WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellulose-specific molecular probes

  1. Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

  2. Molecular MR Imaging Probes

    OpenAIRE

    MAHMOOD, UMAR; JOSEPHSON, LEE

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been successfully applied to many of the applications of molecular imaging. This review discusses by example some of the advances in areas such as multimodality MR-optical agents, receptor imaging, apoptosis imaging, angiogenesis imaging, noninvasive cell tracking, and imaging of MR marker genes.

  3. Nanomaterials and MRI molecular probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Toshiro

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the current state and future prospect of enhancing probes in MRI which enable to image specific cells and molecules mainly from the aspect of cell trafficking. Although MRI requires such probes for specific imaging, it has an advantage that anatomical images are simultaneously available even during surgical operation without radiation exposure, differing from X-CT, -transillumination and positron emission tomography (PET). In the development of novel MRI molecular probes, the recent topic concerns the cell trafficking biology where cells related with transplantation and immunological therapy can be traced. Although superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) has been used as a commercially available enhancer, this nanoparticle has problems like a difficulty to penetrate cell, cytotoxicity and others. For these, authors have developed the nanoparticle SPIO covered with silica shell, which can be chemically modified, e.g., by binding fluorescent pigments to possibly allow MR bimodal molecular imaging. For penetration of particles in cells, envelop of Sendai virus is used. PET-CT has been more popular these days; however, MRI is superior to CT for imaging soft tissues, and development of PET-MRI is actively under progress aiming the multi-modal imaging. At present, molecular probes for MRI are certainly not so many as those for PET and cooperative efforts to develop the probes are required in medical, technological and pharmaceutical fields. (R.T.)

  4. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  5. New molecular probes of vascular inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular Cardiovascular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Münster, Münster, and DFG CRC 656 Molecular Cardiovascular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" >VRACHIMIS, Alexis; HONOLD, Lisa; Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" data-affiliation=" (European Institute of Molecular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, and DFG EXC 1003 Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" >FAUST, Andreas; Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" data-affiliation=" (European Institute of Molecular Imaging, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, and DFG EXC 1003 Cells in Motion Cluster of Excellence, Westfälische Wilhelms University Münster, Münster, (Germany))" >HERMANN, Sven; SCHÄFERS, Michael

    2016-01-01

    New molecular imaging approaches featuring the assessment of inflammatory processes in the vascular wall on top of existing anatomic and functional vessel imaging procedures could emerge as decisive tools for the understanding and prevention of cardiovascular events. In this respect imaging approaches addressing specific molecular and cellular targets in atherosclerosis are of high interest. This review summarizes the rationale and current status of nuclear imaging probes which possess high translational potential.

  6. Scanning probe methods applied to molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlicek, Niko

    2013-08-01

    Scanning probe methods on insulating films offer a rich toolbox to study electronic, structural and spin properties of individual molecules. This work discusses three issues in the field of molecular and organic electronics. An STM head to be operated in high magnetic fields has been designed and built up. The STM head is very compact and rigid relying on a robust coarse approach mechanism. This will facilitate investigations of the spin properties of individual molecules in the future. Combined STM/AFM studies revealed a reversible molecular switch based on two stable configurations of DBTH molecules on ultrathin NaCl films. AFM experiments visualize the molecular structure in both states. Our experiments allowed to unambiguously determine the pathway of the switch. Finally, tunneling into and out of the frontier molecular orbitals of pentacene molecules has been investigated on different insulating films. These experiments show that the local symmetry of initial and final electron wave function are decisive for the ratio between elastic and vibration-assisted tunneling. The results can be generalized to electron transport in organic materials.

  7. Probing molecular potentials with an optical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A. A.; Korobenko, A.; Hepburn, J. W.; Milner, V.

    2017-09-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to excite coherent rotational wave packets in N2O, OCS, and CS2 molecules with rotational quantum numbers reaching up to J ≈465 , 690, and 1186, respectively. Time-resolved rotational spectroscopy at such ultra-high levels of rotational excitation can be used as a sensitive tool to probe the molecular potential energy surface at internuclear distances far from their equilibrium values. Significant bond stretching in the centrifuged molecules results in the growing period of the rotational revivals, which are experimentally detected using coherent Raman scattering. We measure the revival period as a function of the centrifuge-induced rotational frequency and compare it with the numerical calculations based on the known Morse-cosine potentials.

  8. Bioresponsive probes for molecular imaging: concepts and in vivo applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, S.M. van; Robillard, M.S.; Langereis, S.; Grull, H.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool to visualize and characterize biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo. In most molecular imaging approaches, probes are used to bind to disease-specific biomarkers highlighting disease target sites. In recent years, a new subset of

  9. Bioresponsive probes for molecular imaging : Concepts and in vivo applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijnhoven, S.M.J.; Robillard, M.S.; Langereis, S.; Grüll, H.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool to visualize and characterize biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo. In most molecular imaging approaches, probes are used to bind to disease-specific biomarkers highlighting disease target sites. In recent years, a new subset of

  10. Protein recognition by a pattern-generating fluorescent molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pode, Zohar; Peri-Naor, Ronny; Georgeson, Joseph M.; Ilani, Tal; Kiss, Vladimir; Unger, Tamar; Markus, Barak; Barr, Haim M.; Motiei, Leila; Margulies, David

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescent molecular probes have become valuable tools in protein research; however, the current methods for using these probes are less suitable for analysing specific populations of proteins in their native environment. In this study, we address this gap by developing a unimolecular fluorescent probe that combines the properties of small-molecule-based probes and cross-reactive sensor arrays (the so-called chemical 'noses/tongues'). On the one hand, the probe can detect different proteins by generating unique identification (ID) patterns, akin to cross-reactive arrays. On the other hand, its unimolecular scaffold and selective binding enable this ID-generating probe to identify combinations of specific protein families within complex mixtures and to discriminate among isoforms in living cells, where macroscopic arrays cannot access. The ability to recycle the molecular device and use it to track several binding interactions simultaneously further demonstrates how this approach could expand the fluorescent toolbox currently used to detect and image proteins.

  11. Probing gas-surface interactions with a molecular beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruit, M.E.M.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of direct scattering, trapping and sticking in molecular beam scattering is probed. The O 2 /Ag interaction was chosen, using the close-packed (111) plane of Ag as target surface. 170 refs.; 22 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Polarization of fluorescence: a probe of molecular autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroi, G.E.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Poliakoff, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The polarization of fluorescence from excited-state molecular photoions provides a direct probe of the photoionization dynamics and the symmetry signatures of autoionizing resonances. Measurements on CO 2 and CS 2 are presented as examples

  13. Deposition of molecular probes in heavy ion tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Esser, M

    1999-01-01

    By using polarized fluorescence techniques the physical properties of heavy ion tracks such as the dielectric number, molecular alignment and track radius can be traced by molecular fluorescence probes. Foils of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were used as a matrix for the ion tracks wherein fluorescence probes such as aminostyryl-derivatives can be incorporated using a suitable solvent, e.g. N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) as transport medium. The high sensitivity of fluorescence methods allowed the comparison of the probe properties in ion tracks with the virgin material. From the fluorescence Stokes shift the dielectric constants could be calculated, describing the dielectric surroundings of the molecular probes. The lower dielectric constant in the tracks gives clear evidence that there is no higher accommodation of the highly polar solvent DMF in the tracks compared with the virgin material. Otherwise the dielectric constant in the tracks should be higher than in the virgin material. The orientation of t...

  14. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  15. Probing the brain with molecular fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Souparno; Harvey, Peter; Simon, Jacob C; Jasanoff, Alan

    2018-04-09

    One of the greatest challenges of modern neuroscience is to incorporate our growing knowledge of molecular and cellular-scale physiology into integrated, organismic-scale models of brain function in behavior and cognition. Molecular-level functional magnetic resonance imaging (molecular fMRI) is a new technology that can help bridge these scales by mapping defined microscopic phenomena over large, optically inaccessible regions of the living brain. In this review, we explain how MRI-detectable imaging probes can be used to sensitize noninvasive imaging to mechanistically significant components of neural processing. We discuss how a combination of innovative probe design, advanced imaging methods, and strategies for brain delivery can make molecular fMRI an increasingly successful approach for spatiotemporally resolved studies of diverse neural phenomena, perhaps eventually in people. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioresponsive probes for molecular imaging:Concepts and in vivo applications

    OpenAIRE

    Duijnhoven, van, SMJ Sander; Robillard, MS Marc; Langereis, S Sander; Grüll, H Holger

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a powerful tool to visualize and characterize biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo. In most molecular imaging approaches, probes are used to bind to disease-specific biomarkers highlighting disease target sites. In recent years, a new subset of molecular imaging probes, known as bioresponsive molecular probes, has been developed. These probes generally benefit from signal enhancement at the site of interaction with its target. There are mainly ...

  17. Fluorescent and Colorimetric Molecular Recognition Probe for Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Pike, Sarah Jane; Hunter, Christopher Alexander

    2018-01-01

    The association constants for formation of 1 : 1 complexes between a H-bond donor, 1-naphthol, and a diverse range of charged and neutral H-bond acceptors have been measured using UV/vis absorption and fluorescence emission titrations. The performance of 1-naphthol as a dual colorimetric and fluorescent molecular recognition probe for determining the H-bond acceptor (HBA) parameters of charged and neutral solutes has been investigated in three solvents. The data were employed to establish sel...

  18. The development of nanobody probes for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhiling; Lan Xiaoli; Zhang Yongxue

    2014-01-01

    The nanobody is a novel antibody fragment, which has beneficial biophysical and pharmacokinetic properties, such as the small molecular weight, high affinity and specificity for antigen. Nanobody is ideally suitable for molecular imaging as a targeting probe that could label antigen at nmol level in vitro. In animal models of xenografted tumor, atherosclerotic plaques and brain disorders, the target tissues were specifically and clearly detected and the high tumor-to-blood (T/B) ratios were obtained. Structural or chemical modified nanobodies will have higher affinity and retention to target tissues, and be convenient for the application of molecular imaging. With the development of the related research, nanobody-based molecular imaging will be gradually transformed into the clinical applications, and play an important role in early diagnosis and therapeutic assessment. (authors)

  19. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hong

    Full Text Available Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  20. Probing molecular chirality by coherent optical absorption spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, W. Z. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wei, L. F. [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2011-11-15

    We propose an approach to sensitively probe the chirality of molecules by measuring their coherent optical-absorption spectra. It is shown that quantum dynamics of the cyclic three-level chiral molecules driven by appropriately designed external fields is total-phase dependent. This will result in chirality-dependent absorption spectra for the probe field. As a consequence, the charality-dependent information in the spectra (such as the locations and relative heights of the characteristic absorption peaks) can be utilized to identify molecular chirality and determinate enantiomer excess (i.e., the percentages of different enantiomers). The feasibility of the proposal with chiral molecules confined in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is also discussed.

  1. Sugar transport across lactose permease probed by steered molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Yin, Ying; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) transports sugar across the inner membrane of the bacterium using the proton motive force to accumulate sugar in the cytosol. We have probed lactose conduction across LacY using steered molecular dynamics, permitting us to follow molecular and energetic...... details of lactose interaction with the lumen of LacY during its permeation. Lactose induces a widening of the narrowest parts of the channel during permeation, the widening being largest within the periplasmic half-channel. During permeation, the water-filled lumen of LacY only partially hydrates lactose......, forcing it to interact with channel lining residues. Lactose forms a multitude of direct sugar-channel hydrogen bonds, predominantly with residues of the flexible N-domain, which is known to contribute a major part of LacY's affinity for lactose. In the periplasmic half-channel lactose predominantly...

  2. Ultrafast dissociation: An unexpected tool for probing molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Paul; Miron, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultrafast dissociation has been investigated by means of XPS and mass spectrometry. ► The interplay between electron relaxation and molecular dynamics is evidenced. ► Extension toward polyatomics, clusters, adsorbed molecules is considered. ► Quantum effects (spectral hole, angular effects) evidence the molecular field anisotropy. -- Abstract: Ultrafast dissociation following core–shell excitation into an antibonding orbital led to the early observation in HBr of atomic Auger lines associated to the decay of dissociated excited atoms. The purpose of this article is to review the very large variety of systems where such a situation has been encountered, extending from simple diatomic molecules toward more complex systems like polyatomics, clusters, or adsorbed molecules. Interestingly, this phenomenon has revealed an extremely rich and powerful tool for probing nuclear dynamics and its subtle interplay with electron relaxation occurring on a comparable time scale. Consequently this review covers a surprisingly large period, starting in 1986 and still ongoing.

  3. Rotationally resolved flurorescence as a probe of molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Kakar, S.; Choi, H.C.

    1993-01-01

    We present rotationally resolved data for N 2 (2σ u -1 ) photoionization in the excitation energy range 19 ≤ hν ≤ 35 eV. These are the first rotationally resolved measurements on the photoion over an extended spectral range above the ionization threshold. The requisite resolution is obtained by measuring rotationally resolved fluorescence from electronically excited photoions created by synchrotron radiation. This technique is useful for studying dynamical features embedded deep in the ionization continua and should supplement laser-based methods that are limited to probing near-threshold phenomena. The present study shows that the outgoing photoelectron can alter the rotational motion of the more massive photoion by exchanging angular momentum and this partitioning of angular momentum depends on the ionization dynamics. Thus, our data directly probe electron-molecule interactions and are sensitive probes of scattering dynamics. We are currently investigating dynamical features such as shape resonances and Cooper minima with rotational resolution for deciphering microscopic aspects of molecular scattering and these efforts will be discussed

  4. Fluorescent and colorimetric molecular recognition probe for hydrogen bond acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Sarah J; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-11-22

    The association constants for formation of 1 : 1 complexes between a H-bond donor, 1-naphthol, and a diverse range of charged and neutral H-bond acceptors have been measured using UV/vis absorption and fluorescence emission titrations. The performance of 1-naphthol as a dual colorimetric and fluorescent molecular recognition probe for determining the H-bond acceptor (HBA) parameters of charged and neutral solutes has been investigated in three solvents. The data were employed to establish self-consistent H-bond acceptor parameters (β) for benzoate, azide, chloride, thiocyanate anions, a series of phosphine oxides, phosphate ester, sulfoxide and a tertiary amide. The results demonstrate both the transferability of H-bond parameters between different solvents and the utility of the naphthol-based dual molecular recognition probe to exploit orthogonal spectroscopic techniques to determine the HBA properties of neutral and charged solutes. The benzoate anion is the strongest HBA studied with a β parameter of 15.4, and the neutral tertiary amide is the weakest H-bond acceptor investigated with a β parameter of 8.5. The H-bond acceptor strength of the azide anion is higher than that of chloride (12.8 and 12.2 respectively), and the thiocyanate anion has a β value of 10.8 and thus is a significantly weaker H-bond acceptor than both the azide and chloride anions.

  5. Probing two-centre interference in molecular high harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vozzi, C; Calegari, F; Benedetti, E; Berlasso, R; Sansone, G; Stagira, S; Nisoli, M; Altucci, C; Velotta, R; Torres, R; Heesel, E; Kajumba, N; Marangos, J P

    2006-01-01

    Two-centre interference in the recombination step of molecular high harmonic generation (HHG) has been probed in CO 2 and O 2 . We report the order dependence of characteristic enhancements or suppressions of high harmonic production in aligned samples of both molecules. In CO 2 , a robust destructive interference was seen consistent with the known separation of the oxygen atoms that are active in HHG. In O 2 , a harmonic enhancement was found indicating constructive interference. A good agreement was found with a simple two-centre interference model that includes the angular distribution function of the sample. The effective momentum of the electron wave was determined from the spectral position of these interferences. Ellipticity-dependent studies in CO 2 clearly show how the destructive interference can be 'switched off' by increasing the degree of ellipticity and thus shifting the effective resonance condition

  6. ProbeZT: Simulation of transport coefficients of molecular electronic junctions under environmental effects using Büttiker's probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Roman; Kilgour, Michael; Segal, Dvira

    2018-03-01

    We present our in-house quantum transport package, ProbeZT. This program provides linear response coefficients: electrical and electronic thermal conductances, as well as the thermopower of molecular junctions in which electrons interact with the surrounding thermal environment. Calculations are performed based on the Büttiker probe method, which introduces decoherence, energy exchange and dissipation effects phenomenologically using virtual electrode terminals called probes. The program can realize different types of probes, each introducing various environmental effects, including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons. The molecular system is described by an arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonian, allowing the study of different geometries beyond simple one-dimensional wires. Applications of the program to study the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions are illustrated. The program also has a built-in functionality to simulate electron transport in double-stranded DNA molecules based on a tight-binding (ladder) description of the junction.

  7. Molecular electrostatics for probing lone pair-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Neetha; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H; Kumar, Anmol; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2013-11-14

    An electrostatics-based approach has been proposed for probing the weak interactions between lone pair containing molecules and π deficient molecular systems. For electron-rich molecules, the negative minima in molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) topography give the location of electron localization and the MESP value at the minimum (Vmin) quantifies the electron-rich character of that region. Interactive behavior of a lone pair bearing molecule with electron deficient π-systems, such as hexafluorobenzene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine and 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene explored within DFT brings out good correlation of the lone pair-π interaction energy (E(int)) with the Vmin value of the electron-rich system. Such interaction is found to be portrayed well with the Electrostatic Potential for Intermolecular Complexation (EPIC) model. On the basis of the precise location of MESP minimum, a prediction for the orientation of a lone pair bearing molecule with an electron deficient π-system is possible in the majority of the cases studied.

  8. Molecular Probes: An Innovative Technology for Monitoring Membrane Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Sergio

    The ultimate objective of this study is to use molecular probes as an innovative and alternative technology contributing to the advance of membrane science by monitoring membrane processes in-situ, on-line and at sub-micron scale. An optical sensor for oxygen sensing was developed by the immobilization of tris (1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium (II) (Ru(phen)3) in a dense polymeric membrane made of polystyrene (PS) or Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). The emission of the probe was quenched by both the temperature and by the oxygen. Moreover, the oxygen sensitivity was affected by the oxygen permeability of the membrane. The evaluation of the oxygen concentration is prone to errors since the emission of a single probe depends on several parameters (i.e. optical path, source intensity). The correction of these artefacts was obtained by the immobilization of a second luminescent molecule non-sensitive to the oxygen, Coumarin. The potential of the luminescent ratiometric sensor for the non-invasive monitoring of oxygen in food packaging using polymeric films with different oxygen permeability was evaluated. Emphasis was given to the efficiency of the optical sensor for the on-line, in-situ and non invasive monitoring of the oxygen by comparing the experimental data with a model which takes into account the oxygen permeability of the packaging materials evaluated independently. A nano-thermometer based on silica nano-particles doped with Ru(phen)3 was developed. A systematic study shows how it is possible to control the properties of the nano-particles as well as their temperature sensitivity. The nano-thermometer was immobilized on a membrane surface by dip-coating providing information about the temperature on the membrane surface. Hydrophobic porous membrane made of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) was prepared via electrospinning and employed in a direct contact membrane distillation process. Using a designed membrane module and a membrane doped with Ru

  9. Structure–performance characterization for carbon molecular sieve membranes using molecular scale gas probes

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha

    2015-04-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Understanding the relationship between carbon molecular sieve (CMS) pore structure and corresponding gas separation performance enables optimization for a given gas separation application. The final pyrolysis temperature and starting polymer precursor are the two critical parameters in controlling CMS performance. This study considers structure and performance changes of CMS derived from a commercially available polymer precursor at different pyrolysis temperatures. As reviewed in this paper, most traditional characterization methods based on microscopy, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, sorption-based pore size distribution measurements etc. provide limited information for relating separation performance to the CMS morphology and structural changes. A useful alternative approach based on different sized gases as molecular scale probes of the CMS pore structure was successfully used here in conjunction with separation data to provide critical insights into the structure-performance relationships of the engineered CMS.

  10. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J Christensen

    Full Text Available Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response to variable ionic strengths, temperatures, and glycosylation status. Near-physiological conditions provided excellent agreement with the crystal structure (average RMSD ∼0.92 Å and residual agreement with experimental B-factors. The persistence of backbone hydrogen bonds was identified as a key descriptor of structural response to environment, whereas solvent-accessibility, radius of gyration, and fluctuations were only locally relevant. Backbone hydrogen bonds decreased systematically with temperature in all simulations (∼9 per 50 K, probing structural changes associated with enthalpy-entropy compensation. Approaching T opt (∼350 K from 300 K, this change correlated with a beginning "unzipping" of critical β-sheets. 0 M ionic strength triggered partial denucleation of the C-terminal (known experimentally to be sensitive at 400 K, suggesting a general salt stabilization effect. In contrast, F(- (but not Cl(- specifically impaired secondary structure by formation of strong hydrogen bonds with backbone NH, providing a mechanism for experimentally observed small anion destabilization, potentially remedied by site-directed mutagenesis at critical intrusion sites. N-glycosylation was found to support structural integrity by increasing persistent backbone hydrogen bonds by ∼4 across simulations, mainly via prevention of F(- intrusion. Hydrogen-bond loss in distinct loop regions and ends of critical β-sheets suggest potential strategies for laboratory optimization of these industrially important enzymes.

  11. UPAR targeted molecular imaging of cancers with small molecule-based probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Chen, Seng; Zhang, Wanshu; Tu, Yufeng; Sun, Yao

    2017-10-15

    Molecular imaging can allow the non-invasive characterization and measurement of biological and biochemical processes at the molecular and cellular levels in living subjects. The imaging of specific molecular targets that are associated with cancers could allow for the earlier diagnosis and better treatment of diseases. Small molecule-based probes play prominent roles in biomedical research and have high clinical translation ability. Here, with an emphasis on small molecule-based probes, we review some recent developments in biomarkers, imaging techniques and multimodal imaging in molecular imaging and highlight the successful applications for molecular imaging of cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Mingsen [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China); Ye, Gui; Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jiangj1@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Cai, Shaohong, E-mail: caish@mail.gufe.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025 (China); Guizhou Key Laboratory of Economic System Simulation, Guizhou University of Finance and Economics, Guiyang, 550004 (China); Sun, Guangyu [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, 550018 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  13. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D. [Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computational Science and Engineering and Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  14. Molecularly imprinted fluorescent probe based on FRET for selective and sensitive detection of doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhifeng, E-mail: 897061147@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Deng, Peihong; Li, Junhua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Xu, Li [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Tang, Siping [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • FRET-based molecularly imprinted probe for detection of doxorubicin was prepared. • The detection limit of the probe was 13.8 nM for doxorubicin. • The FRET-based probe had a higher selectivity for the template than ordinary MIMs. - Abstract: In this work, a new type of fluorescent probe for detection of doxorubicin has been constructed by the combined use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and molecular imprinting technique (MIT). Using doxorubicin as the template, the molecularly imprinted polymer thin layer was fabricated on the surfaces of carbon dot (CD) modified silica by sol-gel polymerization. The excitation energy of the fluorescent donor (CDs) could be transferred to the fluorescent acceptor (doxorubicin). The FRET based fluorescent probe demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for doxorubicin. The detection limit was 13.8 nM. The fluorescent probe was successfully applied for detecting doxorubicin in doxorubicin-spiked plasmas with a recovery of 96.8–103.8%, a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3–2.8%. The strategy for construction of FRET-based molecularly imprinted materials developed in this work is very promising for analytical applications.

  15. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Yoreo, J.J.; Bartelt, M.C.; Orme, C.A.; Villacampa, A.; Weeks, B.L.; Miller, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies

  16. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajen, Rasanayagam Sivasayan; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Feng Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Postfach 3148, D-55021 Mainz (Germany); Su Haibin, E-mail: n-chandra@imre.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: muellen@mpip-mainz.mpg.de, E-mail: hbsu@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-28

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2}) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2} spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  17. Probing Molecular Insights into Zika Virus–Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Lee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent Zika virus (ZIKV outbreak in the Americas surprised all of us because of its rapid spread and association with neurologic disorders including fetal microcephaly, brain and ocular anomalies, and Guillain–Barré syndrome. In response to this global health crisis, unprecedented and world-wide efforts are taking place to study the ZIKV-related human diseases. Much has been learned about this virus in the areas of epidemiology, genetic diversity, protein structures, and clinical manifestations, such as consequences of ZIKV infection on fetal brain development. However, progress on understanding the molecular mechanism underlying ZIKV-associated neurologic disorders remains elusive. To date, we still lack a good understanding of; (1 what virologic factors are involved in the ZIKV-associated human diseases; (2 which ZIKV protein(s contributes to the enhanced viral pathogenicity; and (3 how do the newly adapted and pandemic ZIKV strains alter their interactions with the host cells leading to neurologic defects? The goal of this review is to explore the molecular insights into the ZIKV–host interactions with an emphasis on host cell receptor usage for viral entry, cell innate immunity to ZIKV, and the ability of ZIKV to subvert antiviral responses and to cause cytopathic effects. We hope this literature review will inspire additional molecular studies focusing on ZIKV–host Interactions.

  18. Probing Molecular Insights into Zika Virus–Host Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ina; Li, Ge; Wang, Shusheng; Desprès, Philippe; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2018-01-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas surprised all of us because of its rapid spread and association with neurologic disorders including fetal microcephaly, brain and ocular anomalies, and Guillain–Barré syndrome. In response to this global health crisis, unprecedented and world-wide efforts are taking place to study the ZIKV-related human diseases. Much has been learned about this virus in the areas of epidemiology, genetic diversity, protein structures, and clinical manifestations, such as consequences of ZIKV infection on fetal brain development. However, progress on understanding the molecular mechanism underlying ZIKV-associated neurologic disorders remains elusive. To date, we still lack a good understanding of; (1) what virologic factors are involved in the ZIKV-associated human diseases; (2) which ZIKV protein(s) contributes to the enhanced viral pathogenicity; and (3) how do the newly adapted and pandemic ZIKV strains alter their interactions with the host cells leading to neurologic defects? The goal of this review is to explore the molecular insights into the ZIKV–host interactions with an emphasis on host cell receptor usage for viral entry, cell innate immunity to ZIKV, and the ability of ZIKV to subvert antiviral responses and to cause cytopathic effects. We hope this literature review will inspire additional molecular studies focusing on ZIKV–host Interactions. PMID:29724036

  19. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD) was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response...... integrity by increasing persistent backbone hydrogen bonds by ∼4 across simulations, mainly via prevention of F(-) intrusion. Hydrogen-bond loss in distinct loop regions and ends of critical β-sheets suggest potential strategies for laboratory optimization of these industrially important enzymes....

  20. Molecular Imaging Probes for Diagnosis and Therapy Evaluation of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer death in women where early detection and accurate assessment of therapy response can improve clinical outcomes. Molecular imaging, which includes PET, SPECT, MRI, and optical modalities, provides noninvasive means of detecting biological processes and molecular events in vivo. Molecular imaging has the potential to enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology and effects of drug action during both preclinical and clinical phases of drug development. This has led to the identification of many molecular imaging probes for key processes in breast cancer. Hormone receptors, growth factor receptor, and angiogenic factors, such as ER, PR, HER2, and VEGFR, have been adopted as imaging targets to detect and stage the breast cancer and to monitor the treatment efficacy. Receptor imaging probes are usually composed of targeting moiety attached to a signaling component such as a radionuclide that can be detected using dedicated instruments. Current molecular imaging probes involved in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy evaluation are reviewed, and future of molecular imaging for the preclinical and clinical is explained.

  1. A Molecularly Targeted Theranostic Probe for Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxue; Bardhan, Rizia; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family has been implicated in ovarian cancer because of its participation in signaling pathway regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. Currently, effective diagnostic and therapeutic schemes are lacking for treating ovarian cancer and consequently ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate. While HER2 receptor expression does not usually affect the survival rates of ovarian cancer to the same extent as in breast cancer, it can be employed as a docking site for directed nanotherapies in cases with de novo or acquired chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we have exploited a novel gold nanoshell-based complex (nanocomplex) for targeting, dual modal imaging, and photothermal therapy of HER2 overexpressing and drug resistant ovarian cancer OVCAR3 cells in vitro. The nanocomplexes are engineered to simultaneously provide contrast as fluorescence optical imaging probe and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. Both immunofluorescence staining and MRI successfully demonstrate that nanocomplex-anti-HER2 conjugates specifically bind to OVCAR3 cells as opposed to the control, MDA-MB-231 cells, which have low HER2 expression. In addition, nanocomplexes targeted to OVCAR3 cells, when irradiated with near infrared (NIR) laser result in selective destruction of cancer cells through photothermal ablation. We also demonstrate that NIR light therapy and the nanocomplexes by themselves are non-cytotoxic in vitro. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a successful integration of dual modal bioimaging with photothermal cancer therapy for treatment of ovarian cancer. Based on their efficacy in vitro, these nanocomplexes are highly promising for image guided photo-thermal therapy of ovarian cancer as well as other HER2 overexpressing cancers. PMID:20371708

  2. A small molecular pH-dependent fluorescent probe for cancer cell imaging in living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junbao; Li, Wenqi; Li, Juanjuan; Shi, Rongguang; Yin, Gui; Wang, Ruiyong

    2018-05-15

    A novel pH-dependent two-photon fluorescent molecular probe ABMP has been prepared based on the fluorophore of 2, 4, 6-trisubstituted pyridine. The probe has an absorption wavelength at 354 nm and corresponding emission wavelength at 475 nm with the working pH range from 2.20 to 7.00, especially owning a good liner response from pH = 2.40 to pH = 4.00. ABMP also has excellent reversibility, photostability and selectivity which promotes its ability in analytical application. The probe can be excited with a two-photon fluorescence microscopy and the fluorescence cell imaging indicated that the probe can distinguish Hela cancer cells out of normal cells with a two-photon fluorescence microscopy which suggested its potential application in tumor cell detection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  4. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research

  5. Picosecond Transient Photoconductivity in Functionalized Pentacene Molecular Crystals Probed by Terahertz Pulse Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegmann, F. A.; Tykwinski, R. R.; Lui, K. P.; Bullock, J. E.; Anthony, J. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have measured transient photoconductivity in functionalized pentacene molecular crystals using ultrafast optical pump-terahertz probe techniques. The single crystal samples were excited using 800nm, 100fs pulses, and the change in transmission of time-delayed, subpicosecond terahertz pulses was used to probe the photoconducting state over a temperature range from 10 to 300K. A subpicosecond rise in photoconductivity is observed, suggesting that mobile carriers are a primary photoexcitation. At times longer than 4ps, a power-law decay is observed consistent with dispersive transport.

  6. The research progress of dual-modality probes for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Feng; Chen Yue

    2010-01-01

    Various imaging modalities have been exploited to investigate the anatomic or functional dissemination of tissues in the body. However, no single imaging modality allows overall structural, functional, and molecular information as each imaging modality has its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The combination of two imaging modalities that investigates the strengths of different methods might offer the prospect of improved diagnostic abilities. As more and more dual-modality imaging system have become clinically adopted, significant progress has been made toward the creation of dual-modality imaging probes, which can be used as novel tools for future multimodality systems. These all-in-one probes take full advantage of two different imaging modalities and could provide comprehensive information for clinical diagnostics. This review discusses the advantages and challenges in developing dual-modality imaging probes. (authors)

  7. Protein rotational dynamics investigated with a dual EPR/optical molecular probe. Spin-labeled eosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C E; Hustedt, E J; Beechem, J M; Beth, A H

    1993-01-01

    An acyl spin-label derivative of 5-aminoeosin (5-SLE) was chemically synthesized and employed in studies of rotational dynamics of the free probe and of the probe when bound noncovalently to bovine serum albumin using the spectroscopic techniques of fluorescence anisotropy decay and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and their long-lifetime counterparts phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR. Previous work (Beth, A. H., Cobb, C. E., and J. M. Beechem, 1992. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy III. 504-512) has shown that the spin-label moiety only slightly altered the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 5-SLE when compared with 5-SLE whose nitroxide had been reduced with ascorbate and with the diamagnetic homolog 5-acetyleosin. In the present work, we have utilized time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and linear EPR spectroscopies to observe and quantitate the psec motions of 5-SLE in solution and the nsec motions of the 5-SLE-bovine serum albumin complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR studies have been carried out to observe and quantitate the microseconds motions of the 5-SLE-albumin complex in glycerol/buffer solutions of varying viscosity. These latter studies have enabled a rigorous comparison of rotational correlation times obtained from these complementary techniques to be made with a single probe. The studies described demonstrate that it is possible to employ a single molecular probe to carry out the full range of fluorescence, phosphorescence, EPR, and saturation transfer EPR studies. It is anticipated that "dual" molecular probes of this general type will significantly enhance capabilities for extracting dynamics and structural information from macromolecules and their functional

  8. Raman spectroscopy in investigations of mechanism of binding of human serum albumin to molecular probe fluorescein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasova, I M; Saletsky, A M

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of molecular probe fluorescein to molecules of human serum albumin was studied by the Raman spectroscopy method. The position of binding Center on human serum albumin molecule for fluorescein is determined. The amino acid residues of albumin molecule, participating in binding of fluorescein at different pH values of solution, are established. The conformation rearrangements of globules of human serum albumin, taking place at binding of fluorescein at different pH values of solution, are registered

  9. Performance of Molecular Inversion Probes (MIP) in Allele CopyNumber Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuker; Moorhead, Martin; Karlin-Neumann, George; Wang,Nicolas J.; Ireland, James; Lin, Steven; Chen, Chunnuan; Heiser, LauraM.; Chin, Koei; Esserman, Laura; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Faham,Malek

    2007-05-14

    We have developed a new protocol for using MolecularInversion Probes (MIP) to accurately and specifically measure allele copynumber (ACN). The new protocol provides for significant improvementsincluding the reduction of input DNA (from 2?g) by more than 25 fold (to75ng total genomic DNA), higher overall precision resulting in one orderof magnitude lower false positive rate, and greater dynamic range withaccurate absolute copy number up to 60 copies.

  10. Structure–performance characterization for carbon molecular sieve membranes using molecular scale gas probes

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha; Xu, Liren; Koros, William J.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Understanding the relationship between carbon molecular sieve (CMS) pore structure and corresponding gas separation performance enables optimization for a given gas separation application. The final

  11. Analyte-Triggered DNA-Probe Release from a Triplex Molecular Beacon for Nanopore Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bingyuan; Sheng, Yingying; Zhou, Ke; Liu, Quansheng; Liu, Lei; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2018-03-26

    A new nanopore sensing strategy based on triplex molecular beacon was developed for the detection of specific DNA or multivalent proteins. The sensor is composed of a triplex-forming molecular beacon and a stem-forming DNA component that is modified with a host-guest complex. Upon target DNA hybridizing with the molecular beacon loop or multivalent proteins binding to the recognition elements on the stem, the DNA probe is released and produces highly characteristic current signals when translocated through α-hemolysin. The frequency of current signatures can be used to quantify the concentrations of the target molecules. This sensing approach provides a simple, quick, and modular tool for the detection of specific macromolecules with high sensitivity and excellent selectivity. It may find useful applications in point-of-care diagnostics with a portable nanopore kit in the future. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Probing molecular orientations in thin films by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Li, P.; Lu, Z.-H.

    2018-03-01

    A great number of functional organic molecules in active thin-film layers of optoelectronic devices have highly asymmetric structures, such as plate-like, rod-like, etc. This makes molecular orientation an important aspect in thin-films as it can significantly affect both the optical and electrical performance of optoelectronic devices. With a combination of in-situ ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations for organic molecules having a broad range of structural properties, we discovered a rigid connection of core levels and frontier highest occupied molecular orbital levels at organic interfaces. This finding opens up opportunities of using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy as an alternative tool to UPS for providing an easy and unambiguous data interpretation in probing molecular orientations.

  13. Probing molecular orientations in thin films by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A great number of functional organic molecules in active thin-film layers of optoelectronic devices have highly asymmetric structures, such as plate-like, rod-like, etc. This makes molecular orientation an important aspect in thin-films as it can significantly affect both the optical and electrical performance of optoelectronic devices. With a combination of in-situ ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS investigations for organic molecules having a broad range of structural properties, we discovered a rigid connection of core levels and frontier highest occupied molecular orbital levels at organic interfaces. This finding opens up opportunities of using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy as an alternative tool to UPS for providing an easy and unambiguous data interpretation in probing molecular orientations.

  14. Probing a molecular electronic transition by two-colour sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, C.; Dreesen, L.; Nihonyanagi, S.; Masuda, T.; Kondo, T.; Mani, A.A.; Uosaki, K.; Thiry, P.A.; Peremans, A.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that a new emerging technique, two-colour sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, can be used to probe the molecular electronic properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In the CH spectral range (2800-3200 cm -1 ), we show that the sum-frequency generation signal of a porphyrin alkanethiol derivative adsorbed on Pt(1 1 1) reaches a maximum intensity at ∼435 nm SFG wavelength. This wavelength corresponds to the porphyrin moiety specific π-π* molecular electronic transition which is called the Soret or B band. This resonant behaviour is not observed for 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, which are devoid of molecular electronic transition in the investigated visible spectral range

  15. Molecular organization and dynamics of micellar phase of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes: ESR spin probe study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, A. M.; Kasaikin, V. A.; Zakharova, Yu. A.; Aliev, I. I.; Baranovsky, V. Yu.; Doseva, V.; Yasina, L. L.

    2002-04-01

    Molecular dynamics and organization of the micellar phase of complexes of linear polyelectrolytes with ionogenic and non-ionogenic surfactants was studied by the ESR spin probe method. Complexes of polyacrylic acid (PAA) and sodium polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) with alkyltrimethylammonium bromides (ATAB), as well as complexes of poly- N, N'-dimethyldiallylammonium chloride (PDACL) with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were studied. The micellar phase of such complexes is highly organized molecular system, molecular ordering of which near the polymeric chain is much higher than in the 'center' of the micelle, it depends on the polymer-detergent interaction, flexibility of polymeric chain and length of carbonic part of the detergent molecule. Complexes of polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) with non-ionic detergent (dodecyl-substituted polyethyleneglycol), show that the local mobility of surfactant in such complexes is significantly lower than in 'free' micelles and depends on the number of micellar particles participating in formation of complexes.

  16. EPR spin probe and spin label studies of some low molecular and polymer micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, A. M.; Kasaikin, V. A.; Timofeev, V. P.

    1998-12-01

    The rotational mobility of spin probes of different shape and size in low molecular and polymer micelles has been studied. Several probes having nitroxide fragment localized either in the vicinity of micelle interface or in the hydrocarbon core have been used. Upon increasing the number of carbon atoms in hydrocarbon chain of detergent from 7 to 13 (sodium alkyl sulfate micelles) or from 12 to 16 (alkyltrimethylammonium bromide micelles) the rotational mobility of spin probes is decreased by the factor 1.5-2.0. The spin probe rotational mobility in polymer micelles (the complexes of alkyltrimethylammonium bromides and polymethacrylic or polyacrylic acids) is less than mobility in free micelles of the same surfactants. The study of EPR-spectra of spin labeled polymethacrylic acid (PMA) indicated that formation of water soluble complexes of polymer and alkyltrimethylammonium bromides in alkaline solutions (pH 9) does not affect the polymer segmental mobility. On the other hand, the polymer complexes formation in slightly acidic water solution (pH 6) breaks down the compact PMA conformation, thus increasing the polymer segmental mobility. Possible structures of polymer micelles are discussed.

  17. Probing molecular interactions in bone biomaterials: Through molecular dynamics and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmik, Rahul; Katti, Kalpana S.; Verma, Devendra; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-hydroxyapatite (HAP) composites are widely investigated for their potential use as bone replacement materials. The molecular interactions at mineral polymer interface are known to have significant role of mechanical response of the composite system. Modeling interactions between such dissimilar molecules using molecular dynamics (MD) is an area of current interest. Molecular dynamics studies require potential function or force field parameters. Some force fields are described in literature that represents the structure of hydroxyapatite reasonably well. Yet, the applicability of these force fields for studying the interaction between dissimilar materials (such as mineral and polymer) is limited, as there is no accurate representation of polymer in these force fields. We have obtained the parameters of consistent valence force field (CVFF) for monoclinic hydroxyapatite. Validation of parameters was done by comparing the computationally obtained unit cell parameters, vibrational spectra and atomic distances with XRD and FTIR experiments. Using the obtained parameters of HAP, and available parameters of polymer (polyacrylic acid), interaction study was performed with MD simulations. The MD simulations showed that several hydrogen bonds may form between HAP and polyacrylic acid depending upon the exposed surface of HAP. Also there are some favourable planes of HAP where polyacrylic acid is most likely to attach. We have also simulated the mineralization of HAP using a 'synthetic biomineralization'. These modeling studies are supported by photoacoustic spectroscopy experiments on both porous and non porous composite samples for potential joint replacement and bone tissue engineering applications

  18. A new scaling for the rotational diffusion of molecular probes in polymer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Jing; Chen, Anpu; Zhao, Nanrong

    2017-12-13

    In the present work, we propose a new scaling form for the rotational diffusion coefficient of molecular probes in semi-dilute polymer solutions, based on a theoretical study. The mean-field theory for depletion effect and semi-empirical scaling equation for the macroscopic viscosity of polymer solutions are properly incorporated to specify the space-dependent concentration and viscosity profiles in the vicinity of the probe surface. Following the scheme of classical fluid mechanics, we numerically evaluate the shear torque exerted on the probes, which then allows us to further calculate the rotational diffusion coefficient D r . Particular attention is given to the scaling behavior of the retardation factor R rot ≡ D/D r with D being the diffusion coefficient in pure solvent. We find that R rot has little relevance to the macroscopic viscosity of the polymer solution, while it can be well featured by the characteristic length scale r h /δ, i.e. the ratio between the hydrodynamic radius of the probe r h and the depletion thickness δ. Correspondingly, we obtain a novel scaling form for the rotational retardation factor, following R rot = exp[a(r h /δ) b ] with rather robust parameters of a ≃ 0.51 and b ≃ 0.56. We apply the theory to an extensive calculation for various probes in specific polymer solutions of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and dextran. Our theoretical results show good agreements with the experimental data, and clearly demonstrate the validity of the new scaling form. In addition, the difference of the scaling behavior between translational and rotational diffusions is clarified, from which we conclude that the depletion effect plays a more significant role on the local rotational diffusion rather than the long-range translation diffusion.

  19. Progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin αvβ3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haojun; Wu Hua

    2012-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical in the growth, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. The integrins, which express on many types of tumor cells and activated vascular endothelial cells, play an important role in regulation of the tumor angiogenesis. RGD peptide, which contains Arg-Gly-Asp sequence, binds specifically to integrin α v β 3 . Therefore, the radiolabeled RGD peptides may have broad application prospects in radionuclide imaging and therapy. Major research interests include the selection of radionuclides, modification and improvement of RGD structures. In this article, we give a review on research progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin α v β 3 . (authors)

  20. Targeted Capture and High-Throughput Sequencing Using Molecular Inversion Probes (MIPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantsilieris, Stuart; Stessman, Holly A; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E

    2017-01-01

    Molecular inversion probes (MIPs) in combination with massively parallel DNA sequencing represent a versatile, yet economical tool for targeted sequencing of genomic DNA. Several thousand genomic targets can be selectively captured using long oligonucleotides containing unique targeting arms and universal linkers. The ability to append sequencing adaptors and sample-specific barcodes allows large-scale pooling and subsequent high-throughput sequencing at relatively low cost per sample. Here, we describe a "wet bench" protocol detailing the capture and subsequent sequencing of >2000 genomic targets from 192 samples, representative of a single lane on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform.

  1. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    with collective physical properties (e.g. thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature or elastic moduli). Studies in physico-chemical model systems have demonstrated that changes in bilayer physical properties can regulate membrane protein function by altering the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation associated...... with a protein conformational change. This type of regulation is well characterized, and its mechanistic elucidation is an interdisciplinary field bordering on physics, chemistry and biology. Changes in lipid composition that alter bilayer physical properties (including cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids...... channels as molecular force probes for studying this mechanism, with a unique ability to discriminate between consequences of changes in monolayer curvature and bilayer elastic moduli....

  2. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  3. C3H2 observations as a diagnostic probe for molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recently the three-membered ring molecule, cyclopropenylidene, C3H2, has been identified in the laboratory and detected in molecular clouds by Thaddeus, Vrtilek and Gottlieb (1985). This molecule is wide-spread throughout the Galaxy and has been detected in 25 separate sources including cold dust clouds, circumstellar envelopes, HII regions, and the spiral arms observed against the Cas supernova remnant. In order to evaluate the potential of C3H2 as a diagnostic probe for molecular clouds, and to attempt to identify the most useful transitions, statistical equilibrium calculations were carried out for the lowest 24 levels of the ortho species and the lowest 10 levels of the para species. Many of the sources observed by Matthews and Irvine (1985) show evidence of being optically thick in the 1(10)-1(01) line. Consequently, the effects of radiative trapping should be incorporated into the equilibrium calculations. This was done using the Large Velocity Gradient approximation for a spherical cloud of uniform density. Some results of the calculations for T(K)=10K are given. Figures are presented which show contours of the logarithm of the ratio of peak line brightness temperatures for ortho-para pairs of lines at similar frequencies. It appears that the widespread nature of C3H2, the relatively large strength of its spectral lines, and their sensitivity to density and molecular abundance combine to make this a useful molecule for probing physical conditions in molecular clouds. The 1(10)-1(01) and 2(20)-2(11) K-band lines may be especially useful in this regard because of the ease with which they are observed and their unusual density-dependent emission/absorption properties.

  4. Molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Liu, Yongchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-03-01

    During the past two decades, two-photon microscopy (TPM), which utilizes two near-infrared photons as the excitation source, has emerged as a novel, attractive imaging tool for biological research. Compared with one-photon microscopy, TPM offers several advantages, such as lowering background fluorescence in living cells and tissues, reducing photodamage to biosamples, and a photobleaching phenomenon, offering better 3D spatial localization, and increasing penetration depth. Small-molecule-based two-photon fluorescent probes have been well developed for the detection and imaging of various analytes in biological systems. In this review, we will give a general introduction of molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes based on different fluorescence response mechanisms for bioimaging applications during the past decade. Inspired by the desired advantages of small-molecule two-photon fluorescent probes in biological imaging applications, we expect that more attention will be devoted to the development of new two-photon fluorophores and applications of TPM in areas of bioanalysis and disease diagnosis.

  5. Noninvasive imaging of multiple myeloma using near infrared fluorescent molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Bollerman-Nowlis, Alex; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by monoclonal gammopathy and osteolytic bone lesions. Multiple myeloma is most commonly diagnosed in late disease stages, presenting with pathologic fracture. Early diagnosis and monitoring of disease status may improve quality of life and long-term survival for multiple myeloma patients from what is now a devastating and fatal disease. We have developed a near-infrared targeted fluorescent molecular probe with high affinity to the α4β1 integrin receptor (VLA-4)overexpressed by a majority of multiple myeloma cells as a non-radioactive analog to PET/CT tracer currently being developed for human diagnostics. A near-infrared dye that emits about 700 nm was conjugated to a high affinity peptidomimmetic. Binding affinity and specificity for multiple myeloma cells was investigated in vitro by tissue staining and flow cytometry. After demonstration of sensitivity and specificity, preclinical optical imaging studies were performed to evaluate tumor specificity in murine subcutaneous and metastatic multiple myeloma models. The VLA-4-targeted molecular probe showed high affinity for subcutaneous MM tumor xenografts. Importantly, tumor cells specific accumulation in the bone marrow of metastatic multiple myeloma correlated with GFP signal from transfected cells. Ex vivo flow cytometry of tumor tissue and bone marrow further corroborated in vivo imaging data, demonstrating the specificity of the novel agent and potential for quantitative imaging of multiple myeloma burden in these models.

  6. 08-ERD-071 Final Report: New Molecular Probes and Catalysts for Bioenergy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M P; Rowe, A A; Siebers, A K; Jiao, Y

    2011-03-07

    A major thrust in bioenergy research is to develop innovative methods for deconstructing plant cell wall polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, into simple monomers that can be biologically converted to ethanol and other fuels. Current techniques for monitoring a broad array of cell wall materials and specific degradation products are expensive and time consuming. To monitor various polymers and assay their breakdown products, molecular probes for detecting specific carbohydrates and lignins are urgently needed. These new probes would extend the limited biochemical techniques available, and enable realtime imaging of ultrastructural changes in plant cells. Furthermore, degradation of plant biomass could be greatly accelerated by the development of catalysts that can hydrolyze key cell wall polysaccharides and lignin. The objective of this project was to develop cheap and efficient DNA reagents (aptamers) used to detect and quantify polysaccharides, lignin, and relevant products of their breakdown. A practical goal of the research was to develop electrochemical aptamer biosensors, which could be integrated into microfluidic devices and used for high-throughput screening of enzymes or biological systems that degrade biomass. Several important model plant cell wall polymers and compounds were targeted for specific binding and purification of aptamers, which were then tested by microscopic imaging, circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy, and electrochemical biosensors. Using this approach, it was anticiated that we could provide a basis for more efficient and economically viable biofuels, and the technologies established could be used to design molecular tools that recognize targets sought in medicine or chemical and biological defense projects.

  7. Development of new Molecular Imaging probes; Desarrollo de nuevas sondas de Imagen Molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Vallejo, V.; Baz, Z.; Llop, J.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) are essential tools for the early diagnose of certain pathologies, and have been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of disease, the visualization of biological and physiological phenomena and in the process of drug development. PET and SPECT require the administration of a radiotracer (compound labelled with a radioactive nuclide) to the subject under investigation (patient, healthy volunteer or experimental animal). Due to their high sensitivity and their noninvasive nature, nuclear imaging techniques have a great potential. However, only a few radiotracers are currently routinely used in clinical diagnose. In contrast, new tracers suitable for the visualization of new targets or showing improved specificity, selectivity or pharmacokinetic properties are continuously designed, synthesized and assayed in the preclinical setting. Far from performing an exhaustive revision of the new radiotracers currently under development, this paper aims to collate recent advances related to the preparation of novel nuclear imaging probes, which have a significant scientific impact in terms of literature volume, and which could be translated to the clinical environment in the near future. First, peptides and nanoparticles (NPs) are discussed. Finally, antibody derivatives and the recently developed pretargeting strategy, which enables the visualization of tumours while lowering significantly the effective dose posed on the subject under investigation, will be briefly covered. [Spanish] Las técnicas de imagen nuclear, entre las que se encuentran la tomografía por emisión de positrones (PET) y la tomografía por emisión de fotón único (SPECT) son herramientas fundamentales no sólo en el entorno clínico diagnóstico, sino también para el estudio mecanístico de determinadas patologías, la visualización de procesos biol

  8. Multiscale diffusion of a molecular probe in a crowded environment: a concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Megan; Thao, Chang; Timerman, Randi; Welty, Robb; Berry, Brenden; Sheets, Erin D.; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2015-08-01

    Living cells are crowded with macromolecules and organelles. Yet, it is not fully understood how macromolecular crowding affects the myriad of biochemical reactions, transport and the structural stability of biomolecules that are essential to cellular function and survival. These molecular processes, with or without electrostatic interactions, in living cells are therefore expected to be distinct from those carried out in test tube in dilute solutions where excluded volumes are absent. Thus there is an urgent need to understand the macromolecular crowding effects on cellular and molecular biophysics towards quantitative cell biology. In this report, we investigated how biomimetic crowding affects both the rotational and translation diffusion of a small probe (rhodamine green, RhG). For biomimetic crowding agents, we used Ficoll-70 (synthetic polymer), bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin (proteins) at various concentrations in a buffer at room temperature. As a control, we carried out similar measurements on glycerolenriched buffer as an environment with homogeneous viscosity as a function of glycerol concentration. The corresponding bulk viscosity was measured independently to test the validity of the Stokes-Einstein model of a diffusing species undergoing a random walk. For rotational diffusion (ps-ns time scale), we used time-resolved anisotropy measurements to examine potential binding of RhG as a function of the crowding agents (surface structure and size). For translational diffusion (μs-s time scale), we used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for single-molecule fluctuation analysis. Our results allow us to examine the diffusion model of a molecular probe in crowded environments as a function of concentration, length scale, homogeneous versus heterogeneous viscosity, size and surface structures. These biomimetic crowding studies, using non-invasive fluorescence spectroscopy methods, represent an important step towards understanding cellular biophysics and

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS): a probe for molecular organisation in self-assembled biomimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Celesta; Dong, Aurelia W; Hill, Anita J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2015-07-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been shown to be highly sensitive to conformational, structural and microenvironmental transformations arising from subtle geometric changes in molecular geometry in self-assembling biomimetic systems. The ortho-positronium (oPs) may be considered an active probe that can provide information on intrinsic packing and mobility within low molecular weight solids, viscous liquids, and soft matter systems. In this perspective we provide a critical overview of the literature in this field, including the evolution of analysis software and experimental protocols with commentary upon the practical utility of PALS. In particular, we discuss how PALS can provide unique insight into the macroscopic transport properties of several porous biomembrane-like nanostructures and suggest how this insight may provide information on the release of drugs from these matrices to aid in developing therapeutic interventions. We discuss the potentially exciting and fruitful application of this technique to membrane dynamics, diffusion and permeability. We propose that PALS can provide novel molecular level information that is complementary to conventional characterisation techniques.

  10. Evaluating enzootic bovine leukemia virus infection by means of molecular probe compared with the results of serological tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichert, M.; Grundbock, J.; Rulka, J.; Kozaczynska, B.; Stec, J.

    1994-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at determining the relation between the finding obtained by means of serological tests and the specific molecular probe. Serological tests were performed according to the methods recommended by the Polish Ministry of Agriculture; ELISA was run with ''Bioveta'' and ''Rhone Merieux'' kits and the AGID test was performed with EBL antigen made in our laboratory. The molecular probe was prepared from the previously cloned provirus DNA of EBL virus. The EBL provirus was detected in 28 samples taken from 44 randomly selected cows in three herds on which a leukemia eradication programme was in process. Three sera out of 28 positive reacting animals were negative in AGID test and only one serum in ELISA. The results indicate that the use of a specific molecular probe has some advantages in the diagnosis of latent virus infections. Besides, it can be applied in the studies on the pathogenesis of enzootic bovine leukemia. (author). 13 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Scanning probe microscopy studies on the adsorption of selected molecular dyes on titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub S. Prauzner-Bechcicki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide, or titania, sensitized with organic dyes is a very attractive platform for photovoltaic applications. In this context, the knowledge of properties of the titania–sensitizer junction is essential for designing efficient devices. Consequently, studies on the adsorption of organic dyes on titania surfaces and on the influence of the adsorption geometry on the energy level alignment between the substrate and an organic adsorbate are necessary. The method of choice for investigating the local environment of a single dye molecule is high-resolution scanning probe microscopy. Microscopic results combined with the outcome of common spectroscopic methods provide a better understanding of the mechanism taking place at the titania–sensitizer interface. In the following paper, we review the recent scanning probe microscopic research of a certain group of molecular assemblies on rutile titania surfaces as it pertains to dye-sensitized solar cell applications. We focus on experiments on adsorption of three types of prototypical dye molecules, i.e., perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA, phtalocyanines and porphyrins. Two interesting heteromolecular systems comprising molecules that are aligned with the given review are discussed as well.

  12. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of arylamine derivatives of rauwolscine as molecular probes for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanier, S.M.; Graham, R.M.; Hess, H.J.; Grodski, A.; Repaske, M.G.; Nunnari, J.M.; Limbird, L.E.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist rauwolscine was structurally modified to yield a series of arylamine carboxamide derivatives, which were investigated as potential molecular probes for the localization and structural characterization of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. The arylamine carboxamides differ in the number of carbon atoms separating the reactive phenyl moiety from the fused ring structure of the parent compound, rauwolscine carboxylate. Competitive inhibition studies with [ 3 H]rauwolscine in rat kidney membranes indicate that the affinity for the carboxamide derivatives is inversely related to the length of the carbon spacer arm with rauwolscine 4-aminophenyl carboxamide exhibiting the highest affinity (Kd = 2.3 +/- 0.2 nM). Radioiodination of rau-AMPC yields a ligand, 125 I-rau-AMPC, which binds to rat kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptors with high affinity, as determined by both kinetic analysis (Kd = k2/k1 = 0.016 min-1/2.1 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 = 0.76 nM) and equilibrium binding studies (Kd = 0.78 +/- 0.16 nM). 125 I-rau-AMPC was quantitatively converted to the photolabile arylazide derivative 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-azido-3-[ 125 I]iodophenyl) carboxamide ( 125 I-rau-AZPC). In a partially purified receptor preparation from porcine brain, this compound photolabels a major (Mr = 62,000) peptide. The labeling of this peptide is inhibited by adrenergic agonists and antagonists with a rank order of potency consistent with an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor binding site. Both 125 I-rau-AMPC and the photolabile arylazide derivative, 125 I-rau-AZPC, should prove useful as molecular probes for the structural and biochemical characterization of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

  14. Patterning a hydrogen-bonded molecular monolayer with a hand-controlled scanning probe microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F. B. Green

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the paramount goals in nanotechnology is molecular-scale functional design, which includes arranging molecules into complex structures at will. The first steps towards this goal were made through the invention of the scanning probe microscope (SPM, which put single-atom and single-molecule manipulation into practice for the first time. Extending the controlled manipulation to larger molecules is expected to multiply the potential of engineered nanostructures. Here we report an enhancement of the SPM technique that makes the manipulation of large molecular adsorbates much more effective. By using a commercial motion tracking system, we couple the movements of an operator's hand to the sub-angstrom precise positioning of an SPM tip. Literally moving the tip by hand we write a nanoscale structure in a monolayer of large molecules, thereby showing that our method allows for the successful execution of complex manipulation protocols even when the potential energy surface that governs the interaction behaviour of the manipulated nanoscale object(s is largely unknown.

  15. Development of Thinopyrum ponticum-specific molecular markers and FISH probes based on SLAF-seq technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqin; Luo, Qiaoling; Teng, Wan; Li, Bin; Li, Hongwei; Li, Yiwen; Li, Zhensheng; Zheng, Qi

    2018-05-01

    Based on SLAF-seq, 67 Thinopyrum ponticum-specific markers and eight Th. ponticum-specific FISH probes were developed, and these markers and probes could be used for detection of alien chromatin in a wheat background. Decaploid Thinopyrum ponticum (2n = 10x = 70) is a valuable gene reservoir for wheat improvement. Identification of Th. ponticum introgression would facilitate its transfer into diverse wheat genetic backgrounds and its practical utilization in wheat improvement. Based on specific-locus-amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology, 67 new Th. ponticum-specific molecular markers and eight Th. ponticum-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes have been developed from a tiny wheat-Th. ponticum translocation line. These newly developed molecular markers allowed the detection of Th. ponticum DNA in a variety of materials specifically and steadily at high throughput. According to the hybridization signal pattern, the eight Th. ponticum-specific probes could be divided into two groups. The first group including five dispersed repetitive sequence probes could identify Th. ponticum chromatin more sensitively and accurately than genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Whereas the second group having three tandem repetitive sequence probes enabled the discrimination of Th. ponticum chromosomes together with another clone pAs1 in wheat-Th. ponticum partial amphiploid Xiaoyan 68.

  16. A low molecular weight zinc{sup 2+}-dipicolylamine-based probe detects apoptosis during tumour treatment better than an annexin V-based probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmowski, Karin [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Department of Pneumology, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Rix, Anne; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kiessling, Fabian [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gray, Brian D. [Molecular Targeting Technologies, Inc., West Chester, PA (United States); Pak, Koon Y. [University Medical Center Heidelberg, Academic Radiology Baden-Baden, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz [RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Aachen (Germany); RWTH-Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); University Medical Center Heidelberg, Academic Radiology Baden-Baden, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Molecular imaging of apoptosis is frequently discussed for monitoring cancer therapies. Here, we compare the low molecular weight phosphatidylserine-targeting ligand zinc{sup 2+}-dipicolylamine (Zn{sup 2+}-DPA) with the established but reasonably larger protein annexin V. Molecular apoptosis imaging with the fluorescently labelled probes annexin V (750 nm, 36 kDa) and Zn{sup 2+}-DPA (794 nm, 1.84 kDa) was performed in tumour-bearing mice (A431). Three animal groups were investigated: untreated controls and treated tumours after 1 or 4 days of anti-angiogenic therapy (SU11248). Additionally, μPET with {sup 18} F-FDG was performed. Imaging data were displayed as tumour-to-muscle ratio (TMR) and validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Compared with untreated control tumours, TUNEL staining indicated significant apoptosis after 1 day (P < 0.05) and 4 days (P < 0.01) of treatment. Concordantly, Zn{sup 2+}-DPA uptake increased significantly after 1 day (P < 0.05) and 4 days (P < 0.01). Surprisingly, annexin V failed to detect significant differences between control and treated animals. Contrary to the increasing uptake of Zn{sup 2+}-DPA, {sup 18} F-FDG tumour uptake decreased significantly at days 1 (P < 0.05) and 4 (P < 0.01). Increase in apoptosis during anti-angiogenic therapy was detected significantly better with the low molecular weight probe Zn{sup 2+}-DPA than with the annexin V-based probe. Additionally, significant treatment effects were detectable as early using Zn{sup 2+}-DPA as with measurements of the glucose metabolism using {sup 18} F-FDG. (orig.)

  17. Improvement in the assessment of direct and facilitated ion transfers by electrochemically induced redox transformations of common molecular probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min; Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie

    2012-01-01

    A new strategy based on a thick organic film modified electrode allowed us, for the first time, to explore the voltammetric processes for a series of hydrophilic ions by electrochemically induced redox transformations of common molecular probes. During the limited time available for voltammetry, ...

  18. Styrene oligomerization as a molecular probe reaction for zeolite acidity: a UV-Vis spectroscopy and DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.; Pidko, E.A.; Groot, de J.M.; Stavitski, E.; Santen, van R.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of H-ZSM-5 crystallites with different framework Si/Al ratios was studied by analyzing the kinetics and reaction mechanism of the oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene as molecular probe reaction for Brønsted acidity. The formation of carbocationic species was followed by UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  19. pH-Induced Modulation of One- and Two-Photon Absorption Properties in a Naphthalene-Based Molecular Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans

    2013-08-13

    Presently, there is a great demand for small probe molecules that can be used for two-photon excitation microscopy (TPM)-based monitoring of intracellular and intraorganelle activity and pH. The candidate molecules should ideally possess a large two-photon absorption cross section with optical properties sensitive to pH changes. In the present work, we investigate the potential of a methoxy napthalene (MONAP) derivative for its suitability to serve as a pH sensor using TPM. Using an integrated approach rooted in hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics, the structures, dynamics, and the one- and two-photon properties of the probe in dimethylformamide solvent are studied. It is found that the protonated form is responsible for the optical property of MONAP at moderately low pH, for which the calculated pH-induced red shift is in good agreement with experiments. A 2-fold increase in the two-photon absorption cross section in the IR region of the spectrum is predicted for the moderately low pH form of the probe, suggesting that this can be a potential probe for pH monitoring of living cells. We also propose some design principles aimed at obtaining control of the absorption spectral range of the probe by structural tuning. Our work indicates that the integrated approach employed is capable of capturing the pH-induced changes in structure and optical properties of organic molecular probes and that such in silico tools can be used to draw structure-property relationships to design novel molecular probes suitable for a specific application.

  20. High quality copy number and genotype data from FFPE samples using Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuker; Carlton, Victoria E.H.; Karlin-Neumann, George; Sapolsky, Ronald; Zhang, Li; Moorhead, Martin; Wang, Zhigang C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Warren, Robert; Walther, Axel; Bondy, Melissa; Sahin, Aysegul; Krahe, Ralf; Tuna, Musaffe; Thompson, Patricia A.; Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Faham, Malek

    2009-02-24

    A major challenge facing DNA copy number (CN) studies of tumors is that most banked samples with extensive clinical follow-up information are Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE). DNA from FFPE samples generally underperforms or suffers high failure rates compared to fresh frozen samples because of DNA degradation and cross-linking during FFPE fixation and processing. As FFPE protocols may vary widely between labs and samples may be stored for decades at room temperature, an ideal FFPE CN technology should work on diverse sample sets. Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) technology has been applied successfully to obtain high quality CN and genotype data from cell line and frozen tumor DNA. Since the MIP probes require only a small ({approx}40 bp) target binding site, we reasoned they may be well suited to assess degraded FFPE DNA. We assessed CN with a MIP panel of 50,000 markers in 93 FFPE tumor samples from 7 diverse collections. For 38 FFPE samples from three collections we were also able to asses CN in matched fresh frozen tumor tissue. Using an input of 37 ng genomic DNA, we generated high quality CN data with MIP technology in 88% of FFPE samples from seven diverse collections. When matched fresh frozen tissue was available, the performance of FFPE DNA was comparable to that of DNA obtained from matched frozen tumor (genotype concordance averaged 99.9%), with only a modest loss in performance in FFPE. MIP technology can be used to generate high quality CN and genotype data in FFPE as well as fresh frozen samples.

  1. On the quantification of the dissolved hydroxyl radicals in the plasma-liquid system using the molecular probe method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yupengxue; Gong, Xinning; He, Bangbang; Li, Xiaofei; Cao, Dianyu; Li, Junshuai; Xiong, Qing; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bing Hui; Huo Liu, Qing

    2018-04-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radical is one of the most important reactive species produced by plasma-liquid interactions, and the OH in liquid phase (dissolved OH radical, OHdis) takes effect in many plasma-based applications due to its high reactivity. Therefore, the quantification of the OHdis in a plasma-liquid system is of great importance, and a molecular probe method usually used for the OHdis detection might be applied. Herein, we investigate the validity of using the molecular probe method to estimate the [OHdis] in the plasma-liquid system. Dimethyl sulfoxide is used as the molecular probe to estimate the [OHdis] in an air plasma-liquid system, and usually the estimation of [OHdis] is deduced by quantifying the OHdis-induced derivative, the formaldehyde (HCHO). The analysis indicates that the true concentration of the OHdis should be estimated from the sum of three terms: the formed HCHO, the existing OH scavengers, and the H2O2 formed from the OHdis. The results show that the measured [HCHO] needs to be corrected since the HCHO consumption is not negligible in the plasma-liquid system. We conclude from the results and the analysis that the molecular probe method generally underestimates the [OHdis] in the plasma-liquid system. If one wants to obtain the true concentration of the OHdis in the plasma-liquid system, one needs to know the consumption behavior of the OHdis-induced derivatives, the information of the OH scavengers (such as hydrated electron, atomic hydrogen besides the molecular probe), and also the knowledge of the H2O2 formed from the OHdis.

  2. A low molecular weight zinc2+-dipicolylamine-based probe detects apoptosis during tumour treatment better than an annexin V-based probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmowski, Karin; Rix, Anne; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kiessling, Fabian; Behrendt, Florian F.; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Gray, Brian D.; Pak, Koon Y.; Palmowski, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging of apoptosis is frequently discussed for monitoring cancer therapies. Here, we compare the low molecular weight phosphatidylserine-targeting ligand zinc 2+ -dipicolylamine (Zn 2+ -DPA) with the established but reasonably larger protein annexin V. Molecular apoptosis imaging with the fluorescently labelled probes annexin V (750 nm, 36 kDa) and Zn 2+ -DPA (794 nm, 1.84 kDa) was performed in tumour-bearing mice (A431). Three animal groups were investigated: untreated controls and treated tumours after 1 or 4 days of anti-angiogenic therapy (SU11248). Additionally, μPET with 18 F-FDG was performed. Imaging data were displayed as tumour-to-muscle ratio (TMR) and validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Compared with untreated control tumours, TUNEL staining indicated significant apoptosis after 1 day (P 2+ -DPA uptake increased significantly after 1 day (P 2+ -DPA, 18 F-FDG tumour uptake decreased significantly at days 1 (P 2+ -DPA than with the annexin V-based probe. Additionally, significant treatment effects were detectable as early using Zn 2+ -DPA as with measurements of the glucose metabolism using 18 F-FDG. (orig.)

  3. Molecularly barcoded Zika virus libraries to probe in vivo evolutionary dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T Aliota

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Defining the complex dynamics of Zika virus (ZIKV infection in pregnancy and during transmission between vertebrate hosts and mosquito vectors is critical for a thorough understanding of viral transmission, pathogenesis, immune evasion, and potential reservoir establishment. Within-host viral diversity in ZIKV infection is low, which makes it difficult to evaluate infection dynamics. To overcome this biological hurdle, we constructed a molecularly barcoded ZIKV. This virus stock consists of a "synthetic swarm" whose members are genetically identical except for a run of eight consecutive degenerate codons, which creates approximately 64,000 theoretical nucleotide combinations that all encode the same amino acids. Deep sequencing this region of the ZIKV genome enables counting of individual barcodes to quantify the number and relative proportions of viral lineages present within a host. Here we used these molecularly barcoded ZIKV variants to study the dynamics of ZIKV infection in pregnant and non-pregnant macaques as well as during mosquito infection/transmission. The barcoded virus had no discernible fitness defects in vivo, and the proportions of individual barcoded virus templates remained stable throughout the duration of acute plasma viremia. ZIKV RNA also was detected in maternal plasma from a pregnant animal infected with barcoded virus for 67 days. The complexity of the virus population declined precipitously 8 days following infection of the dam, consistent with the timing of typical resolution of ZIKV in non-pregnant macaques and remained low for the subsequent duration of viremia. Our approach showed that synthetic swarm viruses can be used to probe the composition of ZIKV populations over time in vivo to understand vertical transmission, persistent reservoirs, bottlenecks, and evolutionary dynamics.

  4. Radioiodinated tropeines: Search for a molecular probe for the characterization of the cocaine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Mills, S.L.; Kanvinde, M.; Basmadjian, N.P.

    1990-01-01

    Three iodinated analogs of cocaine, 2'-iodococaine (1), 2'-iodotropacocaine (2) and 2'-iodobenzoyl tropine (3) were synthesized and radiolabeled by isotope exchange in the presence of Cu ++ using a 'kit' procedure. 1, 2 and 3 radiolabeled with 125 I were injected in mice and their biodistribution studied. Activity with all three radiolabeled compounds peaked in the brian and heart between 5 and 30 min. post injection. Activity from 125 I-2'-iodococaine, peaked in the brain at 15 min (2.38% injected dose/g) and showed a plateau in the heart between 5 and 60 min post injection (1.67 - 2.16%). 125 I-2'-iodotropacocaine at 5 min had the highest uptake in the brian (8.16%) and the heart (4.44%) while activity from 125 I-2'-iodobenzoyl tropine peaked in the brain at 15 min (4.19%) and at 5 min in the heart (3.33%). The biodistribution of 125 I-2'-iodococaine paralleled literature values obtained with 3 H-/ 14 C-cocaine. The authors conclude that radioiodinated tropeines radiolabeled with 123 I may be developed into useful molecular probes to examine and characterize the cocaine receptor in-vivo by SPECT imaging

  5. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joshua W; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-05

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acids (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated an improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.

  6. Probing the molecular determinants of aniline dioxygenase substrate specificity by saturation mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Ee L; Obbard, Jeffrey P; Zhao, Huimin

    2007-02-01

    Aniline dioxygenase is a multicomponent Rieske nonheme-iron dioxygenase enzyme isolated from Acinetobacter sp. strain YAA. Saturation mutagenesis of the substrate-binding pocket residues, which were identified using a homology model of the alpha subunit of the terminal dioxygenase (AtdA3), was used to probe the molecular determinants of AtdA substrate specificity. The V205A mutation widened the substrate specificity of aniline dioxygenase to include 2-isopropylaniline, for which the wild-type enzyme has no activity. The V205A mutation also made 2-isopropylaniline a better substrate for the enzyme than 2,4-dimethylaniline, a native substrate of the wild-type enzyme. The I248L mutation improved the activity of aniline dioxygenase against aniline and 2,4-dimethylaniline approximately 1.7-fold and 2.1-fold, respectively. Thus, it is shown that the alpha subunit of the terminal dioxygenase indeed plays a part in the substrate specificity as well as the activity of aniline dioxygenase. Interestingly, the equivalent residues of V205 and I248 have not been previously reported to influence the substrate specificity of other Rieske dioxygenases. These results should facilitate future engineering of the enzyme for bioremediation and industrial applications.

  7. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J. Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-01

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acids (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated an improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.

  8. Exciplex and excimer molecular probes: detection of conformational flip in a myo-inositol chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirvel, Manikandan; Arsic, Biljana; Freeman, Sally; Bichenkova, Elena V

    2008-06-07

    2-O-tert-Butyldimethylsilyl-4,6-bis-O-pyrenoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoformate (6) and 2-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-4-O-[4-(dimethylamino)benzoyl]-6-O-pyrenoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoacetate (10) adopt conformationally restricted unstable chairs with five axial substituents. In the symmetrical diester 6, the two pi-stacked pyrenoyl groups are electron acceptor-donor partners, giving a strong intramolecular excimer emission. In the mixed ester 10, the pyrenoyl group is the electron acceptor and the 4-(dimethylamino)benzoyl ester is the electron donor, giving a strong intramolecular exciplex emission. The conformation of the mixed ester 10 was assessed using 1H NMR spectroscopy (1H-NOESY) and computational studies. which showed the minimum inter-centroid distance between the two aromatic systems to be approximately 3.9 A. Upon addition of acid, the orthoformate/orthoacetate trigger in 6 and 10 was cleaved, which caused a switch of the conformation of the myo-inositol ring to the more stable penta-equatorial chair, leading to separation of the aromatic ester groups and loss of excimer and exciplex fluorescence, respectively. This study provides proof of principle for the development of novel fluorescent molecular probes.

  9. A Molecular Probe for the Detection of Polar Lipids in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Christie A; Shandala, Tetyana; Carter, Elizabeth A; Ivask, Angela; Guinan, Taryn; Hickey, Shane M; Werrett, Melissa V; Wright, Phillip J; Simpson, Peter V; Stagni, Stefano; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Lay, Peter A; Massi, Massimiliano; Plush, Sally E; Brooks, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have an important role in many aspects of cell biology, including membrane architecture/compartment formation, intracellular traffic, signalling, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism. Lipid biology is therefore integrally involved in major human diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, heart disease, immune disorders and cancers, which commonly display altered lipid transport and metabolism. However, the investigation of these important cellular processes has been limited by the availability of specific tools to visualise lipids in live cells. Here we describe the potential for ReZolve-L1™ to localise to intracellular compartments containing polar lipids, such as for example sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine. In live Drosophila fat body tissue from third instar larvae, ReZolve-L1™ interacted mainly with lipid droplets, including the core region of these organelles. The presence of polar lipids in the core of these lipid droplets was confirmed by Raman mapping and while this was consistent with the distribution of ReZolve-L1™ it did not exclude that the molecular probe might be detecting other lipid species. In response to complete starvation conditions, ReZolve-L1™ was detected mainly in Atg8-GFP autophagic compartments, and showed reduced staining in the lipid droplets of fat body cells. The induction of autophagy by Tor inhibition also increased ReZolve-L1™ detection in autophagic compartments, whereas Atg9 knock down impaired autophagosome formation and altered the distribution of ReZolve-L1™. Finally, during Drosophila metamorphosis fat body tissues showed increased ReZolve-L1™ staining in autophagic compartments at two hours post puparium formation, when compared to earlier developmental time points. We concluded that ReZolve-L1™ is a new live cell imaging tool, which can be used as an imaging reagent for the detection of polar lipids in different intracellular

  10. Single Molecular Level Probing of Structure and Dynamics of Papain Under Denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Chaudhury, Apala; Das, Nilimesh; Sen, Pratik

    2017-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease enzyme present in papaya and known to help in digesting peptide. Thus the structure and function of the active site of papain is of interest. The objective of present study is to unveil the overall structural transformation and the local structural change around the active site of papain as a function of chemical denaturant. Papain has been tagged at Cys-25 with a thiol specific fluorescence probe N-(7- dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA). Guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) has been used as the chemical denaturant. Steady state, time-resolved, and single molecular level fluorescence techniques was applied to map the change in the local environment. It is found that papain undergoes a two-step denaturation in the presence of GnHCl. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) data indicate that the size (hydrodynamic diameter) of native papain is ~36.8 Å, which steadily increases to ~53 Å in the presence of 6M GnHCl. FCS study also reveals that the conformational fluctuation time of papain is 6.3 µs in its native state, which decreased to 2.7 µs in the presence of 0.75 M GnHCl. Upon further increase in GnHCl concentration the conformational fluctuation time increase monotonically till 6 M GnHCl, where the time constant is measured as 14 µs. On the other hand, the measurement of ellipticity, hence the helical structure, by circular dichroism spectroscopy is found to be incapable to capture such structural transformation. It is concluded that in the presence of small amount of GnHCl the active site of papain takes up a more compact structure (although the overall size increases) than in the native state, which has been designated as the intermediate state. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Raman spectroscopy in comparative investigations of mechanisms of binding of three molecular probes - fluorescein, eosin, and erythrosin - to human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, I. M.; Saletsky, A. M.

    2008-11-01

    The comparative analysis of binding of three molecular fluorescent probes (fluorescein, eosin, and erythrosin), belonging to one homologous family, to human serum albumin (HSA) is made by Raman spectroscopy method. The binding of all three probes to binding Center I of HSA is registered. The character of binding of initial probe of the given homologous family - fluorescein - to protein differs from character of binding of its halogen-derivatives (eosin and erythrosin) to protein. The differences in binding of these three probes to HSA are determined by value of electronegativity of atoms of lateral radicals in structural formulas of probes and, therefore, by value of pK of their ionized groups.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a new optical probe in molecular biophysics and biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, J.; Wittig, B.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and detailed molecular structural information plays an increasing role in molecular biophysics and molecular medicine. Therefore, vibrational spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, which provide high structural information content are of growing interest in biophysical and ...

  13. Gene probes : principles and protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 179

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapley, Ralph; Aquino de Muro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  14. Probing Conditions at Ionized/Molecular Gas Interfaces With High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kyle Franklin

    2017-08-01

    Regions of star formation and star death in our Galaxy trace the cycle of gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas in dense molecular clouds collapses to form stars, and stars at the end of their lives return the gas that made up their outer layers back out into the Galaxy. Hot stars generate copious amounts of ultraviolet photons which interact with the surrounding medium and dominate the energetics, ionization state, and chemistry of the gas. The interface where molecular gas is being dissociated into neutral atomic gas by far-UV photons from a nearby hot source is called a photodissociation or photon-dominated region (PDR). PDRs are found primarily in star forming regions where O and B stars serve as the source of UV photons, and in planetary nebulae where the hot core of the dying star acts as the UV source. The main target of this dissertation is molecular hydrogen (H2), the most abundant molecule in the Universe, made from hydrogen formed during the Big Bang. H2 makes up the overwhelming majority of molecules found in the ISM and in PDRs. Far-UV radiation absorbed by H2 will excite an electron in the molecule. The molecule then either dissociates ( 10% of the time; Field et al. 1966) or decays into excited rotational and vibrational ("rovibrational") levels of the electronic ground state. These excited rovibrational levels then decay via a radiative cascade to the ground rovibrational state (v = 0, J = 0), giving rise to a large number of transitions observable in emission from the mid-IR to the optical (Black & van Dishoeck, 1987). These transitions provide an excellent probe of the excitation and conditions within the gas. These transitions are also observed in warm H2, such as in shocks, where collisions excite H2 to higher rovibrational levels. High resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, with its ability to see through dust, and avoid telluric absorption and emission, serves as an effective tool to detect emission from ions, atoms, and molecules

  15. Development and characterization of a handheld hyperspectral Raman imaging probe system for molecular characterization of tissue on mesoscopic scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Arnaud, Karl; Aubertin, Kelly; Strupler, Mathias; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Petrecca, Kevin; Trudel, Dominique; Leblond, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a promising cancer detection technique for surgical guidance applications. It can provide quantitative information relating to global tissue properties associated with structural, metabolic, immunological, and genetic biochemical phenomena in terms of molecular species including amino acids, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acid (DNA). To date in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems mostly included probes and biopsy needles typically limited to single-point tissue interrogation over a scale between 100 and 500 microns. The development of wider field handheld systems could improve tumor localization for a range of open surgery applications including brain, ovarian, and skin cancers. Here we present a novel Raman spectroscopy implementation using a coherent imaging bundle of fibers to create a probe capable of reconstructing molecular images over mesoscopic fields of view. Detection is performed using linear scanning with a rotation mirror and an imaging spectrometer. Different slits widths were tested at the entrance of the spectrometer to optimize spatial and spectral resolution while preserving sufficient signal-to-noise ratios to detect the principal Raman tissue features. The nonbiological samples, calcite and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), were used to characterize the performance of the system. The new wide-field probe was tested on ex vivo samples of calf brain and swine tissue. Raman spectral content of both tissue types were validated with data from the literature and compared with data acquired with a single-point Raman spectroscopy probe. The single-point probe was used as the gold standard against which the new instrument was benchmarked as it has already been thoroughly validated for biological tissue characterization. We have developed and characterized a practical noncontact handheld Raman imager providing tissue information at a spatial resolution of 115 microns over a field of view >14 mm 2 and a spectral resolution of 6 cm -1 over

  16. Radioactive and enzymatic cloned cDNA probes for bovine enteric coronavirus detection by molecular hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collomb, J.; Finance, C.; Alabouch, S.; Laporte, J.

    1992-01-01

    Genomic RNA of F15 strain bovine enteric coronavirus (BECV) was cloned in E. coli. Three clones (174, 160, PG 78), selected in the cDNA library, including a large portion of the nucleocapsid (N), matrix (M) and peplomeric (S) protein genes , were used as probes for a slot blot hybridization assay. Two probe labelling techniques were compared, radiolabelling with 32 P and enzymatic labelling through covalent linkage to peroxidase and chemiluminescence detection. The radioactive probe 174 detected as little as 1 to 3 pg of viral RNA, while the less sensitive enzymatic probe could not reveal more than 100 pg of RNA. No significant detection amplification was achieved when a mixture of the three probes was used. Probe 174 allowed specific identification for BECV. No hybridization was noticed either with rotaviruses or even with other antigenically unrelated members of the family Coronaviridae such as transmissible gastroenteritis virus. The test proved valid for detection of BECV in the supernatant of infected HRT-18 cells: genomic RNA could be detected after direct spotting of samples, but prior nucleic acid extraction after proteinase K treatment improved virus detection. BECV diagnosis in faecal samples using enzymatic probe was compared with conventional diagnostic methods. (authors)

  17. Radioactive and enzymatic cloned cDNA probes for bovine enteric coronavirus detection by molecular hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collomb, J; Finance, C; Alabouch, S [Lab. de Microbiologie Moleculaire, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Univ. de Nancy I, Nancy (France); Laporte, J [Station de Virologie et d' Immunologie Moleculaires, INRA, Jouy-en-Josas (France)

    1992-01-01

    Genomic RNA of F15 strain bovine enteric coronavirus (BECV) was cloned in E. coli. Three clones (174, 160, PG 78), selected in the cDNA library, including a large portion of the nucleocapsid (N), matrix (M) and peplomeric (S) protein genes , were used as probes for a slot blot hybridization assay. Two probe labelling techniques were compared, radiolabeled with [sup 32]P and enzymatic labeled through covalent linkage to peroxidase for chemiluminescence detection. The radioactive probe 174 detected as little as 1-3 pg of viral RNA, while the less sensitive enzymatic probe could not reveal more than 100 pg of RNA. No significant detection amplification was achieved when a mixture of the three probes was used. Probe 174 allowed specific identification for BECV. No hybridization was noticed either with rotaviruses or even with other antigenically unrelated members of the family Coronaviridae such as transmissible gastroenteritis virus. The test proved valid for detection of BECV in the supernatant of infected HRT-18 cells: genomic RNA could be detected after direct spotting of samples, but prior nucleic acid extraction after proteinase K treatment improved virus detection. BECV diagnosis in fecal samples using enzymatic probe was compared with conventional diagnostic methods. (authors).

  18. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas; Weier, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli

    2008-12-16

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-?B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  19. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-12-04

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-{kappa}B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  20. DHA-fluorescent probe is sensitive to membrane order and reveals molecular adaptation of DHA in ordered lipid microdomains☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Heather; Ross, Ron; Harris, Mitchel; Mitchell, Drake C.; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) disrupts the size and order of plasma membrane lipid microdomains in vitro and in vivo. However, it is unknown how the highly disordered structure of DHA mechanistically adapts to increase the order of tightly packed lipid microdomains. Therefore, we studied a novel DHA-Bodipy fluorescent probe to address this issue. We first determined if the DHA-Bodipy probe localized to the plasma membrane of primary B and immortal EL4 cells. Image analysis revealed that DHA-Bodipy localized into the plasma membrane of primary B cells more efficiently than EL4 cells. We then determined if the probe detected changes in plasma membrane order. Quantitative analysis of time-lapse movies established that DHA-Bodipy was sensitive to membrane molecular order. This allowed us to investigate how DHA-Bodipy physically adapted to ordered lipid microdomains. To accomplish this, we employed steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements in lipid vesicles of varying composition. Similar to cell culture studies, the probe was highly sensitive to membrane order in lipid vesicles. Moreover, these experiments revealed, relative to controls, that upon incorporation into highly ordered microdomains, DHA-Bodipy underwent an increase in its fluorescence lifetime and molecular order. In addition, the probe displayed a significant reduction in its rotational diffusion compared to controls. Altogether, DHA-Bodipy was highly sensitive to membrane order and revealed for the first time that DHA, despite its flexibility, could become ordered with less rotational motion inside ordered lipid microdomains. Mechanistically, this explains how DHA acyl chains can increase order upon formation of lipid microdomains in vivo. PMID:22841541

  1. Gene probes : principles and protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 179

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapley, Ralph; Aquino de Muro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    "Senior scientists Marilena Aquino de Muro and Ralph Rapley have brought together an outstanding collection of time-tested protocols for designing and using genes probes in a wide variety of applications...

  2. Dansyl-naphthalimide dyads as molecular probes: effect of spacer group on metal ion binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Balaraman H; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2011-11-17

    Interaction of a few dansyl-naphthalimide conjugates 1a-e linked through polymethylene spacer groups with various metal ions was investigated through absorption, fluorescence, NMR, isothermal calorimetric (ITC), and laser flash photolysis techniques. The characteristic feature of these dyads is that they exhibit competing singlet-singlet energy transfer (SSET) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) processes, both of which decrease with the increase in spacer length. Depending on the spacer group, these dyads interact selectively with divalent Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions, as compared to other mono- and divalent metal ions. Jobs plot analysis showed that these dyads form 2:3 complexes with Cu(2+) ions, while 1:1 complexes were observed with Zn(2+) ions. The association constants for the Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) complexes were determined and are found to be in the order 10(3)-10(5) M(-1). Irrespective of the length of the spacer group, these dyads interestingly act as fluorescence ratiometric molecular probes for Cu(2+) ions by altering the emission intensity of both dansyl and naphthalimide chromophores. In contrast, only the fluorescence intensity of the naphthalimide chromophore of the lower homologues (n = 1-3) was altered by Zn(2+) ions. (1)H NMR and ITC measurements confirmed the involvement of both sulfonamide and dimethylamine groups in the complexation with Cu(2+) ions, while only the latter group was involved with Zn(2+) ions. Laser excitation of the dyads 1a-e showed formation of a transient absorption which can be attributed to the radical cation of the naphthalimide chromophore, whereas only the triplet excited state of the dyads 1a-e was observed in the presence of Cu(2+) ions. Uniquely, the complexation of 1a-e with Cu(2+) ions affects both PET and SSET processes, while only the PET process was partially inhibited by Zn(2+) ions in the lower homologues (n = 1-3) and the higher homologues exhibited negligible changes in their emission properties. Our results

  3. Molecular beacon probes-base multiplex NASBA Real-time for detection of HIV-1 and HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Yeganeh, S; Paryan, M; Mirab Samiee, S; Kia, V; Rezvan, H

    2012-06-01

    Developed in 1991, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) has been introduced as a rapid molecular diagnostic technique, where it has been shown to give quicker results than PCR, and it can also be more sensitive. This paper describes the development of a molecular beacon-based multiplex NASBA assay for simultaneous detection of HIV-1 and HCV in plasma samples. A well-conserved region in the HIV-1 pol gene and 5'-NCR of HCV genome were used for primers and molecular beacon design. The performance features of HCV/HIV-1 multiplex NASBA assay including analytical sensitivity and specificity, clinical sensitivity and clinical specificity were evaluated. The analysis of scalar concentrations of the samples indicated that the limit of quantification of the assay was beacon probes detected all HCV genotypes and all major variants of HIV-1. This method may represent a relatively inexpensive isothermal method for detection of HIV-1/HCV co-infection in monitoring of patients.

  4. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S.

    1989-01-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe [5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)] is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection

  5. Photoinduced molecular chirality probed by ultrafast resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy R. Rouxel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed circularly polarized X-ray light sources can probe the ultrafast chiral electronic and nuclear dynamics through spatially localized resonant core transitions. We present simulations of time-resolved circular dichroism signals given by the difference of left and right circularly polarized X-ray probe transmission following an excitation by a circularly polarized optical pump with the variable time delay. Application is made to formamide which is achiral in the ground state and assumes two chiral geometries upon optical excitation to the first valence excited state. Probes resonant with various K-edges (C, N, and O provide different local windows onto the parity breaking geometry change thus revealing the enantiomer asymmetry.

  6. TiO2 Nanoparticles as a Soft X-ray Molecular Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larabell, Carolyn; Ashcroft, Jared M.; Gu, Weiwei; Zhang, Tierui; Hughes, Steven M.; Hartman, Keith B.; Hofmann, Cristina; Kanaras, Antonios G.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Le Gros, Mark; Yin, Yadong; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2007-06-30

    With the emergence of soft x-ray techniques for imaging cells, there is a pressing need to develop protein localization probes that can be unambiguously identified within the region of x-ray spectrum used for imaging. TiO2 nanocrystal colloids, which have a strong absorption cross-section within the "water-window" region of x-rays, areideally suited as soft x-ray microscopy probes. To demonstrate their efficacy, TiO2-streptavidin nanoconjugates were prepared and subsequently labeled microtubules polymerized from biotinylated tubulin. The microtubules were imaged using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), and the TiO2 nanoparticle tags were specifically identified using x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). These experiments demonstrate that TiO2 nanoparticles are potential probes for protein localization analyses using soft x-ray microscopy.

  7. Dual-Modal Colorimetric/Fluorescence Molecular Probe for Ratiometric Sensing of pH and Its Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Luling; Li, Xiaolin; Huang, Chusen; Jia, Nengqin

    2016-08-16

    As traditional pH meters cannot work well for minute regions (such as subcellular organelles) and in harsh media, molecular pH-sensitive devices for monitoring pH changes in diverse local heterogeneous environments are urgently needed. Here, we report a new dual-modal colorimetric/fluorescence merocyanine-based molecular probe (CPH) for ratiometric sensing of pH. Compared with previously reported pH probes, CPH bearing the benzyl group at the nitrogen position of the indolium group and the phenol, which is used as the acceptor for proton, could respond to pH changes immediately through both the ratiometric fluorescence signal readout and naked-eye colorimetric observation. The sensing process was highly stable and reversible. Most importantly, the suitable pKa value (6.44) allows CPH to presumably accumulate in lysosomes and become a lysosome-target fluorescent probe. By using CPH, the intralysosomal pH fluctuation stimulated by antimalaria drug chloroquine was successfully tracked in live cells through the ratiometric fluorescence images. Additionally, CPH could be immobilized on test papers, which exhibited a rapid and reversible colorimetric response to acid/base vapor through the naked-eye colorimetric analysis. This proof-of-concept study presents the potential application of CPH as a molecular tool for monitoring intralysosomal pH fluctuation in live cells, as well as paves the way for developing the economic, reusable, and fast-response optical pH meters for colorimetric sensing acid/base vapor with direct naked-eye observation.

  8. Planck intermediate results XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively...... for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution....

  9. Light emission probing quantum shot noise and charge fluctuations at a biased molecular junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, N.L.; Lu, Jing Tao; Brandbyge, M.

    2012-01-01

    The emission of plasmonic light from a single C60 molecule on Cu(111) is probed in a scanning tunneling microscope from the weak-coupling, tunneling range to strong coupling of the molecule to the electrodes at contact. At positive sample voltage the photon yield decreases owing to shot...

  10. Rotational spectrum of the molecular ion NH+ as a probe for α and me/mp variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloy, K.; Borschevsky, A.; Hauser, A. W.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Kozlov, M. G.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    We identify the molecular ion NH + as a potential candidate for probing variations in the fine-structure constant α and electron-to-proton mass ratio μ. NH + has an anomalously low-lying excited 4 Σ - state, being only a few hundred cm -1 above the ground 2 Π state. Being a light molecule, this proximity is such that rotational levels of the respective states are highly intermixed for low angular momenta. We find that several low-frequency transitions within the collective rotational spectrum experience enhanced sensitivity to α and μ variation. This is attributable to the close proximity of the 2 Π and 4 Σ - states, as well as the ensuing strong spin-orbit coupling between them. Suggestions that NH + may exist in interstellar space and recent predictions that trapped-ion precision spectroscopy will be adaptable to molecular ions make NH + a promising system for future astrophysical and laboratory studies of α and μ variation.

  11. Turbulence in molecular clouds - A new diagnostic tool to probe their origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Battaglia, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented to uncover the instability responsible for the type of turbulence observed in molecular clouds and the value of the physical parameters of the 'placental medium' from which turbulence originated. The method utilizes the observational relation between velocities and sizes of molecular clouds, together with a recent model for large-scale turbulence (constructed by Canuto and Goldman, 1985).

  12. Transferring Biomarker into Molecular Probe: Melanin Nanoparticle as a Naturally Active Platform for Multimodality Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Quli; Cheng, Kai; Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ruiping; Yang, Min; Lu, Xiaomei; Xing, Lei; Huang, Wei; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Developing multifunctional and easily prepared nanoplatforms with integrated different modalities is highly challenging for molecular imaging. Here, we report the successful transfer of an important molecular target, melanin, into a novel multimodality imaging nanoplatform. Melanin is abundantly expressed in melanotic melanomas and thus has been actively studied as a target for melanoma imaging. In our work, the multifunctional biopolymer nanoplatform based on ultrasmall (

  13. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of molecular length of self-assembled monolayer probed by localized surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Juri; Kajikawa, Kotaro

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method to measure the variation of the molecular length of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) when it is exposed to solutions at different pH conditions. The surface immobilized gold nanospheres (SIGNs) shows strong absorption peak at the wavelengths of 600-800 nm when p-polarized light is illuminated. The peak wavelength depends on the length of the gap distance between the SIGNs and the substrate. The gap is supported by the SAM molecules. According to the analytical calculation based on multiple expansion, the relation between the peak wavelength of the SIGN structures and the gap distance is calculated, to evaluate the molecular length of the SAM through the optical absorption spectroscopy for the SIGN structures. The molecular length of the SIGN structure was measured in air, water, acidic, and basic solutions. It was found that the molecular lengths are longer in acidic solutions.

  15. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  16. Pentamethinium fluorescent probes: The impact of molecular structure on photophysical properties and subcellular localization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bříza, T.; Rimpelová, S.; Králová, Jarmila; Záruba, K.; Kejík, Z.; Ruml, T.; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 107, August 2014 (2014), s. 51-59 ISSN 0143-7208 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.01.05/2.1.00/01.00.30; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.300/30.0060 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pentamethinium salts * Fluorescent probes * Mitochondria * Cardiolipin Photostability * Organelle imaging Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.966, year: 2014

  17. Transferring biomarker into molecular probe: melanin nanoparticle as a naturally active platform for multimodality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Quli; Cheng, Kai; Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Ruiping; Yang, Min; Lu, Xiaomei; Xing, Lei; Huang, Wei; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-10-29

    Developing multifunctional and easily prepared nanoplatforms with integrated different modalities is highly challenging for molecular imaging. Here, we report the successful transfer of an important molecular target, melanin, into a novel multimodality imaging nanoplatform. Melanin is abundantly expressed in melanotic melanomas and thus has been actively studied as a target for melanoma imaging. In our work, the multifunctional biopolymer nanoplatform based on ultrasmall (passive nanoplatforms require complicated and time-consuming processes for prebuilding reporting moieties or chemical modifications using active groups to integrate different contrast properties into one entity. In comparison, utilizing functional biomarker melanin can greatly simplify the building process. We further conjugated αvβ3 integrins, cyclic c(RGDfC) peptide, to MNPs to allow for U87MG tumor accumulation due to its targeting property combined with the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The multimodal properties of MNPs demonstrate the high potential of endogenous materials with multifunctions as nanoplatforms for molecular theranostics and clinical translation.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Affibody Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a highly aggressive and lethal cancer. It is typically asymptomatic at the early stage, with only 10%–20% of HCC patients being diagnosed early enough for appropriate surgical treatment. The delayed diagnosis of HCC is associated with limited treatment options and much lower survival rates. Therefore, the early and accurate detection of HCC is crucial to improve its currently dismal prognosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has been reported to be involved in HCC tumorigenesis and to represent an attractive target for HCC imaging and therapy. In this study, an affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907, targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR, was used for the first time to assess its potential to detect HCC xenografts. By evaluating radio- or fluorescent-labeled Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 as a probe for positron emission tomography (PET or optical imaging of HCC, subcutaneous EGFR-positive HCC xenografts were found to be successfully imaged by the PET probe. Thus, affibody-based PET imaging of EGFR provides a promising approach for detecting HCC in vivo.

  19. Probing the molecular mechanism behind the cognitive impairment induced by THC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Botta, J.; Cordomi, A.; Bondar, Alexey; Lazar, Josef; Pardo, L.; McCormick, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 2 (2017), s. 11-12 ISSN 1742-7835 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : THC * molecular mechanism * cognitive impairment Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry OBOR OECD: Toxicology Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2016

  20. Ultrafast Dynamics in Light-Driven Molecular Rotary Motors Probed by Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Christopher R.; Conyard, Jamie; Heisler, Ismael A.; Jones, Garth; Frost, James; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Photochemical isomerization in sterically crowded chiral alkenes is the driving force for molecular rotary motors in nanoscale machines. Here the excited-state dynamics and structural evolution of the prototypical light-driven rotary motor are followed on the ultrafast time scale by femtosecond

  1. Molecular Origin of Photoprotection in Cyanobacteria Probed by Watermarked Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hontani, Yusaku; Kloz, Miroslav; Polívka, Tomáš; Shukla, Mahendra K.; Sobotka, Roman; Kennis, John T.M.

    2018-01-01

    Photoprotection is fundamental in photosynthesis to avoid oxidative photodamage upon excess light exposure. Excited chlorophylls (Chl) are quenched by carotenoids, but the precise molecular origin remains controversial. The cyanobacterial HliC protein belongs to the Hlip family ancestral to plant

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques: current imaging strategies and molecular imaging probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Mani, Venkatesh; Hyafil, Fabien; Amirbekian, Vardan; Aguinaldo, Juan Gilberto S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2007-01-01

    The vulnerability or destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques has been directly linked to plaque composition. Imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, that allow for evaluation of plaque composition at a cellular and molecular level, could further improve the detection of

  3. A probe to study the toxic interaction of tartrazine with bovine hemoglobin at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yating; Wei, Haoran; Liu, Rutao

    2014-03-01

    Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in food products, but tartrazine in the environment is potentially harmful. The toxic interaction between tartrazine and bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was investigated using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling techniques under simulated physiological conditions. The fluorescence data showed that tartrazine can bind with BHb to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction, in which van der Waals' forces and hydrogen bonds played major roles. Molecular docking results showed that the hydrogen bonds exist between the oxygen atoms at position 31 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys99, and also between the oxygen atoms at position 15 of tartrazine and the nitrogen atom NZ7 on Lys104, Lys105. The results of UV-vis and CD spectra revealed that tartrazine led to conformational changes in BHb, including loosening of the skeleton structure and decreasing α helix in the secondary structure. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that tartrazine binds into the hemoglobin central cavity, and this was verified using a molecular modeling study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Microfluidic technology platforms for synthesizing, labeling and measuring the kinetics of transport and biochemical reactions for developing molecular imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Michael E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies

  5. Electrochemical reverse engineering: A systems-level tool to probe the redox-based molecular communication of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyang; Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; March, John C; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-04-01

    The intestine is the site of digestion and forms a critical interface between the host and the outside world. This interface is composed of host epithelium and a complex microbiota which is "connected" through an extensive web of chemical and biological interactions that determine the balance between health and disease for the host. This biology and the associated chemical dialogues occur within a context of a steep oxygen gradient that provides the driving force for a variety of reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions. While some redox couples (e.g., catecholics) can spontaneously exchange electrons, many others are kinetically "insulated" (e.g., biothiols) allowing the biology to set and control their redox states far from equilibrium. It is well known that within cells, such non-equilibrated redox couples are poised to transfer electrons to perform reactions essential to immune defense (e.g., transfer from NADH to O 2 for reactive oxygen species, ROS, generation) and protection from such oxidative stresses (e.g., glutathione-based reduction of ROS). More recently, it has been recognized that some of these redox-active species (e.g., H 2 O 2 ) cross membranes and diffuse into the extracellular environment including lumen to transmit redox information that is received by atomically-specific receptors (e.g., cysteine-based sulfur switches) that regulate biological functions. Thus, redox has emerged as an important modality in the chemical signaling that occurs in the intestine and there have been emerging efforts to develop the experimental tools needed to probe this modality. We suggest that electrochemistry provides a unique tool to experimentally probe redox interactions at a systems level. Importantly, electrochemistry offers the potential to enlist the extensive theories established in signal processing in an effort to "reverse engineer" the molecular communication occurring in this complex biological system. Here, we review our efforts to develop this

  6. Semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent probes for in vitro and in vivo bio-molecular and cellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwat B. Rizvi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, biological imaging has seen many advances, allowing scientists to unfold many of the mysteries surrounding biological processes. The ideal imaging resolution would be in nanometres, as most biological processes occur at this scale. Nanotechnology has made this possible with functionalised nanoparticles that can bind to specific targets and trace processes at the cellular and molecular level. Quantum dots (QDs or semiconductor nanocrystals are luminescent particles that have the potential to be the next generation fluorophores. This paper is an overview of the basics of QDs and their role as fluorescent probes for various biological imaging applications. Their potential clinical applications and the limitations that need to be overcome have also been discussed.

  7. A nanobody targeting carcinoembryonic antigen as a promising molecular probe for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Meng, Ai-Min; Li, Sheng-Hua; Zhou, Xiao-Liang

    2017-07-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a biomarker and therapy target for non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which is the most common type of lung cancer. Nanobodies with high target specificity are promising candidates to function as anti‑CEA probes. In the present study, the targeting effects of an anti‑CEA nanobody obtained from phage display were investigated using technetium‑99 m (99mTc) and fluorescence labeling. In vitro binding and immunofluorescent staining assays, as well as in vivo blood clearance and biodistribution assays were performed. High specificity and affinity of the nanobody for CEA‑positive H460 cells was observed in vitro. The pharmacokinetics assay of the 99mTc‑nanobody in Wistar rats demonstrated that the nanobody had appropriate T1/2α and T1/2β, which were 20.2 and 143.5 min, respectively. The biodistribution assay using H460 xenograft‑bearing nude mice demonstrated a high ratio of signal in tumor compared with background, which confirmed that the nanobody may be useful as a molecular probe for CEA‑positive cancer, particularly in NSCLC.

  8. Probing molecular dynamics of metal borohydrides on the surface of mesoporous scaffolds by multinuclear high resolution solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Son-Jong, E-mail: Sonjong@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Hyun-Sook [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); To, Magnus [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Young-Su; Cho, Young Whan [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyungkeun; Kim, Chul [Department of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-05

    Graphical abstract: In situ variable temperature multinuclear solid state NMR allows to probe surface wetting, diffusivity, and confinement of metal borohydrides into nanopores. - Abstract: Understanding of surface interactions between borohydride molecules and the surfaces of porous supports have gained growing attention for successful development of nano-confinement engineering. By use of in situ variable temperature (VT) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, molecular mobility changes of LiBH{sub 4} crystalline solid has been investigated in the presence of silica based and carbonaceous surfaces. Spin–spin J-coupling of {sup 1}H–{sup 11}B in LiBH{sub 4} was monitored in series of VT NMR spectra to probe translational mobility of LiBH{sub 4} that appeared to be greatly enhanced upon surface contact. Such enhanced diffusivity was found to be effective in the formation of solid solution and co-confinement with other metal borohydrides. Co-confinement of LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} mixture was demonstrated at temperature as low as 100 °C, much lower than the reported bulk eutectic melting temperature. The discovery adds a novel property of LiBH{sub 4} that has been proven to be highly versatile in many energy related applications.

  9. Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 chemistry devoted to molecular probes for imaging the brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollé, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the living human brain in real-time and in a noninvasive way was for centuries only a dream, made, however, possible today with the remarkable development during the four last decades of powerful molecular imaging techniques, and especially positron emission tomography (PET). Molecular PET imaging relies, from a chemical point of view, on the use and preparation of a positron-emitting radiolabelled probe or radiotracer, notably compounds incorporating one of two short-lived radionuclides fluorine-18 (T1/2 : 109.8 min) and carbon-11 (T1/2 : 20.38 min). The growing availability and interest for the radiohalogen fluorine-18 in radiopharmaceutical chemistry undoubtedly results from its convenient half-life and the successful use in clinical oncology of 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18) F]FDG). The special interest of carbon-11 is not only that carbon is present in virtually all biomolecules and drugs allowing therefore for isotopic labelling of their chemical structures but also that a given molecule could be radiolabelled at different functions or sites, permitting to explore (or to take advantage of) in vivo metabolic pathways. PET chemistry includes production of these short-lived radioactive isotopes via nuclear transmutation reactions using a cyclotron, and is directed towards the development of rapid synthetic methods, at the trace level, for the introduction of these nuclides into a molecule, as well as the use of fast purification, analysis and formulation techniques. PET chemistry is the driving force in molecular PET imaging, and this special issue of the Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, which is strongly chemistry and radiochemistry-oriented, aims at illustrating, be it in part only, the state-of-the-art arsenal of reactions currently available and its potential for the research and development of specific molecular probes labelled with the positron emitters carbon-11 and fluorine-18, with optimal imaging

  10. Probing the Structure and Dynamics of Proteins by Combining Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Jane R; Hertig, Samuel; Missimer, John H; Smith, Lorna J; Steinmetz, Michel O; Dolenc, Jožica

    2012-10-09

    NMR experiments provide detailed structural information about biological macromolecules in solution. However, the amount of information obtained is usually much less than the number of degrees of freedom of the macromolecule. Moreover, the relationships between experimental observables and structural information, such as interatomic distances or dihedral angle values, may be multiple-valued and may rely on empirical parameters and approximations. The extraction of structural information from experimental data is further complicated by the time- and ensemble-averaged nature of NMR observables. Combining NMR data with molecular dynamics simulations can elucidate and alleviate some of these problems, as well as allow inconsistencies in the NMR data to be identified. Here, we use a number of examples from our work to highlight the power of molecular dynamics simulations in providing a structural interpretation of solution NMR data.

  11. RECOGNITION DYNAMICS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI THIOREDOXIN PROBED USING MOLECULAR DYNAMICS AND BINDING FREE ENERGY CALCULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shahul Hameed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available E. coli thioredoxin has been regarded as a hub protein as it interacts with, and regulates, numerous target proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular processes. Thioredoxin can form complexes with a variety of target proteins with a wide range of affinity, using a consensus binding surface. In this study an attempt to deduce the molecular basis for the observed multispecificity of E. coli thioredoxin has been made. In this manuscript it has been shown that structural plasticity, adaptable and exposed hydrophobic binding surface, surface electrostatics, closely clustered multiple hot spot residues and conformational changes brought about by the redox status of the protein have been shown to account for the observed multispecificity and molecular recognition of thioredoxin. Dynamical differences between the two redox forms of the enzyme have also been studied to account for their differing interactions with some target proteins.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy as Molecular Probe of the Macroscopic Metal-Liquid Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Kiefer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal-liquid interfaces are of the utmost importance in a number of scientific areas, including electrochemistry and catalysis. However, complicated analytical methods and sample preparation are usually required to study the interfacial phenomena. We propose an infrared spectroscopic approach that enables investigating the molecular interactions at the interface, but needing only minimal or no sample preparation. For this purpose, the internal reflection element (IRE is wetted with a solution as first step. Second, a small plate of the metal of interest is put on top and pressed onto the IRE. The tiny amount of liquid that is remaining between the IRE and the metal is sufficient to produce an IR spectrum with good signal to noise ratio, from which information about molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, can be deduced. Proof-of-concept experiments were carried out with aqueous salt and acid solutions and an aluminum plate.

  13. Spin dynamics at level crossing in molecular AF rings probed by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, A. E-mail: lascialfari@fisicavolta.unipv.it; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.-H.; Micotti, E.; Furukawa, Y.; Jang, Z.H.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Horvatic, M.; Van Slageren, J

    2004-05-01

    The low-temperature spin dynamics in molecular rings with a finite number (N{<=}10) of magnetic ions was studied by means of {sup 1}H NMR. When an external magnetic field (B) induces a crossing between energy levels, peaks are observed in the spin-lattice relaxation rate of protons, 1/T{sub 1}(B), at constant temperature. We discuss similarities and differences in the data from three different rings: Fe10, Fe6:Li and Cr8.

  14. Spin dynamics at level crossing in molecular AF rings probed by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.-H.; Micotti, E.; Furukawa, Y.; Jang, Z.H.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Horvatic, M.; Van Slageren, J.

    2004-01-01

    The low-temperature spin dynamics in molecular rings with a finite number (N≤10) of magnetic ions was studied by means of 1 H NMR. When an external magnetic field (B) induces a crossing between energy levels, peaks are observed in the spin-lattice relaxation rate of protons, 1/T 1 (B), at constant temperature. We discuss similarities and differences in the data from three different rings: Fe10, Fe6:Li and Cr8

  15. Targeted next generation sequencing for the detection of ciprofloxacin resistance markers using molecular inversion probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-06

    ecological studies have shown development of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens caused by increased antibiotic usage in animals , food, and...et al. Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program. Emerging Infectious Diseases 13, 1633-1639, doi:10.3201...F. J. Molecular detection of antimicrobial resistance . Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 14, 836-871, table of contents, doi:10.1128/CMR.14.4.836-871.2001

  16. Planck intermediate results: XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.

    2016-01-01

    Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould belt molecular clouds we evaluate in this paper statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, N_H. The selected regions, covering several degrees in size, are analysed at an effective angular resolution of 10' FWHM, thus sampling physical scales from 0.4 to 40 pc in the nearest cloud. The column densities in the selected regions range from N_H≈ 10"2"1 to10"2"3 cm"-"2, and hence they correspond to the bulk of the molecular clouds. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analysed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called “histogram of relative orientations”. Throughout this study, we assume that the polarized emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing N_H, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation to mostly perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvénic or sub-Alfvénic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. Finally, we compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.

  17. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, Bernd; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Kleinpoppen, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Derives parameters for electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules calculated from theory. Delivers the quantum mechanical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Presents state-of-the-art experiments in atomic and molecular physics and related theoretical approaches. The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter. The feasibility of such perfect' and-or 'complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory. It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment 'complete'. The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases. This book captures the spirit of research in the direction of the complete experiment in atomic and molecular physics, considering some of the basic quantum processes: scattering, Auger decay and photo-ionization. It includes a description of the experimental methods used to realize, step by step, the complete experiment up to the level of the amplitudes and phases. The corresponding arsenal includes, beyond determining the total cross section, the observation of angle and spin resolved quantities, photon polarization and correlation parameters, measurements applying coincidence techniques, preparing initially polarized targets, and even more sophisticated methods. The 'complete' experiment is, until today, hardly to perform

  18. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Bernd [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Kleinpoppen, Hans

    2013-07-01

    Derives parameters for electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules calculated from theory. Delivers the quantum mechanical knowledge of atomic and molecular physics. Presents state-of-the-art experiments in atomic and molecular physics and related theoretical approaches. The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter. The feasibility of such perfect' and-or 'complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory. It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment 'complete'. The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases. This book captures the spirit of research in the direction of the complete experiment in atomic and molecular physics, considering some of the basic quantum processes: scattering, Auger decay and photo-ionization. It includes a description of the experimental methods used to realize, step by step, the complete experiment up to the level of the amplitudes and phases. The corresponding arsenal includes, beyond determining the total cross section, the observation of angle and spin resolved quantities, photon polarization and correlation parameters, measurements applying coincidence techniques, preparing initially polarized targets, and even more sophisticated methods. The 'complete' experiment is

  19. Molecular transitions as probes of the physical conditions of extragalactic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, Serena

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We present a method to interpret molecular observations and molecular line ratios in nearby extragalactic regions. Methods: Ab initio grids of time dependent chemical models, varying in gas density, temperature, cosmic ray ionization rate, and radiation field, are used as inputs into RADEX calculations. Tables of abundances, column densities, theoretical line intensities, and line ratios for some of the most used dense gas tracers are provided. The degree of correlation as well as degeneracy inherent in molecular ratios is discussed. Comparisons of the theoretical intensities with example observations are also provided. Results: We find that, within the parameters space explored, chemical abundances can be constrained by a well-defined set of gas density, gas temperature, and cosmic ray ionization rates for the species we investigate here. However, line intensities, and more importantly line ratios, from different chemical models can be very similar, thereby leading to a clear degeneracy. We also find that the gas subjected to a galactic cosmic ray ionization rate will not necessarily have reached steady state in 1 million years. The species most affected by time dependency effects are HCN and CS, which are both high density tracers. We use our ab initio method to fit an example set of data from two galaxies, I.e. M 82 and NGC 253. We find that (I) molecular line ratios can be easily matched even with erroneous individual line intensities; (II) no set of species can be matched by a one-component interstellar medium (ISM); and (III) a species may be a good tracer of an energetic process but only under specific density and temperature conditions. Conclusions: We provide tables of chemical abundances and line intensities ratios for some of the most commonly observed extragalactic tracers of dense gas for a grid of models. We show that by taking the chemistry behind each species and the individual line intensities into consideration, many degeneracies that arise

  20. Current and Emerging Technologies for Probing Molecular Signatures of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Ercole

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is understood as an interplay between the initial injury, subsequent secondary injuries, and a complex host response all of which are highly heterogeneous. An understanding of the underlying biology suggests a number of windows where mechanistically inspired interventions could be targeted. Unfortunately, biologically plausible therapies have to-date failed to translate into clinical practice. While a number of stereotypical pathways are now understood to be involved, current clinical characterization is too crude for it to be possible to characterize the biological phenotype in a truly mechanistically meaningful way. In this review, we examine current and emerging technologies for fuller biochemical characterization by the simultaneous measurement of multiple, diverse biomarkers. We describe how clinically available techniques such as cerebral microdialysis can be leveraged to give mechanistic insights into TBI pathobiology and how multiplex proteomic and metabolomic techniques can give a more complete description of the underlying biology. We also describe spatially resolved label-free multiplex techniques capable of probing structural differences in chemical signatures. Finally, we touch on the bioinformatics challenges that result from the acquisition of such large amounts of chemical data in the search for a more mechanistically complete description of the TBI phenotype.

  1. Bulky melamine-based Zn-porphyrin tweezer as a CD probe of molecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Ana G; Vantomme, Ghislaine; Negrón-Abril, Yashira L; Lubian, Elisa; Saielli, Giacomo; Menegazzo, Ileana; Cordero, Roselynn; Proni, Gloria; Nakanishi, Koji; Carofiglio, Tommaso; Berova, Nina

    2011-10-01

    The transfer of chirality from a guest molecule to an achiral host is the subject of significant interest especially when, upon chiral induction, the chiroptical response of the host/guest complex can effectively report the absolute configuration (AC) of the guest. For more than a decade, dimeric metalloporphyrin hosts (tweezers) have been successfully applied as chirality probes for determination of the AC for a wide variety of chiral synthetic compounds and natural products. The objective of this study is to investigate the utility of a new class of melamine-bridged Zn-porphyrin tweezers as sensitive AC reporters. A combined approach based on an experimental CD analysis and a theoretical prediction of the prevailing interporphyrin helicity demonstrates that these tweezers display favorable properties for chiral recognition. Herein, we discuss the application of the melamine-bridged tweezer to the chiral recognition of a diverse set of chiral guests, such as 1,2-diamines, α-amino-esters and amides, secondary alcohols, and 1,2-amino-alcohols. The bulky periphery and the presence of a rigid porphyrin linkage lead, in some cases, to a more enhanced CD sensitivity than that reported earlier with other tweezers. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Multivariate calibration analysis of colorimetric mercury sensing using a molecular probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Hernandez, Javier; Albero, Josep; Correig, Xavier; Llobet, Eduard; Palomares, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Selectivity is one of the main challenges of sensors, particularly those based on chemical interactions. Multivariate analytical models can determine the concentration of analytes even in the presence of other potential interferences. In this work, we have determined the presence of mercury ions in aqueous solutions in the ppm range (0-2 mg L -1 ) using a ruthenium bis-thiocyanate complex as a chemical probe. Moreover, we have analyzed the mercury-containing solutions with the co-existence of higher concentrations (19.5 mg L -1 ) of other potential competitors such as Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ions. Our experimental model is based on partial least squares (PLS) method and other techniques as genetic algorithm and statistical feature selection (SFS) that have been used to refine, beforehand, the analytical data. In summary, we have demonstrated that the root mean square error of prediction without pre-treatment and with statistical feature selection can be reduced from 10.22% to 6.27%

  3. Molecular Imaging of Cancer Using X-ray Computed Tomography with Protease Targeted Iodinated Activity-Based Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Hanmant K; Tsvirkun, Darya; Ben-Nun, Yael; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Popovtzer, Rachela; Blum, Galia

    2018-03-14

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a robust, precise, fast, and reliable imaging method that enables excellent spatial resolution and quantification of contrast agents throughout the body. However, CT is largely inadequate for molecular imaging applications due mainly to its low contrast sensitivity that forces the use of large concentrations of contrast agents for detection. To overcome this limitation, we generated a new class of iodinated nanoscale activity-based probes (IN-ABPs) that sufficiently accumulates at the target site by covalently binding cysteine cathepsins that are exceptionally highly expressed in cancer. The IN-ABPs are comprised of a short targeting peptide selective to specific cathepsins, an electrophilic moiety that allows activity-dependent covalent binding, and tags containing dendrimers with up to 48 iodine atoms. IN-ABPs selectively bind and inhibit activity of recombinant and intracellular cathepsin B, L, and S. We compared the in vivo kinetics, biodistribution, and tumor accumulation of IN-ABPs bearing 18 and 48 iodine atoms each, and their control counterparts lacking the targeting moiety. Here we show that although both IN-ABPs bind specifically to cathepsins within the tumor and produce detectable CT contrast, the 48-iodine bearing IN-ABP was found to be optimal with signals over 2.1-fold higher than its nontargeted counterpart. In conclusion, this study shows the synthetic feasibility and potential utility of IN-ABPs as potent contrast agents that enable molecular imaging of tumors using CT.

  4. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A₃ Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2017-03-11

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes, termed A₁, A 2A , A 2B and A₃, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The human A₃AR (hA₃AR) subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA₃AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of newly emerged A₃AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A₃AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  5. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A3 Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancetta, Antonella; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes, termed A1, A2A, A2B and A3, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The human A3AR (hA3AR) subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA3AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of newly emerged A3AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A3AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates. PMID:28287473

  6. Structural Probing and Molecular Modeling of the A3 Adenosine Receptor: A Focus on Agonist Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Ciancetta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is an endogenous modulator exerting its functions through the activation of four adenosine receptor (AR subtypes, termed A1, A2A, A2B and A3, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR superfamily. The human A3AR (hA3AR subtype is implicated in several cytoprotective functions. Therefore, hA3AR modulators, and in particular agonists, are sought for their potential application as anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardioprotective agents. Structure-based molecular modeling techniques have been applied over the years to rationalize the structure–activity relationships (SARs of newly emerged A3AR ligands, guide the subsequent lead optimization, and interpret site-directed mutagenesis (SDM data from a molecular perspective. In this review, we showcase selected modeling-based and guided strategies that were applied to elucidate the binding of agonists to the A3AR and discuss the challenges associated with an accurate prediction of the receptor extracellular vestibule through homology modeling from the available X-ray templates.

  7. Field-free molecular alignment probed by the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsson, P; Rouzee, A; Siu, W; Huismans, Y; Vrakking, M J J [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics (AMOLF), Science Park 113, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lepine, F [Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, LASIM, UMR 5579, 43 bvd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Marchenko, T [Laboratoire d' Optique Applique, ENSTA/Ecole Polytechnique, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Duesterer, S; Tavella, F; Stojanovic, N; Azima, A; Treusch, R [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kling, M F [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: per.johnsson@fysik.lth.se

    2009-07-14

    High flux extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources like the free electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) offer the possibility of diffractive imaging of small objects. Irrespective of whether the diffraction is based on the detection of photons or photoelectrons, it is required that the measurement is done in the reference frame of the molecule meaning that, for a sample of several molecules, it is necessary to pre-align the molecules in the sample. As a step towards performing molecular frame diffraction experiments, we report experiments on field-free molecular alignment performed at FLASH. The impulsive alignment induced by a 100 fs near-infrared laser pulse in a rotationally cold CO{sub 2} sample is characterized by ionizing and dissociating the molecules with a time-delayed XUV-FEL pulse. The time-dependent angular distributions of ionic fragments measured by a velocity map imaging spectrometer exhibit rapid changes associated with the induced rotational dynamics. The experimental results show hints of a dissociation process that depends nonlinearly on the XUV intensity.

  8. Spin excitations in 3D molecular magnets probed by neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bordallo, H N; Chapon, L C; Manson, J L; Cook, J C; Lee, S H; Copley, J R D; Yildirim, T; Kern, S

    2002-01-01

    The emerging field of molecular magnetism constitutes a new branch of materials science that deals with the magnetic properties of molecules, or assemblies of molecules, that contain magnetic centers. The growing interest in understanding the origin of the magnetic ordering in these materials is to obtain novel multiproperty molecular magnetic materials with high transition temperatures. Molecules based on the dicyanamide ion [N ident to C-N-C ident to N], abbreviated (dca), such as M(dca) sub 2 [M=Mn, Ni], have shown interesting bulk properties that prompted our inelastic neutron scattering (INS) studies. While the Mn sup 2 sup + ion is isotropic because of its L=0 configuration, the isostructural Ni analog has S=1 and demonstrates marked single-ion anisotropy. Mn(dca) sub 2 is a canted antiferromagnet below 16 K, while Ni(dca) sub 2 is a ferromagnet below 21 K. INS has been used to investigate the magnetic excitations in Mn(dca) sub 2 and Ni(dca) sub 2. For Mn(dca) sub 2 , a Heisenberg model gives good corr...

  9. Molecular frame photoemission: a probe of electronic/nuclear photo-dynamics and polarization state of the ionizing light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veyrinas, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This is thesis is dedicated to the study and the use of the remarkable properties of the molecular frame photoelectron angular distribution (MFPAD). This observable is a very sensitive probe of both the photoionization (PI) processes in small molecules, through the determination of the magnitudes and relative phases of the dipole matrix elements, and the polarization state of the ionizing light, which is entirely encoded in the MFPAD in terms of the Stokes parameters (s1, s2, s3). MFPAD measurements take advantage of dissociative photoionization (DPI) processes by combining an electron-ion 3D momentum spectroscopy technique with the use of different radiation facilities: SOLEIL synchrotron (DESIRS and PLEIADES beamlines) and the XUV PLFA beamline (SLIC, LIDyL Attophysics group, CEA Saclay) based on the interaction of a strong laser field with a gaseous target called high harmonic generation (HHG). The first part of the thesis is devoted to the complete characterization of the polarization state of an incoming radiation. In this context, an original 'molecular polarimetry' method is introduced and demonstrated by comparison with a VUV optical polarimeter available on the DESIRS beamline. Using this method to determine the full polarization ellipse of HHG radiation generated in different conditions on the XUV PLFA facility leads to original results that include the challenging disentanglement of the circular and unpolarized components of the studied radiation. The second part deals with the study of DPI of the H 2 , D 2 and HD molecules induced by circularly polarized light at resonance with the doubly excited states Q1 and Q2. In this energy region (30-35 eV) where direct ionization, autoionization and dissociation compete on a femtosecond timescale, the photonic excitation gives rise to complex ultrafast electronic and nuclear coupled dynamics. The remarkable asymmetries observed in the circular dichroism in the molecular frame, compared to quantum

  10. Ultra-Broadband Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy and Pump-Probe Microscopy of Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokoyny, Boris M.

    Ultrafast spectroscopy offers an unprecedented view on the dynamic nature of chemical reactions. From charge transfer in semiconductors to folding and isomerization of proteins, these all important processes can now be monitored and in some instances even controlled on real, physical timescales. One of the biggest challenges of ultrafast science is the incredible energetic complexity of most systems. It is not uncommon to encounter macromolecules or materials with absorption spectra spanning significant portions of the visible spectrum. Monitoring a multitude of electronic and vibrational transitions, all dynamically interacting with each other on femtosecond timescales poses a truly daunting experimental task. The first part of this thesis deals with the development of a novel Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy (2DES) and its associated, advanced detection methodologies. Owing to its ultra-broadband implementation, this technique enables us to monitor femtosecond chemical dynamics that span the energetic landscape of the entire visible spectrum. In order to demonstrate the utility of our method, we apply it to two laser dye molecules, IR-144 and Cresyl Violet. Variation of photophysical properties on a microscopic scale in either man-made or naturally occurring systems can have profound implications on how we understand their macroscopic properties. Recently, inorganic hybrid perovskites have been tapped as the next generation solar energy harvesting materials. Their remarkable properties include low exciton binding energy, low exciton recombination rates and long carrier diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, considerable variability in device properties made with nearly identical preparation methods has puzzled the community. In the second part of this thesis we use non-linear pump probe microscopy to study the heterogeneous nature of femtosecond carrier dynamics in thin film perovskites. We show that the local morphology of the perovskite thin films has a

  11. Neocarzinostatin as a probe for DNA protection activity--molecular interaction with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Der-Hang; Li, Huang-Hsien; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Liu, Chia-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS), a potent mutagen and carcinogen, consists of an enediyne prodrug and a protein carrier. It has a unique double role in that it intercalates into DNA and imposes radical-mediated damage after thiol activation. Here we employed NCS as a probe to examine the DNA-protection capability of caffeine, one of common dietary phytochemicals with potential cancer-chemopreventive activity. NCS at the nanomolar concentration range could induce significant single- and double-strand lesions in DNA, but up to 75 ± 5% of such lesions were found to be efficiently inhibited by caffeine. The percentage of inhibition was caffeine-concentration dependent, but was not sensitive to the DNA-lesion types. The well-characterized activation reactions of NCS allowed us to explore the effect of caffeine on the enediyne-generated radicals. Postactivation analyses by chromatographic and mass spectroscopic methods identified a caffeine-quenched enediyne-radical adduct, but the yield was too small to fully account for the large inhibition effect on DNA lesions. The affinity between NCS chromophore and DNA was characterized by a fluorescence-based kinetic method. The drug-DNA intercalation was hampered by caffeine, and the caffeine-induced increases in DNA-drug dissociation constant was caffeine-concentration dependent, suggesting importance of binding affinity in the protection mechanism. Caffeine has been shown to be both an effective free radical scavenger and an intercalation inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that caffeine ingeniously protected DNA against the enediyne-induced damages mainly by inhibiting DNA intercalation beforehand. The direct scavenging of the DNA-bound NCS free radicals by caffeine played only a minor role. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Substitutional HCN- molecular ions in KCN crystal: a paramagnetic probe in a ferroelastic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weid, J.P. von der; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Ribeiro, S.C.

    1978-01-01

    The HCN - molecular ion was produced in single crystals of KCN: 10 -2 OH - irradiated by UV light at 77 K. The spin Hamiltonian parameters were measured at 60 K and the temperature dependence of the spectrum was investigated between 60 K and 170 K. This temperature dependence is explained by the rapid motion of the molecule with the increasing temperature and the elastic interaction of the molecule with the surrounding ions. Using the similarity between the paramagnetic HCN - molecule and the CN - ions of the host lattice a qualitative picture of the local phenomena occuring in the ferroelastic phase of KCN could be made and the energy of the elastic interaction between CN - was estimated of the order of 7 meV [pt

  13. Electromagnetic probes of molecular motors in the electron transport chains of mitochondria and chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. H., Jr.; Nawarathna, D.; Vajrala, V.; Gardner, J.; Widger, W. R.

    2005-12-01

    We report on measurements of harmonics generated by whole cells, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in response to applied sinusoidal electric fields. The frequency- and amplitude-dependence of the induced harmonics exhibit features that correlate with physiological processes. Budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) cells produce numerous harmonics, the amplitudes of which depend strongly on frequency. When the second or third harmonic amplitude is plotted vs. applied frequency, we observe two peaks, around 3 kHz and 12 kHz, which are suppressed by respiratory inhibitors. We observe similar peaks when measuring the harmonic response of B. indicas, a relative of the mitochondrial ancestor. In uncoupled mitochondria, in which most of the electron transport chain is active but the ATP-synthase molecular turbine is inactive, only one (lower frequency) of the two peaks is present. Finally, we find that harmonics generated by chloroplasts depend dramatically on incident light, and vanish in the absence of light.

  14. Simple fluorescence-based detection of protein kinase A activity using a molecular beacon probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changbei; Lv, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Kemin; Jin, Shunxin; Liu, Haisheng; Wu, Kefeng; Zeng, Weimin

    2017-11-02

    Protein kinase A was detected by quantifying the amount of ATP used after a protein kinase reaction. The ATP assay was performed using the T4 DNA ligase and a molecular beacon (MB). In the presence of ATP, DNA ligase catalyzed the ligation of short DNA. The ligation product then hybridized to MB, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement of the MB. This assay was capable of determining protein kinase A in the range of 12.5∼150 nM, with a detection limit of 1.25 nM. Furthermore, this assay could also be used to investigate the effect of genistein on protein kinase A. It was a universal, non-radioisotopic, and homogeneous method for assaying protein kinase A.

  15. Peptide-based biosensors: From self-assembled interfaces to molecular probes in electrochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Bala, Camelia

    2018-04-01

    Redox-tagged peptides have emerged as functional materials with multiple applications in the area of sensing and biosensing applications due to their high stability, excellent redox properties and versatility of biomolecular interactions. They allow direct observation of molecular interactions in a wide range of affinity and enzymatic assays and act as electron mediators. Short helical peptides possess the ability to self-assemble in specific configurations with the possibility to develop in highly-ordered, stable 1D, 2D and 3D architectures in a hierarchical controlled manner. We provide here a brief overview of the electrochemical techniques available to study the electron transfer in peptide films with particular interest in developing biosensors with immobilized peptide motifs, for biological and clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel PET molecular probes for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Yanyan; Guan Yihui; Wu Ping

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and will become increasingly prevalent with population aging. It is accepted that the pathologic changes underlying AD appear in the brain years to decades before the symptomatic stages. Clinical measures of cognitive impairment, as used for definition of dementia, will not allow early diagnosis of AD-pathology in the mild or asymptomatic stages. There has been growing interest in early diagnosis of this disease, particularly regarding the initiation of new treatment strategies ahead of the onset of irreversible neuronal damage. Brain imaging markers are among the most promising candidates for this diagnostic challenge. PET has been demonstrated to be a most sensitive, specific, noninvasive, objective and quantitative method for early identification of AD-pathology and molecular biology, thus for prediction of dementia of the Alzheimer type, even in the mild and asymptomatic stages. (authors)

  17. The rotation of NO3− as a probe of molecular ion - water interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogden T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydration dynamics of aqueous nitrate, NO3−(aq, is studied by 2D-IR spectroscopy, UV-IR- and UV-UV transient absorption spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared to Car-Parinello molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The 2D-IR measurements and MD simulations of the non-degenerate asymmetric stretch vibrations of nitrate reveal an intermodal energy exchange occurring on a 0.2 ps time scale related to hydrogen bond fluctuations. The transient absorption measurements find that the nitrate ions rotate in 2 ps. The MD simulations indicate that the ion rotation is associated with the formation of new hydrogen bonds. The 2 ps rotation time thus indicates that the hydration shell of aqueous nitrate is rather labile.

  18. Molecular Polygons Probe the Role of Intramolecular Strain in the Photophysics of π-Conjugated Chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Philipp; Vogelsang, Jan; Poluektov, Georgiy; Schönfelder, Nina; Keller, Tristan J; Jester, Stefan-Sven; Höger, Sigurd; Lupton, John M

    2017-01-24

    π-Conjugated segments, chromophores, are the electronically active units of polymer materials used in organic electronics. To elucidate the effect of the bending of these linear moieties on elementary electronic properties, such as luminescence color and radiative rate, we introduce a series of molecular polygons. The π-system in these molecules becomes so distorted in bichromophores (digons) that these absorb and emit light of arbitrary polarization: any part of the chain absorbs and emits radiation with equal probability. Bending leads to a cancellation of transition dipole moment (TDM), increasing excited-state lifetime. Simultaneously, fluorescence shifts to the red as radiative transitions require mixing of the excited state with vibrational modes. However, strain can become so large that excited-state localization on shorter units of the chain occurs, compensating TDM cancellation. The underlying correlations between shape and photophysics can only be resolved in single molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Advancing molecular-guided surgery through probe development and testing in a moderate cost evaluation pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Hull, Sally M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason; Hoopes, Jack; Roberts, David W.; Strong, Theresa V.; Draney, Daniel; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    Molecular guided oncology surgery has the potential to transform the way decisions about resection are done, and can be critically important in areas such as neurosurgery where the margins of tumor relative to critical normal tissues are not readily apparent from visual or palpable guidance. Yet there are major financial barriers to advancing agents into clinical trials with commercial backing. We observe that development of these agents in the standard biological therapeutic paradigm is not viable, due to the high up front financial investment needed and the limitations in the revenue models of contrast agents for imaging. The hypothesized solution to this problem is to develop small molecular biologicals tagged with an established fluorescent reporter, through the chemical agent approval pathway, targeting a phase 0 trials initially, such that the initial startup phase can be completely funded by a single NIH grant. In this way, fast trials can be completed to de-risk the development pipeline, and advance the idea of fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) reporters into human testing. As with biological therapies the potential successes of each agent are still moderate, but this process will allow the field to advance in a more stable and productive manner, rather than relying upon isolated molecules developed at high cost and risk. The pathway proposed and tested here uses peptide synthesis of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-binding Affibody molecules, uniquely conjugated to IRDye 800CW, developed and tested in academic and industrial laboratories with well-established records for GMP production, fill and finish, toxicity testing, and early phase clinical trials with image guidance.

  20. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, R.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Thiyagarajan, P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Hoffman, A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Alkan-Onyuksel, H. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50{Angstrom}. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50{Angstrom}. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine.

  1. Probing spatial locality in ionic liquids with the grand canonical adaptive resolution molecular dynamics technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrack Jabes, B.; Krekeler, C.; Klein, R.; Delle Site, L.

    2018-05-01

    We employ the Grand Canonical Adaptive Resolution Simulation (GC-AdResS) molecular dynamics technique to test the spatial locality of the 1-ethyl 3-methyl imidazolium chloride liquid. In GC-AdResS, atomistic details are kept only in an open sub-region of the system while the environment is treated at coarse-grained level; thus, if spatial quantities calculated in such a sub-region agree with the equivalent quantities calculated in a full atomistic simulation, then the atomistic degrees of freedom outside the sub-region play a negligible role. The size of the sub-region fixes the degree of spatial locality of a certain quantity. We show that even for sub-regions whose radius corresponds to the size of a few molecules, spatial properties are reasonably reproduced thus suggesting a higher degree of spatial locality, a hypothesis put forward also by other researchers and that seems to play an important role for the characterization of fundamental properties of a large class of ionic liquids.

  2. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  3. Probing the molecular and electronic structure of the lichen metabolite usnic acid: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galasso, V.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: DFT calculations of structural preferences, acidic properties, carbonyl vibrations, 13 C NMR chemical shifts, and absorption spectrum account for the unique structural backbone, chemical behaviour, and spectroscopic properties of usnic acid, the cortical pigment and potent reactive of lichens. - Abstract: The molecular structure of usnic acid was investigated by the density functional theory (DFT). Two keto-enol tautomers are nearly isoenergetic and more stable than other tautomers. Noteworthy is the energy difference among the three intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds. The DFT/PCM calculated dissociation constants account for the acidic sequence of the three OH-groups. The electronic structure was also studied by calculating IR/Raman, NMR, and absorption features. A reliable assignment of the 'fingerprint' carbonyl stretching modes was supported by calculations on related molecules. The calculated NMR chemical shifts fit expectation in terms of a fast interconversion between the two most preferred tautomers. A variety of π → π* and n → π* excitations, localized on a single ring or involving a charge-transfer between the two lateral rings of the molecule, gives rise to the broad UV-absorption bands. This property accounts for the efficient protection against damaging solar radiation provided by usnic acid for lichens.

  4. Surface transport mechanisms in molecular glasses probed by the exposure of nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Shigang; Musumeci, Daniele; Zhang, Wei; Gujral, Ankit; Ediger, M. D.; Yu, Lian

    2017-05-01

    For a glass-forming liquid, the mechanism by which its surface contour evolves can change from bulk viscous flow at high temperatures to surface diffusion at low temperatures. We show that this mechanistic change can be conveniently detected by the exposure of nano-particles native in the material. Despite its high chemical purity, the often-studied molecular glass indomethacin contains low-concentration particles approximately 100 nm in size and 0.3% in volume fraction. Similar particles are present in polystyrene, another often-used model. In the surface-diffusion regime, particles are gradually exposed in regions vacated by host molecules, for example, the peak of a surface grating and the depletion zone near a surface crystal. In the viscous-flow regime, particle exposure is not observed. The surface contour around an exposed particle widens over time in a self-similar manner as 3 (Bt)1/4, where B is a surface mobility constant and the same constant obtained by surface grating decay. This work suggests that in a binary system composed of slow- and fast-diffusing molecules, slow-diffusing molecules can be stranded in surface regions vacated by fast-diffusing molecules, effectively leading to phase separation.

  5. Probing the molecular and electronic structure of the lichen metabolite usnic acid: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galasso, V., E-mail: galasso@univ.trieste.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2010-08-23

    Graphical abstract: DFT calculations of structural preferences, acidic properties, carbonyl vibrations, {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts, and absorption spectrum account for the unique structural backbone, chemical behaviour, and spectroscopic properties of usnic acid, the cortical pigment and potent reactive of lichens. - Abstract: The molecular structure of usnic acid was investigated by the density functional theory (DFT). Two keto-enol tautomers are nearly isoenergetic and more stable than other tautomers. Noteworthy is the energy difference among the three intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds. The DFT/PCM calculated dissociation constants account for the acidic sequence of the three OH-groups. The electronic structure was also studied by calculating IR/Raman, NMR, and absorption features. A reliable assignment of the 'fingerprint' carbonyl stretching modes was supported by calculations on related molecules. The calculated NMR chemical shifts fit expectation in terms of a fast interconversion between the two most preferred tautomers. A variety of {pi} {yields} {pi}* and n {yields} {pi}* excitations, localized on a single ring or involving a charge-transfer between the two lateral rings of the molecule, gives rise to the broad UV-absorption bands. This property accounts for the efficient protection against damaging solar radiation provided by usnic acid for lichens.

  6. Aureochrome 1 illuminated: structural changes of a transcription factor probed by molecular spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Kerruth

    Full Text Available Aureochrome 1 from Vaucheria frigida is a recently identified blue-light receptor that acts as a transcription factor. The protein comprises a photosensitive light-, oxygen- and voltage-sensitive (LOV domain and a basic zipper (bZIP domain that binds DNA rendering aureochrome 1 a prospective optogenetic tool. Here, we studied the photoreaction of full-length aureochrome 1 by molecular spectroscopy. The kinetics of the decay of the red-shifted triplet state and the blue-shifted signaling state were determined by time-resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy. It is shown that the presence of the bZIP domain further prolongs the lifetime of the LOV390 signaling state in comparison to the isolated LOV domain whereas bound DNA does not influence the photocycle kinetics. The light-dark Fourier transform infrared (FTIR difference spectrum shows the characteristic features of the flavin mononucleotide chromophore except that the S-H stretching vibration of cysteine 254, which is involved in the formation of the thio-adduct state, is significantly shifted to lower frequencies compared to other LOV domains. The presence of the target DNA influences the light-induced FTIR difference spectrum of aureochrome 1. Vibrational bands that can be assigned to arginine and lysine side chains as well to the phosphate backbone, indicate crucial changes in interactions between transcription factor and DNA.

  7. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, R.P.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Hoffman, A.; Alkan-Onyuksel, H.

    1994-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50 Angstrom. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50 Angstrom. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine

  8. Probing of molecular replication and accumulation in shallow heat gradients through numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Lorenz; Hartmann, Michael; Lanzmich, Simon; Braun, Dieter

    2016-07-27

    How can living matter arise from dead matter? All known living systems are built around information stored in RNA and DNA. To protect this information against molecular degradation and diffusion, the second law of thermodynamics imposes the need for a non-equilibrium driving force. Following a series of successful experiments using thermal gradients, we have shown that heat gradients across sub-millimetre pores can drive accumulation, replication, and selection of ever longer molecules, implementing all the necessary parts for Darwinian evolution. For these lab experiments to proceed with ample speed, however, the temperature gradients have to be quite steep, reaching up to 30 K per 100 μm. Here we use computer simulations based on experimental data to show that 2000-fold shallower temperature gradients - down to 100 K over one metre - can still drive the accumulation of protobiomolecules. This finding opens the door for various environments to potentially host the origins of life: volcanic, water-vapour, or hydrothermal settings. Following the trajectories of single molecules in simulation, we also find that they are subjected to frequent temperature oscillations inside these pores, facilitating e.g. template-directed replication mechanisms. The tilting of the pore configuration is the central strategy to achieve replication in a shallow temperature gradient. Our results suggest that shallow thermal gradients across porous rocks could have facilitated the formation of evolutionary machines, significantly increasing the number of potential sites for the origin of life on young rocky planets.

  9. 68Ga-DOTA-NGR as a novel molecular probe for APN-positive tumor imaging using MicroPET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Lu, Xiaoli; Wan, Nan; Hua, Zichun; Wang, Zizheng; Huang, Hongbo; Yang, Min; Wang, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) is selectively expressed on many tumors and the endothelium of tumor neovasculature, and may serve as a promising target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR) peptides have been shown to bind specifically to the APN receptor and have served as vehicles for the delivery of various therapeutic drugs in previous studies. The purpose of this study was to synthesize and evaluate the efficacy of a (68)Ga-labeled NGR peptide as a new molecular probe that binds to APN. NGR peptide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with (68)Ga at 95°C for 10 min. In vitro uptake and binding analysis was performed with A549 and MDA-MB231 cells. Biodistribution of (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR was determined in normal mice by dissection method. (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR PET was performed in A549 and MDA-MB231 xenografts, and included dynamic and static imaging. APN expression in tumors and new vasculatures was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The radiochemical purity of (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR was 98.0% ± 1.4% with a specific activity of about 17.49 MBq/nmol. The uptake of (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR in A549 cells increased with longer incubation times, and could be blocked by cold DOTA-NGR, while no specific uptake was found in MDA-MB231 cells. In vivo biodistribution studies showed that (68)Ga-DOTA-NGR was mainly excreted from the kidney, and rapidly cleared from blood and nonspecific organs. MicroPET imaging showed that high focal accumulation had occurred in the tumor site at 1 h post-injection (pi) in A549 tumor xenografts. A significant reduction of tumor uptake was observed following coinjection with a blocking dose of DOTA-NGR, whereas only mild uptake was found in MDA-MB231 tumor xenografts. Tumor uptake, measured as the tumor/lung ratio, increased with time peaking at 12.58 ± 1.26 at 1.5 h pi. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that APN was overexpressed on A549 cells and neovasculature. (68)Ga

  10. Probing the hydrogen equilibrium and kinetics in zeolite imidazolate frameworks via molecular dynamics and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Jobic, Hervé; Kolokolov, Daniil I; Karmakar, Shilpi; Biniwale, Rajesh; Papadopoulos, George K

    2013-01-21

    The problem of simulating processes involving equilibria and dynamics of guest sorbates within zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF) by means of molecular dynamics (MD) computer experiments is of growing importance because of the promising role of ZIFs as molecular "traps" for clean energy applications. A key issue for validating such an atomistic modeling attempt is the possibility of comparing the MD results, with real experiments being able to capture analogous space and time scales to the ones pertained to the computer experiments. In the present study, this prerequisite is fulfilled through the quasi-elastic neutron scattering technique (QENS) for measuring self-diffusivity, by elaborating the incoherent scattering signal of hydrogen nuclei. QENS and MD experiments were performed in parallel to probe the hydrogen motion, for the first time in ZIF members. The predicted and measured dynamics behaviors show considerable concentration variation of the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient in the two topologically different ZIF pore networks of this study, the ZIF-3 and ZIF-8. Modeling options such as the flexibility of the entire matrix versus a rigid framework version, the mobility of the imidazolate ligand, and the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects in the potential functions were examined in detail for the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen and also of deuterium, by employing MD combined with Widom averaging towards studying phase equilibria. The latter methodology ensures a rigorous and efficient way for post-processing the dynamics trajectory, thereby avoiding stochastic moves via Monte Carlo simulation, over the large number of configurational degrees of freedom a nonrigid framework encompasses.

  11. The stable isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen in the tropopause region probed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Batenburg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available More than 450 air samples that were collected in the upper troposphere – lower stratosphere (UTLS region by the CARIBIC aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container have been analyzed for molecular hydrogen (H2 mixing ratios (χ(H2 and H2 isotopic composition (deuterium content, δD.

    More than 120 of the analyzed samples contained air from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS. These show that χ(H2 does not vary appreciably with O3-derived height above the thermal tropopause (TP, whereas δD does increase with height. The isotope enrichment is caused by H2 production and destruction processes that enrich the stratospheric H2 reservoir in deuterium (D; the exact shapes of the profiles are mainly determined by mixing of stratospheric with tropospheric air. Tight negative correlations are found between δD and the mixing ratios of methane (χ(CH4 and nitrous oxide (χ(N2O, as a result of the relatively long lifetimes of these three species. The correlations are described by δD[‰]=−0.35 · χ(CH4[ppb]+768 and δD[‰]=−1.90· χ(N2O[ppb]+745. These correlations are similar to previously published results and likely hold globally for the LMS.

    Samples that were collected from the Indian subcontinent up to 40° N before, during and after the summer monsoon season show no significant seasonal change in χ(H2, but δD is up to 12.3‰ lower in the July, August and September monsoon samples. This δD decrease is correlated with the χ(CH4 increase in these samples. The significant correlation with χ(CH4 and the absence of a perceptible χ(H2 increase that accompanies the δD decrease indicates that microbial production of

  12. Probing specific molecular processes and intermediates by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: application to the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Kandori, Hideki; Padrós, Esteve

    2011-06-23

    We present a general approach for probing the kinetics of specific molecular processes in proteins by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a model we demonstrate that by appropriately monitoring some selected IR bands it is possible obtaining the kinetics of the most important events occurring in the photocycle, namely changes in the chromophore and the protein backbone conformation, and changes in the protonation state of the key residues implicated in the proton transfers. Besides confirming widely accepted views of the bR photocycle, our analysis also sheds light into some disputed issues: the degree of retinal torsion in the L intermediate to respect the ground state; the possibility of a proton transfer from Asp85 to Asp212; the relationship between the protonation/deprotonation of Asp85 and the proton release complex; and the timing of the protein backbone dynamics. By providing a direct way to estimate the kinetics of photocycle intermediates the present approach opens new prospects for a robust quantitative kinetic analysis of the bR photocycle, which could also benefit the study of other proteins involved in photosynthesis, in phototaxis, or in respiratory chains.

  13. Efficient and Scalable Synthesis of 4-Carboxy-Pennsylvania Green Methyl Ester: A Hydrophobic Building Block for Fluorescent Molecular Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woydziak, Zachary R; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorinated fluorophores are valuable tools for studies of biological systems. However, amine-reactive single-isomer derivatives of these compounds are often very expensive. To provide an inexpensive alternative, we report a practical synthesis of 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester. Derivatives of this hydrophobic fluorinated fluorophore, a hybrid of the dyes Oregon Green and Tokyo Green, are often cell permeable, enabling labeling of intracellular targets and components. Moreover, the low pKa of Pennsylvania Green (4.8) confers bright fluorescence in acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes, enhancing its utility for chemical biology investigations. To improve access to the key intermediate 2,7-difluoro-3,6-dihydroxyxanthen-9-one, we subjected bis-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)methanone to iterative nucleophilic aromatic substitution by hydroxide on scales of > 40 g. This intermediate was used to prepare over 15 grams of pure 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester in 28% overall yield without requiring chromatography. This compound can be converted into the amine reactive N -hydroxysuccinimidyl ester in essentially quantitative yield for the synthesis of a wide variety of fluorescent molecular probes.

  14. Diagnostic performance of automated liquid culture and molecular line probe assay in smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Aarti; Biswas, Debasis; Raghuvanshi, Shailendra; Sindhwani, Girish; Kakati, Barnali; Sharma, Shweta

    2017-04-01

    The diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is particularly challenging, and automated liquid culture and molecular line probe assays (LPA) may prove particularly useful. The objective of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of automated liquid culture (ALC) technology and commercial LPA in sputum smear-negative PTB suspects. Spot sputum samples were collected from 145 chest-symptomatic smear-negative patients and subjected to ALC, direct drug susceptibility test (DST) testing and LPA, as per manufacturers' instructions. A diagnostic yield of 26.2% was observed among sputum smear-negative TB suspects with 47.4% of the culture isolates being either INH- and/or rifampicin-resistant. Complete agreement was observed between the results of ALC assay and LPA except for two isolates which demonstrated sensitivity to INH and rifampicin at direct DST but were rifampicin-resistant in LPA. Two novel mutations were also detected among the multidrug isolates by LPA. In view of the diagnostic challenges associated with the diagnosis of TB in sputum smear-negative patients, our study demonstrates the applicability of ALC and LPA in establishing diagnostic evidence of TB.

  15. Automated synthesis with HPLC purification of 18F-FMISO as specific molecular imaging probe of tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingwei; Zhang Yingjian; Zhang Yongping

    2012-01-01

    An improved automated synthesis of 1-H-1-(3-[ 18 F] fluoro-2-hydroxypropyl)-2-nitro-imidazole ( 18 F-FMISO), a specific molecular imaging probe of tumor hypoxia, was developed using an upgraded Explora GN module integrated with Explora LC for HPLC purification in this study. The radiochemical synthesis of 18 F-FMISO was started with precursor 1-( 2'-nitro-1'-imidazolyl)-2-O-tetrahydropyranyl-3-O-tosyl-propanediol (NITTP) and included nucleophilic [ 18 F] radio-fluorination at 120℃ for 5 min and hydrolysis at 130℃ for 8 min. The automated synthesis of 18 F-FMISO, presenting fast, reliable and multi-run features, could be completed with the total synthesis time of less than 65 min and radiochemical yield of 25%∼35% (without decay correction). The quality control of 18 F-FMISO was identical with the radiopharmaceutical requirements, especially the radiochemical purity of greater than 99% and high chemical purity and specific activity own to HPLC purification. (authors)

  16. A Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Optical Fiber Probe Fabricated with Electropolymerized Molecular Imprinting Film for Melamine Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP films prepared by bulk polymerization suffer from numerous deficiencies, including poor mass transfer ability and difficulty in controlling reaction rate and film thickness, which usually result in poor repeatability. However, polymer film synthesized by electropolymerization methods benefit from high reproducibility, simplicity and rapidity of preparation. In the present study, an Au film served as the refractive index-sensitive metal film to couple with the light leaked out from optical fiber core and the electrode for electropolymerizing MIP film simultaneously. The manufactured probe exhibited satisfactory sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, the surface morphology and functional groups of the synthesized MIP film were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR for further insights into the adsorption and desorption processes. Given the low cost, label-free test, simple preparation process and fast response, this method has a potential application to monitor substances in complicated real samples for out-of-lab test in the future.

  17. Multiphoton ionization as a probe of molecular photofragmentation: statistical and dynamical energy partitioning in the multiphoton dissociation of nitromethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockney, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) appears in its first use as a probe of laser-induced photofragmentation. Specifically, MPI here reveals the internal and translational energy content of the nascent fragments from the infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of nitromethane (CH 3 NO 2 ). The apparatus for this work consists of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam crossed by two pulsed and focused lasers - a CO 2 laser to induce collision-free unimolecular dissociation of CH 3 NO 2 , and a tunable dye laser following immediately to ionize selectively one of the pair of dissociation fragments for detection by a mass spectrometer and particle multiplier. A computer simulation of each fragment's MPI spectrum, a series of four photon resonances to members of the npsigma/sub u/ Rydberg state of NO 2 and three photon resonances to two vibrational members of the #betta# 1 Rydberg state of CH 3 , aids in determining the fragment's internal energy content. The dye laser is delayed and its focus is traced through a small quarter circle centered at the focus of the CO 2 laser. The flight times of the fragments from the point of dissociation and their laboratory scattering angular distributions at fixed ionizing laser wavelength provide their center of mass recoil velocity distributions. The energy deposited in the fragments evidences a striking mixture of statistical and dynamical energy partitioning. The statistical RRKM theory of unimolecular decomposition accurately predicts the amount of internal energy found in the fragments

  18. Nano-confined water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite: Reorientational dynamics probed by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Faraone, A.; Udovic, T.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; de Souza, N. R.; Reinholdt, M. X.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2008-12-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs, anionic clays) represent excellent model systems for detailed molecular- level studies of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of nano-confined water in mineral interlayers and nano-pores, because LDH interlayers can have a well-defined structures and contain H2O molecules and a wide variety of anions in structurally well-defined positions and coordinations. [Ca2Al(OH)6]Cl·2H2O, also known as hydrocalumite or Friedel's salt, has a well- ordered Ca,Al distribution in the hydroxide layer and a very high degree of H2O,Cl ordering in the interlayer. It is also one of the only LDH phase for which a single crystal structure refinement is available. Thus, it is currently the best model compound for understanding the structure and dynamical behavior of interlayer and surface species in other, less-ordered, LDHs. We investigated the structural and dynamic behavior of water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite using inelastic (INS) and quasielastic (QENS) neutron scattering and molecular dynamics computer simulations. The comperehensive neutron scattering studies were performed for one fully hydrated and one dehydrated sample of hydrocalumite using several complementary instruments (HFBS, DCS and FANS at NCNR; HRMECS and QENS at IPNS) at temperatures above and below the previously discovered order-disorder interlayer phase transition. Together the experimental and molecular modeling results capture the important details of the dynamics of nano-confined water and the effects of the orientational ordering of H2O molecules above and below the phase transition. They provide otherwise unobtainable experimental information about the transformation of H2O librational and diffusional modes across the order-disorder phase transition and significantly add to our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of water in LDH phases based on the earlier NMR, IR, X-ray, and calorimetric measurements. The approach can now be extended to probe the

  19. Molecular Level Understanding of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) Induced Sol-Gel Transition of Pluronic F127 Using Fisetin as a Fluorescent Molecular Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jhili; Swain, Jitendriya; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2018-01-11

    The thermoreversible sol-gel transition of pluronic F127 is markedly altered even with addition of submicellar concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. Multiple fluorescence parameters like fluorescence intensity, fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence lifetime of both the prototropic forms (anion (A - *) and phototautomer FT*) of the photoprototropic fluorescent probe fisetin has been efficiently used to understand the molecular level properties like polarity and microviscosity of the PF127-SDS system as a function of temperature. The SDS-induced increase in the interfacial hydrophobicity level is seen to affect the sol-gel phase transition of PF127 (21-18 °C). The E T (30) polarity parameter value of anionic emission of fisetin suggests that there is a considerable decrease in the polarity of the PF127 medium with increase in temperature and with the addition of SDS. The microviscosity progressively increases from ∼5 mPa s (sol state, 10 °C) to ∼22.01 mPa s (gel state 35 °C) in aqueous solution of PF127. The variation in microviscosity with addition of SDS in PF127-SDS mixed system is significant in sol phase whereas in gel phase this variation is significantly less. Temperature dependent fluorescence lifetime of FT* indicates that there is heterogeneity in distribution of fisetin molecules at different domains of PF127. This work also show-cases the sensitivity of fisetin toward change in polarity and change in sol-gel transition temperature of copolymer PF127 with variation in temperature (both forward and reverse directions) and SDS.

  20. Characterization of sorbent properties of soil organic matter and carbonaceous geosorbents using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoshi; Grathwohl, Peter; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2009-01-15

    Nonspecific interactions and modes (i.e., adsorption vs absorption) of sorption by noncondensed, amorphous organic phases (here termed organic matter; OM) in soils and by rigid, aromatic, and condensed phases (termed carbonaceous geosorbents; CGs) were investigated using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes. Sorption isotherms of n- and cyclooctane from water for seven CGs (charcoal, lignite coke, activated carbon, graphite, partially oxidized graphite, diesel soot, bituminous coal), four sorbents with a predominance of OM (lignite, peat, two sapric soils), and two soils containing OM and high amounts of CGs were measured in batch systems. The peat and the sapric soils showed extensively linear sorption, while the CGs exhibited highly nonlinear (Freundlich exponents 0.2-0.7) and strong (Koc values being up to 10(5) times those for the OM-rich materials at low concentrations) sorption for the alkanes studied, showing that enhanced sorption by CGs can occur to completely apolar sorbates that do not undergo any specific interaction. Sorption by CGs was generally stronger and more nonlinear for n-octane than for cyclooctane, which suggests a strong dependence of sorption on the 3-D structure of sorbate molecules. The n-octane-to-cyclooctane sorption coefficient ratios (Kn/Kc) for adsorption to CGs were > or = 1, being distinctly different from those for absorption to the OM-rich materials (Kn/Kc soils determined by quantitative petrography analysis suggest, however, that CGs occurring in soils may be far less effective sorbents than the reference CGs used in the sorption experiments at least for nonspecifically interacting sorbates, probably because of competitive sorption and/or pore blocking by natural OM. The presented approaches and results offer a basis for interpreting sorption data for other organic compounds, as nonspecific interactions and sorption modes are relevant for any compound.

  1. Fast probing of glucose and fructose in plant tissues via plasmonic affinity sandwich assay with molecularly-imprinted extraction microprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Pir; Liu, Jia; Xing, Rongrong; Wen, Yanrong; Wang, Yijia; Liu, Zhen

    2017-12-01

    Determination of specific target compounds in agriculture food and natural plant products is essential for many purposes; however, it is often challenging due to the complexity of the sample matrices. Herein we present a new approach called plasmonic affinity sandwich assay for the facile and rapid probing of glucose and fructose in plant tissues. The approach mainly relies on molecularly imprinted plasmonic extraction microprobes, which were prepared on gold-coated acupuncture needles via boronate affinity controllable oriented surface imprinting with the target monosaccharide as the template molecules. An extraction microprobe was inserted into plant tissues under investigation, which allowed for the specific extraction of glucose or fructose from the tissues. The glucose or fructose molecules extracted on the microprobe were labeled with boronic acid-functionalized Raman-active silver nanoparticles, and thus affinity sandwich complexes were formed on the microprobes. After excess Raman nanotags were washed away, the microprobe was subjected to Raman detection. Upon being irradiated with a laser beam, surface plasmon on the gold-coated microprobes was generated, which further produced plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering of the silver-based nanotags and thereby provided sensitive detection. Apple fruits, which contain abundant glucose and fructose, were used as a model of plant tissues. The approach exhibited high specificity, good sensitivity (limit of detection, 1 μg mL -1 ), and fast speed (the whole procedure required only 20 min). The spatial distribution profiles of glucose and fructose within an apple were investigated by the developed approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The potential of flow-through microdialysis for probing low-molecular weight organic anions in rhizosphere soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulyok, Michael; Miró, Manuel; Stingeder, Gerhard; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, flow-through microdialysis is presented as a novel analytical tool for automatic sampling of low molecular weight organic anions (LMWOA), such as oxalate and citrate, in solid samples of environmental concern. The microsampling methodology involves the implantation of dedicated capillary-type probes offering unrivalled spatial resolution (ca. 200μm) in definite soil sites. These passive samplers are aimed at monitoring local processes, such as the release of organic acids occurring in the rhizosphere environment, in nearly real-time. The influence of chemical and physical variables (composition and flow rate of the perfusion liquid, ionic strength and pH of the outer medium and presence of metal ions therein) was assessed in vitro using liquid-phase assays. On the other hand, the resistance of the external solid medium to mass transfer, and the actual applicability of in vivo calibration methods were investigated using quartz sand as an inert model soil. Microdialysers furnished with 3cm long semipermeable tubular membranes were perfused with 0.01M NaNO 3 at a flow rate of 2.0μl/min, yielding dialysis recoveries ≥45% for both assayed LMWOAs in simulated background soil electrolyte solutions, and ≥24% in the interstitial liquid of complex solid samples. Full knowledge of the fate of LMWOAs in soils was obtained through the application of stimulus-response approaches that mimic the discrete exudation pulses of roots. Highly time-resolved microdialysates were used to discern readily available species such as free carboxylic anions and LMW metal-organic acid complexes from adsorbed, precipitated or mineralised analyte species in a variety of soil samples containing variable amounts of organic matter, exchangeable cations and different levels of metal pollution.

  3. Synthesis of new molecular probes radiolabelled with fluorine-18 for imaging neuro-inflammation with Positon Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medran-Navarrete, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The work presented in this manuscript aims to describe the synthesis of new ligands of the translocation protein 18 kDa (TSPO), their in vitro evaluation and, for the most promising candidates, their isotopic radiolabelling with the short-lived positron emitter fluorine-18 (t 1/2 : 109.8 minutes). The ultimate goal of this work consists in developing new molecular probes, or bio-markers, for imaging neuro-inflammation in a non-invasive and atraumatic manor using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Neuro-inflammatory processes have been identified in Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, MS and various psychiatric pathologies. The radioligand of choice for imaging TSPO is currently [ 18 F]DPA-714, a pyr-azolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine radiolabelled with fluorine-18 which has been recently prepared in our laboratories. However, [ 18 F]DPA-714 undergoes a rapid in vivo loss of the radioactive fluorine by cleavage of the fluoro-alkoxy chain as demonstrated in metabolic studies. Therefore, my PhD project aimed to design and develop new structurally related analogues of DPA-714 where the linkage between the main backbone and the fluorine-18 would be reinforced. To this extent, nineteen compounds were prepared and their affinity towards the TSPO was evaluated. Two promising candidates, coded DPA-C5yne and CfO-DPA-714, were radiolabelled with fluorine-18 with good radiochemical yields (20-30 %) and high specific radioactivities (50-90 GBq/μmol). These radioligands were also evaluated by PET imaging at the preclinical stage and displayed equivalent or slightly improved results when compared to [ 18 F]DPA- 714. (author) [fr

  4. Molecular identification of Clonorchis sinensis and discrimination with other opisthorchid liver fluke species using Multiple Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA).

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, J.; Xu, J.; Liang, P.; Mao, Q.; Huang, Y.; Lu, X.; Deng, C.; Liang, C.; de Hoog, G.S.; Yu, X.

    2011-01-01

    Background Infections with the opisthorchid liver flukes Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, and O. felineus cause severe health problems globally, particularly in Southeast Asia. Early identification of the infection is essential to provide timely and appropriate chemotherapy to patients. Results In this study we evaluate a PCR-based molecular identification method, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), which allows rapid and specific detection of single nucleotid...

  5. Designing topological defects in 2D materials using scanning probe microscopy and a self-healing mechanism: a density functional-based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Igor; Đurišić, Ivana; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-12-01

    Engineering of materials at the atomic level is one of the most important aims of nanotechnology. The unprecedented ability of scanning probe microscopy to address individual atoms opened up the possibilities for nanomanipulation and nanolitography of surfaces and later on of two-dimensional materials. While the state-of-the-art scanning probe lithographic methods include, primarily, adsorption, desorption and repositioning of adatoms and molecules on substrates or tailoring nanoribbons by etching of trenches, the precise modification of the intrinsic atomic structure of materials is yet to be advanced. Here we introduce a new concept, scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip, for engineering of the atomic structure of membranes based on two-dimensional materials. In order to indicate the viability of the concept, we present our theoretical research, which includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, Fourier analysis and electronic transport calculations. While stretching can be employed for fabrication of atomic chains only, our comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations indicate that nanomanipulation by scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip is capable of assembling a wide range of topological defects in two-dimensional materials in a rather controllable and reproducible manner. We analyze two possibilities. In the first case the probe tip is retracted from the membrane while in the second case the tip is released beneath the membrane allowing graphene to freely relax and self-heal the pore made by the tip. The former approach with the tip rotation can be achieved experimentally by rotation of the sample, which is equivalent to rotation of the tip, whereas irradiation of the membrane by nanoclusters can be utilized for the latter approach. The latter one has the potential to yield a yet richer diversity of topological defects on account of a lesser determinacy. If successfully realized experimentally the concept proposed here could

  6. Refinement of glucagon-like peptide 1 docking to its intact receptor using mid-region photolabile probes and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence J; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C-H; Pinon, Delia I; Sexton, Patrick M; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-05-06

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7-36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu(141) above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp(297) within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region.

  7. Super-resolution imaging of a 2.5 kb non-repetitive DNA in situ in the nuclear genome using molecular beacon probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yanxiang; Cao, Bo; Ma, Tszshan; Niu, Gang; Huo, Yingdong; Huang, Jiandong; Chen, Danni; Liu, Yi; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Michael Q; Niu, Hanben

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution visualization of short non-repetitive DNA in situ in the nuclear genome is essential for studying looping interactions and chromatin organization in single cells. Recent advances in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using Oligopaint probes have enabled super-resolution imaging of genomic domains with a resolution limit of 4.9 kb. To target shorter elements, we developed a simple FISH method that uses molecular beacon (MB) probes to facilitate the probe-target binding, while minimizing non-specific fluorescence. We used three-dimensional stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (3D-STORM) with optimized imaging conditions to efficiently distinguish sparsely distributed Alexa-647 from background cellular autofluorescence. Utilizing 3D-STORM and only 29–34 individual MB probes, we observed 3D fine-scale nanostructures of 2.5 kb integrated or endogenous unique DNA in situ in human or mouse genome, respectively. We demonstrated our MB-based FISH method was capable of visualizing the so far shortest non-repetitive genomic sequence in 3D at super-resolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21660.001 PMID:28485713

  8. A novel water-soluble 1,8-naphthalimide as a fluorescent pH-probe and a molecular logic circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, Nikolai I.; Dimitrova, Margarita D.; Krasteva, Paoleta V.; Bojinov, Vladimir B.

    2017-01-01

    A novel highly water-soluble fluorescence sensing 1,8-naphthalimide is synthesized and investigated. The novel compound is designed on the “fluorophore-receptor 1 -spacer-receptor 2 ” model as a molecular fluorescence probe for determination of ions in 100% aqueous media. The novel probe comprising hydrazide and N-methylpiperazine substituents is capable of operating simultaneously via ICT and PET signaling mechanism and of recognizing selectively protons and hydroxyl anions over the representative metal ions and anions. Due to the remarkable fluorescence changes as a function of pH the system is able to act as a three output combinatorial logic circuit with two chemical inputs. Two INHIBIT gates in fluorescence and absorption mode as well as an IMPLICATION logic gate are obtained. Because of the parallel action of both INHIBIT gates a magnitude digital comparator is achieved for the first time in this way.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Jenkins, L. (Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, San Jose, CA (United States)); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. (Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Sheppard, L. (Palo Verde Laboratory, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)); Flejter, W.L. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Zackowski, J. (Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainsville, FL (United States)); Tsien, F. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Schwartz, S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Molecularly Imprinted Core-Shell CdSe@SiO2/CDs as a Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for 4-Nitrophenol Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyue; Gao, Zhao; Yu, Yanjun; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2018-01-01

    4-Nitrophenol (4-NP) is a priority pollutant in water and is both carcinogenic and genotoxic to humans and wildlife even at very low concentrations. Thus, we herein fabricated a novel molecularly imprinted core-shell nanohybrid as a ratiometric fluorescent sensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of 4-NP. This sensor was functioned by the transfer of fluorescence resonance energy between photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) and 4-NP. This sensor was synthesized by linking organosilane-functionalized CDs to silica-coated CdSe quantum dots (CdSe@SiO2) via Si-O bonds. The nanohybrids were further modified by anchoring a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer on the ratiometric fluorescent sensor through a facile sol-gel polymerization method. The morphology, chemical structure, and optical properties of the resulting molecularly imprinted dual-emission fluorescent probe were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic analysis. The probe was then applied in the detection of 4-NP and exhibited good linearity between 0.051 and 13.7 μg/mL, in addition to a low detection limit of 0.026 μg/mL. Furthermore, the simplicity, reliability, high selectivity, and high sensitivity of the developed sensor demonstrate that the combination of MIPs and ratiometric fluorescence allows the preparation of excellent fluorescent sensors for the detection of trace or ultra-trace analytes.

  11. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the K m changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. New molecular markers and cytogenetic probes enable chromosome identification of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium introgression lines for improving protein and gluten contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangrong; Wang, Hongjin; Lang, Tao; Li, Jianbo; La, Shixiao; Yang, Ennian; Yang, Zujun

    2016-10-01

    New molecular markers were developed for targeting Thinopyrum intermedium 1St#2 chromosome, and novel FISH probe representing the terminal repeats was produced for identification of Thinopyrum chromosomes. Thinopyrum intermedium has been used as a valuable resource for improving the disease resistance and yield potential of wheat. A wheat-Th. intermedium ssp. trichophorum chromosome 1St#2 substitution and translocation has displayed superior grain protein and wet gluten content. With the aim to develop a number of chromosome 1St#2 specific molecular and cytogenetic markers, a high throughput, low-cost specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology was used to compare the sequences between a wheat-Thinopyrum 1St#2 (1D) substitution and the related species Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome, 2n = 14). A total of 5142 polymorphic fragments were analyzed and 359 different SLAF markers for 1St#2 were predicted. Thirty-seven specific molecular markers were validated by PCR from 50 randomly selected SLAFs. Meanwhile, the distribution of transposable elements (TEs) at the family level between wheat and St genomes was compared using the SLAFs. A new oligo-nucleotide probe named Oligo-pSt122 from high SLAF reads was produced for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and was observed to hybridize to the terminal region of 1St#L and also onto the terminal heterochromatic region of Th. intermedium genomes. The genome-wide markers and repetitive based probe Oligo-pSt122 will be valuable for identifying Thinopyrum chromosome segments in wheat backgrounds.

  13. Effects of constituent ions of a phosphonium-based ionic liquid on molecular organization of H2O as probed by 1-propanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Takeshi; Miki, Kumiko; Ayako, Nitta

    2015-01-01

    on the basis of 1-propanol probing methodology devised by Koga et al. The resulting characterization of the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity is displayed on a two-dimensional map together with previous results, for a total of four cations and nine anions of typical ionic liquid (IL) constituents. The results......Aqueous solutions of tetrabutylphosphonium trifluoroacetate, [P4444]CF3COO, exhibit a liquid-liquid phase transition with a lower critical solution temperature. Herein, we characterized the constituent ions, [P4444](+) and CF3COO(-), in terms of their effects on the molecular organization of H2O...

  14. Molecular detection of harmful cyanobacteria and expression of their toxin genes in Dutch lakes using multi-probe RNA chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Guillebault, Delphine; Alfonso, Amparo; Rodríguez, Inés; Botana, Luis M.; Bijkerk, Ronald; Medlin, Linda K.

    Abstract Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are a major threat to water quality and human health. Adequate risk assessment is thus required, which relies strongly on comprehensive monitoring. Here, we tested novel multi-probe RNA chips developed in the European project, μAqua, to determine the abundance

  15. Molecular Imaging of β-Amyloid Plaques with Near-Infrared Boron Dipyrromethane (BODIPY-Based Fluorescent Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Watanabe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of β-amyloid (Aβ plaques is a critical neurodegenerative change in Alzheimer disease (AD. We designed and synthesized novel boron dipyrromethane (BODIPY-based Aβ probes (BAPs and evaluated their utility for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Aβ plaques in the brain. In binding experiments in vitro, BAPs showed high affinity for synthetic Aβ aggregates (Kd = 18–149 nM. Furthermore, BAPs clearly stained Aβ plaques in sections of Tg2576 mice. In mouse brain tissue, BAPs showed sufficient uptake for optical imaging. In addition, ex vivo fluorescent staining of brain sections from Tg2576 mice after the injection of BAP-2 showed selective binding of Aβ plaques with little nonspecific binding. BAPs may be useful as a near-infrared fluorescent probe for imaging Aβ plaques.

  16. Applications of nucleoside-based molecular probes for the in vivo assessment of tumour biochemistry using positron emission tomography (PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard I. Wiebe

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a non-invasive nuclear imaging technique. In PET, radiolabelled molecules decay by positron emission. The gamma rays resulting from positron annihilation are detected in coincidence and mapped to produce three dimensional images of radiotracer distribution in the body. Molecular imaging with PET refers to the use of positron-emitting biomolecules that are highly specific substrates for target enzymes, transport proteins or receptor proteins. Molecular imaging with PET produces spatial and temporal maps of the target-related processes. Molecular imaging is an important analytical tool in diagnostic medical imaging, therapy monitoring and the development of new drugs. Molecular imaging has its roots in molecular biology. Originally, molecular biology meant the biology of gene expression, but now molecular biology broadly encompasses the macromolecular biology and biochemistry of proteins, complex carbohydrates and nucleic acids. To date, molecular imaging has focused primarily on proteins, with emphasis on monoclonal antibodies and their derivative forms, small-molecule enzyme substrates and components of cell membranes, including transporters and transmembrane signalling elements. This overview provides an introduction to nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleic acids in the context of molecular imaging.A tomografia por emissão de pósitrons (TEP é uma técnica de imagem não invasiva da medicina nuclear. A TEP utiliza moléculas marcadas com emissores de radiação beta positiva (pósitrons. As radiações gama medidas que resultam do aniquilamento dos pósitrons são detectadas por um sistema de coincidência e mapeadas para produzir uma imagem tridimensional da distribuição do radiotraçador no corpo. A imagem molecular com TEP refere-se ao uso de biomoléculas marcadas com emissor de pósitron que são substratos altamente específicos para alvos como enzimas, proteínas transportadoras ou receptores prot

  17. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  18. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  19. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD as an MR molecular probe imaging integrin alphanubeta3 receptor-expressed tumor-MR molecular imaging of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Tianlong; Du, Xiangke; Zhang, Sen; Liu, Xia; Li, Xubing

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a novel MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif for imaging integrin alphanubeta3 receptor-expressed tumor. Commercially available HYNIC-RGD conjugated with co-ligand EDDA was labeled with Gd(3+), and the mixture was isolated and purified by solid phase extract (SPE) to get the entire probe Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HHCC) cell line BEL-7402 was cultured and the cells harvested and suspended in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) were subcutaneously inoculated into athymic nude mice for tumor growth. In vitro cell binding assay to integrin alphanubeta3 receptor and cell viability experiments were conducted. The in vivo imaging of the three arms of xenografts were performed by MR scan with a dedicated animal coil at time points of 0, 30, 60, 90min and 24-h post-intravenous injection (p.i.). Three arms of nude mice then were sacrificed for histological examination to confirm the imaging results. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD was successfully isolated by SPE and validity was verified on signal enhancement through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The nude mice model bearing HHCC was well established. There was approx. 30% signal enhancement on T1WI FSE images at 90min post-intravenous injection of the Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD compared with baseline, and the signal to time curve is straightforward over time in the span of 0-90min p.i., while the control arms do not show this tendency. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD has the potential to serve as an MR probe detecting integrin alphanubeta3 receptor-expressed tumor. Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD as an MR molecular probe imaging integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor-expressed tumor-MR molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo Tianlong [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: huotianlong@bjmu.edu.cn; Du Xiangke [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: duxk@263.net; Zhang Sen [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: skagerrak_s@yahoo.com.cn; Liu Xia [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: iamliuxia@126.com; Li Xubing [Peking University People' s Hospital, Radiology Department, 11 Xizhimen South Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)], E-mail: lixb@bjmu.edu.cn

    2010-02-15

    Rationale and objective: The aim of this study is to develop a novel MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif for imaging integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor-expressed tumor. Materials and methods: Commercially available HYNIC-RGD conjugated with co-ligand EDDA was labeled with Gd{sup 3+}, and the mixture was isolated and purified by solid phase extract (SPE) to get the entire probe Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HHCC) cell line BEL-7402 was cultured and the cells harvested and suspended in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) were subcutaneously inoculated into athymic nude mice for tumor growth. In vitro cell binding assay to integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor and cell viability experiments were conducted. The in vivo imaging of the three arms of xenografts were performed by MR scan with a dedicated animal coil at time points of 0, 30, 60, 90 min and 24-h post-intravenous injection (p.i.). Three arms of nude mice then were sacrificed for histological examination to confirm the imaging results. Results: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD was successfully isolated by SPE and validity was verified on signal enhancement through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The nude mice model bearing HHCC was well established. There was approx. 30% signal enhancement on T1WI FSE images at 90 min post-intravenous injection of the Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD compared with baseline, and the signal to time curve is straightforward over time in the span of 0-90 min p.i., while the control arms do not show this tendency. Conclusion: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD has the potential to serve as an MR probe detecting integrin {alpha}{nu}{beta}3 receptor-expressed tumor.

  1. Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD as an MR molecular probe imaging integrin ανβ3 receptor-expressed tumor-MR molecular imaging of angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Tianlong; Du Xiangke; Zhang Sen; Liu Xia; Li Xubing

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and objective: The aim of this study is to develop a novel MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif for imaging integrin ανβ3 receptor-expressed tumor. Materials and methods: Commercially available HYNIC-RGD conjugated with co-ligand EDDA was labeled with Gd 3+ , and the mixture was isolated and purified by solid phase extract (SPE) to get the entire probe Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD. Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HHCC) cell line BEL-7402 was cultured and the cells harvested and suspended in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) were subcutaneously inoculated into athymic nude mice for tumor growth. In vitro cell binding assay to integrin ανβ3 receptor and cell viability experiments were conducted. The in vivo imaging of the three arms of xenografts were performed by MR scan with a dedicated animal coil at time points of 0, 30, 60, 90 min and 24-h post-intravenous injection (p.i.). Three arms of nude mice then were sacrificed for histological examination to confirm the imaging results. Results: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD was successfully isolated by SPE and validity was verified on signal enhancement through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The nude mice model bearing HHCC was well established. There was approx. 30% signal enhancement on T1WI FSE images at 90 min post-intravenous injection of the Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD compared with baseline, and the signal to time curve is straightforward over time in the span of 0-90 min p.i., while the control arms do not show this tendency. Conclusion: Gd-EDDA/HYNIC-RGD has the potential to serve as an MR probe detecting integrin ανβ3 receptor-expressed tumor.

  2. A Fluorescent Molecular Probe for the Detection of Hydrogen Based on Oxidative Addition Reactions with Crabtree-Type Hydrogenation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Pavlo; Plenio, Herbert

    2015-11-02

    A Crabtree-type Ir(I) complex tagged with a fluorescent dye (bodipy) was synthesized. The oxidative addition of H2 converts the weakly fluorescent Ir(I) complex (Φ=0.038) into a highly fluorescent Ir(III) species (Φ=0.51). This fluorogenic reaction can be utilized for the detection of H2 and to probe the oxidative addition step in the catalytic hydrogenation of olefins. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Aromatic C-Nitroso Compounds and Their Dimers: A Model for Probing the Reaction Mechanisms in Crystalline Molecular Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Biljan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the dimerization and dissociation of aromatic C-nitroso compounds and their dimers, the reactions that could be used as a convenient model for studying the thermal organic solid-state reaction mechanisms. This molecular model is simple because it includes formation or breaking of only one covalent bond between two nitrogen atoms. The crystalline molecular solids of nitroso dimers (azodioxides dissociate by photolysis under the cryogenic conditions, and re-dimerize by slow warming. The thermal re-dimerization reaction is examined under the different topotactic conditions in crystals: disordering, surface defects, and phase transformations. Depending on the conditions, and on the molecular structure, aromatic C-nitroso compounds can associate to form one-dimensional polymeric structures and are able to self-assemble on gold surfaces.

  4. ICT-Isomerization-Induced Turn-On Fluorescence Probe with a Large Emission Shift for Mercury Ion: Application in Combinational Molecular Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Sushil Ranjan; Mondal, Bijan; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Thakur, Arunabha

    2017-10-02

    A unique turn-on fluorescent device based on a ferrocene-aminonaphtholate derivative specific for Hg 2+ cation was developed. Upon binding with Hg 2+ ion, the probe shows a dramatic fluorescence enhancement (the fluorescence quantum yield increases 58-fold) along with a large red shift of 68 nm in the emission spectrum. The fluorescence enhancement with a red shift may be ascribed to the combinational effect of C═N isomerization and an extended intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanism. The response was instantaneous with a detection limit of 2.7 × 10 -9 M. Upon Hg 2+ recognition, the ferrocene/ferrocenium redox peak was anodically shifted by ΔE 1/2 = 72 mV along with a "naked eye" color change from faint yellow to pale orange for this metal cation. Further, upon protonation of the imine nitrogen, the present probe displays a high fluorescence output due to suppression of the C═N isomerization process. Upon deprotonation using strong base, the fluorescence steadily decreases, which indicates that H + and OH - can be used to regulate the off-on-off fluorescence switching of the present probe. Density functional theory studies revealed that the addition of acid leads to protonation of the imine N (according to natural bond orbital analysis), and the resulting iminium proton forms a strong H-bond (2.307 Å) with one of the triazole N atoms to form a five-membered ring, which makes the molecule rigid; hence, enhancement of the ICT process takes place, thereby leading to a fluorescence enhancement with a red shift. The unprecedented combination of H + , OH - , and Hg 2+ ions has been used to generate a molecular system exhibiting the INHIBIT-OR combinational logic operation.

  5. Molecular identification of Clonorchis sinensis and discrimination with other opisthorchid liver fluke species using multiple Ligation-depended Probe Amplification (MLPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections with the opisthorchid liver flukes Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, and O. felineus cause severe health problems globally, particularly in Southeast Asia. Early identification of the infection is essential to provide timely and appropriate chemotherapy to patients. Results In this study we evaluate a PCR-based molecular identification method, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA, which allows rapid and specific detection of single nucleotide acid differences between Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and O. felineus. Three probe pairs were derived from the Internally Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1 of three opisthorchid liver flukes using a systematic phylogenetic analysis. Specific loci were detected in all three species, yielding three amplicons with 198,172 and 152 bp, respectively, while no cross reactions were observed. A panel of 66 C. sinensis isolates was screened using MLPA. All species were positively identified, and no inhibition was observed. The detection limit was 103 copies of the ITS gene for the three liver flukes, or about 60 pg genomic DNA for Clonorchis sinensis. Amplification products can be detected by electrophoresis on agarose gel or in a capillary sequencer. In addition, genomic DNA of Clonorchis sinensis in fecal samples of infected rats was positively amplified by MLPA. Conclusion The flexibility and specificity make MLPA a potential tool for specific identification of infections by opisthorchid liver flukes in endemic areas.

  6. A comparative study of the enhancement of molecular emission in a spatially confined plume through optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Dayu; Liang, Peipei; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian, E-mail: jsun@fudan.edu.cn

    2013-01-01

    The spatial confinement effects of shock wave on the expansion of a carbon plume induced by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in air and the enhancement of the plume emission were studied by optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements. A metal disk was set in the way of the ablation-generated shock wave to block and reflect the supersonically propagating shock wave. The reflected shock wave propagated backwards and confined the expanding plume. The optical emission of CN molecules was enhanced in contrast to the case without the block disk and the emission enhancement was dependent on the position of the disk. Based on the results of time-integrated and -resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and the time- and space-resolved probe beam deflection measurements, the processes occurring in the plume were discussed and the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of molecular emission in the spatially confined plume were investigated. - Highlights: ► Spatial confinement and optical emission enhancement of carbon plume were studied. ► Ablation-generated shockwave propagating in air was reflected by a block disk. ► The effects of reflected shockwave on the emission enhancement were confirmed. ► The reflect shockwave confined the carbon plume and enhanced the plume emission.

  7. A comparative study of the enhancement of molecular emission in a spatially confined plume through optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Dayu; Liang, Peipei; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The spatial confinement effects of shock wave on the expansion of a carbon plume induced by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in air and the enhancement of the plume emission were studied by optical emission spectroscopy and probe beam deflection measurements. A metal disk was set in the way of the ablation-generated shock wave to block and reflect the supersonically propagating shock wave. The reflected shock wave propagated backwards and confined the expanding plume. The optical emission of CN molecules was enhanced in contrast to the case without the block disk and the emission enhancement was dependent on the position of the disk. Based on the results of time-integrated and -resolved optical emission spectroscopy, and the time- and space-resolved probe beam deflection measurements, the processes occurring in the plume were discussed and the mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of molecular emission in the spatially confined plume were investigated. - Highlights: ► Spatial confinement and optical emission enhancement of carbon plume were studied. ► Ablation-generated shockwave propagating in air was reflected by a block disk. ► The effects of reflected shockwave on the emission enhancement were confirmed. ► The reflect shockwave confined the carbon plume and enhanced the plume emission

  8. Dissociation and ionization of molecular ions by ultra-short intense laser pulses probed by coincidence 3D momentum imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik; Wang, Pengqian; Xia, Jiangfan; Max Sayler, A.; Smith, Mark A.; Maseberg, J.W.; Carnes, Kevin D.; Esry, Brett D.

    2005-01-01

    We have experimentally explored laser-induced dissociation and ionization of diatomic molecular ions using coincidence 3D momentum imaging. The vibrationally excited molecular ion beam (4-8 keV) is crossed by an ultrafast intense laser beam (28-200 fs, 10 13 -10 14 W/cm 2 ). The resulting fragments are recorded in coincidence by a time and position-sensitive detector. Complete angular distributions and kinetic energy release maps are reconstructed from the measured dissociation-momentum vectors. The angular distribution of the H + + H fragments was found to be strongly correlated to their kinetic energy release upon dissociation. Low KER was associated with very narrow angular distributions and high KER with distributions peaking away from the laser polarization. Ionization was found to be smaller than dissociation and increased with laser intensity. The H + + H + fragments have a very narrow angular distribution along the laser polarization

  9. Probing the behavior of bovine serum albumin upon binding to atenolol: insights from spectroscopic and molecular docking approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tuo-Ying; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi; Shi, Jie-Hua

    2018-04-01

    Molecular interaction of atenolol, a selective β 1 receptor antagonist with the major carrier protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), was investigated under imitated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) by means of fluorescence spectroscopy, UV absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and molecular modeling studies. The steady-state fluorescence spectra manifested that static type, due to formation of the atenolol-BSA complex, was the dominant mechanism for fluorescence quenching. The characteristic information about the binding interaction of atenolol with BSA in terms of binding constant (K b ) were determined by the UV-vis absorption titration, and were found to be in the order of 10 3  M -1 at different temperatures, indicating the existence of a weak binding in this system. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the binding process was primarily mediated by van der Waals force and hydrogen bonds due to the negative sign for enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ), entropy change (ΔS 0 ). The molecular docking results elucidated that atenolol preferred binding on the site II of BSA according to the findings observed in competitive binding experiments. Moreover, via alterations in synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and FT-IR spectral properties, it was concluded that atenolol could arouse slight configurational and micro-environmental changes of BSA.

  10. Probing the interaction of a therapeutic flavonoid, pinostrobin with human serum albumin: multiple spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevin R Feroz

    Full Text Available Interaction of a pharmacologically important flavonoid, pinostrobin (PS with the major transport protein of human blood circulation, human serum albumin (HSA has been examined using a multitude of spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking studies. Analysis of the fluorescence quenching data showed a moderate binding affinity (1.03 × 10(5 M(-1 at 25°C between PS and HSA with a 1∶1 stoichiometry. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data (ΔS = +44.06 J mol(-1 K(-1 and ΔH = -15.48 kJ mol(-1 and molecular simulation results suggested the involvement of hydrophobic and van der Waals forces, as well as hydrogen bonding in the complex formation. Both secondary and tertiary structural perturbations in HSA were observed upon PS binding, as revealed by intrinsic, synchronous, and three-dimensional fluorescence results. Far-UV circular dichroism data revealed increased thermal stability of the protein upon complexation with PS. Competitive drug displacement results suggested the binding site of PS on HSA as Sudlow's site I, located at subdomain IIA, and was well supported by the molecular modelling data.

  11. Structure biodistribution relationship of radioiodinated tropeines: search for a molecular probe for the characterization of the cocaine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Mills, S.L.; Kanvinde, M.; Basmadjian, N.P.

    1990-01-01

    Three iodinated analogs of cocaine were synthesized and radiolabeled by isotope exchange in the presence of CU ++ using a ''kit'' procedure. 2'-Iodococaine, 2'-iodotropacocaine and 2'-iodobenzoyl tropine radiolabeled with 125 I were injected in mice and their biodistribution studied. Activity with all three radiolabeled compounds peaked in the brain and heart between 5 and 30 min. post injection. Activity from 125 I-2'-iodococaine peaked in the brain at 15 min and showed a plateau in the heart between 5 and 60 min post injection. Sup(125)I-2'-iodotropacocaine at 5 min had the highest uptake in the brain and the heart while activity from 125 I-2'-iodobenzoyl tropine peaked in the brain at 15 min and at 5 min in the heart. The biodistribution of 125 1-2'-iodococaine paralleled literature values obtained with 3 H'/ 14 C-cocaine. We conclude that radioiodinated tropeines radiolabeled with 123 I may be developed into useful probes to examine and characterize the cocaine receptor in-vivo by SPECT imaging. (author)

  12. Development of a pharmacophore for cruzain using oxadiazoles as virtual molecular probes: quantitative structure-activity relationship studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Anacleto S.; de Oliveira, Marcelo T.; Andricopulo, Adriano D.

    2017-09-01

    Chagas's is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, 7 million people are infected worldwide leading to 7000 deaths per year. Drugs available, nifurtimox and benzimidazole, are limited due to low efficacy and high toxicity. As a validated target, cruzain represents a major front in drug discovery attempts for Chagas disease. Herein, we describe the development of 2D QSAR (r_{{{pred}}}2 = 0.81) and a 3D-QSAR-based pharmacophore (r_{{{pred}}}2 = 0.82) from a series of non-covalent cruzain inhibitors represented mostly by oxadiazoles (lead compound, IC50 = 200 nM). Both models allowed us to map key intermolecular interactions in S1', S2 and S3 cruzain sub-sites (including halogen bond and C‒H/π). To probe the predictive capacity of obtained models, inhibitors available in the literature from different classes displaying a range of scaffolds were evaluate achieving mean absolute deviation of 0.33 and 0.51 for 2D and 3D models, respectively. CoMFA revealed an unexplored region where addition of bulky substituents to produce new compounds in the series could be beneficial to improve biological activity.

  13. Structure biodistribution relationship of radioiodinated tropeines: search for a molecular probe for the characterization of the cocaine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Mills, S.L.; Kanvinde, M.; Basmadjian, N.P. (Oklahoma Univ., Oklahoma City, OK (USA). Health Sciences Center)

    1990-07-01

    Three iodinated analogs of cocaine were synthesized and radiolabeled by isotope exchange in the presence of CU{sup ++} using a ''kit'' procedure. 2'-Iodococaine, 2'-iodotropacocaine and 2'-iodobenzoyl tropine radiolabeled with {sup 125}I were injected in mice and their biodistribution studied. Activity with all three radiolabeled compounds peaked in the brain and heart between 5 and 30 min. post injection. Activity from {sup 125}I-2'-iodococaine peaked in the brain at 15 min and showed a plateau in the heart between 5 and 60 min post injection. Sup(125)I-2'-iodotropacocaine at 5 min had the highest uptake in the brain and the heart while activity from {sup 125}I-2'-iodobenzoyl tropine peaked in the brain at 15 min and at 5 min in the heart. The biodistribution of {sup 125}1-2'-iodococaine paralleled literature values obtained with {sup 3}H'/{sup 14}C-cocaine. We conclude that radioiodinated tropeines radiolabeled with {sup 123}I may be developed into useful probes to examine and characterize the cocaine receptor in-vivo by SPECT imaging. (author).

  14. Conformational study of sarcosine as probed by matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea; Fausto, R.

    2003-01-01

    Sarcosine (N-methylglycine) has been studied by matrix-isolation FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations undertaken at the DFT/B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory with the 6-311++G(d, p) and 6-31++G(d, p) basis set, respectively. Eleven different conformers were located in the potential energy surface (PES) of sarcosine, with the ASC conformer being the ground conformational state. This form is analogous to the glycine most stable conformer and is characterized by a NH...O= intramole...

  15. Insights into structural and dynamical features of water at halloysite interfaces probed by DFT and classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Davide; Pedone, Alfonso; Mancini, Giordano; Duce, Celia; Tiné, Maria Rosaria; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-01-21

    Density functional theory calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the structure and dynamics of water molecules on kaolinite surfaces and confined in the interlayer of a halloysite model of nanometric dimension. The first technique allowed us to accurately describe the structure of the tetrahedral-octahedral slab of kaolinite in vacuum and in interaction with water molecules and to assess the performance of two widely employed empirical force fields to model water/clay interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the hydrogen bond network structure and dynamics of water adsorbed on kaolinite surfaces and confined in the halloysite interlayer. The results are in nice agreement with the few experimental data available in the literature, showing a pronounced ordering and reduced mobility of water molecules at the hydrophilic octahedral surfaces of kaolinite and confined in the halloysite interlayer, with respect to water interacting with the hydrophobic tetrahedral surfaces and in the bulk. Finally, this investigation provides new atomistic insights into the structural and dynamical properties of water-clay interfaces, which are of fundamental importance for both natural processes and industrial applications.

  16. Nitro Stretch Probing of a Single Molecular Layer to Monitor Shock Compression with Picosecond Time-Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher; Lagutchev, Alexei; Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2011-06-01

    To obtain maximum possible temporal resolution, laser-driven shock compression of a molecular monolayer was studied using vibrational spectroscopy. The stretching transitions of nitro groups bound to aromatic rings was monitored using a nonlinear coherent infrared spectroscopy termed sum-frequency generation, which produced high-quality signals from this very thin layer. To overcome the shock opacity problem, a novel polymer overcoat method allowed us to make the observation window (witness plate) a few micrometers thick. The high signal-to-noise ratios (>100:1) obtained via this spectroscopy allowed us to study detailed behavior of the shocked molecules. To help interpret these vibrational spectra, additional spectra were obtained under conditions of static pressures up to 10 GPa and static temperatures up to 1000 C. Consequently, this experiment represents a significant step in resolving molecular dynamics during shock compression and unloading with both high spatial and temporal resolution. Supported by the Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliance Program from the Carnegie-DOE Alliance Center under grant number DOE CIW 4-3253-13 and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under award number FAA9550-09-1-0163.

  17. THE MASS-SIZE RELATION FROM CLOUDS TO CORES. I. A NEW PROBE OF STRUCTURE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, J.; Shetty, R.; Goodman, A. A.; Pillai, T.; Myers, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    We use a new contour-based map analysis technique to measure the mass and size of molecular cloud fragments continuously over a wide range of spatial scales (0.05 ≤ r/pc ≤ 10), i.e., from the scale of dense cores to those of entire clouds. The present paper presents the method via a detailed exploration of the Perseus molecular cloud. Dust extinction and emission data are combined to yield reliable scale-dependent measurements of mass. This scale-independent analysis approach is useful for several reasons. First, it provides a more comprehensive characterization of a map (i.e., not biased toward a particular spatial scale). Such a lack of bias is extremely useful for the joint analysis of many data sets taken with different spatial resolution. This includes comparisons between different cloud complexes. Second, the multi-scale mass-size data constitute a unique resource to derive slopes of mass-size laws (via power-law fits). Such slopes provide singular constraints on large-scale density gradients in clouds.

  18. Probing the interactions of bromchlorbuterol-HCl and phenylethanolamine A with HSA by multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Zhao, Tingting; Zhou, Huifeng; Wang, Yu; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular docking showed that BCB/PEA was bound at sub-domain IIA of HSA. • Fluorescence lifetimes indicated that the quenching was a static quenching. • CD spectra showed that BCB/PEA changed the conformation of HSA. • The competitive binding between site markers and BCB/PEA was studied. • The mutual influence on the two drugs binding HSA was studied. - Abstract: Using fluorescence quenching, fluorescence lifetime, (UV + vis) absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking technique, the interactions of human serum albumin (HSA) with bromchlorbuterol-HCl (BCB) and phenylethanolamine A (PEA) were investigated. The quenching rate constants and binding constants for BCB/PEA with HSA were determined at T = (292.15, 302.15 and 312.15) K respectively, which were all decreased with the increase of the temperature, showing not a dynamic quenching. The fluorescence lifetime of HSA with BCB/PEA had changed little compared to that of HSA alone (τ_0), further confirming that BCB/PEA quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of HSA is a static quenching. The effects of K"+, Ca"2"+, Cu"2"+, Zn"2"+ and Fe"3"+ on the binding were studied. The analysis of the thermodynamic parameters for BCB/(PEA + HSA) showed that BCB/PEA could bind to HSA via hydrophobic force. The binding distances were determined as 2.90 and 4.11 nm for (BCB + HSA) and (PEA + HSA) based on the Förster’s non-radiative energy transfer theory (FRET). Synchronous fluorescence and CD spectra indicated that the conformation of HSA was changed by BCB/PEA. The competitive studies for the drug with site marker suggested that both BCB and PEA were bound at Sudlow’s sites I (sub-domain IIA, also known as indometacin binding site) in HSA, and the results of the study of molecular docking also leads to the same conclusion. The competitive binding experiments for the two drugs were also performed, which further indicates that PEA and BCB could share the same binding site, and PEA has a much

  19. Probing the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide and decalanine using temperature as a tunable parameter in molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A; Bhattacharya, S

    2016-01-01

    We perform several molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of solvated alanine dipeptide and decalanine in vacuum with temperature as a tunable parameter and in the process, generate Markov state models (MSMs) at each temperature. An interesting observation that the kinetic rates appear to obey the Arrhenius rate law allows us to predict the dynamics of alanine dipeptide at 300 K at the microsecond timescales using the nanoseconds long high temperature calculations without actually performing MD simulations at 300 K. We conclude that the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide contains superbasins deeper than k B T and determine the energy barriers associated with the moves from the Arrhenius rate expression. Similar insights regarding the energy landscape associated with folding/unfolding pathways of a deca-alanine molecule are obtained using kinetic rates calculated at different temperatures. (paper)

  20. Proposed alteration of images of molecular orbitals obtained using a scanning tunneling microscope as a probe of electron correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroz, Dimitrios; Rontani, Massimo; Corni, Stefano

    2013-01-04

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) allows us to image single molecules decoupled from the supporting substrate. The obtained images are routinely interpreted as the square moduli of molecular orbitals, dressed by the mean-field electron-electron interaction. Here we demonstrate that the effect of electron correlation beyond the mean field qualitatively alters the uncorrelated STS images. Our evidence is based on the ab initio many-body calculation of STS images of planar molecules with metal centers. We find that many-body correlations alter significantly the image spectral weight close to the metal center of the molecules. This change is large enough to be accessed experimentally, surviving to molecule-substrate interactions.

  1. Perturbations in DNA structure upon interaction with porphyrins revealed by chemical probes, DNA footprinting and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K G; Neidle, S

    1995-06-01

    The interactions of several porphyrins with a 74 base-pair DNA sequence have been examined by footprinting and chemical protection methods. Tetra-(4-N-methyl-(pyridyl)) porphyrin (TMPy), two of its metal complexes and tetra-(4-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TMAP) bind to closely similar AT-rich sequences. The three TMPy ligands produce modest changes in DNA structure and base accessibility on binding, in contrast to the large-scale conformational changes observed with TMAP. Molecular modelling studies have been performed on TMPy and TMAP bound in the AT-rich minor groove of an oligonucleotide. These have shown that significant structural change is needed to accommodate the bulky trimethyl substituent groups of TMAP, in contrast to the facile minor groove fit of TMPy.

  2. Probing of possible olanzapine binding site on human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic methods and molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Rahimi, Behnoosh; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Sadrjavadi, Komail; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding affinity is one of the major factors that determine the pharmacokinetics, halftime and bioavailability of drugs in various tissues. In the present study, the interaction of olanzapine (OLZ), a thienobenzodiazepine drug, administered for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with HSA has been studied using spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and FTIR combined with computational procedures. Analyzing of the Stern–Volmer quenching data showed only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10 4 M −1 at 298 K. Thermodynamic analyses showed enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were 28.03±3.42 kJ mol −1 and −25.52±11.52 J mol −1 K −1 , respectively. Molecular docking results suggested the hydrophobic residues such as Val 216 , Leu 327 , Ala 350 and polar residues such as Glu 354 play an important role in the drug binding. Decrement in α-helix content of the protein upon OLZ binding was also confirmed by evidences provided by molecular dynamics simulation as well as FTIR spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Leu 327 , Ala 350 as well as hydrophilic residues of HSA play an important role in the binding reaction. • The drug has only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10 4 M −1 at 298 K. • The drug binds near to site I

  3. Probing of possible olanzapine binding site on human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic methods and molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen, E-mail: mohsenshahlaei@yahoo.com [Nano drug delivery research Center, Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Behnoosh [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Student research committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrjavadi, Komail [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding affinity is one of the major factors that determine the pharmacokinetics, halftime and bioavailability of drugs in various tissues. In the present study, the interaction of olanzapine (OLZ), a thienobenzodiazepine drug, administered for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with HSA has been studied using spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and FTIR combined with computational procedures. Analyzing of the Stern–Volmer quenching data showed only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. Thermodynamic analyses showed enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were 28.03±3.42 kJ mol{sup −1} and −25.52±11.52 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. Molecular docking results suggested the hydrophobic residues such as Val{sub 216}, Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} and polar residues such as Glu{sub 354} play an important role in the drug binding. Decrement in α-helix content of the protein upon OLZ binding was also confirmed by evidences provided by molecular dynamics simulation as well as FTIR spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} as well as hydrophilic residues of HSA play an important role in the binding reaction. • The drug has only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. • The drug binds near to site I.

  4. Molecular frame photoemission by a comb of elliptical high-order harmonics: a sensitive probe of both photodynamics and harmonic complete polarization state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrinas, K; Gruson, V; Weber, S J; Barreau, L; Ruchon, T; Hergott, J-F; Houver, J-C; Lucchese, R R; Salières, P; Dowek, D

    2016-12-16

    Due to the intimate anisotropic interaction between an XUV light field and a molecule resulting in photoionization (PI), molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs) are most sensitive probes of both electronic/nuclear dynamics and the polarization state of the ionizing light field. Consequently, they encode the complex dipole matrix elements describing the dynamics of the PI transition, as well as the three normalized Stokes parameters s 1 , s 2 , s 3 characterizing the complete polarization state of the light, operating as molecular polarimetry. The remarkable development of advanced light sources delivering attosecond XUV pulses opens the perspective to visualize the primary steps of photochemical dynamics in time-resolved studies, at the natural attosecond to few femtosecond time-scales of electron dynamics and fast nuclear motion. It is thus timely to investigate the feasibility of measurement of MFPADs when PI is induced e.g., by an attosecond pulse train (APT) corresponding to a comb of discrete high-order harmonics. In the work presented here, we report MFPAD studies based on coincident electron-ion 3D momentum imaging in the context of ultrafast molecular dynamics investigated at the PLFA facility (CEA-SLIC), with two perspectives: (i) using APTs generated in atoms/molecules as a source for MFPAD-resolved PI studies, and (ii) taking advantage of molecular polarimetry to perform a complete polarization analysis of the harmonic emission of molecules, a major challenge of high harmonic spectroscopy. Recent results illustrating both aspects are reported for APTs generated in unaligned SF 6 molecules by an elliptically polarized infrared driving field. The observed fingerprints of the elliptically polarized harmonics include the first direct determination of the complete s 1 , s 2 , s 3 Stokes vector, equivalent to (ψ, ε, P), the orientation and the signed ellipticity of the polarization ellipse, and the degree of polarization P. They are

  5. Probing the molecular forces involved in binding of selected volatile flavour compounds to salt-extracted pea proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Arntfield, Susan D

    2016-11-15

    Molecular interactions between heterologous classes of flavour compounds with salt-extracted pea protein isolates (PPIs) were determined using various bond disrupting agents followed by GC/MS analysis. Flavour bound by proteins decreased in the order: dibutyl disulfide>octanal>hexyl acetate>2-octanone=benzaldehyde. Benzaldehyde, 2-octanone and hexyl acetate interacted non-covalently with PPIs, whereas octanal bound PPIs via covalent and non-covalent forces. Dibutyl disulfide reacted with PPIs covalently, as its retention was not diminished by urea and guanidine hydrochloride. Using propylene glycol, H-bonding and ionic interactions were implicated for hexyl acetate, benzaldehyde, and 2-octanone. A protein-destabilising salt (Cl3CCOONa) reduced bindings for 2-octanone, hexyl acetate, and benzaldehyde; however, retention for octanal and dibutyl disulfide increased. Conversely, a protein-stabilising salt (Na2SO4) enhanced retention for benzaldehyde, 2-octanone, hexyl acetate and octanal. Formation of a volatile flavour by-product, 1-butanethiol, from dibutyl disulfide when PPIs were treated with dithiothreitol indicated occurrence of sulfhydryl-disulfide interchange reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Probing into the binding interaction between medroxyprogesterone acetate and bovine serum albumin (BSA): spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Dong-Qi; Qiu, Min-Jie; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Min; Wang, Qi; Shi, Jie-Hua

    2016-09-01

    To further understand the mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the binding interaction of MPA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) was studied using fluorescence emission spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular docking methods. The experimental results reveal that the fluorescence of BSA quenches due to the formation of MPA-BSA complex. The number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant for MPA-BSA complex are ~1 and 4.6 × 10(3)  M(-1) at 310 K, respectively. However, it can be concluded that the binding process of MPA with BSA is spontaneous and the main interaction forces between MPA and BSA are van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding interaction due to the negative values of ΔG(0) , ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) in the binding process of MPA with BSA. MPA prefers binding on the hydrophobic cavity in subdomain IIIA (site II'') of BSA resulting in a slight change in the conformation of BSA, but BSA retaining the α-helix structure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Probing ligand binding modes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MurC ligase by molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, C M; Mulakayala, Chaitanya; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, Chikati; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Multi drug resistance capacity for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-Mtb) demands the profound need for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. The present work is on Mtb-MurC ligase, which is an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, a component of Mtb cell wall. In this paper the 3-D structure of Mtb-MurC has been constructed using the templates 1GQQ and 1P31. Structural refinement and energy minimization of the predicted Mtb-MurC ligase model has been carried out by molecular dynamics. The streochemical check failures in the energy minimized model have been evaluated through Procheck, Whatif ProSA, and Verify 3D. Further torsion angles for the side chains of amino acid residues of the developed model were determined using Predictor. Docking analysis of Mtb-MurC model with ligands and natural substrates enabled us to identify specific residues viz. Gly125, Lys126, Arg331, and Arg332, within the Mtb-MurC binding pocket to play an important role in ligand and substrate binding affinity and selectivity. The availability of Mtb-MurC ligase built model, together with insights gained from docking analysis will promote the rational design of potent and selective Mtb-MurC ligase inhibitors as antituberculosis therapeutics.

  8. A disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor coated with a molecularly imprinted polymer as a selective fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Xuan-Anh; Acha, Victor; Bonomi, Paolo; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Haupt, Karsten

    2015-02-15

    We have developed a disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor by coating a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescent signaling group on a 4-cm long polystyrene optical waveguide. The MIP is composed of a naphthalimide-based fluorescent monomer, which shows fluorescence enhancement upon binding with carboxyl-containing molecules. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and the mycotoxin citrinin were used as model analytes. The coating of the MIP was either performed ex-situ, by dip-coating the fiber with MIP particles synthesized beforehand, or in-situ by evanescent-wave photopolymerization on the fiber. The sensing element was interrogated with a fiber-coupled spectrofluorimeter. The fiber optic sensor detects targets in the low nM range and exhibits specific and selective recognition over structural analogs and non-related carboxyl-containing molecules. This technology can be extended to other carboxyl-containing analytes, and to a broader spectrum of targets using different fluorescent monomers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Green's function-stochastic methods framework for probing nonlinear evolution problems: Burger's equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger's equation, and hydrodynamic organization of near-molecular-scale vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keanini, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Systematic approach for physically probing nonlinear and random evolution problems. → Evolution of vortex sheets corresponds to evolution of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. → Organization of near-molecular scale vorticity mediated by hydrodynamic modes. → Framework allows calculation of vorticity evolution within random strain fields. - Abstract: A framework which combines Green's function (GF) methods and techniques from the theory of stochastic processes is proposed for tackling nonlinear evolution problems. The framework, established by a series of easy-to-derive equivalences between Green's function and stochastic representative solutions of linear drift-diffusion problems, provides a flexible structure within which nonlinear evolution problems can be analyzed and physically probed. As a preliminary test bed, two canonical, nonlinear evolution problems - Burgers' equation and the nonlinear Schroedinger's equation - are first treated. In the first case, the framework provides a rigorous, probabilistic derivation of the well known Cole-Hopf ansatz. Likewise, in the second, the machinery allows systematic recovery of a known soliton solution. The framework is then applied to a fairly extensive exploration of physical features underlying evolution of randomly stretched and advected Burger's vortex sheets. Here, the governing vorticity equation corresponds to the Fokker-Planck equation of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a correspondence that motivates an investigation of sub-sheet vorticity evolution and organization. Under the assumption that weak hydrodynamic fluctuations organize disordered, near-molecular-scale, sub-sheet vorticity, it is shown that these modes consist of two weakly damped counter-propagating cross-sheet acoustic modes, a diffusive cross-sheet shear mode, and a diffusive cross-sheet entropy mode. Once a consistent picture of in-sheet vorticity evolution is established, a number of analytical results, describing the

  10. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a type IV pilus probe initial stages of a force-induced conformational transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Baker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are long, protein filaments built from a repeating subunit that protrudes from the surface of a wide variety of infectious bacteria. They are implicated in a vast array of functions, ranging from bacterial motility to microcolony formation to infection. One of the most well-studied type IV filaments is the gonococcal type IV pilus (GC-T4P from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Cryo-electron microscopy has been used to construct a model of this filament, offering insights into the structure of type IV pili. In addition, experiments have demonstrated that GC-T4P can withstand very large tension forces, and transition to a force-induced conformation. However, the details of force-generation, and the atomic-level characteristics of the force-induced conformation, are unknown. Here, steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulation was used to exert a force in silico on an 18 subunit segment of GC-T4P to address questions regarding the nature of the interactions that lead to the extraordinary strength of bacterial pili. SMD simulations revealed that the buried pilin α1 domains maintain hydrophobic contacts with one another within the core of the filament, leading to GC-T4P's structural stability. At the filament surface, gaps between pilin globular head domains in both the native and pulled states provide water accessible routes between the external environment and the interior of the filament, allowing water to access the pilin α1 domains as reported for VC-T4P in deuterium exchange experiments. Results were also compared to the experimentally observed force-induced conformation. In particular, an exposed amino acid sequence in the experimentally stretched filament was also found to become exposed during the SMD simulations, suggesting that initial stages of the force induced transition are well captured. Furthermore, a second sequence was shown to be initially hidden in the native filament and became exposed upon

  11. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a type IV pilus probe initial stages of a force-induced conformational transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph L; Biais, Nicolas; Tama, Florence

    2013-04-01

    Type IV pili are long, protein filaments built from a repeating subunit that protrudes from the surface of a wide variety of infectious bacteria. They are implicated in a vast array of functions, ranging from bacterial motility to microcolony formation to infection. One of the most well-studied type IV filaments is the gonococcal type IV pilus (GC-T4P) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Cryo-electron microscopy has been used to construct a model of this filament, offering insights into the structure of type IV pili. In addition, experiments have demonstrated that GC-T4P can withstand very large tension forces, and transition to a force-induced conformation. However, the details of force-generation, and the atomic-level characteristics of the force-induced conformation, are unknown. Here, steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation was used to exert a force in silico on an 18 subunit segment of GC-T4P to address questions regarding the nature of the interactions that lead to the extraordinary strength of bacterial pili. SMD simulations revealed that the buried pilin α1 domains maintain hydrophobic contacts with one another within the core of the filament, leading to GC-T4P's structural stability. At the filament surface, gaps between pilin globular head domains in both the native and pulled states provide water accessible routes between the external environment and the interior of the filament, allowing water to access the pilin α1 domains as reported for VC-T4P in deuterium exchange experiments. Results were also compared to the experimentally observed force-induced conformation. In particular, an exposed amino acid sequence in the experimentally stretched filament was also found to become exposed during the SMD simulations, suggesting that initial stages of the force induced transition are well captured. Furthermore, a second sequence was shown to be initially hidden in the native filament and became exposed upon stretching.

  12. UV laser photoactivation of hexachloroplatinate bound to individual nucleobases in vacuo as molecular level probes of a model photopharmaceutical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Edward; Sen, Ananya; Yoshikawa, Naruo; Bergström, Ed; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2016-06-01

    Isolated molecular clusters of adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil bound to hexachloroplatinate, PtCl6(2-), have been studied using laser electronic photodissociation spectroscopy to investigate photoactivation of a platinum complex in the vicinity of a nucleobase. These metal complex-nucleobase clusters represent model systems for identifying the fundamental photochemical processes occurring in photodynamic platinum drug therapies that target DNA. This is the first study to explore the specific role of a strongly photoactive platinum compound in the aggregate complex. Each of the clusters studied displays a broadly similar absorption spectra, with a strong λmax ∼ 4.6 eV absorption band and a subsequent increase in the absorption intensity towards higher spectral-energy. The absorption bands are traced to ligand-to-metal-charge-transfer excitations on the PtCl6(2-) moiety within the cluster, and result in Cl(-)·nucleobase and PtCl5(-) as primary photofragments. These results demonstrate how selective photoexcitation can drive distinctive photodecay channels for a model photo-pharmaceutical. In addition, cluster absorption due to excitation of nucleobase-centred chromophores is observed in the region around 5 eV. For the uracil cluster, photofragments consistent with ultrafast decay of the excited state and vibrational predissociation on the ground-state surface are observed. However, this decay channel becomes successively weaker on going from thymine to cytosine to adenine, due to differential coupling of the excited states to the electron detachment continuum. These effects demonstrate the distinctive photophysical characteristics of the different nucleobases, and are discussed in the context of the recently recorded photoelectron spectra of theses clusters.

  13. Routinely automated production of 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F] fluorothymidine as a specific molecular imaging probe of tumor cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingwei; Zhang Yingjian; Zhang Yongping

    2011-01-01

    This work was aimed at developing a routine for automated production of 3'-deoxy-3'-[ 18 F]fluorothymidine ( 18 F-FLT), a specific molecular imaging probe of tumor cell proliferation, using one-pot two-step strategy and an upgraded Explora GN module integrated with a semi-preparative HPLC system. Firstly, the nucleophilic [ 18 F] radiofluorination of precursor BDNT with activated 18 F ion was carried out at 120 degree C for 5 min to yield the labeled intermediate 18 F-BDFT. Secondly, the acidic hydrolysis of 18 F-BDFT was run at 110 degree C for 5 min to produce 18 F-FLT after addition of HCl, and 18 F-FLT was purified by HPLC. This automated production of 18 F-FLT is of fast, reliable and multi-run features, being completed within 65 min with radiochemical yield of 15%-25% (without decay correction). The quality control of 18 F-FLT was identical with the radiopharmaceutical requirements, especiallly the radiochemical purity of greater than 99% and high chemical purity and specific activity own to HPLC purification. (authors)

  14. Chemomechanics with Molecular Force Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    has been impossible. Furthermore, energy is a directionless (scalar) parameter, which fails to capture the directional nature of kinetically...over- all yields [27,54]. Clean high-yielding macrocyclization was achieved by oxidation of thiols under high dilution. The activation parameters for...881 (2007). 52. R. Singh, G. M. Whitesides. In Supplement S: The Chemistry of Sulphur -Containing Functional Groups, S. Patai, Z. Rappoport (Eds.), p

  15. Diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis with radiolabelled probes: comparison of the kDNA PCR-hybridization with three molecular methods in different clinical samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Aline Leandra C.; Ferreira, Sidney A.; Carregal, Virginia M.; Andrade, Antero Silva R., E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia; Melo, Maria N., E-mail: melo@icb.ufmg.br [Departamento de Parasitologia. Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi is responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil and the dog is the main domestic reservoir. Disease control is based on the elimination of infected animals and the use of a sensitive and specific diagnostic test is necessary. The Brazilian VL control program emphasizes serologic surveys, mainly using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), followed by the elimination of the seropositive dogs. However, these techniques present limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) associated to hybridization with DNA probes labeled with {sup 32}P has been recognized as a valuable tool for Leishmania identification. In this study, the sensitivity of kDNA PCR hybridization method was compared with three other molecular methods: Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Nested PCR (ITS-1nPCR), Leishmania nested PCR (LnPCR) and Seminested kDNA PCR (kDNA snPCR). The comparison was performed in different clinical specimens: conjunctival swab, skin, blood and bone marrow. A group of thirty symptomatic dogs, positive in the parasitological and serological tests, was used. When. The techniques targeting kDNA mini-circles (kDNA snPCR and KDNA PCR-hybridization) showed the worst result for blood samples. The KDNA-PCR hybridization showed the best sensitivity for conjunctival swab. By comparing the samples on the basis of positivity obtained by the sum of all methods, the blood showed the worst outcome (71/120).The bone marrow showed the highest positivity (106/120), followed by conjunctival swab (100/120) and skin (89/120). Since the bone marrow samples are unsuitable for routine epidemiological surveys, the conjunctival swab was recommended because it allows high sensitivity, especially when associated with kDNA PCR hybridization method, and is a noninvasive sampling method. (author)

  16. Assessing the acidity of high silica chabazite H-SSZ-13 by FTIR using CO as molecular probe: Comparison with H-SAPO-34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiga, Silvia; Regli, Laura; Cocina, Donato; Lamberti, Carlo; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-02-24

    Zeolitic materials based on the chabazite topology, such as H-SAPO-34, possess unique shape-selectivity properties for converting methanol into light olefins. In addition to the topology, zeolite acidity is inherently linked to catalyst activity and selectivity. The acidic properties of high silica chabazite (H-SSZ-13) have attracted much attention in the past decade because the material represents an idealized model system having one acidic site per cage. Conclusions drawn so far have essentially been founded on quantum chemical methods. An experimentally based benchmark of the acidity of H-SSZ-13 has hitherto not been available. In this work, transmission FTIR spectroscopy provides a description of the different acidic sites of H-SSZ-13 by using CO as molecular probe at 70 K. The results demonstrate that H-SSZ-13 is a strongly Brønsted acidic material, essentially having two distinct families of acidic sites. In contrast to numerous preceding reports, we find it fundamental to consider proton distributions among all four possible sites, and do not delimit the interpretations to only two sites. The present data consistently suggest the most abundant family of protons to have three members being located on different crystalline positions on the eight-membered-ring window giving access to the chabazite cage. Consequently, these protons are exposed to two neighboring cages. The second, and less abundant family, is constituted by only one site that is situated on the six-membered ring defining the top/bottom of the barrel-shaped chabazite cage. This proton is therefore only exposed to one cage and requires a higher CO pressure to form adducts. Toward CO, both families of sites possess the same acidity. Parallel experiments were also carried out for the isostructural and commercially important H-SAPO-34 having an equal density of acidic sites. This is the first attempt to directly compare, on an experimental basis, the acidity of these two materials.

  17. Diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis with radiolabelled probes: comparison of the kDNA PCR-hybridization with three molecular methods in different clinical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Aline Leandra C.; Ferreira, Sidney A.; Carregal, Virginia M.; Andrade, Antero Silva R.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi is responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil and the dog is the main domestic reservoir. Disease control is based on the elimination of infected animals and the use of a sensitive and specific diagnostic test is necessary. The Brazilian VL control program emphasizes serologic surveys, mainly using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), followed by the elimination of the seropositive dogs. However, these techniques present limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) associated to hybridization with DNA probes labeled with 32 P has been recognized as a valuable tool for Leishmania identification. In this study, the sensitivity of kDNA PCR hybridization method was compared with three other molecular methods: Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Nested PCR (ITS-1nPCR), Leishmania nested PCR (LnPCR) and Seminested kDNA PCR (kDNA snPCR). The comparison was performed in different clinical specimens: conjunctival swab, skin, blood and bone marrow. A group of thirty symptomatic dogs, positive in the parasitological and serological tests, was used. When. The techniques targeting kDNA mini-circles (kDNA snPCR and KDNA PCR-hybridization) showed the worst result for blood samples. The KDNA-PCR hybridization showed the best sensitivity for conjunctival swab. By comparing the samples on the basis of positivity obtained by the sum of all methods, the blood showed the worst outcome (71/120).The bone marrow showed the highest positivity (106/120), followed by conjunctival swab (100/120) and skin (89/120). Since the bone marrow samples are unsuitable for routine epidemiological surveys, the conjunctival swab was recommended because it allows high sensitivity, especially when associated with kDNA PCR hybridization method, and is a noninvasive sampling method. (author)

  18. Probing the Energetics of Dynactin Filament Assembly and the Binding of Cargo Adaptor Proteins Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Electrostatics-Based Structural Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2017-01-10

    Dynactin, a large multiprotein complex, binds with the cytoplasmic dynein-1 motor and various adaptor proteins to allow recruitment and transportation of cellular cargoes toward the minus end of microtubules. The structure of the dynactin complex is built around an actin-like minifilament with a defined length, which has been visualized in a high-resolution structure of the dynactin filament determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). To understand the energetic basis of dynactin filament assembly, we used molecular dynamics simulation to probe the intersubunit interactions among the actin-like proteins, various capping proteins, and four extended regions of the dynactin shoulder. Our simulations revealed stronger intersubunit interactions at the barbed and pointed ends of the filament and involving the extended regions (compared with the interactions within the filament), which may energetically drive filament termination by the capping proteins and recruitment of the actin-like proteins by the extended regions, two key features of the dynactin filament assembly process. Next, we modeled the unknown binding configuration among dynactin, dynein tails, and a number of coiled-coil adaptor proteins (including several Bicaudal-D and related proteins and three HOOK proteins), and predicted a key set of charged residues involved in their electrostatic interactions. Our modeling is consistent with previous findings of conserved regions, functional sites, and disease mutations in the adaptor proteins and will provide a structural framework for future functional and mutational studies of these adaptor proteins. In sum, this study yielded rich structural and energetic information about dynactin and associated adaptor proteins that cannot be directly obtained from the cryo-EM structures with limited resolutions.

  19. Micropolarity and Hydrogen-Bond Donor Ability of Environmentally Friendly Anionic Reverse Micelles Explored by UV/Vis Absorption of a Molecular Probe and FTIR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Valeria R; Silber, Juana J; Falcone, Ruben Darío; Correa, N Mariano

    2018-03-19

    In the present work we show how two biocompatible solvents, methyl laurate (ML) and isopropyl myristate (IPM), can be used as a less toxic alternative to replace the nonpolar component in a sodium 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles (RMs) formulation. In this sense, the micropolarity and the hydrogen-bond ability of the interface were monitored through the use of the solvatochromism of a molecular probe (1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinium betaine, QB) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Our results demonstrate that the micropolarity sensed by QB in ML RMs is lower than in IPM RMs. Additionally, the water molecules form stronger H-bond interactions with the polar head of AOT in ML than in IPM. By FTIR was revealed that more water molecules interact with the interface in ML/AOT RMs. On the other hand, for AOT RMs generated in IPM, the weaker water-surfactant interaction allows the water molecules to establish hydrogen bonds with each other trending to bulk water more easily than in ML RMs, a consequence of the dissimilar penetration of nonpolar solvents into the interfacial region. The penetration process is strongly controlled by the polarity and viscosity of the external solvents. All of these results allow us to characterize these biocompatible systems, providing information about interfacial properties and how they can be altered by changing the external solvent. The ability of the nontoxic solvent to penetrate or not into the AOT interface produces a new interface with attractive properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Super-quenched Molecular Probe Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission and Photoinduced Electron Transfer Mechanisms for Formaldehyde Detection in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haitao; Wang, Fujia; Zheng, Jilin; Lin, Hao; Liu, Bin; Tang, Yi-Da; Zhang, Chong-Jing

    2018-06-04

    Energy transfer between fluorescent dyes and quenchers is widely used in the design of light-up probes. Although dual quenchers are more effective in offering lower background signals and higher turn-on ratios than one quencher, such probes are less explored in practice as they require both quenchers to be within the proximity of the fluorescent core. In this contribution, we utilized intramolecular motion and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) as quenching mechanisms to build super-quenched light-up probes based on fluorogens with aggregation-induced emission. The optimized light-up probe possesses negligible background and is able to detect not only free formaldehyde (FA) but also polymeric FA, with an unprecedented turn-on ratio of >4900. We envision that this novel dual quenching strategy will help to develop various light-up probes for analyte sensing. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  2. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  3. Nanoplatform-based molecular imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    "Nanoplathform-Based Molecular Imaging provides rationale for using nanoparticle-based probes for molecular imaging, then discusses general strategies for this underutilized, yet promising, technology...

  4. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  5. Optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  6. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. An oligogalacturonide-derived molecular probe demonstrates the dynamics of calcium-mediated pectin complexation in cell walls of tip-growing structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Rydahl, Maja Gro

    2017-01-01

    walls and in mediating cell-to-cell adhesion. Current immunological methods enable only steady-state detection of egg box formation in situ. Here we present a tool for efficient real-time visualisation of available sites for HG crosslinking within cell wall microdomains. Our approach is based on calcium-mediated...... thermodynamic model. Using defined carbohydrate microarrays, we show that the long OG probe binds exclusively to HG that has a very low degree of esterification and in the presence of divalent ions. We used this probe to study real-time dynamics of HG during elongation of Arabidopsis pollen tubes and root hairs...

  8. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  9. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Preliminary study of molecular imaging of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft with Gd-based MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid chelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Tianlong; Du Xiangke; Zhang Sen; Li Xubin; Liu Xia

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop a Gd-based MR probe containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif to reveal integrin αvβ3 receptor-expressed tumor. Methods: Commercially available HYNIC- RGD conjugate with co-ligand EDDA was labeled with GdCl 3 , and the mixture was isolated and purified by solid phase extract (SPE) to get the entire probe Gd-EDDA-HYNIC-RGD. Human HCC cell line BEL-7402 was cultured and the cells harvested and suspended then subcutaneously inoculated into athymic nude mice for tumor growth. In vitro cell binding assay to integrin αcβ3 receptor and cell viability experiments were conducted. Then in vivo, imaging of the three arms of xenografts were performed by MR scan with a dedicated animal coil at baseline and time points of 0, 30, 60, 90 minutes and 24 hour post-intravenous injection (p. i.) via the tail vein. Three arms of nude mice then were sacrificed for histological examination to confirm the imaging results. Results: Gd-EDDA-HYNIC-RGD was successfully isolated by SPE and validity was verified on signal enhancement through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The T 1 relaxation rate of the probe is 3.31 mmol/s; It is well tolerated to living cells when the concentration of the probe is below 0.1 μmol/ml; both BEL-7402 Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma cell line and the tumor expressed αvβ3 receptor; The RGD-ligand was observed specifically binding with αvβ3 receptor in vitro; The nude mice model bearing HHCC was well established. The signal intensity (SI) at the tumor site were 2247.6±39.0 at baseline and 2820.9±35.2 at 90 min p.i. respectively, the SI at 90 min increased less than 25% of baseline, which is statistically different (t=-38.031, P 0.05); The signal to time curve for probe-administrated group is straightforward over time in the span of 0 to 90 minute p.i. while the control arms do not show such tendency. Conclusion: Gd-EDDA-HYNIC-RGD has the potential to used as an MR probe detecting integrin αvβ3 receptor-expressed tumor

  12. Primitive chain network simulations of probe rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Yuichi; Amamoto, Yoshifumi; Pandey, Ankita; Liu, Cheng-Yang

    2017-09-27

    Probe rheology experiments, in which the dynamics of a small amount of probe chains dissolved in immobile matrix chains is discussed, have been performed for the development of molecular theories for entangled polymer dynamics. Although probe chain dynamics in probe rheology is considered hypothetically as single chain dynamics in fixed tube-shaped confinement, it has not been fully elucidated. For instance, the end-to-end relaxation of probe chains is slower than that for monodisperse melts, unlike the conventional molecular theories. In this study, the viscoelastic and dielectric relaxations of probe chains were calculated by primitive chain network simulations. The simulations semi-quantitatively reproduced the dielectric relaxation, which reflects the effect of constraint release on the end-to-end relaxation. Fair agreement was also obtained for the viscoelastic relaxation time. However, the viscoelastic relaxation intensity was underestimated, possibly due to some flaws in the model for the inter-chain cross-correlations between probe and matrix chains.

  13. Probe specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  14. A molecular dual fluorescence-ON probe for Mg2+ and Zn2+: Higher selectivity towards Mg2+ over Zn2+ in a mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maity, Shubhra Bikash; Bharadwaj, Parimal K.

    2014-01-01

    A Schiff base incorporating a coumarin fluorophore has been synthesized from easily available materials and is characterized by X-ray crystallography and other techniques. The probe serves as a dual analyte sensor and quantifies Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ ions by emission enhancement at different wavelengths without interference from a host of biologically relevant alkali/alkaline earth and transition metal ions. In presence of Mg 2+ the light yellow color of the probe in methanol changes to yellow–orange while in presence of Zn 2+ ion it changes to orange and hence can be detected through naked eye. The probe selectively gives emission of Mg 2+ when Zn 2+ ion is also present. - Highlights: • A Schiff base incorporating a coumarin fluorophore has been synthesized. • It acts as a dual analyte sensor and quantifies Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ ions by emission enhancement at different wavelengths. • It shows excellent selectivity for Mg 2+ ion in presence of alkali, alkaline earth metals as well as first row transition metals

  15. Validation of a simple and fast method to quantify in vitro mineralization with fluorescent probes used in molecular imaging of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moester, Martiene J.C.; Schoeman, Monique A.E.; Oudshoorn, Ineke B.; Beusekom, Mara M. van; Mol, Isabel M.; Kaijzel, Eric L.; Löwik, Clemens W.G.M.; Rooij, Karien E. de

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We validate a simple and fast method of quantification of in vitro mineralization. •Fluorescently labeled agents can detect calcium deposits in the mineralized matrix of cell cultures. •Fluorescent signals of the probes correlated with Alizarin Red S staining. -- Abstract: Alizarin Red S staining is the standard method to indicate and quantify matrix mineralization during differentiation of osteoblast cultures. KS483 cells are multipotent mouse mesenchymal progenitor cells that can differentiate into chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts and are a well-characterized model for the study of bone formation. Matrix mineralization is the last step of differentiation of bone cells and is therefore a very important outcome measure in bone research. Fluorescently labelled calcium chelating agents, e.g. BoneTag and OsteoSense, are currently used for in vivo imaging of bone. The aim of the present study was to validate these probes for fast and simple detection and quantification of in vitro matrix mineralization by KS483 cells and thus enabling high-throughput screening experiments. KS483 cells were cultured under osteogenic conditions in the presence of compounds that either stimulate or inhibit osteoblast differentiation and thereby matrix mineralization. After 21 days of differentiation, fluorescence of stained cultures was quantified with a near-infrared imager and compared to Alizarin Red S quantification. Fluorescence of both probes closely correlated to Alizarin Red S staining in both inhibiting and stimulating conditions. In addition, both compounds displayed specificity for mineralized nodules. We therefore conclude that this method of quantification of bone mineralization using fluorescent compounds is a good alternative for the Alizarin Red S staining

  16. Validation of a simple and fast method to quantify in vitro mineralization with fluorescent probes used in molecular imaging of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moester, Martiene J.C. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Schoeman, Monique A.E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Oudshoorn, Ineke B. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Percuros BV, Leiden (Netherlands); Beusekom, Mara M. van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Mol, Isabel M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Percuros BV, Leiden (Netherlands); Kaijzel, Eric L.; Löwik, Clemens W.G.M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Rooij, Karien E. de, E-mail: k.e.de_rooij@lumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Percuros BV, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We validate a simple and fast method of quantification of in vitro mineralization. •Fluorescently labeled agents can detect calcium deposits in the mineralized matrix of cell cultures. •Fluorescent signals of the probes correlated with Alizarin Red S staining. -- Abstract: Alizarin Red S staining is the standard method to indicate and quantify matrix mineralization during differentiation of osteoblast cultures. KS483 cells are multipotent mouse mesenchymal progenitor cells that can differentiate into chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts and are a well-characterized model for the study of bone formation. Matrix mineralization is the last step of differentiation of bone cells and is therefore a very important outcome measure in bone research. Fluorescently labelled calcium chelating agents, e.g. BoneTag and OsteoSense, are currently used for in vivo imaging of bone. The aim of the present study was to validate these probes for fast and simple detection and quantification of in vitro matrix mineralization by KS483 cells and thus enabling high-throughput screening experiments. KS483 cells were cultured under osteogenic conditions in the presence of compounds that either stimulate or inhibit osteoblast differentiation and thereby matrix mineralization. After 21 days of differentiation, fluorescence of stained cultures was quantified with a near-infrared imager and compared to Alizarin Red S quantification. Fluorescence of both probes closely correlated to Alizarin Red S staining in both inhibiting and stimulating conditions. In addition, both compounds displayed specificity for mineralized nodules. We therefore conclude that this method of quantification of bone mineralization using fluorescent compounds is a good alternative for the Alizarin Red S staining.

  17. Photodissociation of 1,2-dibromoethylene at 248 nm: Br2 molecular elimination probed by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Ping-Chen; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Sun, B J; Chang, A H H

    2008-06-02

    The Br2 elimination channel is probed for 1,2-C2H2Br2 in the B(3)Pi(+)ou-X(1)Sigma(+)g transition upon irradiation at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). The nascent vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is obtained to be 0.7+/-0.2, thus indicating that the Br2 fragment is produced in hot vibrational states. The obtained Br2 products are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground-state cis isomer via four-center elimination or from cis/trans isomers via three-center elimination, each mechanism involving a transition state that has a Br-Br distance much larger than that of ground state Br2. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathways that lead to Br2 elimination may proceed either through the electronic ground state by internal conversion or through the triplet state by intersystem crossing. Temperature-dependence measurements are examined, thereby supporting the pathway that involves internal conversion--which was excluded previously by using product translational spectroscopy (PTS). The quantum yield for the Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.120.1, being substantially contributed by the ground-state Br2 product. The discrepancy of this value from that (of 0.2) obtained by PTS may rise from the lack of measurements in probing the triplet-state Br2 product.

  18. Multiplexed color-coded probe-based gene expression assessment for clinical molecular diagnostics in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human renal allograft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Benjamin; Afzali, Bahman; Dominy, Katherine M; Chapman, Erin; Gill, Reeda; Hidalgo, Luis G; Roufosse, Candice; Sis, Banu; Mengel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Histopathologic diagnoses in transplantation can be improved with molecular testing. Preferably, molecular diagnostics should fit into standard-of-care workflows for transplant biopsies, that is, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) processing. The NanoString(®) gene expression platform has recently been shown to work with FFPE samples. We aimed to evaluate its methodological robustness and feasibility for gene expression studies in human FFPE renal allograft samples. A literature-derived antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) 34-gene set, comprised of endothelial, NK cell, and inflammation transcripts, was analyzed in different retrospective biopsy cohorts and showed potential to molecularly discriminate ABMR cases, including FFPE samples. NanoString(®) results were reproducible across a range of RNA input quantities (r = 0.998), with different operators (r = 0.998), and between different reagent lots (r = 0.983). There was moderate correlation between NanoString(®) with FFPE tissue and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with corresponding dedicated fresh-stabilized tissue (r = 0.487). Better overall correlation with histology was observed with NanoString(®) (r = 0.354) than with qRT-PCR (r = 0.146). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of multiplexed gene expression quantification from FFPE renal allograft tissue. This represents a method for prospective and retrospective validation of molecular diagnostics and its adoption in clinical transplantation pathology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. What Lurks in ULIRGs?—Probing the Chemistry and Excitation of Molecular Gas in the Nuclei of Arp 220 and NGC 6240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar, Swarnima; Scoville, Nick [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We have imaged the dense star-forming regions of Arp 220 and NGC 6240 in the 3 mm band transitions of CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, and CS at 0.″5–0.″8 resolution using CARMA. Our data set images all these lines at similar resolutions and high sensitivity, and can be used to derive line ratios of faint high excitation lines. In both the nuclei of Arp 220, the HCN/HNC ratios suggest chemistry of X-ray Dominated Regions (XDRs)—a likely signature of an active galactic nucleus. In NGC 6240, there is no evidence of XDR type chemistry, but there the bulk of the molecular gas is concentrated between the nuclei rather than on them. We calculated molecular H{sub 2} densities from excitation analysis of each of the molecular species. It appears that the abundances of HNC and HCO{sup +} in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies may be significantly different from those in galactic molecular clouds. The derived H{sub 2} volume densities are ∼5 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −3} in the Arp 220 nuclei and ∼10{sup 4} cm{sup −3} in NGC 6240.

  20. Progress on molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Quan; Zhang Yongxue

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a new era of medical imaging,which can non-invasively monitor biological processes at the cellular and molecular level in vivo, including molecular imaging of nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance molecular imaging, ultrasound molecular imaging,optical molecular imaging and molecular imaging with X-ray. Recently, with the development of multi-subjects amalgamation, multimodal molecular imaging technology has been applied in clinical imaging, such as PET-CT and PET-MRI. We believe that with development of molecular probe and multi-modal imaging, more and more molecular imaging techniques will be applied in clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  1. Lateral distribution of NBD-PC fluorescent lipid analogs in membranes probed by molecular dynamics-assisted analysis of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loura, Luís M S

    2012-11-08

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool used for many problems in membrane biophysics, including characterization of the lateral distribution of lipid components and other species of interest. However, quantitative analysis of FRET data with a topological model requires adequate choices for the values of several input parameters, some of which are difficult to obtain experimentally in an independent manner. For this purpose, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be potentially useful as they provide direct detailed information on transverse probe localization, relative probe orientation, and membrane surface area, all of which are required for analysis of FRET data. This is illustrated here for the FRET pairs involving 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as donor and either 1-palmitoyl,2-(6-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] hexanoyl)- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C6-NBD-PC) or 1-palmitoyl,2-(12-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12-NBD-PC) as acceptors, in fluid vesicles of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-3-glycerophosphocholine (DPPC, 50 °C). Incorporation of results from MD simulations improves the statistical quality of model fitting to the experimental FRET data. Furthermore, the decay of DPH in the presence of moderate amounts of C12-NBD-PC (>0.4 mol%) is consistent with non-random lateral distribution of the latter, at variance with C6-NBD-PC, for which aggregation is ruled out up to 2.5 mol% concentration. These conclusions are supported by analysis of NBD-PC fluorescence self-quenching. Implications regarding the relative utility of these probes in membrane studies are discussed.

  2. Trans-acting RNAs as molecular probes for monitoring time-dependent structural change of an RNA complex adapting two structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuri; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2011-03-01

    As dynamic structural changes are pivotal for the functions of some classes of RNA molecule, it is important to develop methods to monitor structural changes in RNA in a time-dependent manner without chemical modification. Based on previous reports that trans-acting RNAs can be used as probes for analysis and control of 3D structures of target RNAs, we applied this method to monitor time-dependent structural changes in RNA. We designed and performed a proof-of-principle study using a simple model RNA complex that adopts two different structures as a target. The time-dependent structural changes in the target RNA were successfully monitored using two trans-acting RNAs, which stably form a ternary complex with the bimolecular target RNA and act as a catalyst to join two RNA fragments of the target complex, respectively. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lanthanide paramagnetic probes for NMR spectroscopic studies of fast molecular conformational dynamics and temperature control. Effective six-site proton exchange in 18-crown-6 by exchange spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babailov, Sergey P

    2012-02-06

    (1)H and (13)C NMR measurements are reported for the CDCl(3) and CD(2)Cl(2) solutions of [La(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (I), [Pr(18-crown-6) (NO(3))(3)] (II), [Ce(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (III), and [Nd(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (IV) complexes. Temperature dependencies of the (1)H NMR spectra of paramagnetic II-IV have been analyzed using the dynamic NMR (DNMR) methods for six-site exchange. Two types of conformational dynamic processes were identified (the first one is conditioned by interconversion of complex enantiomeric forms and pseudorotation of a macrocycle molecule upon the C(2) symmetry axis; the second one is conditioned by macrocycle molecule inversion). Application of exchange spectroscopy (2D-EXSY) of DNMR for investigation of this dynamic system (II-IV) simplifies the assignment of the NMR signals and represents the first experimental study of multisite exchange. In the present work, the methodology of paramagnetic 4f (Ce, Pr, and Nd) probe applications for the study of free-energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes in chemical exchange processes, as well as the advantages of this method in a comparison with DNMR studies of diamagnetic substances, is discussed. In particular, as a result of paramagnetic chemical shifts in 4f complexes, the range of measurable rate constants expands considerably compared to the analogous range in diamagnetic compounds. Coordination compounds investigated in the paper represent new types of thermometric NMR sensors and lanthanide paramagnetic probes for in situ temperature control in solution.

  4. Probing the effect of polymer molecular weight on penetration into the wood cell wall using polyethylenimine (PEI) as a model compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorvel, Brian; Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar; Chen, Ida; Bowling, Andrew; Williams, Kerry; King, Steve

    2018-05-01

    Decking is one of the largest applications for the treated wood market. The most challenging property to obtain for treated wood is dimensional stability, which can be achieved, in part, by cell wall bulking, cell wall polymer crosslinking and removal of hygroscopic components in the cell wall. A commonly accepted key requirement is for the actives to infuse through the cell wall, which has a microporosity of ∼5-13 nm. Equally as challenging is being able to measure and quantify the cell wall penetration. Branched polyethylenimine (PEI) was studied as a model polymer for penetration due to its water solubility, polarity, variable molecular weight ranges, and ability to form a chelation complex with preservative metals to treat lumbers. Two different molecular weight polyethylenimines (PEI), one with a weight average molecular weight (Mw) equal to 800 Da and the other 750 000 Da, were investigated for penetration by microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Analytical methods were developed to both create smooth interfaces and for relative quantitation and visualisation of PEI penetration into the wood. The results showed both PEI with Mw of 800 Da and PEI with Mw of 750 000 Da coated the lumens in high density. However, only the PEI with Mw of 800 appeared to penetrate the cell walls in sufficient levels. Literature has shown the hydrodynamic radii of PEI 750 000 is near 29 nm, whereas a smaller PEI at 25 K showed 4.5 nm. Most importantly the results, based on methods developed, show how molecular weight and tertiary structure of the polymer can affect its penetration, with the microporosity of the wood being the main barrier. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Delineating residues for haemolytic activities of snake venom cardiotoxin 1 from Naja naja as probed by molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Biswajit; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2017-02-01

    Cardiotoxins (CTXs) are single polypeptide chain consisting of 59-62 amino acids with four disulfide bridges and globular proteins of simple β-sheet folds. The CTXs are one of principal toxic components causing haemolysis and damaging various cells and belong to three-finger toxin (TFT) superfamily of snake venoms. However, there is no natural or synthetic small molecular inhibitor to the protein toxins to date. In the present study, modes of interaction of cardiotoxin 1 (CTX1) from Indian cobra (Naja naja) with heterogeneous erythrocyte membrane (EM) model system have been extensively examined by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in near physiological conditions and comprehensive analyses of the MD data revealed two distinct principal regions ('head groove' and 'loop groove') of the protein toxin for establishing structural interactions with the EM system. Moreover, combined analyses of data from high-throughput virtual screening of NCI small molecular database, in vitro haemolytic assays for top-hits of the chemical compounds against crude venom of Naja naja and as well CTXs purified from the venom and pharmacokinetic examinations on the chemical compounds retarding haemolytic activities of CTXs suggested that Etidronic acid and Zoledronic acid are promising prototypic chemical inhibitors to CTXs of snake venoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Design and synthesis of a biotinylated chemical probe for detecting the molecular targets of an inhibitor of the production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ysobel R; Galloway, Warren R J D; Hodgkinson, James T; Spring, David R

    2013-09-25

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human pathogen associated with a variety of life-threatening nosocomial infections. This organism produces a range of virulence factors which actively cause damage to host tissues. One such virulence factor is pyocyanin, known to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. Previous studies had identified a novel compound capable of strongly inhibiting the production of pyocyanin. It was postulated that this inhibition results from modulation of an intercellular communication system termed quorum sensing, via direct binding of the compound with the LasR protein receptor. This raised the possibility that the compound could be an antagonist of quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa, which could have important implications as this intercellular signaling mechanism is known to regulate many additional facets of P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. However, there was no direct evidence for the binding of the active compound to LasR (or any other targets). Herein we describe the design and synthesis of a biotin-tagged version of the active compound. This could potentially be used as an affinity-based chemical probe to ascertain, in a direct fashion, the active compound's macromolecular biological targets, and thus better delineate the mechanism by which it reduces the level of pyocyanin production.

  7. Monte Carlo wave-packet approach to trace nuclear dynamics in molecular excited states by XUV-pump-IR-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qingli; Bello, Roger Y.; Martín, Fernando; Palacios, Alicia; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2018-04-01

    Recent research interests have been raised in uncovering and controlling ultrafast dynamics in excited neutral molecules. In this work we generalize the Monte Carlo wave packet (MCWP) approach to XUV-pump-IR-probe schemes to simulate the process of dissociative double ionization of H2 where singly excited states in H2 are involved. The XUV pulse is chosen to resonantly excite the initial ground state of H2 to the lowest excited electronic state of 1Σu + symmetry in H2 within the Franck-Condon region. The delayed intense IR pulse couples the excited states of 1Σu + symmetry with the nearby excited states of 1Σg + symmetry. It also induces the first ionization from H2 to H2 + and the second ionization from H2 + to H++H+. To reduce the computational costs in the MCWP approach, a sampling method is proposed to determine in time the dominant ionization events from H2 to H2+. By conducting a trajectory analysis, which is a unique possibility within the MCWP approach, the origins of the characteristic features in the nuclear kinetic energy release spectra are identified for delays ranging from 0 to 140 fs and the nuclear dynamics in the singly excited states in H2 is mapped out.

  8. Novel Molecular Beacon Probe-Based Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Encountered in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Kamboj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF is an emerging zoonotic disease in India and requires immediate detection of infection both for preventing further transmission and for controlling the infection. The present study describes development, optimization, and evaluation of a novel molecular beacon-based real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV. The developed assay was found to be a better alternative to the reported TaqMan assay for routine diagnosis of CCHF.

  9. Infrared absorption by molecular gases as a probe of nanoporous silica xerogel and molecule-surface collisions: Low-pressure results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Auwera, J.; Ngo, N. H.; El Hamzaoui, H.; Capoen, B.; Bouazaoui, M.; Ausset, P.; Boulet, C.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Transmission spectra of gases confined (but not adsorbed) within the pores of a 1.4-cm-thick silica xerogel sample have been recorded between 2.5 and 5 μm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. This was done for pure CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, and CH4 at room temperature and pressures of a few hectopascals. Least-squares fits of measured absorption lines provide the optical-path lengths within the confined (LC) and free (LF) gas inside the absorption cell and the half width at half maximum ΓC of the lines of the confined gases. The values of LC and LF retrieved using numerous transitions of all studied species are very consistent. Furthermore, LC is in satisfactory agreement with values obtained from independent measurements, thus showing that reliable information on the open porosity volume can be retrieved from an optical experiment. The values of ΓC, here resulting from collisions of the molecules with the inner surfaces of the xerogel pores, are practically independent of the line for each gas and inversely proportional to the square root of the probed-molecule molar mass. This is a strong indication that, for the studied transitions, a single collision of a molecule with a pore surface is sufficient to change its rotational state. A previously proposed simple model, used for the prediction of the line shape, leads to satisfactory agreement with the observations. It also enables a determination of the average pore size, bringing information complementary to that obtained from nitrogen adsorption porosimetry.

  10. Development of a One-Step Probe Based Molecular Assay for Rapid Immunodiagnosis of Infection with M. tuberculosis Using Dried Blood Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauenfeldt, Thomas; Heyckendorf, Jan; Graff Jensen, Sidse

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antigen specific release of IP-10 is the most promising alternative marker to IFN-γ for infection with M. tuberculosis. Compared to Interferon-γ release assays (IGRA), IP-10 is released in high levels enabling novel approaches such as field friendly dried blood spots (DBS) and molecular...... was validated and applied for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection in DBS samples from 43 patients with confirmed TB, 13 patients with latent TB and 96 presumed uninfected controls. In parallel, IP-10 and INF-γ levels were measured in Quantiferon (QFT-TB) plasma supernatants. RESULTS: IP-10 m......RNA upregulation was detectable at 4 hours after stimulation (6 fold upregulation) peaking at 8 hours (108 fold upregulation). IFN-γ expression occurred in concert but levels were lower (peak 6.7 fold upregulation). IP-10 gene expression level was significantly higher in patients with tuberculosis (median 31...

  11. Molecular gas in the Herschel-selected strongly lensed submillimeter galaxies at z 2-4 as probed by multi-J CO lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Omont, A.; Beelen, A.; Gao, Y.; van der Werf, P.; Gavazzi, R.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Ivison, R.; Lehnert, M.; Liu, D.; Oteo, I.; González-Alfonso, E.; Dannerbauer, H.; Cox, P.; Krips, M.; Neri, R.; Riechers, D.; Baker, A. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Cooray, A.; Smail, I.

    2017-12-01

    We present the IRAM-30 m observations of multiple-J CO (Jup mostly from 3 up to 8) and [C I](3P2 → 3P1) ([C I](2-1) hereafter) line emission in a sample of redshift 2-4 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). These SMGs are selected among the brightest-lensed galaxies discovered in the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). Forty-seven CO lines and 7 [C I](2-1) lines have been detected in 15 lensed SMGs. A non-negligible effect of differential lensing is found for the CO emission lines, which could have caused significant underestimations of the linewidths, and hence of the dynamical masses. The CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs), peaking around Jup 5-7, are found to be similar to those of the local starburst-dominated ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and of the previously studied SMGs. After correcting for lensing amplification, we derived the global properties of the bulk of molecular gas in the SMGs using non-LTE radiative transfer modelling, such as the molecular gas density nH2 102.5-104.1 cm-3 and the kinetic temperature Tk 20-750 K. The gas thermal pressure Pth ranging from 105 K cm-3 to 106 K cm-3 is found to be correlated with star formation efficiency. Further decomposing the CO SLEDs into two excitation components, we find a low-excitation component with nH2 102.8-104.6 cm-3 and Tk 20-30 K, which is less correlated with star formation, and a high-excitation one (nH2 102.7-104.2 cm-3, Tk 60-400 K) which is tightly related to the on-going star-forming activity. Additionally, tight linear correlations between the far-infrared and CO line luminosities have been confirmed for the Jup ≥ 5 CO lines of these SMGs, implying that these CO lines are good tracers of star formation. The [C I](2-1) lines follow the tight linear correlation between the luminosities of the [C I](2-1) and the CO(1-0) line found in local starbursts, indicating that [C I] lines could serve as good total molecular gas mass tracers for high-redshift SMGs as well

  12. Photochemical reactions in biological systems: probing the effect of the environment by means of hybrid quantum chemistry/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Burmeister, Carl F; Robb, Michael A; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2012-06-14

    Organisms have evolved a wide variety of mechanisms to utilize and respond to light. In many cases, the biological response is mediated by structural changes that follow photon absorption in a protein complex. The initial step in such cases is normally the photoisomerization of a highly conjugated prosthetic group. To understand better the factors controlling the isomerization, we perform atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. In this perspective article we briefly review the key theoretical concepts of photochemical reactions and present a practical simulation scheme for simulating photochemical reactions in biomolecular systems. In our scheme, a multi-configurational quantum mechanical description is used to model the electronic rearrangement for those parts of the system that are involved in the photon absorption. For the remainder, typically consisting of the apo-protein and the solvent, a simple force field model is used. The interactions in the systems are thus computed within a hybrid quantum/classical framework. Forces are calculated on-the-fly, and a diabatic surface hopping procedure is used to model the excited-state decay. To demonstrate how this method is used we review our studies on photoactivation of the photoactive yellow protein, a bacterial photoreceptor. We will show what information can be obtained from the simulations, and, by comparing to recent experimental findings, what the limitations of our simulations are.

  13. Using ethane and butane as probes to the molecular structure of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl] imide ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Pison, Laure; Pensado, Alfonso S; Pádua, Agilio A H

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the solubility and the thermodynamic properties of solvation, between 298 and 343 K and at pressures close to atmospheric, of ethane and n-butane in several ionic liquids based on the bis[(trifluoromethyl) sulfonyl]imide anion and on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations, [CnC1Im] [NTf2], with alkyl side-chains varying from two to ten carbon atoms. The solubility of butane is circa one order of magnitude larger than that of ethane with mole fractions as high as 0.15 in [C10C1Im][NTf2] at 300 K. The solubilities of both n-butane and ethane gases are higher for ionic liquids with longer alkyl chains. The behaviour encountered is explained by the preferential solvation of the gases in the non-polar domains of the solvents, the larger solubility of n-butane being attributed to the dispersive contributions to the interaction energy. The rise in solubility with increasing size of the alkyl-side chain is explained by a more favourable entropy of solvation in the ionic liquids with larger cations. These conclusions are corroborated by molecular dynamics simulation studies.

  14. A Combined Molecular Docking/Dynamics Approach to Probe the Binding Mode of Cancer Drugs with Cytochrome P450 3A4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Panneerselvam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytarabine, daunorubicin, doxorubicin and vincristine are clinically used for combinatorial therapies of cancers in different combinations. However, the knowledge about the interaction of these drugs with the metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 is limited. Therefore, we utilized computational methods to predict and assess the drug-binding modes. In this study, we performed docking, MD simulations and free energy landscape analysis to understand the drug-enzyme interactions, protein domain motions and the most populated free energy minimum conformations of the docked protein-drug complexes, respectively. The outcome of docking and MD simulations predicted the productive, as well as the non-productive binding modes of the selected drugs. Based on these interaction studies, we observed that S119, R212 and R372 are the major drug-binding residues in CYP3A4. The molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area analysis revealed the dominance of hydrophobic forces in the CYP3A4-drug association. Further analyses predicted the residues that may contain favorable drug-specific interactions. The probable binding modes of the cancer drugs from this study may extend the knowledge of the protein-drug interaction and pave the way to design analogs with reduced toxicity. In addition, they also provide valuable insights into the metabolism of the cancer drugs.

  15. Probing molecular interactions of poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) with lipid matrix models to interpret the therapeutic potential of the co-polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Pal, Tapan K; Guha, Sujoy K

    2012-03-01

    To understand and maximize the therapeutic potential of poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA), a synthetic, pharmacologically-active co-polymer, its effect on conformation, phase behavior and stability of lipid matrix models of cell membranes were investigated. The modes of interaction between SMA and lipid molecules were also studied. While, attenuated total reflection-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and static (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments detected SMA-induced conformational changes in the headgroup region, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies revealed thermotropic phase behavior changes of the membranes. (1)H NMR results indicated weak immobilization of SMA within the bilayers. Molecular interpretation of the results indicated the role of hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic forces between SMA and zwitterionic phospholipid bilayers. The extent of membrane fluidization and generation of isotropic phases were affected by the surface charge of the liposomes, and hence suggested the role of electrostatic interactions between SMA and charged lipid headgroups. SMA was thus found to directly affect the structural integrity of model membranes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spaser as a biological probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Weingold, Robert; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nolan, Jacqueline; Harrington, Walter; Kuchyanov, Alexander S.; Parkhomenko, Roman G.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid; Biris, Alexandru S.; Plekhanov, Alexander I.; Stockman, Mark I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding cell biology greatly benefits from the development of advanced diagnostic probes. Here we introduce a 22-nm spaser (plasmonic nanolaser) with the ability to serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of generating stimulated emission directly inside living cells and animal tissues. We have demonstrated a lasing regime associated with the formation of a dynamic vapour nanobubble around the spaser that leads to giant spasing with emission intensity and spectral width >100 times brighter and 30-fold narrower, respectively, than for quantum dots. The absorption losses in the spaser enhance its multifunctionality, allowing for nanobubble-amplified photothermal and photoacoustic imaging and therapy. Furthermore, the silica spaser surface has been covalently functionalized with folic acid for molecular targeting of cancer cells. All these properties make a nanobubble spaser a promising multimodal, super-contrast, ultrafast cellular probe with a single-pulse nanosecond excitation for a variety of in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  17. Investigation of a calcium-responsive contrast agent in cellular model systems: feasibility for use as a smart molecular probe in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovski, Goran; Gottschalk, Sven; Milošević, Milena; Engelmann, Jörn; Hagberg, Gisela E; Kadjane, Pascal; Andjus, Pavle; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2014-05-21

    Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca(2+) may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of current fMRI techniques. Here we report an in vitro proof-of-principle study with a Ca(2+)-sensitive, Gd(3+)-based SCA in an attempt to validate its potential use as a functional in vivo marker. First, we quantified its relaxometric response in a complex 3D cell culture model. Subsequently, we examined potential changes in the functionality of primary glial cells following administration of this SCA. Monitoring intracellular Ca(2+) showed that, despite a reduction in the Ca(2+) level, transport of Ca(2+) through the plasma membrane remained unaffected, while stimulation with ATP induced Ca(2+)-transients suggested normal cellular signaling in the presence of low millimolar SCA concentrations. SCAs merely lowered the intracellular Ca(2+) level. Finally, we estimated the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) for an idealized in vivo fMRI experiment with SCA, for extracellular Ca(2+) concentration level changes expected during intense neuronal activity which takes place upon repetitive stimulation. The values we obtained indicate changes in T1 of around 1-6%, sufficient to be robustly detectable using modern MRI methods in high field scanners. Our results encourage further attempts to develop even more potent SCAs and appropriate fMRI protocols. This would result in novel methods that allow monitoring of essential physiological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

  18. Probing the binding of Cu(2+) ions to a fragment of the Aβ(1-42) polypeptide using fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Żmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-09-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular dynamics simulations (MD), with the NMR-derived restraints, were used to investigate the interactions of Cu(2+) ions with a fragment of the Aβ(1-42) polypeptide, Aβ(5-16) with the following sequence: Ac-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr-Glu-Val-His-His-Gln-Lys-NH2, denoted as HZ1. The studies presented in this paper, when compared with our previous results (Makowska et al., Spectrochim. Acta A 153: 451-456), show that the affinity of the peptide to metal ions is conformation-dependent. All the measurements were carried out in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution, pH6.0. The Stern-Volmer equations, along with spectroscopic observations, were used to determine the quenching and binding parameters. The obtained results unequivocally suggest that Cu(2+) ions quench the fluorescence of HZ1 only through a static quenching mechanism, in contrast to the fragment from the N-terminal part of the FPB28 protein, with sequence Ac-Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr- NH2 (D9) and its derivative with a single point mutation: Ac-Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr- NH2 (D9_M), where dynamic quenching occurred. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔITCH, ΔITCS) for the interactions between Cu(2+) ions and the HZ1 peptide were determined from the calorimetric data. The conditional thermodynamic parameters suggest that, under the experimental conditions, the formation of the Cu(2+)-HZ1 complex is both an enthalpy and entropy driven process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular dynamics and MM/GBSA-integrated protocol probing the correlation between biological activities and binding free energies of HIV-1 TAR RNA inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2018-02-01

    The interaction of HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat with its cognate transactivation response (TAR) RNA has emerged as a promising target for developing antiviral compounds and treating HIV infection, since it is a crucial step for efficient transcription and replication. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM/GBSA calculations have been performed on a series of neamine derivatives in order to estimate appropriate MD simulation time for acceptable correlation between ΔG bind and experimental pIC 50 values. Initially, all inhibitors were docked into the active site of HIV-1 TAR RNA. Later to explore various conformations and examine the docking results, MD simulations were carried out. Finally, binding free energies were calculated using MM/GBSA method and were correlated with experimental pIC 50 values at different time scales (0-1 to 0-10 ns). From this study, it is clear that in case of neamine derivatives as simulation time increased the correlation between binding free energy and experimental pIC 50 values increased correspondingly. Therefore, the binding energies which can be interpreted at longer simulation times can be used to predict the bioactivity of new neamine derivatives. Moreover, in this work, we have identified some plausible critical nucleotide interactions with neamine derivatives that are responsible for potent inhibitory activity. Furthermore, we also provide some insights into a new class of oxadiazole-based back bone cyclic peptides designed by incorporating the structural features of neamine derivatives. On the whole, this approach can provide a valuable guidance for designing new potent inhibitors and modify the existing compounds targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA.

  20. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations.

  1. Binding modes and pathway of RHPS4 to human telomeric G-quadruplex and duplex DNA probed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Kelly; Siddiquei, Farzana; Wu, Chun

    2017-07-19

    RHPS4, a potent binder to human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex, shows high efficacy in tumor cell growth inhibition. However, it's preferential binding to DNA G-quadruplex over DNA duplex (about 10 fold) remains to be improved toward its clinical application. A high resolution structure of the single-stranded telomeric DNA G-quadruplexes, or B-DNA duplex, in complex with RHPS4 is not available yet, and the binding nature of this ligand to these DNA forms remains to be elusive. In this study, we carried out 40 μs molecular dynamics binding simulations with a free ligand to decipher the binding pathway of RHPS4 to a DNA duplex and three G-quadruplex folders (parallel, antiparallel and hybrid) of the human telomeric DNA sequence. The most stable binding mode identified for the duplex, parallel, antiparallel and hybrid G-quadruplexes is an intercalation, bottom stacking, top intercalation and bottom intercalation mode, respectively. The intercalation mode with similar binding strength to both the duplex and the G-quadruplexes, explains the lack of binding selectivity of RHPS4 to the G-quadruplex form. Therefore, a ligand modification that destabilizes the duplex intercalation mode but stabilizes the G-quadruplex intercalation mode will improve the binding selectivity toward G-quadruplex. The intercalation mode of RHPS4 to both the duplex and the antiparallel and the hybrid G-quadruplex follows a base flipping-insertion mechanism rather than an open-insertion mechanism. The groove binding, the side binding and the intercalation with flipping out of base were observed to be intermediate states before the full intercalation state with paired bases.

  2. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wenjun, E-mail: wjzheng@buffalo.edu; Glenn, Paul [Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  3. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  4. Probe Techniques. Introductory Remarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emeleus, K. G. [School of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1968-04-15

    In this brief introduction to the session on probes, the history of theii development is first touched on briefly. Reference is then made to the significance of the work to be described by Medicus, for conductivity and recombination calculations, and by Lam and Su, for a wide range of medium and higher pressure plasmas. Finally, a number of other probe topics are mentioned, including multiple probes; probes in electronegative plasmas; resonance probes; probes in noisy discharges; probes as oscillation detectors; use of probes where space-charge is not negligible. (author)

  5. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  6. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  7. Probe-diverse ptychography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, I., E-mail: isaac.russellpeterson@rmit.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, the University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Harder, R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, I.K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    We propose an extension of ptychography where the target sample is scanned separately through several probes with distinct amplitude and phase profiles and a diffraction image is recorded for each probe and each sample translation. The resulting probe-diverse dataset is used to iteratively retrieve high-resolution images of the sample and all probes simultaneously. The method is shown to yield significant improvement in the reconstructed sample image compared to the image obtained using the standard single-probe ptychographic phase-retrieval scheme.

  8. A dual inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases, [¹⁸F]FB-ML5, as a molecular probe for non-invasive MMP/ADAM-targeted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, Nathalie; Castelli, Riccardo; Tuin, Adriaan W; Overkleeft, Herman S; Wisastra, Rosalina; Dekker, Frank J; Prély, Laurette M; Bischoff, Rainer; Bischoff, Rainer P M; van Waarde, Aren; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Elsinga, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical studies have shown a correlation between increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)/a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) activity and poor outcome of cancer. Various MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) have been developed for therapeutic purposes in oncology. In addition, molecular imaging of MMP/ADAM levels in vivo would allow the diagnosis of tumors. We selected the dual inhibitor of MMPs and ADAMs, ML5, which is a hydroxamate-based inhibitor with affinities for many MMPs and ADAMs. ML5 was radiolabelled with (18)F and the newly obtained radiolabelled inhibitor was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. ML5 was radiolabelled by direct acylation with N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) for PET (positron emission tomography). The resulting radiotracer [(18)F]FB-ML5 was evaluated in vitro in human bronchial epithelium 16HBE cells and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The non-radioactive probe FB-ML5 and native ML5 were tested in a fluorogenic inhibition assay against MMP-2, -9, -12 and ADAM-17. The in vivo kinetics of [(18)F]FB-ML5 were examined in a HT1080 tumor-bearing mouse model. Specificity of probe binding was examined by co-injection of 0 or 2.5mg/kg ML5. ML5 and FB-ML5 showed high affinity for MMP-2, -9, -12 and ADAM-17; indeed IC50 values were respectively 7.4 ± 2.0, 19.5 ± 2.8, 2.0 ± 0.2 and 5.7 ± 2.2 nM and 12.5 ± 3.1, 31.5 ± 13.7, 138.0 ± 10.9 and 24.7 ± 2.8 nM. Radiochemical yield of HPLC-purified [(18)F]FB-ML5 was 13-16% (corrected for decay). Cellular binding of [(18)F]FB-ML5 was reduced by 36.6% and 27.5% in MCF-7 and 16 HBE cells, respectively, after co-incubation with 10 μM of ML5. In microPET scans, HT1080 tumors exhibited a low and homogeneous uptake of the tracer. Tumors of mice injected with [(18)F]FB-ML5 showed a SUVmean of 0.145 ± 0.064 (n=6) which decreased to 0.041 ± 0.027 (n=6) after target blocking (pFB-ML5 demonstrated rather low binding in ADAM-17 overexpressing cell lines. [(18)F]FB-ML5 uptake showed significant

  9. [Development of a Fluorescence Probe for Live Cell Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Aya

    2017-01-01

    Probes that detect specific biological materials are indispensable tools for deepening our understanding of various cellular phenomena. In live cell imaging, the probe must emit fluorescence only when a specific substance is detected. In this paper, we introduce a new probe we developed for live cell imaging. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity is higher in tumor cells than in normal cells and is involved in the development of resistance to various anticancer drugs. We previously reported the development of a general strategy for the synthesis of probes for detection of GST enzymes, including fluorogenic, bioluminogenic, and 19 F-NMR probes. Arylsulfonyl groups were used as caging groups during probe design. The fluorogenic probes were successfully used to quantitate very low levels of GST activity in cell extracts and were also successfully applied to the imaging of microsomal MGST1 activity in living cells. The bioluminogenic and 19 F-NMR probes were able to detect GST activity in Escherichia coli cells. Oligonucleotide-templated reactions are powerful tools for nucleic acid sensing. This strategy exploits the target strand as a template for two functionalized probes and provides a simple molecular mechanism for multiple turnover reactions. We developed a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction-triggered fluorescent probe. The probe completed its reaction within 30 s of initiation and amplified the fluorescence signal from 0.5 pM target oligonucleotide by 1500 fold under isothermal conditions. Additionally, we applied the oligonucleotide-templated reaction for molecular releasing and peptide detection.

  10. Traversing probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashburn, D.N.; Stevens, R.H.; Woodall, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  11. Traversing probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  12. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  13. A Crowdsourcing Evaluation of the NIH Chemical Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Boyer, Scott; Curpan, Ramona F.; Glen, Robert C.; Hopkins, Andrew L.; Lipinski, Christopher A.; Marshall, Garland R.; Martin, Yvonne C.; Ostopovici-Halip, Liliana; Rishton, Gilbert; Ursu, Oleg; Vaz, Roy J.; Waller, Chris; Waldmann, Herbert; Sklar, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2008, the NIH molecular libraries and imaging initiative (MLI) pilot phase funded ten high-throughput Screening Centers, resulting in the deposition of 691 assays into PubChem and the nomination of 64 chemical probes. We crowdsourced the MLI output to 11 experts, who expressed medium or high levels of confidence in 48 of these 64 probes. PMID:19536101

  14. A Crowdsourcing Evaluation of the NIH Chemical Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Boyer, Scott; Curpan, Ramona F.; Glen, Robert C.; Hopkins, Andrew L.; Lipinski, Christopher A.; Marshall, Garland R.; Martin, Yvonne C.; Ostopovici-Halip, Liliana; Rishton, Gilbert; Ursu, Oleg; Vaz, Roy J.; Waller, Chris; Waldmann, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2008, the NIH molecular libraries and imaging initiative (MLI) pilot phase funded ten high-throughput Screening Centers, resulting in the deposition of 691 assays into PubChem and the nomination of 64 chemical probes. We crowdsourced the MLI output to 11 experts, who expressed medium or high levels of confidence in 48 of these 64 probes.

  15. A Hall probe technique for characterizing high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Sheldon, P.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Thin-film GaAs Hall probes were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy technology. A contactless technique was developed to characterize thin-film, high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) materials. The Hall probes detected the ac magnetic flux penetration through the high-temperature superconducting materials. The Hall detector has advantages over the mutual inductance magnetic flux detector

  16. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  17. Molecular imaging in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  18. Probe tests microweld strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Probe is developed to test strength of soldered, brazed or microwelded joints. It consists of a spring which may be adjusted to the desired test pressure by means of a threaded probe head, and an indicator lamp. Device may be used for electronic equipment testing.

  19. Targeted molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. Edmund

    2003-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to visualize the cellular and molecular processes occurring in living tissues, and for the imaging of specific molecules in vivo, the development of reporter probes and dedicated imaging equipment is most important. Reporter genes can be used to monitor the delivery and magnitude of therapeutic gene transfer, and the time variation involved. Imaging technologies such as micro-PET, SPECT, MRI and CT, as well as optical imaging systems, are able to non-invasively detect, measure, and report the simultaneous expression of multiple meaningful genes. It is believed that recent advances in reporter probes, imaging technologies and gene transfer strategies will enhance the effectiveness of gene therapy trials

  20. Small molecule probes for cellular death machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qian, Lihui; Yuan, Junying

    2017-08-01

    The past decade has witnessed a significant expansion of our understanding about the regulated cell death mechanisms beyond apoptosis. The application of chemical biological approaches had played a major role in driving these exciting discoveries. The discovery and use of small molecule probes in cell death research has not only revealed significant insights into the regulatory mechanism of cell death but also provided new drug targets and lead drug candidates for developing therapeutics of human diseases with huge unmet need. Here, we provide an overview of small molecule modulators for necroptosis and ferroptosis, two non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms, and discuss the molecular pathways and relevant pathophysiological mechanisms revealed by the judicial applications of such small molecule probes. We suggest that the development and applications of small molecule probes for non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms provide an outstanding example showcasing the power of chemical biology in exploring novel biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The probe rules in single particle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    techniques and probes that have made historically very demanding and specialized bio-imaging techniques more easily accessible and achievable. SPT has in particular found extensive use for analyzing the molecular organization of biological membranes. From these and other studies using complementary...... techniques it has been determined that the organization of native plasma membranes is heterogeneous over a very large range of spatial and temporal scales. The observed heterogeneities in the organization have the practical consequence that the SPT results in investigations of native plasma membranes...... are time dependent. Furthermore, because the accessible time dynamics, and also the spatial resolution, in an SPT experiment is mainly dependent on the luminous brightness and photostability of the particular SPT probe that is used, available SPT results are ultimately dependent on the SPT probes...

  2. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  3. Automated design of genomic Southern blot probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiyama Noboru H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sothern blotting is a DNA analysis technique that has found widespread application in molecular biology. It has been used for gene discovery and mapping and has diagnostic and forensic applications, including mutation detection in patient samples and DNA fingerprinting in criminal investigations. Southern blotting has been employed as the definitive method for detecting transgene integration, and successful homologous recombination in gene targeting experiments. The technique employs a labeled DNA probe to detect a specific DNA sequence in a complex DNA sample that has been separated by restriction-digest and gel electrophoresis. Critically for the technique to succeed the probe must be unique to the target locus so as not to cross-hybridize to other endogenous DNA within the sample. Investigators routinely employ a manual approach to probe design. A genome browser is used to extract DNA sequence from the locus of interest, which is searched against the target genome using a BLAST-like tool. Ideally a single perfect match is obtained to the target, with little cross-reactivity caused by homologous DNA sequence present in the genome and/or repetitive and low-complexity elements in the candidate probe. This is a labor intensive process often requiring several attempts to find a suitable probe for laboratory testing. Results We have written an informatic pipeline to automatically design genomic Sothern blot probes that specifically attempts to optimize the resultant probe, employing a brute-force strategy of generating many candidate probes of acceptable length in the user-specified design window, searching all against the target genome, then scoring and ranking the candidates by uniqueness and repetitive DNA element content. Using these in silico measures we can automatically design probes that we predict to perform as well, or better, than our previous manual designs, while considerably reducing design time. We went on to

  4. Optical Probes for Neurobiological Sensing and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric H; Chin, Gregory; Rong, Guoxin; Poskanzer, Kira E; Clark, Heather A

    2018-04-13

    Fluorescent nanosensors and molecular probes are next-generation tools for imaging chemical signaling inside and between cells. Electrophysiology has long been considered the gold standard in elucidating neural dynamics with high temporal resolution and precision, particularly on the single-cell level. However, electrode-based techniques face challenges in illuminating the specific chemicals involved in neural cell activation with adequate spatial information. Measuring chemical dynamics is of fundamental importance to better understand synergistic interactions between neurons as well as interactions between neurons and non-neuronal cells. Over the past decade, significant technological advances in optical probes and imaging methods have enabled entirely new possibilities for studying neural cells and circuits at the chemical level. These optical imaging modalities have shown promise for combining chemical, temporal, and spatial information. This potential makes them ideal candidates to unravel the complex neural interactions at multiple scales in the brain, which could be complemented by traditional electrophysiological methods to obtain a full spatiotemporal picture of neurochemical dynamics. Despite the potential, only a handful of probe candidates have been utilized to provide detailed chemical information in the brain. To date, most live imaging and chemical mapping studies rely on fluorescent molecular indicators to report intracellular calcium (Ca 2+ ) dynamics, which correlates with neuronal activity. Methodological advances for monitoring a full array of chemicals in the brain with improved spatial, temporal, and chemical resolution will thus enable mapping of neurochemical circuits with finer precision. On the basis of numerous studies in this exciting field, we review the current efforts to develop and apply a palette of optical probes and nanosensors for chemical sensing in the brain. There is a strong impetus to further develop technologies capable of

  5. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  6. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  7. Adjustable Pitot Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Robbins, W. Eugene; Horsley, Lewis A.

    1991-01-01

    Probe readily positionable in core of uniform flow in hypersonic wind tunnel. Formed of pair of mating cylindrical housings: transducer housing and pitot-tube housing. Pitot tube supported by adjustable wedge fairing attached to top of pitot-tube housing with semicircular foot. Probe adjusted both radially and circumferentially. In addition, pressure-sensing transducer cooled internally by water or other cooling fluid passing through annulus of cooling system.

  8. Probing chirality with a femtosecond reaction microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen M. H. M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Detection of molecular chirality with high sensitivity and selectivity is important for many analytical and practical applications. Photoionization has emerged as a very sensitive probe of chirality in molecules. We show here that a table top setup with a femtosecond laser and a single imaging detector for both photoelectrons and photoions enables detection of chirality up to 3 orders of magnitude better than the existing conventional absorption based techniques.

  9. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  10. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  11. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  12. Theory of NMR probe design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnall, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The NMR probe is the intrinsic part of the NMR system which allows transmission of a stimulus to a sample and the reception of a resulting signal from a sample. NMR probes are used in both imaging and spectroscopy. Optimal probe design is important to the production of adequate signal/moise. It is important for anyone using NMR techniques to understand how NMR probes work and how to optimize probe design

  13. Development of radiolabeled probes directed against sigma-1 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Masuda, Ryohei; Shiba, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that sigma-1 receptors regulate the release of signaling substances in the central nervous systems and are related to various diseases, such as schizophrenia, stress disorders, dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and cancer. If the quantification of the sigma-1 receptors is possible, the pathophysiology, the stage, and the early detection of the diseases could be understandable. Molecular imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radioactive probes makes noninvasive quantification of the in vivo metabolism and function possible. Currently, only nuclear medicine diagnosis using PET or SPECT can quantify the sigma-1 receptors. Therefore, there is great expectation for the development of molecular probes to image the sigma-1 receptors specifically. In this paper, we introduce our research on the development of radiohalogen-labeled molecular probes directed against the sigma-1 receptors. (author)

  14. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  15. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  16. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General ... Author Affiliations. Ashok Ambastha1. Joint In-Charge Udaipur Solar Observatory Physical Research laboratory P.O. Box No. 198 Udaipur 313 001, India ...

  17. Flexible position probe assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The combination of a plurality of tubular transducer sections and a flexible supporting member extending through the tubular transducer sections forms a flexible elongated probe of a design suitable for monitoring the level of an element, such as a nuclear magnetically permeable control rod or liquid. 3 claims, 23 figures

  18. Electroactive crown ester-Cu2+ complex with in-situ modification at molecular beacon probe serving as a facile electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of CaMV 35s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Fengping; Liao, Xiaolei; Gao, Feng; Qiu, Weiwei; Wang, Qingxiang

    2017-06-15

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor has been facilely constructed by in-situ assembly of electroactive 4'-aminobenzo-18-crown-6-copper(II) complex (AbC-Cu 2+ ) on the free terminal of the hairpin-structured molecule beacon. The 3'-SH modified molecule beacon probe was first immobilized on the gold electrode (AuE) surface through self-assembly chemistry of Au-S bond. Then the crow ester of AbC was covalently coupled with 5'-COOH on the molecule beacon, and served as a platform to attach the Cu 2+ by coordination with ether bond (-O-) of the crown cycle. Thus, an electroactive molecule beacon-based biosensing interface was constructed. In comparison with conventional methods for preparation of electroactive molecule beacon, the approach presented in this work is much simpler, reagent- and labor-saving. Selectivity study shows that the in-situ fabricated electroactive molecule beacon remains excellent recognition ability of pristine molecule beacon probe to well differentiate various DNA fragments. The target DNA can be quantatively determined over the range from 0.10pM to 0.50nM. The detection limit of 0.060pM was estimated based on signal-to-noise ratio of 3. When the biosensor was applied for the detection cauliflower mosaic virus 35s (CaMV 35s) in soybean extraction samples, satisfactory results are achieved. This work opens a new strategy for facilely fabricating electrochemical sensing interface, which also shows great potential in aptasensor and immurosensor fabrication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes...

  20. Probing vibrational activities, electronic properties, molecular docking and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of 4-chlorophenyl ({[(1E)-3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene]amino}oxy)methanone: A promising anti-Candida agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasheela, K.; Al-Wahaibi, Lamya H.; Periandy, S.; Hassan, Hanan M.; Sebastian, S.; Xavier, S.; Daniel, Joseph C.; El-Emam, Ali A.; Attia, Mohamed I.

    2018-05-01

    The promising anti-Candida agent, 4-chlorophenyl ({[1E-3(1H-imidazole-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene}oxy)methanone (4-CPIPM) was comprehensively characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, as well as 1H and 13C spectroscopic techniques. The theoretical calculations in the current study utilized Gaussian 09 W software with DFT approach of the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. The experimental X-ray diffraction data of the 4-CPIPM molecule were compared with the optimized structure and showed well agreement. Intermolecular electronic interactions and their stabilization energies have been analyzed by natural bond orbital method. Potential energy distribution confirmed the normal fundamental mode of vibration with the aid of MOLVIB software. The chemical shift values of the 1H and 13C spectra of the title compound were computed using gauge independent atomic orbital and the results were compared with the experimental values. The time-dependent density function theory method was used to predict the electronic, absorption wavelength and frontier molecular orbital energies. The HOMO-LUMO plots proved the charge transfer in the molecular system of the title compound through conjugated paths. The molecular electrostatic potential analysis provided the electrophilic and nucleophilic reactive sites in the title molecule which have been analyzed using Hirshfeld surface and two dimensions fingerprint plots. Non covalent interactions were also studied using reduced density gradient analysis and color filled electron density diagram. Molecular docking studies of the ligand-protein interactions along with their binding energies were carried out aiming to explain the potent anti-Candida activity of the title molecule.

  1. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  2. Carbon nanotubes as in vivo bacterial probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Ghosh, Debadyuti; Belcher, Angela M.

    2014-09-01

    With the rise in antibiotic-resistant infections, non-invasive sensing of infectious diseases is increasingly important. Optical imaging, although safer and simpler, is less developed than other modalities such as radioimaging, due to low availability of target-specific molecular probes. Here we report carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as bacterial probes for fluorescence imaging of pathogenic infections. We demonstrate that SWNTs functionalized using M13 bacteriophage (M13-SWNT) can distinguish between F‧-positive and F‧-negative bacterial strains. Moreover, through one-step modification, we attach an anti-bacterial antibody on M13-SWNT, making it easily tunable for sensing specific F‧-negative bacteria. We illustrate detection of Staphylococcus aureus intramuscular infections, with ~3.4 × enhancement in fluorescence intensity over background. SWNT imaging presents lower signal spread ~0.08 × and higher signal amplification ~1.4 × , compared with conventional dyes. We show the probe offers greater ~5.7 × enhancement in imaging of S. aureus infective endocarditis. These biologically functionalized, aqueous-dispersed, actively targeted, modularly tunable SWNT probes offer new avenues for exploration of deeply buried infections.

  3. Carbon nanotubes as in vivo bacterial probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Neelkanth M; Ghosh, Debadyuti; Belcher, Angela M

    2014-09-17

    With the rise in antibiotic-resistant infections, non-invasive sensing of infectious diseases is increasingly important. Optical imaging, although safer and simpler, is less developed than other modalities such as radioimaging, due to low availability of target-specific molecular probes. Here we report carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as bacterial probes for fluorescence imaging of pathogenic infections. We demonstrate that SWNTs functionalized using M13 bacteriophage (M13-SWNT) can distinguish between F'-positive and F'-negative bacterial strains. Moreover, through one-step modification, we attach an anti-bacterial antibody on M13-SWNT, making it easily tunable for sensing specific F'-negative bacteria. We illustrate detection of Staphylococcus aureus intramuscular infections, with ~3.4 × enhancement in fluorescence intensity over background. SWNT imaging presents lower signal spread ~0.08 × and higher signal amplification ~1.4 × , compared with conventional dyes. We show the probe offers greater ~5.7 × enhancement in imaging of S. aureus infective endocarditis. These biologically functionalized, aqueous-dispersed, actively targeted, modularly tunable SWNT probes offer new avenues for exploration of deeply buried infections.

  4. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  5. Heavy ion beam probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickok, R.L.

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included

  6. Probing Zeolite Crystal Architecture and Structural Imperfections using Differently Sized Fluorescent Organic Probe Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Frank C; Schmidt, Joel E; Rombouts, Jeroen A; Lammertsma, Koop; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2017-05-05

    A micro-spectroscopic method has been developed to probe the accessibility of zeolite crystals using a series of fluorescent 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide (DAMPI) probes of increasing molecular size. Staining large zeolite crystals with MFI (ZSM-5) topology and subsequent mapping of the resulting fluorescence using confocal fluorescence microscopy reveal differences in structural integrity: the 90° intergrowth sections of MFI crystals are prone to develop structural imperfections, which act as entrance routes for the probes into the zeolite crystal. Polarization-dependent measurements provide evidence for the probe molecule's alignment within the MFI zeolite pore system. The developed method was extended to BEA (Beta) crystals, showing that the previously observed hourglass pattern is a general feature of BEA crystals with this morphology. Furthermore, the probes can accurately identify at which crystal faces of BEA straight or sinusoidal pores open to the surface. The results show this method can spatially resolve the architecture-dependent internal pore structure of microporous materials, which is difficult to assess using other characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  8. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  9. Induced current heating probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Ferguson, B.G.; Winstanley, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    An induced current heating probe is of thimble form and has an outer conducting sheath and a water flooded flux-generating unit formed from a stack of ferrite rings coaxially disposed in the sheath. The energising coil is made of solid wire which connects at one end with a coaxial water current tube and at the other end with the sheath. The stack of ferrite rings may include non-magnetic insulating rings which help to shape the flux. (author)

  10. Far Western: probing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarson, Margret B; Pugacheva, Elena N; Orlinick, Jason R

    2007-08-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe far-Western technique described in this protocol is fundamentally similar to Western blotting. In Western blots, an antibody is used to detect a query protein on a membrane. In contrast, in a far-Western blot (also known as an overlay assay) the antibody is replaced by a recombinant GST fusion protein (produced and purified from bacteria), and the assay detects the interaction of this protein with target proteins on a membrane. The membranes are washed and blocked, incubated with probe protein, washed again, and subjected to autoradiography. The GST fusion (probe) proteins are often labeled with (32)P; alternatively, the membrane can be probed with unlabeled GST fusion protein, followed by detection using commercially available GST antibodies. The nonradioactive approach is substantially more expensive (due to the purchase of antibody and detection reagents) than using radioactively labeled proteins. In addition, care must be taken to control for nonspecific interactions with GST alone and a signal resulting from antibody cross-reactivity. In some instances, proteins on the membrane are not able to interact after transfer. This may be due to improper folding, particularly in the case of proteins expressed from a phage expression library. This protocol describes a way to overcome this by washing the membrane in denaturation buffer, which is then serially diluted to permit slow renaturation of the proteins.

  11. NASA's interstellar probe mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liewer, P.C.; Ayon, J.A.; Wallace, R.A.; Mewaldt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Interstellar Probe will be the first spacecraft designed to explore the nearby interstellar medium and its interaction with our solar system. As envisioned by NASA's Interstellar Probe Science and Technology Definition Team, the spacecraft will be propelled by a solar sail to reach >200 AU in 15 years. Interstellar Probe will investigate how the Sun interacts with its environment and will directly measure the properties and composition of the dust, neutrals and plasma of the local interstellar material which surrounds the solar system. In the mission concept developed in the spring of 1999, a 400-m diameter solar sail accelerates the spacecraft to ∼15 AU/year, roughly 5 times the speed of Voyager 1 and 2. The sail is used to first bring the spacecraft to ∼0.25 AU to increase the radiation pressure before heading out in the interstellar upwind direction. After jettisoning the sail at ∼5 AU, the spacecraft coasts to 200-400 AU, exploring the Kuiper Belt, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and the nearby interstellar medium

  12. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  13. Rheo-optical two-dimensional (2D) near-infrared (NIR) correlation spectroscopy for probing strain-induced molecular chain deformation of annealed and quenched Nylon 6 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Mizukado, Junji

    2018-04-01

    A rheo-optical characterization technique based on the combination of a near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer and a tensile testing machine is presented here. In the rheo-optical NIR spectroscopy, tensile deformations are applied to polymers to induce displacement of ordered or disordered molecular chains. The molecular-level variation of the sample occurring on short time scales is readily captured as a form of strain-dependent NIR spectra by taking an advantage of an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) equipped with the NIR spectrometer. In addition, the utilization of NIR with much less intense absorption makes it possible to measure transmittance spectra of relatively thick samples which are often required for conventional tensile testing. An illustrative example of the rheo-optical technique is given with annealed and quenched Nylon 6 samples to show how this technique can be utilized to derive more penetrating insight even from the seemingly simple polymers. The analysis of the sets of strain-dependent NIR spectra suggests the presence of polymer structures undergoing different variations during the tensile elongation. For instance, the tensile deformation of the semi-crystalline Nylon 6 involves a separate step of elongation of the rubbery amorphous chains and subsequent disintegration of the rigid crystalline structure. Excess amount of crystalline phase in Nylon 6, however, results in the retardation of the elastic deformation mainly achieved by the amorphous structure, which eventually leads to the simultaneous orientation of both amorphous and crystalline structures.

  14. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  15. A Flexible, Grid-Enabled Web Portal for GROMACS Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marc; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming a standard part of workflows in structural biology. They are used for tasks as diverse as assessing molecular flexibility, probing conformational changes, assessing the impact of mutations, or gaining information about molecular interactions. However,

  16. A flexible, grid-enabled web portal for GROMACS molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Wassenaar, T.A.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming a standard part of workflows in structural biology. They are used for tasks as diverse as assessing molecular flexibility, probing conformational changes, assessing the impact of mutations, or gaining information about molecular interactions. However,

  17. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair for fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M Uljana [Richland, WA; Cao, Haishi [Richland, WA

    2010-08-17

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  18. Wearable probes for service design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullane, Aaron; Laaksolahti, Jarmo Matti; Svanæs, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Probes are used as a design method in user-centred design to allow end-users to inform design by collecting data from their lives. Probes are potentially useful in service innovation, but current probing methods require users to interrupt their activity and are consequently not ideal for use...... by service employees in reflecting on the delivery of a service. In this paper, we present the ‘wearable probe’, a probe concept that captures sensor data without distracting service employees. Data captured by the probe can be used by the service employees to reflect and co-reflect on the service journey......, helping to identify opportunities for service evolution and innovation....

  19. Molecular Composition Analysis of Distant Targets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a system capable of probing the molecular composition of cold solar system targets such as asteroids, comets, planets and moons from a distant vantage....

  20. Probing the interaction of human serum albumin with vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahaki, Hanie, E-mail: hanieh.mahaki@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of Riboflavin (RB) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) with human serum albumin (HSA) using different spectroscopic, zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques under imitated physiological conditions. The resonance light scattering (RLS) method determined the critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in the presence and absence of L-Arg which confirmed the zeta potential results. The binding constants (K{sub a}) of HSA–RB were 2.5×10{sup 4} and 9.7×10{sup 3} M{sup −1}, respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 280 nm, also were 7.5×10{sup 3} and 7.3×10{sup 3}, respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 295 nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that in the presence of L-Arg, the binding constant of HSA–RB was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to results in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The binding distances between HSA and RB in two- and three-component systems were estimated by the Forster theory which revealed that nonradiative energy transfer from HSA to RB occurred with a high probability. The effect of RB on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) in both systems. Docking studies demonstrated a reduction in the binding affinity between RB and HSA in the presence of L-Arg. -- Highlights: ► We studied the interaction of riboflavin with HSA in presence and absence of L-Arg. ► Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. ► We compared the binding mechanism of riboflavin (RB) to HSA in both systems. ► We determined critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in both systems. ► The binding site of RB on HSA in both systems has been determined.

  1. Probing the interaction of human serum albumin with vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Mahaki, Hanie

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of Riboflavin (RB) and L-Arginine (L-Arg) with human serum albumin (HSA) using different spectroscopic, zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques under imitated physiological conditions. The resonance light scattering (RLS) method determined the critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in the presence and absence of L-Arg which confirmed the zeta potential results. The binding constants (K a ) of HSA–RB were 2.5×10 4 and 9.7×10 3 M −1 , respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 280 nm, also were 7.5×10 3 and 7.3×10 3 , respectively in binary and ternary system at the excitation wavelength of 295 nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that in the presence of L-Arg, the binding constant of HSA–RB was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to results in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The binding distances between HSA and RB in two- and three-component systems were estimated by the Forster theory which revealed that nonradiative energy transfer from HSA to RB occurred with a high probability. The effect of RB on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) in both systems. Docking studies demonstrated a reduction in the binding affinity between RB and HSA in the presence of L-Arg. -- Highlights: ► We studied the interaction of riboflavin with HSA in presence and absence of L-Arg. ► Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. ► We compared the binding mechanism of riboflavin (RB) to HSA in both systems. ► We determined critical aggregation concentration of RB on HSA in both systems. ► The binding site of RB on HSA in both systems has been determined

  2. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  3. The solar probe mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.; Anderson, J.; Bohlin, J.D.; Burlaga, L.F.; Farquhar, R.; Gloeckler, G.; Goldstein, B.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Holzer, T.E.; Jones, W.V.; Kellogg, P.J.; Krimigis, S.M.; Kundu, M.R.; Lazarus, A.J.; Mellott, M.M.; Parker, E.N.; Rosner, R.; Rottman, G.J.; Slavin, J.A.; Suess, S.T.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Woo, R.T.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Solar Probe will deliver a 133.5 kg science payload into a 4 R s perihelion solar polar orbit (with the first perihelion passage in 2004) to explore in situ one of the last frontiers in the solar system---the solar corona. This mission is both affordable and technologically feasible. Using a payload of 12 (predominantly particles and fields) scientific experiments, it will be possible to answer many long-standing, fundamental problems concerning the structure and dynamics of the outer solar atmosphere, including the acceleration, storage, and transport of energetic particles near the Sun and in the inner ( s ) heliosphere

  4. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...... characterized as being highly nomadic and thus potential users of mobile and ubiquitous technologies. The methodology has been applied in the 1ST MAGNET Beyond project in order to obtain user needs and requirements in the process of developing pilot services. We report on the initial findings from applying...

  5. Molecular environmental geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Peggy A.

    1999-05-01

    The chemistry, mobility, and bioavailability of contaminant species in the natural environment are controlled by reactions that occur in and among solid, aqueous, and gas phases. These reactions are varied and complex, involving changes in chemical form and mass transfer among inorganic, organic, and biochemical species. The field of molecular environmental geochemistry seeks to apply spectroscopic and microscopic probes to the mechanistic understanding of environmentally relevant chemical processes, particularly those involving contaminants and Earth materials. In general, empirical geochemical models have been shown to lack uniqueness and adequate predictive capability, even in relatively simple systems. Molecular geochemical tools, when coupled with macroscopic measurements, can provide the level of chemical detail required for the credible extrapolation of contaminant reactivity and bioavailability over ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of molecular chemistry and reaction mechanisms at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interfaces spurred by the application of new spectroscopies and microscopies. These methods, such as synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques, vibrational and resonance spectroscopies, and scanning probe microscopies, provide direct chemical information that can elucidate molecular mechanisms, including element speciation, ligand coordination and oxidation state, structural arrangement and crystallinity on different scales, and physical morphology and topography of surfaces. Nonvacuum techniques that allow examination of reactions in situ (i.e., with water or fluids present) and in real time provide direct links between molecular structure and reactivity and measurements of kinetic rates or thermodynamic properties. Applications of these diverse probes to laboratory model systems have provided fundamental insight into inorganic and organic reactions at

  6. A Direct Comparison of Azide and Nitrile Vibrational Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Xin Sonia; Coutifaris, Basil A.; Brewer, Scott H.; Fenlon, Edward E.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of 2′-azido-5-cyano-2′-deoxyuridine, N3CNdU (1), from trityl-protected 2′-amino-2′-deoxyuridine was accomplished in four steps with a 12.5% overall yield. The IR absorption positions and profiles of the azide and nitrile group of N3CNdU were investigated in 14 different solvents and water/DMSO solvent mixtures. The azide probe was superior to the nitrile probe in terms of its extinction coefficient, which is 2–4 times larger. However, the nitrile IR absorbance profile is generally less complicated by accidental Fermi resonance. The IR frequencies of both probes undergo a substantial red shift upon going from water to aprotic solvents such as THF or DMSO. DFT calculations supported the hypothesis that the molecular origin of the higher observed frequency in water is primarily due to hydrogen bonds between the probes and water molecules. PMID:21336362

  7. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  8. Rapid identification and detection of pathogenic Fungi by padlock probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsui, C.K.M.; Wang, B.; Schoen, C.D.; Hamelin, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are important pathogens of human diseases, as well as to agricultural crop and trees. Molecular diagnostics can detect diseases early, and improve identification accuracy and follow-up disease management. The use of padlock probe is effective to facilitate these detections and pathogen

  9. A Simple Refraction Experiment for Probing Diffusion in Ternary Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Cecil A.; Mankidy, Bijith D.; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion is a fundamental phenomenon that is vital in many chemical processes such as mass transport in living cells, corrosion, and separations. We describe a simple undergraduate-level experiment based on Weiner's Method to probe diffusion in a ternary aqueous mixture of small molecular-weight molecules. As an illustration, the experiment…

  10. Mass amplifying probe for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy detection of small molecules in complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liang; Zou, Yuan; Lin, Ninghang; Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-07-03

    Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is a reliable and excellent choice for fluorescence sensing. One of the key factors influencing the FA value for any molecule is the molar mass of the molecule being measured. As a result, the FA method with functional nucleic acid aptamers has been limited to macromolecules such as proteins and is generally not applicable for the analysis of small molecules because their molecular masses are relatively too small to produce observable FA value changes. We report here a molecular mass amplifying strategy to construct anisotropy aptamer probes for small molecules. The probe is designed in such a way that only when a target molecule binds to the probe does it activate its binding ability to an anisotropy amplifier (a high molecular mass molecule such as protein), thus significantly increasing the molecular mass and FA value of the probe/target complex. Specifically, a mass amplifying probe (MAP) consists of a targeting aptamer domain against a target molecule and molecular mass amplifying aptamer domain for the amplifier protein. The probe is initially rendered inactive by a small blocking strand partially complementary to both target aptamer and amplifier protein aptamer so that the mass amplifying aptamer domain would not bind to the amplifier protein unless the probe has been activated by the target. In this way, we prepared two probes that constitute a target (ATP and cocaine respectively) aptamer, a thrombin (as the mass amplifier) aptamer, and a fluorophore. Both probes worked well against their corresponding small molecule targets, and the detection limits for ATP and cocaine were 0.5 μM and 0.8 μM, respectively. More importantly, because FA is less affected by environmental interferences, ATP in cell media and cocaine in urine were directly detected without any tedious sample pretreatment. Our results established that our molecular mass amplifying strategy can be used to design aptamer probes for rapid, sensitive, and selective

  11. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M; Satzinger, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  12. Theoretical Probing of Weak Anion-Cation Interactions in Certain Pyridinium-Based Ionic Liquid Ion Pairs and the Application of Molecular Electrostatic Potential in Their Ionic Crystal Density Determination: A Comparative Study Using Density Functional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Aswathy; Thomas, Vibin Ipe; Żyła, Gaweł; Padmanabhan, A S; Mathew, Suresh

    2018-01-11

    A comprehensive study on the structure, nature of interaction, and properties of six ionic pairs of 1-butylpyridinium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations in combination with tetrafluoroborate (BF 4 - ), chloride (Cl - ), and bromide (Br - ) anions have been carried out using density functional theory (DFT). The anion-cation interaction energy (ΔE int ), thermochemistry values, theoretical band gap, molecular orbital energy order, DFT-based chemical activity descriptors [chemical potential (μ), chemical hardness (η), and electrophilicity index (ω)], and distribution of density of states (DOS) of these ion pairs were investigated. The ascendancy of the -CH 3 substituent at the fourth position of the 1-butylpyridinium cation ring on the values of ΔE int , theoretical band gap and chemical activity descriptors was evaluated. The ΔE int values were negative for all six ion pairs and were highest for Cl - containing ion pairs. The theoretical band gap value after -CH 3 substitution increased from 3.78 to 3.96 eV (for Cl - ) and from 2.74 to 2.88 eV (for Br - ) and decreased from 4.9 to 4.89 eV (for BF 4 - ). Ion pairs of BF 4 - were more susceptible to charge transfer processes as inferred from their significantly high η values and comparatively small difference in ω value after -CH 3 substitution. The change in η and μ values due to the -CH 3 substituent is negligibly small in all cases except for the ion pairs of Cl - . Critical-point (CP) analyses were carried out to investigate the AIM topological parameters at the interionic bond critical points (BCPs). The RDG isosurface analysis indicated that the anion-cation interaction was dominated by strong H cat ···X ani and C cat ···X ani interactions in ion pairs of Cl - and Br - whereas a weak van der Waal's effect dominated in ion pairs of BF 4 - . The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP)-based parameter ΔΔV min measuring the anion-cation interaction strength showed a good linear correlation with

  13. HERSCHEL SURVEY OF GALACTIC OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, AND H{sub 3}O{sup +}: PROBING THE MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FRACTION AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gerin, M.; Falgarone, E. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Supérieure, PSL Research University, CNRS, UMR8112, F-75014 Paris (France); Schilke, P.; Chambers, E. T.; Ossenkopf, V. [I. Physikalisches Institut der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Benz, A. O. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zürich (Switzerland); Winkel, B.; Menten, K. M. [MPI für Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Black, John H.; Persson, C. M. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Bruderer, S.; Van Dishoeck, E. F. [Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Godard, B.; Lis, D. C. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR8112, LERMA, F-75005 Paris (France); Goicoechea, J. R. [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Gupta, H. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sonnentrucker, P. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); and others

    2015-02-10

    In diffuse interstellar clouds the chemistry that leads to the formation of the oxygen-bearing ions OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} begins with the ionization of atomic hydrogen by cosmic rays, and continues through subsequent hydrogen abstraction reactions involving H{sub 2}. Given these reaction pathways, the observed abundances of these molecules are useful in constraining both the total cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen (ζ{sub H}) and molecular hydrogen fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}}). We present observations targeting transitions of OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} made with the Herschel Space Observatory along 20 Galactic sight lines toward bright submillimeter continuum sources. Both OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} are detected in absorption in multiple velocity components along every sight line, but H{sub 3}O{sup +} is only detected along 7 sight lines. From the molecular abundances we compute f{sub H{sub 2}} in multiple distinct components along each line of sight, and find a Gaussian distribution with mean and standard deviation 0.042 ± 0.018. This confirms previous findings that OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} primarily reside in gas with low H{sub 2} fractions. We also infer ζ{sub H} throughout our sample, and find a lognormal distribution with mean log (ζ{sub H}) = –15.75 (ζ{sub H} = 1.78 × 10{sup –16} s{sup –1}) and standard deviation 0.29 for gas within the Galactic disk, but outside of the Galactic center. This is in good agreement with the mean and distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates previously inferred from H{sub 3}{sup +} observations. Ionization rates in the Galactic center tend to be 10-100 times larger than found in the Galactic disk, also in accord with prior studies.

  14. Homology modeling, docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations using graphical processing unit architecture to probe the type-11 phosphodiesterase catalytic site: a computational approach for the rational design of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichero, Elena; D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Moscatelli, Marco; Bruno, Olga; Orro, Alessandro; Rotolo, Chiara; Milanesi, Luciano; Fossa, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Phosphodiesterase 11 (PDE11) is the latest isoform of the PDEs family to be identified, acting on both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The initial reports of PDE11 found evidence for PDE11 expression in skeletal muscle, prostate, testis, and salivary glands; however, the tissue distribution of PDE11 still remains a topic of active study and some controversy. Given the sequence similarity between PDE11 and PDE5, several PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to cross-react with PDE11. Accordingly, many non-selective inhibitors, such as IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, and dipyridamole, have been documented to inhibit PDE11. Only recently, a series of dihydrothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one derivatives proved to be selective toward the PDE11 isoform. In the absence of experimental data about PDE11 X-ray structures, we found interesting to gain a better understanding of the enzyme-inhibitor interactions using in silico simulations. In this work, we describe a computational approach based on homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation to derive a predictive 3D model of PDE11. Using a Graphical Processing Unit architecture, it is possible to perform long simulations, find stable interactions involved in the complex, and finally to suggest guideline for the identification and synthesis of potent and selective inhibitors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Probing the effect of the non-active-site mutation Y229W in New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 by site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic studies, and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Chen

    Full Text Available New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1 has attracted extensive attention for its high catalytic activities of hydrolyzing almost all β-lactam antibiotics. NDM-1 shows relatively higher similarity to subclass B1 metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs, but its residue at position 229 is identical to that of B2/B3 MβLs, which is a Tyr instead of a B1-MβL-conserved Trp. To elucidate the possible role of Y229 in the bioactivity of NDM-1, we performed mutagenesis study and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Although residue Y229 is spatially distant from the active site and not contacting directly with the substrate or zinc ions, the Y229W mutant was found to have higher kcat and Km values than those of wild-type NDM-1, resulting in 1 ∼ 7 fold increases in k(cat /K(m values against tested antibiotics. In addition, our MD simulations illustrated the enhanced flexibility of Loop 2 upon Y229W mutation, which could increase the kinetics of both substrate entrance (kon and product egress (koff. The enhanced flexibility of Loop 2 might allow the enzyme to adjust the geometry of its active site to accommodate substrates with different structures, broadening its substrate spectrum. This study indicated the possible role of the residue at position 229 in the evolution of NDM-1.

  16. Neutral helium beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rezwanul

    1999-10-01

    This article discusses the development of a code where diagnostic neutral helium beam can be used as a probe. The code solves numerically the evolution of the population densities of helium atoms at their several different energy levels as the beam propagates through the plasma. The collisional radiative model has been utilized in this numerical calculation. The spatial dependence of the metastable states of neutral helium atom, as obtained in this numerical analysis, offers a possible diagnostic tool for tokamak plasma. The spatial evolution for several hypothetical plasma conditions was tested. Simulation routines were also run with the plasma parameters (density and temperature profiles) similar to a shot in the Princeton beta experiment modified (PBX-M) tokamak and a shot in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor tokamak. A comparison between the simulation result and the experimentally obtained data (for each of these two shots) is presented. A good correlation in such comparisons for a number of such shots can establish the accurateness and usefulness of this probe. The result can possibly be extended for other plasma machines and for various plasma conditions in those machines.

  17. Chemical Probes of Rapid Estrogen Signaling in Breast Cancer Treatment and Chemoprevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weatherman, Rose V

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design new chemical tools to selectively probe the molecular mechanisms of action of rapid estrogen receptor action and their relevance to breast cancer drugs like tamoxifen...

  18. Multiplex fluorescence melting curve analysis for mutation detection with dual-labeled, self-quenched probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Huang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA is a powerful tool for mutation detection based on melting temperature generated by thermal denaturation of the probe-target hybrid. Nevertheless, the color multiplexing, probe design, and cross-platform compatibility remain to be limited by using existing probe chemistries. We hereby explored two dual-labeled, self-quenched probes, TaqMan and shared-stem molecular beacons, in their ability to conduct FMCA. Both probes could be directly used for FMCA and readily integrated with closed-tube amplicon hybridization under asymmetric PCR conditions. Improved flexibility of FMCA by using these probes was illustrated in three representative applications of FMCA: mutation scanning, mutation identification and mutation genotyping, all of which achieved improved color-multiplexing with easy probe design and versatile probe combination and all were validated with a large number of real clinical samples. The universal cross-platform compatibility of these probes-based FMCA was also demonstrated by a 4-color mutation genotyping assay performed on five different real-time PCR instruments. The dual-labeled, self-quenched probes offered unprecedented combined advantage of enhanced multiplexing, improved flexibility in probe design, and expanded cross-platform compatibility, which would substantially improve FMCA in mutation detection of various applications.

  19. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  20. The Galaxy Evolution Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Galaxy Evolution Probe Team

    2018-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Probe (GEP) is a concept for a far-infrared observatory to survey large regions of sky for star-forming galaxies from z = 0 to beyond z = 3. Our knowledge of galaxy formation is incomplete and requires uniform surveys over a large range of redshifts and environments to accurately describe mass assembly, star formation, supermassive black hole growth, interactions between these processes, and what led to their decline from z ~ 2 to the present day. Infrared observations are sensitive to dusty, star-forming galaxies, which have bright polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and warm dust continuum in the rest-frame mid infrared and cooler thermal dust emission in the far infrared. Unlike previous far-infrared continuum surveys, the GEP will measure photometric redshifts commensurate with galaxy detections from PAH emission and Si absorption features, without the need for obtaining spectroscopic redshifts of faint counterparts at other wavelengths.The GEP design includes a 2 m diameter telescope actively cooled to 4 K and two instruments: (1) An imager covering 10 to 300 um with 25 spectral resolution R ~ 8 bands (with lower R at the longest wavelengths) to detect star-forming galaxies and measure their redshifts photometrically. (2) A 23 – 190 um, R ~ 250 dispersive spectrometer for redshift confirmation and identification of obscured AGN using atomic fine-structure lines. Lines including [Ne V], [O IV], [O III], [O I], and [C II] will probe gas physical conditions, radiation field hardness, and metallicity. Notionally, the GEP will have a two-year mission: galaxy surveys with photometric redshifts in the first year and a second year devoted to follow-up spectroscopy. A comprehensive picture of star formation in galaxies over the last 10 billion years will be assembled from cosmologically relevant volumes, spanning environments from field galaxies and groups, to protoclusters, to dense galaxy clusters.Commissioned by NASA, the

  1. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding and RAD (control probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111 In(3+, a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111In] RGD and [(111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.. The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide, which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  2. Probing the Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Runa

    2016-01-01

    Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating navigatio...... to the territory through its lines and laws, and how the very structure of the occupation has changed over the years, I seek to make visible the ways in which architectures of uncertainty compensate for the fleeting terrain that HH is probing.......Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating...

  3. Heat transfer probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  4. Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Solar Probe Plus mission is planned to be launched in 2018 to study the upper solar corona with both.in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation. The mission will utilize 6 Venus gravity assist maneuver to gradually lower its perihelion to 9.5 Rs below the expected Alfven pOint to study the sub-alfvenic solar wind that is still at least partially co-rotates with the Sun. The detailed science objectives of this mission will be discussed. SPP will have a strong synergy with The ESA/NASA Solar orbiter mission to be launched a year ahead. Both missions will focus on the inner heliosphere and will have complimentary instrumentations. Strategies to exploit this synergy will be also presented.

  5. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  6. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtele, Jonathan [UC Berkeley and LBNL

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  7. Traversing incore probe device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the neutron flux distribution in the reactor core always at a high accuracy. Constitution: A nuclear fission ionizing chamber type detector is disposed at the end of a cable for sending a detection signal of a traversing incore probe device and, further, a gamma-ray ionizing chamber type detector is connected in adjacent therewith and a selection circuit for selecting both of the detection signals and inputting them to a display device is disposed. Then, compensation for the neutron monitors is conducted by the gamma-ray ionizing chamber type detector during normal operation in which control rods are not driven and the positioning is carried out by the nuclear fission ionizing chamber type detector. Furthermore, both of the compensation for the neutron detector and the positioning are carried out by the nuclear fission ionizing chamber type detector upon starting where the control rods are driven. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications. PMID:27036751

  9. Invited Review Article: Pump-probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Martin C., E-mail: Martin.Fischer@duke.edu; Wilson, Jesse W.; Robles, Francisco E. [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Warren, Warren S. [Departments of Chemistry, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Multiphoton microscopy has rapidly gained popularity in biomedical imaging and materials science because of its ability to provide three-dimensional images at high spatial and temporal resolution even in optically scattering environments. Currently the majority of commercial and home-built devices are based on two-photon fluorescence and harmonic generation contrast. These two contrast mechanisms are relatively easy to measure but can access only a limited range of endogenous targets. Recent developments in fast laser pulse generation, pulse shaping, and detection technology have made accessible a wide range of optical contrasts that utilize multiple pulses of different colors. Molecular excitation with multiple pulses offers a large number of adjustable parameters. For example, in two-pulse pump-probe microscopy, one can vary the wavelength of each excitation pulse, the detection wavelength, the timing between the excitation pulses, and the detection gating window after excitation. Such a large parameter space can provide much greater molecular specificity than existing single-color techniques and allow for structural and functional imaging without the need for exogenous dyes and labels, which might interfere with the system under study. In this review, we provide a tutorial overview, covering principles of pump-probe microscopy and experimental setup, challenges associated with signal detection and data processing, and an overview of applications.

  10. Towards molecular electronics with large-area molecular junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, HB; Blom, PWM; de Leeuw, DM; de Boer, B

    2006-01-01

    Electronic transport through single molecules has been studied extensively by academic(1-8) and industrial(9,10) research groups. Discrete tunnel junctions, or molecular diodes, have been reported using scanning probes(11,12), break junctions(13,14), metallic crossbars(6) and nanopores(8,15). For

  11. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  12. Pulsed-laser atom-probe field-ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.; Tsong, T.T.

    1980-01-01

    A time-of-flight atom-probe field-ion microscope has been developed which uses nanosecond laser pulses to field evaporate surface species. The ability to operate an atom-probe without using high-voltage pulses is advantageous for several reasons. The spread in energy arising from the desorption of surface species prior to the voltage pulse attaining its maximum amplitude is eliminated, resulting in increased mass resolution. Semiconductor and insulator samples, for which the electrical resistivity is too high to transmit a short-duration voltage pulse, can be examined using pulsed-laser assisted field desorption. Since the electric field at the surface can be significantly smaller, the dissociation of molecular adsorbates by the field can be reduced or eliminated, permitting well-defined studies of surface chemical reactions. In addition to atom-probe operation, pulsed-laser heating of field emitters can be used to study surface diffusion of adatoms and vacancies over a wide range of temperatures. Examples demonstrating each of these advantages are presented, including the first pulsed-laser atom-probe (PLAP) mass spectra for both metals (W, Mo, Rh) and semiconductors (Si). Molecular hydrogen, which desorbs exclusively as atomic hydrogen in the conventional atom probe, is shown to desorb undissociatively in the PLAP. Field-ion microscope observations of the diffusion and dissociation of atomic clusters, the migration of adatoms, and the formation of vacancies resulting from heating with a 7-ns laser pulse are also presented

  13. Electromechanical response of amorphous LaAlO3 thin film probed by scanning probe microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Alexis S.; Baboux, Nicolas; Albertini, David; Vilquin, Bertrand; Saint Girons, Guillaume; Pelloquin, Sylvain; Gautier, Brice

    2014-07-01

    The electromechanical response of a 3 nm thick amorphous LaAlO3 layer obtained by molecular beam epitaxy has been studied using scanning probe microscopies. Although this kind of sample is not ferroelectric due to its amorphous nature, the resulting images are identical to what is generally obtained on truly ferroelectric samples probed by piezoresponse force microscopy: domains of apparently opposite polarisation are detected, and perfect, square shaped hysteresis loops are recorded. Moreover, written patterns are stable within 72 h. We discuss in the general case the possible origins of this behaviour in terms of charge injection, ionic conduction and motion of oxygen vacancies. In the case presented in this paper, since the writing process has been conducted with applied voltages lower than the injection threshold measured by conductive atomic force Microscopy, allowing to withdraw the hypothesis of charge injection in the sample, we propose that a bistable distribution of oxygen vacancies is responsible for this contrast.

  14. Electromechanical response of amorphous LaAlO3 thin film probed by scanning probe microscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borowiak, Alexis S.; Baboux, Nicolas; Albertini, David; Gautier, Brice; Vilquin, Bertrand; Saint Girons, Guillaume; Pelloquin, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The electromechanical response of a 3 nm thick amorphous LaAlO 3 layer obtained by molecular beam epitaxy has been studied using scanning probe microscopies. Although this kind of sample is not ferroelectric due to its amorphous nature, the resulting images are identical to what is generally obtained on truly ferroelectric samples probed by piezoresponse force microscopy: domains of apparently opposite polarisation are detected, and perfect, square shaped hysteresis loops are recorded. Moreover, written patterns are stable within 72 h. We discuss in the general case the possible origins of this behaviour in terms of charge injection, ionic conduction and motion of oxygen vacancies. In the case presented in this paper, since the writing process has been conducted with applied voltages lower than the injection threshold measured by conductive atomic force Microscopy, allowing to withdraw the hypothesis of charge injection in the sample, we propose that a bistable distribution of oxygen vacancies is responsible for this contrast.

  15. Methods for plant molecular biology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weissbach, Arthur; Weissbach, Herbert

    1988-01-01

    .... Current techniques to carry out plant cell culture and protoplast formation are described as are methods for gene and organelle transfer. The detection of DNA and RNA viruses by molecular probes or ELISA assays and the cloning and transcription of viral RNA complete the volume.

  16. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard s...

  17. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aquino de Muro, Marilena; Rapley, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  18. Non-inductive current probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1977-01-01

    The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is......The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is...

  19. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel R; Guimarães, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2′-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall......Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2′-O-methyl (2′-OMe) RNA modifications have...

  20. Peltier cooling in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Longji; Miao, Ruijiao; Wang, Kun; Thompson, Dakotah; Zotti, Linda Angela; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2018-02-01

    The study of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions is of fundamental interest for the development of various technologies including cooling (refrigeration) and heat-to-electricity conversion1-4. Recent experimental progress in probing the thermopower (Seebeck effect) of molecular junctions5-9 has enabled studies of the relationship between thermoelectricity and molecular structure10,11. However, observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions—a critical step for establishing molecular-based refrigeration—have remained inaccessible. Here, we report direct experimental observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions. By integrating conducting-probe atomic force microscopy12,13 with custom-fabricated picowatt-resolution calorimetric microdevices, we created an experimental platform that enables the unified characterization of electrical, thermoelectric and energy dissipation characteristics of molecular junctions. Using this platform, we studied gold junctions with prototypical molecules (Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au, Au-terphenyl-4,4''-dithiol-Au and Au-4,4'-bipyridine-Au) and revealed the relationship between heating or cooling and charge transmission characteristics. Our experimental conclusions are supported by self-energy-corrected density functional theory calculations. We expect these advances to stimulate studies of both thermal and thermoelectric transport in molecular junctions where the possibility of extraordinarily efficient energy conversion has been theoretically predicted2-4,14.

  1. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  2. Water cooled static pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  3. Mechanisms of Probe Tack Adhesion of Model Acrylic Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakrout, Hamed; Creton, Costantino; Ahn, Dongchan; Shull, Kenneth R.

    1997-03-01

    The adhesion mechanisms of model acrylate homopolymers and copolymers are studied with an instrumented probe tack test. A video camera positioned under the transparent glass substrate records the bonding and debonding process while the force displacement curve is acquired. This setup allows to couple the observation of the cavitation and fibrillation mechanisms, occurring during the debonding of the film from the stainless steel probe, with the mechanical measurement of stress and strain. The transitions between different debonding mechanisms are critically dicussed in terms of the bulk and surface properties of the adhesive and its molecular structure.

  4. Seven novel probe systems for real-time PCR provide absolute single-base discrimination, higher signaling, and generic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James L; Hu, Peixu; Shafer, David A

    2014-11-01

    We have developed novel probe systems for real-time PCR that provide higher specificity, greater sensitivity, and lower cost relative to dual-labeled probes. The seven DNA Detection Switch (DDS)-probe systems reported here employ two interacting polynucleotide components: a fluorescently labeled probe and a quencher antiprobe. High-fidelity detection is achieved with three DDS designs: two internal probes (internal DDS and Flip probes) and a primer probe (ZIPR probe), wherein each probe is combined with a carefully engineered, slightly mismatched, error-checking antiprobe. The antiprobe blocks off-target detection over a wide range of temperatures and facilitates multiplexing. Other designs (Universal probe, Half-Universal probe, and MacMan probe) use generic components that enable low-cost detection. Finally, single-molecule G-Force probes employ guanine-mediated fluorescent quenching by forming a hairpin between adjacent C-rich and G-rich sequences. Examples provided show how these probe technologies discriminate drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants, Escherichia coli O157:H7, oncogenic EGFR deletion mutations, hepatitis B virus, influenza A/B strains, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human VKORC1 gene. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  6. Steerable Doppler transducer probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidel, H.F.; Greenwood, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    An ultrasonic diagnostic probe is described which is capable of performing ultrasonic imaging and Doppler measurement consisting of: a hollow case having an acoustic window which passes ultrasonic energy and including chamber means for containing fluid located within the hollow case and adjacent to a portion of the acoustic window; imaging transducer means, located in the hollow case and outside the fluid chamber means, and oriented to direct ultrasonic energy through the acoustic window toward an area which is to be imaged; Doppler transducer means, located in the hollow case within the fluid chamber means, and movably oriented to direct Doppler signals through the acoustic window toward the imaged area; means located within the fluid chamber means and externally controlled for controllably moving the Doppler transducer means to select one of a plurality of axes in the imaged area along which the Doppler signals are to be directed; and means, located external to the fluid chamber means and responsive to the means for moving, for providing an indication signal for identifying the selected axis

  7. Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Han

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging strives to visualize processes in living subjects at the molecular level. Monitoring biochemical processes at this level will allow us to directly track biological processes and signaling events that lead to pathophysiological abnormalities, and help make personalized medicine a reality by allowing evaluation of therapeutic efficacies on an individual basis. Although most molecular imaging techniques emerged from the field of oncology, they have now gradually gained acceptance by the cardiovascular community. Hence, the availability of dedicated high-resolution small animal imaging systems and specific targeting imaging probes is now enhancing our understanding of cardiovascular diseases and expediting the development of newer therapies. Examples include imaging approaches to evaluate and track the progress of recent genetic and cellular therapies for treatment of myocardial ischemia. Other areas include in vivo monitoring of such key molecular processes as angiogenesis and apoptosis. Cardiovascular molecular imaging is already an important research tool in preclinical experiments. The challenge that lies ahead is to implement these techniques into the clinics so that they may help fulfill the promise of molecular therapies and personalized medicine, as well as to resolve disappointments and controversies surrounding the field

  8. STM-SQUID probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Tachiki, Minoru; Itozaki, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a STM-SQUID probe microscope. A high T C SQUID probe microscope was combined with a scanning tunneling microscope for investigation of samples at room temperature in air. A high permeability probe needle was used as a magnetic flux guide to improve the spatial resolution. The probe with tip radius of less than 100 nm was prepared by microelectropolishing. The probe was also used as a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Topography of the sample surface could be measured by the scanning tunneling microscope with high spatial resolution prior to observation by SQUID microscopy. The SQUID probe microscope image could be observed while keeping the distance from the sample surface to the probe tip constant. We observed a topographic image and a magnetic image of Ni fine pattern and also a magnetically recorded hard disk. Furthermore we have investigated a sample vibration method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio

  9. The AMEMIYA probe. Theoretical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belitz, Hans Joahim; Althausen, Bernhard; Uehara, Kazuya; Amemiya, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The present probe was developed in order to measure the temperature T i of positive ions in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of tokamak where T i is usually larger than the electron temperature Ti so that the presheath in front of the probe need not be considered and the ions reach the probe with the thermal velocity. The axis of the cylindrical probe is placed parallel to the magnetic field. The important parameter are L/a, the ratio of the length to the radius of the cylindrical probe and κ, the ratio of the probe radius to (π/4) 1/2 , where is the mean ion Larmor radius. The ion current densities to the side and the end surfaces are expressed by the double integral, which can give an analytical formula with respect to the value of κ. If two electrodes with different lengths are placed parallel to the magnetic field, the difference of current densities can be reduced to κ and hence to Ti. Some examples of the application of the probe to tokamaks, JFT-2M and Textor, are demonstrated. (author)

  10. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  11. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  12. Molecular imaging II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semmler, Wolfhard; Schwaiger, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this textbook of molecular imaging is to provide an up to date review of this rapidly growing field and to discuss basic methodological aspects necessary for the interpretation of experimental and clinical results. Emphasis is placed on the interplay of imaging technology and probe development, since the physical properties of the imaging approach need to be closely linked with the biologic application of the probe (i.e. nanoparticles and microbubbles). Various chemical strategies are discussed and related to the biologic applications. Reporter-gene imaging is being addressed not only in experimental protocols, but also first clinical applications are discussed. Finally, strategies of imaging to characterize apoptosis and angiogenesis are described and discussed in the context of possible clinical translation. (orig.)

  13. Short recovery time NMR probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramia, M.E.; Martin, C.A.; Jeandrevin, S.

    2011-01-01

    A NMR probe for low frequency and short recovery time is presented in this work. The probe contains the tuning circuit, diode expanders and quarter wavelength networks to protect the receiver from both the amplifier noise and the coil ringing following the transmitter power pulse. It also possesses a coil damper which is activated by of non active components. The probe performance shows a recovery time of about of 15μs a sensitive Q factor reduction and an increase of the signal to noise ratio of about 68% during the reception at a work frequency of 2 MHz. (author)

  14. Scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainsbridge, B.

    1994-01-01

    In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, 'because we are too big'. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs

  15. Scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainsbridge, B [Murdoch Univ., WA (Australia). School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, `because we are too big`. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Neutron Scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboussant, G.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with inelastic neutron scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets and focuses on their magnetic properties at low temperature and low energies. Several molecular magnets (Mn 12 , V 15 , Ni 12 , Mn 4 , etc.) are reviewed. Inelastic neutron scattering is shown to be a perfectly suited spectroscopy tool to -a) probe magnetic energy levels in such systems and -b) provide key information to understand the quantum tunnel effect of the magnetization in molecular spin clusters. (author)

  17. Lepton probes in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvieux, J. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1994-12-31

    Facilities are overviewed which use the lepton probe to learn about nuclear physics. The lepton accelerating methods out some existing facilities are considered. The ELFE project is discussed in detail. (K.A.). 43 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Probing of flowing electron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himura, H.; Nakashima, C.; Saito, H.; Yoshida, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Probing of streaming electron plasmas with finite temperature is studied. For the first time, a current-voltage characteristic of an electric probe is measured in electron plasmas. Due to the fast flow of the electron plasmas, the characteristic curve spreads out significantly and exhibits a long tail. This feature can be explained calculating the currents collected to the probe. In flowing electron plasmas, the distribution function observed in the laboratory frame is non-Maxwellian even if the plasmas come to a state of thermal equilibrium. Another significant feature of the characteristic is that it determines a floating potential where the current equals zero, despite there being very few ions in the electron plasma. A high impedance probe, which is popularly used to determine the space potential of electron plasmas, outputs the potential. The method is available only for plasmas with density much smaller than the Brillouin limit

  19. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  20. Pneumatic probe with laser interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements to upgrade the accuracy of Rotacon probes by a complete redesign of probe to include a Michelson interferometer to replace the existing long-range capacity transducer are described. This has resulted in a compact and interchangeable probe cartridge with a 3 μin. resolution and accuracy; the cartridge can be installed and replaced in the Rotacon gauge with the minimum of realignment, which should reduce our dependence on operator skill. In addition, the stylus contact force can be reduced to 750 mg for the contacting types, but an alternative feature, which we are still developing, will use a gas jet cushion in place of the stylus to provide a noncontacting version of the same basic probe cartridge. This device is very sensitive to external vibration effects because it is virtually frictionless

  1. Lepton probes in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvieux, J.

    1994-01-01

    Facilities are overviewed which use the lepton probe to learn about nuclear physics. The lepton accelerating methods out some existing facilities are considered. The ELFE project is discussed in detail. (K.A.). 43 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Probing Molecular Ions With Laser-Cooled Atomic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-11

    1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA, 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no...multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy of CaH+ in a Coulomb crystal, and quantum logic spectroscopy of CaH+. The first two goals have been completed and the...dissociation technique benefits from larger ion number in a three- dimensional Coulomb crystal. We used this technique to measure the for the first time

  3. Radiation-Induced Polymerization Monitored with Fluorogenic Molecular Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frahn, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    Each year over one billion pounds of acrylic-based polymeric products are produced world wide. Such products include windows in aircraft, lenses in eyeglasses and CD players, coatings on parquet flooring and various architectural structures such as skylights and domes. Often these products are made

  4. Study on radioactive labeling of molecular probes for Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhe; Zhang Jinming

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, the pathological features of AD include neuritic plaques composed of beta-amyloid protein, neurofibrillary tangles. Direct imaging of amyloid load in patients with AD in vivo would be useful for the early diagnosis of AD and the development and assessment of new treatment strategies. Different strategies are being used to develop compounds suitable for in vivo imaging of amyloid deposits in human brains. Two compounds, 18 F-FDDNP and 11 C-PIB, both show more binding in the brains of patients with AD than in those of healthy people. Additional compounds will probably be developed that are suitable not only for PET but also for single photon emission CT(SPECT). (authors)

  5. Probing the limits of metal plasticity with molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A.; Stukowski, Alexander; Oppelstrup, Tomas; Bulatov, Vasily V.

    2017-10-01

    Ordinarily, the strength and plasticity properties of a metal are defined by dislocations--line defects in the crystal lattice whose motion results in material slippage along lattice planes. Dislocation dynamics models are usually used as mesoscale proxies for true atomistic dynamics, which are computationally expensive to perform routinely. However, atomistic simulations accurately capture every possible mechanism of material response, resolving every ``jiggle and wiggle'' of atomic motion, whereas dislocation dynamics models do not. Here we present fully dynamic atomistic simulations of bulk single-crystal plasticity in the body-centred-cubic metal tantalum. Our goal is to quantify the conditions under which the limits of dislocation-mediated plasticity are reached and to understand what happens to the metal beyond any such limit. In our simulations, the metal is compressed at ultrahigh strain rates along its [001] crystal axis under conditions of constant pressure, temperature and strain rate. To address the complexity of crystal plasticity processes on the length scales (85-340 nm) and timescales (1 ns-1μs) that we examine, we use recently developed methods of in situ computational microscopy to recast the enormous amount of transient trajectory data generated in our simulations into a form that can be analysed by a human. Our simulations predict that, on reaching certain limiting conditions of strain, dislocations alone can no longer relieve mechanical loads; instead, another mechanism, known as deformation twinning (the sudden re-orientation of the crystal lattice), takes over as the dominant mode of dynamic response. Below this limit, the metal assumes a strain-path-independent steady state of plastic flow in which the flow stress and the dislocation density remain constant as long as the conditions of straining thereafter remain unchanged. In this distinct state, tantalum flows like a viscous fluid while retaining its crystal lattice and remaining a strong and stiff metal.

  6. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  7. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α- 32 P-labeled probe

  8. De novo molecular design

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2013-01-01

    Systematically examining current methods and strategies, this ready reference covers a wide range of molecular structures, from organic-chemical drugs to peptides, Proteins and nucleic acids, in line with emerging new drug classes derived from biomacromolecules. A leader in the field and one of the pioneers of this young discipline has assembled here the most prominent experts from across the world to provide first-hand knowledge. While most of their methods and examples come from the area of pharmaceutical discovery and development, the approaches are equally applicable for chemical probes an

  9. Mapping Rotational Wavepacket Dynamics with Chirped Probe Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Dmitri; Odhner, Johanan; Levis, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We develop an analytical model description of the strong-field pump-probe polarization spectroscopy of rotational transients in molecular gases in a situation when the probe pulse is considerably chirped: the frequency modulation over the pulse duration is comparable with the carrier frequency. In this scenario, a femtosecond pump laser pulse prepares a rotational wavepacket in a gas-phase sample at room temperature. The rotational revivals of the wavepacket are then mapped onto a chirped broadband probe pulse derived from a laser filament. The slow-varying envelope approximation being inapplicable, an alternative approach is proposed which is capable of incorporating the substantial chirp and the related temporal dispersion of refractive indices. Analytical expressions are obtained for the probe signal modulation over the interaction region and for the resulting heterodyned transient birefringence spectra. Dependencies of the outputs on the probe pulse parameters reveal the trade-offs and the ways to optimize the temporal-spectral imaging. The results are in good agreement with the experiments on snapshot imaging of rotational revival patterns in nitrogen gas. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through AFOSR MURI Grant No. FA9550-10-1-0561.

  10. IVVS probe mechanical concept design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it; Neri, Carlo; De Collibus, Mario Ferri; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Pollastrone, Fabio; Crescenzi, Fabio

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA designed, developed and tested a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS). • IVVS mechanical design has been revised from 2011 to 2013 to meet ITER requirements. • Main improvements are piezoceramic actuators and a step focus system. • Successful qualification activities validated the concept design for ITER environment. - Abstract: ENEA has been deeply involved in the design, development and testing of a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) required for the inspection of ITER plasma-facing components. The IVVS probe shall be deployed into the vacuum vessel, providing high resolution images and metrology measurements to detect damages and possible erosion. ENEA already designed and manufactured an IVVS probe prototype based on a rad-hard concept and driven by commercial micro-step motors, which demonstrated satisfying viewing and metrology performances at room conditions. The probe sends a laser beam through a reflective rotating prism. By rotating the axes of the prism, the probe can scan all the environment points except those present in a shadow cone and the backscattered light signal is then processed to measure the intensity level (viewing) and the distance from the probe (metrology). During the last years, in order to meet all the ITER environmental conditions, such as high vacuum, gamma radiation lifetime dose up to 5 MGy, cumulative neutron fluence of about 2.3 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, temperature of 120 °C and magnetic field of 8 T, the probe mechanical design was significantly revised introducing a new actuating system based on piezo-ceramic actuators and improved with a new step focus system. The optical and mechanical schemes have been then modified and refined to meet also the geometrical constraints. The paper describes the mechanical concept design solutions adopted in order to fulfill IVVS probe functional performance requirements considering ITER working environment and geometrical constraints.

  11. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  12. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little...

  13. 2-Aminopurine hairpin probes for the detection of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F.; Loppnow, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molecular beacon with 2AP bases detects DNA damage in a simple mix-and-read assay. ► Molecular beacons with 2AP bases detect damage at a 17.2 nM limit of detection. ► The 2AP molecular beacon is linear over a 0–3.5 μM concentration range for damage. - Abstract: Nucleic acid exposure to radiation and chemical insults leads to damage and disease. Thus, detection and understanding DNA damage is important for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. However, current methods of DNA damage detection are either time-consuming, destroy the sample, or are too specific to be used for generic detection of damage. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence sensor of 2-aminopurine (2AP), a fluorescent analogue of adenine, incorporated in the loop of a hairpin probe for the quantification of ultraviolet (UV) C-induced nucleic acid damage. Our results show that the selectivity of the 2AP hairpin probe to UV-induced nucleic acid damage is comparable to molecular beacon (MB) probes of DNA damage. The calibration curve for the 2AP hairpin probe shows good linearity (R 2 = 0.98) with a limit of detection of 17.2 nM. This probe is a simple, fast and economic fluorescence sensor for the quantification of UV-induced damage in DNA.

  14. Eddy-current probe design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kincaid, T.G.; McCary, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes theoretical and experimental work directed toward finding the optimum probe dimensions and operating frequency for eddy current detection of half-penny surface cracks in nonmagnetic conducting materials. The study applies to probes which excite an approximately uniform spatial field over the length of the crack at the surface of the material. In practical terms, this means that the probe is not smaller than the crack length in any of its critical dimensions. The optimization of a simple coil probe is first analyzed in detail. It is shown that signal-to-noise ratio and lift-off discrimination are maximized by a pancake coil with mean radius not greater than the crack length, operated at a frequency which gives a skin depth equal to the crack depth. The results obtained for the simple coil are then used as a basis for discussion of the design of coils with ferrite cores and shields, and for the design of recording head type probes

  15. Gamma-ray imaging probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    External nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging of early primary and metastatic lung cancer tumors is difficult due to the poor sensitivity and resolution of existing gamma cameras. Nonimaging counting detectors used for internal tumor detection give ambiguous results because distant background variations are difficult to discriminate from neighboring tumor sites. This suggests that an internal imaging nuclear medicine probe, particularly an esophageal probe, may be advantageously used to detect small tumors because of the ability to discriminate against background variations and the capability to get close to sites neighboring the esophagus. The design, theory of operation, preliminary bench tests, characterization of noise behavior and optimization of such an imaging probe is the central theme of this work

  16. Scanning vector Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Bending, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a scanning vector Hall probe microscope for mapping magnetic field vector over magnetic samples. The microscope is based on a micromachined Hall sensor and the cryostat with scanning system. The vector Hall sensor active area is ∼5x5 μm 2 . It is realized by patterning three Hall probes on the tilted faces of GaAs pyramids. Data from these 'tilted' Hall probes are used to reconstruct the full magnetic field vector. The scanning area of the microscope is 5x5 mm 2 , space resolution 2.5 μm, field resolution ∼1 μT Hz -1/2 at temperatures 10-300 K

  17. Detecting the effects of toxic agents on spermatogenesis using DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, N.B.

    1987-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of spermatogenesis suggest that DNA probes can be used to monitor the effects of toxic agents in male germ cells of mammals. Molecular hybridization analyses with DNA probes can provide a reproducible methodology capable of detecting changes ranging from massive deletions to single base pair substitutions in the genome of exposed individuals. A constantly increasing number of DNA probes that can be used to detect such alterations in human sperm DNA exist for both ubiquitously expressed proteins and for genes solely expressed in the testis. In this chapter, the currently available testicular stage-specific and/or cell type-specific DNA probes and the techniques by which they can be utilized in reproductive toxicology studies are discussed. The advantages, limitations, and future technological advances of this novel biological marker system for the human male reproductive system are also considered

  18. Smart optical probes for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Skoch, Jesse; Hills, Ivory D.; Swager, Timothy M.; Nesterov, Evgueni E.

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent probes for amyloid-beta (Aβ) are an exciting option for molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease research and may translate to clinical diagnostics. However, Aβ-targeted optical probes often suffer from poor specificity and slow clearance from the brain. We are designing smart optical probes that emit characteristic fluorescence signal only when bound to Aβ. We synthesized a family of dyes and tested Aβ-binding sensitivity with fluorescence spectroscopy and tissue-staining. Select compounds exhibited Aβ-dependent changes in fluorescence quantum yield, lifetime, and emission spectra that may be imaged microscopically or in vivo using new lifetime and spectral fluorescence imaging techniques. Smart optical probes that turn on when bound to Aβ will improve amyloid detection and may enable quantitative molecular imaging in vivo. (orig.)

  19. Remote Laser Evaporative Molecular Absorption Spectroscopy Sensor System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a sensor system capable of remotely probing the molecular composition of cold solar system targets (asteroids, comets, planets, moons), such as from a...

  20. Conceptual design of a Raman probe for inclusion in the in-tank cone penetrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyle, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, tank wastes are to be characterized by drilling and physically removing core samples. The cores are analyzed in laboratories in a hot cell environment. The purpose of the cone penetrometer is to bring the interrogative methods to the sample in its native environment, providing faster, safer, and more cost effective tank characterization, both in terms of time and effort. Probes currently exist for the physical characterization of tank wastes in terms of porosity, density, temperature, and electrical conductivity. The main tool for chemical analysis in the in-tank cone penetrometer will be a fiber optic Raman spectroscopy probe, which will be used to collect information about the molecular chemical constituents of the tank wastes. This report addresses the design and implementation of a Raman probe with the in-tank cone penetrometer. The scope of this document includes design specifications and recommendations for the following aspects of the in-tank Raman cone penetrometer probe: cone penetrometer probe interface--an unit for the inclusion of a Raman probe in the in-tank cone penetrometer will be described; window materials--chemically resistant and mechanically stable materials for the cone penetrometer probe interface window will be considered; Raman probes--Raman probes for inclusion in the penetrometer will be discussed

  1. Molecular hematology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Provan, Drew; Gribben, John

    2010-01-01

    ... The molecular basis of hemophilia, 219 Paul LF Giangrande 4 The genetics of acute myeloid leukemias, 42 Carolyn J Owen & Jude Fitzgibbon 19 The molecular basis of von Willebrand disease, 233 Luciano Baronc...

  2. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-labeled DNA probe. Images PMID:16348233

  3. Radical probing of spliceosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Charnpal S; Kent, Oliver A; MacMillan, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and use of a directed hydroxyl radical probe, tethered to a pre-mRNA substrate, to map the structure of this substrate during the spliceosome assembly process. These studies indicate an early organization and proximation of conserved pre-mRNA sequences during spliceosome assembly. This methodology may be adapted to the synthesis of a wide variety of modified RNAs for use as probes of RNA structure and RNA-protein interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Architectural Probes of the Infraordinary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen

    2017-01-01

    of the city plays a vital role for the social coexistence of and the correlation between its inhabitants. In an era of explosive growth of our cities, it is crucial to critically examine the everyday social dimension, if our cities are to be liveable in the future. To enquire into the everyday topography...... approaches for probing into and interrogating the infraordinary: frameworks of perception and situated probes. Both are deployed in order to get at distance of the familiar and by-pass the usual hierarchies of perception to gain new knowledge. These critical spatial practices span an interdisciplinary...

  5. Detecting device of atomic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonenkov, N.V.

    1979-01-01

    Operation of an atomic-probe recording device is discussed in detail and its flowsheet is given. The basic elements of the atomic-probe recording device intented for microanalysis of metals and alloys in an atomic level are the storage oscillograph with a raster-sweep unit, a two-channel timer using frequency meters, a digital printer, and a control unit. The digital printer records information supplied by four digital devices (two frequency meters and two digital voltmeters) in a four-digit binary-decimal code. The described device provides simultaneous recording of two ions produced per one vaporation event

  6. Probing nuclear matter with dileptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    Dileptons are shown to be of interest in helping probe extreme conditions of temperature and density in nuclear matter. The current state of experimental knowledge about dileptons is briefly described, and their use in upcoming experiments with light ions at CERN SPS are reviewed, including possible signatures of quark matter formation. Use of dileptons in an upcoming experiment with a new spectrometer at Berkeley is also discussed. This experiment will probe the nuclear matter equation of state at high temperature and density. 16 refs., 8 figs

  7. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  8. On the calculation of the equivalent circuit for an electrostatic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, B.V.; Kotel'nikov, V.A.; Cherepanov, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    An electric circuit of the probe including a nonlinear element - the layer of a volumetric charge - is considered. Free-molecular and gas dynamical modes are investigated. Calculations of transition processes in the probe circuit are conducted. Characteristic times of formation of the excited zone and the transition process in the circuit are compared. The threshold value of time constant of the circuit at which the transition process in the excited zone can be neglected is determined

  9. In situ hybridization of phytoplankton using fluorescently labeled rRNA probes

    OpenAIRE

    Groben, R.; Medlin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescently-labelled molecular probes were used to identify and characterise phytoplankton species using in situ hybridisation coupled with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The application of this technique is sometimes problematic, because of the many different species with which this method is to be used. Problems that may occur are: probe penetration versus maintanance of cell stability, strong autofluorescence and/or cell lost during the sample processing. Here we present a m...

  10. Diagnostic molecular microbiology: a 2013 snapshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax, Marilynn Ransom; Salimnia, Hossein

    2013-12-01

    Molecular testing has a large and increasing role in the diagnosis of infectious diseases. It has evolved significantly since the first probe tests were FDA approved in the early 1990s. This article highlights the uses of molecular techniques in diagnostic microbiology, including "older," as well as innovative, probe techniques, qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR, highly multiplexed PCR panels, some of which use sealed microfluidic test cartridges, MALDI TOF, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Tests are grouped together by technique and target. Tests with similar roles for similar analytes are compared with respect to benefits, drawbacks, and possible problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Labelling of HBV-DNA probe using reagent made in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Quanshi

    1991-01-01

    The labelling hepatitis Bvirus DNA (HBV-DNA) probe was studied by using reagent made in China. The results showed that: (1) The dNTPs with high specific activity was necessary for the labelling of nigh specific activity HBV-DNA probe; (2) reaction of labelling HBV-DNA probe was completed in a few minutes; (3) 0.37 MBq 3 H dTTP (specific activity 1.554TBq/mmol) was enough to label 1 μg HBV-DNA and the specific activity of probe reached 3.4 x 10 cpm/μg; (4) 7 MBqα- 32 P dATP (specific activity > 111 TBq/mmol) can label HBV-DNA probe to specific activity 1.35 x 10 cpm/μg. It was concluded that the reagent made in China can be used for the study in molecular biology

  12. Kelvin probe force microscopy from single charge detection to device characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Glatzel, Thilo

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and variety of Kelvin probe force microscopy, including technical details. It also offers an overview of the recent developments and numerous applications, ranging from semiconductor materials, nanostructures and devices to sub-molecular and atomic scale electrostatics. In the last 25 years, Kelvin probe force microscopy has developed from a specialized technique applied by a few scanning probe microscopy experts into a tool used by numerous research and development groups around the globe. This sequel to the editors’ previous volume “Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Measuring and Compensating Electrostatic Forces,” presents new and complementary topics. It is intended for a broad readership, from undergraduate students to lab technicians and scanning probe microscopy experts who are new to the field.

  13. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Francesco; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss about the role of new probes for molecular imaging in the evaluation of prostate cancer (PCa). This review focuses particularly on the role of new promising radiotracers for the molecular imaging with PET/computed tomography in the detection of PCa recurrence. The role of these new imaging techniques to guide lesion-target therapies and the potential application of these molecular probes as theranostics agents is discussed. Finally, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to castration in PCa and the maintenance of active androgen receptor are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes...... in a photo-sensitive film illuminated with the probes, and it is confirmed that the radiated optical field is unambigiously confined only for the coated probe. Near-field optical imaging of a standing evanescent-wave pattern is used to compare the detection characteristics of the probes, and it is concluded...... that, for the imaging of optical-field intensity distributions containing predominantly evanescent-wave components, a sharp uncoated tip is the probe of choice. Complementary results obtained with optical phase-conjugation experiments with he uncoated probes are discussed in relation to the probe...

  15. Nuclear physics with electroweak probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhar, Omar

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the italian theoretical Nuclear Physics community has played a leading role in the development of a unified approach, allowing for a consistent and fully quantitative description of the nuclear response to electromagnetic and weak probes. In this paper I review the main achievements in both fields, point out some of the open problems, and outline the most promising prospects

  16. Resolution analysis by random probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fichtner, Andreas; van Leeuwen, T.

    2015-01-01

    We develop and apply methods for resolution analysis in tomography, based on stochastic probing of the Hessian or resolution operators. Key properties of our methods are (i) low algorithmic complexity and easy implementation, (ii) applicability to any tomographic technique, including full‐waveform

  17. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  18. Probing Pharmaceutical Mixtures during Milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Greg; Römann, Philipp; Poller, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    interpret the spectral changes. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which has several practical advantages over XRPD, for probing (dis-)order during pharmaceutical processing, showcasing its potential for future development, and implementation as an in...

  19. A sensitive fluorescent probe for the polar solvation dynamics at protein-surfactant interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Singha, Subhankar; Jun, Yongwoong; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Jhimli; Das, Ranjan; Ahn, Kyo-Han; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2017-05-17

    Relaxation dynamics at the surface of biologically important macromolecules is important taking into account their functionality in molecular recognition. Over the years it has been shown that the solvation dynamics of a fluorescent probe at biomolecular surfaces and interfaces account for the relaxation dynamics of polar residues and associated water molecules. However, the sensitivity of the dynamics depends largely on the localization and exposure of the probe. For noncovalent fluorescent probes, localization at the region of interest in addition to surface exposure is an added challenge compared to the covalently attached probes at the biological interfaces. Here we have used a synthesized donor-acceptor type dipolar fluorophore, 6-acetyl-(2-((4-hydroxycyclohexyl)(methyl)amino)naphthalene) (ACYMAN), for the investigation of the solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. A significant structural rearrangement of a model histone protein (H1) upon interaction with anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as revealed from the circular dichroism (CD) studies is nicely corroborated in the solvation dynamics of the probe at the interface. The polarization gated fluorescence anisotropy of the probe compared to that at the SDS micellar surface clearly reveals the localization of the probe at the protein-surfactant interface. We have also compared the sensitivity of ACYMAN with other solvation probes including coumarin 500 (C500) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylamino-styryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). In comparison to ACYMAN, both C500 and DCM fail to probe the interfacial solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. While C500 is found to be delocalized from the protein-surfactant interface, DCM becomes destabilized upon the formation of the interface (protein-surfactant complex). The timescales obtained from this novel probe have also been compared with other femtosecond resolved studies and molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. Cardiovascular molecular imaging of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, S.L.; Reutelingsperger, C.P.M.; Corsten, M.F.; Hofstra, L.; Narula, J.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging strives to visualise processes at the molecular and cellular level in vivo. Understanding these processes supports diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy on an individual basis and thereby makes personalised medicine possible. Apoptosis is a well-organised mode of cell suicide that plays a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Apoptosis is associated with loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic plaque instability, congestive heart failure and allograft rejection of the transplanted heart. Thus, apoptosis constitutes an attractive target for molecular imaging of CVD. Our current knowledge about the molecular players and mechanisms underlying apoptosis offers a rich palette of potential molecular targets for molecular imaging. However, only a few have been successfully developed so far. This review highlights aspects of the molecular machinery and biochemistry of apoptosis relevant to the development of molecular imaging probes. It surveys the role of apoptosis in four major areas of CVD and portrays the importance and future perspectives of apoptosis imaging. The annexin A5 imaging protocol is emphasised since it is the most advanced protocol to measure apoptosis in both preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  1. Cardiovascular molecular imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, S.L.; Reutelingsperger, C.P.M. [Maastricht University, Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Corsten, M.F.; Hofstra, L. [Maastricht University, Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Narula, J. [University of California Irvine, Department of Cardiology, Irvine (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Molecular imaging strives to visualise processes at the molecular and cellular level in vivo. Understanding these processes supports diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy on an individual basis and thereby makes personalised medicine possible. Apoptosis is a well-organised mode of cell suicide that plays a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Apoptosis is associated with loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic plaque instability, congestive heart failure and allograft rejection of the transplanted heart. Thus, apoptosis constitutes an attractive target for molecular imaging of CVD. Our current knowledge about the molecular players and mechanisms underlying apoptosis offers a rich palette of potential molecular targets for molecular imaging. However, only a few have been successfully developed so far. This review highlights aspects of the molecular machinery and biochemistry of apoptosis relevant to the development of molecular imaging probes. It surveys the role of apoptosis in four major areas of CVD and portrays the importance and future perspectives of apoptosis imaging. The annexin A5 imaging protocol is emphasised since it is the most advanced protocol to measure apoptosis in both preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  2. Contamination-free sounding rocket Langmuir probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatucci, W. E.; Schuck, P. W.; Walker, D. N.; Kintner, P. M.; Powell, S.; Holback, B.; Leonhardt, D.

    2001-04-01

    A technique for removing surface contaminants from a sounding rocket spherical Langmuir probe is presented. Contamination layers present on probe surfaces can skew the collected data, resulting in the incorrect determination of plasma parameters. Despite following the usual probe cleaning techniques that are used prior to a launch, the probe surface can become coated with layers of adsorbed neutral gas in less than a second when exposed to atmosphere. The laboratory tests reported here show that by heating the probe from the interior using a small halogen lamp, adsorbed neutral particles can be removed from the probe surface, allowing accurate plasma parameter measurements to be made.

  3. X-ray Pump–Probe Investigation of Charge and Dissociation Dynamics in Methyl Iodine Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics is of fundamental interest in natural science research. The capability of investigating molecular dynamics is one of the various motivations for ultrafast optics. We present our investigation of photoionization and nuclear dynamics in methyl iodine (CH3I molecule with an X-ray pump X-ray probe scheme. The pump–probe experiment was realized with a two-mirror X-ray split and delay apparatus. Time-of-flight mass spectra at various pump–probe delay times were recorded to obtain the time profile for the creation of high charge states via sequential ionization and for molecular dissociation. We observed high charge states of atomic iodine up to 29+, and visualized the evolution of creating these high atomic ion charge states, including their population suppression and enhancement as the arrival time of the second X-ray pulse was varied. We also show the evolution of the kinetics of the high charge states upon the timing of their creation during the ionization-dissociation coupled dynamics. We demonstrate the implementation of X-ray pump–probe methodology for investigating X-ray induced molecular dynamics with femtosecond temporal resolution. The results indicate the footprints of ionization that lead to high charge states, probing the long-range potential curves of the high charge states.

  4. Diversity of radioprobes targeted to tumor angiogenesis on molecular functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xia; Zhang Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular functional imaging could visualize, characterize, and measure the bio- logical processes including tumor angiogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The molecular probes labeled by a variety of radionuclide used in the field of the nuclear medicine play pivotal roles in molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the regulatory role of different probes in tumor angiogenesis has not been systematically illustrated. The current status of tumor angiogenesis imaging with radiolabeled probes of peptide, monoclonal antibody as well as its fragment, especially nanoparticle-based probes to gain insights into the robust tumor angiogenesis development were summarized. It was recognized that only the probes such as nanoparticle-based probes, which truly target the tumor vasculature rather than tumor cells because of poor extravasation, are really tumor angiogenesis imaging agent. The research of molecular probe targeted to angiogenesis would meet its flourish just after the outstanding improvements in the in vivo stability and biocompatibility, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of tumor angiogenesis imaging probes are made. Translation to clinical applications will also be critical for the maximize benefits of these novel agents. The future of tumor angiogenesis imaging lies in liable imaging probes and multiple imaging modalities, imaging of protein-protein interactions, and quantitative molecular imaging. (authors)

  5. Comparison of Langmuir probe and multipole resonance probe measurements in argon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen mixtures in a double ICP discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Oberberg, Moritz; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-07-01

    The results of a Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP) are compared to a Langmuir probe in measuring the electron density in Ar, H2, N2, and O2 mixtures. The MRP was designed for measurements in industry processes, i.e., coating or etching. To evaluate a possible influence on the MRP measurement due to molecular gases, different plasmas with increasing molecular gas content in a double inductively coupled plasma at 5 Pa and 10 Pa at 500 W are used. The determined electron densities from the MRP and the Langmuir probe slightly differ in H2 and N2 diluted argon plasmas, but diverge significantly with oxygen. In pure molecular gas plasmas, electron densities measured with the MRP are always higher than those measured with the Langmuir Probe, in particular, in oxygen containing mixtures. The differences can be attributed to etching of the tungsten wire in the Ar:O2 mixtures and rf distortion in the pure molecular discharges. The influence of a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function, negative ions or secondary electron emission seems to be of no or only minor importance.

  6. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  7. Computer modelling of eddy current probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    Computer programs have been developed for modelling impedance and transmit-receive eddy current probes in two-dimensional axis-symmetric configurations. These programs, which are based on analytic equations, simulate bobbin probes in infinitely long tubes and surface probes on plates. They calculate probe signal due to uniform variations in conductor thickness, resistivity and permeability. These signals depend on probe design and frequency. A finite element numerical program has been procured to calculate magnetic permeability in non-linear ferromagnetic materials. Permeability values from these calculations can be incorporated into the above analytic programs to predict signals from eddy current probes with permanent magnets in ferromagnetic tubes. These programs were used to test various probe designs for new testing applications. Measurements of magnetic permeability in magnetically biased ferromagnetic materials have been performed by superimposing experimental signals, from special laboratory ET probes, on impedance plane diagrams calculated using these programs. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs

  8. The time domain triple probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, M.A.; Hallock, G.A.; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    A new Langmuir probe technique based on the triple probe method is being developed to provide simultaneous measurement of plasma temperature, potential, and density with the temporal and spatial resolution required to accurately characterize plasma turbulence. When the conventional triple probe method is used in an inhomogeneous plasma, local differences in the plasma measured at each probe introduce significant error in the estimation of turbulence parameters. The Time Domain Triple Probe method (TDTP) uses high speed switching of Langmuir probe potential, rather than spatially separated probes, to gather the triple probe information thus avoiding these errors. Analysis indicates that plasma response times and recent electronics technology meet the requirements to implement the TDTP method. Data reduction techniques of TDTP data are to include linear and higher order correlation analysis to estimate fluctuation induced particle and thermal transport, as well as energy relationships between temperature, density, and potential fluctuations

  9. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes.

  10. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in foods, by a combination of PCR and DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingianni, A; Floris, M; Palomba, P; Madeddu, M A; Quartuccio, M; Pompei, R

    2001-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a frequent contaminant of water and foods. Its rapid detection is needed before some foods can be prepared for marketing. In this work L. monocytogenes has been searched for in foods, by a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a DNA probe. Both PCR and the probe were prepared for recognizing a specific region of the internalin gene, which is responsible for the production of one of the most important pathogenic factors of Listeria. The combined use of PCR and the DNA probe was used for the detection of L. monocytogenes in over 180 environmental and food samples. Several detection methods were compared in this study, namely conventional culture methods; direct PCR; PCR after an enrichment step; a DNA probe alone; a DNA probe after enrichment and another commercially available gene-probe. Finally PCR and the DNA probe were used in series on all the samples collected. When the DNA probe was associated with the PCR, specific and accurate detection of listeria in the samples could be obtained in about a working-day. The present molecular method showed some advantages in terms of rapidity and specificity in comparison to the other aforementioned tests. In addition, it resulted as being easy to handle, even for non-specialized personnel in small diagnostic microbiology laboratories. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Where do pulse oximeter probes break?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crede, S; Van der Merwe, G; Hutchinson, J; Woods, D; Karlen, W; Lawn, J

    2014-06-01

    Pulse oximetry, a non-invasive method for accurate assessment of blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), is an important monitoring tool in health care facilities. However, it is often not available in many low-resource settings, due to expense, overly sophisticated design, a lack of organised procurement systems and inadequate medical device management and maintenance structures. Furthermore medical devices are often fragile and not designed to withstand the conditions of low-resource settings. In order to design a probe, better suited to the needs of health care facilities in low-resource settings this study aimed to document the site and nature of pulse oximeter probe breakages in a range of different probe designs in a low to middle income country. A retrospective review of job cards relating to the assessment and repair of damaged or faulty pulse oximeter probes was conducted at a medical device repair company based in Cape Town, South Africa, specializing in pulse oximeter probe repairs. 1,840 job cards relating to the assessment and repair of pulse oximeter probes were reviewed. 60.2 % of probes sent for assessment were finger-clip probes. For all probes, excluding the neonatal wrap probes, the most common point of failure was the probe wiring (>50 %). The neonatal wrap most commonly failed at the strap (51.5 %). The total cost for quoting on the broken pulse oximeter probes and for the subsequent repair of devices, excluding replacement components, amounted to an estimated ZAR 738,810 (USD $98,508). Improving the probe wiring would increase the life span of pulse oximeter probes. Increasing the life span of probes will make pulse oximetry more affordable and accessible. This is of high priority in low-resource settings where frequent repair or replacement of probes is unaffordable or impossible.

  12. Probe-based recording technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naberhuis, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) prompted researchers to contemplate whether such technology could be used as the basis for the storage and retrieval of information. With magnetic data storage technology facing limits in storage density due to the thermal instability of magnetic bits, the super-paramagnetic limit, the heir-apparent for information storage at higher densities appeared to be variants of the STM or similar probe-based storage techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Among these other techniques that could provide replacement technology for magnetic storage, near-field optical scanning optical microscopy (NSOM or SNOM) has also been investigated. Another alternative probe-based storage technology called atomic resolution storage (ARS) is also currently under development. An overview of these various technologies is herein presented, with an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in each particularly with respect to reduced device dimensions. The role of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) is emphasized

  13. Solar Probe Cup: Laboratory Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Korreck, K. E.; Stevens, M. L.; Larson, D. E.; Wright, K. H., Jr.; Gallagher, D. L.; Whittlesey, P. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Solar Probe Cup (SPC) is a Faraday Cup instrument that will fly on the Paker Solar Probe (PSP) spacecraft, orbiting the Sun at as close as 9.86 solar radii. The SPC instrument is designed to measure the thermal solar wind plasma (protons, alphas, and electrons) that will be encountered throughout its close encounter with the Sun. Due to the solar wind flow being primarily radial, the SPC instrument is pointed directly at the Sun, resulting in an extreme thermal environment that must be tolerated throughout the primary data collection phase. Laboratory testing has been performed over the past 6 months to demonstrate the instrument's performance relative to its requirements, and to characterize the measurements over the expected thermal range. This presentation will demonstrate the performance of the instrument as measured in the lab, describe the operational configurations planned for flight, and discuss the data products that will be created.

  14. Electrostatic probes in luminescent discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Raposo, C. da.

    1980-01-01

    A system to produce luminescent type plasma by continuos discharge and ionization by high frequency was constructed. The ionization was done in the air and in the argon under pressures from 3 to 10 mmHg. The parameters of a non magnetized collisional plasma and the parameters of a magnetized plasma such as, density, eletron temperature and potential, using a Langmuir probe with plane geometry, were determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. DNA Probe for Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Hottinger, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognizes L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an α-32P-l...

  16. Atomic beams probe surface vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    In the last two years, surface scientist have begun trying to obtain the vibrational frequencies of surface atoms in both insulating and metallic crystals from beams of helium atoms. It is the inelastic scattering that researchers use to probe surface vibrations. Inelastic atomic beam scattering has only been used to obtain vibrational frequency spectra from clean surfaces. Several experiments using helium beams are cited. (SC)

  17. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  18. Lasers probe the atomic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.

    1986-01-01

    The article is contained in a booklet on the Revised Nuffield Advanced Physics Course, and concentrates on two techniques to illustrate how lasers probe the atomic nucleus. Both techniques employ resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for obtaining atomic transition energies. The first uses lasers to determine the change in the nuclear charge radius with isotope, the second concerns the use of lasers for ultrasensitive detection of isotopes and elements. The application of lasers in resonance ionization spectroscopy and proton decay is also described. (UK)

  19. Label-free biosensing with functionalized nanopipette probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Senkei; Karhanek, Miloslav; Davis, Ronald W; Pourmand, Nader

    2009-03-24

    Nanopipette technology can uniquely identify biomolecules such as proteins based on differences in size, shape, and electrical charge. These differences are determined by the detection of changes in ionic current as the proteins interact with the nanopipette tip coated with probe molecules. Here we show that electrostatic, biotin-streptavidin, and antibody-antigen interactions on the nanopipette tip surface affect ionic current flowing through a 50-nm pore. Highly charged polymers interacting with the glass surface modulated the rectification property of the nanopipette electrode. Affinity-based binding between the probes tethered to the surface and their target proteins caused a change in the ionic current due to a partial blockade or an altered surface charge. These findings suggest that nanopipettes functionalized with appropriate molecular recognition elements can be used as nanosensors in biomedical and biological research.

  20. Probing a gravitational cat state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastopoulos, C; Hu, B L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the nature of a gravitational two-state system (G2S) in the simplest setup in Newtonian gravity. In a quantum description of matter a single motionless massive particle can in principle be in a superposition state of two spatially separated locations. This superposition state in gravity, or gravitational cat state, would lead to fluctuations in the Newtonian force exerted on a nearby test particle. The central quantity of importance for this inquiry is the energy density correlation. This corresponds to the noise kernel in stochastic gravity theory, evaluated in the weak field nonrelativistic limit. In this limit quantum fluctuations of the stress–energy tensor manifest as the fluctuations of the Newtonian force. We describe the properties of such a G2S system and present two ways of measuring the cat state for the Newtonian force, one by way of a classical probe, the other a quantum harmonic oscillator. Our findings include: (i) mass density fluctuations persist even in single particle systems, and they are of the same order of magnitude as the mean; (ii) a classical probe generically records a non-Markovian fluctuating force; (iii) a quantum probe interacting with the G2S system may undergo Rabi oscillations in a strong coupling regime. This simple prototypical gravitational quantum system could provide a robust testing ground to compare predictions from alternative quantum theories, since the results reported here are based on standard quantum mechanics and classical gravity. (paper)

  1. The Van Allen Probes mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, James

    2014-01-01

    This collection of articles provides broad and detailed information about NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin-spacecraft Earth-orbiting mission. The mission has the objective of achieving predictive understanding of the dynamic, intense, energetic, dangerous, and presently unpredictable belts of energetic particles that are magnetically trapped in Earth’s space environment above the atmosphere. It documents the science of the radiation belts and the societal benefits of achieving predictive understanding. Detailed information is provided about the Van Allen Probes mission design, the spacecraft, the science investigations, and the onboard instrumentation that must all work together to make unprecedented measurements within a most unforgiving environment, the core of Earth’s most intense radiation regions.
 This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in space science, solar-terrestrial interactions and studies of the up...

  2. Tools to probe the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.; Augueres, J.L.; Amiaux, J.; Cara, Ch.; Fontignie, J.; Rio, Y.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; De Vismes, A.; Cordier, B.; Fesquet, M.; Ferrando, Ph.; Authier, M.; Pantin, E.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Boulade, O.; Refregier, A.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Agnese, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Agnese, P.; Pigot, C.; Duband, L.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Carton, P.H.; Starck, J.L.; Bournaud, F.; Teyssier, R.; Audit, E.; Brun, A.S.; Leca, P.; Menache, Ch.; Pomarede, D.; Thooris, B.; Meis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This special issue of Clefs CEA journal is entirely devoted to astrophysics and to the exploration and probing of the Universe. The second part of this dossier, described here, makes a status of the tools used to probe the universe: telescopes, imaging spectrometers, data processing and simulation. Content: A - Telescopes of the future: 1. Seeing further out: JWST: looking back on a past 13 billion years old, Space specifics: the learning curve to know-how, Fabricating a corona-graph mask, SVOM, a satellite to detect the explosions of the first stars to be formed in the Universe; 2. Seeing more precisely: SIMBOL-X, pioneering formation flying, ELT/METIS, a 42-meter giant, One hundred telescopes for the CTA arrays; 3. Seeing wider: Euclid, mapping the extragalactic sky, ANTARES: the neutrino, another cosmic messenger; B - The new generation of imaging spectrometers: Observing the Universe in the submillimeter spectral region, The X-ray Universe, Space cryo-coolers, Out in the extreme, tumultuous Universe, Probing the Sun with GOLF-NG, Focus: From light to imagery; C - Data analysis in astrophysics; D - Numerical simulation in astrophysics: Information technology and theoretical predictions in astrophysics, Supercomputers for a better understanding of the Universe, The visualization of astrophysical simulations, Godunov, a numerical platform for education and research

  3. A computerized Langmuir probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilling, L.S.; Bydder, E.L.; Carnegie, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    For low pressure plasmas it is important to record entire single or double Langmuir probe characteristics accurately. For plasmas with a depleted high energy tail, the accuracy of the recorded ion current plays a critical role in determining the electron temperature. Even for high density Maxwellian distributions, it is necessary to accurately model the ion current to obtain the correct electron density. Since the electron and ion current saturation values are, at best, orders of magnitude apart, a single current sensing resistor cannot provide the required resolution to accurately record these values. We present an automated, personal computer based data acquisition system for the determination of fundamental plasma properties in low pressure plasmas. The system is designed for single and double Langmuir probes, whose characteristics can be recorded over a bias voltage range of ±70 V with 12 bit resolution. The current flowing through the probes can be recorded within the range of 5 nA-100 mA. The use of a transimpedance amplifier for current sensing eliminates the requirement for traditional current sensing resistors and hence the need to correct the raw data. The large current recording range is realized through the use of a real time gain switching system in the negative feedback loop of the transimpedance amplifier

  4. A computerized Langmuir probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, L. S.; Bydder, E. L.; Carnegie, D. A.

    2003-07-01

    For low pressure plasmas it is important to record entire single or double Langmuir probe characteristics accurately. For plasmas with a depleted high energy tail, the accuracy of the recorded ion current plays a critical role in determining the electron temperature. Even for high density Maxwellian distributions, it is necessary to accurately model the ion current to obtain the correct electron density. Since the electron and ion current saturation values are, at best, orders of magnitude apart, a single current sensing resistor cannot provide the required resolution to accurately record these values. We present an automated, personal computer based data acquisition system for the determination of fundamental plasma properties in low pressure plasmas. The system is designed for single and double Langmuir probes, whose characteristics can be recorded over a bias voltage range of ±70 V with 12 bit resolution. The current flowing through the probes can be recorded within the range of 5 nA-100 mA. The use of a transimpedance amplifier for current sensing eliminates the requirement for traditional current sensing resistors and hence the need to correct the raw data. The large current recording range is realized through the use of a real time gain switching system in the negative feedback loop of the transimpedance amplifier.

  5. Institute for Molecular Medicine Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, Michael E [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-12-14

    The objectives of the project are the development of new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging instrumentation, chemistry technology platforms and new molecular imaging probes to examine the transformations from normal cellular and biological processes to those of disease in pre-clinical animal models. These technology platforms and imaging probes provide the means to: 1. Study the biology of disease using pre-clinical mouse models and cells. 2. Develop molecular imaging probes for imaging assays of proteins in pre-clinical models. 3. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models to provide to other scientists the means to guide and improve the processes for discovering new drugs. 4. Develop imaging assays in pre-clinical models for others to use in judging the impact of drugs on the biology of disease.

  6. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  7. Measuring the mechanical properties of molecular conformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, S. P.; Taylor, S.; Baran, J. D.; Champness, N. R.; Larsson, J. A.; Moriarty, P.

    2015-09-01

    Scanning probe-actuated single molecule manipulation has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for the systematic atomic-scale interrogation of molecular adsorbates. To date, however, the extent to which molecular conformation affects the force required to push or pull a single molecule has not been explored. Here we probe the mechanochemical response of two tetra(4-bromophenyl)porphyrin conformers using non-contact atomic force microscopy where we find a large difference between the lateral forces required for manipulation. Remarkably, despite sharing very similar adsorption characteristics, variations in the potential energy surface are capable of prohibiting probe-induced positioning of one conformer, while simultaneously permitting manipulation of the alternative conformational form. Our results are interpreted in the context of dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations which reveal significant differences in the diffusion barriers for each conformer. These results demonstrate that conformational variation significantly modifies the mechanical response of even simple porpyhrins, potentially affecting many other flexible molecules.

  8. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botnar, R.M.; Ebersberger, H.; Noerenberg, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  9. Influence of probe geometry on the response of an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1999-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe is examined with reference to the probe geometry. The study involves the evaluation of the probe lambda function, from which response-related characteristic parameters can be derived. These parameters enable the probe detection sensitivity Se and spatial...

  10. Molecular Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid...

  11. Molecular genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.R.; Krontiris, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    In this chapter the authors review new findings concerning the molecular genetics of malignant melanoma in the context of other information obtained from clinical, epidemiologic, and cytogenetic studies in this malignancy. These new molecular approaches promise to provide a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of melanoma, thereby suggesting new methods for its treatment and prevention

  12. Molecular Modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 5. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular Docking. Rama Rao Nadendla. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 51-60. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Electromechanical response of amorphous LaAlO{sub 3} thin film probed by scanning probe microscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowiak, Alexis S.; Baboux, Nicolas; Albertini, David; Gautier, Brice, E-mail: brice.gautier@insa-lyon.fr [Institut des nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, Université de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270, 7 Avenue Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Vilquin, Bertrand; Saint Girons, Guillaume; Pelloquin, Sylvain [Institut des nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Université de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5270, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongues, F-69134 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2014-07-07

    The electromechanical response of a 3 nm thick amorphous LaAlO{sub 3} layer obtained by molecular beam epitaxy has been studied using scanning probe microscopies. Although this kind of sample is not ferroelectric due to its amorphous nature, the resulting images are identical to what is generally obtained on truly ferroelectric samples probed by piezoresponse force microscopy: domains of apparently opposite polarisation are detected, and perfect, square shaped hysteresis loops are recorded. Moreover, written patterns are stable within 72 h. We discuss in the general case the possible origins of this behaviour in terms of charge injection, ionic conduction and motion of oxygen vacancies. In the case presented in this paper, since the writing process has been conducted with applied voltages lower than the injection threshold measured by conductive atomic force Microscopy, allowing to withdraw the hypothesis of charge injection in the sample, we propose that a bistable distribution of oxygen vacancies is responsible for this contrast.

  14. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  15. Molecular Genetics Techniques to Develop New Treatments for Brain Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Jacob; Fathallan-Shaykh, Hassan

    2006-09-22

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to devise novel molecular gene therapies for malignant brain tumors, (2) advance our understanding of the immune system in the central nervous system; and (3) apply genomics to find molecular probes to diagnose brain tumors, predict prognosis, biological behavior and their response to treatment.

  16. Quantifying transition voltage spectroscopy of molecular junctions: Ab initio calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jingzhe; Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    Transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) has recently been introduced as a spectroscopic tool for molecular junctions where it offers the possibility to probe molecular level energies at relatively low bias voltages. In this work we perform extensive ab initio calculations of the nonlinear current...

  17. PEGylated Red-Emitting Calcium Probe with Improved Sensing Properties for Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsot, Flavien; Shen, Weida; Ashokkumar, Pichandi; Audinat, Etienne; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Collot, Mayeul

    2017-11-22

    Monitoring calcium concentration in the cytosol is of main importance as this ion drives many biological cascades within the cell. To this end, molecular calcium probes are widely used. Most of them, especially the red emitting probes, suffer from nonspecific interactions with inner membranes due to the hydrophobic nature of their fluorophore. To circumvent this issue, calcium probes conjugated to dextran can be used to enhance the hydrophilicity and reduce the nonspecific interaction and compartmentalization. However, dextran conjugates also feature important drawbacks including lower affinity, lower dynamic range, and slow diffusion. Herein, we combined the advantage of molecular probes and dextran conjugate without their drawbacks by designing a new red emitting turn-on calcium probe based on PET quenching, Rhod-PEG, in which the rhodamine fluorophore bears four PEG 4 units. This modification led to a high affinity calcium probe (K d = 748 nM) with reduced nonspecific interactions, enhanced photostability, two-photon absorbance, and brightness compared to the commercially available Rhod-2. After spectral characterizations, we showed that Rhod-PEG quickly and efficiently diffused through the dendrites of pyramidal neurons with an enhanced sensitivity (ΔF/F 0 ) at shorter time after patching compared to Rhod-2.

  18. Astrophysical interpretation of molecular spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoville, N.Z.

    1984-01-01

    As sensitive, high resolution spectrometers are developed throughout the infrared great progress is anticipated in understanding not only the young-stellar objects but also the active galaxy nuclei so luminous in the far-infrared. In the infrared the variety of atomic and molecular spectroscopic transitions is capable of probing conditions ranging from hot circumstellar HII regions, molecular envelopes, and shock fronts at > 2000 K down to cold, low density interstellar gas at < 10 K. The ability to measure both physical conditions and kinematics aids in the separation of the physical regimes and in the building of a coherent dynamic/evolutionary model. The author briefly reviews the characteristics of some of the observed molecular transitions and theoretical considerations important for understanding their excitation. (Auth.)

  19. TORE SUPRA fast reciprocating radio frequency probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.E. Jr.; Harris, J.H.; Haste, G.R.; Kwon, M.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Saoutic, B.; Becoulet, A.; Fraboulet, D.; Beaumont, B.; Kuus, H.; Ladurelle, L.; Pascal, J.Y.

    1995-01-01

    A fast reciprocating ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) probe was installed and operated on TORE SUPRA during 1992/1993. The body of the probe was originally used on the ATF experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The probe was adapted for use on TORE SUPRA, and mounted on one of the two fast reciprocating probe mounts. The probe consists of two orthogonal single-turn wire loops, mounted so that one loop senses toroidal rf magnetic fields and the other senses poloidal rf magnetic fields. The probe began operation in June, 1993. The probe active area is approximately 5 cm long by 2 cm, and the reciprocating mount has a slow stroke (5 cm/s) of 30 cm and a fast stroke (1.5 m/s) of about 10 cm. The probe was operated at distances from the plasma edge ranging from 30 to -5 cm (i.e., inside the last closed flux surface). The probe design, electronics, calibration, data acquisition, and data processing are discussed. First data from the probe are presented as a function of ICRF power, distance from the plasma, loop orientation, and other plasma parameters. Initial data show parametric instabilities do not play an important role for ICRF in the TORE SUPRA edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasmas. Additionally it is observed that the probe signal has little or no dependence on position in the SOL/plasma edge

  20. Development of X-ray excitable luminescent probes for scanning X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moronne, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Transmission soft X-ray microscopy is now capable of achieving resolutions that are typically 5 times better than the best-visible light microscopes. With expected improvements in zone plate optics, an additional factor of two may be realized within the next few years. Despite the high resolution now available with X-ray microscopes and the high X-ray contrast provided by biological molecules in the soft X-ray region (λ=2-5 nm), molecular probes for localizing specific biological targets have been lacking. To circumvent this problem, X-ray excitable molecular probes are needed that can target unique biological features. In this paper we report our initial results on the development of lanthanide-based fluorescent probes for biological labeling. Using scanning luminescence X-ray microscopy (SLXM, Jacobsen et al., J. Microscopy 172 (1993) 121-129), we show that lanthanide organo-polychelate complexes are sufficiently bright and radiation resistant to be the basis of a new class of X-ray excitable molecular probes capable of providing at least a fivefold improvement in resolution over visible light microscopy. Lanthanide probes, able to bind 80-100 metal ions per molecule, were found to give strong luminescent signals with X-ray doses exceeding 10 8 Gy, and were used to label actin stress fibers and in vitro preparations of polymerized tubulin. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Aspheric surface measurement using capacitive probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xin; Yuan, Daocheng; Li, Shaobo

    2017-02-01

    With the application of aspheres in optical fields, high precision and high efficiency aspheric surface metrology becomes a hot research topic. We describe a novel method of non-contact measurement of aspheric surface with capacitive probe. Taking an eccentric spherical surface as the object of study, the averaging effect of capacitive probe measurement and the influence of tilting the capacitive probe on the measurement results are investigated. By comparing measurement results from simultaneous measurement of the capacitive probe and contact probe of roundness instrument, this paper indicates the feasibility of using capacitive probes to test aspheric surface and proposes the compensation method of measurement error caused by averaging effect and the tilting of the capacitive probe.

  2. Brownian motion probe for water-ethanol inhomogeneous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kazuki; Judai, Ken

    2017-12-01

    Brownian motion provides information regarding the microscopic geometry and motion of molecules, insofar as it occurs as a result of molecular collisions with a colloid particle. We found that the mobility of polystyrene beads from the Brownian motion in a water-ethanol mixture is larger than that predicted from the liquid shear viscosity. This indicates that mixing water and ethanol is inhomogeneous in micron-sized probe beads. The discrepancy between the mobility of Brownian motion and liquid mobility can be explained by the way the rotation of the beads in an inhomogeneous viscous solvent converts the translational movement.

  3. Scanning Hall probe microscopy of a diluted magnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Seongsoo; Samarth, Nitin; Lozanne, Alex de

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the micromagnetic properties of a diluted magnetic semiconductor as a function of temperature and applied field with a scanning Hall probe microscope built in our laboratory. The design philosophy for this microscope and some details are described. The samples analyzed in this work are Ga 0.94 Mn 0.06 As films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the magnetic domains are 2-4 μm wide and fairly stable with temperature. Magnetic clusters are observed above T C , which we ascribe to MnAs defects too small and sparse to be detected by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

  4. Scanning Hall probe microscopy of a diluted magnetic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Seongsoo; Samarth, Nitin; de Lozanne, Alex

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the micromagnetic properties of a diluted magnetic semiconductor as a function of temperature and applied field with a scanning Hall probe microscope built in our laboratory. The design philosophy for this microscope and some details are described. The samples analyzed in this work are Ga0.94Mn0.06As films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the magnetic domains are 2-4 μm wide and fairly stable with temperature. Magnetic clusters are observed above TC, which we ascribe to MnAs defects too small and sparse to be detected by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

  5. Molecular photoionization studies of nucleobases and correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poliakoff, Erwin D. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    We proposed molecular photoionization studies in order to probe correlated events in fundamental scattering phenomena. In particular, we suggested that joint theoretical-experimental studies would provide a window into the microscopic aspects that are of central importance in AMO and chemical physics generally, and would generate useful data for wide array of important DOE topics, such as ultrafast dynamics, high harmonic generation, and probes of nonadiabatic processes. The unifying theme is that correlations between electron scattering dynamics and molecular geometry highlight inherently molecular aspects of the photoelectron behavior.

  6. Gamma-Ray Imaging Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Walter James

    1988-12-01

    External nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging of early primary and metastatic lung cancer tumors is difficult due to the poor sensitivity and resolution of existing gamma cameras. Nonimaging counting detectors used for internal tumor detection give ambiguous results because distant background variations are difficult to discriminate from neighboring tumor sites. This suggests that an internal imaging nuclear medicine probe, particularly an esophageal probe, may be advantageously used to detect small tumors because of the ability to discriminate against background variations and the capability to get close to sites neighboring the esophagus. The design, theory of operation, preliminary bench tests, characterization of noise behavior and optimization of such an imaging probe is the central theme of this work. The central concept lies in the representation of the aperture shell by a sequence of binary digits. This, coupled with the mode of operation which is data encoding within an axial slice of space, leads to the fundamental imaging equation in which the coding operation is conveniently described by a circulant matrix operator. The coding/decoding process is a classic coded-aperture problem, and various estimators to achieve decoding are discussed. Some estimators require a priori information about the object (or object class) being imaged; the only unbiased estimator that does not impose this requirement is the simple inverse-matrix operator. The effects of noise on the estimate (or reconstruction) is discussed for general noise models and various codes/decoding operators. The choice of an optimal aperture for detector count times of clinical relevance is examined using a statistical class-separability formalism.

  7. Design and application of noncontinuously binding probes used for haplotyping and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont-Kingdon, Genevieve; Margraf, Rebecca L; Sumner, Kelli; Millson, Alison; Lyon, Elaine; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2008-06-01

    Many methods for genotyping use melting temperature (Tm) of sequence-specific probes. Usually the probes hybridize to a continuous stretch of DNA that contains the variant(s). In contrast, hybridization of noncontinuous probes to a template can form bulges. This report generates guidelines for the design of noncontinuous probes. We used software to predict hybridization structures and Tms from 10 noncontinuous probes and 54 different templates. Predicted Tms were compared to existing experimental data. The bulging template's sequences (omitted in the probe) ranged in size from 1 to 73 nucleotides. In 36 cases, we compared observed and predicted DeltaTms between alleles complementary to the probe and mismatched alleles. In addition, using software that predicts effects of bulges, we designed a probe and then tested it experimentally. The mean differences between predicted and observed Tms were 0.65 (2.51) degrees C with the Visual OMP software and 0.28 (1.67) degrees C with the MeltCalc software. DeltaTms were within a mean (SD) of 0.36 (1.23) degrees C (Visual OMP) and -0.01 (1.02) degrees C (MeltCalc) of observed values. An increase in the size of the template bulge resulted in a decrease in Tms. In 2 templates, the presence of a variant in the bulge influenced the experimental Tm of 2 noncontinuous probes, a result that was not predicted by the software programs. The use of software prediction should prove useful for the design of noncontinuous probes that can be used as tools for molecular haplotyping, multiplex genotyping, or masking sequence variants.

  8. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  9. Active Probing of Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    ft. shuttle wake mlay also a kect the optration (if mi’:nc di.tg. Ibk Prwwattr of ,frttirw 844 I. %rvaom ’itbi h" $od iy radlet 6�va of IkeA dtm t...probe had a specially designed inner shaft caused by the existence of some ballistic electrons after made with .pring sleel tubing. By externally...potential to the electron thermal energy i(s distances downstream of the body (see Fig. 1). This (e OIT,) was on the order of 10 in steady state. design

  10. Astrophysical probes of fundamental physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, C.J.A.P.

    2009-01-01

    I review the motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible to experiment. I highlight the current controversial evidence for varying couplings and present some new results. Finally I focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements might be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with some advantages over standard methods. In particular I discuss what can be achieved with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  11. Astrophysical probes of fundamental physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, C.J.A.P. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    I review the motivation for varying fundamental couplings and discuss how these measurements can be used to constrain fundamental physics scenarios that would otherwise be inaccessible to experiment. I highlight the current controversial evidence for varying couplings and present some new results. Finally I focus on the relation between varying couplings and dark energy, and explain how varying coupling measurements might be used to probe the nature of dark energy, with some advantages over standard methods. In particular I discuss what can be achieved with future spectrographs such as ESPRESSO and CODEX.

  12. Probing nuclear structure with nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, E.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this lecture is to show how nucleon scattering can be used to probe the structure of target nuclei, and how nucleon scattering observables can be interpreted in terms of nuclear structure using microscopic optical potentials. After a brief overview of the specificities of nucleon-nucleus scattering, and a quick reminder on scattering theory, the main part of this lecture is devoted to the construction of optical potentials in which the target nuclei structure information is folded with an effective interaction. Several examples of such microscopic optical model potentials are given. (author)

  13. Calculation of vibrational shifts of nitrile probes in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase upon ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, Joshua P; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-01-16

    The vibrational Stark effect provides insight into the roles of hydrogen bonding, electrostatics, and conformational motions in enzyme catalysis. In a recent application of this approach to the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), thiocyanate probes were introduced in site-specific positions throughout the active site. This paper implements a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach for calculating the vibrational shifts of nitrile (CN) probes in proteins. This methodology is shown to reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational shifts upon binding of the intermediate analogue equilinen to KSI for two different nitrile probe positions. Analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations provides atomistic insight into the roles that key residues play in determining the electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bonding interactions experienced by the nitrile probe. For the M116C-CN probe, equilinen binding reorients an active-site water molecule that is directly hydrogen-bonded to the nitrile probe, resulting in a more linear C≡N--H angle and increasing the CN frequency upon binding. For the F86C-CN probe, equilinen binding orients the Asp103 residue, decreasing the hydrogen-bonding distance between the Asp103 backbone and the nitrile probe and slightly increasing the CN frequency. This QM/MM methodology is applicable to a wide range of biological systems and has the potential to assist in the elucidation of the fundamental principles underlying enzyme catalysis.

  14. Controlled Clustering of Gold Nanoparticles using Solid-support for Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyejin; Chae, Jinjoo; Jeong, Hong; Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoonsik

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated small clusters of gold nanoparticles by using solid-supported aggregation of gold nanoparticles. The fabricated Au nanoclusters consisting mainly of dimers showed homogeneous characteristics in cluster size and SERS intensity. The SERS enhancement of 4-ABT molecules in an effective area within 2-nm gap appeared to be approximately 10. Detachment process by ultrasonication was successively carried out in order to use the nanoclusters as SERS probes. The possibility of these clusters as SERS probe was proved in terms of signal and cluster size. Single molecule-level sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was known approximately fifteen years ago. Ever since there have been many different applications benefiting from the ultra-high sensitivity such as single molecule detection, chemical sensing and bio-molecular probes. Especially, SERS has drawn much attention in bio-multiplexing probes owing to its unique optical characteristics claiming extremely narrow bandwidth, high sensitivity of light signals, and non-bleaching feature

  15. Spectrally-resolved response properties of the three most advanced FRET based fluorescent protein voltage probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Mutoh

    Full Text Available Genetically-encoded optical probes for membrane potential hold the promise of monitoring electrical signaling of electrically active cells such as specific neuronal populations in intact brain tissue. The most advanced class of these probes was generated by molecular fusion of the voltage sensing domain (VSD of Ci-VSP with a fluorescent protein (FP pair. We quantitatively compared the three most advanced versions of these probes (two previously reported and one new variant, each involving a spectrally distinct tandem of FPs. Despite these different FP tandems and dissimilarities within the amino acid sequence linking the VSD to the FPs, the amplitude and kinetics of voltage dependent fluorescence changes were surprisingly similar. However, each of these fluorescent probes has specific merits when considering different potential applications.

  16. Controlled Clustering of Gold Nanoparticles using Solid-support for Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hyejin; Chae, Jinjoo; Jeong, Hong [Department of Chemistry Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoonsik [Interdisciplinary Program in Nano-Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We fabricated small clusters of gold nanoparticles by using solid-supported aggregation of gold nanoparticles. The fabricated Au nanoclusters consisting mainly of dimers showed homogeneous characteristics in cluster size and SERS intensity. The SERS enhancement of 4-ABT molecules in an effective area within 2-nm gap appeared to be approximately 10. Detachment process by ultrasonication was successively carried out in order to use the nanoclusters as SERS probes. The possibility of these clusters as SERS probe was proved in terms of signal and cluster size. Single molecule-level sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was known approximately fifteen years ago. Ever since there have been many different applications benefiting from the ultra-high sensitivity such as single molecule detection, chemical sensing and bio-molecular probes. Especially, SERS has drawn much attention in bio-multiplexing probes owing to its unique optical characteristics claiming extremely narrow bandwidth, high sensitivity of light signals, and non-bleaching feature.

  17. Probing the RAFT process using a model reaction between alkoxyamine and dithioester

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.

    2012-01-01

    A small-molecular model reaction was designed to probe the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process. In this reaction, alkoxyamine releases radicals that react in situ with dithioester through the RAFT process, generating new radicals through the fragmentation of the

  18. Environmentally sensitive probes for monitoring protein-membrane interactions at nanomolar concentrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shvadchak, Volodymyr V.; Kucherak, Oleksandr; Afitska, Kseniia; Dziuba, D.; Yushchenko, Dmytro A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1859, č. 5 (2017), s. 852-859 ISSN 0005-2736 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : solvatochromic probes * fluorescence * protein-membrane interaction * affinity * binding stoichiometry * alpha-synuclein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  19. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron......, however, was obtained by a study of a single molecular transistor. The investigated OPE5-TTF compound was captured in a three-terminal experiment, whereby manipulation of the molecule’s electronic spin was possible in different charge states. Thus, we demonstrated how the cruciform molecules could...

  20. Molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The research in molecular sciences summarized includes photochemistry, radiation chemistry, geophysics, electromechanics, heavy-element oxidizers , heavy element chemistry collisions, atoms, organic solids. A list of publications is included