immobilization of the resulted ash. This rapid ashing apparatus, developed by CIRP, is usually used for pretreatment of samples prior to chemical analysis and physical measurements. The results show that it can ash 3 kg of animal carcasses a batch, the ashing time is 5-7 h and the ash content is less than 4 wt%. The ashing temperature not exceeding 450 deg. C was used without any risk of high losses of radionuclides. The ash from the rapid ashing apparatus was demonstrated to be immobilized with ordinary silicate cement. The optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form was 35 {+-} 5 wt% cement, 29 {+-} 2 wt% water, and 36 {+-} 6 wt% ash. The performance of the waste form was in compliance with the technical requirements except for impact resistance. Mixing additives in immobilization formulations can improve the performance of the cemented ash waste form. The additives chosen were DH{sub 4A} flow promoter as a cement additive and vermiculite or zeolite as a supplement. The recommended formulation, i.e. an improved formulation of the cemented ash waste form is that additives DH{sub 4A} flow promoter and vermiculite (or zeolite) are added on the ground of optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form, the dosage of water, DH{sub 4A} and vermiculite (or zeolite) is 70 wt%, 0.5 wt% and {<=} 5 wt% of the cement dosage, respectively. The cemented ash waste forms obtained meet all the requirements for disposal. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs, 13 tabs.

  12. Experimental evaluation of cement materials for solidifying sodium nitrate

    Sasaki, Tadashi; Numata, Mamoru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Yoshikazu

    2003-03-01

    Low-level liquid waste containing sodium nitrate is planned to be transformed to salt block by evaporation with sodium borate in the Low-level Waste Treatment Facility (LWTF), then salt block will be stored temporally. It should be important to investigate the method how to treat these liquid waste suitable to final disposal criteria that will be settled in future. Cement solidification is one of promising candidates because it has been achieved as the solidification material for the shallow land disposal. The research was conducted to evaluate applicability of various cement materials to solidification of sodium nitrate. The following cements were tested. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Portland Blast-furnace Slag Cement; C type (PBFSC). Alkali Activated Slag Cement (AASC, supplied by JGC). The test results are as follows; (1) AASC is characterized by a high sodium nitrate loading (-70 wt%) compared with other types of cement material. High fluidity of the cement paste, high strength after solidification, and minimization of free water on the cement paste are achieved under all test conditions. (2) OOPC and PBFSC produced free water on the cement paste in the early days and delayed the hardening period. 3 or more days are required to harden evan with 30 wt% content of sodium nitrate. (3) Though PBFSC contains blast furnace slag similar to AASC, there is no advantage prior to OPC. To design an ideal cement conditioning system for sodium nitrate liquid waste in the LWTF, the further studies are necessary such as the simulated waste test, Kd test, pilot test, and layout design. (author)

  13. Radiobiological waste treatment-ashing treatment and immobilization with cement

    Feng Shengtao; Gong Li; Cheng Li; Wang Benli; Wang Lihong

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the results of the study on the treatment of radioactive biological waste in the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP). The possibility of radiobiological waste treatment was investigated by using a RAF-3 type rapid ashing apparatus together with the immobilization of the resulted ash. This rapid ashing apparatus, developed by CIRP, is usually used for pretreatment of samples prior to chemical analysis and physical measurements. The results show that it can ash 3 kg of animal carcasses a batch, the ashing time is 5-7 h and the ash content is less than 4 wt%. The ashing temperature not exceeding 450 deg. C was used without any risk of high losses of radionuclides. The ash from the rapid ashing apparatus was demonstrated to be immobilized with ordinary silicate cement. The optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form was 35 ± 5 wt% cement, 29 ± 2 wt% water, and 36 ± 6 wt% ash. The performance of the waste form was in compliance with the technical requirements except for impact resistance. Mixing additives in immobilization formulations can improve the performance of the cemented ash waste form. The additives chosen were DH 4A flow promoter as a cement additive and vermiculite or zeolite as a supplement. The recommended formulation, i.e. an improved formulation of the cemented ash waste form is that additives DH 4A flow promoter and vermiculite (or zeolite) are added on the ground of optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form, the dosage of water, DH 4A and vermiculite (or zeolite) is 70 wt%, 0.5 wt% and ≤ 5 wt% of the cement dosage, respectively. The cemented ash waste forms obtained meet all the requirements for disposal. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs, 13 tabs

  14. Characterization of polymer-modified cement as a solidification agent for the radwaste

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kwak, Kyung-Kil; Hong, Dae-Seok; Ryu, Woo-Seog

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Polymer-modified cement (PMC) by modification with water-based resins. ► Determination of the optimized polymer content. ► Evaluation of the improved chemical resistance of the PMC. ► Decrease of the amount of ions released into the demineralized water. ► Highly improved property for the nuclide diffusivity at the Co-60. - Abstract: Polymer-modified cement can be produced by partially replacing cement hydrate binders in ordinary Portland cement with polymeric compounds. It is known that the addition of the polymer to the cement paste leads to improved quality, which would be expected to have a high chemical resistance. In order to investigate the application as a solidification agent for the radwaste, polymer-modified cement specimens, by modification with water-based resins, were prepared according to the polymer content from 0% to 30%. The optimized polymer content in the cement pastes was then determined through the compressive strength and the porosity test. Finally, the improved chemical resistance of the polymer-modified cement with the optimized polymer content was evaluated by the thermal cycling, the immersion, and the leaching tests. From the test results, the amount of ions released into the water showed lower values of about 20% at the polymer-modified cement. Especially, a highly improved nuclide diffusivity of Co-60 was observed in the polymer-modified cement.

  15. Corneal permeability for cement dust: prognosis for occupational safety

    Kalmykov, R. V.; Popova, D. V.; Kamenskikh, T. G.; Genina, E. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Bashkatov, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    The high dust content in air of a working zone causes prevalence of pathologies of the anterior segment of the eye of workers of cement production. Therefore, studying of features of cement dust impact on structure of a cornea and development of ways of eye protection from this influence is relevant. In this work experimental studies were carried out with twenty eyes of ten rabbits. OCTtomography was used to monitor the light attenuation coefficient of the cornea in vitro during the permeability of cement dust and/or keratoprotector (Systein Ultra). The permeability coefficients of the cornea for water, cement dust and keratoprotector were measured. A computer model allowing one to analyze the diffusion of these substances in the eye cornea was developed. It was shown that 1) the cement dust falling on the eye cornea caused pronounced dehydration of the tissue (thickness decreasing) and led to the increase of the attenuation coefficient, which could affect the deterioration of the eyesight of workers in the conditions of cement production; 2) the application of the keratoprotector to the eye cornea when exposed by cement dust, slowed significantly the dehydration process and did not cause the increase of the attenuation coefficient that characterized the stabilization of visual functions. At this, the keratoprotector itself did not cause dehydration and led to the decrease of the attenuation coefficient, which could allow it to be used for a long time in the order to protect the organ of vision from the negative effects of cement dust.

  16. Binding of chloride and alkalis in Portland cement systems

    Nielsen, Erik P.; Herfort, Duncan; Geiker, Mette R.

    2005-01-01

    A thermodynamic model for describing the binding of chloride and alkalis in hydrated Portland cement pastes has been developed. The model is based on the phase rule, which for cement pastes in aggressive marine environment predicts multivariant conditions, even at constant temperature and pressure. The effect of the chloride and alkalis has been quantified by experiments on cement pastes prepared from white Portland cements containing 4% and 12% C 3 A, and a grey Portland cement containing 7% C 3 A. One weight percent calcite was added to all cements. The pastes prepared at w/s ratio of 0.70 were stored in solutions of different Cl (CaCl 2 ) and Na (NaOH) concentrations. When equilibrium was reached, the mineralogy of the pastes was investigated by EDS analysis on the SEM. A well-defined distribution of chloride was found between the pore solution, the C-S-H phase, and an AFm solid solution phase consisting of Friedel's salt and monocarbonate. Partition coefficients varied as a function of iron and alkali contents. The lower content of alkalis in WPC results in higher chloride contents in the C-S-H phase. High alkali contents result in higher chloride concentrations in the pore solution

  17. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  18. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  19. Viability of Eggshells Ash Affecting the Setting Time of Cement

    Fazeera Ujin; Kamran Shavarebi Ali; Zarina Yasmin Hanur Harith

    2016-01-01

    This research paper reports on the feasibility and viability of eggshells ash and its effects on the water content and setting time of cement. An experiment was carried out to determine the quantity of water required in order to follow standard cement paste of normal consistency in accordance with MS EN 196-3:2007. The eggshells ash passing the 90µm sieve was used in the investigation. Eggshells ash with percentage of 0%, 0.1%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0% were constituted to replace the cement....

  20. Mechanical Properties and Durability of CNT Cement Composites

    María del Carmen Camacho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, changes in mechanical properties of Portland cement-based mortars due to the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT and corrosion of embedded steel rebars in CNT cement pastes are reported. Bending strength, compression strength, porosity and density of mortars were determined and related to the CNT dosages. CNT cement paste specimens were exposed to carbonation and chloride attacks, and results on steel corrosion rate tests were related to CNT dosages. The increase in CNT content implies no significant variations of mechanical properties but higher steel corrosion intensities were observed.

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  2. INFLUENCE OF SUBSTITUTION OF ORDINARY PORTLAND CEMENT BY SILICA FUME ON THE HYDRATION OF SLAG-PORTLAND CEMENT PASTES

    E.A. El-Alfi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Effect of gradual substitution of ordinary Portland cement by a few percent of silica fume (0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 wt.% on the hydration properties of slag-Portland cement pastes up to 12 months was investigated. The results show that the composite cement pastes containing silica fume give the higher physico-mechanical properties than that of the slag-Portland cement. Also, the XRD results reveal that the peak of Ca(OH2 shows higher intensity in the sample without silica fume and completely disappears in the sample containing 7.5 wt.% silica fume content. Also, the intensity peaks of C4AH13 sharply increase with silica fume content.

  3. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  4. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  5. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth.The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests.The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect.Our findings suggested a new bioactive

  6. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  7. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  8. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  9. Feasibility of backfilling mines using cement kiln dust, fly ash, and cement blends

    Beltagui H.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement kiln dust (CKD is an industrial by-product of the cement manufacturing process, the composition of which can vary widely. Recent years of using alternative fuels have resulted in higher chloride and alkali contents within CKDs; as such, this limits the applications in which CKDs can be utilised. Using a CKD containing a high free lime content of 29.5%, it is shown that this CKD is capable of activating pulverized fuel ash (PFA due to its high alkalinity, which can be utilised in low strength un-reinforced applications. One potential application involves the backfill of mines, reducing the need for continuous maintenance of the mine. This study focuses on the compressive strength achieved by various blends of CKD, PFA, and cement. Samples were hand mixed and compacted in 100 mm x 50 mm diameter cylinders, and unconfined compressive strength measurements taken at 28 and 56 days. The hydration products were assessed through the use of x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. Aiming to maximise the use of CKD at a water to binder (w/b ratio of 0.2, it was found that the maximum CKD content possible to achieve the required strength was 90% CKD blended with 10% cement.

  10. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  11. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  12. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  13. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  14. Thermal behavior of asphalt cements

    Claudy, P.M.; Letoffe, J.M.; Martin, D.; Planche, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Asphalt cements are highly complex mixtures of hydrocarbon molecules whose thermal behavior is of prime importance for petroleum and road industry. From DSC, the determination of several thermal properties of asphalts is given, e.g. glass-transition temperature and crystallized fraction content.The dissolution of a pure n-paraffin C n H 2n+2 in an asphalt, as seen by DSC, should be a single peak. For 20 g of these glasses change with time and temperature. The formation of the crystallized phases is superposed to the enthalpic relaxation of the glasses, making a kinetic study very difficult. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Investigation on the potential of waste cooking oil as a grinding aid in Portland cement.

    Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Jianfeng; Huang, Yuyan; Jiang, Zhengwu; Yang, Xiaojie; Yang, Zhenghong; Chen, Qing

    2016-12-15

    Although there are several methods for managing waste cooking oil (WCO), a significant result has not been achieved in China. A new method is required for safe WCO management that minimizes the environmental threat. In this context, this work was developed in which cement clinker and gypsum were interground with various WCOs, and their properties, such as grindability, water-cement ratio required to achieve a normal consistency, setting times, compressive strength, contents of calcium hydroxide and ettringite in the hardened paste, microstructure and economic and environmental considerations, were addressed in detail. The results show that, overall, WCO favorably improves cement grinding. WCO prolonged the cement setting times and resulted in longer setting times. Additionally, more remarkable effects were found in cements in which WCO contained more unsaturated fatty acid. WCOs increased the cement strength. However, this enhancement was rated with respect to the WCO contents and components. WCOs decreased the CH and AFt contents in the cement hardened paste. Even the AFt content at later ages was reduced when WCO was used. WCO also densify microstructure of the hardened cement paste. It is economically and environmentally feasible to use WCOs as grinding aids in the cement grinding process. These results contribute to the application of WCOs as grinding aids and to the safe management of WCO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Peat Soil Stabilization using Lime and Cement

    Mohd Zambri Nadhirah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the comparison between two additive Lime and Cement for treating peat soil in term of stabilization. Peat and organic soils are commonly known for their high compressibility, extremely soft, and low strength. The aim of this paper is to determine the drained shear strength of treated peat soil from Perlis for comparison purposes. Direct Shear Box Test was conducted to obtain the shear strength for all the disturbed peat soil samples. The quick lime and cement was mixed with peat soil in proportions of 10% and 20% of the dry weight peat soil. The experiment results showed that the addition of additives had improved the strength characteristics of peat soil by 14% increment in shear strength. In addition, the mixture of lime with peat soil yield higher result in shear strength compared to cement by 14.07% and 13.5% respectively. These findings indicate that the lime and cement is a good stabilizer for peat soil, which often experienced high amount of moisture content.

  17. Peat Soil Stabilization using Lime and Cement

    Zambri, Nadhirah Mohd; Ghazaly, Zuhayr Md.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the comparison between two additive Lime and Cement for treating peat soil in term of stabilization. Peat and organic soils are commonly known for their high compressibility, extremely soft, and low strength. The aim of this paper is to determine the drained shear strength of treated peat soil from Perlis for comparison purposes. Direct Shear Box Test was conducted to obtain the shear strength for all the disturbed peat soil samples. The quick lime and cement was mixed with peat soil in proportions of 10% and 20% of the dry weight peat soil. The experiment results showed that the addition of additives had improved the strength characteristics of peat soil by 14% increment in shear strength. In addition, the mixture of lime with peat soil yield higher result in shear strength compared to cement by 14.07% and 13.5% respectively. These findings indicate that the lime and cement is a good stabilizer for peat soil, which often experienced high amount of moisture content.

  18. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  19. XRF analysis of portland cement for major and trace elements

    Abdunnabi, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    Libyan portland cement produced in several factories around the country, in Lip tis, Zoltan, Souq-Elkamis, Dernah and El-Fatach, were analyzed for quantitative major and trace elements and mineral content, which were compered with those imported from Spain, Romania, Cyprus, and Egypt. X-ray fluorescence spectro X lab 2000 spectrometer equipped with Rh-and X-ray tube was used for the analysis of various samples. The detector Si(Li) with a resolution of 148 eV at Mn K-a=5.9 keV facilitates the determination of a wide range of elements from sodium to uranium, with a detection limit at sub levels. Cement samples in the powder form were analyzed using the pellet-technique. The pellets were prepared by mixing 4g of the cement powder with 0.9 g of binder (HWC) and pressed at high pressure. A ful analysis including, background counting, matrix correction and all relevant corrections were achieved automatically by XLAB 2000 software package. For major and trace elements X RF results were higher for most of the elements than those analyzed with atomic absorption spectrometry. The mineral content showed that Libyan cement is comparable to the imported ones, also the Libyan cement meets the requirements of the international specifications of the portland cement. (Author)

  20. Properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag

    Kourounis, S.; Tsivilis, S.; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Papadimitriou, G.D.; Tsibouki, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The present research study investigates the properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag, a by-product of the conversion process of iron to steel. For this purpose, a reference sample and three cements containing up to 45% w/w steel slag were tested. The steel slag fraction used was the '0-5 mm', due to its high content in calcium silicate phases. Initial and final setting time, standard consistency, flow of normal mortar, autoclave expansion and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days were measured. The hydrated products were identified by X-ray diffraction while the non-evaporable water was determined by TGA. The microstructure of the hardened cement pastes and their morphological characteristics were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It is concluded that slag can be used in the production of composite cements of the strength classes 42.5 and 32.5 of EN 197-1. In addition, the slag cements present satisfactory physical properties. The steel slag slows down the hydration of the blended cements, due to the morphology of contained C 2 S and its low content in calcium silicates

  1. Investigation of magnesium oxychloride cement at the initial hardening stage

    Averina Galina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the process of variation of magnesium oxychloride cement deformations at the initial hardening stage depending on the activity of magnesium oxide powder which is determined by the parameters of the source material burning. Investigation is focused on magnesium cements obtained from pure magnesium hydroxide. Source materials were burnt at various temperatures with the purpose to obtain magnesium oxide powder with different activity. Regular content of hydrated phases was determined in hardened magnesium cement prepared on the basis of binders with different activity. The study reveals the influence of magnesium oxide powder activity on the process of deformation occurrence in hardened magnesium cement and its tendency to crack formation.

  2. Leaching behaviour of strontium-90 in cement composites

    Matsuzuru, H.; Ito, A.

    1977-01-01

    The leaching of 90 Sr from a cement composite into an aqueous phase has been studied by the method recommended by IAEA. The amount leached was measured as functions of waste to cement ratio (Wa/C), salt content of waste, temperature of leachant and curing time of specimens. The leach coefficient of 90 Sr varies from ca. 6 x 10 -8 to 4 x 10 -7 cm 2 /day depending on the composition of specimen and the leaching conditions. The leachability depends on such factors as Wa/C, temperature of leachant and curing time. The Portland cement composite gives a higher leaching fraction than the slag cement one. Additives used have no significant effect on the leachability. The amount leached in deionized water as a leachant is higher than in synthetic sea water. On the basis of the results obtained, the amount of 90 Sr leached from a composite of 200 1 drum size for an extended period was estimated. (author)

  3. Utilization of mine tailings as partial cement replacement

    Sigvardsen, Nina Marie; Nielsen, M.R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2017-01-01

    Depositing mine tailings entail major economic costs and negative environmental impacts. Thus finding an alternative to depositing is of interest. This study focused on the use of mine tailings as partial cement replacement, thereby preventing depositing the mine tailings. At the same time......, such use would reduce the CO2 emission related to the production of cement. Mine tailings from two different mines Zinkgruvan (Sweden) and Nalunaq (Greenland) were both tested as 5 and 10 % cement replacement. All mortar specimens with mine tailings had lower compressive strength compared to a reference...... compared to a specimen containing a 10 % replacement of cement with coal fly ash, commonly used in Denmark. The compressive strength of specimens containing mine tailings exceeded the compressive strength of the specimen containing coal fly ash, indicating further the amorphous content of volcanic decent...

  4. Evaluation of neutron shielding made of cement type material

    Seshimo, Takuya; Nagai, Takayuki; Onose, Atsushi; Takuma, Yasuhisa; Tanuma, Hiroyuki; Otagawa, Masaaki

    1998-01-01

    We prepared boron-containing cement and evaluated the characteristics of this new cement. This is the material of neutron shielding which is lighter than existing one. The quality we aimed is: H ≥ 0.025 g/cm 3 , B ≥ 0.065 g/cm 3 , density ≤ 1.70 g/cm 3 . We made test pieces changing water powder ratio (W/P), adding amount of air entraining agent, adding amount of water reducing agent, and time of vibration, and then, evaluated the characteristics. The measured parameters are the air content, mortar flow and homogeneity for cement mortar, homogeneity and compressive strength for hardened one. From the results of these tests, we confirmed the possibility of making neutron shielding that can satisfy the aimed quality using this boron-containing cement. After all, we established the method of making the neutron shielding, and this method was used in the construction of RETF. (author)

  5. Measurement and control of cement set times in waste solidification

    Stone, J.A.; d'Entremont, P.D.

    1976-09-01

    Fixation of radioactive waste in concrete was investigated on laboratory scale. Some cement formulations containing simulated or actual sludges from the Savannah River Plant had set times that would be too short for reliable handling in plant equipment. Set times could be controlled by use of excess water, but the concrete forms produced had inferior strength. A commercial organic retarder was found to be effective for increasing set times of cement-sludge formulations. However, the dosage of retarder required to control set times of high-alumina cement formulations was 1.0 to 1.5 wt percent of dry solids, which is 5 to 10 times the normal dosage for Portland cements. Data were obtained to predict the optimum content of retarder and water

  6. Silver-Doped Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements with Antibacterial Properties

    J. V. Rau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPCs with antibacterial properties are demanded for clinical applications. In this study, we demonstrated the use of a relatively simple processing route based on preparation of silver-doped CPCs (CPCs-Ag through the preparation of solid dispersed active powder phase. Real-time monitoring of structural transformations and kinetics of several CPCs-Ag formulations (Ag = 0 wt %, 0.6 wt % and 1.0 wt % was performed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction technique. The partial conversion of β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP phase into the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD took place in all the investigated cement systems. In the pristine cement powders, Ag in its metallic form was found, whereas for CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, CaAg(PO33 was detected and Ag (met. was no longer present. The CPC-Ag 0 wt % cement exhibited a compressive strength of 6.5 ± 1.0 MPa, whereas for the doped cements (CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % the reduced values of the compressive strength 4.0 ± 1.0 and 1.5 ± 1.0 MPa, respectively, were detected. Silver-ion release from CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, measured by the Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, corresponds to the average values of 25 µg/L and 43 µg/L, respectively, rising a plateau after 15 days. The results of the antibacterial test proved the inhibitory effect towards pathogenic Escherichia coli for both CPC-Ag 0.6 wt % and CPC-Ag 1.0 wt % cements, better performances being observed for the cement with a higher Ag-content.

  7. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  8. Cement-latex grouting mortar for cementing boreholes

    Kateev, I S; Golyshkina, L A; Gorbunova, I V; Kurochkin, B M; Vakula, Ya V

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of cement-latex grouting mortar for the purpose of separating strata when reinforcing boreholes at deposits in the Tatar Associated SSR is evaluated. Results of studies of the physical and mechanical properties of cement-latex grouting mortar systems (mortar plus brick) are presented. Formulas for preparing cement-latex grouting mortor are evaluated and results of industrial tests of such mortars shown.

  9. US cement industry

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Chemical environment in cements

    Glasser, F.B.; Angus, M.J.; McCulloch, C.E.; Macphee, D.; Rahman, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The alkalinity of Portland cements is responsible for precipitation and low solubility of many radwastes species. The sources of alkalinity are evaluated and two chemical models, based on experimental and theoretical data presented enabling the effect of blending agents (PFA, silica fume, etc.) to be evaluated and the alkalinity of the system at longer ages predicted. The data take the form of a solubility model which is applicable to non-heat generating wastes. 7 refs., 10 figs

  11. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  12. Influence of moisture condition on chloride diffusion in partially saturated ordinary Portland cement mortar

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Ye, G.

    2018-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the influence of moisture condition, including moisture content and its distribution, on the chloride diffusion in partially saturated ordinary Portland cement mortar. The mortar samples with water-to-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6, cured for 1

  13. E-modulus evolution and its relation to solids formation of pastes from commercial cements

    Maia, Lino; Azenha, Miguel; Geiker, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Models for early age E-modulus evolution of cement pastes are available in the literature, but their validation is limited. This paper provides correlated measurements of early age evolution of E-modulus and hydration of pastes from five commercial cements differing in limestone content. A recently...

  14. Influence of zeolite and cement additions on mechanical behavior of sandy soil

    Hossein Mola-Abasi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the cemented sand is one of economic and environmental topics in soil stabilization. In this instance, a blend of sand, cement and other materials such as fiber, glass, nanoparticle and zeolite can be commercially available and effectively used in soil stabilization in road construction. However, the influence and effectiveness of zeolite on the properties of cemented sand systems have not been completely explored. In this study, based on an experimental program, the effects of zeolite on the characteristics of cemented sands are investigated. Stabilizing agent includes Portland cement of type II and zeolite. Results show the improvements of unconfined compressive strength (UCS and failure properties of cemented sand when the cement is replaced by zeolite at an optimum proportion of 30% after 28 days. The rate of strength improvement is approximately between 20% and 78%. The efficiency of using zeolite increases with the increases in cement amount and porosity. Finally, a power function of void-cement ratio and zeolite content is demonstrated to be an appropriate method to assess UCS of zeolite-cemented mixtures.

  15. Applicability of low alkalinity cement for construction and alteration of bentonite in the cement

    Iriya, K.; Fujii, K.; Kubo, H.; Uegaki, Y.

    2002-02-01

    A concept of radioactive waste repository in which both bentonite and cementitious materials exist in deep cavern as engineered barriers is proposed. It is pointed out that pore water of cement is approximately 12.0 to 13.0 of pH and that it maintains for a long period. Therefore alteration of bentonite and rocks should be studied. Mixing test upon some interaction between modeled cement water and bentonite and rocks have been carried out since 1995 as a part of TRU repository's study. And low alkalinity of cement has been studied as parallel to study on alteration of bentonite. HFSC which has high fly ash content and which shows approximately 10.5 to 11.0 of pH of pore water was developed. Cementitious materials are generally use as a combination with steel, since its tensile strength is low. The corrosion of steel in concrete becomes a big problem in case of decreasing pH of cement. There is little available reference, since low alkalinity cement is quite new and special ordered one. Accelerating test for corrosion in low alkalinity concrete were carried out in order to collect data of corrosion. Although alteration of bentonite by several types of modeled cement water was tested. Long term test by actual cement pore water has not carried out. The alteration in 360 days was investigated. Conclusion obtained in this study is following. Corrosion of steel (re-bar) 1) Re-bar in HFSC with 60% of W/C is significantly corroded. The corrosion rate is bigger than the rate of ordinary used cement. 2) Diffusivity of Cl - ion in HFSC is similar to it in OPC comparing by the same water powder ratio. 3) Corrosion rate of HFSC 30 is similar to OPC60. However corrosion is progressed in HFSC 30 without Cl - ion due to lower alkalinity, but it isn't done in OPC within a certain amount of Cl - ion. Alteration of bentonite and rocks 1) Although no secondary minerals was observed in HFSC, monmorironite is gradually lost by increasing calcite. 2) Secondary minerals were observed in

  16. Optimization and characterization of a cemented ultimate-storage product

    Brunner, H.

    1981-12-01

    The U- and Pu-containing packaging wastes can be homogeneously cemented after a washing and fragmentation process. Both finely crushed and coarsely fragmented raw wastes yield products with sufficient mechanical stability. The processability limit of the coarsely fragmented raw waste using cement paste or mortar is largely determined by the cellulose content, which is not to exceed 1.3% by weight in the end waste. Of 9 binders studied, the most corrosion-resistant products were obtained with blast-furnace slag cement, whereas poured concrete and Maxit are much less resistant in five-component brine. In the cemented product, hydrolysis of plasticizers (DOP) from plastics (PVC) occurs, leading to release of 2-ethyl-hexanol. This reaction occurs to a much lower degree with blast-furnace slag cement than with all other binders studied. The binder chosen for further tests consists of blast-furnace slag cement, concrete fluidizer and a stabilizer, and is processed at a W/C ratio of 0.43.

  17. Using dehydrated cement paste as new type of cement additive

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.; Dong, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study, including evaluation and modification, on using dehydrated cement paste (DCP) as a new type of cement additive. After a series of processes, normal DCP (N-DCP) was produced as before and a modified form of DCP (M-DCP) was produced as well. The cementitious

  18. Improvement in engineering properties of soft-soil using cement and lime additives: A case study of southern Vietnam

    To-Anh Phan, Vu; Ngoc-Anh Pham, Kha

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of using two additives to improve natural soft soil properties in southern Vietnam (i.g., cement and cement-lime mixture). The specimens were prepared by compacting method. Firstly, the natural soil was mixed with cement or cement-lime to determine the optimum water contents of various additive contents. Then, optimum water content was used to produce samples to test some engineering properties such as unconfined compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and Young’s modulus. The specimens were tested by various curing duration of 7, 14, and 28 days. Results indicated that using cement additive is suitable for improvement of soft soil in the local area and cement-soil stabilization can be replaced as the subbase layer of the flexible pavement according to current Vietnamese standard. In addition, a higher cement content has a greater compressive strength as well as tensile strength. Besides, the Young’ modulus has significantly increased with a long-term curing age and more cement content. No evidences of increasing in strength and modulus are found with the cement-lime-soil stabilization. Finally, the best-fit power function is established by the relationships between unconfined compressive strength and splitting tensile strength as well unconfined compressive strength and Young’s Modulus, with the coefficient of determination, R2>0.999.

  19. In vitro shear bond strength of cementing agents to fixed prosthodontic restorative materials.

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Sorensen, John A

    2004-09-01

    Durable bonding to fixed prosthodontic restorations is desirable; however, little information is available on the strength of the bond between different cements and fixed prosthodontic restorative materials. This study determined the shear-bond strength of cementing agents to high-gold-content alloy castings and different dental ceramics: high-strength aluminum oxide (Procera AllCeram), leucite-reinforced (IPS Empress), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS Empress 2). Prepolymerized resin composite cylinders (5.5 mm internal diameter, n=20) were bonded to the pretreated surfaces of prosthodontic materials. High-gold-content alloy and high-strength aluminum oxide surfaces were airborne-particle-abraded, and pressable ceramics were hydrofluoric acid-etched and silanized prior to cementing. The cementing agents tested were a zinc-phosphate cement (Fleck's zinc cement), glass ionomer cements (Fuji I, Ketac-Cem), resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus, Fuji Cem, RelyX Luting), resin cements (RelyX ARC, Panavia F, Variolink II, Compolute), and a self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem). Half the specimens (n=10) were tested after 30 minutes; the other half (n=10) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 14 days and then thermal cycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear-bond strength tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by multifactorial analysis of variance taking interactions between effects into account. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey method was used (alpha=.05). In a 3-way ANOVA model, the main factors substrate, cement, time, and all corresponding interactions were statistically significant (all P <.0001). In subsequent separate 1-way or 2-way ANOVA models for each substrate type, significant differences between cement types and polymerizing modes were found (all P <.001). None of the

  20. Developing Low-Clinker Ternary Blends for Indian Cement Industry

    Pal, Aritra

    2018-05-01

    In today's scenario cement-concrete has become the backbone of infrastructure development. The use of concrete is increasing day by day and so does cement. One of the major concerns is that the cement manufacturing contributes 7% of total man-made CO2 emission in the environment. At the same time India being a developing country secured the second position in cement production. On the other hand solid waste management is one of the growing problems in India. As we are one of the major contributors in this situation so, the time has come to think about the sustainable alternatives. From various researches it has been observed that the low clinker cement can be suitable option. In the present paper we have tried to develop a low clinker ternary blend for Indian cement industry using the concept of synergetic behavior of fly ash-limestone reaction and formation of more stable monocarboaluminate hydrate and hemicarboaluminate hydrate. 30% fly ash and 15% limestone and 5% gypsum have been used as supplementary cementing material for replacing 50% clinker. The mechanical properties like, compressive strength, have been studied for the fly ash limestone ternary blends cements and the results have been compared with the other controlled blends and ternary blends. The effect of intergrinding of constituent materials has shown a comparable properties which can be used for various structural application. The effect of dolomitic limestone has also been studied in fly ash limestone ternary blends and the result shows the relation between compressive strength and dolomite content is inversely proportional.

  1. Biomass for green cement

    Cumming, R. [Lafarge Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Lafarge examined the use of waste biomass products in its building materials and provided background information on its operations. Cement kiln infrastructure was described in terms of providing access to shipping, rail and highways; conveying and off-loading equipment; having large storage facilities; and, offering continuous monitoring and stack testing. The presentation identified the advantages and disadvantages of a few different biomass cases such as coal; scrap tires; non-recyclable household waste; and processed biomass. A chart representing landfill diversion rates was presented and the presentation concluded with a discussion of energy recovery and recycling. 1 tab., figs.

  2. Study of incorporation of casting wastes in soil-cement blocks

    Folmann, R.; Malkowski, W.; Valentina, L.V.D.; Folgureras, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Soil-cement bricks are an ecological alternative to conventional ones because they don't need to be burned to gain strength. This study examines the technical possibility of reuse of foundry sand as fine aggregate in soil-cement. The raw materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and particle size. The foundry sand wastes were mixed at different levels to soil and cement. Compaction tests were performed to define the mixtures at optimum moisture content corresponding to the maximum density. Isothermal Conduction Calorimeter was performed to study the influence of waste in the cement hydration reaction. The results indicate that the addition of foundry sand waste decreases the optimum moisture content and increases the maximum density without significantly affecting the cement set. (author)

  3. Strength and Deformability of Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste on the Basis of Basalt Fiber

    Yury Barabanshchikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research object of the paper is cement paste with the particulate reinforcement of basalt fiber. Regardless of fibers’ length at the same fiber cement mix workability and cement consumption equality compressive solidity of the specimens is reduced with increasing fiber content. This is due to the necessity to increase the water-cement ratio to obtain a given workability. The flexural stability of the specimens with increasing fiber content increments in the same conditions. There is an optimum value of the fibers’ dosage. That is why stability has a maximum when crooking. The basaltic fiber particulate reinforcement usage can abruptly increase the cement paste level limiting extensibility, which is extremely important in terms of crack resistance.

  4. Process of preparing hydraulic cement

    1919-12-11

    A process of preparing hydraulic cement from oil shale or shale coke is characterized in that the oil shale or shale coke after the distillation is burned long and hot to liberate the usual amount of carbonic acid and then is fine ground to obtain a slow hardening hydraulic cement.

  5. Health hazards of cement dust

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  6. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  7. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  8. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  9. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    Han, Weiwei; Sun, Tao; Li, Xinping; Sun, Mian; Lu, Yani

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Borosilicate glass waste used as cement additive can improves its radiation shielding. • When content is 14.8%, the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm"−"1 after 28 d. • From 0 to 22.2%, linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. - Abstract: Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm"−"1 after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  10. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    Han, Weiwei [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Sun, Tao, E-mail: sunt@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Roadway Bridge & Structure Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Li, Xinping [Key Laboratory of Roadway Bridge & Structure Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Sun, Mian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Lu, Yani [Urban Construction Institute, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan, Hubei 432000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Borosilicate glass waste used as cement additive can improves its radiation shielding. • When content is 14.8%, the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm{sup −1} after 28 d. • From 0 to 22.2%, linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. - Abstract: Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm{sup −1} after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  11. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  12. Moisture desorption out of portland cement under irradiation

    Sugak, E.B.; Denisov, A.V.; Muzalevskij, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the results of measuring residual water content and water losses of the basic hydrated mine rals of clinker and cement stone irradiated at three different reactors. Structural parameters of the binding agent and binding water quantity are calculated on the basis of binding agent physical model and are compared with the experimental data

  13. Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Cement Panel Influenced by Treated and Untreated Coconut Fiber Addition

    Abdullah, Alida; Jamaludin, Shamsul Baharin; Anwar, Mohamed Iylia; Noor, Mazlee Mohd; Hussin, Kamarudin

    This project was conducted to produce a cement panel with the addition of treated and untreated coconut fiber in cement panel. Coconut fiber was added to replace coarse aggregate (sand) in this cement panel. In this project, the ratios used to design the mixture were 1:1:0, 1:0.97:0.03, 1:0.94:0.06, 1:0.91:0.09 (cement: sand: coconut fiber). The water cement ratio was constant at 0.55. The sizes of sample tested were, 160 mm x 40 mm x 40 mm for compression test, and 100 mm x 100 mm x 40 mm for density, moisture content and water absorption tests. After curing samples for 28 days, it was found that the addition of coconut fiber, further increase in compressive strength of cement panel with untreated coconut fiber. Moisture content of cement panel with treated coconut fiber increased with increasing content of coconut fiber whereas water absorption of cement panel with untreated coconut fiber increased with increasing content of coconut fiber. The density of cement panel decreased with the addition of untreated and treated coconut fiber.

  14. Hydraulic activity of belite cement from class C coal fly ash. Effect of curing and admixtures

    Goñi, S., Guerrero, A.

    2006-01-01

    [EN] The effect of curing method and a water-reducing additive on the hydraulic activity of high lime content (ASTM type C) fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) is reported. A class C fly ash was subjected to hydrothermal treatment and subsequent calcination to synthesize FABC. Hydraulic activity was evaluated in the cement paste over 180 days from the physically bound water content as determined by thermogravimetric analysis and the degree of hydration, in turn found with...

  15. Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of Hardened Cement Paste with Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Energy Storage

    Hongzhi Cui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, structural-functional integrated cement-based materials were prepared by employing cement paste and a microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM manufactured using urea-formaldehyde resin as the shell and paraffin as the core material. The encapsulation ratio of the MPCM could reach up to 91.21 wt%. Thermal energy storage cement pastes (TESCPs incorporated with different MPCM contents (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% by weight of cement were developed, and their thermal and mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that the total energy storage capacity of the hardened cement specimens with MPCM increased by up to 3.9-times compared with that of the control cement paste. The thermal conductivity at different temperature levels (35–36 °C, 55–56 °C and 72–74 °C decreased with the increase of MPCM content, and the decrease was the highest when the temperature level was 55–56 °C. Moreover, the compressive strength, flexural strength and density of hardened cement paste decreased with the increase in MPCM content linearly. Among the evaluated properties, the compressive strength of TESCPs had a larger and faster degradation with the increase of MPCM content.

  16. Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of Hardened Cement Paste with Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Energy Storage.

    Cui, Hongzhi; Liao, Wenyu; Memon, Shazim Ali; Dong, Biqin; Tang, Waiching

    2014-12-16

    In this research, structural-functional integrated cement-based materials were prepared by employing cement paste and a microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) manufactured using urea-formaldehyde resin as the shell and paraffin as the core material. The encapsulation ratio of the MPCM could reach up to 91.21 wt%. Thermal energy storage cement pastes (TESCPs) incorporated with different MPCM contents (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% by weight of cement) were developed, and their thermal and mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that the total energy storage capacity of the hardened cement specimens with MPCM increased by up to 3.9-times compared with that of the control cement paste. The thermal conductivity at different temperature levels (35-36 °C, 55-56 °C and 72-74 °C) decreased with the increase of MPCM content, and the decrease was the highest when the temperature level was 55-56 °C. Moreover, the compressive strength, flexural strength and density of hardened cement paste decreased with the increase in MPCM content linearly. Among the evaluated properties, the compressive strength of TESCPs had a larger and faster degradation with the increase of MPCM content.

  17. Radon exhalation study from cement, cement slabs and concrete slabs with variation in fly ash

    Sharma, Nisha; Singh, Jaspal

    2012-01-01

    Fly ash is a waste product from coal-fired power plants. Fly ash has become a subject of world-wide interest in recent years because of its diverse uses, e.g. in the manufacture of concrete for building purposes, for the filling of underground cavities, or as a component of building material. The fly ash may contain enhanced levels of the natural radionuclides in the uranium and thorium series and by using the fly ash in building materials, the radiation levels in houses may thus be technologically enhanced. Because of its relatively high radionuclide contents (including 226 Ra), fly ash may, however, present a potential hazard to the population through its radon emanation, which would be highly undesirable. Since fly ash is frequently used as a building material, the idea of the experiment was to mix fly ash in different proportions in the cement in the powder form, cemented slabs and concrete slabs to study the combined behaviors. Alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detector, commonly known as Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs), were used to measure the radon concentration. The alpha particles emitted from the radon causes the radiation damaged tracks. The chemical etching in NaOH at 60°C for about 90 minutes was done to reveal these latent tracks, which were then scanned and counted by an optical microscope of suitable magnification. By calculating the track density of registered tracks, the radon concentrations were determined. In case of cement in the powder form and in cemented slab, starting from the pure cement, fly ash was added up to 70% by weight. In this case the radon exhalation rate has increased by addition of fly ash in the cement and in case of concrete slabs by the addition of fly ash in the cement the radon exhalation increases up to 60% and then decreases. Therefore, on the basis of our investigations we concluded that in general radon exhalation rate increases with the addition of fly ash. (author)

  18. Utilization of municipal sewage sludge as additives for the production of eco-cement

    Lin, Yiming; Zhou, Shaoqi; Li, Fuzhen; Lin, Yixiao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and scanning electron micrograph (SEM) indicated that the major components in the eco-cement clinkers were similar to those in ordinary Portland cement. ► Though the C 2 S phase formation increased with the increase of sewage sludge contents. ► All the eco-cement pastes had a longer initial setting time and final setting time than those of plain cement paste, which increased as the sewage sludge contents in raw meal increased. ► All the eco-cement pastes had lower early flexural strengths and it increased with the increase of sewage sludge contents increased, while the compressive strengths decreased slightly. ► However, it had no significant effect on all the strengths at later ages. - Abstract: The effects of using dried sewage sludge as additive on cement property in the process of clinker burning were investigated in this paper. The eco-cement samples were prepared by adding 0.50–15.0% of dried sewage sludge to unit raw meal, and then the mixtures were burned at 1450 °C for 2 h. The results indicated that the major components in the eco-cement clinkers were similar to those in ordinary Portland cement. Although the C 2 S phase formation increased with the increase of sewage sludge content, it was also found that the microstructure of the mixture containing 15.0% sewage sludge in raw meal was significantly different and that a larger amount of pores were distributed in the clinker. Moreover, all the eco-cement pastes had a longer initial setting time and final setting time than those of plain cement paste, which increased as the sewage sludge content in the raw meal increased. All the eco-cement pastes had lower early flexural strengths, which increased as the sewage sludge content increased, while the compressive strengths decreased slightly. However, this had no significant effect on all the strengths at later stages. Furthermore, the leaching concentrations of all the types of eco-cement

  19. Development of low-activation design method for reduction of radioactive waste (4). Development of low-activation cement

    Ichitsubo, Koki; Tanosaki, Takao; Miura, Keiichi; Tomotake, Hiroichi; Yamada, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideki; Kinno, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Akira

    2008-01-01

    When nuclear plants will reach to decommission stage, a huge amount of concrete should be disposed as radioactive waste. To reduce the amount of radioactive concrete, the most effective methodology is not to use the materials of high radionuclide content such as coal ash and blast furnace slag, and to use limestone as additives or aggregate. However, concrete uses Portland cement for hardening, therefore, it is difficult to reduce the amount of radioactive concrete unless radionuclide content in cement is reduced. So in this study, we tried to develop the new type of Low-activation cement by reducing of radionuclide as europium and cobalt. As a result, we could reduce the amount of europium and cobalt in cement significantly, and obtained the result that the new cements can reduce radioactivity to one-third or less against commercially Portland cement in Japan. (author)

  20. Review for the improvement of low alkaline cement from viewpoint of hydration control

    Imoto, Harutake; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2006-01-01

    It is concerns that high pH pore water from cementitious materials will become harmful to barrier system such as bedrock and buffer materials in the radioactive repository. Then sulpho-aluminate type low alkaline cement 'LAC' was developed. But LAC concrete has some problems on its workability and initial crack due to high reactability. It is necessary for LAC to be improved to avoid these problems. In this study, the conventional knowledge on reactability and hardened properties of sulpho-aluminate cement were reviewed from the viewpoint of hydration controlling. From the results, the recipe for the improvement of 'LAC' was investigated. Early hydration of sulpho-aluminate were delayed by the decreasement of calcium hydroxide quantity and increasement of calcium sulphate in cement. Retarder delayed hydration of sulpho-aluminate more than composition of cement. The effect of cement admixture on the early hydration of sulpho-aluminate cement were not reported. Blast furnace slag as cement admixture affect on the long-term hydration and strength development. So, it was guess that sulpho-aluminate type low alkaline cement 'LAC' have good strength development by controlling recipi of additional ratio of blast furnace slag and be-lite content in the sulpho-aluminate cement. (author)

  1. The behavior of biogenic silica-rich rocks and volcanic tuffs as pozzolanic additives in cement

    Fragoulis, Dimitris; Stamatakis, Michael; Anastasatou, Marianthi

    2015-04-01

    Cements currently produced, include a variety of pozzolanic materials, aiming for lower clinker addition and utilization of vast deposits of certain raw materials and/or mining wastes and byproducts. The major naturally occurring pozzolanic materials include glassy tuffs, zeolitic tuffs, diatomites and volcanic lavas rich in glassy phase, such as perlites. Therefore, based on the available raw materials in different locations, the cement composition might vary according to the accessibility of efficient pozzolanic materials. In the present investigation, the behavior of pozzolanic cements produced with representative samples of the aforementioned materials was studied, following the characterization of the implemented pozzolanas with respect to their chemical and mineralogical characteristics. Laboratory cements were produced by co-grinding 75% clinker, 5% gypsum and 20% pozzolana, for the same period of time (45 min). Regarding pozzolanic materials, four different types of pozzolanas were utilized namely, diatomite, perlite, zeolite tuff and glassy tuff. More specifically, two diatomite samples originated from Australia and Greece, with high and low reactive silica content respectively, two perlite samples originated from Turkey and from Milos Island, Greece, with different reactive silica contents, a zeolite tuff sample originated from Turkey and a glassy tuff sample originated from Milos Island, Greece. The above pozzolana samples, which were ground in the laboratory ball mill for cement production performed differently during grinding and that was reflected upon the specific surface area (cm2/gr) values. The perlites and the glassy tuff were the hardest to grind, whereas, the zeolite tuff and the Australian diatomite were the easiest ones. However, the exceedingly high specific surface area of the Australian diatomite renders cement difficult to transport and tricky to use for concrete manufacturing, due to the high water demand of the cement mixture. Regarding

  2. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  3. Triaxial shear behavior of a cement-treated sand–gravel mixture

    Younes Amini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of parameters, e.g. cement content, cement type, relative density, and grain size distribution, can influence the mechanical behaviors of cemented soils. In the present study, a series of conventional triaxial compression tests were conducted on a cemented poorly graded sand–gravel mixture containing 30% gravel and 70% sand in both consolidated drained and undrained conditions. Portland cement used as the cementing agent was added to the soil at 0%, 1%, 2%, and 3% (dry weight of sand–gravel mixture. Samples were prepared at 70% relative density and tested at confining pressures of 50 kPa, 100 kPa, and 150 kPa. Comparison of the results with other studies on well graded gravely sands indicated more dilation or negative pore pressure in poorly graded samples. Undrained failure envelopes determined using zero Skempton's pore pressure coefficient (A¯=0 criterion were consistent with the drained ones. Energy absorption potential was higher in drained condition than undrained condition, suggesting that more energy was required to induce deformation in cemented soil under drained state. Energy absorption increased with increase in cement content under both drained and undrained conditions.

  4. Methods and Production of Cementation Materials for Immobilisation into Waste Form. Research of Cementation Processes for Specific Liquid Radioactive Waste Streams of Radiochemical Plants

    Sukhanov, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    In the near future Russian Federation is planning to use industrial cementation facilities at two radiochemical combines - PA 'Mayak' and Mountain Chemical Combine. Scope of the research within the IAEA CRP contact No. 14176 included the development of cementation processes for specfic liquid radioactive waste streams that are present in these enterprisers. The research on cementation of liquid waste from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing at PA 'Mayak' allowed obtaining experimental data characterizing the technological process and basic characteristics of the produced cement compounds (e.g. mechanical strength, water resistance, frost resistance, flowability, etc.) immobilizing different streams of waste (e.g. hydrated-salt sludges, filter material pulps, mixture of hydrated salt slurries and filter material pulps, tritium liquid waste). Determined optimum technological parameters will allow industrial scale production of cement compound with required quality and higher flowability that is necessary for providing uniform filling of compartments of storage facilities at these sites. The research has been also carried out for the development of cementation technology for immobilization of pulps from storage tanks of Mountain Chemical Combine radiochemical plant. Cementation of such pulps is a difficult technological task because pulps are of complex chemical composition (e.g. hydroxides of manganese, iron, nickel, etc., as well as silicon oxide) and a relatively high activity. The research of cementation process selection for these pulps included studies of the impact of sorbing additive type and content on cement compounds leachability, flowability, impact of cement compound age to its mechanical strength, heat generation of cement compounds and others. The research results obtained allowed testing of cementation facility with a pulse type mixer on the full-scale. Use of such mixer for pulp cementation makes possible to prepare a homogeneous cement compound with the

  5. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  6. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  7. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.O.; Wilding, C.R.; McHugh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I - and IO 3 - species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and E h of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  8. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  9. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Glasser, F. P. [University of Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  10. Optimization of a biomimetic bone cement: role of DCPD.

    Panzavolta, Silvia; Bracci, Barbara; Rubini, Katia; Bigi, Adriana

    2011-08-01

    We previously proposed a biomimetic α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) bone cement where gelatin controls the transformation of α-TCP into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), leading to improved mechanical properties. In this study we investigated the setting and hardening processes of biomimetic cements containing increasing amounts of CaHPO(4)·2H2O (DCPD) (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15 wt.%), with the aim to optimize composition. Both initial and final setting times increased significantly when DCPD content accounts for 10 wt.%, whereas cements containing 15 wt.% DCPD did not set at all. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations were performed on samples maintained in physiological solution for different times. DCPD dissolution starts soon after cement preparation, but the rate of transformation decreases on increasing DCPD initial content in the samples. The rate of α-TCP to CDHA conversion during hardening decreases on increasing DCPD initial content. Moreover, the presence of DCPD prevents gelatin release during hardening. The combined effects of gelatin and DCPD on the rate of CDHA formation and porosity lead to significantly improved mechanical properties, with the best composition displaying a compressive strength of 35 MPa and a Young modulus of 1600 MPa. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Does cement mantle thickness really matter?

    Caruana, J.

    2008-01-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of differing thicknesses. This thesis is concerned with variability in cement thickness around the Stanmore Hip, due to surgical approach, broach size and stem orientation, and its effects on stress and cracking in the cement. The extent to which cement mantle thi...

  12. Heavyweight cement concrete with high stability of strength parameters

    Kudyakov, Konstantin; Nevsky, Andrey; Danke, Ilia; Kudyakov, Aleksandr; Kudyakov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    The present paper establishes regularities of basalt fibers distribution in movable cement concrete mixes under different conditions of their preparation and their selective introduction into mixer during the mixing process. The optimum content of basalt fibers was defined as 0.5% of the cement weight, which provides a uniform distribution of fibers in the concrete volume. It allows increasing compressive strength up to 51.2% and increasing tensile strength up to 28.8%. Micro-structural analysis identified new formations on the surface of basalt fibers, which indicates the good adhesion of hardened cement paste to the fibers. Stability of concrete strength parameters has significantly increased with introduction of basalt fibers into concrete mix.

  13. Radon exhalation of cementitious materials made with coal fly ash: Part 2 - testing hardened cement-fly ash pastes

    Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Levit, A.; Steiner, V.; Metzger, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in measuring radionuclides and radon concentrations in fly ash (FA), cement and other components of building products is due to the concern about health hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The paper focuses on studying the influence of FA on radon exhalation rate (radon flux) from cementitious materials. In the previous part of the paper the state of the art was presented, and the experiments for testing raw materials, Portland cement and coal fly ash, were described. Since the cement and FA have the most critical role in the radon release process relative to other concrete constituents (sand and gravel), and their contribution is dominant in the overall radium content of concrete, tests were carried out on cement paste specimens with different FA contents, 0-60% by weight of the binder (cement+FA). It is found that the dosage of FA in cement paste has a limited influence on radon exhalation rate, if the hardened material is relatively dense. The radon flux of cement-FA pastes is lower than that of pure cement paste: it is about ∼3 mBq m -2 s -1 for cement-FA pastes with FA content as high as 960 kg m -3

  14. TiC含量对WC-TiC-TaC硬质合金材料微观组织及力学性能的影响%Effects of TiC Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Property of WC-TiC-TaC Cemented Carbides

    高姣姣; 姜龙凯; 宋金鹏; 梁国星; 安晶; 谢俊彩; 曹磊; 吕明

    2017-01-01

    本研究采用真空热压烧结技术,在1600℃下制备了WC-TiC-TaC硬质合金材料,研究了TiC含量对其微观组织及力学性能的影响.结果表明,随着TiC含量的增多,硬质合金材料的晶粒显著增大.当TiC的含量从10wt% 增加到25wt%时,硬质合金材料的硬度逐渐增大,最高可达19.81 GPa,这是由于TiC的硬度高于基体WC的硬度;与此同时,硬质合金材料的抗弯强度和断裂韧度逐渐减小.当TiC的含量为10wt%时,材料的抗弯强度有最大值,其值为1147.24 MPa,这是由于在材料内部形成了均匀、细小的晶粒组织;在此含量下,复合材料的增韧机理为细晶增韧、裂纹偏转、裂纹分支、裂纹桥接和韧窝增韧,其断裂韧度有最大值,为14.60 MPa·m1/2.%WC-TiC-TaC cemented carbides were fabricated by hot-pressed sintering at 1600℃. Effects of TiC content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these cemented carbides were investigated. It was found that when TiC content was increased from 10wt% to 25wt%, both the average grain size and the Vickers hardness increased pro-gressively, but both the flexural strength and the fracture toughness decreased gradually. The increase of Vickers hard-ness was attributed to the increase of TiC content and the hardness of TiC was higher than that of WC. The value of the highest Vickers hardness was 19.81 GPa. This work also showed that the highest flexural strength (1147.24 MPa) was ascribed to the fine and homogeneous grains, and that the highest fracture toughness (14.60 MPa·m1/2) was due to the intensive coupled mechanism of the fine-grain toughening, crack deflection, crack branching, crack bridging, and toughness dimples.

  15. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  16. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  17. Impact of coal and rice husk ash on the quality and chemistry of cement clinker

    Nawaz, S.; Kanwal, S.; Rahim, U.; Sheikh, N.; Shahzad, K.

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of rice husk as an alternative fuel for coal is of interest due to its availability in huge quantities in Pakistan and also because its combustion is environmental pollution friendly as it generates much less SOX due to its much lower sulphur content (0.1-0.3%) compared to sulphur content in coals, particularly indeginous coals ranging from 0.6-14.8%. The purpose of present study was to examine the impact of co-firing of rice husk and coal on the quality of cement clinker so as to substitute expensive imported coal with the abundantly available cheaper rice husk to reduce the cost of production of the cement. For this investigation raw feed mix (mixture of limestone, clay, bauxite and laterite in predetermined proportions) used for cement manufacture was mixed with predetermined varying proportions of coal ash and rice husk ash and placed inside a muffle furnace at 1200 degree C - 1500 degree C i-e the temperatures prevailing in the industrial cement kilns, for various periods of time to obtain cement clinker. The quality and chemistry of cement clinker thus produced in the laboratory was experimentally studied to ensure the quality of cement clinker that would be obtained by co-firing of rice husk and coal in different proportions in industrial cement kilns as the coal ash and rice husk ash produced during combustion will get mixed with cement clinker in industrial kilns. The results indicated that there was decrease in the Lime Saturation Factor, Free Lime and Tricalcium Silicate (C3S) content and increase in the Dicalcium Silicate (C2S) content by increasing the rice husk ash and decreasing the coal ash proportion in the clinker. (author)

  18. Rheological measurements on cement grouts

    Dalton, M.J.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the techniques which have been developed at Winfrith for assessing the rheological properties of cement grouts. A discussion of the theory of rheology and its application to cement is given and the methodology for calibrating a special paddle measuring system for a commercial viscometer is described. The use of the system for determining flow curves, equilibrium viscosity, viscosity as a function of shearing time and structure changes is also discussed. (author)

  19. Strength, shrinkage, erodibility and capillary flow characteristics of cement-treated recycled pavement materials

    William Fedrigo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Full-depth recycling with portland cement (FDR-PC has been widely used for pavement rehabilitation; however, doubts remain regarding factors affecting some properties of the recycled material. Aiming on quantifying the effects of those factors on the strength, drying shrinkage, erodibility, capillary rise and absorption of cement-treated mixtures (CTM of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP and graded crushed stone, tests were conducted considering different RAP contents, cement contents, compaction efforts and curing times. Cement addition increased the mixtures strength and reduced their erodibility and capillary flow characteristics, but increased shrinkage. Low cement contents resulted in acceptable strength for CTM, but in high capillary rise and absorption, not being suitable if the layer is exposed to long periods of water soaking. Higher compaction effort led to similar effects as cement addition, counterbalancing low cement contents usage and reducing costs and shrinkage cracking risk. Strength and shrinkage showed higher growth rates at early stages, and then precautions should be taken in order to avoid moisture loss. Increasing RAP content decreased strength; though, RAP effect on the other properties was statistically non-significant, indicating a similar behaviour as CTM without RAP. Considering the studied properties, the mixture with most satisfactory behaviour for field applications was identified. The results highlighted strength is not the only property to be considered when designing FDR-PC mixtures; although presenting acceptable strength, some mixtures may fail due to shrinkage cracking or erosion, when exposed to water content variations. Keywords: Full-depth recycling with cement, Strength, Drying shrinkage, Erodibility, Capillary rise, Absorption

  20. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  1. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    Chen, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Chien-Wen; Hsueh, Nai-Shuo; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate can improve osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement. • The higher the calcium sulfate content, the shorter the setting time in the composite cement. • The results were useful for designing calcium-based cement with optimal properties. -- Abstract: An ideal bone graft substitute should have the same speed of degradation as formation of new bone tissue. To improve the properties of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) featured for its rapid resorption, a low degradation material of dicalcium silicate (DCS) was added to the CSH cement. This study examined the effect of DCS (20, 40, 60 and 80 wt%) on the in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities of the calcium-based composite cements. The diametral tensile strength, porosity and weight loss of the composite cements were evaluated before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteogenic activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization, of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on cement surfaces were also examined. As a result, the greater the DCS amount, the higher the setting time was in the cement. Before soaking in SBF, the diametral tensile strength of the composite cements was decreased due to the introduction of DCS. On 180-day soaking, the composite cements containing 20, 40, 60 and 80 wt% DCS lost 80%, 69%, 61% and 44% in strength, respectively. Regarding in vitro bioactivity, the DCS-rich cements were covered with clusters of apatite spherulites after soaking for 7 days, while there was no formation of apatite spherulites on the CSH-rich cement surfaces. The presence of DCS could reduce the degradation of the CSH cements, as evidenced in the results of weight loss and porosity. More importantly, DCS may promote effectively the cell proliferation, proliferation and mineralization. The combination of osteogenesis of DCS and degradation of CSH made the calcium-based composite cements an attractive choice for

  2. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  4. Imaging of Flames in Cement Kilns To Study the Influence of Different Fuel Types

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Nielsen, Mads; Clausen, Sønnik

    2017-01-01

    The cement industry aims to use an increased amount of alternative fuels to reduce production costs and CO2 emissions. In this study three cement plants firing different kinds and percentages of alternative fuel were studied. A specially developed camera setup was used to monitor the flames...... in the three cement kilns and assess the effect of alternative fuels on the flame. It was found that cofiring with solid recovered fuel (SRF) would delay the ignition point by about 2 m and lower the intensity and temperature of the kiln flame compared to a fossil fuel flame. This is related to a larger...... particle size and moisture content of the alternative fuels, which lowers the conversion rate compared to fossil fuels. The consequences can be a lower kiln temperature and cement quality. The longer conversion time may also lead to the possibility of localized reducing conditions in the cement kiln, which...

  5. Effect of natural fibers on mechanical properties of green cement mortar

    AL-Zubaidi, Aseel B.

    2018-05-01

    Natural fibers of banana, reed, palm and coconut were used to reinforce cement composite. Optical microscopy showed that the prepared fibers are different in size and morphology. Nearly equiaxed, ribbon-like and nearly cylindrical morphologies were observed. Each of the utilized natural fibers was incorporated in the cement matrix at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 wt% and cured for 28 days. The scanning electron micrographs for the 1.0 wt% -reinforced composite showed differences in porosity, grain size and shape. Each of the utilized fibers has different effect on the microstructure of the cement composite that depends on the fiber size and morphology. Water absorption, thermal conductivity, bending strength, hardness and compression strengths were measured for the reinforced cement composite. It is found that the final physical and mechanical properties of the set cement composite depend on the fiber content and fiber type through the differences in their sizes and morphologies.

  6. Comparative analysis of the life cycle impact assessment of available cement inventories in the EU

    Josa, Alejandro; Aguado, Antonio; Cardim, Arnaldo; Byars, Ewan

    2007-01-01

    Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is one of basic steps in life cycle assessment methodology (LCA). This paper presents a comparative study of the LCIA of different life cycle inventories (LCI) for EU cements. The analysis unit used is the manufacture of 1 kg of cement, from 'cradle to gate'. The impact categories considered are those resulting from the manufacture of cement and include greenhouse effects, acidification, eutrophication and summer and winter smog, amongst others. The results of the study highlighted some inconsistencies in existing inventories. As for the LCIA, the main environmental interventions related to cement manufacture were classified and characterised and their effect on different impact categories analysed. Differences observed in evaluation of the impact of cement type were essentially related to their clinker content

  7. Geo-environmental application of municipal solid waste incinerator ash stabilized with cement

    Davinder Singh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of soluble salts contained in the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI ash significantly affects the strength development and hardening reaction when stabilized with cement. The present study focuses on the compaction and strength behavior of mixed specimens of cement and MSWI ash. A series of indices such as unconfined compressive strength, split tensile strength, California bearing ratio (CBR and pH value was examined. Prior to this, the specimens were cured for 7 d, 14 d, and 28 d. The test results depict that the maximum dry density (MDD decreases and the optimum moisture content (OMC increases with the addition of cement. The test results also reveal that the cement increases the strength of the mixed specimens. Thus, the combination of MSWI ash and cement can be used as a lightweight filling material in different structures like embankment and road construction.

  8. The long term effect on cement mortar by admixture of spray drying absorption products

    Jeppesen, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary investigations have shown that the substitutions of up to 10% fly ash (FA), with spray drying absorption products (SDA), in cement mortars (cement: 80% rapid portland cement (RPC), 10-20% FA, 0-10% SDA) results in low early strength of the same magnitude as in mortar with 80% RPC + 20% FA. Use of the modified instructions for preparation of mortar prisms containing SDA resulted in satisfactory early strengths. A series of mortar prisms with increasing content of SDA (x% RPC, (100-x)% SDA in cements; 0 80% cannot be stored wet. The effects on mortars of the individual constituents of the SDA-products are studied by XRD, development in strength and density. Fragments of 2 year old SDA containing cement mortars and SDA containing concrete from a parking place have been studied

  9. Influence Of Cement Kiln Dust As Partial Replacement On Some Properties Of Ordinary And White Portland Cement

    Salah Sharif

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cement Kiln Dust (CKD is produced as a solid waste with large quantities during manufacturing of Portland cement clinker. The possibility of utilizing CKD as partial replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC and White Portland Cement (WPC produced in factories of the Iraqi cement state company has been examined in this study to fulfil the environmental and economical aims. Different percentages of CKD were blended with OPC and WPC mixes. The results show that the amount of water for normal consistency were increased with about 39 % and 31 % for OPC and WPC blended with 25 % CKD. The setting time (initial and final decreases with increasing percent of CKD added. Compressive strength decreases slightly with increasing CKD content up to 10 %. For 7- day curing time, it decreases 7 % and 9 % for OPC and WPC mixes, respectively. As percent of added CKD increases to more than 10 %, the compressive strength and other parameters where affected significantly. Overall results proved that OPC and WPC blended with up to 10 % CKD are admissible for passing relevant specification requirements.

  10. Low pH Cements

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  11. Low pH Cements

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  12. Applicability of low alkaline cement for construction and alteration of bentonite in the cement. 2

    Iriya, Keishiro; Fujii, Kensuke; Tajima, Takatoshi; Takeda, N.; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    This study consists of accelerating corrosion test of rebar in saline, automogeneous shrinkage test of HFSC, accelerating test for bentonite and rock, and summarizing rock and bentonite alteration. Corrosion of rebars in HFSC: Since sorption capacity of HFSC for Cl ion is slow due to low alkalinity, rate of corrosion of rebar in HFSC is very large. Cracking due to corrosion is generating in 4 years or 20 years, although service period is deferent in OPC amount. Automogenous shrinkage: Automogenous shrinkage of HFSC is larger than OPC in cement paste. It decreases corresponding to rise of fly ash content. The shrinkage in HFSC 226 is quite similar to OPC. The shrinkage in HFSC concrete is smaller than OPC concrete. 720 days alteration test of bentonite by solution of low alkaline cement: Ion exchange to Ca bentonite and calcite are observed in the solid phase. Thin plate of bentonite is disappeared and round shaped secondary mineral is generated. Dissolution of bentonite and generation of secondary minerals are limited in pH 11.0 or less, since pH of bentonite is about 10.0. 720 days alteration test of rock by solution of low alkaline cement: Calcite is generated in very test. Very small evidence is observed as generation of secondary minerals. Etched pits are observed in tuff A due to corrosion. (author)

  13. Effect of the Type of Surface Treatment and Cement on the Chloride Induced Corrosion of Galvanized Reinforcements

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Mobili, Alessandra; Vicerè, Anna Maria; Roventi, Gabriella; Bellezze, Tiziano

    2017-10-01

    The effect of a new passivation treatment, obtained by immersion of the galvanized reinforcements in a trivalent chromium salts based solution, on the chlorides induced corrosion has been investigated. To investigate also the effect of cement alkalinity on corrosion behaviour of reinforcements, concretes manufactured with three different European cements were compared. The obtained results show that the alternative treatment based on hexavalent chromium-free baths forms effective protection layers on the galvanized rebar surfaces. The higher corrosion rates of zinc coating in concrete manufactured with Portland cement compared to those recorded for bars in concrete manufactured with pozzolanic cement depends strongly on the higher chloride content at the steel concrete interface.

  14. Peach leaf responses to soil and cement dust pollution.

    Maletsika, Persefoni A; Nanos, George D; Stavroulakis, George G

    2015-10-01

    Dust pollution can negatively affect plant productivity in hot, dry and with high irradiance areas during summer. Soil or cement dust were applied on peach trees growing in a Mediterranean area with the above climatic characteristics. Soil and cement dust accumulation onto the leaves decreased the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) available to the leaves without causing any shade effect. Soil and mainly cement dust deposition onto the leaves decreased stomatal conductance, photosynthetic and transpiration rates, and water use efficiency due possibly to stomatal blockage and other leaf cellular effects. In early autumn, rain events removed soil dust and leaf functions partly recovered, while cement dust created a crust partially remaining onto the leaves and causing more permanent stress. Leaf characteristics were differentially affected by the two dusts studied due to their different hydraulic properties. Leaf total chlorophyll decreased and total phenol content increased with dust accumulation late in the summer compared to control leaves due to intense oxidative stress. The two dusts did not cause serious metal imbalances to the leaves, except of lower leaf K content.

  15. Polymer-cement interactions towards improved wellbore cement fracture sealants

    Beckingham, B. S.; Iloejesi, C.; Minkler, M. J.; Schindler, A. K.; Beckingham, L. E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in deep geologic formations is a promising means of reducing point source emissions of CO2. In these systems, CO2 is captured at the source and then injected to be utilized (eg. in enhanced oil recovery or as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal energy plants) or stored in geologic formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or saline aquifers. While CCUS in subsurface systems could aid in reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions, the potential for CO2 leakage from these systems to overlying formations remains a major limitation and poses a significant risk to the security of injected CO2. Thus, improved materials for both initial wellbore isolation and repairing leakage pathways that develop over time are sought. One approach for the repair of cement fractures in wellbore (and other) systems is the injection of polymer materials into the fracture with a subsequent environmentally dependent (temperature, pressure, pH, etc.) densification or solidification. Here, we aim to investigate novel polymer materials for use to repair leaking wellbores in the context of CCUS. We synthesize and fully characterize a series of novel polymer materials and utilize a suite of analysis techniques to examine polymer-cement interactions at a range of conditions (namely temperature, pressure and pH). Initial findings will be leveraged to design novel polymer materials for further evaluation in polymer-cement composite cores, cement fracture healing, and the aging behavior of healed cements.

  16. Highly permeable, cement-bounded backfilling mortars for SMA repositories

    Jacobs, F.; Mayer, G.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1994-03-01

    In low- and intermediate-level waste repositories, gas is produced due e.g. to corrosion. This gas must be able to escape from the repository in order to prevent damage to the repository structure. A cement-based backfill should take over this function. For this purpose, the composition of cement-based materials was varied to study their influence on porosity and permeability. In parallel to this study the behaviour of fresh concrete, the liberation of the heat of hydration and the hardened concrete properties were investigated. To characterize the permeability of cement-based materials the following parameters are important: 1) composition of the material (pore fabric), 2) storage conditions (degree of saturation), 3) degree of hydration (age), 4) measuring fluid. A change in the composition of cement-based materials can vary the permeability by ten orders of magnitude. It is shown that, by using dense aggregates, the transport of the fluid takes place through the matrix and along the aggregate/matrix interface. By using porous aggregates the permeability can be increased by two orders of magnitude. In the case of a dense matrix, porous aggregates do not alter the permeability. Increasing the matrix content or interface content increases permeability. Hence light weight mortars are an obvious choice. Like-grained mixes showed higher permeabilities in combination with better mechanical properties but, in comparison to normal mixes, they showed worse flow properties. With the composition cement-: water-: aggregate content 1:0.4:5.33 the likegrained mix with aggregates ranging from 2 to 3 mm proved to be a suitable material. With a low compaction after 28 days this mix reaches a permeability of 4.10 -12 m 2 and an uniaxial cylinder compressive strength of 16 N/mm 2 . (author) 58 figs., 23 tabs., refs

  17. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures.

    Glinicki, Michał A; Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria; Gibas, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-02

    The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement-ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  18. Potential Mixture of POFA and SCBA as Cement Replacement in Concrete – A Review

    Ali Noorwirdawati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is an important material used in all kind of building construction and ordinary Portland cement (OPC is one of an important element in the production of concrete. However, the production of cement causes a problem because of high CO2 emission to atmosphere. The manufacture of 1 tonnes of cement would produce approximately released 1 tonnes of CO2. So, the need to search another material that can replace a cement with same properties and environmental friendly are crucial. The suitable material to replace cement has to be a pozzolanic materials. This is because pozzolanic materials has cementitious properties and high silica content. Palm oil fuel ash (POFA and sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA are the material that suitable to replace cement because of high silica content. The use of POFA and SCBA in concrete has been studied by many researcher and it has been proved to improve the mechanical strength of the concrete either in normal concrete, high strength concrete or lightweight concrete. This paper would discuss the overview of the previous study on the cement replacement by POFA and SCBA and the potential of the both materials to be mix together to improve its properties. The chemical element which will be the focus point is SiO4, MgO, CaO and SO3, while the physical and mechanical properties such as workability, specific gravity, compressive strength and tensile strength will also be reviewed.

  19. Utilization of the national Portland cement for immobilizing radioactive wastes - Physical characteristics

    Rzyski, B.M.; Suarez, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper shows the results obtained in the study of the national Portland cement, P320, as matrix for radioactive nitric waste incorporation. Cement use practice in other countries is common for this purposes and demonstrates to be cheap and accessible when low and medium level wastes are immobilized. Some of physical characteristics as: homogeneity,mechanical strenght, setting and porosity are analysed due to water-cement ratio and salt contents. Those characteristics which are proper of the final product, must be controlled in such way to assure a long time integrity of the wasteform. The establishment of process and quality control criteria are based in such kind of data. (author) [pt

  20. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  1. Measurement of radioactivity in building materials: The case of Portland cement used in Kinshasa

    Tshiashala, M.D.; Karisa, N.; Solo, K.; Poloto, I.C.; Bashike, K.M.F.

    2005-01-01

    The study deals with the measurement of radioactivity in some cement samples from the national manufacture of cement of the west area of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The geological materials used in the cement manufacture process may contain some naturel radioactive elements such as U, Th and K. To do so, direct gamma spectrometry using HPGe detector has been performed. Detected radioisotopes from the three main radioactive families have been quantitatively determined. The U, Th and K contents are of the same order of magnitude as in terrestrial crust

  2. The Influence of Diatomite on the Strength and Microstructure of Portland Cement

    Liu Jun; Shao Peng; Wang Shihao

    2016-01-01

    To study the influence of the types and mixing amount of diatomite on the Portland cement, we prepared the cement specimen doped with the calcined first-grade, first-grade and second-grade diatomite ,tested the 3d, 7d, 14d compressive strength, and studied and discussed phase, structure and morphology of diatomite in the binary system by the method of XRD, SEM . Experimental results show that with the addition of diatomite, the strength of cement paste increase; the optimal contents of calcin...

  3. The Effect of Graphene Oxide on Cement Mortar

    Kjaernsmo, Henrik; Kakay, Samdar; Fossa, Kjell T.; Gronli, John

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the effect of water dispersed- and powder Graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticle on fresh cement mortar, microstructure and mechanical strength after 3,7, and 28 days of curing. These properties were studied by treating the cement mortar with 0.03 wt%, 0.05 wt%, and 0.2 wt% GO of the cement weight combined with 0.8wt % polycarboxylate superplasticizer. The results show that the workability decreases as increasing the content of water dispersed GO. The heat of hydration is increased for both types of GO systems. The percent air content in 0.03 wt% and 0.05 wt% GO is almost constant, but increased from 3.2 % to 4.9 % in 0.2 wt% water dispersed GO. The increased air content has effect on poor compaction and workability. GO has the potential of accelerating the hydration process and enhance the early mechanical strength (3 and 7 days), but the workability seems to diminish the mechanical strength after 28 days of curing, particularly for the highest content of water dispersed GO. No distinct influence of GO on the microstructure. The overall results showed that the impact of water dispersed GO was found out to be higher than the powder GO.

  4. Seepage/Cement Interactions

    Carpenter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) pertaining to this task defines the work scopes and objectives for development of various submodels for the Physical and Chemical Environment Abstraction Model for TSPA-LA. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) for this specific task establishes that an evaluation be performed of the chemical reactions between seepage that has entered the drift and concrete which might be used in the repository emplacement drifts. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) then states that the potential effects of these water/grout reactions on chemical conditions in the drift be assessed factoring in the influence of carbonation and the relatively small amount of grout. This task is also directed at: (1) developing a conceptualization of important cement/seepage interactions and potential impacts on EBS performance, (2) performing a screening analysis to assess the importance of cement/seepage interactions. As the work progresses and evolves on other studies, specifically the Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment (P andCE) Model (in progress), many of the issues associated with items 1 and 2, above, will be assessed. Such issues include: (1) Describing the mineralogy of the specified cementitious grout and its evolution over time. (2) Describing the composition of the water before contacting the grout. (3) Developing reasonable upper-bound estimates for the composition of water contacting grout, emphasizing pH and concentrations for anions such as sulfate. (4) Evaluating the equilibration of cement-influenced water with backfill and gas-phase CO 2 . (5) Developing reasonable-bound estimates for flow rate of affected water into the drift. The concept of estimating an ''upper-bound'' range for reaction between the grout and the seepage, particularly in terms of pH is based on equilibrium being established between the seepage and the grout. For example, this analysis can be based on equilibrium being established as

  5. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO 2 ) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO 2 to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO 2 to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms

  6. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models.

  7. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    2011-12-08

    ... and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... and Cement Clinker from Japan: Investigation No. 731- TA-461 (Third Review). By order of the...

  8. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  9. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    Brown, D.J.; James, J.M.; Lee, D.J.; Smith, D.L.; Walker, A.T.

    1982-03-01

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm 3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  10. Characterization of cement-stabilized Cd wastes

    Maria Diez, J.; Madrid, J.; Macias, A.

    1996-01-01

    Portland cement affords both physical and chemical immobilization of cadmium. The immobilization has been studied analyzing the pore fluid of cement samples and characterizing the solid pastes by X-ray diffraction. The influence of cadmium on the cement hydration and on its mechanical properties has been also studied by isothermal conduction calorimetry and by the measure of strength and setting development. Finally, the effect of cement carbonation on the immobilization of cadmium has been analyzed

  11. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  12. Cementation of Radioactive Waste from a PWR with Calcium Sulfoaluminate Cement

    Li, J.

    2013-01-01

    Spent radioactive ion-exchange resin (SIER) and evaporation concentrates are radioactive wastes that are produced at by pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. Borate, which is used as a retardent for cement, is also present as a moderator in a PWR, therefore, borate will be present in both ion-exchange resins and evaporation concentrates. In this study the use of Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (SAC) as encapsulation medium for these waste streams was investigated. The study involved the manufacturing of different cement test samples with different amounts of SAC cement, waste resins (50% water content) and admixtures. In order to reduce hydration heat during 200 L solidification experiments, different admixtures were investigated. Initial results based on compressive strength tests and hydration temperature studies, indicated that zeolite was the best admixture for the current waste form. Experiments indicated that the addition of resin material into the current cement matrix reduces the hydration heat during curing Experimental results indicated that a combination of SAC (35 wt. %), zeolite (7 wt. %) mix with 42 wt. % resins (50% water content) and 16 wt. % of water forms a optimum cured monolith with low hydration heat. The microstructures of hydrated OPC, SAC and SAC with zeolite addition were studied using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM results indicated that the SAC matrices consist of a needle type structure that changed gradually into a flake type structure with the addition of zeolite. Additionally, the presence of zeolite material inside the SAC matrix reduced the leaching rates of radionuclides significantly. In a final 200 L grouting test, measured results indicated a hydration temperature below 90oC withno thermal cracks after solidified. The influence of radiation on the compressive strength and possible gas generation (due to radiolysis) on cement waste forms containing different concentrations ion exchange resin was

  13. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  14. A study on the properties of blended regenerated spent catalyst and cement sandcrete blocks

    Amissah, Emmanuel Kofi

    2016-07-01

    Sandcrete is widely used as building material. Its properties greatly depend on the properties and proportions of its constituents. The main binder material to produce sandcrete is the Portland cement. The uncertainty about future availability of commonly used Portland materials concomitantly with the environmental problems such as greenhouse gases emissions and high cost of clinker consumption are highlighting the need of identifying other materials for the construction industry, which will aid in minimizing the clinker consumption and reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and cost in the production of cement. The purpose of this study is to examine the properties of sandcrete blocks produced with blended Regenerated Spent Catalyst and cement. In this work, two different series of sandcrete mixtures in which cement was partially replaced with Regenerated Spent Catalyst(RSC) within the range of 5% to 20% (by mass) with an increment of 5%. 100% cement sandcrete was also prepared as reference sandcrete. The physical properties studied were compressive strength, water absorption and setting time. Chemical property studied was chloride content. Comparison of data between the control and that of cement with additives were made. The results obtained in this study clearly indicated that substituting Portland cement up to 20wt. % RSC gave sandcrete strengths higher than the 32.5N/mm 2 , which corresponds to that of Portland cement. The replacement of Portland cement with 10 wt. % of RSC gave the highest strength of 34.0 N/mm 2 . Thus, Regenerated Spent Catalyst may be utilized as effective mineral additive for designing durable sandcrete structures. The optimum amount of RSC recommended to be added as an additive to the Portland cement is 10%. (au)

  15. Study of belite calcium sulfo-aluminate cement potential for zinc conditioning: From hydration to durability

    Berger, St.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium silicate cements are widely used for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste conditioning. However, wastes produced by nuclear activities are very diverse and some of their components may chemically react with cement phases. For instance, ashes resulting from the incineration of technological wastes including neoprene and polyvinylchloride may contain substantial amounts of soluble zinc chloride. This compound is known to strongly delay or inhibit Portland cement setting. One approach to limit adverse cement-waste interactions is to select a binder showing a better compatibility with the waste while keeping cement matrix advantages (low cost, simple process, hydration with water provided by the waste...). This work thus investigates the potential of calcium sulfo-aluminate cement for zinc Zn(II) immobilization. Four aspects were considered: hydration (kinetics and products formed), properties of hydrated binders, mechanisms of zinc retention and durability of the cement pastes (based on leaching experiments and modelling). The influence of three main parameters was assessed: the gypsum content of the cement, the concentration of ZnCl 2 and the thermal evolution at early age. It follows that materials based on a calcium sulfo-aluminate cement containing 20% gypsum are interesting candidates for zinc Zn(II) stabilization/solidification: there is no delay in hydration, mineralogy of the hydrated phases is slightly dependent on thermal history, mechanical strength is high, dimensional changes are limited and zinc Zn(II) is well immobilized, even if the cement paste is leached by pure water during a long period (90 d). (author)

  16. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  17. Cement production from coal conversion residues

    Brown, L.D.; Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Nahas, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Cement is produced by feeding residue solids containing carbonaceous material and ash constituents obtained from converting a carbonaceous feed material into liquids and/or gases into a cement-making zone and burning the carbon in the residue solids to supply at least a portion of the energy required to convert the solids into cement

  18. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  19. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    -based binders without taking into account the viscoelastic effects. For the first time, model based on poromechanics was used to calculate the macroscopic tensile stress that develops in CSA cement-based binders due to crystallization of ettringite. The models enabled a reasonable prediction of tensile stress due to crystallization of ettringite including the failure of an OPC-CSA binder which had high CSA cement content. Elastic strain based on crystallization stress was calculated and compared with the observed strain. A mismatch between observed and calculated elastic strain indicated the presence of early-age creep. Lastly, the application of CSA cement in concretes is discussed to link the paste and concrete behavior.

  20. High-level radioactive waste incorporation into (special) cements

    Roy, D.M.; Gouda, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A feasibility study has demonstrated that very strong, durable, relatively impermeable cylinders may be prepared by hot pressing combinations of cements with simulated radioactive waste solids. While the properties have not been studied exhaustively, the results suggest an optional method for immobilization and isolation of radioactive waste. Samples prepared with calcium aluminate cements appeared to have properties superior to those with Portland cements. Four simulated radioactive waste compositions having high rare-earth oxide contents, and some containing a large excess of NaNO 3 , were studied. Modest temperatures [423 to 673 K (150 to 400 0 C)] were used for hot pressing at pressures from 178 to 345 MPa. Dense strong very low porosity specimens resulted when mixtures containing from 10 to 50% waste were hot pressed, incorporating also a small percentage of water. In addition, high-strength cement cylinders were prepared with the waste solid (approximately 20 wt% waste) in a separate core and were very resistant to leaching by water near its boiling point. With this configuration, even the NaNO 3 -containing wastes were resistant to leaching by water

  1. Geomechanical investigations for the designing of cemented filling

    Berry, P.

    1980-05-15

    Laboratory and in situ investigations have led to the identification of the main geomechanical parameters that condition the stability of the cemented fill in the Gavorrano pyrite mine (Tuscany, Italy); such parameters were used for working out a satisfactory mining method. The pyrite is mined with the descending horizontal slice method with integral cemented filling which is obtained by throwing a mixture of limestone aggregates and cement into the mined voids. The laboratory geomechanical investigations carried out on fill samples have pointed out that the physical and mechanical characteristics are highly variable and this is essentially due to the fact that the fill is cast into place by compressed air. In particular, it was pointed out that the strength depends upon the cement content and upon the porosity according to a power law. The in situ measurements of the convergence between the roof and the floor, and the load measurements pointed out the considerable importance of the horizontal and vertical joints that cross the fill mass and that are inevitably brought about by a discontinuity of the fill. The results of the study made it possible to adopt an acceptable geomechanical behaviour model of the fill. On the basis of this model the mining pattern was deeply modified, the width and the height of the slices were considerably enlarged and thus the output was improved.

  2. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  3. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  4. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures

    Michał A. Glinicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement—ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  5. Estimation of the degree of hydration of blended cement pastes by a scanning electron microscope point-counting procedure

    Feng, X.; Garboczi, E.J.; Bentz, D.P.; Stutzman, P.E.; Mason, T.O.

    2004-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) point-counting technique was employed to study the hydration of plain portland and blended cement pastes containing fly ash or slag. For plain portland cement pastes, the results for the degree of cement hydration obtained by the SEM point-counting technique were consistent with the results from the traditional loss-on-ignition (LOI) of nonevaporable water-content measurements; agreement was within ±10%. The standard deviation in the determination of the degree of cement hydration via point counting ranged from ±1.5% to ±1.8% (one operator, one sample). For the blended cement pastes, it is the first time that the degree of hydration of cement in blended systems has been studied directly. The standard deviation for the degree of hydration of cement in the blended cement pastes ranged from ±1.4% to ±2.2%. Additionally, the degrees of reaction of the mineral admixtures (MAs) were also measured. The standard deviation for the degree of fly ash reaction was ±4.6% to ±5.0% and ±3.6% to ±4.3% for slag. All of the analyses suggest that the SEM point-counting technique can be a reliable and effective analysis tool for use in studies of the hydration of blended cement pastes

  6. Effect of bioglass 45S5 addition on properties, microstructure and cellular response of tetracalcium phosphate/monetite cements

    Stulajterova, R., E-mail: rstulajterova@saske.sk; Medvecky, L.; Giretova, M.; Sopcak, T.; Kovalcikova, A.

    2017-04-15

    Tetracalcium phosphate/nanomonetite (TTCPMH) cement composites with 7.5 and 15 wt% addition of melt-derived 45S5 bioactive glass were prepared by mechanical homogenization of powder components and 2% NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution was used as a hardening liquid. The properties of composites with the acidic (Ca/P ratio equal 1.5) or basic (Ca/P ratio equal 1.67) TTCPMH component were compared. Addition of glass component caused rapid rise in pH of composites up to 10. In microstructure of basic cement composite, the large bioglass particles weakly bounded to surrounding cement matrix were found contrary to a more compact microstructure of acidic cement composites with the high number of spherical silica particles. Both the significant refinement of hydroxyapatite particles and the change to needle-like morphology with rise in the content of bioglass were identified in hydroxyapatite coatings created during soaking of composites in phosphate buffered saline. In acidic cement mixtures, the increase of compressive strength with an amount of bioglass was found whereas the opposite tendency was revealed in the case of basic cement mixtures. The higher concentrations of ions were verified in solutions after immersion of acidic cement composites. The severe cytotoxicity of extracts and composite cement substrates containing 15 wt% of bioglass demonstrated adverse effects of both the ionic concentrations and unappropriate surface texture on proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells. The enhanced ALP activities of cells cultured on composite cements confirmed the positive effect of bioactive glass addition on differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Novel B45S5 bioglass/tetracalcium phosphate/nanomonetite cement composites • Cement basicity negatively affected their microstructure. • Acid composite cements had higher compressive strengths than basic composites. • Fast differentiation of MSC to osteoblast line on composite with 7.5 wt% of bioglass

  7. Prediction of calcite Cement Distribution in Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs using Seismic Data

    Bakke, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis investigates how calcite cemented layers can be detected by reflection seismic data and how seismic data combined with other methods can be used to predict lateral variation in calcite cementation in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs. Focus is on the geophysical aspects. Sequence stratigraphy and stochastic modelling aspects are only covered superficially. Possible sources of calcite in shallow marine sandstone are grouped into internal and external sources depending on their location relative to the presently cemented rock. Well data and seismic data from the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea have been analysed. Tuning amplitudes from stacks of thin calcite cemented layers are analysed. Tuning effects are constructive or destructive interference of pulses resulting from two or more closely spaced reflectors. The zero-offset tuning amplitude is shown to depend on calcite content in the stack and vertical stack size. The relationship is found by regression analysis based on extensive seismic modelling. The results are used to predict calcite distribution in a synthetic and a real data example. It is found that describing calcite cemented beds in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs is not a deterministic problem. Hence seismic inversion and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well data have been combined in a probabilistic approach to produce models of calcite cemented barriers constrained by a maximum amount of information. It is concluded that seismic data can provide valuable information on distribution of calcite cemented beds in reservoirs where the background sandstones are relatively homogeneous. 63 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Setting temperature evolution of nitrate radwaste immobilized in ordinary portland cement

    Rzyski, B.M.; Suarez, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Materials based on hydraulic cements such as ordinary Portland cement (OPC) have many applications in the radioactive waste disposal field. Cement hydration process is an exothermic reaction and can cause a considerable temperature rise in the cemented waste form. Specially when large blocks of waste forms are produced it is necessary to have some information about the temperature build up which occurs inside the mass, because this effect may have some influences on the ultimate properties of the hardened cement paste. This temperature rise cause expansion while the cement paste is hardening. When the cooling process takes place, to the surrounding temperature, crackings and contractions may then occur. Whether cracking arise it depends both on the magnitude of the temperature induced stress and on the capacity of the mixture to accommodate the strain. This paper compares the temperature growth in pastes into two different geometries: one uses a waste container with 3.8 dm 3 (one US gallon) capacity placed inside a 0.21 m 3 (55 gallons) concrete lined drum, which acts as a radiation shielding, and the other the same container placed in ambient at room temperature. Correlations between the time of temperature occurrence, maximum temperature, the water to cement ratio and salt content were observed

  9. Study on pore structure and diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in hardened low-alkaline cement

    Mihara, Morihiro; Torii, Kazuyuki

    2009-03-01

    Low-alkaline cement using pozzolans is under consideration as a possible filling and structural material in geological disposal for long-lived radioactive waste. Silica fume and fly ash are used to develop the low-alkaline cement which is named HFSC, High-volume Fly ash Silica fume Cement. In this study, pore structure and diffusivity of chloride ion in HFSC pastes were investigated in order to understand the fundamental transport properties of ions. HFSC which included different contents of fly ash (40%, 50% and 60%) with silica fume (20%) and ordinary Portland (OPC) cement were prepared. Hardened cement pastes were supplied to pore structure analysis and in-diffusion experiment with NaCl and CaCl 2 solution. Mercury intrusion method (MIP) commonly used and image analysis of backscattered electron microscopy (BSE) for pore in hardened cement paste were performed to investigate the pore structure. The porosity of HFSC was larger than that of OPC measured by MIP. However, pore diameter increasing pore volume of HFSC was smaller than that of OPC. It was observed that lager pores were in HFSC than in OPC from BSE. These large pores in HFSC were originated from cenosphere of FA. The apparent diffusivity of chloride in HFSC with fly ash of 40% showed smallest value in the cement pastes. It was concluded that the smallest diffusion coefficient was caused by a pore of HFSC which had a bended structure and ion exclusion/filtration effect. (author)

  10. Effects of Particle Size and Cement Replacement of LCD Glass Powder in Concrete

    Seong Kyum Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high quality liquid crystal display (LCD processing waste glass (LPWG generated from the manufacturing process of Korea’s LCD industries, having the world’s highest technological level and production, was finely ground into particles smaller than cement particles (higher fineness than OPC to verify their applicability and performance as a replacement for cement. For a concrete mix having a W/B ratio of 0.44, cement was replaced with LPWG glass powder (LGP at ratios of 5, 10, 15, and 20% (LGP12 and 5 and 10% (LGP5 according to the particle size to prepare test cylinder specimens, which were tested with respect to air contents, slump in fresh concrete, and compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of hardened concrete. The microstructure of the concrete specimens was analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX, and a Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP. Replacement of cement with LGP for cement could effectively decrease the quantity of cement used due to the excellent performance of LGP. It may positively contribute to the sustainable development of the cement industry as well as waste recycling and environment conservation on a national scale.

  11. [Cement augmentation on the spine : Biomechanical considerations].

    Kolb, J P; Weiser, L; Kueny, R A; Huber, G; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Since the introduction of vertebroplasty and screw augmentation, the management of osteoporotic fractures has changed significantly. The biomechanical characteristics of the risk of adjacent fractures and novel treatment modalities for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, including pure cement augmentation by vertebroplasty, and cement augmentation of screws for posterior instrumentation, are explored. Eighteen human osteoporotic lumbar spines (L1-5) adjacent to vertebral bodies after vertebroplasty were tested in a servo-hydraulic machine. As augmentation compounds we used standard cement and a modified low-strength cement. Different anchoring pedicle screws were tested with and without cement augmentation in another cohort of human specimens with a simple pull-out test and a fatigue test that better reflects physiological conditions. Cement augmentation in the osteoporotic spine leads to greater biomechanical stability. However, change in vertebral stiffness resulted in alterations with the risk of adjacent fractures. By using a less firm cement compound, the risk of adjacent fractures is significantly reduced. Both screw augmentation techniques resulted in a significant increase in the withdrawal force compared with the group without cement. Augmentation using perforated screws showed the highest stability in the fatigue test. The augmentation of cement leads to a significant change in the biomechanical properties. Differences in the stability of adjacent vertebral bodies increase the risk of adjacent fractures, which could be mitigated by a modified cement compound with reduced strength. Screws that were specifically designed for cement application displayed greatest stability in the fatigue test.

  12. The Effect of Water Cement Ratio on Cement Brick Containing High Density Polyethylene (HDPE as Sand Replacement

    Ali Noorwirdawati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste disposal can contribute to the problem of environmental pollution. Most of the waste material is plastic based, because the nature of difficult of plastic degradable by itself. In order to overcome the problem, many study has been conducted on the reuse of plastic material into various field such as civil engineering and construction. In this study, municipal solid waste (MSW in the form of High Density Polyethylene (HDPE plastic was used to replace sand in cement sand brick production. The HDPE used in this study was obtained from a recycle factory at Nilai, Negeri Sembilan. 3% of HDPE replacement was applied in this study, with the cement-sand mix design of 1:6 and water-cement ratio 0.35, 0.40, 0.45 and 0.50 respectively. All specimens were tested for compressive strength and water absorption at 7 and 28 days. The density of the bricks was also recorded. The finding show that brick with 3% HDPE content and 0.45 of water-cement ratio at 28 days of age curing show the highest compressive strength, which is 19.5N/mm2 compared to the control specimen of 14.4 N/mm2.

  13. Influence of various amount of diatomaceous earth used as cement substitute on mechanical properties of cement paste

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Medved, Igor; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Zahálková, Jana; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Active silica containing materials in the sub-micrometer size range are commonly used for modification of strength parameters and durability of cement based composites. In addition, these materials also assist to accelerate cement hydration. In this paper, two types of diatomaceous earths are used as partial cement replacement in composition of cement paste mixtures. For raw binders, basic physical and chemical properties are studied. The chemical composition of tested materials is determined using classical chemical analysis combined with XRD method that allowed assessment of SiO2 amorphous phase content. For all tested mixtures, initial and final setting times are measured. Basic physical and mechanical properties are measured on hardened paste samples cured 28 days in water. Here, bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive and flexural strength, are measured. Relationship between compressive strength and total open porosity is studied using several empirical models. The obtained results give evidence of high pozzolanic activity of tested diatomite earths. Their application leads to the increase of both initial and final setting times, decrease of compressive strength, and increase of flexural strength.

  14. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  15. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    Matsuzuru, Hideo; Ito, Akihiko

    1978-10-01

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  16. Rare earth elements as a tool for studying the formation of cemented layers in an area affected by acid mine drainage

    Grawunder, Anja; Lonschinski, Martin; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Spatially resolved analysis of 14 rare earth elements (REE) by LA-ICP-MS. • Positive correlation of Mn contents and (positive) Ce anomalies. • Linkage of the two cemented layer’s formation to soil solution and groundwater. - Abstract: In a profile with two cemented layers sampled in an area affected by acid mine drainage, both have rare earth element (REE) signatures with positive Ce anomalies in the Post Archean Australian Shale-normalised patterns. Both cemented layers have higher contents of environmentally relevant metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, U, and Zn) than the over- and underlying unconsolidated Quaternary sediments and are depleted of Al, Ca, K, and Mg. The cemented layers are enriched in middle and heavy REE, but only the bulk pattern of the lower cemented layer reveals a positive Ce anomaly. For the upper cemented layer, this positive Ce anomaly was only determined by spatially resolved laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) studies only for segments with a high abundance of Mn, occurring as Mn phases as proven by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The Mn phases are formed secondarily to the ferric cement and are especially enriched in Ce and Co. The Ce anomaly of the lower cemented layer most probably is inherited from groundwater to the ferric cement, whereas the Ce anomaly of the upper cemented layer is the result of preferential scavenging of Ce onto the Mn phases compared to other REE

  17. Through BHA (Bottom Hole Assembly) cementing with proprietary cementing technology

    Fanguy, Charles ' Joey' ; Mueller, Dan T. [BJ Services Company, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, J.C. [Palm Energy Partners, LLC, Metairie, LA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    There are many problems that can arise when drilling into sub-normally pressured or naturally fractured zones. Lost circulation is one problem that is commonly encountered while drilling oil and gas wells. Lost circulation can lead to increased costs associated with drilling due to rig time, spreadsheet costs, and expensive mud system losses. Cement is one of the most effective treatment options, although it is not normally considered the first option because most operators are forced to trip out of the wellbore and utilize a squeeze packer. This is not always a viable option because of potential well control issues associated with the hydrostatic pressure reduction due to the losses of the whole mud. One treatment option that is commonly overlooked is pumping cement slurries through the bottom hole assembly and drill bit. This is generally not attempted for a variety of reasons. These reasons include: I Concern about 'squeezing off' of the cement in the bit II Lack of potential quality control associated with mixing 'on the fly' III Lack of the ability to test the actual mixed slurry samples The use of a pre-mixed, storable cement slurry has eliminated the concerns associated with pumping cement slurries through mud motors, MWD tools, BHA's, and drill bits. This advanced cement technology has been successfully utilized while reducing the risks associated with these lost circulation treatments. In addition, this technology has eliminated the costs associated with using a squeeze packer and the rig time required for several trips out of the wellbore. The paper will describe the premixed slurry properties and QA/QC procedures that are required for successful through the bit operations. This paper will also provide case histories of successful through the bit operation, as well as background information leading to the treatments. The case histories include successful through the bit remediation of severe lost circulation zones and as well the

  18. Cemented Horizons and Hardpans in the Coastal Tablelands of Northeastern Brazil

    João Bosco Vasconcellos Gomes

    horizons, whether they were spodic or not. The extracts of the aqueous solution displayed a noticeable accumulation of Si in the cemented horizons, except in the p-PAC. The presence of argillans in all cemented horizons allows them to be defined as illuvial, with the exception of the placic horizons, regardless of the presence of podzolization processes. The cemented horizons were preponderantly apedal, with a matrix of little porosity. The Fe, Al, and Si contents extracted by acid ammonium oxalate were effective at highlighting the influence of compounds with a low degree of crystallinity in the morphology of cemented horizons.

  19. Effect of Palmyra Palm Leaf Ash on Cement Stabilization of Makurdi Shale

    Amos Yala IORLIAM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Makurdi Shale was treated with palmyra palm leaf ash (PPLA and cement to assess its suitability as a material in construction of flexible pavement. Classification, Compaction, Consistency, California bearing ratio (CBR and Unconfined compressive strength (UCS tests, were conducted on the shale specimen treated with, cement and PPLA in a combined incremental order of 2% up to 10% of cement and 2% up to 14% of PPLA of dry weight of soil sample respectively. Results of tests showed that Makurdi shale is an A-7-6, high plasticity (CH and high swell potential soil by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO, Unified Soil Classification System (USCS and Nigerian Building and Road Research Institute (NBRRI classification systems respectively. The plasticity index (PI reduced from 30.5% for untreated Makurdi shale to 4% at 10% cement +14% PPLA contents. The maximum soaked CBR and 7 day UCS values of 92% and 1041 kN/m2 were obtained at 10% cement+14 % PPLA contents respectively. From the results, Makurdi shale treated with a combination of 10%cement+14% PPFA with a soaked CBR value of 92 %, 7 day UCS value of 1041 kN/m2 and 82 % value of resistance to loss in strength, satisfied the requirement for sub-base specification. It is therefore recommended for use as sub-base materials in flexible pavement.

  20. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    Bondarenko, V.; Pavlotskaya, E.; Martynova, L.; Epik, I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  1. Treatment of Petroleum Drill Cuttings Using Stabilization/Solidification Method by Cement and Modified Clay Mixes

    Soroush Ghasemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High organic content in petroleum drill cuttings is a substantial obstacle which hinders cement hydration and subsequently decreases the clean-up efficiency of the stabilization/solidification (S/S process. In this study, a modified clayey soil (montmorillonite with low to moderate polarity was used as an additive to cement. Because of its high adsorption capacity, the clay is capable of mitigating the destructive role of organic materials and preventing their interference with the hydration process. Mixes containing different ratios of cement, waste and modified clay were prepared and tested for their mechanical and chemical characteristics. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH and Pb content of the samples were analyzed as well. For this purpose, the mixes were subjected to unconfined compressive strength (UCS and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP tests. The results indicated that the specimens with 28-day curing time at a cement/waste ratio of 25% or higher (w/w and 10% modified clay (w/w met the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA criterion for compressive strength. Moreover, a reduction of 94% in the leaching of TPH was observed with the specimens undergoing the TCLP with a cement/waste ratio of 30% (w/w and a clay/waste ratio of 30% (w/w. Finally, the specimens with 30% cement/waste and 10% clay/waste ratios showed the least concentration (6.14% of leached Pb.

  2. Effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer on the hydration characteristics of portland cement pastes

    Safaa.M. El Gamal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (modified lignosulphonate base on the hydration characteristics of hardened Portland cement pastes were studied at different curing conditions. Four mixtures were prepared using 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 wt% addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (SR of cement. These pastes were hydrated under two different conditions; (i normal curing at room temperature; 25 °C up to 90 days periods and (ii hydrothermal curing at a pressure of 8 atm. of saturated steam up to 24 h. The compressive strength, combined water content, free lime content, gel/space ratio and microstructure of hardened cement pastes were studied. The results revealed that addition of SR superplasticizer promote the dispersion of cement particles and interacts with Ca(OH2. The addition of SR superplasticizer exhibits Portland cement better workability during the preparation of pastes. In addition, amore compact structure were obtained leading to higher values of compressive strength for all the hardened hydrated pastes under both normal and hydrothermal curing. The results indicated that the addition of SR superplasticizer to Portland cement does not alter the types of hydration products formed during normal or hydrothermal conditions; only it caused a decrease in the degree of the porosity of the formed pastes.

  3. Prediction of zeolite-cement-sand unconfined compressive strength using polynomial neural network

    MolaAbasi, H.; Shooshpasha, I.

    2016-04-01

    The improvement of local soils with cement and zeolite can provide great benefits, including strengthening slopes in slope stability problems, stabilizing problematic soils and preventing soil liquefaction. Recently, dosage methodologies are being developed for improved soils based on a rational criterion as it exists in concrete technology. There are numerous earlier studies showing the possibility of relating Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) and Cemented sand (CS) parameters (voids/cement ratio) as a power function fits. Taking into account the fact that the existing equations are incapable of estimating UCS for zeolite cemented sand mixture (ZCS) well, artificial intelligence methods are used for forecasting them. Polynomial-type neural network is applied to estimate the UCS from more simply determined index properties such as zeolite and cement content, porosity as well as curing time. In order to assess the merits of the proposed approach, a total number of 216 unconfined compressive tests have been done. A comparison is carried out between the experimentally measured UCS with the predictions in order to evaluate the performance of the current method. The results demonstrate that generalized polynomial-type neural network has a great ability for prediction of the UCS. At the end sensitivity analysis of the polynomial model is applied to study the influence of input parameters on model output. The sensitivity analysis reveals that cement and zeolite content have significant influence on predicting UCS.

  4. Application of experiment planning during investigation of cementation process in solid carburizers

    Lisenkov, A.N.; Denisov, V.M.; Prigozhina, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model of cementation process in solid carburizirs is obtained, the most effective contents of carburizers are chosen. Specimens are produced out of St20, 12KhN3A, 40Kh13, KhVG steels. It is shown that specimens of St20 and 12KhN3A steels have the higher depth of cementated layer, specimens made of 40Kh13 and KhVG steels-the lower depth. It is shown that the quality of cementated layer structure at recommended regimes improved, cementated layer depth for low-carbon steels changed a little and for tool steels increased infficiently: for KhVG steel in 2-3 times for 40Kh13 steel in 1.5-2.5 times

  5. Effect of Graphene Oxide (GO on the Morphology and Microstructure of Cement Hydration Products

    Liguo Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on the microstructure of cement mortars were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric (TG, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. Cement mortar samples with different proportions of GO (0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08 wt % based on the weight of cement were prepared. The test results showed that GO affected the crystallization of cement hydration products, C–S–H (calcium silicate hydrate is the main hydrate product and CH (calcium hydroxide. The morphology of hydration products changed with the increase of GO content. Furthermore, the results of XRD analyses showed that the diffraction peak intensity and the crystal grain size of CH (001, (100, (101, and (102 for GO samples increased considerably compared with the control sample. Based on the results, it can be understood that GO can modify the crystal surface of CH, leading to the formation of larger crystals.

  6. E-modulus evolution and its relation to solids formation of pastes from commercial cements

    Maia, Lino; Azenha, Miguel; Geiker, Mette; Figueiras, Joaquim

    2012-01-01

    Models for early age E-modulus evolution of cement pastes are available in the literature, but their validation is limited. This paper provides correlated measurements of early age evolution of E-modulus and hydration of pastes from five commercial cements differing in limestone content. A recently developed methodology allowed continuous monitoring of E-modulus from the time of casting. The methodology is a variant of classic resonant frequency methods, which are based on determination of the first resonant frequency of a composite beam containing the material. The hydration kinetics — and thus the rate of formation of solids — was determined using chemical shrinkage measurements. For the cements studied similar relationships between E-modulus and chemical shrinkage were observed for comparable water-to-binder ratio. For commercial cements it is suggested to model the E-modulus evolution based on the amount of binder reacted, instead of the degree of hydration.

  7. About influence of some superplasticizers on hydration and the structure of hardened cement paste

    Koryanova Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current construction can not be imagined without the use of high-quality mortars and concretes obtained by using high-tech and workable mixtures with lower water content. Obtaining such mixtures in current conditions is impossible without the use of superplasticizers. The use of superplasticizers in concrete technology requires an answer to the question of the influence of superplasticizers on the deformation-strength properties of cement stone. There is a well-known dependence “composition-technology-structure-properties”, from which it follows that the strength and deformation properties of cement stone directly depend on the hydration of cement stone in the early stages and structure formation. The influence of some types of superplasticizers on the hydration and structure of cement stone, namely, total, open and conditionally-closed porosity, total contraction, autogenous shrinkage, contraction porosity and hydration heat is considered in the article.

  8. Cement-Based Renders Manufactured with Phase-Change Materials: Applications and Feasibility

    Luigi Coppola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the evaluation of the rheological and mechanical performances of cement-based renders manufactured with phase-change materials (PCM in form of microencapsulated paraffin for innovative and ecofriendly residential buildings. Specifically, cement-based renders were manufactured by incorporating different amount of paraffin microcapsules—ranging from 5% to 20% by weight with respect to binder. Specific mass, entrained or entrapped air, and setting time were evaluated on fresh mortars. Compressive strength was measured over time to evaluate the effect of the PCM addition on the hydration kinetics of cement. Drying shrinkage was also evaluated. Experimental results confirmed that the compressive strength decreases as the amount of PCM increases. Furthermore, the higher the PCM content, the higher the drying shrinkage. The results confirm the possibility of manufacturing cement-based renders containing up to 20% by weight of PCM microcapsules with respect to binder.

  9. Performance of Periwinkle Shell Ash Blended Cement Concrete Exposed to Magnesium Sulphate

    Umoh A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the compressive strength of periwinkle shell ash (PSA blended cement concrete in magnesium sulphate medium. Specimens were prepared from designed characteristics strength of 25 MPa. The cement replacement with PSA ranged between 0 and 40% by volume. A total of 180 cube specimens were cast and cured in water. At 28 days curing, 45 specimens each were transferred into magnesium sulphate of 1%, 3%, and 5% solution, while others were continuously cured in water and tested at 62, 92, and 152 days. The results revealed a higher loss in compressive strength with the control mix, and that it increases with increased in MgSO4 concentration and exposure period, whereas, the attack on the PSA blended cement concrete was less and the least value recorded by 10% PSA content. Therefore, the study concluded that the optimum percentage replacement of cement with 10% PSA could mitigate magnesium sulphate attack.

  10. Compound soil-tyre chips modified by cement as a road construction material

    Panu Promputthangkoon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to overcome the two problems of low-quality soil and a growing number of discarded tyres bymixing low-CBR soil with recycled tyre chips. The compound soil-tyre chips was then stabilised by Portland cement with theaim of using them as a new material in road construction in order to reduce the occurrence of shrinkage cracks. To achievethe purposes of this research three standard geotechnical testing programmes were employed: (1 modified compaction tests,(2 California Bearing Ratio tests (CBR, and (3 unconfined compression tests. The modified compaction test results provedthat for the mixtures having very low tyre chips and cement content, the behaviour is very complex. It was also observed thatthe greater the percentage of rubber added the lower the global density. However, this is predictable as the specific gravityof the rubber is much lower than that of the soil. For the relationship between the optimum moisture content (OMC and thecement content, it was observed that there is no clear pattern.For the specimens having no cement added, the CBR for unsoaked specimens was observed to be greater than that forsoaked specimens. However, when the cement was introduced the CBR test showed that the resistance to penetration for thesoaked specimens was significantly greater, indicating the effects of cement added on the strength. In addition, it was foundthat the CBR values for both soaked and unsoaked specimens gradually increased with the increase of cement content.Lastly, the unconfined compressive strength progressively increased with the increased percentage of cement.

  11. The cement recycling of the earthquake disaster debris by Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd

    Kataoka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    A tremendous quantity of earthquake disaster debris and tsunami sediment was resulted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd., a Sumitomo Osaka Cement subsidiary, was the first cement industry company to receive and process such waste materials outside of their usual prefecture area, while the company is performing their treatment and recycling services locally in Hachinohe City and Aomori Prefecture. This report provides an explanation about the recycling mechanism of waste materials and by-products in cement manufacturing process, and introduces an example of actual achievements for the disaster debris treatment by utilizing the cement recycling technologies at the Hachinohe Cement Plant. (author)

  12. Fixation of calcined waste by bituminization or cementation

    Napravnik, J.; Kyrs, M.; Ditl, P.

    1983-01-01

    The overall concept is given of the combination of calcination with fixation into bitumen, cement etc. The design is shown of a calciner with the capacity of 10 L/h which was tested on real radioactive wastes for 2000 h. The geometrical and operating parameters of the apparatus have been optimized based on a statistical evaluation of the experiments. Wastes containing nitrates are calcined at 300-550 deg. C, yielding oxides. Wastes containing sulphates, carbonates, KMnO 4 , or borates are calcined at 150-330 deg. C, yielding soluble salts. The content of H 3 BO 4 and Na 2 B 4 O 7 and in some cases of sulphates in the calcinate retards hardening of the mixture with cement. Nitrates and detergents also interfere. The effect of the above components on the products mixed with bitumen is much less. Detergents can be decomposed at 200-300 deg. C; organic acids can be reacted with A1 salts to form insoluble substances lowering the leaching rate of Sr and Cs; small amounts of SiO 2 eliminate the effect of borates on cement hardening. The drawbacks of bituminization with bitumen emulsions are the complicated preparation of the emulsion, higher leaching rate of the product and low stability of the emulsion against breaking. The leachability was determined (1-50 days) of different products containing LWR wastes: 33% of concentrated waste in cement of calcination product stabilized with PVA exhibit approx. 8x10 - 3 g/cm 2 per day, 33% of calcine in cement approx. 3x10 - 3 ; 40% concentrate fixed with bitumen emulsion approx. 9x10 - 4 ; 50% calcine stabilized with PVA in bitumen, pilot-plant scale approx. 2x10 - 5 ; the same but on a laboratory scale approx. 1.10 - 5 . (author)

  13. Permeability Characteristics of Compacted and Stabilized Clay with Cement, Peat Ash and Silica Sand

    Seyed Esmaeil Mousavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the influence of stabilization with cement, peat ash, and silica sand on permeability coefficient (kv of compacted clay, using a novel approach to stabilize the clay with peat ash as a supplementary material of cement in the compacted and stabilized soil. In order to assess the mentioned influence, test specimens of both untreated and stabilized soil have been tested in the laboratory so that their permeability could be evaluated. Falling head and one dimensional consolidation tests of laboratory permeability were performed on the clay specimens and the chemical compositions of the materials as well as microstructure of the stabilized soil with 18% cement, 2% peat ash, and 5% silica sand were investigated, using X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy respectively. Results show that for soil stabilization with up to 8% cement content (of the dry weight of the soil, the average value of coefficient of permeability (kv is very close to that of untreated soil, whereas the kv value decreases drastically for 18% cement under identical void ratio conditions. It is further revealed that addition of 18% cement, 2% peat ash, and 5% silica sand had decreased the coefficient of permeability by almost 2.2 folds after 24 h, while about 1.7 folds increase was observed in coefficient of permeability once 13.5% of cement, 1.5% of peat ash, and 20% of silica sand were added. The partial replacement of cement with the 2% peat ash can reduce the consumption of cement for soil stabilization.

  14. Use sulfoferritic cements in construction

    Samchenko, Svetlana V.; Zorin, Dmitriy A.

    2018-03-01

    Currently, high-rise construction has received increasing attention around the world. In the big cities under construction is less space and one solution is the high-rise construction. However, high-rise buildings use special requirements, such as strength, thermal insulation, wind load and others. When concrete is exposed to continuous loads by wind or to mechanical loads, it undergoes abrasion. Resistance to this process depends on the characteristics of materials that the concrete and finishing seams are made of. Research on increasing impact and abrasion resistance of calcium sulfoferrite-based cement stone from the perspective of formation of cement stone structure will be instrumental in developing durable materials for application in high-rise construction.

  15. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV), coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive a...

  16. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU; B.SAI DOONDI; N. M .V .VAMSI KRISHNA; K.PRASANTHI

    2013-01-01

    India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green hous...

  17. Stabilization and solidification of Pb in cement matrices

    Gollmann, Maria A.C.; Silva, Marcia M. da; Santos, Joao H. Z. dos; Masuero, Angela B.

    2010-01-01

    Pb was incorporated to a series of cement matrices, which were submitted to different cure time and pH. Pb content leached to aqueous solution was monitored by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The block resistance was evaluated by unconfined compressive strength at 7 and 28 ages. Data are discussed in terms of metal mobility along the cement block monitored by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. The Pb incorporated matrices have shown that a long cure time is more suitable for avoiding metal leaching. For a longer cure period the action of the metal is higher and there is a decreasing in the compressive strength. The XRF analyses show that there is a lower Ca concentration in the matrix in which Pb was added. (author)

  18. Optimizing cementious content in concrete mixtures for required performance.

    2012-01-01

    "This research investigated the effects of changing the cementitious content required at a given water-to-cement ratio (w/c) on workability, strength, and durability of a concrete mixture. : An experimental program was conducted in which 64 concrete ...

  19. Use of alternative fuels in cement manufacture. Effect on clinker and cement characteristics and properties

    Puertas, F.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares industrial clinker and cement produced using conventional and alternative fuels (animal meal, tyres or a mixture of the two. The results show no relevant differences in terms of mineralogical composition between the clinker manufactured with alternative fuels and the product obtained using conventional fuel. Clinker produced with alternative fuels at any one factory have a very similar or even lower content in heavy metals than the product manufactured with conventional fuel in the same plant (with the sole exception of Zn when the alternative fuel used is shredded tyres. Mineralogical and morphological analyses reveal no significant differences between the two types of products that can be attributed to the type of fuel used in their manufacture. All six types of cement studied are compliant with the existing legislation as regards both physical and chemical properties. Cement compressive strength is found to be to legal standards regardless of the type of fuel used. Finally, the rheological properties of the cement paste are observed to be unaffected by the type of fuel.

    Se han estudiado clínkeres y cementos obtenidos en procesos industriales que han utilizado combustibles convencionales y combustibles alternativos (harinas cárnicas, neumáticos usados y mezclas de ambos. Los resultados obtenidos han demostrado que los clínkeres fabricados con los combustibles alternativos no presentan diferencias significativas en la composición mineralógica respecto a los obtenidos con combustibles convencionales. Los contenidos de metales pesados en los clínkeres procedentes de la misma fábrica (a excepción de los contenidos en Zn en aquéllos que utilizan neumáticos son muy similares o incluso inferiores a los fabricados con combustibles convencionales. Los análisis mineralógico y morfológico de los clínkeres no evidencian diferencias asignables al tipo de combustible utilizado. Todos los cementos estudiados cumplen

  20. Modernization of Byuzmeyinsky Cement Plant

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective of saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emission, investigations and discussions were given on a modernization project for Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory, the only cement factory in Turkmenistan. Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory uses the wet process which consumes a large amount of energy, is inferior in production efficiency and quality, and discharging a great amount of greenhouse effect gas. The present project will execute change of the raw material crusher into a vertical roll mill for one of the four wet kilns, and change of the facilities for raw material powder mixing and storing and clinker manufacturing into dry-type facilities using the NSP system. As a result of the discussions, the energy saving effect would be 86,321 tons of crude oil equivalent annually, and the greenhouse gas emission reducing effect would be 224,467 t-CO2 annually. The total fund amount required for the project is estimated to be 90,211,000 dollars. With regard to the profitability, the internal financial profit rate would be 9.71% after tax, and the ROE would be 18.62%, whereas the project is considered feasible. (NEDO)

  1. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  2. Use of Incineration Solid Waste Bottom Ash as Cement Mixture in Cement Production

    Jun, N. H.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Jin, T. S.; Kadir, A. A.; Tugui, C. A.; Sandu, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Incineration solid waste bottom ash was use to examine the suitability as a substitution in cement production. This study enveloped an innovative technology option for designing new equivalent cement that contains incineration solid waste bottom ash. The compressive strength of the samples was determined at 7, 14, 28 and 90 days. The result was compared to control cement with cement mixture containing incineration waste bottom ash where the result proved that bottom ash cement mixture able achieve its equivalent performance compared to control cement which meeting the requirement of the standards according to EN 196-1. The pozzolanic activity index of bottom ash cement mixture reached 0.92 at 28 days and 0.95 at 90 and this values can be concluded as a pozzolanic material with positive pozzolanic activity. Calcium hydroxide in Portland cement decreasing with the increasing replacement of bottom ash where the reaction occur between Ca(OH)2 and active SiO2.

  3. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    Varas, M.J.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-01-01

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements

  4. Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials

    Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Haecker, C.J.; Jensen, O.M.

    1999-10-01

    The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary porosity percolation, diffusivity, chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, internal relative humidity evolution, and interfacial transition zone microstructure. The effects of flocculation and dispersion of the cement particles in the starting microstructures on resultant properties are also briefly evaluated. The computer simulations are conducted using two cement particle size distributions that bound those commonly in use today and three different water-to-cement ratios: 0.5, 0.3, and 0.246. For lower water-to-cement ratio systems, the use of coarser cements may offer equivalent or superior performance, as well as reducing production costs for the manufacturer.

  5. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing

  6. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr_3Al_2O_6 and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  7. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  8. Chemistry of cements for nuclear applications

    Barrett, P.; Glasser, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    In recent times the nuclear industry has thrown up challenges which cannot be met by the application of conventional civil and materials engineering knowledge. The contributions in this volume investigate all aspects of cement performance. The scope of the papers demonstrates the current balance of activities which have as their objective the elucidation of kinetics and immobilization, determining material interactions and of assessing future performance. The papers reflect the varied goals of the sponsors who include national governments, the Commission of the European Communities and the nuclear industries. In six parts attention is paid to the durability of cement and concrete in repository environment; interactions between cement, waste components and ground water; properties and performance of cement materials; leach behavior and mechanisms, diffusional properties of cement and concrete, including porosity-permeability relationships; and thermodynamics of cementitious systems and modelling of cement performance

  9. Cement/bentonite interaction. Results from 16 month laboratory tests

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    The work concerns possible bentonite clay mineral alteration in constructions with bentonite in close contact with cement, and the effect of such changes on bentonite buffer properties. The investigation comprises a 16 months laboratory test series with hydrothermal cell tests, percolation tests and diffusion tests. MX-80 Wyoming bentonite was used in all tests. Two types of artificial cement pore water solutions were used in the percolation and diffusion tests. The swelling pressure and the hydraulic conductivity were measured continuously in the percolation tests. After termination, the clay was analyzed with respect to changes in element distribution, mineralogy and shear strength. The water solutions were analyzed with respect to pH, cations and major anions. The results concerning chemical and mineralogical changes are in summary: Ion exchange in the montmorillonite until equilibrium with cement pore-water ions was reached; Increase in cation exchange capacity; Dissolution of original cristobalite; Increase in quartz content; Minor increase in illite content; Minor formation of chlorite; Formation of CSH(I); Wash away of CSH-gel into surrounding water. A large decrease in swelling pressure and a moderate increase in hydraulic conductivity were recorded in the samples percolated by SULFACEM pore-water solution. The mineralogical alterations only concerned a minor part of the total bentonite mass and the changes in physical properties were therefore most likely due to the replacement of the original charge balancing cation by cement pore-water cations. Comparisons between the current test result and results from 4 month tests indicate that the rates of illite and chlorite formation were reduced during the tests. The presence of zeolites in the clay could not be ensured. However, the discovery of CSH material is important since CSH is expected to precede the formation of zeolites 5 refs, 48 figs, 11 tabs

  10. Radiological impact of cement, concrete and admixtures in Spain

    Chinchon-Paya, S.; Piedecausa, B.; Hurtado, S.; Sanjuan, M.A.; Chinchon, S.

    2011-01-01

    It has been analyzed samples of portland cement (PC) with and without admixtures, samples of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) with different content of Al 2 O 3 and specimens of concrete made with PC and CAC using High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry. The activity concentration index (I) is much less than 0.5 mSv y -1 for all the concrete specimens according to the Radiation protection document 112 of the European Commission. The PC without admixtures (CEM I 52,5 R) and the PC with addition of limestone (CEM II/BL 32,5 N) also have an I value much lower than 0.5 and the PC with the addition of fly ash and blast furnace slag (CEM IV/B (V) 32,5 N and III/A 42.5 N/SR) have an I value close to 0.6. The I value of the CAC used in the manufacture of structural precast concrete is of the order of 1 mSv y -1 . Some of the CAC used in refractory concrete reaches a value close to 2 mSv y -1 . - Highlights: → The activity values (I) of spanish portland cement and admixtures studied are similar to those described by other authors. → For the first time in scientific publications we have shown results of several calcium aluminate cements (CAC). → CAC used in structural concrete has an approximate I value = 1 (similar to blast furnace slag and fly ash). → One type of CAC with Al 2 O 3 content of 51% used in refractory concretes has a value of I = 2.

  11. Modifications induced by adding natural zeolitic pozzolans to cement paste

    Blanco-Varela, M. T.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic pozzolans owe their pozzolanic activity chiefly to the presence of vitreous or zeolitic material rich in SiO2, and Al20y compounds that react with the portlandite produced during cement hydration to generate amorphous gels with cementitious properties. The present study analyzes the modifications taking place in the composition, structure and micro structure of the hydra ted cement paste when 20% of the cement by weight is replaced by two finely ground zeolitic rocks from Cuban deposits. Hydrated cement pastes were prepared with a CEM I35 cement, as well as with mixes of the cement and two Cuban zeolitic rocks (20% by weight. After eight months of hydration, the pastes were characterized -mineralogically, chemically and microstructurally- with XRD, FTIR, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR, DTA/TG, back scattered electron microscopy and mercury porosimetry techniques. The replacement of 20% by weight of the cement with two finely ground zeolitic rocks significantly modified the composition, structure, quantity and microstructure of the hydrated cement paste reaction product. The C-S-H gel formed in these pastes differed in quantity, which was larger, and composition from the original cement gel. Moreover, the gel formed in addition-free cement had a higher Ca and a lower Al content and shorter silicate chains than the C-S-H product formed in the pastes made with zeolitic rocks. Finally, the pastes with pozzolan additions had fewer and smaller pores.

    La actividad de las puzolanas de origen volcánico procede fundamentalmente de la presencia de material vitreo o zeolítico rico en SiO2 y Al2Oy que son los que reaccionan con la portlandita producida en la hidratación del cemento generando geles amorfos con propiedades cementantes. El objetivo del presente trabajo es estudiar las modificaciones que produce la sustitución del 20% en peso de cemento por dos

  12. STUDY ON POZZOLANA ACTIVITY OF WHEAT STRAW ASH AS POTENTIAL ADMIXTURE FOR BLENDED CEMENTS

    Ondrej Jankovsky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat straw ash coming from combustion of packed wheat straw was studied as a potential pozzolana active admixture for blended cements. X-Ray fluorescence, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to examine chemical and mineralogical composition, morphology and elemental distribution of a raw untreated ash. Due to high carbon content, the wheat straw ash was thermally treated for 2 hours at 700 °C and analyzed again using the same analytic techniques. Thermal treatment process was monitored using simultaneous thermal analysis and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The pozzolana activity was assessed using Chapelle and Frattini tests. In the next step, wheat straw ash was used for preparation of blended cement pastes. The content of ash in the blends was 10, 15, and 20% by mass. For the hardened pastes, basic physical properties, mechanical parameters, and pore size distribution were measured. For fresh past mixes, workability was tested. Moreover, leachability of chlorides, nitrates, sulfates and alkalis from paste samples was studied. The experimentally obtained data pointed to the high pozzolana activity of wheat straw ash and sufficient mechanical properties of cement pastes with the ash content up to 20 mass% of cement. In summary, the analyzed waste product from biomass combustion was found to be applicable as a part of cement-based blended binder providing economic and environmental benefits for concrete industry.

  13. Gamma Spectrometry Analysis of Different Brands of Cement used in Nigeria

    Olarinoye, I.O.; Baba-Kutigi, A.N.; Sharifat, I.; Kolo, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    The natural radionuclide content of common brands of cement consumed in Nigeria is presented in this work. Samples of 9 brands of grey ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and 5 brands of white cement were collected and analyzed for their radiological content by gamma spectrometry using a 7.6 x 7.6 NaI(TI) detector. The total average content of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 k for all the cement brand samples were 38.1, 27.9 and 301.1 Bq/kg respectively and are lower when compared to the world average (50, 50 and 500 Bq/Kg) in building materials. The evaluated radium equivalent activities, external and internal indices were lower than the recommended safe limit and are comparable with result from similar studies concluded in other countries. The evaluation mean gonadal dose of equivalents of two cement brand samples were found to be higher than the world average in soil while others are less than the world average in soil.

  14. Effect of Selected Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials on the Cement Clinker Quality

    Strigáč Július

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of the effects of alternative fuels and raw materials on the cement clinker quality. The clinker quality was expressed by the content of two principal minerals alite C3S and belite C2S. The additions of alternative fuels ashes and raw materials, in principle, always increased the belite content and conversely reduced the amount of alite. The alternative fuels with high ash content were used such as the meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge and the used alternative raw materials were metallurgical slags - granulated blastfurnace slag, air cooled blastfurnace slag and demetallized steel slag, fluidized bed combustion fly ash and waste glass. Meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge were evaluated as moderately suitable alternative fuels which can be added in the amounts of 2.8 wt. % addition of meat-bone meals ash, 3.64 wt. % addition of sewage sludge ash and 3.8 wt. % addition of paper sludge ash to the cement raw mixture. Demetallised steel slag is suitable for production of special sulphate resistant cement clinker for CEM I –SR cement with addition up to 5 wt. %. Granulated blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4 wt. %. Air cooled blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4.2 wt. %. Waste glass is not very appropriate alternative raw material with addition only 1.16 wt. %. Fluidized bed combustion fly ash appears not to be equally appropriate alternative raw material for cement clinker burning with less potential utilization in the cement industry and with addition 3.41 wt. %, which forms undesired anhydrite CaSO4 in the cement clinker.

  15. Effect of W/C Ratio on Durability and Porosity in Cement Mortar with Constant Cement Amount

    Yun-Yong Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water is often added to concrete placing for easy workability and finishability in construction site. The additional mixing water can help easy mixing and workability but causes increased porosity, which yields degradation of durability and structural performances. In this paper, cement mortar samples with 0.45 of W/C (water to cement ratio are prepared for control case and durability performances are evaluated with additional water from 0.45 to 0.60 of W/C. Several durability tests including strength, chloride diffusion, air permeability, saturation, and moisture diffusion are performed, and they are analyzed with changed porosity. The changing ratios and patterns of durability performance are evaluated considering pore size distribution, total porosity, and additional water content.

  16. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    Keeling, Parnell; Lennon, Alexander B; Kenny, Patrick J; O'Reilly, Peter; Prendergast, Patrick J

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct. Primary cement mantles were formed by cementing a polished stem into sections of tubular steel. If in the test group, the mantle underwent conditioning in saline to simulate ageing and was subject to a fatigue of 1 million cycles. If in the control group no such conditioning or fatigue was carried out. The cement-in-cement procedure was then undertaken. Both groups underwent a fatigue of 1 million cycles subsequent to the revision procedure. Application of a Mann-Whitney test on the recorded subsidence (means: 0.51, 0.46, n=10+10, P=0.496) and inducible displacement (means: 0.38, 0.36, P=0.96) revealed that there was no statistical difference between the groups. This study represents further biomechanical investigation of the mechanical behaviour of cement-in-cement revision constructs. Results suggest that pre-revision fatigue and ageing of the cement may not be deleterious to the mechanical performance of the revision construct. Thus, this study provides biomechanical evidence to back-up recent successes with this useful revision technique. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    Sobolev, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecologi...

  18. Pulmonary Cement Embolism following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    Ümran Toru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimal invasive procedure that is applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. During vertebroplasty, the leakage of bone cement outside the vertebral body leads to pulmonary cement embolism, which is a serious complication of this procedure. Here we report a 48-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea after percutaneous vertebroplasty and diagnosed as pulmonary cement embolism.

  19. classical optimization of bagasse ash content in cement-stabilized

    Optimization of construction materials with laboratory data is a very possible way of minimizing waste of resources (materials and cost). There had been several successful attempts of optimization of construction materials. However, optimization in soil stabilization for road-work has been very rare because of its complexities ...

  20. The Optimization of Calcareous Fly Ash-Added Cement Containing Grinding Aids and Strength-Improving Additives

    Gökhan Kaplan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an experimental study which explores the physical, mechanical, and economic factors involved in the production of type CEM II A-B/W cement. In this context, 4 cement additives were used in two different dosages (200 and 800 g/t. Class C fly ash was used for composite cement production at ratios of 5%, 20%, and 35%. It was shown that Blaine fineness increases with the increasing fly ash content. The use of fly ash at ratios of 5% and 20% was not found to have any unfavorable effects on the compressive strength at the early days. It is found that the use of additive for improving the early-age strength is preferable when fly ash is used. It is possible to produce Class 52.5 N cement using additives to improve early strength and 20% fly ash. Loss in strength was observed in cement mortars produced using glycol-based grinding aid. Increasing the dosage of chemical additive also led to loss in strength due to nonhomogeneous distribution of hydration products. As a result, grinding fly ash with clinker and the use of cement chemicals contribute to the cement sector in terms of sustainability. It is possible to produce cements with improved mechanical properties especially with the use of 20% fly ash.

  1. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    Ono, F.; Tanaka, S.; Yamawaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reactor or experimental rooms is a matter of problem for safety control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate these tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were studied by combining various experimental methods. From the basic studies on tritium-cement interactions, it has become possible to evaluate tritium uptake by cement or concrete and subsequent tritium release behavior as well as tritium removing methods from them

  2. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  3. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the products' properties. (author)

  4. Use of rubber crumbs in cement concrete

    Longvinenko, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Rubber crumb obtained from worn out tires has been increasingly used over the last 15-20 years, especially in manufacture of asphalt and cement concrete mixtures. This review pays principal attention to application of the rubber crumb to cement concrete mixtures. Use of the rubber crumb in cement concrete is not as successful as in asphalt concrete mixtures, due to incompatibility problems linked to chemical composition and a significant difference in rigidity between the rubber crumb and concrete mixture aggregates. Different methods are proposed and studied to mitigate the adverse influence and increase the beneficial effects of the rubber crumb when added to cement concrete.

  5. Controls on Cementation in a Chalk Reservoir

    Meireles, Leonardo Teixeira Pinto; Hussein, A.; Welch, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we identify different controls on cementation in a chalk reservoir. Biot’s coefficient, a measure of cementation, stiffness and strength in porous rocks, is calculated from logging data (bulk density and sonic Pwave velocity). We show that Biot’s coefficient is correlated...... that some degree of pore filling cementation occurred in Kraka (Alam, 2010). Lack of correlation between Biot’s coefficient and Gamma Ray (GR) indicates that the small amount of clay present is generally located in the pore space, thus not contributing to frame stiffness. While there was no compositional...... control on cementation via clay, we could infer that stratigraphy impacts on the diagenetic process....

  6. Immobilisation of radwaste in cement based matrices

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Pointer, C.; Cowie, J.; Wilding, C.R.; Mattingley, N.J.; Evans, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The solubilities and influence on cement pH are reported for calcium aluminate and aluminosulphate hydrates. The solubility of Ca(OH) 2 is reported to 700 bars. Polymerization of C-S-H is investigated by NMR. Specific interactions of U 6+ and iodine (I - , IO 3 - ) with cement components are described. The impact of radiation on cements and the influence of higher temperature are documented. The role of dissolved Ca and CO 2 in groundwaters as dissolution media for cements are reported. (author)

  7. Integer programming of cement distribution by train

    Indarsih

    2018-01-01

    Cement industry in Central Java distributes cement by train to meet daily demand in Yogyakarta and Central Java area. There are five destination stations. For each destination station, there is a warehouse to load cements. Decision maker of cement industry have a plan to redesign the infrastructure and transportation system. The aim is to determine how many locomotives, train wagons, and containers and how to arrange train schedules with subject to the delivery time. For this purposes, we consider an integer programming to minimize the total of operational cost. Further, we will discuss a case study and the solution the problem can be calculated by LINGO software.

  8. Prediction of hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water using a numerical cement hydration model

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D numerical cement hydration model is used for predicting alkali and hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water. First, this numerical model is calibrated for Dutch cement employing both chemical shrinkage and calorimetric experiments. Secondly, the strength development of some

  9. Evaluation of cement thixotropy for the cement of oil wells in areas ...

    ... economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster. Keywords: cementing; lost circulation; ...

  10. Re-use of drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) sludge: Characterization and technological behaviour of cement mortars with atomized sludge additions

    Husillos Rodriguez, N.; Martinez Ramirez, S.; Blanco Varela, M.T.; Guillem, M.; Puig, J.; Larrotcha, E.; Flores, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to characterize spray-dried DWTP sludge and evaluate its possible use as an addition for the cement industry. It describes the physical, chemical and micro-structural characterization of the sludge as well as the effect of its addition to Portland cements on the hydration, water demand, setting and mechanical strength of standardized mortars. Spray drying DWTP sludge generates a readily handled powdery material whose particle size is similar to those of Portland cement. The atomized sludge contains 12-14% organic matter (mainly fatty acids), while its main mineral constituents are muscovite, quartz, calcite, dolomite and seraphinite (or clinoclor). Its amorphous material content is 35%. The mortars were made with type CEM I Portland cement mixed with 10 to 30% atomized sludge exhibited lower mechanical strength than the control cement and a decline in slump. Setting was also altered in the blended cements with respect to the control.

  11. Geotechnical Properties of Clayey Soil Stabilized with Cement ...

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-31

    Dec 31, 2017 ... ... to investigate the different effects of cement-sawdust ash and cement on a ... Keywords: Cement, Saw dust, strength test subgrade material, highway construction ... characteristics of lateritic soil stabilized with sawdust ash.

  12. Low alkaline cement used in the construction of a gallery in the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory

    Nakayama, Masashi; Sato, Haruo; Sugita, Yutaka; Ito, Seiji; Minamide, Masashi; Kitagawa, Yoshito

    2011-01-01

    In Japan, any high level radioactive waste (HLW) pos is to be constructed at over 300 m depth below surface. Tunnel support is used for safety during the construction and operation, and shotcrete and concrete lining are used as the tunnel support. Concrete is a composite material comprised of aggregate, cement and various admixtures. Low alkaline cement has been developed for the long term stability of the barrier systems whose performance could be negatively affected by highly alkaline conditions arising due to cement used in a repository. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed a low alkaline cement, named as HFSC (Highly Flyash Contained Silicafume Cement), containing over 60wt% of silica-fume (SF) and fly-ash (FA). HFSC was used experimentally as the shotcrete material in construction of part of the 140m deep gallery in the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The objective of this experiment was to assess the performance of HFSC shotcrete in terms of mechanics, workability, durability, and so on. HFSC used in this experiment is composed of 40wt% OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement), 20wt% SF, and 40 wt% FA. This composition was determined based on mechanical testing of various mixes of the above components. Because of the low OPC content, the strength of HFSC tends to be lower than that of OPC. The total length of tunnel using HFSC shotcrete is about 73 m and about 500 m 3 of HESC was used. The workability of HESC shotcrete was confirmed in this experimental construction. (author)

  13. Changes of strength characteristics of pervious concrete due to variations in water to cement ratio

    Kovac, M.; Sicakova, A.

    2017-10-01

    Pervious concrete is considered to be a sustainable pavement material due to high water permeability. The experiment presented in this paper was aimed at study the influence of water to cement ratio on both the compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete. Typically, less water content in concrete mixture leads to less porosity of cement paste and thus it provides desirable mechanical properties. In case of conventional dense concrete, the lower is the water to cement ratio, the higher or better is the strength, density and durability of concrete. This behaviour is not quite clear in case of pervious concrete because of low amount of cement paste present. Results of compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete are discussed in the paper while taking into account values measured after 2 and 28 days of hardening and variations in water to cement ratio. The results showed that changes of water to cement ratio from 0.25 to 0.35 caused only slight differences in strength characteristics, and this applied to both types of tested strength.

  14. Influence of time addition of superplasticizers on the rheological properties of fresh cement pastes

    Aiad, Ismail

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the fluidity and the fluidity loss of fresh cement pastes are affected by the kind and the time of addition of organic admixtures. The influence of the time addition of two chemical admixtures, namely, melamine formaldehyde sulfonate (MFS) and naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonate (NFS), on the rheological properties of ordinary Portland and sulfate-resisting cement pastes through the first 120 min of hydration was investigated. The admixture addition was delayed by 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min. Shear stress and apparent viscosity of the cement pastes were determined at different shear rates (3-146 s -1 ) and hydration times of 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. The concentration of Ca 2+ and the combined water content of the cement pastes were determined after 120 min. Yield stress and plastic viscosity values were also determined by using the Bingham model. The results show that an increase in the addition time of the admixture reduces the shear stress, the yield stress, and the plastic viscosity of the cement pastes at the early ages (15 min) as well as at later early ages (120 min). The optimum delaying time of admixture addition is found to be 10-15 min. This time does not depend on the cement and superplasticizer type

  15. The Influence of Diatomite on the Strength and Microstructure of Portland Cement

    Liu Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the influence of the types and mixing amount of diatomite on the Portland cement, we prepared the cement specimen doped with the calcined first-grade, first-grade and second-grade diatomite ,tested the 3d, 7d, 14d compressive strength, and studied and discussed phase, structure and morphology of diatomite in the binary system by the method of XRD, SEM . Experimental results show that with the addition of diatomite, the strength of cement paste increase; the optimal contents of calcined first-grade ,first-grade and second-grade diatomite in Portland cement are 5%,Compared to the blank group, the strength of specimen can be increased by 54.6%, 15.4% and 10.2%, respectively; At the same time ,the 7d microscopic hydration of different diatomite particles were analyzed through the experiment , and the shell of calcined diatomite particles were better hydrated than that of first-grade and second-grade diatomite particles. The results indicate that the diatomite can improve the strength of cement paste, the hydration of different diatomite particles can influence the growth of cement paste strength.

  16. Lime kiln dust as a potential raw material in portland cement manufacturing

    Miller, M. Michael; Callaghan, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the manufacture of portland cement involves burning in a rotary kiln a finely ground proportional mix of raw materials. The raw material mix provides the required chemical combination of calcium, silicon, aluminum, iron, and small amounts of other ingredients. The majority of calcium is supplied in the form of calcium carbonate usually from limestone. Other sources including waste materials or byproducts from other industries can be used to supply calcium (or lime, CaO), provided they have sufficiently high CaO content, have low magnesia content (less than 5 percent), and are competitive with limestone in terms of cost and adequacy of supply. In the United States, the lime industry produces large amounts of lime kiln dust (LKD), which is collected by dust control systems. This LKD may be a supplemental source of calcium for cement plants, if the lime and cement plants are located near enough to each other to make the arrangement economical.

  17. Rietveld analysis, powder diffraction and cement

    Peterson, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Phase quantification of cement is essential in its industrial use, however many methods are inaccurate and/or time consuming. Powder diffraction is one of the more accurate techniques used for quantitative phase analysis of cement. There has been an increase in the use of Rietveld refinement and powder diffraction for the analysis and phase quantification of cement and its components in recent years. The complex nature of cement components, existence of solid solutions, polymorphic variation of phases and overlapping phase peaks in diffraction patterns makes phase quantification of cements by powder diffraction difficult. The main phase in cement is alite, a solid solution of tricalcium silicate. Tricalcium silicate has been found to exist in seven modifications in three crystal systems, including triclinic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral structures. Hence, phase quantification of cements using Rietveld methods usually involves the simultaneous modelling of several tricalcium silicate structures to fit the complex alite phase. An industry ordinary Portland cement, industry and standard clinker, and a synthetic tricalcium silicate were characterised using neutron, laboratory x-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction. Diffraction patterns were analysed using full-profile Rietveld refinement. This enabled comparison of x-ray, neutron and synchrotron data for phase quantification of the cement and examination of the tricalcium silicate. Excellent Rietveld fits were achieved, however the results showed that the quantitative phase analysis results differed for some phases in the same clinker sample between various data sources. This presentation will give a short introduction about cement components including polymorphism, followed by the presentation of some problems in phase quantification of cements and the role of Rietveld refinement in solving these problems. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  18. Compressive Strength and Physical Properties Behavior of Cement Mortars with addition of Cement Klin Dust

    Auday A Mehatlaf

    2017-01-01

    Cement Klin Dust (CKD) was the waste of almost cement industry factories, so that in this paper utilization of CKD as filler in cement and/or concrete was the main objective. CKD from the Karbala cement factory had been used and analysis to know the chemical composition of the oxides was done. In this paper cement mortars with different weight percentages of CKD (0,5,10,20,30,40) had been prepared. Physical properties such as density and porosity were done in different age curing (3, 7, 28) d...

  19. Effect of Nano-SiO2 on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland Cement

    Liguo Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper systematically studied the modification of cement-based materials by nano-SiO2 particles with an average diameter of about 20 nm. In order to obtain the effect of nano-SiO2 particles on the mechanical properties, hydration, and pore structure of cement-based materials, adding 1%, 3%, and 5% content of nano-SiO2 in cement paste, respectively. The results showed that the reaction of nano-SiO2 particles with Ca(OH2 (crystal powder started within 1 h, and formed C–S–H gel. The reaction speed was faster after aging for three days. The mechanical properties of cement-based materials were improved with the addition of 3% nano-SiO2, and the early strength enhancement of test pieces was obvious. Three-day compressive strength increased 33.2%, and 28-day compressive strength increased 18.5%. The exothermic peak of hydration heat of cement increased significantly after the addition of nano-SiO2. Appearance time of the exothermic peak was advanced and the total heat release increased. Thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC analysis showed that nano-SiO2 promoted the formation of C–S–H gel. The results of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP showed that the total porosity of cement paste with 3% nano-SiO2 was reduced by 5.51% and 5.4% at three days and 28 days, respectively, compared with the pure cement paste. At the same time, the pore structure of cement paste was optimized, and much-detrimental pores and detrimental pores decreased, while less harmful pores and innocuous pores increased.

  20. Effect of Nano-SiO2 on the Hydration and Microstructure of Portland Cement

    Wang, Liguo; Zheng, Dapeng; Zhang, Shupeng; Cui, Hongzhi; Li, Dongxu

    2016-01-01

    This paper systematically studied the modification of cement-based materials by nano-SiO2 particles with an average diameter of about 20 nm. In order to obtain the effect of nano-SiO2 particles on the mechanical properties, hydration, and pore structure of cement-based materials, adding 1%, 3%, and 5% content of nano-SiO2 in cement paste, respectively. The results showed that the reaction of nano-SiO2 particles with Ca(OH)2 (crystal powder) started within 1 h, and formed C–S–H gel. The reaction speed was faster after aging for three days. The mechanical properties of cement-based materials were improved with the addition of 3% nano-SiO2, and the early strength enhancement of test pieces was obvious. Three-day compressive strength increased 33.2%, and 28-day compressive strength increased 18.5%. The exothermic peak of hydration heat of cement increased significantly after the addition of nano-SiO2. Appearance time of the exothermic peak was advanced and the total heat release increased. Thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analysis showed that nano-SiO2 promoted the formation of C–S–H gel. The results of mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) showed that the total porosity of cement paste with 3% nano-SiO2 was reduced by 5.51% and 5.4% at three days and 28 days, respectively, compared with the pure cement paste. At the same time, the pore structure of cement paste was optimized, and much-detrimental pores and detrimental pores decreased, while less harmful pores and innocuous pores increased. PMID:28335369

  1. Analyses of heavy metals in mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement.

    Schembri, Matthew; Peplow, George; Camilleri, Josette

    2010-07-01

    Portland cement is used in the construction industry as a binder in concrete. It is manufactured from chalk, limestone, and clay, which are clinkered at very high temperatures and ground with gypsum to form Portland cement. The raw materials and the manufacturing process can result in the inclusion of heavy metals in Portland cement. Portland cement with a four to one addition of bismuth oxide is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), which is used mainly as a dental material. Heavy metal inclusion can be of concern because MTA is in contact with hard and soft tissues. Measurements of arsenic, lead, and chromium in hydrated gray and white Portland cement, ProRoot MTA, and MTA Angelus were conducted with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry after acid digestion on the hydrated material. The leaching of the metal ions from the solid material in water and simulated body fluid (SBF) was also determined. All cement types showed high relative values of leached chromium compared with arsenic and lead in both the total metal content and leached species. The gray Portland cement showed the highest total amount of metal. The white Portland and both MTAs had lower values for all the leached metal ions. Both MTAs released more arsenic than the amount specified in ISO 9917-1 (2007). Portland cements and MTAs showed evidence of heavy metals in the acid-soluble form as well as leaching in deionized water and SBF. MTA contained levels of arsenic higher than the safe limit specified by the ISO 9917-1 (2007). Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    Romildo Dias Tolêdo Filho

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical properties, physical performance and durability of cement based matrices reinforced with naturally occurring fibres including sisal, coconut, jute, bamboo and wood fibres. These fibres have always been considered promising as reinforcement of cement based matrices because of their availability, low cost and low consumption of energy. In this review, the general properties of the composites are described in relation to fibre content, length, strength and stiffness. A chronological development of sisal fibre reinforced, cement based matrices is reported and experimental data are provided to illustrate the performance of sisal fibre reinforced cement composites. A brief description on the use of these composite materials as building products has been included. The influence of sisal fibres on the development of plastic shrinkage in the pre-hardened state, on tensile, compressive and bending strength in the hardened state of mortar mixes is discussed. Creep and drying shrinkage of the composites and the durability of natural fibres in cement based matrices are of particular interest and are also highlighted. The results show that the composites reinforced with sisal fibres are reliable materials to be used in practice for the production of structural elements to be used in rural and civil construction. This material could be a substitute asbestos-cement composite, which is a serious hazard to human and animal health and is prohibited in industrialized countries. The

  3. Composite cements containing natural pozzolan and granulated blast furnace slag

    Irassar, E. F.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available For reasons of market demand and Portland cement production,the manufacture of cements with two or more separately ground additions to produce customized cements is becoming common practice.When pozzolan or slag content in this type of cements is high, however, the initial strength of the resulting product may be adversely impacted. This problem can be minimized by activating one or both of the replacement materials. The present study analyzes the effect of Portland cement additions such as physically activated natural pozzolan(up to 20% and/or granulated blast furnace slag (up to 35% on mortar flexural and compressive strength. The results show that higher strength is attained in ternary than binary cements. Initially (2 and 7 days, the highest compressive strengths are reached by mortars with up to 13% natural pozzolan and 5% slag, whereas at later ages mortars with larger proportions of additions are found to perform best.Debido a las exigencias del mercado y de la producción de cemento Portland, es cada vez más frecuente la elaboración de cementos con dos o más adiciones a partir de la molienda separada de sus constituyentes, dando origen a la formulación de los cementos a medida.Cuando el contenido de adiciones es alto, la utilización de puzolana y escoria en este tipo de cementos presenta la peculiaridad de disminuir la resistencia inicial del cemento resultante. Sin embargo, si algunas o ambas adiciones se activan, este problema puede minimizarse. En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la incorporación al cemento Portland de puzolana natural (hasta 20% activada físicamente y/o escoria granulada de alto horno (hasta 35% sobre la resistencia a flexión y a compresión de morteros. Los resultados indican que los cementos ternarios presentan un mejor comportamiento resistente que los cementos binarios. Las máximas resistencias a compresión en las primeras edades (2 y 7 díasse alcanzan con hasta 13% de puzolana natural y 5% de

  4. A Study on the Manufacturing Properties of Crack Self-Healing Capsules Using Cement Powder for Addition to Cement Composites

    Choi, Yun-Wang; Oh, Sung-Rok; Choi, Byung-Keol

    2017-01-01

    We fabricated crack self-healing capsules using cement powder for mixing into cement composites and evaluated the properties of the capsule manufacturing process in this study. The manufacture of the self-healing capsules is divided into core production processing of granulating cement in powder form and a coating process for creating a wall on the surfaces of the granulated cement particles. The produced capsules contain unhardened cement and can be mixed directly with the cement composite m...

  5. Analysis of Chemical Composition of Portland Cement in Ghana: A Key to Understand the Behavior of Cement

    Bediako, Mark; Amankwah, Eric Opoku

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Portland cement in concrete or mortar formation is very well influenced by chemical compositions among other factors. Many engineers usually have little information on the chemical compositions of cement in making decisions for the choice of commercially available Portland cement in Ghana. This work analyzed five different brands of Portland cement in Ghana, namely, Ghacem ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland limestone cement (PLC), CSIR-BRRI Pozzomix, Dangote OPC, a...

  6. Strontium doped injectable bone cement for potential drug delivery applications.

    Taha, Ali; Akram, Muhammad; Jawad, Zaidoon; Alshemary, Ammar Z; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2017-11-01

    Microwave assisted wet precipitation method was used to synthesize calcium deficient strontium doped β-tricalcium phosphate (Sr-βTCP) with a chemical formula of Ca 2.96-x Sr x (PO 4 ) 2 . Sr-βTCP was reacted with monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O, MCPM] in presence of water to furnish corresponding Sr containing brushite cement (Sr-Brc). The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Strontium content in the prepared samples was determined by using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The effect of Sr 2+ ions on the structural, mechanical, setting properties and drug release of the cement is reported. Incorporation of Sr 2+ ions improved the injectability, setting time and mechanical properties of the Brc. The release profiles of antibiotics incorporated in Brc and Sr-Brc confirmed that the Sr incorporation into the Brc results in the efficient release of the antibiotics from the cement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel method to produce dry geopolymer cement powder

    H.A. Abdel-Gawwad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer cement is the result of reaction of two materials containing aluminosilicate and concentrated alkaline solution to produce an inorganic polymer binder. The alkali solutions are corrosive and often viscous solutions which are not user friendly, and would be difficult to use for bulk production. This work aims to produce one-mix geopolymer mixed water that could be an alternative to Portland cement by blending with dry activator. Sodium hydroxide (SH was dissolved in water and added to calcium carbonate (CC then dried at 80 °C for 8 h followed by pulverization to a fixed particle size to produce the dry activator consisting of calcium hydroxide (CH, sodium carbonate (SC and pirssonite (P. This increases their commercial availability. The dry activator was blended with granulated blast-furnace slag (GBFS to produce geopolymer cement powder and by addition of water; the geopolymerization process is started. The effect of W/C and SH/CC ratio on the physico-mechanical properties of slag pastes was studied. The results showed that the optimum percent of activator and CC content is 4% SH and 5% CC, by the weight of slag, which give the highest physico-mechanical properties of GBFS. The characterization of the activated slag pastes was carried out using TGA, DTG, IR spectroscopy and SEM techniques.

  8. Polymer-Cement Mortar with Quarry Waste as Sand Replacement

    D. N. Gómez-Balbuena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The activities of carved Quarry extraction generate problems of landscape pollution such is the case of solid waste discharged into open land dumps in central Mexico. This article presents the technological application of this solid waste in a new polymeric material with properties similar to those of a traditional mortar. It is concluded that the polymeric material uses low amounts of cement with respect to the traditional mortar, and it is elaborated with the recycled quarry as they are presented in its granulometry. The polymer used favored a low water/cement ratio (0.3 which did not allow to decrease resistance due to the fine nature of the materials (residues and cement in addition to maintaining the workability of the material. The quarry residue was classified as silt with low plasticity and was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fluorescence to identify 76% of SiO2, which is why it was used as a stone aggregate even though the fines content was approximately 93%. The maximum compression resistance obtained at 28 days were 8 Mpa with the polymer/solid ratios of 0.10, water/solids of 0.30, and quarry/solids of 0.67. Linear equations were analyzed for more representative values with R squared adjustment.

  9. The influence of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Korzen, Migge Sofie Hoffmann; Skibsted, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes effects of cement type and temperature on chloride binding in cement paste, which is an important subject in relation to life-time modelling of reinforced concrete structures. The influence of cement type on chloride binding is investigated by substituting cement with pure...... cement clinker. Both theoretical considerations and experimental data for chloride binding in cement pastes are presented. A physico-chemically based model to describe the influence of temperature on physical binding of chloride is presented. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear...... magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for quantification of the anhydrous and hydrated aluminate and silicate phases in the chloride exposed cement pastes. The 27Al isotropic chemical shift and nuclear quadrupole coupling is reported for a synthetic sample of Friedel's salt, Ca2Al(OH)6Cl×2H2O....

  10. Feasibility of producing nano cement in a traditional cement factory in Iraq

    Sada Abdalkhaliq Hasan Alyasri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the economic feasibility of producing nano cement through the establishment of a production line within an existing cement factory. Creating a nano cement production line within the Alkufa Cement factory in Iraq is selected as a case study. Evaluation measures including internal rate of return (IRR, net present value (NPV and breakeven point (BEP are used to evaluate the possible gain that can be achieved from this option. The results demonstrated a positive NPV. The IRR is found to be 26.8% and BEP is reached within 3 years after the establishment of the line. This indicates that producing nano cement in the existing cement factory is economically feasible and can be more advantageous than the ordinary cement.

  11. Is it cement to be? Downhole cement that uses zeolite additive may offer lightweight alternative

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-05-01

    C2C Zeolite Corporation produces zeolites from a large deposit near Cache Creek, British Columbia, and processes them for use as an additive in downhole cement well casings. Early research indicates that zeolites can significantly improve the way downhole cement is made in the oil industry. Zeolites are made up mostly of silicates of aluminum and calcium. They have a great ability to absorb water, resulting in a lighter and more fluid cement than is currently available. C2C claims that zeolites will reduce cement weight, column pressure and operator costs. The cost benefits of using lighter cement downhole includes easier moving, processing and handling of the mix. Initial research suggests that zeolites might prove to be viable alternatives to other cement lighteners such as silica fumes or flyash. Zeolite-based cement also performed reasonably well in freeze-thaw tests and showed good adhesion and no evidence of shrinkage in downhole tests. 3 figs.

  12. Cements in radioactive waste management. Characterization requirements of cement products for acceptance and quality assurance purposes

    Rahman, A.A.; Glasser, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cementitious materials are used as immobilizing matrices for low (LLW) and medium-level wastes (MLW) and are also components of the construction materials in the secondary barriers and the repositories. This report has concerned itself with a critical assessment of the quality assurance aspects of the immobilization and disposal of MLW and LLW cemented wastes. This report has collated the existing knowledge of the use and potential of cementitious materials in radioactive waste immobilization and highlighted the physico-chemical parameters. Subject areas include an assessment of immobilization objectives and cement as a durable material, waste stream and matrix characterization, quality assurance concepts, nature of cement-based systems, chemistry and modelling of cement hydration, role and effect of blending agents, radwaste-cement interaction, assessment of durability, degradative and radiolytic processes in cements and the behaviour of cement-based matrices and their near-field interactions with the environment and the repository conditions

  13. Radon exhalation of cementitious materials made with coal fly ash: Part 1 - scientific background and testing of the cement and fly ash emanation

    Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Steiner, V.; Metzger, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in measuring radionuclides and radon concentrations in fly ash, cement and other components of building products is due to the concern of health hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The current work focuses on studying the influence of fly ash (FA) on radon-exhalation rate (radon flux) from cementitious materials. The tests were carried out on cement paste specimens with different FA contents. The first part of the paper presents the scientific background and describes the experiments, which we designed for testing the radon emanation of the raw materials used in the preparation of the cement-FA pastes. It is found that despite the higher 226 Ra content in FA (more than 3 times, compared with Portland cement) the radon emanation is significantly lower in FA (7.65% for cement vs. 0.52% only for FA)

  14. Shrinkage Properties of Cement Stabilized Gravel

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Cement stabilized gravel is an attractive material in road construction because its strength prop-erties are accommodating the increasingly higher requirements to the bearing capacity of a base course. However, reflection cracking of cement stabilized gravel is a major concern. In this pa...

  15. Development and design of a cementation process

    Vicente, R.

    1986-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for the immobilization of intermediate level liquid waste in cement is presented. The cementation process adopted a vibration assisted mixing process. The solidified waste is packed in 200 litres drum with barite concrete lining. The waste package is classified as Type A package for transport. (Author) [pt

  16. Development and design of a cementation process

    Vicente, R.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for the immobilization of intermediate-level liquid wastes in cement is presented. The cementation process adopted a vibration assisted mixing process. The solidified waste is packed in 200 litres drum with barite concrete lining. The waste package is classified as Type A package for transport. (Author) [pt

  17. Investigation of a Hardened Cement Paste Grout

    Esteves, Luis Pedro; Sørensen, Eigil Verner

    This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S.......This report documents a series of tests performed on a hardened cement paste grout delivered by the client, Det Norske Veritas A/S....

  18. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  19. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  20. Facial skeletal augmentation using hydroxyapatite cement.

    Shindo, M L; Costantino, P D; Friedman, C D; Chow, L C

    1993-02-01

    This study investigates the use of a new calcium phosphate cement, which sets to solid, microporous hydroxyapatite, for facial bone augmentation. In six dogs, the supraorbital ridges were augmented bilaterally with this hydroxyapatite cement. On one side, the hydroxyapatite cement was placed directly onto the bone within a subperiosteal pocket. On the opposite side, the cement was contained within a collagen membrane tubule and then inserted into a subperiosteal pocket. The use of collagen tubules facilitated easy, precise placement of the cement. All implants maintained their original augmented height throughout the duration of the study. They were well tolerated without extrusion or migration, and there was no significant sustained inflammatory response. Histologic studies, performed at 3, 6, and 9 months revealed that when the cement was placed directly onto bone, progressive replacement of the implant by bone (osseointegration of the hydroxyapatite with the underlying bone) without a loss of volume was observed. In contrast, when the cement-collagen tubule combination was inserted, primarily a fibrous union was noted. Despite such fibrous union, the hydroxyapatite-collagen implant solidly bonded to the underlying bone, and no implant resorption was observed. Hydroxyapatite cement can be used successfully for the experimental augmentation of the craniofacial skeleton and may be applicable for such uses in humans.

  1. Elaborating the History of Our Cementing Societies

    Cao, Zhi; Shen, Lei; Løvik, Amund N.

    2017-01-01

    Modern cities and societies are built fundamentally based on cement and concrete. The global cement production has risen sharply in the past decades due largely to urbanization and construction. Here we deployed a top-down dynamic material flow analysis (MFA) model to quantify the historical deve...

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  3. Contact dermatitis in cement workers in Isfahan

    Iraji Fariba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to recent industrialization and inadequately protected workers or in other words poor supervision on constructive workers habits in our large city of Isfahan cement contact dermatitis is relatively high especially among cement factory workers and constructive personnel. PURPOSES: To investigate the prevalence rate of cement contact dermatitis in cement factory workers in Isfahan. METHODS: A case-control clinical study was carried out by randomly selecing 150 factory workders and 150 official clerks in a cement factory in Isfahan in 2001. After a complete physical examination, data was recorded in observational checklists. FINDINGS: The percentages of contact dermatitis prevalences in the first and the second groups were 22% and 5.3% respectively. About 60% of cement workers with contact dermatitis were between 30-40 years of age. There was a direct relationship with age in both groups of the workers. In the high-exposure group, the hand eczema along was 70% but in the other group the percentage of involvement was the same in exposed and unexposed anatomical areas. CONCLUSIONS: There was a direct relationship between occurrence and the severity of involvement and duration of contact in the first group. Cent percent of cement workers had contact dermatitis after 10 or less years, but the percentage among the other group was 35%. LIMITATION: Irritant contact dermatitis to cement has not been detected.

  4. Murine osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation on strontium releasing hydroxyapatite forming cements

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun, E-mail: bol11@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Parekh, Shrey, E-mail: smp116@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds and self-setting cements containing Sr{sup 2+} ions incorporated are particularly of interest in bone regeneration. To date, the approach widely used to incorporate Sr{sup 2+} ions into HA cements has been the addition of Sr{sup 2+} containing salts, such as SrCO{sub 3}, SrCl{sub 2} ∙ 6H{sub 2}O, or SrHPO{sub 4}. However, this approach is dependent upon the relative solubility of Sr{sup 2+} containing salts with respect to calcium phosphate (CaP) precursors. Therefore, in the current study Sr{sup 2+} substituted dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was first synthesized and directly reacted with tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) to form Sr{sup 2+} substituted HA forming cements. Rietveld refinement indicated that after one week of aging in phosphate buffered saline, cements prepared with and without Sr{sup 2+} were composed of 75% HA and 25% unreacted TTCP by weight. Cements prepared with 10% Sr{sup 2+} DCPD exhibited increased compressive strengths in comparison to unsubstituted cements. Increased MC3T3-E1 proliferation and differentiation were also observed on the cements prepared with increasing Sr{sup 2+} content. It was concluded that both the scaffold microstructure and Sr{sup 2+} ion release supported osteogenic differentiation. With respect to osteoclastic differentiation, no statistically significant differences in TRAP activity or cell morphology were observed. This suggests that the amount of Sr{sup 2+} released may have been too low to influence osteoclast formation in comparison to unsubstituted cements. The results obtained herein demonstrate that the use of Sr{sup 2+} substituted DCPD precursors rather than individually separate Sr{sup 2+} containing salts may be a useful approach to prepare Sr{sup 2+} containing HA cements. - Highlights: • Sr{sup 2+} containing HA cement was prepared by reacting TTCP with Sr{sup 2+} substituted DCPD. • Cements with increased Sr{sup 2+} supported increased

  5. Evolution of cement based materials in a repository for radioactive waste and their chemical barrier function

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Metz, Volker; Schlieker, Martina; Bohnert, Elke

    2015-01-01

    The use of cementitious materials in nuclear waste management is quite widespread. It covers the solidification of low/intermediate-level liquid as well as solid wastes (e.g. laboratory wastes) and serves as shielding. For both high-level and intermediate-low level activity repositories, cement/concrete likewise plays an important role. It is used as construction material for underground and surface disposals, but more importantly it serves as barrier or sealing material. For the requirements of waste conditioning, special cement mixtures have been developed. These include special mixtures for the solidification of evaporator concentrates, borate binding additives and for spilling solid wastes. In recent years, low-pH cements were strongly discussed especially for repository applications, e.g. (Celine CAU DIT COUMES 2008; Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). Examples for relevant systems are Calcium Silicate Cements (ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based) or Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC). Low-pH pore solutions are achieved by reduction of the portlandite content by partial substitution of OPC by mineral admixtures with high silica content. The blends follow the pozzolanic reaction consuming Ca(OH) 2 . Potential admixtures are silica fume (SF) and fly ashes (FA). In these mixtures, super plasticizers are required, consisting of polycarboxilate or naphthalene formaldehyde as well as various accelerating admixtures (Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). The pH regime of concrete/cement materials may stabilize radionuclides in solution. Newly formed alteration products retain or release radionuclides. An important degradation product of celluloses in cement is iso-saccharin acid. According to Glaus 2004 (Glaus and van Loon 2004), it reacts with radionuclides forming dissolved complexes. Apart from potentially impacting radionuclide solubility limitations, concrete additives, radionuclides or other strong complexants compete for surface sites for sorbing onto cement phases. In

  6. Cement Type Influence on Alkali-Silica Reaction in Concrete with Crushed Gravel Aggregate

    Rutkauskas, A.; Nagrockienė, D.; Skripkiūnas, G.

    2017-10-01

    Alkali-silica reaction is one of the chemical reactions which have a significant influence for durability of concrete. During alkali and silica reaction, silicon located in aggregates of the concrete, reacts with high alkali content. This way in the micropores of concrete is forming hygroscopic gel, which at wet environment, expanding and slowly but strongly destroying concrete structures. The goal of this paper- to determine the influence of cement type on alkali-silica reaction of mortars with crushed gravel. In the study crushed gravel with fraction 4/16 mm was used and four types of cements tested: CEM I 42.5 R; CEM I 42.5 SR; CEM II/A-S 42.5; CEM II/A-V 52.5. This study showed that crushed gravel is low contaminated on reactive particles containing of amorphous silica dioxide. The expansion after 14 days exceed 0.054 %, by RILEM AAR-2 research methodology (testing specimen dimension 40×40×160 mm). Continuing the investigation to 56 days for all specimens occurred alkaline corrosion features: microcracking and the surface plaque of gel. The results showed that the best resistance to alkaline corrosion after 14 days was obtained with cement CEM I 42.5 SR containing ash additive, and after 56 days with cement CEM II/A-V 52.5 containing low alkali content. The highest expansion after 14 and 56 days was obtained with cement CEM I 42.5 R without active mineral additives.

  7. Smart cement modified with iron oxide nanoparticles to enhance the piezoresistive behavior and compressive strength for oil well applications

    Vipulanandan, C; Mohammed, A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, smart cement with a 0.38 water-to-cement ratio was modified with iron oxide nanoparticles (NanoFe 2 O 3 ) to have better sensing properties, so that the behavior can be monitored at various stages of construction and during the service life of wells. A series of experiments evaluated the piezoresistive smart cement behavior with and without NanoFe 2 O 3 in order to identify the most reliable sensing properties that can also be relatively easily monitored. Tests were performed on the smart cement from the time of mixing to a hardened state behavior. When oil well cement (Class H) was modified with 0.1% of conductive filler, the piezoresistive behavior of the hardened smart cement was substantially improved without affecting the setting properties of the cement. During the initial setting the electrical resistivity changed with time based on the amount of NanoFe 2 O 3 used to modify the smart oil well cement. A new quantification concept has been developed to characterize the smart cement curing based on electrical resistivity changes in the first 24 h of curing. Addition of 1% NanoFe 2 O 3 increased the compressive strength of the smart cement by 26% and 40% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. The modulus of elasticity of the smart cement increased with the addition of 1% NanoFe 2 O 3 by 29% and 28% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. A nonlinear curing model was used to predict the changes in electrical resistivity with curing time. The piezoresistivity of smart cement with NanoFe 2 O 3 was over 750 times higher than the unmodified cement depending on the curing time and nanoparticle content. Also the nonlinear stress–strain and stress–change in resistivity relationships predicated the experimental results very well. Effects of curing time and NanoFe 2 O 3 content on the model parameters have been quantified using a nonlinear model. (paper)

  8. Leach characterization of cement encapsulated wastes

    Roy, D.M.; Scheetz, B.E.; Wakeley, L.D.; Barnes, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix encapsulation of defense nuclear waste as well as intermediate-level commercial wastes within a low-temperature cementitious composite were investigated. The cements for this study included both as-received and modified calcium silicate and calcium aluminate cements. Specimens were prepared following conventional formulation techniques designed to produce dense monoliths, followed by curing at 60 0 C. An alternative preparation procedure is contrasted in which the specimens were ''warm'' pressed in a uniaxial press at 150 0 C at 50,000 psi for 0.5 h. Specimens of the waste/cement composites were leached in deionized water following three different procedures which span a wide range of temperatures and solution saturation conditions. Aluminate and compositionally adjusted silicate cements exhibited a better retentivity for Cs and Sr than did the as-received silicate cement. 15 refs

  9. Conditioning of radioactive waste solutions by cementation

    Vejmelka, P.; Rudolph, G.; Kluger, W.; Koester, R.

    1992-02-01

    For the cementation of the low and intermediate level evaporator concentrates resulting from the reprocessing of spent fuel numerous experiments were performed to optimize the waste form composition and to characterize the final waste form. Concerning the cementation process, properties of the waste/cement suspension were investigated. These investigations include the dependence of viscosity, bleeding, setting time and hydration heat from the waste cement slurry composition. For the characterization of the waste forms, the mechanical, thermal and chemical stability were determined. For special cases detailed investigations were performed to determine the activity release from waste packages under defined mechanical and thermal stresses. The investigations of the interaction of the waste forms with aqueous solutions include the determination of the Cs/Sr release, the corrosion resistance and the release of actinides. The Cs/Sr release was determined in dependence of the cement type, additives, setting time and sample size. (orig./DG) [de

  10. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  11. Cement analysis using d + D neutrons

    Womble, Phillip C.; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    In the cement industry, the primary concern is quality control. The earlier the cement industry can institute quality control upon their product, the more significant their savings in labor, energy and material. We are developing a prototype cement analyzer using pulsed neutrons from a d-D electronic neutron generator with the goal of ensuring quality control of cement in an on-line manner. By utilizing a low intensity d-D neutron source and a specially-designed moderator assembly, we are able to produce one of the safest neutron-based systems in the market. Also, this design includes some exciting new methods of data acquisition which may substantially reduce the final installation costs. In our proof-of-principle measurements, we were able to measure the primary components of cement (Al, Si, Ca and Fe) to limits required for the raw materials, the derived mixes and the clinkers utilizing this neutron generator

  12. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped

    Su, Ying-Fang [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung [Department of Stomatology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jaw-Ji, E-mail: jjyang@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • The higher the Si in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • Si20-doped in TCP improved cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. • The Si ion stimulated collagen secreted from cells. • The Si released from substrate can promote osteogenic and angiogenic.

  13. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  14. Cement and concrete options paper

    1999-10-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of concrete are projected to increase from 10.5 million tonnes in 1990 to almost 14 million tonnes in 2010. Over half of this amount will be non-energy related emissions of carbon dioxide resulting from the conversion of limestone to lime. According to this report by industry experts, the industry has an excellent record of improving energy efficiency and there are few easy gains remaining. Nevertheless, improvements in energy efficiency and fuel use, increased use of concrete where it can be shown to result in net reduction of GHG emissions, and partial replacement of cement by supplementary cementitious materials that involve no additional generation of GHGs, could yield an approximate reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of nearly seven million tons in 2010. The industry proposes three measures to realise these benefits: (1) encouraging replacement of fossil fuels by otherwise waste material, (2) encouraging increased use of concrete in constructing houses and roads, and (3) encouraging increased use of supplementary cementing materials. The industry is opposed to carbon or energy taxes that increase the cost of doing business, on the grounds that such taxes would adversely affect the industry's competitive position internationally. tabs

  15. Neutron activation as an online procedure in cement plants; Neutronenaktivierung als Online-Verfahren in Zementwerken

    Anon.

    2012-07-01

    The use of PGNAA (Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) makes it possible to determine the content of the components in bulk flows in cement plants directly online on the conveyor belt. The nature of the excitation and radiation means that the material can be penetrated even with large layer thicknesses on the belt. (orig.)

  16. Partial Replacement of Cement with Bagasse Ash in Hot Mix Asphalt ...

    It is in this light that a laboratory based investigation for the replacement of cement with BA in Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) was conducted. Tests on the suitability of materials used and their performance in terms of known engineering properties was carried out. Bitumen content of 4.5%, 5.5%, 6.5% and 7.5% was adopted.

  17. the suitability of lime rice husk ash cement as construction material

    NIJOTECH

    Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria. ... It was therefore concluded that high percentage contents of silica, ... the Lime Rice Husk Ash cement when used as a construction material would depend ... thermal treatment of the silica in the husk .... test specimen in their moulds were stored in a.

  18. Basic Hand Tools for Bricklaying and Cement Masonry [and] Basic Hand Tools of the Carpenter.

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Intended for student use, this unit discusses and illustrates the tools used in brick and masonry and carpentry. Contents of the brick and masonry section include informative materials on bricklaying tools (brick trowels, joint tools, levels, squares, line and accessories, rules, hammers and chisels, tool kits) and cement masonry tools (tampers,…

  19. Determination of isothermal unsaturated capillary flow in high performance cement mortars by NMR imaging

    Hazrati, K.; Pel, L.; Marchand, J.; Kopinga, K.; Pigeon, M.

    2002-01-01

    The time-dependent liquid water distribution in cement mortar mixtures during water absorption was determined using a proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) technique. The variation of the material water diffusion coefficient with the water content was established on the basis of these

  20. In-place cement stabilized base reconstruction techniques interim report : "construction and two year evaluation".

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of soil cement shrinkage crack mitigation techniques. The contents of this report reflect an evaluation of the construction of the test sections and a two-year evaluation of the test sect...

  1. Use of Cemented Super-Fine Unclassified Tailings Backfill for Control of Subsidence

    Lei Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Known for its advantages in preventing geological and environmental hazards, cemented paste backfill (CPB has become a topic of interest for scientists and mining engineers in recent decades. This paper presents the results of a study on the use of cemented super-fine tailings backfill (CSUTB in an underground mine for control of surface subsidence. An analytical solution is developed based on the available model to calculate the required strength of backfill when in contact with non-cemented tailings (NCT. The effect of solid contents on the rheological properties of CSUTB is investigated. A reasonable mix proportion (RMP of CSUTB is determined for Zhongguan Iron Mine (ZGIM based on laboratory experiments. The validity of RMP in surface subsidence control is verified by a 3D numerical model. The obtained results show that CSUTB requires higher strength when in contact with NCT than when in contact with orebody. Rheological characteristics, e.g., slump, fluidity, and bleeding rate of fresh CSUTB, decrease with higher solids content, of which values with a certain solids content can be determined by quadratic polynomial regression equations. RMP with a cement to tailings (c/t ratio of 1:10 and a solids content of 70% is recommended for ZGIM, as it shows favorable mechanical and rheological abilities. The deformation parameters (curvature, inclination, and horizontal deformation rate obtained from numerical modeling are acceptable and lower than critical values, meaning CSUTB can feasibly be used with RMP in subsidence control.

  2. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  3. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  4. Application of Neutron imaging in pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement: comparison of hydration of H20 with D2O based Portland cements

    Dussenova, D.; Bilheux, H.; Radonjic, M.

    2012-12-01

    storage of the hydrogen atom. In such case, neutron tomography does not give information of the pore structure as neutrons will strongly scatter of H and the data have low count and low statistics or low neutron transmission. Hence, as the comparison and the possible tuning technique, neutron tomography measurements are performed on a Deuterium Oxide (D2O) or heavy water samples the same dimensions, cement composition, cement/liquid content and hydration time as the H2O samples. The advantage of using heavy water is that the total neutron cross-section for Deuterium is approximately four times smaller than Hydrogen's and, thus, permits better neutron transmission, i.e. better statistics. D2O does not alter cement properties or its chemical composition; therefore, the samples are almost identical. Comparison of the measurements using water and heavy water samples and the preparation of the measurement cement samples are discussed in this

  5. Mineralization dynamics of metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements

    Gevaudan, Juan Pablo; Campbell, Kate M.; Kane, Tyler; Shoemaker, Richard K.; Srubar, Wil V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the early-age dynamics of mineral formation in metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements. The effects of silica availability and alkali content on mineral formation were investigated via X-ray diffraction and solid-state 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 2, 7, 14, and 28 days. Silica availability was controlled by using either liquid- (immediate) or solid-based (gradual) sodium silicate supplements. Mineral (zeolitic) and amorphous microstructural characteristics were correlated with observed changes in bulk physical properties, namely shrinkage, density, and porosity. Results demonstrate that, while alkali content controls the mineralization in immediately available silica systems, alkali content controls the silica availability in gradually available silica systems. Immediate silica availability generally leads to a more favorable mineral formation as demonstrated by correlated improvements in bulk physical properties.

  6. Mineralization dynamics of metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements

    Gevaudan, Juan Pablo; Campbell, Kate M.; Kane, Tyler J.; Shoemaker, Richard K.; Srubar, Wil V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the early-age dynamics of mineral formation in metakaolin-based alkali-activated cements. The effects of silica availability and alkali content on mineral formation were investigated via X-ray diffraction and solid-state 29 Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 2, 7, 14, and 28 days. Silica availability was controlled by using either liquid- (immediate) or solid-based (gradual) sodium silicate supplements. Mineral (zeolitic) and amorphous microstructural characteristics were correlated with observed changes in bulk physical properties, namely shrinkage, density, and porosity. Results demonstrate that, while alkali content controls the mineralization in immediately available silica systems, alkali content controls the silica availability in gradually available silica systems. Immediate silica availability generally leads to a more favorable mineral formation as demonstrated by correlated improvements in bulk physical properties.

  7. Effects of fibers on expansive shotcrete mixtures consisting of calcium sulfoaluminate cement, ordinary Portland cement, and calcium sulfate

    H. Yu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The mining industry often uses shotcrete for ground stabilization. However, cracking within shotcrete is commonly observed, which delays production schedules and increases maintenance costs. A possible crack reduction method is using expansive shotcrete mixture consisting of calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA, ordinary Portland cement (OPC, and calcium sulfate (CS to reduce shrinkage. Furthermore, fibers can be added to the mixture to restrain expansion and impede cracking. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of nylon fiber, glass fiber, and steel fiber on an expansive shotcrete mixture that can better resist cracking. In this study, parameters such as density, water absorption, volume of permeable voids, unconfined compressive strength (UCS, splitting tensile strength (STS, and volume change of fiber-added expansive mixtures were determined at different time periods (i.e. the strengths on the 28th day, and the volume changes on the 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th days. The results show that addition of fibers can improve mixture durability, in the form of decreased water absorption and reduced permeable pore space content. Moreover, the expansion of the CSA-OPC-CS mixture was restrained up to 50% by glass fiber, up to 43% by nylon fiber, and up to 28% by steel fiber. The results show that the STS was improved by 57% with glass fiber addition, 43% with steel fiber addition, and 38% with nylon fiber addition. The UCS was also increased by 31% after steel fiber addition, 26% after nylon fiber addition, and 16% after glass fiber addition. These results suggest that fiber additions to the expansive shotcrete mixtures can improve durability and strengths while controlling expansion. Keywords: Shotcrete, Restrained expansion, Fibers, Calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA, Ordinary Portland cement (OPC, Calcium sulfate (CS

  8. Cement-in-cement acetabular revision with a constrained tripolar component.

    Leonidou, Andreas; Pagkalos, Joseph; Luscombe, Jonathan

    2012-02-17

    Dislocation of a total hip replacement (THR) is common following total hip arthroplasty (THA). When nonoperative management fails to maintain reduction, revision surgery is considered. The use of constrained acetabular liners has been extensively described. Complete removal of the old cement mantle during revision THA can be challenging and is associated with significant complications. Cement-in-cement revision is an established technique. However, the available clinical and experimental studies focus on femoral stem revision. The purpose of this study was to present a case of cement-in-cement acetabular revision with a constrained component for recurrent dislocations and to investigate the current best evidence for this technique. This article describes the case of a 74-year-old woman who underwent revision of a Charnley THR for recurrent low-energy dislocations. A tripolar constrained acetabular component was cemented over the primary cement mantle following removal of the original liner by reaming, roughening the surface, and thoroughly irrigating and drying the primary cement. Clinical and radiological results were good, with the Oxford Hip Score improving from 11 preoperatively to 24 at 6 months postoperatively. The good short-term results of this case and the current clinical and biomechanical data encourage the use of the cement-in-cement technique for acetabular revision. Careful irrigation, drying, and roughening of the primary surface are necessary. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    Nair, Sriramya D.; Patzek, Tadeusz; van Oort, Eric

    2017-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  10. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    Konstantin Sobolev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA cement helps to improve its ecological compatibility. HVMA cement technology is based on the intergrinding of portland cement clinker, gypsum, mineral additives, and a special complex admixture. This new method increases the compressive strength of ordinary cement, improves durability of the cement-based materials, and - at the same time - uses inexpensive natural mineral additives or industrial by-products. This improvement leads to a reduction of energy consumption per unit of the cement produced. Higher strength, better durability, reduction of pollution at the clinker production stage, and decrease of landfill area occupied by industrial by-products, all provide ecological advantages for HVMA cement.

  11. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    Nair, Sriramya D.

    2017-10-02

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  12. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  13. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing ...

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housing and modern infrastructure, the aim of this paper is to analyse the Emergy and Ecological Footprint of different cement manufacturing processes for a particular cement plant. There are several mitigation measures that can be incorporated in the cement manufacturing process to reduce the demand for fossil fuels and consequently reduce the CO2 emissions. The mitigation measures considered in this paper were the use of alternative fuels and a more energy efficient kiln process. In order to estimate the sustainability effect of the aforementioned measures, Emergy and Ecological Footprint were calculated for four different scenarios. The results show that Emergy, due to the high input mass of raw material needed for clinker production, stays at about the same level. However, for the Ecological Footprint, the results show that by combining the use of alternative fuels together with a more energy efficient kiln process, the environmental impact of the cement manufacturing process can be lowered. The research paper presents an analysis of the sustainability of cement production , a major contributor to carbon emissions, with respect to using alternative fuels and a more efficient kiln. It show

  14. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device...: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Bone Cement.” [67 FR 46855, July 17, 2002] ...

  15. Effect of Cement Grades on some properties of Sandcrete ...

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of cement grade on some properties of sandcrete. The cement used for this work was Ordinary Portland cement (Dangote brand) of grade 42.5 and 32.5 meeting the requirement of ASTM C150 type 1 cement. Three types of fine aggregate was also used to produce ...

  16. Energy economy and industrial ecology in the Brazilian cement sector

    Tavares, Marina Elisabete Espinho; Schaeffer, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The article discusses the following issues of the Brazilian cement sector: the Brazilian cement main types specification, cement quantities evolution produced in Brazil from 1987 to 1997, energy conservation in the cement production process with additives, energy economy cost estimates from the utilization of additives, and several technologies energy economy cost used in the industrial sector

  17. Effect of colloidal nano-silica on the mechanical and physical behaviour of waste-glass cement mortar

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M.S.J.; Olabi, A.G.; Messeiry, M.; Abadir, E.F.; Hussain, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Glass powder (GP) and nano-silica (CS) were used as a partial cement replacement in cement mortar (CM). → No damaging effect can be detected due to the reaction between GP and CM with particle size up to 75 μm. → Hybrid combination of GP/CS greatly improved mechanical properties and microstructure of CM. -- Abstract: This paper presents a laboratory study of the properties of colloidal nano-silica (CS)/waste glass cement composites. The microstructure, alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and the mechanical properties of cement mortars containing waste glass powder (WG) as a cement replacement with and without CS are investigated and compared with plain mortar. In addition, the hydration of cement compounds was followed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that incorporation of WG has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of cement mortars especially when CS is presented. In addition, the DTA/TGA results and XRD analysis show a reduction in the calcium hydroxide (CH) content in mortars with both WG and a hybrid combination of WG and CS. This confirms the improvement of mechanical properties and the occurrence of the pozzolanic reaction after 28 days of hydration.

  18. Sulfate resistance of nanosilica contained Portland cement mortars

    Batilov, Iani B.

    Soils, sea water and ground water high in sulfates are commonly encountered hostile environments that can attack the structure of concrete via chemical and physical mechanisms which can lead to costly repairs or replacement. Sulfate attack is a slow acting deteriorative phenomenon that can result in cracking, spalling, expansion, increased permeability, paste-to-aggregate bond loss, paste softening, strength loss, and ultimately, progressive failure of concrete. In the presented research study, Portland cement (PC) mortars containing 1.5% to 6.0% nanosilica (nS) cement replacement by weight were tested for sulfate resistance through full submersion in sodium sulfate to simulate external sulfate attack. Mortars with comparable levels of cement replacement were also prepared with microsilica (mS). Three cement types were chosen to explore nS' effectiveness to reduce sulfate expansion, when paired with cements of varying tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and Blaine fineness, and compare it to that of mS. Mortars were also made with combined cement replacement of equal parts nS and mS to identify if they were mutually compatible and beneficial towards sulfate resistance. Besides sulfate attack expansion of mortar bars, the testing program included investigations into transport and microstructure properties via water absorption, sulfate ion permeability, porosimetry, SEM with EDS, laser diffraction, compressive strength, and heat of hydration. Expansion measurements indicated that mS replacement mortars outperformed both powder form nS, and nS/mS combined replacement mixtures. A negative effect of the dry nS powder replacement attributed to agglomeration of its nanoparticles during mixing negated the expected superior filler, paste densification, and pozzolanic activity of the nanomaterial. Agglomerated nS was identified as the root cause behind poor performance of nS in comparison to mS for all cement types, and the control when paired with a low C3A sulfate resistant

  19. Agricultural residues based composites part II: Hydration characteristics of cement- cellulosic fibers composites

    Hekal, E.E.; Kishar, E.A.; Abd-El-Khader, A.H.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Mobarak, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is the utilization of the local agricultural wastes, such as ice straw bagasse, cotton stalks and linen fibers, which cause a big environmental problem. Different cement-fiber composites were prepared using 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 6% fibers by weight of cement. The lengths of the fibers used were 0.5, 0.8, and 1.25 mm. Hydration of the different, composites was carried out at room temperature for various lime intervals namely, 1.3,7 .28 and 90 days. Combined water contents, compressive strength and phase composition of the different prepared composites were examined

  20. Research on preparation and performance of graphite cement-based materials used for fast neutron shielding

    Xu Jun; Kang Qing; Shen Zhiqiang; Wang Zhenggang; Wang Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out to investigate the 14.8 MeV neutron attenuation properties for 3 kinds of cement-graphite composites. In comparison with the void group, the 14.8 MeV neutron attenuation properties of cement-graphite composites raised not clearly in 8 mm thickness, and drop not remarkably in 40 mm thickness; with the increase of graphite content and the thickness, the 14.8 MeV neutron attenuation properties were enhanced clearly. The data may be useful to the radiation shielding design of neutron. (authors)

  1. Research on cement-based grouts for the OECD/NEA international Stripa project

    Onofrei, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with the work that has been carried out on cement-based by AECL research in Canada. The results indicate that it is possible to manufacture low water content high-performance cement-grouts, the performance of which would be acceptable for at least thousands of years and probably for much longer periods. Moreover, these grouts were shown to have negligible hydraulic conductivity, associated with very low porosity and to be highly leach resistant in repository conditions. (TEC). 18 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  2. CSER 00-001 Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for Cementation Operations at the PFP

    DOBBIN, K.D.

    2000-04-18

    Glovebox HA-20MB is located in Room 235B of the 234-5Z Building at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. This enclosure contains mixers, mixer bowls, a crusher unit, an isolated inoperable conveyor unit, plutonium residue feed cans, cemented cans, and a feedwater container. Plutonium residue, not conducive to other forms of stabilization, is prepared for storage and ultimate disposal by cementation. The feed residue material cans can have plutonium contents of only a few grams or up to 200 grams. This evaluation accommodates this wide range of container fissile concentrations.

  3. Operating experience with KRAFTWERK UNION cementation line

    Podmaka, L.; Tomik, L.

    1988-01-01

    A facility is described designed for fixation in a cement matrix of the radioactive concentrate produced by thickening waste water from the Bohunice nuclear power plant. The cementation line output is 0.6 m 3 concentrate/h. The concentrate is put in 200 l drums. The individual operating units, cement management, air conditioning, dosimetric monitoring and the building part are described. The requirements for the operators and the assessment of the quality of raw materials and the product are discussed. (M.D.). 3 figs., 4 refs

  4. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases...... in Portland cement, i.e. tricalcium silicate, dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium alumino ferrite. Details of the The process of solid state synthesis are is described in general including practical advice on equipment and techniques. Finally In addition, some exemplary mix compositions...

  5. Estimation and measurement of porosity change in cement paste

    Lee, Eunyong; Jung, Haeryong; Kwon, Ki-jung; Kim, Do-Gyeum

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to understand the porosity change of cement pastes. The cement pastes were prepared using commercially available Type-I ordinary Portland cement (OPC). As the cement pastes were exposed in water, the porosity of the cement pastes sharply increased; however, the slow decrease of porosity was observed as the dissolution period was extended more than 50 days. As expected, the dissolution reaction was significantly influenced by w/c ratio and the ionic strength of solution. A thermodynamic model was applied to simulate the porosity change of the cement pastes. It was highly influenced by the depth of the cement pastes. There was porosity increase on the surface of the cement pastes due to dissolution of hydration products, such as portlandite, ettringite, and CSH. However, the decrease of porosity was estimated inside the cement pastes due to the precipitation of cement minerals. (author)

  6. Compressive Strength and Physical Properties Behavior of Cement Mortars with addition of Cement Klin Dust

    Auday A Mehatlaf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement Klin Dust (CKD was the waste of almost cement industry factories, so that in this paper utilization of CKD as filler in cement and/or concrete was the main objective. CKD from the Karbala cement factory had been used and analysis to know the chemical composition of the oxides was done. In this paper cement mortars with different weight percentages of CKD (0,5,10,20,30,40 had been prepared. Physical properties such as density and porosity were done in different age curing (3, 7, 28 day. In addition, mechanical properties included the coefficient of thermal conductivity and compressive strength had also observed with different age (3,7, and 28 for all prepared specimens. From the obtained the experimental results and their discussion, it was clear that the addition (20% of CKD had the good results in cement mortars.  

  7. Superplasticizer function and sorption in high performance cement based grouts

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.N.; Roe, L.H.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes laboratory studies undertaken to determine interactions between the main components of high-performance cement-based grout. These interactions were studied with the grouts in both their unset and hardened states with the specific intention of determining the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer; the phase of residence of the superplasticizer in hardened materials; and the permanence of the superplasticizer in hardened grouts. In unset pastes attempts were made to extract superplasticizer by mechanical processes. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was leached from the grouts. A microautoradiographic method was developed to investigate the phases of residence of superplasticizer in hardened grouts and confirm the inferences from the leaching studies. In hardened grout the superplasticizer was located on the hydrated phases formed during the early stages of cement hydration. These include tricalcium aluminate hydrates and tricalcium silicate phases. There is some tendency for the superplasticizer to sorb on ettringite. The presence of superplasticizer did not coincide with the locations of unreacted silica fume and high silica content phases such as C 2 S-H. The observations explain the findings of the studies of unset pastes which also showed that the sorption of superplasticizer is likely to be enhanced with increased mixing water content and, hence, distribution in and exposure to the hydration reaction surfaces in the grout. Superplasticizer can be leached in very small quantities from the hardened grouts. Rapid release takes place from the unsorbed superplasticizer contained in the accessible pore space. Subsequent release likely occurs with dissolution of the cement phases and the exposure of isolated pores to groundwater. (au) (37 refs.)

  8. Characterization and chemical activity of Portland cement and two experimental cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Camilleri, J

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the chemical activity of Portland cement and two other cement types with similar chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate with the aim of developing these cements for further applications in dentistry. The chemical composition of the three cement types namely Portland cement, calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement was evaluated by elemental analysis using energy dispersive analysis with X-ray under the scanning electron microscope and by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to determine the phases. The constituents of the hydration reaction by-products were evaluated by XRD analysis of the set cements at 1, 7, 28 and 56 days and by analysis of the leachate by ion chromatography. The pH of both cements and leachate was determined at different time intervals. Cements admixed with micro-silica were also tested to determine the effect of micro-silica on the reaction by-products. All three cement types were composed of tricalcium silicate as the main constituent phase. The hydration reaction of Portland cement produced calcium hydroxide. However, this was not present in the other cements tested at all ages. Admixed micro-silica had little or no effect on the cements with regard to reaction by-products. The pH of all cements tested was alkaline. Both the experimental calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement had different hydration reactions to that of Portland cement even though calcium silicate was the major constituent element of both cement types. No calcium hydroxide was produced as a by-product to cement hydration. Micro-silica addition to the cement had no effect on the hydration reaction.

  9. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    2011-08-12

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-461 (Third Review)] Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States International...

  10. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  11. Physicochemical characterization of cement kiln dust for potential reuse in acidic wastewater treatment

    Mackie, A.; Boilard, S.; Walsh, M.E.; Lake, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is a fine-grained material produced during the manufacture of cement. Current reuse options are limited and the bulk of CKD not reused in the cement manufacturing process is sent to landfills or stored on-site. Due to the calcium oxide (CaO) content of CKD, it has the potential to be used as a replacement for lime in treating acidic wastewaters such as acid rock drainage (ARD). This paper outlines the results of an examination of the physical and chemical properties of CKD samples collected from six cement plants. The CKD samples were analyzed for major oxides using X-ray diffraction (XRD), available lime, specific surface area, particle size, and morphology using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and compared with a commercial quicklime product. Conductivity, pH, and calcium concentrations of slaked CKD and quicklime solutions were used as indicators of reactivity of the CKD. Slaking of two of the CKD samples with the highest free lime contents (e.g., 34 and 37% free CaO) gave elevated pH values statistically comparable to those of the commercial quicklime sample that was characterized as having 87% available CaO. Acid neutralization trials indicate that even CKD samples with low free lime contents could be effective at neutralizing acidic wastewaters.

  12. Leaf structural traits of tropical woody species resistant to cement dust.

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-08-01

    Cement industries located nearby limestone outcrops in Brazil have contributed to the coating of cement dust over native plant species. However, little is known about the extent of the response of tropical woody plants to such environmental pollutant particularly during the first stages of plant development and establishment. This work focused on the investigation of possible alterations in leaf structural and ultrastructural traits of 5-month-old Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae), 6-month-old Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão (Anacardiaceae), and 9-month-old Trichilia hirta L. (Meliaceae) challenged superficially with cement dust during new leaf development. Leaf surface of plants, the soil or both (leaf plus soil), were treated (or not) for 60 days, under controlled conditions, with cement dust at 2.5 or 5.0 mg cm(-2). After exposure, no significant structural changes were observed in plant leaves. Also, no plant death was recorded by the end of the experiment. There was also some evidence of localized leaf necrosis in G. ulmifolia and T. hirta, leaf curling in M. urundeuva and T. hirta, and bulges formation on epidermal surface of T. hirta, after cement dust contact with plant shoots. All species studied exhibited stomata obliteration while T. hirta, in particular, presented early leaf abscission, changes in cellular relief, and organization and content of midrib cells. No significant ultrastructural alterations were detected under the experimental conditions studied. Indeed, mesophyll cells presented plastids with intact membrane systems. The high plant survival rates, together with mild morphoanatomic traits alterations in leaves, indicate that G. ulmifolia is more resistant to cement dust pollutant, followed by M. urundeuva and T. hirta. Thus, the three plant species are promising for being used to revegetate areas impacted by cement industries activities.

  13. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an ac...

  14. Foamed cement for squeeze cementing low-pressure, highly permeable reservoirs

    Chmllowski, W.; Kondratoff, L.B.

    1992-01-01

    Four different cement squeezing techniques have been used on wells producing from the Keg River formation in the Rainbow Lake area of Alberta, Canada. This paper evaluates 151 cement squeeze treatments performed at 96 wellsites and compares the use of foam cement vs. conventional squeeze treatments and techniques. Discussion includes key aspects, such as candidate selection, slurry design, treatment design, economic evaluation, and operational considerations

  15. Hydration of fly ash cement and microstructure of fly ash cement pastes

    Shiyuan, H.

    1981-01-01

    The strength development and hydration of fly ash cement and the influence of addition of gypsum on those were studied at normal and elevated temperatures. It was found that an addition of a proper amount of gypsum to fly ash cement could accelerate the pozzolanic reaction between CH and fly ash, and as a result, increase the strength of fly ash cement pastes after 28 days.

  16. Nanofunctionalized zirconia and barium sulfate particles as bone cement additives

    Riaz Gillani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Riaz Gillani1, Batur Ercan1, Alex Qiao3, Thomas J Webster1,21Division of Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3G3 Technology Innovations, LLC, Pittsford, NY, USAAbstract: Zirconia (ZrO2 and barium sulfate (BaSO4 particles were introduced into a methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA solution with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA beads during polymerization to develop the following novel bone cements: bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 nanoparticles, bone cements with ZrO2 nanoparticles functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMS, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 nanoparticles, and bone cements with BaSO4 nanoparticles functionalized with TMS. Results demonstrated that in vitro osteoblast (bone-forming cell densities were greater on bone cements containing BaSO4 ceramic particles after four hours compared to control unmodified bone cements. Osteoblast densities were also greater on bone cements containing all of the ceramic particles after 24 hours compared to unmodified bone cements, particularly those bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles. Bone cements containing ceramic particles demonstrated significantly altered mechanical properties; specifically, under tensile loading, plain bone cements and bone cements containing unfunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited brittle failure modes whereas bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited plastic failure modes. Finally, all bone cements containing ceramic particles possessed greater radio-opacity than unmodified bone cements. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated a positive impact on the properties of traditional bone cements for orthopedic applications with the addition of unfunctionalized and TMS functionalized ceramic nanoparticles

  17. Cement stabilization of hazardous and radioactive electroplating sludge

    Langton, C.A.; Pickett, J.B.; Martin, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Cement stabilization was evaluated for treatment of nickel and uranium in electroplating sludge at the Savannah River Site. Waste forms were prepared by pretreating the sludge and the solidifying it in a variety of cement, cement plus flyash, and cement-flyash-slag mixes. The sludge was also treated by one-step filtration-solidification. Leaching results and processing data indicate the cement solidification is an effective method of treating hazardous-low-level electroplating waste

  18. experimental study of cement grout: rheological behavior and sedimentation

    Rosquoët , Frédéric; Alexis , Alain ,; Khelidj , Abdelhafid; Phelipot-Mardelé , Annabelle

    2002-01-01

    International audience; Three basic elements (cement, water and admixture) usually make up injectable cement grouts used for prestressed cable coating, repair and consolidation of masonry, soil grouting, etc... The present study was divided into two parts. First, in order to characterize rheologically fresh cement paste with W/C ratios (water/cement ratio) varying between 0.35 and 1, an experimental study was carried out and has revealed that the cement past behaves like a shear-thinning mate...

  19. Nanoscaled Mechanical Properties of Cement Composites Reinforced with Carbon Nanofibers

    Barbhuiya, Salim; Chow, PengLoy

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on nanoscaled mechanical properties of cement composites. CNFs were added to cement composites at the filler loading of 0.2 wt % (by wt. of cement). Micrographs based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that CNFs are capable of forming strong interfacial bonding with cement matrices. Experimental results using nanoindentation reveal that the addition of CNFs in cement composites increases the proportions of high-density calcium...

  20. Effect of Cement Composition in Lampung on Concrete Strength

    Riyanto, Hery

    2014-01-01

    The strength and durability of concrete depends on the composition of its constituent materials ie fine aggregate, coarse aggregate, cement, water and other additives. The cement composition is about 10% acting as a binder paste material fine and coarse aggregates. In the Lampung market there are several brands of portland cement used by the community to make concrete construction. Although there is a standard of the government of portland cement composition, yet each brand of cement has diff...

  1. Natural radioactivity of raw materials and products of cement manufacturing and of power plant fly ashes

    Gallyas, Miklos

    1984-01-01

    The natural radioactivity was investigated for several building materials used in Hungary, including cement, concrete, glasses, fine ceramic products, insulation materials, and also for some industrial wastes utilized as building material aggregates like slags, fly ashes etc., from their radiation health aspect. The dose commitments of the population from building materials standardized in several countries are presented. The 232 Th, 226 Ra, and 40 K contents of building materials were measured by gamma spectrometry, using NaI/Tl/scintillation detectors. The results were used to qualify cement materials and fly ash aggregates according to their origin in Hungary, from the point of view of their natural radioactivity. It was concluded that the radioactivity level of the majority of Hungarian cements are below the adopted international standards. (R.P.)

  2. CONTRIBUTION TO THE STATISTICAL INTERPRETATION OF RAW MATERIALS FOR THE CEMENT INDUSTRY OF SPLIT

    Miroslav Matijaca

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Up to the last two decades cement was produced from mari called »tupina« (with about 76% CaCOj which is an ideal mixture for cement production. Due to the quantity decrease of this raw material, cement production went on using the mixture of other members of the flysch series: limestones, marls, clay, loess, sandstones a.o. By the analysis of natural materials the CaCO^ content has mostly been proved. Therefore, knowing the correlation of oxides in mineral raw material is of special significance. The article discusses investigation results of the correlation between CaCO-i and other oxides of the raw material (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Influence of citric acid as setting retarder in CPV portland cement pastes and mortars

    Mendes, B.C.; Lopes, M.M.S.; Alvarenga, R.C.S.S.; Fassoni, D.P.; Pedroti, L.G.; Azevedo, A.R.G. de

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to study the availability of using and the influence of citric acid in the properties of pastes and mortars made with Portland cement CPV ARI both in fresh and hardened form. The citric acid dosages were 0, 0.4%, and 0.8% relative to the cement mass. The produced cement pastes were tested to determine normal consistency water and initial and final setting times. Mortars were tested to determine the consistency index, specific gravity, air entrained content in the fresh stage, hardened bulk density, compressive strength at ages 7, 14, and 28 days, and analysis by XRD technique. The results show that citric acid, besides improve the mortar workability, contribute to an increase in mechanical strength in older than 14 days. (author)

  4. Characterisation of Cements From Dominantly Volcanic Raw Materials of the Carpathian Bend Zone

    Halmagy Timea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations regarding the production of cements from local raw materials, such as limestone from Varghis, gypsum from Nucsoara, basaltic scoria from Racosul de Jos, volcanic tuff from Racosul de Sus, diatomite from Filia, and red mud from Oradea. The raw mixtures, based on modified Bogue calculations, contain limestone, gypsum, and one or two of the above-mentioned materials. The cements resulted from clinker grinding in a laboratory gas furnace at 1260-1300 °C, with one hour at the peak temperatures, and were characterised for Blaine specific surface area, specific density, and mineral phases. Physico-mechanical properties, such as water content for normal consistency, setting time, soundness, and compressive strength were also determined. Results show that these cements contain belite, ferrite, calcium sulphoaluminate, anhydrite, and some minor compounds.

  5. NANOFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE (NFC AS A POTENTIAL REINFORCEMENT FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE CEMENT MORTAR COMPOSITES

    Mònica Ardanuy,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC has been evaluated as a potential reinforcement for cement mortar composites. Two types of vegetable fibres with different composition and properties (cellulose content and microfibrillar angle, sisal, and cotton linters pulps, were initially characterised in order to assess their reinforcing capability. Sisal pulp was found to be most suitable as reinforcement for the brittle cementitious matrix. Nanofibrillated cellulose was produced by the application of a high intensity refining process of the sisal pulp. It was found that 6 hours of refining time was required to obtain the desired nanofibrillation of the fibers. Cement mortar composites reinforced with both the sisal fibres and the nanofibrillated cellulose were prepared, and the mechanical properties were determined under flexural tests. The cement mortar composites reinforced with the nanofibrillated cellulose exhibited enhanced flexural properties, but lower values of fracture energy, than the ones reinforced with the conventional sisal fibres.

  6. Use of X-ray diffraction to quantify amorphous supplementary cementitious materials in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements

    Snellings, R.; Salze, A.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    The content of individual amorphous supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements was quantified by the PONKCS [1] X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The analytical precision and accuracy of the method were assessed through comparison to a series of mixes of known phase composition and of increasing complexity. A 2σ precision smaller than 2–3 wt.% and an accuracy better than 2 wt.% were achieved for SCMs in mixes with quartz, anhydrous Portland cement, and hydrated Portland cement. The extent of reaction of SCMs in hydrating binders measured by XRD was 1) internally consistent as confirmed through the standard addition method and 2) showed a linear correlation to the cumulative heat release as measured independently by isothermal conduction calorimetry. The advantages, limitations and applicability of the method are discussed with reference to existing methods that measure the degree of reaction of SCMs in blended cements

  7. Recycle of fired phosphogypsum waste product as a cement replacement and its role on the hydration and strength development of pastes

    Tantawi, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Partially up to fully substituted of treated phosphogypsum x(PG) for natural gypsum on the physico- mechanical as well as kinetic of hydration of ordinary Portland cement has been discussed . The results show that by increasing PG % the water to cement ratio decreased while the initial and final setting times increased So PG acts as a retarder and water reducer . The retardation effect may be attributed to formation of ettringite layer which formed on the surface of C3A of cement pastes . The chemically combined water, free lime content and bulk density increased with curing time and with PG content for all cement pastes up to 90 days due to increasing of the rate of hydration. The compressive strength increased by increasing of PG % due to formation of anhydrite , changes in major oxides content and reduction of impurities . X-Ray Diffraction, SEM and DTA of some samples have been studied

  8. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); León-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  9. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis properties of dental pulp cell on novel injectable tricalcium phosphate cement by silica doped.

    Su, Ying-Fang; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yung; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-09-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material in clinical. In this study, we have doped silica (Si) into β-TCP and enhanced its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of Si-doped with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of the diametral tensile strength, ions released and weight loss of cements was considered after immersion. In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on Si-doped β-TCP cements. The results showed that setting time and injectability of the Si-doped β-TCP cements were decreased as the Si content was increased. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 30.1%, 36.9%, 48.1%, and 55.3% were observed for the cement doping 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% Si into β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the Si-rich cements promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the Si-doped in the cement is more than 20%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by Si released from Si-doped β-TCP cements. The degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of Si gives a strong reason to believe that these Si-doped β-TCP cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Removal of cobalt and nickel from zinc sulphate solutions using activated cementation

    Boyanov B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different parameters (duration, temperature, zinc dust quantity, concentration of activators - copper and antimony on the process of activated cementation of Co and Ni has been studied. We have worked with industrial zinc sulphate solutions. During the process of activated cementation of Co and Ni, copper (involved as CuSO4.5H2O and antimony (involved as Sb2O3 were used as activators. The lowest values of Co content have been obtained at a temperature of 80-85 oC, CCu = 200-300 mg/dm3 and 18 multiple surplus of zinc dust. After adding Cu to the solution, mainly the cementation of Ni is activated, and that of Co is activated to a lower degree. It was found that when GSb : GCo ratio is between 0.5 : 1 and 2 : 1, the solution is purified from Co and Ni to a great degree. After intensive stirring and increasing the duration of the process the cement sediments dissolve reversely. This holds true of Co to a greater extent, as compared to Ni. The results obtained will be used to establish optimal conditions for the carrying out of activated cementation in Zinc Production Plant in KCM SA, Plovdiv.

  11. Evaluation of water behavior between aggregate and cement paste matrix by neutron radiography

    Maruyama, Ippei; Kanematsu, Manabu; Teramoto, Atsushi; Hayano, Hiroyuki; Iikura, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takafumi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a water-supplied area from the saturated lightweight aggregate in high strength concrete. For this objective, phenomena of water transfer between cement paste, whose water to cement ratio is 0.25, and aggregates is visualized by neutron radiography technique. The parameter of this test was the type of aggregates, namely saturated lightweight aggregate, air dried lightweight aggregate, and ordinary sandstone. Additionally the steel is also tested for understanding the 'wall-effect'. Experimental results show that water supply from saturated lightweight aggregate continued upto more than 14days, and the water supplied area of cement paste was ranged within 4mm from the aggregate surface, and air dried lightweight aggregate suck the water from cement paste upto 12 hours and that water was released after 24 hours. Reduction of water content in cement paste, which was seen in both the test with steel and ordinary sandstone, was ranged within 1.2 mm from the surface. (author)

  12. Design and characterization of low-heat and low-alkalinity cements

    Codina, M.; Cau-dit-Coumes, C.; Le Bescop, P.; Verdier, J.; Ollivier, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to formulate and characterize low-alkalinity and low-heat cements which would be compatible with an underground waste repository environment. Several systems comprising Portland cement, a pozzolan (silica fume or fly ash) and blastfurnace slag were compared. All blends were characterized by high amounts of additions, the Portland cement (PC) fraction ranging only from 20 to 60%. Cement hydration was studied using several techniques: X-ray Diffraction, TGA-DTA, calorimetry, pore solution extraction and microscopy. The most important result obtained with some ternary blends was the drop in the pore solution pH by more than one unit as compared with control samples elaborated with commercial cements. The alkali content (∼ 1 to 4 mmol/L) of the interstitial solution was also strongly reduced. The blends exhibited a low-heat output as required. Leaching tests carried out in pure water indicated a very slow decalcification of the samples. Several techniques such as optical microscopy, SEM/BSE, X-ray microanalysis or X-ray diffraction were compared to estimate the degraded thickness

  13. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    Pawel Sikora

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100% to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed.

  14. Incorporation of cement bypass flue dust in fly ash and blast furnace slag-based geopolymer

    Mohamed E. Sultan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This work utilizes cement kiln dust in fly ash and blast furnace slag-based geopolymer. Geopolymer cement was produced using different compositions of ground, granulated blast furnace slag with fly ash and cement bypass flue dust. Crystalline sodium metasilicate pentahydrate was used as an activator at 10, 15 and 20% (by weight of the geopolymer source materials. The geopolymer is formed in the solid state like ordinary Portland cement. The mechanical and chemical properties of the geopolymeric materials were examined. Measuring of mechanical properties by compressive strength of the hardened geopolymer pastes at different curing ages; microstructure was evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM; thermal properties were estimated by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA and derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG. The results indicate that the compressive strength of the geopolymer pastes is increased with higher Na2SiO3.5H2O content. The geopolymeric properties were enhanced by higher pH, which helps in the dissolution of geopolymer source materials during geopolymerization. SEM showed that mixes containing 15 and 20% sodium metasilicate had more compact and dense structures. On the other hand, GGBFS mix (G-20 exhibits more hydration and geopolymeric products during TGA/DTG compared with other mixes which contain FA with/without GGBFS. Keywords: Cement bypass flue dust, Geopolymer, Ground granulated blast furnace, Fly ash

  15. Cementation feasibility of a uranium-thorium based solution by physical and mechanical characterization

    Carpentiero, R.; Luce, A.; Troiani, F.

    2002-01-01

    By reprocessing Elk River nuclear fuel, at the ENEA ITREC Plant (South of Italy), about 3 m 3 of Uranium-Thorium based solution were produced. Previously considered an intermediate product to be further treated to recover U and Th, it is now being considered a waste, due to considerable content of fission products and to phasing out of the Italian nuclear industry. Together with other treatment options, a conditioning process in cement matrix is being evaluated, supported by some chemical, physical and mechanical tests on samples prepared with simulated waste. The main components selected to simulate the real solution were thorium nitrate (at two different concentrations), ferrous nitrate and nitric acid. This solution has been neutralized with sodium carbonate (at two different concentration) and cemented by means of a properly defined formulation. Pozzolanic blend cement, at different water to cement ratio, with and without a silica type additive, has been investigated. Cubic samples were subjected to compression tests and repeated freeze-thaw cycles followed by compression tests. Cylindrical samples were subjected to a leach test (according. to the tn ANSI/ANS-16.1 standard). The obtained results are above the minimum acceptance values established by the Italian authority. The evaluated properties are the first important elements to estimate the long term-instability of conditioned radioactive waste. Meanwhile a preliminary theoretical study has been done to evaluate the gas evolution from the matrix due to radiolysis effect. The reached conclusions encourage the development of further analysis to implement a cementation facility. (Author)

  16. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    Sikora, Pawel; Augustyniak, Adrian; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Rucinska, Teresa; Nawrotek, Pawel; Mijowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide) were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100%) to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed. PMID:28773823

  17. Technical benefit and risk analysis on cement clinkering process with compact internal burning of carbon

    Chen, Hanmin

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates the potential technical benefit and risk for cement clinkering process with compact internal burning of carbon, a laboratory-phase developing technique, from 9 aspects, including the heat consumption of clinkering and exhaust heat utilization, clinker quality, adaptability to alternative fuels, the disposal ability of industrial offal and civil garbage, adaptability to the raw materials and fuels with high content of chlorine, sulphur and alkali, the feasibility of process scale up, the briquetting process of the coal-containing cement raw meal pellet, NO x emission and the capital cost and benefit of conversion project. It is concluded that it will be able to replace the modern precalciner rotary kiln process and to become the main stream technique of cement clinkering process in low carbon economy times. - Highlights: • Compact internal burning of carbon enables cement shaft kiln to run stably. • Compact internal burning of carbon enables cement shaft kiln to scale up. • New process triples energy efficiency with excellent environmental performance. • It will be able to compete with and replace the existing precalciner kiln process. • It will become the mainstream clinkering process in low carbon economy

  18. Effect of soil stabilized by cement on dynamic response of machine foundations

    Al-Wakel Saad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine foundations require significant attention from designers. The main goal of the design of machine foundation is to limit the amplitude displacement and not disturb the people who work near the machine. In some cases, if the design of machine foundations does not satisfy the acceptable value of the dynamic response (such as maximum amplitude of displacement, the stabilization of soil under the machine foundation may be used to decrease the amplitude of displacement. This paper outlines effect of stabilized soil under the foundation by cement on the displacement response of machine foundations. Three-dimensional analyses by using finite element method are carried out to investigate the effect of depth of stabilized layer with different percentage of cement content on the dynamic response of the machine foundation. In addition, the effect of area stabilized by cement material on the dynamic response of machine foundation is investigated. The results shown that, the dynamic response of machine foundations generally decreases with increasing the depth of soil layer stabilized with cement. A significant decrease in the displacement of machine foundations is occurred for the stabilized soil layer with a depth of two times of the width of foundation, and the optimum percentage of cement for stabilizing is 6%.

  19. Basalt waste added to Portland cement

    Thiago Melanda Mendes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement is widely used as a building material and more than 4.3 billion tons were produced in 2014, with increasing environmental impacts by this industry, mainly through CO2 emissions and consumption of non-removable raw materials. Several by-products have been used as raw materials or fuels to reduce environmental impacts. Basaltic waste collected by filters was employed as a mineral mixture to Portland cement and two fractions were tested. The compression strength of mortars was measured after 7 days and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Electron Diffraction Scattering (EDS were carried out on Portland cement paste with the basaltic residue. Gains in compression strength were observed for mixtures containing 2.5 wt.% of basaltic residue. Hydration products observed on surface of basaltic particles show the nucleation effect of mineral mixtures. Clinker substitution by mineral mixtures reduces CO2 emission per ton of Portland cement.

  20. Subgrade stabilization alternatives to lime and cement.

    2010-04-15

    This project involved four distinct research activities, (1) the influence of temperature on lime-stabilized soils, (2) the influence of temperature on cement-stabilized soils (3) temperature modeling of stabilized subgrade and (4) use of calcium chl...

  1. Cement materials for cesium and iodine confinement

    Nicolas, G.; Lequeux, N.; Boch, P.; Prene, S.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: radioactive waste storage, cement materials reacting with radioactive cesium and iodine, chemical barrier formation against radioactive pollution, ceramization, long term stability, XRD, PIXE analysis

  2. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  3. Recycled materials in Portland cement concrete

    2000-06-01

    This report pertains to a comprehensive study involving the use of recycled materials in Portland cement concrete. Three different materials were studied including crushed glass (CG), street sweepings (SS), and recycled concrete (RC). Blast furnace s...

  4. Pore structure in blended cement pastes

    Canut, Mariana Moreira Cavalcanti

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained by...... on assumptions of degree of reaction and product densities gave for plain cement pastes results comparable to MIP data.......Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained...... supplement each other. Cement pastes (w/b=0.4) with and without slag and fly ash cured at two moisture (sealed and saturated) and temperature (20 and 55ºC) conditions were used to investigate the combined impact of SCMs addition and curing on the pore structure of pastes cured up to two years. Also...

  5. High performance concrete with blended cement

    Biswas, P.P.; Saraswati, S.; Basu, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Principal objectives of the proposed project are two folds. Firstly, to develop the HPC mix suitable to NPP structures with blended cement, and secondly to study its durability necessary for desired long-term performance. Three grades of concrete to b considered in the proposed projects are M35, M50 and M60 with two types of blended cements, i.e. Portland slag cement (PSC) and Portland pozzolana cement (PPC). Three types of mineral admixtures - silica fume, fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag will be used. Concrete mixes with OPc and without any mineral admixture will be considered as reference case. Durability study of these mixes will be carried out

  6. Three-point bending fatigue behavior of WC–Co cemented carbides

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Dong; Gao, Xinliang; Tang, Hongwei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanical fatigue tests were conducted on a specific designed jig. ► Three-point bending fatigue behavior of WC–Co cemented carbides was studied. ► Fatigue mechanisms of WC–Co cemented carbides with different WC grain sizes and Co binder contents were revealed. -- Abstract: WC–Co cemented carbides with different WC grain sizes and Co binder contents were sintered and fabricated. The three-point bending specimens with a single edge notch were prepared for tests. In the experiments, the mechanical properties of materials were investigated under static and cyclic loads (20 Hz) in air at room temperature. The fatigue behaviors of the materials under the same applied loading conditions are presented and discussed. Optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the micro-mechanisms of damage during fatigue, and the results were used to correlate with the mechanical fatigue behavior of WC–Co cemented carbides. Experimental results indicated that the fatigue fracture surfaces exhibited more fracture origins and diversification of crack propagation paths than the static strength fracture surfaces. The fatigue fracture typically originates from inhomogeneities or defects such as micropores or aggregates of WC grains near the notch tip. Moreover, due to the diversity and complexity of the fatigue mechanisms, together with the evolution of the crack tip and the ductile deformation zone, the fatigue properties of WC–Co cemented carbides were largely relevant with the combination of transverse rupture strength and fracture toughness, rather than only one of them. Transverse rupture strength dominated the fatigue behavior of carbides with low Co content, whilst the fatigue behavior of carbides with high Co content was determined by fracture toughness.

  7. Evaluation of the Compressive Strength of Cement-Spent Resins Matrix Mixed with Bio char

    Zalina Laili; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Zalina Laili; Mohd Abdul Wahab; Nur Azna Mahmud; Nurfazlina Zainal Abidin

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of compressive strength of cement-spent resins matrix mixed with bio char was investigated. In this study, bio char with different percentage (5 %, 8 %, 11 % 14 % and 18 %) was used as alternative admixture material for cement solidification of spent resins. Some properties of the physical and chemical of spent resins and bio char were also investigated. The performance of cemented spent resins with the addition of bio char was evaluated based on their compressive strength and the water resistance test. The compressive strength was evaluated at three different curing periods of 7, 14 and 28 days, while 4 weeks of immersion in distilled water was chosen for water resistance test. The result indicated that the compressive strength at 7, 14 and 28 days of curing periods were above the minimum criterion for example > 3.45 MPa of acceptable level for cemented waste form. Statistical analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between the compressive strength of the specimen and the percentage of bio char content. Result from the water resistance test showed that only one specimen that contained of 5 % of bio char failed the water resistance test due to the high of spent resins/ bio char ratio. The compressive strength of cement solidified spent resins was found increased after the water resistance test indicating further hydration occurred after immersed in water. The results of this study also suggest that the specimen with 8 %, 11 %, 14 % and 18 % of bio char content were resistance in water and suitable for the leaching study of radionuclides from cement-bio char-spent resins matrix. (author)

  8. Effects of the super plasticizers and the water/cement ratio on the mini-slump of Portland cement pastes

    Meirelles, J.R.; Morelli, A.C.; Baldo, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    The rheology of Portland cement concrete is dominated by the cement paste rheology. In general the rheological behavior of cement pastes is evaluated by means of the mini-slump test. In the present paper it was investigated the effect of the water/cement ratio was as of two types of superplasticizers (melamine and naftalen based) on the mini-slump of pastes of common cement pastes. (author)

  9. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    R. Fujiyama; F. Darwish; M.V. Pereira

    2014-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the eff...

  10. Topics in cement and concrete research

    Brouwers, Jos; Russel, M.I.; Basheer, P.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper addresses several topics in regard to the sustainable design and use of concrete. First, major features concerning the sustainable aspects of the material concrete are summarised. Then the major constituent, from an environmental point of view, cement is discussed in detail, particularly the hydration and application of slag cement. The intelligent combining of mineral oxides, which are found in clinker, slag, fly ashes etc., is designated as mineral oxide engineering. It re...

  11. Study on properties and testing methods of thermo-responsive cementing system for well cementing in heavy oil thermal recovery

    Li, Lianjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, thermo-responsive cement slurry system were being developed, the properties of conventional cement slurry, compressive strength high temperature of cement sheath, mechanical properties of cement sheath and thermal properties of cement sheath were being tested. Results were being used and simulated by Well-Life Software, Thermo-responsive cement slurry system can meet the requirements of heavy oil thermal recovery production. Mechanical and thermal properties of thermo-responsive cement sheath were being tested. Tensile fracture energy of the thermo-responsive cement sheath is larger than conventional cement. The heat absorption capacity of conventional cement sheath is larger than that of thermo-responsive cement sheath, this means more heat is needed for the unit mass once increasing 1.0 °C, which also indicates that thermo-responsive cement own good heat insulating and preservation effects. The heat conductivity coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of thermo-responsive cement is less than and conventional cement, this means that thermo-responsive cement have good heat preservation and insulation effects with good thermal expansion stabilities.

  12. Photoactive glazed polymer-cement composite

    Baltes, Liana; Patachia, Silvia; Tierean, Mircea; Ekincioglu, Ozgur; Ozkul, Hulusi M.

    2018-04-01

    Macro defect free cements (MDF), a kind of polymer-cement composites, are characterized by remarkably high mechanical properties. Their flexural strengths are 20-30 times higher than those of conventional cement pastes, nearly equal to that of an ordinary steel. The main drawback of MDF cements is their sensitivity to water. This paper presents a method to both diminish the negative impact of water on MDF cements mechanical properties and to enlarge their application by conferring photoactivity. These tasks were solved by glazing MDF cement with an ecological glaze containing nano-particles of TiO2. Efficiency of photocatalytic activity of this material was tested against methylene blue aqueous solution (4.4 mg/L). Influence of the photocatalyst concentration in the glaze paste and of the contact time on the photocatalysis process (efficiency and kinetic) was studied. The best obtained photocatalysis yield was of 97.35%, after 8 h of exposure to 254 nm UV radiation when used an MDF glazed with 10% TiO2 in the enamel paste. Surface of glazed material was characterized by optic microscopy, scratch test, SEM, XRD, and EDS. All these properties were correlated with the aesthetic aspect of the glazed surface aiming to propose using of this material for sustainable construction development.

  13. Pre-cementation of deep shaft

    Heinz, W. F.

    1988-12-01

    Pre-cementation or pre-grouting of deep shafts in South Africa is an established technique to improve safety and reduce water ingress during shaft sinking. The recent completion of several pre-cementation projects for shafts deeper than 1000m has once again highlighted the effectiveness of pre-grouting of shafts utilizing deep slimline boreholes and incorporating wireline technique for drilling and conventional deep borehole grouting techniques for pre-cementation. Pre-cementation of deep shaft will: (i) Increase the safety of shaft sinking operation (ii) Minimize water and gas inflow during shaft sinking (iii) Minimize the time lost due to additional grouting operations during sinking of the shaft and hence minimize costly delays and standing time of shaft sinking crews and equipment. (iv) Provide detailed information of the geology of the proposed shaft site. Informations on anomalies, dykes, faults as well as reef (gold bearing conglomerates) intersections can be obtained from the evaluation of cores of the pre-cementation boreholes. (v) Provide improved rock strength for excavations in the immediate vicinity of the shaft area. The paper describes pre-cementation techniques recently applied successfully from surface and some conclusions drawn for further considerations.

  14. Analysis of rheological properties of bone cements.

    Nicholas, M K D; Waters, M G J; Holford, K M; Adusei, G

    2007-07-01

    The rheological properties of three commercially available bone cements, CMW 1, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC, were investigated. Testing was undertaken at both 25 and 37 degrees C using an oscillating parallel plate rheometer. Results showed that the three high viscosity cements exhibited distinct differences in curing rate, with CMW 1 curing in 8.7 min, Palacos R and Cemex ISOPLASTIC in 13 min at 25 degrees C. Furthermore it was found that these curing rates were strongly temperature dependent, with curing rates being halved at 37 degrees C. By monitoring the change of viscosity with time over the entire curing process, the results showed that these cements had differing viscosity profiles and hence exhibit very different handling characteristics. However, all the cements reached the same maximum viscosity of 75 x 10(3) Pa s. Also, the change in elastic/viscous moduli and tan delta with time, show the cements changing from a viscous material to an elastic solid with a clear peak in the viscous modulus during the latter stages of curing. These results give valuable information about the changes in rheological properties for each commercial bone cement, especially during the final curing process.

  15. Development of a biodegradable bone cement

    Yusof Abdullah; Nurhaslinda Ee Abdullah; Wee Pee Chai; Norita Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradable bone cement is a newly developed bone repair material, which is able to give immediate support to the implant area, and does not obstruct the bone repairing and regeneration process through appropriate biodegradation rate, which is synchronized with the mechanical load it should bear. The purpose of this study is to locally produce biodegradable bone cement using HA as absorbable filler. The cement is composed of an absorbable filler and unsaturated polyester for 100% degradation. Cross-linking effect is achieved through the action of poly (vinyl pyrrol lidone) (PVP) and an initiator. On the other hand, PPF was synthesized using direct esterification method. Characteristics of the bone cement were studied; these included the curing time, cross-linking effect and curing temperature. The products were characterized using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) to perform phase analysis and Scanning Electrons Microscopes to determine the morphology. The physical and mechanical properties of the bone cement were also investigated. The biocompatibility of the bone cement was tested using simulated body physiological solution. (Author)

  16. Evaluation of the amount of excess cement around the margins of cement-retained dental implant restorations: the effect of the cement application method.

    Chee, Winston W L; Duncan, Jesse; Afshar, Manijeh; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2013-04-01

    Complete removal of excess cement from subgingival margins after cementation of implant-supported restorations has been shown to be unpredictable. Remaining cement has been shown to be associated with periimplant inflammation and bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the amount of excess cement after cementation with 4 different methods of cement application for cement-retained implant-supported restorations. Ten implant replicas/abutments (3i) were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Forty complete veneer crowns (CVCs) were fabricated by waxing onto the corresponding plastic waxing sleeves. The wax patterns were cast and the crowns were cemented to the implant replicas with either an interim (Temp Bond) or a definitive luting agent (FujiCEM). Four methods of cement application were used for cementation: Group IM-Cement applied on the internal marginal area of the crown only; Group AH-Cement applied on the apical half of the axial walls of the crown; Group AA-Cement applied to all axial walls of the interior surface of the crown, excluding the occlusal surface; and Group PI-Crown filled with cement then seated on a putty index formed to the internal configuration of the restoration (cementation device) (n=10). Cement on the external surfaces was removed before seating the restoration. Cement layers were applied on each crown, after which the crown was seated under constant load (80 N) for 10 minutes. The excess cement from each specimen was collected and measured. One operator performed all the procedures. Results for the groups were compared, with 1 and 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple range test (α=.05). No significant difference in the amount of excess/used cement was observed between the 2 different types of cements (P=.1). Group PI showed the least amount of excess cement in comparison to other test groups (P=.031). No significant difference was found in the amount of excess cement among groups MI, AH, and AA. Group AA showed the

  17. Cement Types, Composition, Uses and Advantages of Nanocement, Environmental Impact on Cement Production, and Possible Solutions

    S. P. Dunuweera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We first discuss cement production and special nomenclature used by cement industrialists in expressing the composition of their cement products. We reveal different types of cement products, their compositions, properties, and typical uses. Wherever possible, we tend to give reasons as to why a particular cement type is more suitable for a given purpose than other types. Cement manufacturing processes are associated with emissions of large quantities of greenhouse gases and environmental pollutants. We give below quantitative and qualitative analyses of environmental impact of cement manufacturing. Controlling pollution is a mandatory legal and social requirement pertinent to any industry. As cement industry is one of the biggest CO2 emitters, it is appropriate to discuss different ways and means of CO2 capture, which will be done next. Finally, we give an account of production of nanocement and advantages associated with nanocement. Nanofillers such as nanotitania, nanosilica, and nanoalumina can be produced in large industrial scale via top-down approach of reducing size of naturally available bulk raw materials to those in the nanorange of 1 nm–100 nm. We mention the preparation of nanotitania and nanosilica from Sri Lankan mineral sands and quartz deposits, respectively, for the use as additives in cement products to improve performance and reduce the amount and cost of cement production and consequent environmental impacts. As of now, mineral sands and other treasures of minerals are exported without much value addition. Simple chemical modifications or physical treatments would add enormous value to these natural materials. Sri Lanka is gifted with highly pure quartz and graphite from which silica and graphite nanoparticles, respectively, can be prepared by simple size reduction processes. These can be used as additives in cements. Separation of constituents of mineral sands is already an ongoing process.

  18. Secondary raw materials for synthesising new kind of cements

    Goñi, S.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a comparative study of some characteristics of new belite cements obtained from two kind of wastes, which were used as secondary raw materials: fly ash (FA, of low CaO content, from coal combustion, and ash from incineration of municipal solid waste (MSWIA. Cements were synthesised in a range of temperature between 700°C and 900°C from MSWIA and FA, which were previously activated by hydrothermal treatment at 200°C The evolution of cemented phases with the heating temperature was followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results were compared with those obtained from heating the starting FA and MSWIA without the previous hydrothermal treatment. The degree of hydration was quantitatively evaluated by the combined water content, determined from thermogravimetric analyses, during a period of 28 days or 200 days from mixing depending of hydration kinetics of each cement.

    Este trabajo es un estudio comparativo de algunas de las características de nuevos cementos belíticos, obtenidos a partir de dos tipos de residuos, como materia prima secundaria: cenizas volantes (CV de bajo contenido en cal, procedentes de la combustión del carbón y cenizas procedentes de la incineración de residuos sólidos urbanos (CIRSU. Los cementos fueron sintetizados en un rango de temperaturas comprendido entre 700°C y 900°C después de un tratamiento hidrotermal de la CV y CIRSU a 200°C La evolución de las fases cementicias, con la temperatura de calentamiento, fue estudiada por difracción de rayos X (DRX. Los resultados fueron comparados con aquellos obtenidos, directamente, por calentamiento de los residuos, sin un tratamiento hidrotermal previo de los mismos. El grado de hidratación fue cuantitativamente evaluado, por medio del análisis termogravimétrico, a partir del agua combinada de los cementos hidratados durante un período de 28 días o 200 días, dependiendo de la cinética de hidratación de cada cemento.

  19. Use of MRF residue as alternative fuel in cement production.

    Fyffe, John R; Breckel, Alex C; Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Single-stream recycling has helped divert millions of metric tons of waste from landfills in the U.S., where recycling rates for municipal solid waste are currently over 30%. However, material recovery facilities (MRFs) that sort the municipal recycled streams do not recover 100% of the incoming material. Consequently, they landfill between 5% and 15% of total processed material as residue. This residue is primarily composed of high-energy-content non-recycled plastics and fiber. One possible end-of-life solution for these energy-dense materials is to process the residue into Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) that can be used as an alternative energy resource capable of replacing or supplementing fuel resources such as coal, natural gas, petroleum coke, or biomass in many industrial and power production processes. This report addresses the energetic and environmental benefits and trade-offs of converting non-recycled post-consumer plastics and fiber derived from MRF residue streams into SRF for use in a cement kiln. An experimental test burn of 118 Mg of SRF in the precalciner portion of the cement kiln was conducted. The SRF was a blend of 60% MRF residue and 40% post-industrial waste products producing an estimated 60% plastic and 40% fibrous material mixture. The SRF was fed into the kiln at 0.9 Mg/h for 24h and then 1.8 Mg/h for the following 48 h. The emissions data recorded in the experimental test burn were used to perform the life-cycle analysis portion of this study. The analysis included the following steps: transportation, landfill, processing and fuel combustion at the cement kiln. The energy use and emissions at each step is tracked for the two cases: (1) The Reference Case, where MRF residue is disposed of in a landfill and the cement kiln uses coal as its fuel source, and (2) The SRF Case, in which MRF residue is processed into SRF and used to offset some portion of coal use at the cement kiln. The experimental test burn and accompanying analysis indicate

  20. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied.

  1. Sulphur cement pre-composition and process for preparing such sulphur cement pre-composition

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides a process for the preparation of a sulphur cement pre-composition comprising reacting sulphur modifier with polysulphide-containing organosilane to obtain in the presence of sulphur the sulphur cement pre-composition, wherein the organosilane has the general molecular formula:

  2. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    Skibsted, Jørgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly...

  3. Ceramic residue for producing cements, method for the production thereof, and cements containing same

    Sánchez de Rojas, María Isabel; Frías, Moisés; Asensio, Eloy; Medina Martínez, César

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a ceramic residue produced from construction and demolition residues, as a puzzolanic component of cements. The invention also relates to a method for producing said ceramic residues and to another method of producing cements using said residues. This type of residue is collected in recycling plants, where it is managed. This invention facilitates a potential commercial launch.

  4. Analysis of CCRL proficiency cements 151 and 152 using the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory

    Bullard, Jeffrey W.; Stutzman, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    To test the ability of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software to predict cement hydration properties, characterization of mineralogy and phase distribution is necessary. Compositional and textural characteristics of Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) cements 151 and 152 were determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis followed by computer modeling of hydration properties. The general procedure to evaluate a cement is as follows: (1) two-dimensional SEM backscattered electron and X-ray microanalysis images of the cement are obtained, along with a measured particle size distribution (PSD); (2) based on analysis of these images and the measured PSD, three-dimensional microstructures of various water-to-cement ratios are created and hydrated using VCCTL, and (3) the model predictions for degree of hydration under saturated conditions, heat of hydration (ASTM C186), setting time (ASTM C191), and strength development of mortar cubes (ASTM C109) are compared to experimental measurements either performed at NIST or at the participating CCRL proficiency sample evaluation laboratories. For both cements, generally good agreement is observed between the model predictions and the experimental data

  5. The effect of sand/cement ratio on radon exhalation from cement specimens containing 226Ra

    Takriti, S.; Shweikani, R.; Ali, A. F.; Rajaa, G.

    2002-09-01

    Portland cement was mixed with different kind of sand (calcite and silica) in different ratio to produce radioactive specimens with radium chloride. The release of radon from these samples was studied. The results showed that radon release from the calcite-cement samples increased with the increases of the sand mixed ratio until fixed value (about 20%) then decreased to less than its release from the beginning, and the release changed with the sand size also. Radon release from silica-cement samples had the same observations of calcite-cement samples. It was found that calcite-cement reduced the radon exhalation quantity rather than the silica-cement samples. The decreases of the radon exhalation from the cement-sand may be due to the creation of free spaces in the samples, which gave the possibility to radon to decay into these free spaces rather than radon exhalation. The daughters of the radon decay 214 Bi and 214 Pb reported by gamma measurements of the cement-sand samples. (author)

  6. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale

    Skibsted, Jorgen; Hall, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, although X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies are discussed briefly

  7. Effect of nano clay particles on mechanical, thermal and physical behaviours of waste-glass cement mortars

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M.S.J.; Olabi, A.G.; Messeiry, M.; Hussain, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Glass powder (GP) and nano clay (NC) were used as a partial cement replacement in cement mortar (CM). → No damaging effect can be detected due to the reaction between GP and CM with particle size up to 75 μm. → Hybrid combination of GP/NC greatly improved mechanical properties and microstructure of CM. - Abstract: Worldwide, around 2.6 billion tons of cement is produced annually. This huge size of production consumes large amounts of energy and is one of the largest contributors to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) release. Accordingly, there is a pressing demand to minimise the quantity of cement used in the concrete industry. The main challenge to this is to get durable concrete with less cement and within reasonable cost. The economic, environmental and engineering benefits of reusing ground waste-glass powder (WGP) as a partial cement replacement has been established, but low glass reactivity and the possible alkali-silica reaction (ASR) are a drawback. Recent advances in nano-technology have revealed that nano-sized particles such as nano clay (NC) have a high surface area to volume ratio that provides the potential for tremendous chemical reactivity, accelerating pozzolanic activity and hindering ASR. This paper presents a laboratory study of the properties of NC/WGP cement composites. The microstructure, ASR, fracture energy, compressive and flexural properties of cement mortars containing WGP as a cement replacement with and without NC are investigated and compared with plain matrix. In addition, the hydration of cement compounds was followed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and also X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that incorporation of glass powder has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of cement mortars after 28 days of hydration. Also, the results revealed that the mechanical properties of the cement mortars with a hybrid combination of glass powder and NC were all higher than

  8. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV, coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive and Minimally Invasive Dentistry and the new preservative techniques recommended. Objective: The objective of the present article was to carry out a literature review study, to determine the characteristics of CIV that has a prominent role in the Minimally Invasive Dentistry profile. Results: The dentist surgeon must be aware of the classification, according to its composition and physical-chemical nature: conventional ionomers; ionomers reinforced by metals; high viscosity and various types of resin modified glass ionomers to correctly choose the CIV that will be used in their clinical interventions, which should occur based on the properties of the material and its clinical indication. Conclusion: It was concluded that the implementation of preventive techniques with CIV in public health care, tend to minimize curative treatments, concurrently valuing the low complexity dental procedures performed in Primary Care, avoiding referrals for treatment of cases of greater complexity at the level Secondary and tertiary care, saving resources.

  9. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; ; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  10. Dynamic leaching behavior of geogenic As in soils after cement-based stabilization/solidification.

    Li, Jiang-Shan; Wang, Lei; Tsang, Daniel C W; Beiyuan, Jingzi; Poon, Chi Sun

    2017-12-01

    Cement-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) is a practical treatment approach for hazardous waste with anthropogenic As sources; however, its applicability for geogenic As-containing soil and the long-term leaching potential remain uncertain. In this study, semi-dynamic leaching test was performed to investigate the influence of S/S binders (cement blended with fuel ash (FA), furnace bottom ash (FBA), or ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS)) on the long-term leaching characteristics of geogenic As. The results showed that mineral admixtures with higher Ca content and pozzolanic activity were more effective in reducing the leached As concentrations. Thus, cement blended with FBA was inferior to other binders in suppressing the As leaching, while 20% replacement of ordinary Portland cement by GGBS was considered most feasible for the S/S treatment of As-containing soils. The leachability of geogenic As was suppressed by the encapsulation effect of solidified matrix and interlocking network of hydration products that were supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. The long-term leaching of geogenic As from the monolithic samples was diffusion-controlled. Increasing the Ca content in the samples led to a decrease in diffusion coefficient and an increase in feasibility for "controlled utilization" of the S/S-treated soils.

  11. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de; Bezerra, U.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  12. Petroleum Sludge as gypsum replacement in cement plants: Its Impact on Cement Strength

    Benlamoudi, Ali; Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Khodja, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Due to high cost of cement manufacturing and the huge amount of resources exhaustion, companies are trying to incorporate alternative raw materials or by-products into cement production so as to produce alternative sustainable cement. Petroleum sludge is a dangerous waste that poses serious imparts on soil and groundwater. Given that this sludge contains a high percentage of anhydrite (CaSO4), which is the main component of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), it may play the same gypsum role in strength development. In this research, a total replacement of gypsum (100%) has been substituted by petroleum sludge in cement production and has led to an increase of 28.8% in UCS values after 28 curing days. Nevertheless, the burning of this waste has emitted a considerable amount of carbon monoxide (CO) gas that needs to be carefully considered prior to use petroleum sludge within cement plants.

  13. Comparative study on strength properties of cement mortar by partial replacement of cement with ceramic powder and silica fume

    Himabindu, Ch.; Geethasri, Ch.; Hari, N.

    2018-05-01

    Cement mortar is a mixture of cement and sand. Usage of high amount of cement increases the consumption of natural resources and electric power. To overcome this problem we need to replace cement with some other material. Cement is replaced with many other materials like ceramic powder, silica fume, fly ash, granulated blast furnace slag, metakaolin etc.. In this research cement is replaced with ceramic powder and silica fume. Different combinations of ceramic powder and silica fume in cement were replaced. Cement mortar cubes of 1:3 grade were prepared. These cubes were cured under normal water for 7 days, 14days and 28 days. Compressive strength test was conducted for all mixes of cement mortar cubes.

  14. A new method to analyze copolymer based superplasticizer traces in cement leachates.

    Guérandel, Cyril; Vernex-Loset, Lionel; Krier, Gabriel; De Lanève, Michel; Guillot, Xavier; Pierre, Christian; Muller, Jean François

    2011-03-15

    Enhancing the flowing properties of fresh concrete is a crucial step for cement based materials users. This is done by adding polymeric admixtures. Such additives have enabled to improve final mechanicals properties and the development of new materials like high performance or self compacting concrete. Like this, the superplasticizers are used in almost cement based materials, in particular for concrete structures that can have a potential interaction with drinking water. It is then essential to have suitable detection techniques to assess whether these organic compounds are dissolved in water after a leaching process or not. The main constituent of the last generation superplasticizer is a PolyCarboxylate-Ester copolymer (PCE), in addition this organic admixture contains polyethylene oxide (free PEO) which constitutes a synthesis residue. Numerous analytical methods are available to characterize superplasticizer content. Although these techniques work well, they do not bring suitable detection threshold to analyze superplasticizer traces in solution with high mineral content such as leachates of hardened cement based materials formulated with superplasticizers. Moreover those techniques do not enable to distinguish free PEO from PCE in the superplasticizer. Here we discuss two highly sensitive analytical methods based on mass spectrometry suitable to perform a rapid detection of superplasticizer compounds traces in CEM I cement paste leachates: MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, is used to determine the free PEO content in the leachate. However, industrial copolymers (such as PCE) are characterized by high molecular weight and polymolecular index. These two parameters lead to limitation concerning analysis of copolymers by MALDI-TOFMS. In this study, we demonstrate how pyrolysis and a Thermally assisted Hydrolysis/Methylation coupled with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, provides good results for the detection of PCE copolymer traces in CEM I cement paste

  15. TECHNOLOGY AND EFFICIENCY OF PEAT ASH USAGE IN CEMENT CONCRETE

    G. D. Liakhevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main ways to improve physical and mechanical properties of cement concrete is an introduction of ash obtained due to burning of fossil fuels into concrete mix. The concrete mixes with ash are characterized by high cohesion, less water gain and disintegration. At the same time the concrete has high strength, density, water resistance, resistance to sulfate corrosion. The aim of this paper is to explore the possibility to use peat ash and slag of peat enterprises of the Republic of Belarus in the concrete for improvement of its physical and mechanical properties and characteristics of peat ash, slag, micro-silica, cement, superplasticizing agent. Compositions and technology for preparation of concrete mixes have been developed and concrete samples have been have been fabricated and tested in the paper. It has been shown that the concrete containing ash, slag obtained due to burning of peat in the industrial installations of the Usiazhsky and Lidsky Peat Briquette Plants and also MK-85-grade micro-silica NSPKSAUsF-1-grade superplasticizing agent have concrete tensile strength within 78–134 MPa under axial compression and 53 MPa – for the control composition. This index is 1.5–2.5 times more than for the sample containing no additives.The usage of peat ash, slag together with MK-85-grade micro-silica and NSPKSAUsF-1-grade superplasticizing agent for fabrication of concrete and reinforced bridge and tunnel structures will provide the following advantages: reduction of cross-sectional area of structures while maintaining their bearing capacity due to higher value of tensile strength in case of axial compression; higher density, waterand gas tightness due to low water cement ratio; high resistance to aggressive environment due to lower content of capillary pores that ensures bridge structure longevity; achievement of environmental and social impacts.

  16. Characterisation of cemented/bituminized LAW and MAW waste products

    Vejmelka, P.; Johnsen, P.; Kluger, W.; Koester, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the context of work for characterising low and medium activity waste products, investigations were carried out to determine the release of radioactivity from binding waste in given accidents, such as mechanical and thermal loading for the operating phase of a final store. The effects of mechanical loads on MAW cement products and the effects of thermal laods on MAW cement and MAW bitumen products were examined. The release of fine dust reaching the lungs, with a particle size of ≤10 μm from a 200 litre roller seam cement binder with a maximum mechanical load of 3x10 5 Nm covering the accident case is about 1.5 g and therefore corresponds to ≅ 10 -4 % of the total radio-activity inventory for homogeneous products. With thermal loading (60 minute oil fire, 800 0 C) ≅ 10 -3 % of the radioactivity inventory is released via the release of water from the waste binder. The activity release of MAW bitumen products containing NaNO 3 (175 litre drum) with thermal load is considerably higher, as due to the NaNO 3 content of the products, after an induction period of about 20 minutes there is an exothermal reaction between the bitumen and the NaNO 3 , which leads to burning of the bitumen with considerable aerosol formation. The Na losses are about 32% and the Pu losses, derived from the results of laboratory experiments with samples containing Eu and Pu and samples containing Eu on the original size, are only 15% maximum, even with complete burn up. It was shown for all the investigations with samples of the original size that the effects of the load cases considered can be reduced or completely avoided by additional packing (concrete shielding). (orig./RB) [de

  17. Immobilization of radioactive waste in cement based matrices

    Glasser, F.P.; Rahman, A.A.; Macphee, S.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of hydrated cement systems are described. The behaviour of slag-based cement is described with a view to predicting their long term pH, Esub(n) and mineralogical balance. Modelling studies which enable the prediction at long ages of cement composites are advanced and a base model of the CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O system presented. The behaviour of U and I in cements is explored. The tolerance of cement systems for a wide range of miscellaneous waste stream components and environmental hazards is described. The redox potential in cements is effectively lowered by irradiation. (author)

  18. Colorectal cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease in asbestos cement and cement workers

    Jacobsson, K.

    1993-09-01

    Radiologically visible parenchymal changes (small opacities >= 1/0;ILO 1980 classification) were present in 20% of a sample of workers (N=174), employed for 20 years (median) in an asbestos cement plant. Exposure-response relationships were found, after controlling for age and smoking habits. In a sample of asbestos cement workers with symptoms and signs suggestive of pulmonary disease (N=33), increased lung density measured by x-ray computed tomography, and reduced static lung volumes and lung compliance was found. In a cohort of asbestos cement workers (N=1.929) with an estimated median exposure of 1.2 fibres/ml, the mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease was increased in comparison to a regional reference cohort (N=1.233). A two-to three-fold increase of non-malignant respiratory mortality was noted among workers employed for more than a decade in the asbestos cement plant, compared to cement workers (N=1.526), who in their turn did not experience and increased risk compared to the general population. In the cohorts of asbestos cement and cement workers, there was a tow-to three-fold increased incidence of cancer in the right part of the colon, compared to the general population as well as to external reference cohorts of other industrial workers (N=3.965) and fishermen (N=8.092). A causal relation with the exposure to mineral dust and fibres was supported by the findings of higher risk estimated in subgroups with high cumulated asbestos doses or longer duration of cement work. The incidence of cancer in the left part of the colon was not increased. Morbidity data, but not mortality data, disclosed the subsite-specific risk pattern. Both asbestos cement workers and cement workers has an increased incidence of rectal cancer, compared with the general population, and with the fishermen. The risk was, however, of the same magnitude among the other industrial workers. 181 refs

  19. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (Pcements and glass ionomer cements showed significantly higher values compared to dual-polymerizing resin cements. In all root segments, dual-polymerizing resin cements provided significantly lower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The differences between soil grouting with cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry

    Zhu, Mingting; Sui, Haitong; Yang, Honglu

    2018-01-01

    Cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry are the most widely applied for soil grouting reinforcement project. The viscosity change of cement slurry is negligible during grouting period and presumed to be time-independent while the viscosity of cement-water glass slurry increases with time quickly and is presumed to be time-dependent. Due to the significantly rheology differences between them, the grouting quality and the increasing characteristics of grouting parameters may be different, such as grouting pressure, grouting surrounding rock pressure, i.e., the change of surrounding rock pressure deduced by grouting pressure. Those are main factors for grouting design. In this paper, a large-scale 3D grouting simulation device was developed to simulate the surrounding curtain grouting for a tunnel. Two series of surrounding curtain grouting experiments under different geo-stress of 100 kPa, 150 kPa and 200 kPa were performed. The overload test on tunnel was performed to evaluate grouting effect of all surrounding curtain grouting experiments. In the present results, before 240 seconds, the grouting pressure increases slowly for both slurries; after 240 seconds the increase rate of grouting pressure for cement-water glass slurry increases quickly while that for cement slurry remains roughly constant. The increasing trend of grouting pressure for cement-water glass is similar to its viscosity. The setting time of cement-water glass slurry obtained from laboratory test is less than that in practical grouting where grout slurry solidifies in soil. The grouting effect of cement-water glass slurry is better than that of cement slurry and the grouting quality decreases with initial pressure.

  1. Effect of wet curing duration on durability parameters of hydraulic cement concretes.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic cement concrete slabs were cast and stored outdoors in Charlottesville, Virginia, to study the impact of wet curing duration on durability parameters. Concrete mixtures were produced using portland cement, portland cement with slag cement, ...

  2. Influence of temporary cement contamination on the surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements.

    Takimoto, Masayuki; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    The surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements were examined after the removal of temporary cements. The labial dentine surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit SiC paper. Acrylic resin blocks were luted to the prepared dentine surfaces using HY Bond Temporary Cement Hard (HY), IP Temp Cement (IP), Fuji TEMP (FT) or Freegenol Temporary Cement (TC), and stored for 1 week. After removal of the temporary cements with an ultrasonic tip, the contact angle values of five specimens per test group were determined for the three test liquids, and the surface-energy parameters of the dentine surfaces were calculated. The dentine bond strengths of the self-adhesive cements were measured after removal of the temporary cements in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's HSD test. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component γ(S)(d) (dispersion) was relatively constant at 41.7-43.3 mJm(-2). After removal of the temporary cements, the value of the γ(S)(h) (hydrogen-bonding) component decreased, particularly with FT and TC. The dentine bond strength of the self-adhesive cements was significantly higher for those without temporary cement contamination (8.2-10.6 MPa) than for those with temporary cement contamination (4.3-7.1 MPa). The γ(S) values decreased due to the decrease of γ(S)(h) values for the temporary cement-contaminated dentine. Contamination with temporary cements led to lower dentine bond strength. The presence of temporary cement interferes with the bonding performance of self-adhesive cements to dentine. Care should be taken in the methods of removal of temporary cement when using self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved cement solidification of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    1993-01-01

    Cementation was the first and is still the most widely applied technique for the conditioning of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Compared with other solidification techniques, cementation is relatively simple and inexpensive. However, the quality of the final cemented waste forms depends very much on the composition of the waste and the type of cement used. Different kinds of cement are used for different kinds of waste and the compatibility of a specific waste with a specific cement type should always be carefully evaluated. Cementation technology is continuously being developed in order to improve the characteristics of cemented waste in accordance with the increasing requirements for quality of the final solidified waste. Various kinds of additives and chemicals are used to improve the cemented waste forms in order to meet all safety requirements. This report is meant mainly for engineers and designers, to provide an explanation of the chemistry of cementation systems and to facilitate the choice of solidification agents and processing equipment. It reviews recent developments in cementation technology for improving the quality of cemented waste forms and provides a brief description of the various cement solidification processes in use. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Effect of MXene (Nano-Ti3C2 on Early-Age Hydration of Cement Paste

    Haibin Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new two-dimensional material, MXene (nano-Ti3C2 has been widely applied in many fields, especially for reinforced composite materials. In this paper, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction (XRD, hydration heat, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and EDS analysis were used to analyze the impact of MXene on cement hydration properties. The obtained results revealed that (a MXene could greatly improve the early compressive strength of cement paste with 0.04 wt% concentration, (b the phase type of early-age hydration products has not been changed after the addition of MXene, (c hydration exothermic rate within 72 h has small difference at different amount of MXene, and (d morphologies of hydration products were varied with the dosage of MXene, a lot of tufted ettringites appeared in 3 d hydration products when the content of MXene was 0.04 wt%, which will have a positive effect on improving the early mechanical properties of cement paste. MXene has inhibited the Portland cement hydration process; the main role of MXene in the cement hydration process is to promote the messy ettringite becoming regular distribution at a node and form network connection structure in the crystals growth process, making the mechanics performance of cement paste significantly improved.

  5. Alpha radioactivity in Indian cement samples

    Nain, M.; Chauhan, R. P.; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    The essential constituents of radioactive and each of cements like lime, silica and alumina are derived from earth's crust in which radioactive elements like uranium, thorium etc are also present in varying amounts almost everywhere. These two elements are considered as the parent elements of uranium and thorium radioactive decay series in which radon and thoron are produced respectively as decay products. In the present study the samples of ordinary Portland cement , Portland pozzolana cement and some other cementious finishing materials like white cement, Plaster of Paris , cement putty etc were collected and analysed for radium and radon concentrations along with radon exhalation rates. Materials and Methods: Alpha sensitive LR-115 Type II plastic track detectors commonly known as S olid State Nuclear Track Detectors w ere used to measure the radium and radon concentration. The alpha particles emitted from the radon causes the radiation damaged tracks. The Chemical etching in NaOH at 60 C for about 90 minutes was done to reveal these latent tracks, which were then scanned and counted by an optical microscope of suitable magnification. By calculating the track density of registered tracks, the radon and radium concentrations along with exhalation rate of radon, were determined using required formulae. Results: The radon and radium concentration in various brands of cements found to vary from 333±9.9 to 506±13.3 Bq m-3 and from 3.7±0.1 to 5.6±0.2 Bq k g-1 while in various cementious finishing materials used in the construction, these were found to vary from 378±19.7 to 550±9.8 Bq m-3 and from 4.2±0.2 to 6.1±0.1 Bq Kg-1, respectively. Based on the data the mass and surface exhalation rates were also calculated Conclusion: The measurements indicate that there is marginal variation of the concentration of radium and radon in various brands of cements in India with lower levels in the cement samples having red oxide and higher levels in fly ash based cement

  6. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanium dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanium dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields such a as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  7. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications.

  8. Microbial-influenced cement degradation: Literature review

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews literature which addresses the effect of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are identified, which are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with concrete and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Mechanisms inherent in microbial-influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. This report provides sufficient evidence of the potential for microbial-influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW to justify the enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion, as well as the development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbiological-induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form

  9. Possibilities of special cements in ceramic applications

    Capmas, A.; Bier, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    About 25 years ago, the only way to have confinement material for high temperature applications was to prepare a ceramic by sintering or fusion at high temperature. A new technology came, with the production of Low Cement Castables. This new product was obtained by a careful choice of the granulometry of the aggregates, an optimization of the defloculation of fine particles, including the cement (Calcium Aluminate Cement) and the addition of silica fume. Silica fume brought two improvements: a) a fluidifying effect, due partly to the low sensitivity of viscosity to pH, and partly to the geometric effect of the nicely spherical particle, b) a chemical effect, brought by the reaction of silica and Calcium Aluminate Cement to give a coherent zeolithic structure, through which water could escape during the first firing. From a ceramist point of view, it is interesting to understand how this components, nearly colloidal system mixed in water can be heated up to ceramization without any noticeable change in mechanical characteristics and shrinkage. From a more practical point of view, it is also interesting to realize that some characteristics, usually attributed only to ceramics, also apply with low cement castables technology: high compressive strength, flexural strength, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, impact resistance. (orig.)

  10. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  11. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  12. Plug cementing: Horizontal to vertical conditions

    Calvert, D.G.; Heathman, J.F.; Griffith, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an in-depth study of cement plug placement that was conducted with large-scale models for the improvement of plug cementing practices and plug integrity. Common hole and workstring geometries were examined with various rheology and density ratios between the drilling fluid and cement. The critical conditions dictating the difference between success and failure for various wellbore angles and conditions were explored, and the mechanisms controlling slurry movement before and after placement are now better understood. An understanding of these mechanisms allows the engineer to better tailor a design to specific hole conditions. Controversial concepts regarding plug-setting practices have been examined and resolved. The cumulative effects of density, rheology, and hole angle are major factors affecting plug success. While the Boycott effect and an extrusion effect were observed to be predominant in inclined wellbores, a spiraling or {open_quotes}roping{close_quotes} effect controls slurry movement in vertical wellbores. Ultimate success of a cement plug can be obtained if allowances are made for these effects in the job design, provided all other previously published recommended placement practices are followed. Results of this work can be applied to many sidetracking and plug-to-abandon operations. Additionally, the understanding of the fluid movement (creep) mechanisms holds potential for use in primary and remedial cementing work, and in controlling the placement of noncementitious fluids in the wellbore.

  13. Durability of compressed soil-cement bricks

    Acosta Valle, A.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This papers shows the evaluation process of the durability of compressed soil-cement bricks. A great number of tests were made to determine the behavior of bricks when they are compression loaded and under the influence of moisture. Two different types of soils were used to produce the bricks, a lime-clay soil and a sand one. The sand soil is very resistant. The other one has a limited use. An experimental design was used to test the bricks. It is a rotational and quadratic method with a hexagonal figure which contains replicas at the central point. This method ensures the reliability of test results. Otherwise, it would reduce the amount of specimens necessary for the tests. The optimun moisture content is obtained by using a press machine. It is more rational than the standard Proctor compactation test, because it applies the same type and amount of energy used to produce the bricks. The obtained results show the behavior differences between the two compressed soil-cement bricks subjected to the compression test, water absorption and wetting and drying tests. The durability tests results are very important in the possible use of the bricks produced.

    En el trabajo se evalúa la durabilidad de elementos aglomerados de suelo estabilizado. Se realiza un amplio número de ensayos encaminados a determinar el comportamiento frente a la acción de las cargas y la humedad de dos suelos con características diferentes: uno limo-arcilloso y el otro arenoso. Este último presenta resultados muy favorables en ambas direcciones. El otro, con un posible uso más limitado. Se emplea un método de diseño experimental del tipo rotacional cuadrático en hexágono, con réplicas en el punto central, el que garantiza la confiabilidad de los resultados de los ensayos, a la vez que disminuye la cantidad de especímenes a ensayar. Se determina la humedad óptima a utilizar en las diferentes dosificaciones empleando la máquina compactadora, que resulta m

  14. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 μm/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 μm/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

  15. Glass Polyalkenoate Cements Designed for Cranioplasty Applications: An Evaluation of Their Physical and Mechanical Properties

    Basel A. Khader

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs have potential for skeletal cementation. Unfortunately, commercial GPCs all contain, and subsequently release, aluminum ions, which have been implicated in degenerative brain disease. The purpose of this research was to create a series of aluminum-free GPCs constructed from silicate (SiO2, calcium (CaO, zinc (ZnO and sodium (Na2O-containing glasses mixed with poly-acrylic acid (PAA and to evaluate the potential of these cements for cranioplasty applications. Three glasses were formulated based on the SiO2-CaO-ZnO-Na2O parent glass (KBT01 with 0.03 mol % (KBT02 and 0.06 mol % (KBT03 germanium (GeO2 substituted for ZnO. Each glass was then mixed with 50 wt % of a patented SiO2-CaO-ZnO-strontium (SrO glass composition and the resultant mixtures were subsequently reacted with aqueous PAA (50 wt % addition to produce three GPCs. The incorporation of Ge in the glass phase was found to result in decreased working (142 s to 112 s and setting (807 s to 448 s times for the cements manufactured from them, likely due to the increase in crosslink formation between the Ge-containing glasses and the PAA. Compressive (σc and biaxial flexural (σf strengths of the cements were examined at 1, 7 and 30 days post mixing and were found to increase with both maturation and Ge content. The bonding strength of a titanium cylinder (Ti attached to bone by the cements increased from 0.2 MPa, when placed, to 0.6 MPa, after 14 days maturation. The results of this research indicate that Germano-Silicate based GPCs have suitable handling and mechanical properties for cranioplasty fixation.

  16. Characterization of waste products prepared from radioactive contaminated clayey soil cemented according to the GEODUR process

    Brodersen, K.; Vinther, A.

    1990-11-01

    Radioactive contaminated soil may arise due to accidents of various types or may be detected during decommisioning of nuclear installations. Ordinary surface soil cannot normally be conditioned using conventional cementation processes since the content of humic materials retards or prevents the solidification. An additive available from the Danish firm Geodur A/S makes it possible to circumvent this difficulty and to produce a monolithic, nondusting waste type using rather small amounts of cement. The report describes work on characterization of such a cemented waste product prepared on basis of clayey top soil from the Risoe area. The claimed advantages of the process was verified, and data for the compression strength (low), hydraulic conductivity (satisfactory) and other pore structure-related properties are given for the obtained products. Unfortunately the behaviour of cesium and strontium, representing two of the most relevant radionuclides, was not too promising. The retention of cesium is satisfactory, but less good than for the untreated soil. Greatly improved cesium retention after drying of the materials was noticed. Good retention of strontium is only obtained after reaction of the material with carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The behaviour of the two isotopes in other types of cemented waste is somewhat similar, but the decrease in retention compared with untreated soil makes the process less interesting as a possibility for remedial actions after accidents, etc. Some further studies of the cemented soil waste are beeing made within the frame of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Studies. Elements forming low solublity components in the high pH environment in the cemented soil will probably be retained quite efficiently. This was demonstrated in case of Zn. (author) 11 tabs., 22 ills., 8 refs

  17. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  18. NEURO-FUZZY MODELLING OF BLENDING PROCESS IN CEMENT PLANT

    Dauda Olarotimi Araromi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The profitability of a cement plant depends largely on the efficient operation of the blending stage, therefore, there is a need to control the process at the blending stage in order to maintain the chemical composition of the raw mix near or at the desired value with minimum variance despite variation in the raw material composition. In this work, neuro-fuzzy model is developed for a dynamic behaviour of the system to predict the total carbonate content in the raw mix at different clay feed rates. The data used for parameter estimation and model validation was obtained from one of the cement plants in Nigeria. The data was pre-processed to remove outliers and filtered using smoothening technique in order to reveal its dynamic nature. Autoregressive exogenous (ARX model was developed for comparison purpose. ARX model gave high root mean square error (RMSE of 5.408 and 4.0199 for training and validation respectively. Poor fit resulting from ARX model is an indication of nonlinear nature of the process. However, both visual and statistical analyses on neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS model gave a far better result. RMSE of training and validation are 0.28167 and 0.7436 respectively, and the sum of square error (SSE and R-square are 39.6692 and 0.9969 respectively. All these are an indication of good performance of ANFIS model. This model can be used for control design of the process.

  19. MODIFICATION OF FOAMED CEMENT-CLAY MORTARS BY STABILIZERS

    Panfilova Marina Ivanovna

    2012-10-01

    by-product generated in the course of combustion of crossties, and reduction of the cement consumption rate. The authors have identified that ash added into the injection does not cause any deterioration of the mortar strength; rather, it assures its structural stability and prevents any leaching of heavy metals that it contains. The authors have identified that adding 20 to 26 % of flue ash into the injection reduces the mortar hardening time by 30 %, while the strength of the mortar that has 20 % of ash is almost equal to the one of the benchmark sample. However, any higher ash content causes deterioration of the hardening strength of the mortar. Therefore, the authors have discovered that 20 % of the cement may be replaced by the ash generated in the course of combustion of waste crossties. This replacement is to be performed in the course of preparation of mortars, and it is aimed at the strengthening of the soil. This operation is to be performed in the incinerator to preserve the solution properties. This technology reduces the amount of hazardous by-products through their recycling.

  20. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  1. The Comparison of Sorption and Solubility Behavior of Four Different Resin Luting Cements in Different Storage Media.

    Giti, Rashin; Vojdani, Mahroo; Abduo, Jaafar; Bagheri, Rafat

    2016-06-01

    Structural integrity and dimensional stability are the key factors that determine the clinical success and durability of luting cements in the oral cavity. Sorption and solubility of self-adhesive resin luting cements in food-simulating solutions has not been studied sufficiently. This study aimed to compare the sorption and solubility of 2 conventional and 2 self-adhesive resin-based luting cements immersed in four different storage media. A total of 32 disc-shaped specimens were prepared from each of four resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray), and Choice 2 (Bisco). Eight specimens of each material were immersed in all tested solutions including n-heptane 97%, distilled water, apple juice, or Listerine mouth wash. Sorption and solubility were measured by weighing the specimens before and after immersion and desiccation. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 18, using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test with p≤ 0.05 set as the level of significance. There was a statistically significant interaction between the materials and solutions. The effect of media on the sorption and solubility was material-dependent. While seT showed the highest values of the sorption in almost all solutions, Choice 2 showed the least values of sorption and solubility. Immersion in apple juice caused more sorption than other solutions (p≤ 0.05). The sorption and solubility behavior of the studied cements were significantly affected by their composition and the storage media. The more hydrophobic materials with higher filler content like Choice 2 resin cement showed the least sorption and solubility. Due to their lower sorption and solubility, these types of resin-based luting cements are recommended to be used clinically.

  2. A cost effective cultivation medium for biocalcification of Bacillus pasteurii KCTC 3558 and its effect on cement cubes properties.

    Yoosathaporn, S; Tiangburanatham, P; Bovonsombut, S; Chaipanich, A; Pathom-Aree, W

    2016-01-01

    Application of carbonate precipitation induced by Bacillus pasteurii for improving some properties of cement has been reported. However, it is not yet successful in commercial scale due to the high cost of cultivation medium. This is the first report on the application of effluent from chicken manure bio-gas plant, a high protein content agricultural waste, as an alternative growth medium for carbonate precipitation by B. pasteurii KCTC3558. Urease activity of B. pasteurii KCTC3558 cultured in chicken manure effluent medium and other three standard media were examined using phenate method. The highest urease production was achieved in chicken manure effluent medium (16.756Umg(-1) protein). Cost per liter of chicken manure effluent medium is up to 88.2% lower than other standard media. The most effective cultivation media was selected for carbonate precipitation study in cement cubes. Water absorption, voids, apparent density and compressive strength of cement cubes were measured according to the ASTM standard. The correlation between the increasing density and compressive strength of bacterial added cement cube was evident. The density of bacterial cement cube is 5.1% higher than control while the compressive strength of cement mixed with bacterial cells in chicken manure effluent medium increases up to 30.2% compared with control. SEM and XRD analysis also found the crystalline phase of calcium carbonate within bacterial cement which confirmed that the increasing density and compressive strength were resulted from bacterial carbonate precipitation. This study indicated that the effluent from chicken manure bio-gas plant could be used as an alternative cost effective culture medium for cultivation and biocalcification of B. pasteurii KCTC3558 in cement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Thermal and mechanical properties of NaOH treated hemp fabric and calcined nanoclay-reinforced cement nanocomposites

    Hakamy, A.; Shaikh, F.U.A.; Low, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of nanoclay and hemp fabric-reinforced cement composites. • The optimum nanoclay and hemp fabric content is 1.0 and 6.9 wt.% respectively. • Surface-treated hemp fabric-reinforced cement composites demonstrated better mechanical properties. • Surface modification of hemp fabric was effective in improving the hemp fabric-cement matrix adhesion. - Abstract: Cement nanocomposites reinforced with hemp fabrics and calcined nanoclay (CNC) have been fabricated and investigated. CNC is prepared by heating nanoclay (Cloisite 30B) at 900 °C for 2 h. The influences of CNC dispersion on the mechanical properties and thermal properties of these composites have been characterized in terms of porosity, density, water absorption, flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength and thermal stability. The microstructure is investigated using Quantitative X-ray Diffraction Analysis (QXDA) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The effects of alkali (NaOH) treatment of hemp fabric on the mechanical properties of hemp fabric-reinforced cement composites with different fabric contents of 4.5, 5.7, 6.9 and 8.1 wt% are also investigated. Results show that the optimum hemp fabric content is 6.9 wt% (i.e. 6 fabric layers). Results also indicated that physical, mechanical and thermal properties were enhanced due to the addition of CNC into the cement matrix and the optimum content of CNC was 1 wt%. The treated hemp fabric-reinforced nanocomposites containing 1 wt% CNC exhibited the highest flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength and thermal stability by virtue of good fibre–matrix interface. This environmentally friendly nanocomposite can be used for various construction applications such as ceilings and roofs

  4. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  5. Heat of hydration measurements on cemented radioactive wastes. Part 1: cement-water pastes

    Lee, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the hydration of cement pastes in terms of chemical and kinetic models. A calorimetric technique was used to measure the heat of hydration to develop these models. The effects of temperature, water/cement ratio and cement replacements, ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and pulverised fuel ash (PFA) on the hydration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is reported. The incorporation of BFS or PFA has a marked effect on the hydration reaction. The effect of temperature is also important but changing the water/cement ratio has little effect. Results from cement pastes containing only water and cement yield total heats of reaction of 400, 200 and 100 kJ/kg for OPC, BFS and PFA respectively. Using the results from the models which have been developed, the effect of major salts present in radioactive waste streams can be assessed. Values of the total heat of reaction, the time to complete 50 percent reaction, and the energy of activation, can be compared for different waste systems. (U.K.)

  6. Preparing hydraulic cement from oil-shale residue

    1921-08-28

    A process for preparation of hydraulic cement from oil-shale residue is characterized in that, as flux is used, rich-in-lime poor-in-sulfur portland-cement clinker, by which the usual gypsum addition, is avoided.

  7. Diffusion of radon through varying depths of cement

    Takriti, S.; Shweikani, R.; Ali, A.F.; Hushari, M.; Kheitou, M.

    2001-01-01

    Portland cement was mixed with different concentrations of radium chloride (1200, 2400 and 3600 Bq) to produce radioactive sources. These sources were surrounded with cement of different thickness (1, 2 and 4 cm). The release of radon from these sources (before and after being surrounded) was studied. The results showed that radon release from the sources itself was less then its release from the same source after being surrounded by cement, and the release did not change with the thickness of cement. Samples were covered with a thin layer of polyethylene before being surrounded with cement. It was found that this additional layer reduced the radon exhalation. This thin layer stopped any reaction between the source and the surrounding cement during solidification of the cement layers. These reactions are thought to be the reason for the increase of radon exhalation from the sources surrounded by cement

  8. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use .... or open dumping which have effect on surface and ... Table 1: Chemical Composition of Calcium Carbide Waste and Cement.

  9. Study on cementation of simulated radioactive borated liquid wastes

    Sun Qina; Li Junfeng; Wang Jianlong

    2010-01-01

    To compare sulfoaluminate cement with ordinary Portland cement on their cementation of radioactive borated liquid waste and to provide more data for formula optimization, simulated radioactive borated liquid waste were solidified by the two cements. 28 d compressive strength and strength losses after water/freezing/irradiation resistance tests were investigated. Leaching test and X-ray diffraction analysis were also conducted. The results show that it is feasible to solidify borated liquid wastes with sulfoaluminate cement and ordinary Portland cement with formulas used in the study. The 28 d compressive strengths, strength losses after tests and simulated nuclides leaching rates of the solidified waste forms meet the demand of GB 14569.1-93. The sulfoaluminate cement formula show better retention of Cs + than ordinary Portland cement formula. Boron, in form of B (OH) 4 - , incorporate in ettringite as solid solutions. (authors)

  10. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  11. Transportation of ions through cement based materials

    Chatterji, S.

    1994-01-01

    Transportation of ions, both anions and cations, through cement based materials is one of the important processes in their durability and as such has been studied very extensively. It has been studied from the point of view of the reinforcement corrosion, alkali-silica reaction, sulfate attack on cement and concrete, as well as in the context of the use of the cement based materials in the disposal of nuclear waste. In this paper the fundamental equations of diffusion, i.e. Fick's two equations, Nernst and Nernst-Planck equations have been collected. Attention has been drawn to the fact that Fick's two equations are valid for non-ionic diffusants and that for ions the relevant equations are those of Nernst and Nernst-Planck. The basic measurement techniques have also been commented upon

  12. Heavy cement slurries; Pastas pesadas de cimento

    Silva, Francisco Avelar da; Conceicao, Antonio C. Farias [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao do Nordeste. Div. de Tecnicas de Perfuracao; Marins, Carlos Cesar Silva [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Dept. de Perfuracao. Div. de Revestimento e Cimentacao

    1990-12-31

    When going deeper in a high pressure well, the only way to successfully cement your casing or linear is through the use of heavy cement slurry. In 1987 PETROBRAS geologists presented to the Drilling Department a series of deep, hot and high pressure wells to be drilled. The Casing and Cement Division of this department then started a program to face this new challenge. This paper introduces the first part of this program and shows how PETROBRAS is dealing with heavy weight slurries. We present the slurry formulations tested in laboratory, the difficulties found in mixing them in the field, rheology measurements, API free water and API fluid loss from both laboratory and field samples. (author) 3 tabs.

  13. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-02-01

    Over the last seven years, Low Oxidation State Metal Ion reagents (LOMI) have been used to decontaminate the 100 MW(e) Steam Generating Heavy Water Ractor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. The use of these reagents has resulted in a dilute ionic solution containing activation products which are produced by corrosion of metallic components in the reactor. It has been demonstrated that the amount of activity in the solution can be reduced using organic ion exchanger resins. These resins consist of a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid or quaternary ammonium function groups and can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which has been developed is produced from a 9 to 1 blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing 28% ion exchange resin in the water saturated form. If 6% Microsilica is added to the blended cement the waste loading can be increased to 36 w/o. (author)

  14. Application of Carbonate Looping to Cement Industry

    Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, cycle experiments of different types of limestone, cement raw meal and a mixture of limestone and clay were carried out in laboratory scale setups at more realistic conditions (i.e. calcination temperature is 950°C and CO2 concentration is 80%) to simulate the performance...... with an increase in the CO2 partial pressure during calcination, indicating enhancement of sintering by the presence of CO2. As sorbents, cement raw meal and the mixture of limestone and clay show a similar trend as limestone with respect to the decay of the CO2 carrying capacity and this capacity is lower than...... that of limestone at the same conditions in most cases. SEM and XRD analyses indicate that a combination of severe sintering and formation of calcium silicates attributes to the poor performance of the cement raw meal....

  15. Mechanical characterization of sisal reinforced cement mortar

    R. Fujiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at evaluating the mechanical behavior of sisal fiber reinforced cement mortar. The composite material was produced from a mixture of sand, cement, and water. Sisal fibers were added to the mixture in different lengths. Mechanical characterization of both the composite and the plain mortar was carried out using three point bend, compression, and impact tests. Specimens containing notches of different root radii were loaded in three point bending in an effort to determine the effect of the fibers on the fracture toughness of the material. The results obtained indicate that, while fiber reinforcement leads to a decrease in compressive strength, J-integral calculations at maximum load for the different notch root radii have indicated, particularly for the case of long fibers, a significant superiority of the reinforced material in comparison with the plain cement mortar, in consistence with the impact test data.

  16. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar

    , whereas in a normal cement plant, it is 0.9 kg/ kg cl. However the thermal energy demand in the integrated plant increases from 3.9 MJ/ kg cl to 5.6 MJ/ kg cl. But on the other side this additional energy spent can be recovered as a high quality heat to generate electricity. The potential to generate...... electricity depends on the scale of the plant, the bigger the production capacity of cement plant the better, with capacity higher than 3400 tons of clinker/day is required to produce captive electricity to meet the demand both from the cement plant operations and from the CO2 capture system operations....

  17. Cementation of wastes with boric acid

    Tello, Cledola C.O.; Haucz, Maria Judite A.; Alves, Lilian J.L.; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear power plants (PWR) are generated wastes, such as concentrate, which comes from the evaporation of liquid radioactive wastes, and spent resins. Both have boron in their composition. The cementation process is one of the options to solidify these wastes, but the boron has a negative effect on the setting of the cement mixture. In this paper are presented the experiments that are being carried out in order to overcome this problem and also to improve the efficiency of the process. Simulated wastes were cemented using additives (clays, admixtures etc.). In the process and product is being evaluated the effect of the amount, type and addition order of the materials. The mixtures were selected in accordance with their workability and incorporated waste. The solidified products are monolithic without free water with a good mechanical resistance. (author)

  18. Hydration kinetics of cement composites with varying water-cement ratio using terahertz spectroscopy

    Ray, Shaumik; Dash, Jyotirmayee; Devi, Nirmala; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2015-03-01

    Cement is mixed with water in an optimum ratio to form concrete with desirable mechanical strength and durability. The ability to track the consumption of major cement constituents, viz., Tri- and Dicalcium Silicates (C3S, C2S) reacting with water along with the formation of key hydration products, viz., Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (C-S-H) which gives the overall strength to the concrete and Calcium Hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), a hydration product which reduces the strength and durability, using an efficient technique is highly desirable. Optimizing the amount of water to be mixed with cement is one of the main parameters which determine the strength of concrete. In this work, THz spectroscopy has been employed to track the variation in hydration kinetics for concrete samples with different water-cement ratios, viz., 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6. Results show that for the sample with water-cement ratio of 0.3, significant amount of the C3S and C2S remain unreacted even after the initial hydration period of 28 days while for the cement with water-cement ratio of 0.6, most of the constituents get consumed during this stage. Analysis of the formation of Ca(OH)2 has been done which shows that the concrete sample with water-cement ratio of 0.6 produces the highest amount of Ca(OH)2 due to higher consumption of C3S/C2S in presence of excess water which is not desirable. Samples with water-cement ratio of 0.4 and 0.5 show more controlled reaction during the hydration which can imply formation of an optimized level of desired hydration products resulting in a more mechanically strong and durable concrete.

  19. Cementation of the solid radioactive waste with polymer-cement solutions using the method of impregnation

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of solid radioactive waste (SRW), i.e. inclusion of solid radioactive waste into cement matrix without cavities - is one of the main technological processes used for conditioning low and intermediate level radioactive waste. At FSUE 'Radon' the industrialized method of impregnation has been developed and since 2003 has been using for cementation of solid radioactive waste. The technology is that the polymer-cement solution, having high penetrating properties, is supplied under pressure through a tube to the bottom of the container in which solid radioactive waste has preliminarily been placed. The polymer-cement solution is evenly moving upwards through the channels between the particles of solid radioactive waste, fills the voids in the bulk volume of the waste and hardens, forming a cement compound, the amount of which is equal to the original volume. The aim of the investigation was a selection of a cement solution suitable for SRW impregnation (including fine particles) without solution depletion and bottom layers stuffing. It has been chosen a polymer: PHMG (polyhexamethylene-guanidine), which is a stabilizing and water-retaining component of the cement solution. The experiments confirm that the polymer increases the permeability of the cement solution by a 2-2.5 factor, the viscosity by a 1.2 factor, the stability of the consistency by a 1.5-1.7 factor, and extends the operating range of the W/C ratio to 0.5-1.1. So it is possible to penetrate a volume of SRW bigger by a 1.5-2.0 factor. It has been proved, that PHMG polymer increases strength and frost-resistance of the final compounds by a 1.8-2.7 factor, and contributes to fast strength development at the beginning of hardening and it decreases Cs-137 leashing rate by a 1.5-2 factor

  20. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. Because hydraulic cement requires a chemical hydration reaction for setting and hardening, it is subject to potential interactions between elements in the waste and binder that can retard or prevent solidification. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above its melting point, combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991