WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellulose synthase-like genes

  1. Functional genomic analysis supports conservation of function among cellulose synthase-like a gene family members and suggests diverse roles of mannans in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liepman, Aaron H; Nairn, C Joseph; Willats, William G T;

    2007-01-01

    Mannan polysaccharides are widespread among plants, where they serve as structural elements in cell walls, as carbohydrate reserves, and potentially perform other important functions. Previous work has demonstrated that members of the cellulose synthase-like A (CslA) family of glycosyltransferases...... from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), guar (Cyamopsis tetragonolobus), and Populus trichocarpa catalyze beta-1,4-mannan and glucomannan synthase reactions in vitro. Mannan polysaccharides and homologs of CslA genes appear to be present in all lineages of land plants analyzed to date. In many plants......, the CslA genes are members of extended multigene families; however, it is not known whether all CslA proteins are glucomannan synthases. CslA proteins from diverse land plant species, including representatives of the mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms, gymnosperms, and bryophytes, were produced in...

  2. Functional analysis of the cellulose synthase-like genes CSLD1, CSLD2 and CSLD4 in tip-growing arabidopsis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Yoo, Cheol-Min; Mutwil, Marek;

    2008-01-01

    A reverse genetic approach was used to investigate the functions of three members of the cellulose synthase superfamily in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE D1 (CSLD1), CSLD2, and CSLD4. CSLD2 is required for normal root hair growth but has a different role from that...... previously described for CSLD3 (KOJAK). CSLD2 is required during a later stage of hair development than CSLD3, and CSLD2 mutants produce root hairs with a range of abnormalities, with many root hairs rupturing late in development. Remarkably, though, it was often the case that in CSLD2 mutants, tip growth...... would resume after rupturing of root hairs. In silico, semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and promoter-reporter construct analyses indicated that the expression of both CSLD2 and CSLD3 is elevated at reduced temperatures, and the phenotypes of mutants homozygous for...

  3. A cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jianhua

    2010-04-16

    Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought stress significantly affects plant growth and development, but osmotic stress sensing and tolerance mechanisms are not well understood. Forward genetic screens using a root-bending assay have previously identified salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants of Arabidopsis that fall into five loci, SOS1 to SOS5. These loci are required for the regulation of ion homeostasis or cell expansion under salt stress, but do not play a major role in plant tolerance to the osmotic stress component of soil salinity or drought. Here we report an additional sos mutant, sos6-1, which defines a locus essential for osmotic stress tolerance. sos6-1 plants are hypersensitive to salt stress and osmotic stress imposed by mannitol or polyethylene glycol in culture media or by water deficit in the soil. SOS6 encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD5. Only modest differences in cell wall chemical composition could be detected, but we found that sos6-1 mutant plants accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under osmotic stress and are hypersensitive to the oxidative stress reagent methyl viologen. The results suggest that SOS6/AtCSLD5 is not required for normal plant growth and development but has a critical role in osmotic stress tolerance and this function likely involves its regulation of ROS under stress. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The CELLULOSE-SYNTHASE LIKE C (CSLC) Family of Barley Includes Members that Are Integral Membrane Proteins Targeted to the Plasma Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenny M. Dwivany; Dina Yuli; Rachel A. Burton; Neil J. Shirley; Sarah M. Wilson; Geoffrey B. Fincher; Antony Bacic; Ed Newbigin; Monika S. Doblin

    2009-01-01

    The CELLULOSESYNTHASE-LIKE C(CSLC) family is an ancient lineage within the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE/CEL-LULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE (CESA/CSL) polysaccharide synthase superfamily that is thought to have arisen before the diver-gence of mosses and vascular plants. As studies in the flowering plant Arabidopsis have suggested synthesis of the (1,4)-β-glucan backbone of xyloglucan (XyG), a wall polysaccharide that tethers adjacent cellulose microfibrils to each other, as a probable function for the CSLCs, CSLC function was investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), a species with low amounts of XyG in its walls. Four barley CSLC genes were identified (designated HvCSLC1-4). Phylogenetic analysis reveals three well supported clades of CSLCs in flowering plants, with barley having representatives in two of these clades. The four barley CSLCs were expressed in various tissues, with in situ PCR detecting transcripts in all cell types of the coleoptile and root, including cells with primary and secondary cell walls. Co-expression analysis showed that HvCSLC3 was coor-dinately expressed with putative XyG xylosyltransferase genes. Both immuno-EM and membrane fractionation showed that HvCSLC2 was located in the plasma membrane of barley suspension-cultured cells and was not in internal membranes such as endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. Based on our current knowledge of the sub-cellular locations of poly-saccharide synthesis, we conclude that the CSLC family probably contains more than one type of polysaccharide synthase.

  5. An anther-specific chalcone synthase-like gene D5 related to rice pollen development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It was shown in a previous analysis that D5 gene from rice (Oryza sativa L.) was an anther-specific gene encoding a chalcone synthase-related protein. In this study, D5 gene was found specifically expressed in tapetum cells as well as in the peripheral cells of the vascular bundle of rice anthers by RNA in situ hybridization. In order to study its function, D5 was transformed into rice in both sense and antisense directions driven by a rice Actin 1 promoter. It has been observed that the pollen grains from the antisense D5 transgenic rice plants are abnormal, indicating that D5 plays a critical role in rice pollen development.

  6. Functional analyses of a flavonol synthase - like gene from Camellia nitidissima reveal its roles in flavonoid metabolism during floral pigmentation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xing-Wen Zhou; Zheng-Qi Fan; Yue Chen; Yu-Lin Zhu; Ji-Yuan Li; Heng-Fu Yin

    2013-09-01

    The flavonoids metabolic pathway plays central roles in floral coloration, in which anthocyanins and flavonols are derived from common precursors, dihydroflavonols. Flavonol synthase (FLS) catalyses dihydroflavonols into flavonols, which presents a key branch of anthocyanins biosynthesis. The yellow flower of Camellia nitidissima Chi. is a unique feature within the genus Camellia, which makes it a precious resource for breeding yellow camellia varieties. In this work, we characterized the secondary metabolites of pigments during floral development of C. nitidissima and revealed that accumulation of flavonols correlates with floral coloration. We first isolated CnFLS1 and showed that it is a FLS of C. nitidissima by gene family analysis. Second, expression analysis during floral development and different floral organs indicated that the expression level of CnFLS1 was regulated by developmental cues, which was in agreement with the accumulating pattern of flavonols. Furthermore, over-expression of CnFLS1 in Nicotiana tabacum altered floral colour into white or light yellow, and metabolic analysis showed significant increasing of flavonols and reducing of anthocyanins in transgenic plants. Our work suggested CnFLS1 plays critical roles in yellow colour pigmentation and is potentially a key point of genetic engineering toward colour modification in Camellia.

  7. Attenuation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Disruption of a mas-Like Gene or a Chalcone Synthase-Like Gene, Which Causes Deficiency in Dimycocerosyl Phthiocerol Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sirakova, Tatiana D.; Dubey, Vinod S.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading preventable causes of death. Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis makes the discovery of new targets for antimycobacterial drugs critical. The unique mycobacterial cell wall lipids are known to play an important role in pathogenesis, and therefore the genes responsible for their biosynthesis offer potential new targets. To assess the possible role of some of the genes potentially involved in cell wall lipid synthesis, we disrupted a mas-like gene, msl7, ...

  8. Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellulose properties and structure are reviewed, with a primary focus on crystal structure and polymorphy. This focus highlights the conversion from cellulose I to cellulose II, which converts the molecules to being all parallel to each other in the crystal to being antiparallel. This has been co...

  9. Functional analyses of cellulose synthase genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantreau, Maxime; Chabbert, Brigitte; Billiard, Sylvain; Hawkins, Simon; Neutelings, Godfrey

    2015-12-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum) bast fibres are located in the stem cortex where they play an important role in mechanical support. They contain high amounts of cellulose and so are used for linen textiles and in the composite industry. In this study, we screened the annotated flax genome and identified 14 distinct cellulose synthase (CESA) genes using orthologous sequences previously identified. Transcriptomics of 'primary cell wall' and 'secondary cell wall' flax CESA genes showed that some were preferentially expressed in different organs and stem tissues providing clues as to their biological role(s) in planta. The development for the first time in flax of a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach was used to functionally evaluate the biological role of different CESA genes in stem tissues. Quantification of transcript accumulation showed that in many cases, silencing not only affected targeted CESA clades, but also had an impact on other CESA genes. Whatever the targeted clade, inactivation by VIGS affected plant growth. In contrast, only clade 1- and clade 6-targeted plants showed modifications in outer-stem tissue organization and secondary cell wall formation. In these plants, bast fibre number and structure were severely impacted, suggesting that the targeted genes may play an important role in the establishment of the fibre cell wall. Our results provide new fundamental information about cellulose biosynthesis in flax that should facilitate future plant improvement/engineering. PMID:25688574

  10. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  11. Cloning,Characterization,and Gene Annotation of Cellulose Synthase Genes from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BALASUBRAMANI G; AMUDHA J; KATEGERI I S; KHADI B M

    2008-01-01

    @@ The mechanistic basis of cellulose biosynthesis in plants has gained ground during last decade or so.The isolation of plant eDNA clones encoding cotton homologs of the bacterial cellulose synthase catalytic subunit was a significant achievement,which promises the elucidation of cellulose biosynthesis.

  12. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  13. Identifying the catalytic components of cellulose synthase and the maize mixed-linkage beta-glucan synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas C Carpita

    2009-04-20

    Five specific objectives of this project are to develop strategies to identify the genes that encode the catalytic components of "mixed-linkage" (1→3),(1→4)-beta-D-glucans in grasses, to determine the protein components of the synthase complex, and determine the biochemical mechanism of synthesis. We have used proteomic approaches to define intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of Golgi membranes that are associated with polysaccharide synthesis and trafficking. We were successful in producing recombinant catalytic domains of cellulose synthase genes and discovered that they dimerize upon concentration, indicating that two CesA proteins form the catalytic unit. We characterized a brittle stalk2 mutant as a defect in a COBRA-like protein that results in compromised lignin-cellulose interactions that decrease tissue flexibility. We used virus-induced gene silencing of barley cell wall polysaccharide synthesis by BSMV in an attempt to silence specific members of the cellulose synthase-like gene family. However, we unexpectedly found that regardless of the specificity of the target gene, whole gene interaction networks were silenced. We discovered the cause to be an antisense transcript of the cellulose synthase gene initiated small interfering RNAs that spread silencing to related genes.

  14. Noise Making Genes in the Oxygen-18 Climate Signal of Tree-Ring Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, L.; Ellsworth, P.

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies showed that the δ18O values of the oxygen attached to the second carbon of the cellulose glucose moieties (δ18OC-2) adds biochemical noise to the 18O climate signal of cellulose. We expanded the above study to include tree ring sequences to see if this noise persists across time within an individual. The δ18OC-2 noise persists and the δ18O value of the cellulose derivative not having this "noisy" oxygen δ18OP-G is a superior predictor of plant water and relative humidity. We previously proposed that the isotopic noise may be generated by synthesis of polyols (sugar alcohols), since the isotopic noise was particularly strong in areas of plant water or temperature stress. It is well known that plants generate polyols, such as mannitol or inositol to protect membrane structure and build up osmotic pressure under stressful conditions. A survey of previously published leaf cellulose δ18O values shows that, indeed, polyol producing plants tend to have lower oxygen isotope ratios. A working hypothesis based on the reactions of the oxygen attached to the second carbon of the glucose moieties was developed and tested with genetically modified Arabidopsis thaliana var. Columbia. A A. thaliana line genetically modified by the insertion of a mannitol synthesis gene (Mannose 6-Phosphate Reductase) and another mutant line which cannot synthesize starch (lacking plastid Phosphoglucose Mutase) showed significantly lower δ18O values of stem cellulose compared to the wild type. The primary cause of this lower isotopic value of the whole cellulose molecule was lower δ18OC-2 values. These results are consistent with our working hypothesis.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a cellulose-growth-specific gene from Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, S; Yagüe, E; Wood, D A; Thurston, C F

    1992-10-01

    The edible basidiomycete, Agaricus bisporus, produces extracellular endoglucanase. Endoglucanase production is induced by cellulose and repressed by fructose in A. bisporus grown on minimal medium, and is regulated in activity during fruiting body development. An anti-endoglucanase antibody was used to isolate cellulase-related genes. Three main polypeptides of 38, 58, and 60 kDa were immunoprecipitated by the antibody from products of in vitro cell-free translation of mRNAs isolated from cellulose-grown mycelium. No cross-reaction was detected with the translated products from fructose-grown mycelium. This antibody was used to immunoscreen a lambda ZAPII-cDNA expression library made from mRNA isolated from cellulose-grown mycelium. Two cDNA cross-reacting clones, pSRc110 and pSRc200, were isolated. Clones pSRc110 and pSRc200 cross-hybridized and had the same restriction map. Clone pSRc200 hybrid selected an mRNA that on cell-free translation produced a 38-kDa polypeptide. The cDNA fragment from pSRc200 hybridized to a 1.3-kb mRNA from cellulose-grown mycelium. No hybridization was observed when using fructose-grown mycelium mRNA. Thus, the gene (cel1) expressing the 1.3-kb mRNA, is differentially regulated by the carbon source of the culture medium. The cell gene was isolated in a 8.9-kb EcoRI genomic fragment after hybridization to pSRc200. Sequences similar to those in the egl1 and cbh2 genes from Trichoderma reesi were found upstream from the ATG start codon in cel1. Nine short intervening sequences disrupt the cel1 coding sequence, and a strong bias against codons ending with G and A was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1398098

  16. Canola engineered with a microalgal polyketide synthase-like system produces oil enriched in docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Terence A; Bevan, Scott A; Gachotte, Daniel J; Larsen, Cory M; Moskal, William A; Merlo, P A Owens; Sidorenko, Lyudmila V; Hampton, Ronnie E; Stoltz, Virginia; Pareddy, Dayakar; Anthony, Geny I; Bhaskar, Pudota B; Marri, Pradeep R; Clark, Lauren M; Chen, Wei; Adu-Peasah, Patrick S; Wensing, Steven T; Zirkle, Ross; Metz, James G

    2016-08-01

    Dietary omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5) are usually derived from marine fish. Although production of both EPA and DHA has been engineered into land plants, including Arabidopsis, Camelina sativa and Brassica juncea, neither has been produced in commercially relevant amounts in a widely grown crop. We report expression of a microalgal polyketide synthase-like PUFA synthase system, comprising three multidomain polypeptides and an accessory enzyme, in canola (Brassica napus) seeds. This transgenic enzyme system is expressed in the cytoplasm, and synthesizes DHA and EPA de novo from malonyl-CoA without substantially altering plastidial fatty acid production. Furthermore, there is no significant impact of DHA and EPA production on seed yield in either the greenhouse or the field. Canola oil processed from field-grown grain contains 3.7% DHA and 0.7% EPA, and can provide more than 600 mg of omega-3 LC-PUFAs in a 14 g serving. PMID:27398790

  17. Molecular characterization of a cellulose synthase gene (AaxmCesA1) isolated from an Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium hybrid

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Seok Yien Christina; Wickneswari, Ratnam

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose is the major component of plant cell walls, providing mechanical strength to the structural framework of plants. In association with lignin, hemicellulose, protein and pectin, cellulose forms the strong yet flexible bio-composite tissue of wood. Wood formation is an essential biological process and is of significant importance to the cellulosic private sector industry. Cellulose synthase genes encode the catalytic subunits of a large protein complex responsible for the biogenesis of...

  18. Novel Structural and Functional Motifs in cellulose synthase (CesA) Genes of Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Simerjeet; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Gill, Kulvinder; Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the primary determinant of mechanical strength in plant tissues. Late-season lodging is inversely related to the amount of cellulose in a unit length of the stem. Wheat is the most widely grown of all the crops globally, yet information on its CesA gene family is limited. We have identified 22 CesA genes from bread wheat, which include homoeologs from each of the three genomes, and named them as TaCesAXA, TaCesAXB or TaCesAXD, where X denotes the gene number and the last suffix s...

  19. Identification of additive, dominant, and epistatic variation conferred by key genes in cellulose biosynthesis pathway in Populus tomentosa

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Qingzhang; Tian, Jiaxing; Yang, Xiaohui; Pan, Wei; Xu, Baohua; Li, Bailian; Pär K Ingvarsson; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Economically important traits in many species generally show polygenic, quantitative inheritance. The components of genetic variation (additive, dominant and epistatic effects) of these traits conferred by multiple genes in shared biological pathways remain to be defined. Here, we investigated 11 full-length genes in cellulose biosynthesis, on 10 growth and wood-property traits, within a population of 460 unrelated Populus tomentosa individuals, via multi-gene association. To validate positiv...

  20. Isolation of developing secondary xylem specific cellulose synthase genes and their expression profiles during hormone signalling in Eucalyptus tereticornis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balachandran Karpaga Raja Sundari; Modhumita Ghosh Dasgupta

    2014-08-01

    Cellulose synthases (CesA) represent a group of -1, 4 glycosyl transferases involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Recent reports in higher plants have revealed that two groups of CesA gene families exist, which are associated with either primary or secondary cell wall deposition. The present study aimed at identifying developing secondary xylem specific cellulose synthase genes from Eucalyptus tereticornis, a species predominantly used in paper and pulp industries in the tropics. The differential expression analysis of the three EtCesA genes using qRT-PCR revealed 49 to 87 fold relative expression in developing secondary xylem tissues. Three full length gene sequences of EtCesA1, EtCesA2 and EtCesA3 were isolated with the size of 2940, 3114 and 3123 bp, respectively. Phytohormone regulation of all three EtCesA genes were studied by exogenous application of gibberellic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid and 2, 4-epibrassinolide in internode tissues derived from three-month-old rooted cuttings. All three EtCesA transcripts were upregulated by indole acetic acid and gibberellic acid. This study demonstrates that the increased cellulose deposition in the secondary wood induced by hormones can be attributed to the upregulation of xylem specific CesAs.

  1. Gene : CBRC-ATHA-03-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ATHA-03-0002 3 C UNKNOWN CESA7_ARATH 1e-171 52% ref|NP_186955.1| CSLD3 (CELLULOSE ... SYNTHASE- ... LIKE 3); cellulose ... synthase/ transferase, transferring glycosyl group ... opsis thaliana] gb|AAF26119.1|AC012328_22 putative cellulose ... synthase catalytic subunit [Arabidopsis thaliana] ...

  2. Mapping of a Cellulose-Deficient Mutant Named dwarf1-1 in Sorghum bicolor to the Green Revolution Gene gibberellin20-oxidase Reveals a Positive Regulatory Association between Gibberellin and Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Carloalberto; Hirano, Ko; Stork, Jozsef; DeBolt, Seth

    2015-09-01

    Here, we show a mechanism for expansion regulation through mutations in the green revolution gene gibberellin20 (GA20)-oxidase and show that GAs control biosynthesis of the plants main structural polymer cellulose. Within a 12,000 mutagenized Sorghum bicolor plant population, we identified a single cellulose-deficient and male gametophyte-dysfunctional mutant named dwarf1-1 (dwf1-1). Through the Sorghum propinquum male/dwf1-1 female F2 population, we mapped dwf1-1 to a frameshift in GA20-oxidase. Assessment of GAs in dwf1-1 revealed ablation of GA. GA ablation was antagonistic to the expression of three specific cellulose synthase genes resulting in cellulose deficiency and growth dwarfism, which were complemented by exogenous bioactive gibberellic acid application. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that GA was positively regulating the expression of a subset of specific cellulose synthase genes. To cross reference data from our mapped Sorghum sp. allele with another monocotyledonous plant, a series of rice (Oryza sativa) mutants involved in GA biosynthesis and signaling were isolated, and these too displayed cellulose deficit. Taken together, data support a model whereby suppressed expansion in green revolution GA genes involves regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26198258

  3. Mutation in the xpsD gene of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri affects cellulose degradation and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Baptista

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causal agent of citrus canker, is a major threat to the citrus industry worldwide. Although this is a leaf spot pathogen, it bears genes highly related to degradation of plant cell walls, which are typically found in plant pathogens that cause symptoms of tissue maceration. Little is known on Xac capacity to cause disease and hydrolyze cellulose. We investigated the contribution of various open reading frames on degradation of a cellulose compound by means of a global mutational assay to selectively screen for a defect in carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase secretion in X. axonopodis pv. citri. Screening on CMC agar revealed one mutant clone defective in extracellular glycanase activity, out of nearly 3,000 clones. The insertion was located in the xpsD gene, a component of the type II secretion system (T2SS showing an influence in the ability of Xac to colonize tissues and hydrolyze cellulose. In summary, these data show for the first time, that X. axonopodis pv. citri is capable of hydrolyzing cellulose in a T2SS-dependent process. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the ability to degrade cellulose contributes to the infection process as a whole.

  4. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo;

    2014-01-01

    hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas...

  5. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Peter K; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo; Lange, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls. PMID:25461894

  6. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  7. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V.; Strap, Janice L.

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature. PMID:26733991

  8. The phytohormone ethylene enhances bacterial cellulose production, regulates CRP/FNRKx transcription and causes differential gene expression within the cellulose synthesis operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Vincent Augimeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature.

  9. The Phytohormone Ethylene Enhances Cellulose Production, Regulates CRP/FNRKx Transcription and Causes Differential Gene Expression within the Bacterial Cellulose Synthesis Operon of Komagataeibacter (Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augimeri, Richard V; Strap, Janice L

    2015-01-01

    Komagataeibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter) xylinus ATCC 53582 is a plant-associated model organism for bacterial cellulose (BC) biosynthesis. This bacterium inhabits the carposphere where it interacts with fruit through the bi-directional transfer of phytohormones. The majority of research regarding K. xylinus has been focused on identifying and characterizing structural and regulatory factors that control BC biosynthesis, but its ecophysiology has been generally overlooked. Ethylene is a phytohormone that regulates plant development in a variety of ways, but is most commonly known for its positive role on fruit ripening. In this study, we utilized ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) to produce in situ ethylene to investigate the effects of this phytohormone on BC production and the expression of genes known to be involved in K. xylinus BC biosynthesis (bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, bcsD, cmcAx, ccpAx and bglAx). Using pellicle assays and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we demonstrate that ethephon-derived ethylene enhances BC directly in K. xylinus by up-regulating the expression of bcsA and bcsB, and indirectly though the up-regulation of cmcAx, ccpAx, and bglAx. We confirm that IAA directly decreases BC biosynthesis by showing that IAA down-regulates bcsA expression. Similarly, we confirm that ABA indirectly influences BC biosynthesis by showing it does not affect the expression of bcs operon genes. In addition, we are the first to report the ethylene and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced differential expression of genes within the bacterial cellulose synthesis (bcs) operon. Using bioinformatics we have identified a novel phytohormone-regulated CRP/FNRKx transcription factor and provide evidence that it influences BC biosynthesis in K. xylinus. Lastly, utilizing current and previous data, we propose a model for the phytohormone-mediated fruit-bacteria interactions that K. xylinus experiences in nature. PMID:26733991

  10. Cellulosic Ethanol Production by Recombinant Cellulolytic Bacteria Harbouring pdc and adh II Genes of Zymomonas mobilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sobana Piriya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol fermenting genes such as pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh II were cloned from Zymomonas mobilis and transformed into three different cellulolytic bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae JV, Proteus mirabilis JV and Erwinia chrysanthemi and their cellulosic ethanol production capability was studied. Recombinant E. cloacae JV was found to produce 4.5% and 3.5% (v/v ethanol, respectively, when CMC and 4% NaOH pretreated bagasse were used as substrates, whereas recombinant P. mirabilis and E. chrysanthemi with the same substrates could only produce 4%, 3.5%, 1%, and 1.5 % of ethanol, respectively. The recombinant E. cloacae strain produced twofold higher percentage of ethanol than the wild type. The recombinant E. cloacae strain could be improved further by increasing its ethanol tolerance capability through media optimization and also by combining multigene cellulase expression for enhancing ethanol production from various types of lignocellulosic biomass so that it can be used for industrial level ethanol production.

  11. Mechanism by which cellulose triggers cellobiohydrolase I gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Gogary, S; Leite, A; Crivellaro, O; Eveleigh, D E; el-Dorry, H

    1989-01-01

    The expression of cellobiohydrolase I mRNA from Trichoderma reesei, measured by Northern blot hybridization, is controlled by the nature of carbon sources used in the culture medium. Cellulose and the soluble disaccharide sophorose, but not glycerol or glucose, act as inducers. Cellobiohydrolase I mRNA was undetectable when antibodies to the major members of the cellulolytic system were present in the culture medium prior to the addition of cellulose. These antibodies had no repressive effect...

  12. Occurrence, structure, and evolution of nitric oxide synthase-like proteins in the plant kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandroz, Sylvain; Wipf, Daniel; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Melkonian, Michael; Tian, Zhijian; Zhu, Ying; Carpenter, Eric J; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wendehenne, David

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling regulates various physiological processes in both animals and plants. In animals, NO synthesis is mainly catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) enzymes. Although NOS-like activities that are sensitive to mammalian NOS inhibitors have been detected in plant extracts, few bona fide plant NOS enzymes have been identified. We searched the data set produced by the 1000 Plants (1KP) international consortium for the presence of transcripts encoding NOS-like proteins in over 1000 species of land plants and algae. We also searched for genes encoding NOS-like enzymes in 24 publicly available algal genomes. We identified no typical NOS sequences in 1087 sequenced transcriptomes of land plants. In contrast, we identified NOS-like sequences in 15 of the 265 algal species analyzed. Even if the presence of NOS enzymes assembled from multipolypeptides in plants cannot be conclusively discarded, the emerging data suggest that, instead of generating NO with evolutionarily conserved NOS enzymes, land plants have evolved finely regulated nitrate assimilation and reduction processes to synthesize NO through a mechanism different than that in animals. PMID:26933064

  13. Molecular characterization of a cellulose synthase gene (AaxmCesA1) isolated from an Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Seok Yien Christina; Wickneswari, Ratnam

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is the major component of plant cell walls, providing mechanical strength to the structural framework of plants. In association with lignin, hemicellulose, protein and pectin, cellulose forms the strong yet flexible bio-composite tissue of wood. Wood formation is an essential biological process and is of significant importance to the cellulosic private sector industry. Cellulose synthase genes encode the catalytic subunits of a large protein complex responsible for the biogenesis of cellulose in higher plants. The hybrid Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium represents an important source of tree cellulose for forest-based product manufacturing, with enormous economic potential. In this work, we isolate the first cellulose synthase gene, designated AaxmCesA1, from this species. The isolated full-length AaxmCesA1 cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 1,064 amino acids. Sequence analyses revealed that AaxmCesA1 cDNA possesses the key motif characteristics of a CesA protein. AaxmCesA1 shares more than 75 % amino acid sequence identity with CesA proteins from other plant species. Subsequently, the full-length AaxmCesA1 gene of 7,389 bp with partial regulatory and 13 intron regions was also isolated. Relative gene expression analysis by quantitative PCR in different tissues of the Acacia hybrid, suggests the involvement of the AaxmCesA1 gene in primary cell wall synthesis of rapidly dividing young root cells. Similarity analyses using Blast algorithms also suggests a role in primary cell wall deposition in the Acacia hybrid. Southern analysis predicts that AaxmCesA1 is a member of a multigene family with at least two isoforms in the genome of the Acacia hybrid. PMID:24415841

  14. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Michelle Smith-Moritz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6 gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG, a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be a tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to test the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of three day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell was of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.

  15. Alfalfa Cellulose synthase gene expression under abiotic stress: a Hitchhiker's guide to RT-qPCR normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Guerriero

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress represents a serious threat affecting both plant fitness and productivity. One of the promptest responses that plants trigger following abiotic stress is the differential expression of key genes, which enable to face the adverse conditions. It is accepted and shown that the cell wall senses and broadcasts the stress signal to the interior of the cell, by triggering a cascade of reactions leading to resistance. Therefore the study of wall-related genes is particularly relevant to understand the metabolic remodeling triggered by plants in response to exogenous stresses. Despite the agricultural and economical relevance of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., no study, to our knowledge, has addressed specifically the wall-related gene expression changes in response to exogenous stresses in this important crop, by monitoring the dynamics of wall biosynthetic gene expression. We here identify and analyze the expression profiles of nine cellulose synthases, together with other wall-related genes, in stems of alfalfa plants subjected to different abiotic stresses (cold, heat, salt stress at various time points (e.g. 0, 24, 72 and 96 h. We identify 2 main responses for specific groups of genes, i.e. a salt/heat-induced and a cold/heat-repressed group of genes. Prior to this analysis we identified appropriate reference genes for expression analyses in alfalfa, by evaluating the stability of 10 candidates across different tissues (namely leaves, stems, roots, under the different abiotic stresses and time points chosen. The results obtained confirm an active role played by the cell wall in response to exogenous stimuli and constitute a step forward in delineating the complex pathways regulating the response of plants to abiotic stresses.

  16. Functional analysis of the cellulose gene of the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, using RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H B; Lu, Q; Liang, J; Zhang, X Y

    2011-01-01

    Cellulases are pathogenic substances suspected to be responsible for the development of the early symptoms of nematode disease. The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Parasitaphelenchidae), is the causal agent of pine wilt disease, which kills millions of pine trees. We used RNA interference (RNAi), a reverse genetic tool, to analyze the function of the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene of B. xylophilus, which causes the most serious forest tree disease in China and the rest of eastern Asia. Silencing of this gene was detected through real-time PCR and cellulase activity assays after soaking for 24 h in dsRNA. The cellulase gene silencing effects differed among various siRNAs. The propagation and dispersal ability of these nematodes decreased when the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene was silenced. It is important to select an effective siRNA before performing an RNAi test. PMID:21948755

  17. Gene Expression Regulation by the Curli Activator CsgD Protein: Modulation of Cellulose Biosynthesis and Control of Negative Determinants for Microbial Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Brombacher, Eva; Baratto, Andrea; Dorel, Corinne; Landini, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Curli fibers, encoded by the csgBAC genes, promote biofilm formation in Escherichia coli and other enterobacteria. Curli production is dependent on the CsgD transcription activator, which also promotes cellulose biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of CsgD expression from a weak constitutive promoter in the biofilm formation-deficient PHL565 strain of E. coli. We found that despite its function as a transcription activator, the CsgD protein is localized in the cytoplasmic ...

  18. Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan R. White; Ann G. Matthysse

    2004-07-31

    We have cloned the celC gene and its homologue from E. coli, yhjM, in an expression vector and expressed the both genes in E. coli; we have determined that the YhjM protein is able to complement in vitro cellulose synthesis by extracts of A. tumefaciens celC mutants, we have purified the YhjM protein product and are currently examining its enzymatic activity; we have examined whole cell extracts of CelC and various other cellulose mutants and wild type bacteria for the presence of cellulose oligomers and cellulose; we have examined the ability of extracts of wild type and cellulose mutants including CelC to incorporate UDP-14C-glucose into cellulose and into water-soluble, ethanol-insoluble oligosaccharides; we have made mutants which synthesize greater amounts of cellulose than the wild type; and we have examined the role of cellulose in the formation of biofilms by A. tumefaciens. In addition we have examined the ability of a putative cellulose synthase gene from the tunicate Ciona savignyi to complement an A. tumefaciens celA mutant. The greatest difference between our knowledge of bacterial cellulose synthesis when we started this project and current knowledge is that in 1999 when we wrote the original grant very few bacteria were known to synthesize cellulose and genes involved in this synthesis were sequenced only from Acetobacter species, A. tumefaciens and Rhizobium leguminosarum. Currently many bacteria are known to synthesize cellulose and genes that may be involved have been sequenced from more than 10 species of bacteria. This additional information has raised the possibility of attempting to use genes from one bacterium to complement mutants in another bacterium. This will enable us to examine the question of which genes are responsible for the three dimensional structure of cellulose (since this differs among bacterial species) and also to examine the interactions between the various proteins required for cellulose synthesis. We have carried out one

  19. Over-expression of the cucumber expansin gene (Cs-EXPA1) in transgenic maize seed for cellulose deconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangwoong; Devaiah, Shivakumar P; Choi, Seo-Eun; Bray, Jeff; Love, Robert; Lane, Jeffrey; Drees, Carol; Howard, John H; Hood, Elizabeth E

    2016-04-01

    Plant cell wall degradation into fermentable sugars by cellulases is one of the greatest barriers to biofuel production. Expansin protein loosens the plant cell wall by opening up the complex of cellulose microfibrils and polysaccharide matrix components thereby increasing its accessibility to cellulases. We over-expressed cucumber expansin in maize kernels to produce enough protein to assess its potential to serve as an industrial enzyme for applications particularly in biomass conversion. We used the globulin-1 embryo-preferred promoter to express the cucumber expansin gene in maize seed. Expansin protein was targeted to one of three sub-cellular locations: the cell wall, the vacuole, or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To assess the level of expansin accumulation in seeds of transgenic kernels, a high throughput expansin assay was developed. The highest expressing plants were chosen and enriched crude expansin extract from those plants was tested for synergistic effects with cellulase on several lignocellulosic substrates. Activity of recombinant cucumber expansin from transgenic kernels was confirmed on these pretreated substrates. The best transgenic lines (ER-targeted) can now be used for breeding to increase expansin expression for use in the biomass conversion industry. Results of these experiments show the success of expansin over-expression and accumulation in transgenic maize seed without negative impact on growth and development and confirm its synergistic effect with cellulase on deconstruction of complex cell wall substrates. PMID:26712321

  20. Novel Fluorescence Arginine Analogue as a Sensor for Direct Identification and Imaging of Nitric Oxide Synthase-like Enzymes in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kang; Guo, Tongtong; Li, Pengfei; Liu, Yin; Xu, Yufang; Fang, Yuda; Qian, Xuhong

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase like enzyme (NOS-like enzyme), which produces nitric oxide, participates in many biological processes. However it remains unidentified and highly controversial that plants do possess a NOS-like enzyme. In this paper, a novel arginine analogue NP1 was designed and developed for the direct identification and real time tracking of NOS-like enzymes in plant by fluorescence sensing. It could bind NOS-like enzyme efficiently and enter the cell successfully. In vivo fluorescence response results directly proved that NOS-like enzymes did exist in tobacco leaf and would be stimulated by pathogen infection, which also provided a useful chemical tool for the study of the function of NOS-like enzyme in plants. PMID:27586270

  1. Cellulose alters the expression of nuclear factor kappa B-related genes and Toll-like receptor-related genes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Leonie M.; Boekschoten, Mark V.; de Groot, Philip J.; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The immunomodulatory and epithelial barrier effects of cellulose as a dietary fibre were studied to analyse the potential for use in health promoting functional foods. Reporter assays demonstrated cellulose-mediated activation through TLR/MyD88 dependent-, and independent pathways. Microchip analysi

  2. Identification, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of Cell Wall Related Genes in Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, a Food, Fodder, and Biofuel Crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Krishan M.; Thu, Sandi W.; Balasubramanian, Vimal K.; Cobos, Christopher J.; Disasa, Tesfaye; Mendu, Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    Biomass based alternative fuels offer a solution to the world's ever-increasing energy demand. With the ability to produce high biomass in marginal lands with low inputs, sorghum has a great potential to meet second-generation biofuel needs. Despite the sorghum crop importance in biofuel and fodder industry, there is no comprehensive information available on the cell wall related genes and gene families (biosynthetic and modification). It is important to identify the cell wall related genes to understand the cell wall biosynthetic process as well as to facilitate biomass manipulation. Genome-wide analysis using gene family specific Hidden Markov Model of conserved domains identified 520 genes distributed among 20 gene families related to biosynthesis/modification of various cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, and lignin. Chromosomal localization analysis of these genes revealed that about 65% of cell wall related genes were confined to four chromosomes (Chr. 1–4). Further, 56 tandem duplication events involving 169 genes were identified in these gene families which could be associated with expansion of genes within families in sorghum. Additionally, we also identified 137 Simple Sequence Repeats related to 112 genes and target sites for 10 miRNAs in some important families such as cellulose synthase, cellulose synthase-like, and laccases, etc. To gain further insight into potential functional roles, expression analysis of these gene families was performed using publically available data sets in various tissues and under abiotic stress conditions. Expression analysis showed tissue specificity as well as differential expression under abiotic stress conditions. Overall, our study provides a comprehensive information on cell wall related genes families in sorghum which offers a valuable resource to develop strategies for altering biomass composition by plant breeding and genetic engineering approaches.

  3. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Sadat Maleki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4 D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family.

  4. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Samaneh Sadat; Mohammadi, Kourosh; Ji, Kong-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the KORRIGAN, sucrose synthase, cytoskeletal components, and COBRA-like proteins have been involved in cellulose biosynthesis. Understanding the mechanisms of cellulose biosynthesis is of great importance not only for improving wood production in economically important forest trees to mankind but also for plant development. This review article covers the current knowledge about the cellulose biosynthesis-related gene family. PMID:27314060

  5. Cellulose is not just cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidayat, Budi Juliman; Felby, Claus; Johansen, Katja S.;

    2012-01-01

    Most secondary plant cell walls contain irregular regions known as dislocations or slip planes. Under industrial biorefining conditions dislocations have recently been shown to play a key role during the initial phase of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in plant cell walls. In this review we...... not regions where free cellulose ends are more abundant than in the bulk cell wall. In more severe cases cracks between fibrils form at dislocations and it is possible that the increased accessibility that these cracks give is the reason why hydrolysis of cellulose starts at these locations. If acid...

  6. De novo characterization of the Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata transcriptome and analysis of candidate genes involved in cellulose and lignin biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hua-Hong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata is an important timber species that accounts for 20–30% of the total commercial timber production in China. However, the available genomic information of Chinese fir is limited, and this severely encumbers functional genomic analysis and molecular breeding in Chinese fir. Recently, major advances in transcriptome sequencing have provided fast and cost-effective approaches to generate large expression datasets that have proven to be powerful tools to profile the transcriptomes of non-model organisms with undetermined genomes. Results In this study, the transcriptomes of nine tissues from Chinese fir were analyzed using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform. Approximately 40 million paired-end reads were obtained, generating 3.62 gigabase pairs of sequencing data. These reads were assembled into 83,248 unique sequences (i.e. Unigenes with an average length of 449 bp, amounting to 37.40 Mb. A total of 73,779 Unigenes were supported by more than 5 reads, 42,663 (57.83% had homologs in the NCBI non-redundant and Swiss-Prot protein databases, corresponding to 27,224 unique protein entries. Of these Unigenes, 16,750 were assigned to Gene Ontology classes, and 14,877 were clustered into orthologous groups. A total of 21,689 (29.40% were mapped to 119 pathways by BLAST comparison against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database. The majority of the genes encoding the enzymes in the biosynthetic pathways of cellulose and lignin were identified in the Unigene dataset by targeted searches of their annotations. And a number of candidate Chinese fir genes in the two metabolic pathways were discovered firstly. Eighteen genes related to cellulose and lignin biosynthesis were cloned for experimental validating of transcriptome data. Overall 49 Unigenes, covering different regions of these selected genes, were found by alignment. Their expression patterns in different tissues

  7. Cellulose based conductive polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Haishu

    2015-01-01

    Conductive fibers show potential applications in different areas. In this thesis, cellulose and its derivatives, including carboxymethyl cellulose, cellulose acetate as well as methyl cellulose were used to produce fibers via wet spinning. Different conductive materials were also introduced in an attempt to obtain cellulose-derived conductive fibers. Different conductive fillers (Zelec, carbon black, conductive polymers) were evaluated. Among them, PEDOT and PPy conductive polymers showed...

  8. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh-hui

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the

  9. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Deng

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC. These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To address this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of

  10. Genetic organization of the cellulose synthase operon in Acetobacter xylinum.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, H C; Fear, A L; Calhoon, R D; Eichinger, G H; Mayer, R; Amikam, D; Benziman, M; Gelfand, D H; Meade, J H; Emerick, A W

    1990-01-01

    An operon encoding four proteins required for bacterial cellulose biosynthesis (bcs) in Acetobacter xylinum was isolated via genetic complementation with strains lacking cellulose synthase activity. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that the cellulose synthase operon is 9217 base pairs long and consists of four genes. The four genes--bcsA, bcsB, bcsC, and bcsD--appear to be translationally coupled and transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA with an initiation site 97 bases upstream of the co...

  11. A carboxymethyl cellulase from a marine yeast ( Aureobasidium pullulans 98): Its purification, characterization, gene cloning and carboxymethyl cellulose digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yanjun; Zhang, Liang; Chi, Zhenming; Wang, Xianghong

    2015-10-01

    We have reported that A. pullulans 98 produces a high yield of cellulase. In this study, a carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) in the supernatant of the culture of A. pullulans 98 was purified to homogeneity, and the maximum production of CMCase was 4.51 U (mg protein)-1. The SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the molecular mass of the purified CMCase was 67.0 kDa. The optimal temperature of the purified enzyme with considerable thermosensitivity was 40°C, much lower than that of the CMCases from other fungi. The optimal pH of the enzyme was 5.6, and the activity profile was stable in a range of acidity (pH 5.0-6.0). The enzyme was activated by Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, Fe2+ and Cu2+, however, it was inhibited by Fe3+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Mn2+ and Ag+. K m and V max values of the purified enzyme were 4.7 mg mL-1 and 0.57 µmol L-1 min-1 (mg protein)-1, respectively. Only oligosaccharides with different sizes were released from carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) after hydrolysis with the purified CMCase. The putative gene encoding CMCase was cloned from A. pullulans 98, which contained an open reading frame of 954 bp (EU978473). The protein deduced contained the conserved domain of cellulase superfamily (glucosyl hydrolase family 5). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified CMCase was M-A-P-H-A-E-P-Q-S-Q-T-T-E-Q-T-S-S-G-Q-F, which was consistent with that deduced from the cloned gene. This suggested that the purified CMCase was indeed encoded by the cloned CMCase gene in this yeast.

  12. Cloning and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a Trichoderma reesei beta-mannanase gene containing a cellulose binding domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Stålbrand, H; Saloheimo, A; Vehmaanperä, J; HENRISSAT, B.; Penttilä, M

    1995-01-01

    beta-Mannanase (endo-1,4-beta-mannanase; mannan endo-1,4-beta-mannosidase; EC 3.2.1.78) catalyzes endo-wise hydrolysis of the backbone of mannan and heteromannans, including hemicellulose polysaccharides, which are among the major components of plant cell walls. The gene man1, which encodes beta-mannanase, of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei was isolated from an expression library by using antiserum raised towards the earlier-purified beta-mannanase protein. The deduced beta-mannanas...

  13. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  14. Cellulose synthase interacting protein: A new factor in cellulose synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Ying; Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the re...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of NBRC 3288, a Unique Cellulose-Nonproducing Strain of Gluconacetobacter xylinus Isolated from Vinegar

    OpenAIRE

    Ogino, Hidetaka; Azuma, Yoshinao; Hosoyama, Akira; Nakazawa, Hidekazu; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Hasegawa, Akihiro; Otsuyama, Ken-ichiro; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Shirai, Mutsunori

    2011-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter xylinus is involved in the industrial production of cellulose. We have determined the genome sequence of G. xylinus NBRC 3288, a cellulose-nonproducing strain. Comparative analysis of genomes of G. xylinus NBRC 3288 with those of the cellulose-producing strains clarified the genes important for cellulose production in Gluconacetobacter.

  16. Correlation of nitric oxide produced by an inducible nitric oxide synthase-like protein with enhanced expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Inonotus obliquus cocultured with Phellinus morii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanxia; Xi, Qi; Xu, Qian; He, Meihong; Ding, Jianing; Dai, Yucheng; Keller, Nancy P; Zheng, Weifa

    2015-05-01

    Fungal interspecific interactions enhance biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid metabolites (PM), and production of nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in this process. However, it remains unknown which signaling pathway(s) or regulator(s) mediate fungal PM biosynthesis. In this study, we cocultured two white-rot fungi, Inonotus obliquus and Phellinus morii, to examine NO production, expression of the genes involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism and accumulation of phenylpropanoid-derived polyphenols by I. obliquus. Coculture of the two fungi caused an enhanced NO biosynthesis followed by increased transcription of the genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate CoA ligase (4CL), as well as an upregulated biosynthesis of styrylpyrone polyphenols in I. obliquus. Addition of the NO synthase (NOS) selective inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) inhibited NO production by more than 90% followed by cease in transcription of PAL and 4Cl. Treatment of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one did not affect NO production but suppressed transcription of PAL and 4CL and reduced accumulation of total phenolic constituents. Genome-wide analysis of I. obliquus revealed two genes encoding a constitutive and an inducible NOS-like protein, respectively (cNOSL and iNOSL). Coculture of the two fungi did not increase the expression of the cNOSL gene but triggered expression of the iNOSL gene. Cloned iNOSL from Escherichia coli shows higher activity in transferring L-arginine to NO, and this activity is lost upon AG addition. Thus, iNOSL is more responsible for NO production in I. obliquus and may act as an important regulator governing PM production during fungal interspecific interactions. PMID:25582560

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  19. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela; Goedegebuur, Frits; Van Solingen, Pieter; Ward, Michael

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  20. CELLULOSIC NANOCOMPOSITES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Hubbe

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of their wide abundance, their renewable and environmentally benign nature, and their outstanding mechanical properties, a great deal of attention has been paid recently to cellulosic nanofibrillar structures as components in nanocomposites. A first major challenge has been to find efficient ways to liberate cellulosic fibrils from different source materials, including wood, agricultural residues, or bacterial cellulose. A second major challenge has involved the lack of compatibility of cellulosic surfaces with a variety of plastic materials. The water-swellable nature of cellulose, especially in its non-crystalline regions, also can be a concern in various composite materials. This review of recent work shows that considerable progress has been achieved in addressing these issues and that there is potential to use cellulosic nano-components in a wide range of high-tech applications.

  1. Cellulose-silica aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demilecamps, Arnaud; Beauger, Christian; Hildenbrand, Claudia; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana

    2015-05-20

    Aerogels based on interpenetrated cellulose-silica networks were prepared and characterised. Wet coagulated cellulose was impregnated with silica phase, polyethoxydisiloxane, using two methods: (i) molecular diffusion and (ii) forced flow induced by pressure difference. The latter allowed an enormous decrease in the impregnation times, by almost three orders of magnitude, for a sample with the same geometry. In both cases, nanostructured silica gel was in situ formed inside cellulose matrix. Nitrogen adsorption analysis revealed an almost threefold increase in pores specific surface area, from cellulose aerogel alone to organic-inorganic composite. Morphology, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties under uniaxial compression were investigated. Thermal conductivity of composite aerogels was lower than that of cellulose aerogel due to the formation of superinsulating mesoporous silica inside cellulose pores. Furthermore, composite aerogels were stiffer than each of reference aerogels. PMID:25817671

  2. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Micklem, Chris N.; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae. Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology. PMID:27247386

  3. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin; Ellis, Tom

    2016-06-14

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong and ultrapure form of cellulose produced naturally by several species of the Acetobacteraceae Its high strength, purity, and biocompatibility make it of great interest to materials science; however, precise control of its biosynthesis has remained a challenge for biotechnology. Here we isolate a strain of Komagataeibacter rhaeticus (K. rhaeticus iGEM) that can produce cellulose at high yields, grow in low-nitrogen conditions, and is highly resistant to toxic chemicals. We achieved external control over its bacterial cellulose production through development of a modular genetic toolkit that enables rational reprogramming of the cell. To further its use as an organism for biotechnology, we sequenced its genome and demonstrate genetic circuits that enable functionalization and patterning of heterologous gene expression within the cellulose matrix. This work lays the foundations for using genetic engineering to produce cellulose-based materials, with numerous applications in basic science, materials engineering, and biotechnology. PMID:27247386

  4. The barley genome sequence assembly reveals three additional members of the CslF (1,3;1,4-β-glucan synthase gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Schreiber

    Full Text Available An important component of barley cell walls, particularly in the endosperm, is (1,3;1,4-β-glucan, a polymer that has proven health benefits in humans and that influences processability in the brewing industry. Genes of the cellulose synthase-like (Csl F gene family have been shown to be involved in (1,3;1,4-β-glucan synthesis but many aspects of the biosynthesis are still unclear. Examination of the sequence assembly of the barley genome has revealed the presence of an additional three HvCslF genes (HvCslF11, HvCslF12 and HvCslF13 which may be involved in (1,3;1,4-β-glucan synthesis. Transcripts of HvCslF11 and HvCslF12 mRNA were found in roots and young leaves, respectively. Transient expression of these genes in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in phenotypic changes in the infiltrated leaves, although no authentic (1,3;1,4-β-glucan was detected. Comparisons of the CslF gene families in cereals revealed evidence of intergenic recombination, gene duplications and translocation events. This significant divergence within the gene family might be related to multiple functions of (1,3;1,4-β-glucans in the Poaceae. Emerging genomic and global expression data for barley and other cereals is a powerful resource for characterising the evolution and dynamics of complete gene families. In the case of the CslF gene family, the results will contribute to a more thorough understanding of carbohydrate metabolism in grass cell walls.

  5. Evidence of cellulose metabolism by the giant panda gut microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lifeng; Wu, Qi; Dai, Jiayin; Zhang, Shanning; Wei, Fuwen

    2011-01-01

    The giant panda genome codes for all necessary enzymes associated with a carnivorous digestive system but lacks genes for enzymes needed to digest cellulose, the principal component of their bamboo diet. It has been posited that this iconic species must therefore possess microbial symbionts capable of metabolizing cellulose, but these symbionts have remained undetected. Here we examined 5,522 prokaryotic ribosomal RNA gene sequences in wild and captive giant panda fecal samples. We found lowe...

  6. Genome sequence and plasmid transformation of the model high-yield bacterial cellulose producer Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Michael; Reeve, Benjamin; Abbott, James; Freemont, Paul S.; Ellis, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a strong, highly pure form of cellulose that is used in a range of applications in industry, consumer goods and medicine. Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 53582 is one of the highest reported bacterial cellulose producing strains and has been used as a model organism in numerous studies of bacterial cellulose production and studies aiming to increased cellulose productivity. Here we present a high-quality draft genome sequence for G. hansenii ATCC 53582 and find that in addition to the previously described cellulose synthase operon, ATCC 53582 contains two additional cellulose synthase operons and several previously undescribed genes associated with cellulose production. In parallel, we also develop optimized protocols and identify plasmid backbones suitable for transformation of ATCC 53582, albeit with low efficiencies. Together, these results provide important information for further studies into cellulose synthesis and for future studies aiming to genetically engineer G. hansenii ATCC 53582 for increased cellulose productivity.

  7. Cellulose synthesizing Complexes in Vascular Plants andProcaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard M, Jr; Saxena, Inder Mohan

    2009-07-07

    Continuing the work initiated under DE-FG03-94ER20145, the following major accomplishments were achieved under DE-FG02-03ER15396 from 2003-2007: (a) we purified the acsD gene product of the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon as well as transferred the CesA cellulose gene from Gossypium into E. coli in an attempt to crystallize this protein for x-ray diffraction structural analysis; however, crystallization attempts proved unsuccessful; (b) the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon was successfully incorporated into Synechococcus, a cyanobacterium2; (c) this operon in Synechococcus was functionally expressed; (d) we successfully immunolabeled Vigna cellulose and callose synthase components and mapped their distribution before and after wounding; (e) we developed a novel method to produce replicas of cellulose synthases in tobacco BY-2 cells, and we demonstrated the cytoplasmic domain of the rosette TC; (f) from the moss Physcomitrella, we isolated two full-length cDNA sequences of cellulose synthase (PpCesA1 and PpCesA2) and attempted to obtain full genomic DNA sequences; (g) we examined the detailed molecular structure of a new form of non-crystalline cellulose known as nematic ordered cellulose (=NOC)3.

  8. Cellulose Synthesis and Its Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shundai; Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Gu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer synthesized on land, is made of linear chains of ß (1–4) linked D-glucose. As a major structural component of the cell wall, cellulose is important not only for industrial use but also for plant growth and development. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered by other cell wall polysaccharides such as hemicellulose, pectin, and lignin. In higher plants, cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized rosette cellulose synthase complexes. Despite the re...

  9. Fulton Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumait, Necy [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States); Cuzens, John [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States); Klann, Richard [BlueFire Ethanol, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    Final report on work performed by BlueFire on the deployment of acid hydrolysis technology to convert cellulosic waste materials into renewable fuels, power and chemicals in a production facility to be located in Fulton, Mississippi.

  10. BIOINFORMATICS AND BIOSYNTHESIS ANALYSIS OF CELLULOSE SYNTHASE OPERON IN ZYMOMONAS MOBILIS ZM4

    OpenAIRE

    Sheik Abdul Kader Sheik Asraf, K. Narayanan Rajnish, and Paramasamy Gunasekaran

    2011-01-01

    Biosynthesis of cellulose has been reported in many species of bacteria. The genes encoding cellulose biosynthetic enzymes of Z. mobilis have not been studied so far. Preliminary sequence analysis of the Z. mobilis ZM4 genome revealed the presence of a cellulose synthase operon comprised of Open Reading Frames (ORFs) ZMO01083 (bcsA), ZMO1084 (bcsB) and ZMO1085 (bcsC). The first gene of the operon bcsA encodes the cellulose synthase catalytic subunit BcsA. The second gene of the operon bcsB en...

  11. Photoresponsive Cellulose Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris S Argyropoulos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this communication a method for the creation of fluorescent cellulose nanoparticles using click chemistry and subsequent photodimerization of the installed side‐ chains is demonstrated. In the first step, the primary hydroxyl groups on the surface of the CNCs were converted to carboxylic acids by using TEMPO‐mediated hypohalite oxidation. The alkyne groups, essential for the click reaction, were introduced into the surface of TEMPO‐ oxidized CNCs via carbodiimide‐mediated formation of an amide linkage between monomers carrying an amine functionality and carboxylic acid groups on the surface of the TEMPO‐oxidized CNCs. Finally, the reaction of surface‐modified TEMPO‐oxidized cellulose nanocrystals and azido‐bearing coumarin and anthracene monomers were carried out by means of a click chemistry, i.e., Copper(I‐catalyzed Azide‐Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC to produce highly photo‐responsive and fluorescent cellulose nanoparticles. Most significantly, the installed coumarin and/or anthracene side‐chains were shown to undergo UV‐induced [2+2] and [4+4] cycloaddition reactions, bringing and locking the cellulose nanocrystals together. This effort paves the way towards creating, cellulosic photo responsive nano‐arrays with the potential of photo reversibility since these reactions are known to be reversible at varying wavelengths.

  12. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits - which differ among various taxa - affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating (i) the expression of the biosynthesis apparatus, (ii) the export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and (iii) the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of resulting biofilms, which is particularly important for the interactions of bacteria with higher organisms - leading to rhizosphere colonization and modulating the virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. We review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operon found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms and in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  13. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  14. The cellulose resource matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  15. Electrochemical synthesis of cellulose mesylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidirov, Sh Sh; Akhmedov, M. A.; Khibiev, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    The article deal with the possibility anode modification of cellulose to form its ester - mesylate by voltametric measurement method and preparative electrosynthesis on a platinum electrode in the system cellulose - dimethyl sulfoxide - methanesulfonic

  16. Structure of cellulose acetobacter xylinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data are presented on optimization of cellulose synthesis by Acetobacter xylinum (strain VKM V-880) and the structural characteristics of A. xylinum cellulose gel film synthesized during static cultivation. The structural changes caused by the removal of water from gel films are established and the structural organization of macromolecular chains in cellulose A. xylinum is studied

  17. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases. PMID:26799780

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF REGENERATED CELLULOSE MEMBRANES HYDROLYZED FROM CELLULOSE ACETATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Chen; Xiao-peng Xiong; Guang Yang; Li-na Zhang; Sen-lin Lei; Hui Lianga

    2002-01-01

    A series of cellulose acetate membranes were prepared by using formamide as additive, and then were hydrolyzedin 4 wt% aqueous NaOH solution for 8 h to obtain regenerated cellulose membranes. The dependence of degree ofsubstitution, structure, porous properties, solubility and thermal stability on hydrolysis time was studied by chemical titration,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and differentialscanning calorimetry, respectively. The results indicated that the pore size of the regenerated cellulose membranes wasslightly smaller than that of cellulose acetate membrane, while solvent-resistance, crystallinity and thermostability weresignificantly improved. This work provides a simple way to prepare the porous cellulose membranes, which not only kept thegood pore characteristics of cellulose acetate membranes, but also possessed solvent-resistance, high crystallinity andthermostability. Therefore, the application range of cellulose acetate membranes can be expanded.

  19. Degradation of cellulose in irradiated wood and purified celluloses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of cellulose chains in Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus regnans given small gamma-radiation doses has been studied. Scission yields showed marked dose-dependency effects, of which some appear to be due to an inherent dose-dependency exhibited by cellulose itself, and others indicate a protective action of some natural wood constituents. A uniform treatment of viscometry data reported by various workers who have studied radiation-induced degradation of purified cellulose materials, has been used to enable their scission results to be compared with each other and with those for natural wood cellulose of various dose levels. Generally, cellulose in wood is less degraded by radiation than is purified cellulose. However, with Eucalyptus regnans remarkably high scission yields, significantly higher than expected for purified cellulose, were observed at dose levels of 0.5-1.0 x 104Gy. The relevance of these results to changes in pulp yield following irradiation of wood chips, is briefly discussed. (author)

  20. High-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose by the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chi; Li, Zhongkui; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yingjiao; Bryant, Donald A; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose synthase, encoded by the cesA gene, is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose in nature. We show that the cell wall of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 naturally contains cellulose. Cellulose occurs as a possibly laminated layer between the inner and outer membrane, as well as being an important component of the extracellular glycocalyx in this cyanobacterium. Overexpression of six genes, cmc-ccp-cesAB-cesC-cesD-bgl, from Gluconacetobacter xylinus in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 resulted in very high-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose. High-level cellulose production only occurred when the native cesA gene was inactivated and when cells were grown at low salinity. This system provides a method for the production of lignin-free cellulose from sunlight and CO2 for biofuel production and other biotechnological applications. PMID:27462405

  1. The cellulose resource matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, E.R.P.; Yilmaz, G.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2013-01-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where

  2. Cysticercosis cellulose cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inamadar Arun

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A woman aged 30 years with solitary lesion of cysticercosis cellulose cutis is reported. Cutaneous cysticerci are often a pointer to the involvement of internal organs. Our patient was a pure vegetarian so, probable mode of infection may be ingestion of contaminated vegetables, where the practice of using pig feces as manure is prevalent.

  3. Derivatives of Oxidized Cellulose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taubner, T.; Sobek, Jiří; Havelka, P.; Kvasnička, F.; Synytsya, A.; Čopíková, J.

    Praha : Česká společnost chemická, 2009, s. 777. ISSN 0009-2770. [International Conference on Polysaccharides-Glycoscience 2009 /5./. Praha (CZ), 11.11.2009-13.11.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : cellulose * reaction progress * chromatography Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  4. AmrZ regulates cellulose production in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada-Ramírez, Harold A; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Felipe, Antonia; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Rivilla, Rafael; Sanjuán, Juan; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2016-03-01

    In Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, the second messenger c-di-GMP has been previously shown to stimulate pellicle formation and cellulose biosynthesis. A screen for genes involved in cellulose production under high c-di-GMP intracellular levels led to the identification of insertions in two genes, wssB and wssE, belonging to the Pto DC3000 cellulose biosynthesis operon wssABCDEFGHI. Interestingly, beside cellulose-deficient mutants, colonies with a rougher appearance than the wild type also arouse among the transposants. Those mutants carry insertions in amrZ, a gene encoding a transcriptional regulator in different Pseudomonas. Here, we provide evidence that AmrZ is involved in the regulation of bacterial cellulose production at transcriptional level by binding to the promoter region of the wssABCDEFGHI operon and repressing cellulose biosynthesis genes. Mutation of amrZ promotes wrinkly colony morphology, increased cellulose production and loss of motility in Pto DC3000. AmrZ regulon includes putative c-di-GMP metabolising proteins, like AdcA and MorA, which may also impact those phenotypes. Furthermore, an amrZ but not a cellulose-deficient mutant turned out to be impaired in pathogenesis, indicating that AmrZ is a key regulator of Pto DC3000 virulence probably by controlling bacterial processes other than cellulose production. PMID:26564578

  5. Thermophilic microbial cellulose decomposition and methanogenesis pathways recharacterized by metatranscriptomic and metagenomic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Xia; Yubo Wang; Herbert H. P. Fang; Tao Jin; Huanzi Zhong; Tong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The metatranscriptomic recharacterization in the present study captured microbial enzymes at the unprecedented scale of 40,000 active genes belonged to 2,269 KEGG functions were identified. The novel information obtained herein revealed interesting patterns and provides an initial transcriptional insight into the thermophilic cellulose methanization process. Synergistic beta-sugar consumption by Thermotogales is crucial for cellulose hydrolysis in the thermophilic cellulose-degrading consorti...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of cellulose derivatives obtained from bacterial cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical modification of cellulose leads to production of derivatives with different properties from those observed for the original cellulose, for example, increased solubility in more traditional solvents. In this work we synthesized four derivatives of cellulose: microcrystalline cellulose, cellulose acetate, methylcellulose and carboxymethylcellulose using bacterial cellulose as a source. These were characterized in terms of chemical and structural changes by examining the degree of substitution (DS), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy - NMR 13C. The molecular weight and degree of polymerization were evaluated by viscometry. The characterization of the morphology of materials and thermal properties were performed with the techniques of X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy images, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis. (author)

  7. Interactions of microfibrillated cellulose and cellulosic fines with cationic polyelectrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Taipale, Tero

    2010-01-01

    The overall aim of this work was to produce and characterize different types of cellulosic fines and microfibrillated cellulose; to study their interactions with high molar mass cationic polyelectrolytes; and to demonstrate novel examples of their utilization. The work was performed, and its results discussed mainly from papermaking point of view, but the results are also well applicable in other fields of industry. Cellulosic fines are an essential component of papermaking fiber suspens...

  8. Novel oil resistant cellulosic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Aulin, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to prepare and characterise oil resistant cellulosic materials, ranging from model surfaces to papers and aerogels. The cellulosic materials were made oil resistant by chemical and topographic modifications, based on surface energy, surface roughness and barrier approaches. Detailed wetting studies of the prepared cellulosic materials were made using contact angle measurements and standardised penetration tests with different alkanes and oil mixtures. A signific...

  9. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  10. Adaptive mutation related to cellulose producibility in Komagataeibacter medellinensis (Gluconacetobacter xylinus) NBRC 3288.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Minenosuke; Ito, Kohei; Azuma, Yoshinao; Ogino, Hidetaka; Shirai, Mutsunori; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2015-09-01

    Gluconacetobacter xylinus (formerly Acetobacter xylinum and presently Komagataeibacter medellinensis) is known to produce cellulose as a stable pellicle. However, it is also well known to lose this ability very easily. We investigated the on and off mechanisms of cellulose producibility in two independent cellulose-producing strains, R1 and R2. Both these strains were isolated through a repetitive static culture of a non-cellulose-producing K. medellinensis NBRC 3288 parental strain. Two cellulose synthase operons, types I and II, of this strain are truncated by the frameshift mutation in the bcsBI gene and transposon insertion in the bcsCII gene, respectively. The draft genome sequencing of R1 and R2 strains revealed that in both strains the bcsBI gene was restored by deletion of a nucleotide in its C-rich region. This result suggests that the mutations in the bcsBI gene are responsible for the on and off mechanism of cellulose producibility. When we looked at the genomic DNA sequences of other Komagataeibacter species, several non-cellulose-producing strains were found to contain similar defects in the type I and/or type II cellulose synthase operons. Furthermore, the phylogenetic relationship among cellulose synthase genes conserved in other bacterial species was analyzed. We observed that the cellulose genes in the Komagataeibacter shared sequence similarities with the γ-proteobacterial species but not with the α-proteobacteria and that the type I and type II operons could be diverged from a same ancestor in Komagataeibacter. PMID:25913006

  11. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  12. ACCESSIBILITY AND CRYSTALLINITY OF CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ioelovich

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The accessibility of cellulose samples having various degrees of crystallinity was studied with respect to molecules of water, lower primary alcohols, and lower organic acids. It was found that small water molecules have full access to non-crystalline domains of cellulose (accessibility coefficient α = 1. Molecules of the lowest polar organic liquids (methanol, ethanol, and formic acid have partial access into the non-crystalline domains (α<1, and with increasing diameter of the organic molecules their accessibility to cellulose structure decreases. Accessibility of cellulose samples to molecules of various substances is a linear function of the coefficient α and the content of non-crystalline domains. The relationship between crystallinity (X and accessibility (A of cellulose to molecules of some liquids has been established as A = α (1-X. The water molecules were found to have greater access to cellulose samples than the molecules of the investigated organic liquids. The obtained results permit use of accessibility data to estimate the crystallinity of cellulose, to examine the structural state of non-crystalline domains, and to predict the reactivity of cellulose samples toward some reagents.

  13. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios >100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (~74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ζ-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  14. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing. PMID:26964959

  15. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate

  16. The Dictyostelium discoideum cellulose synthase: Structure/function analysis and identification of interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard L. Blanton

    2004-02-19

    OAK-B135 The major accomplishments of this project were: (1) the initial characterization of dcsA, the gene for the putative catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum; (2) the detection of a developmentally regulated event (unidentified, but perhaps a protein modification or association with a protein partner) that is required for cellulose synthase activity (i.e., the dcsA product is necessary, but not sufficient for cellulose synthesis); (3) the continued exploration of the developmental context of cellulose synthesis and DcsA; (4) the isolation of a GFP-DcsA-expressing strain (work in progress); and (5) the identification of Dictyostelium homologues for plant genes whose products play roles in cellulose biosynthesis. Although our progress was slow and many of our results negative, we did develop a number of promising avenues of investigation that can serve as the foundation for future projects.

  17. BIOINFORMATICS AND BIOSYNTHESIS ANALYSIS OF CELLULOSE SYNTHASE OPERON IN ZYMOMONAS MOBILIS ZM4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheik Abdul Kader Sheik Asraf, K. Narayanan Rajnish, and Paramasamy Gunasekaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of cellulose has been reported in many species of bacteria. The genes encoding cellulose biosynthetic enzymes of Z. mobilis have not been studied so far. Preliminary sequence analysis of the Z. mobilis ZM4 genome revealed the presence of a cellulose synthase operon comprised of Open Reading Frames (ORFs ZMO01083 (bcsA, ZMO1084 (bcsB and ZMO1085 (bcsC. The first gene of the operon bcsA encodes the cellulose synthase catalytic subunit BcsA. The second gene of the operon bcsB encodes the cellulose synthase subunit B (BcsB, which shows the presence of BcsB multi-domain and is inferred to bind c-di-GMP, the regulator of cellulose biosynthesis. The third gene of the operon bcsC encodes the cellulose synthase operon C domain protein (BcsC, which belongs to super family of teratrico peptide repeat (TPR that are believed to mediate protein – protein interactions for the formation of cellulose. Multiple sequence alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of BcsA and BcsC with other closely related homologs showed the presence of PVDPYE, HAKAGNLN, DCD motif and TPR motif, the characteristic motifs of bacterial cellulose synthases. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the ORF ZMO1085 and neighboring ORFs namely ZMO1083 and ZMO1084 indicated that all the ORFs are translationally linked and form an operon. Transcript analysis using Real-time PCR indicated the expression of the genes involved in cellulose synthase operon in Zymomonas mobilis ZM4. Z. mobilis colonies grown on RM-glucose containing Congo red displayed a characteristic bright red-brown colour. Z. mobilis colonies grown on RM-glucose medium supplemented with Calcoflour exhibited fluorescence. The arrangement of Calcofluor stained microfibrils can be seen in fluorescence microscopy which is an indicative for cellulose biosynthesis. AFM micrograph of the extracellular matrix of Z. mobilis shows a relatively dense matrix with bacterial cell residues. The presence of cellulose was

  18. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 cellulose fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 wild-type strain to hydrolyze cellulose and ferment the degradation products directly to ethanol and other metabolic byproducts makes it an attractive candidate for consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to investigate the expression of C. thermocellum mRNA during growth on crystalline cellulose in controlled replicate batch fermentations. A time-series analysis of gene expression revealed changes in transcript levels of {approx}40% of genes ({approx}1300 out of 3198 ORFs encoded in the genome) during transition from early-exponential to late-stationary phase. K-means clustering of genes with statistically significant changes in transcript levels identified six distinct clusters of temporal expression. Broadly, genes involved in energy production, translation, glycolysis and amino acid, nucleotide and coenzyme metabolism displayed a decreasing trend in gene expression as cells entered stationary phase. In comparison, genes involved in cell structure and motility, chemotaxis, signal transduction and transcription showed an increasing trend in gene expression. Hierarchical clustering of cellulosome-related genes highlighted temporal changes in composition of this multi-enzyme complex during batch growth on crystalline cellulose, with increased expression of several genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in degradation of non-cellulosic substrates in stationary phase. Overall, the results suggest that under low substrate availability, growth slows due to decreased metabolic potential and C. thermocellum alters its gene expression to (i) modulate the composition of cellulosomes that are released into the environment with an increased proportion of enzymes than can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides other than cellulose, (ii) enhance signal transduction and chemotaxis mechanisms perhaps to sense the oligosaccharide hydrolysis products

  19. Cellulose Derivatives for Water Repellent Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this poster presentation, we will discuss the synthesis and structural characterizations of nitro-benzyl cellulose (1), amino-benzyl cellulose (2) and pentafluoro –benzyl cellulose (3). All cellulose derivatives are synthesized by etherification process in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide h...

  20. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    George J.; Sabapathi SN

    2015-01-01

    Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers...

  1. Cellulose synthase complexes: structure and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This review is to update the most recent progress on characterization of the composition, regulation, and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes. We will highlight proteins that interact with cellulose synthases, e.g. cellulose synthase-interactive protein 1 (CSI1. The potential regulation mechanisms by which cellulose synthase interact with cortical microtubules in primary cell walls will be discussed.

  2. Pharmaceutical significance of cellulose: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The amalgamation of polymer and pharmaceutical sciences led to the introduction of polymer in the design and development of drug delivery systems. Polymeric delivery systems are mainly intended to achieve controlled or sustained drug delivery. Polysaccharides fabricated into hydrophilic matrices remain popular biomaterials for controlled-release dosage forms and the most abundant naturally occurring biopolymer is cellulose; so hdroxypropylmethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose and hydroxyethyl cellulose can be used for production of time controlled delivery systems. Additionally microcrystalline cellulose, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose as well as hydroxypropyl cellulose are used to coat tablets. Cellulose acetate phthalate and hydroxymethyl cellulose phthalate are also used for enteric coating of tablets. Targeting of drugs to the colon following oral administration has also been accomplished by using polysaccharides such as hdroxypropylmethyl cellulose and hydroxypropyl cellulose in hydrated form; also they act as binders that swell when hydrated by gastric media and delay absorption. This paper assembles the current knowledge on the structure and chemistry of cellulose, and in the development of innovative cellulose esters and ethers for pharmaceuticals.

  3. Radiation degradation of cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of straw and other cellulose polymers as feedstuff for ruminants is limited by its low digestibility. During recent decades it was attempted to increase the digestibility of straw by several chemical and physical methods. In this work some results of the degradation of gamma and electron treated wheat straw are reported. Complex methods of treatment (e.g. radiation influence and influence of lyes) are taken into consideration. In vitro-experiments with radiation treated straw show that the digestibility can be increased from 20% up to about 80%. A high pressure liquid chromatography method was used to analyze the hydrolysates. The contents of certain species of carbohydrates in the hydrolysates in dependence on the applied dose are given

  4. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate

  5. Occurrence of Cellulose-Producing Gluconacetobacter spp. in Fruit Samples and Kombucha Tea, and Production of the Biopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neera; Ramana, Karna Venkata; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2015-06-01

    Cellulose producing bacteria were isolated from fruit samples and kombucha tea (a fermented beverage) using CuSO4 solution in modified Watanabe and Yamanaka medium to inhibit yeasts and molds. Six bacterial strains showing cellulose production were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain DFBT, Ga. xylinus strain dfr-1, Gluconobacter oxydans strain dfr-2, G. oxydans strain dfr-3, Acetobacter orientalis strain dfr-4, and Gluconacetobacter intermedius strain dfr-5. All the cellulose-producing bacteria were checked for the cellulose yield. A potent cellulose-producing bacterium, i.e., Ga. xylinus strain DFBT based on yield (cellulose yield 5.6 g/L) was selected for further studies. Cellulose was also produced in non- conventional media such as pineapple juice medium and hydrolysed corn starch medium. A very high yield of 9.1 g/L cellulose was obtained in pineapple juice medium. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) analysis of the bacterial cellulose showed the characteristic peaks. Soft cellulose with a very high water holding capacity was produced using limited aeration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the surface characteristics of normal bacterial cellulose and soft cellulose. The structural analysis of the polymer was performed using (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). More interfibrillar space was observed in the case of soft cellulose as compared to normal cellulose. This soft cellulose can find potential applications in the food industry as it can be swallowed easily without chewing. PMID:25926011

  6. Thermophilic degradation of cellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1982-12-01

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass to chemical feedstocks and fuel by microbial fermentation is an important objective of developing biotechnology. Direct fermentation of cellulosic derivatives to ethanol by thermophilic bacteria offers a promising approach to this goal. Fermentations at elevated temperatures lowers the energy demand for cooling and also facilitates the recovery of volatile products. In addition, thermophilic microorganisms possess enzymes with greater stability than those from mesophilic microorganisms. Three anaerobic thermophilic cocultures that ferment cellulosic substrate mainly to ethanol have been described: Clostridium thermocellum/Clostriidium thermohydrosulfuricum, C. thermocellum/Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum, and C. thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus sp. nov. The growth characteristics and metabolic features of these cocultures are reviewed.

  7. Characterization of Cellulose Synthesis in Plant Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Samaneh Sadat Maleki; Kourosh Mohammadi; Kong-shu Ji

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most significant structural component of plant cell wall. Cellulose, polysaccharide containing repeated unbranched β (1-4) D-glucose units, is synthesized at the plasma membrane by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) from bacteria to plants. The CSC is involved in biosynthesis of cellulose microfibrils containing 18 cellulose synthase (CesA) proteins. Macrofibrils can be formed with side by side arrangement of microfibrils. In addition, beside CesA, various proteins like the...

  8. Chromophores in lignin-free cellulosic materials belong to three compound classes. Chromophores in cellulosics, XII

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CRI (chromophore release and identification) method isolates well-defined chromophoric substances from different cellulosic matrices, such as highly bleached pulps, cotton linters, bacterial cellulose, viscose or lyocell fibers, and cellulose acetates. The chromophores are present only in extrem...

  9. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvi, Denise T.B. de; Barud, Hernane S.; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho. UNESP. Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Caiut, Jose Mauricio A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo. Departamento de Quimica - FFCLRP/USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  10. Bacterial cellulose/boehmite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composites based on bacterial cellulose membranes and boehmite were obtained. SEM results indicate that the bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes are totally covered by boehmite and obtained XRD patterns suggest structural changes due to this boehmite addition. Thermal stability is accessed through TG curves and is dependent on boehmite content. Transparency is high comparing to pure BC as can be seen through UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  11. Cellulose biosynthesis in Acetobacter xylinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-lapse video microscopy has shown periodic reversals during the synthesis of cellulose. In the presence of Congo Red, Acetobacter produces a band of fine fibrils. The direction of cell movement is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of cell, and the rate of movement was decreased. A linear row of particles, presumably the cellulose synthesizing complexes, was found on the outer membrane by freeze-fracture technique. During the cell cycle, the increase of particles in linear row, the differentiation to four linear rows and the separation of the linear rows have been observed. A digitonin-solubilized cellulose synthase was prepared from A. xylinum, and incubated under conditions known to lead to active in vitro synthesis of 1,4-β-D-glucan polymer. Electron microscopy revealed that clusters of fibrils were assembled within minutes. Individual fibrils are 17 ± 2 angstroms in diameter. Evidence for the cellulosic composition of newly synthesized fibrils was based on incorporation of tritium from UDP-[3H] glucose binding of gold-labeled cellobiohydrolase, and an electron diffraction pattern identified as cellulose II polymorph instead of cellulose I

  12. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugo Melida; Antonio Encina; Asier Largo-Gosens; Esther Novo-Uzal; Rogelio Santiago; Federico Pomar; Pedro Garca; Penelope Garca-Angulo; Jose Luis Acebes; Jesus Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment.

  13. Bioconversion of cellulose into electrical energy in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid

    In microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bacteria generate electricity by mediating the oxidation of organic compounds and transferring the resulting electrons to an anode electrode. The first objective of this study was to test the possibility of generating electricity with rumen microorganisms as biocatalysts and cellulose as the electron donor in two-compartment MFCs. Maximum power density reached 55 mW/m2 (1.5 mA, 313 mV) with cellulose as the electron donor. Cellulose hydrolysis and electrode reduction were shown to support the production of current. The electrical current was sustained for over two months with periodic cellulose addition. Clarified rumen fluid and a soluble carbohydrate mixture, serving as the electron donors, could also sustain power output. The second objective was to analyze the composition of the bacterial communities enriched in the cellulose-fed MFCs. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes revealed that the microbial communities differed when different substrates were used in the MFCs. The anode-attached and the suspended consortia were shown to be different within the same MFC. Cloning and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the most predominant bacteria in the anode-attached consortia were related to Clostridium spp., while Comamonas spp. was abundant in the suspended consortia. The external resistance affects the characteristic outputs of MFCs by controlling the flow of electrons from the anode to the cathode. The third objective of this study was to determine the effect of various external resistances on power output and coulombic efficiency of cellulose-fed MFCs. Four external resistances (20, 249, 480, and 1000 ohms) were tested with a systematic approach of operating parallel MFCs independently at constant circuit loads for three months. A maximum power density of 66 mWm-2 was achieved by MFCs with 20 ohms circuit load, while MFCs with 249, 480 and1000 ohms external resistances produced 57

  14. Opportunity for profitable investments in cellulosic biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research efforts to allow large-scale conversion of cellulose into biofuels are being undertaken in the US and EU. These efforts are designed to increase logistic and conversion efficiencies, enhancing the economic competitiveness of cellulosic biofuels. However, not enough attention has been paid to the future market conditions for cellulosic biofuels, which will determine whether the necessary private investment will be available to allow a cellulosic biofuels industry to emerge. We examine the future market for cellulosic biofuels, differentiating between cellulosic ethanol and 'drop-in' cellulosic biofuels that can be transported with petroleum fuels and have equivalent energy values. We show that emergence of a cellulosic ethanol industry is unlikely without costly government subsidies, in part because of strong competition from conventional ethanol and limits on ethanol blending. If production costs of drop-in cellulosic biofuels fall enough to become competitive, then their expansion will not necessarily cause feedstock prices to rise. As long as local supplies of feedstocks that have no or low-valued alternative uses exist, then expansion will not cause prices to rise significantly. If cellulosic feedstocks come from dedicated biomass crops, then the supply curves will have a steeper slope because of competition for land. - Research highlights: → The likelihood of a significant cellulosic ethanol industry in the US looks dim. → Drop-in biofuels made from cellulosic feedstocks have a more promising future. → The spatial dimension of markets for cellulosic feedstocks will be limited. → Corn ethanol will be a tough competitor for cellulosic ethanol.

  15. EndB, a Multidomain Family 44 Cellulase from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17, Binds to Cellulose via a Novel Cellulose-Binding Module and to Another R. flavefaciens Protein via a Dockerin Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Rincón, Marco T.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Kirby, James; Scott, Karen P.; Flint, Harry J.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes in Ruminococcus spp. bind to cellulose are not fully understood. The product of the newly isolated cellulase gene endB from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17 was purified as a His-tagged product after expression in Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind directly to crystalline cellulose. The ability to bind cellulose is shown to be associated with a novel cellulose-binding module (CBM) located within a region of 200 amino aci...

  16. A thermodynamic investigation of the cellulose allomorphs: Cellulose(am), cellulose Iβ(cr), cellulose II(cr), and cellulose III(cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cellulose allomorphs were prepared and carefully characterized. • Measurements by oxygen bomb calorimetry, solution calorimetry, and by PPMS. • Thermodynamic properties for interconversion reactions of the cellulose allomorphs. • Review of the earlier literature with recalculation of property values. • Standard thermodynamic formation properties. - Abstract: The thermochemistry of samples of amorphous cellulose, cellulose I, cellulose II, and cellulose III was studied by using oxygen bomb calorimetry, solution calorimetry in which the solvent was cadoxen (a cadmium ethylenediamine solvent), and with a Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS) in zero magnetic field to measure standard massic heat capacities Cp,w∘ over the temperature range T = (2 to 302) K. The samples used in this study were prepared so as to have different values of crystallinity indexes CI and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, by Karl Fischer moisture determination, and by using gel permeation chromatography to determine the weight average degree of polymerization DPw. NMR measurements on solutions containing the samples dissolved in cadoxen were also performed in an attempt to resolve the issue of the equivalency or non-equivalency of the nuclei in the different forms of cellulose that were dissolved in cadoxen. While large differences in the NMR spectra for the various cellulose samples in cadoxen were not observed, one cannot be absolutely certain that these cellulose samples are chemically equivalent in cadoxen. Equations were derived which allow one to adjust measured property values of cellulose samples having a mass fraction of water wH2O to a reference value of the mass fraction of water wref. The measured thermodynamic properties (standard massic enthalpy of combustion ΔcHw∘, standard massic enthalpy of solution ΔsolHw∘, and Cp,w∘) were used in conjunction with the measured CI values to calculate values of the changes in the standard massic

  17. The thanatos mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana cellulose synthase 3 (AtCesA3) has a dominant-negative effect on cellulose synthesis and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis; Penning, Bryan; Milioni, Dimitra; McCann, Maureen C; Carpita, Nicholas C; Fasseas, Constantinos; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis

    2009-01-01

    Genetic functional analyses of mutants in plant genes encoding cellulose synthases (CesAs) have suggested that cellulose deposition requires the activity of multiple CesA proteins. Here, a genetic screen has led to the identification of thanatos (than), a semi-dominant mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with impaired growth of seedlings. Homozygous seedlings of than germinate and grow but do not survive. In contrast to other CesA mutants, heterozygous plants are dwarfed and display a radially swollen root phenotype. Cellulose content is reduced by approximately one-fifth in heterozygous and by two-fifths in homozygous plants, showing gene-dosage dependence. Map-based cloning revealed an amino acid substitution (P578S) in the catalytic domain of the AtCesA3 gene, indicating a critical role for this residue in the structure and function of the cellulose synthase complex. Ab initio analysis of the AtCesA3 subdomain flanking the conserved proline residue predicted that the amino acid substitution to serine alters protein secondary structure in the catalytic domain. Gene dosage-dependent expression of the AtCesA3 mutant gene in wild-type A. thaliana plants resulted in a than dominant-negative phenotype. We propose that the incorporation of a mis-folded CesA3 subunit into the cellulose synthase complex may stall or prevent the formation of functional rosette complexes. PMID:19645738

  18. Effect of late planting and shading on cellulose synthesis during cotton fiber secondary wall development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    Full Text Available Cotton-rapeseed or cotton-wheat double cropping systems are popular in the Yangtze River Valley and Yellow River Valley of China. Due to the competition of temperature and light resources during the growing season of double cropping system, cotton is generally late-germinating and late-maturing and has to suffer from the coupling of declining temperature and low light especially in the late growth stage. In this study, late planting (LP and shading were used to fit the coupling stress, and the coupling effect on fiber cellulose synthesis was investigated. Two cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cultivars were grown in the field in 2010 and 2011 at three planting dates (25 April, 25 May and 10 June each with three shading levels (normal light, declined 20% and 40% PAR. Mean daily minimum temperature was the primary environmental factor affected by LP. The coupling of LP and shading (decreased cellulose content by 7.8%-25.5% produced more severe impacts on cellulose synthesis than either stress alone, and the effect of LP (decreased cellulose content by 6.7%-20.9% was greater than shading (decreased cellulose content by 0.7%-5.6%. The coupling of LP and shading hindered the flux from sucrose to cellulose by affecting the activities of related cellulose synthesis enzymes. Fiber cellulose synthase genes expression were delayed under not only LP but shading, and the coupling of LP and shading markedly postponed and even restrained its expression. The decline of sucrose-phosphate synthase activity and its peak delay may cause cellulose synthesis being more sensitive to the coupling stress during the later stage of fiber secondary wall development (38-45 days post-anthesis. The sensitive difference of cellulose synthesis between two cultivars in response to the coupling of LP and shading may be mainly determined by the sensitiveness of invertase, sucrose-phosphate synthase and cellulose synthase.

  19. In Vivo Curdlan/Cellulose Bionanocomposite Synthesis by Genetically Modified Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ju; Kawano, Shin; Tajima, Kenji; Kondo, Tetsuo

    2015-10-12

    Bacterial cellulose pellicle produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus (G. xylinus) is one of the best biobased materials having a unique supernetwork structure with remarkable physiochemical properties for a wide range of medical and tissue-engineering applications. It is still necessary to modify them to obtain materials suitable for biomedical use with satisfactory mechanical strength, biodegradability, and bioactivity. The aim of this research was to develop a gene-transformation route for the production of bacterial cellulose/Curdlan (β-1,3-glucan) nanocomposites by separate but simultaneous in vivo synthesis of cellulose and Curdlan. Modification of the cellulose-nanofiber-producing system of G. xylinus enabled Curdlan to be synthesized simultaneously with cellulose nanofibers in vivo, resulting in biopreparation of nanocomposites. The obtained Curdlan/cellulose composites were characterized, and their properties were compared with those of normal bacterial cellulose pellicles, indicating that Curdlan mixed with the cellulose nanofibers at the nanoscale without disruption of the nanofiber network structure in the pellicle. PMID:26360299

  20. Increasing cellulose production and transgenic plant growth in forest tree species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Wei; Aaron Nelson; Emmanuel Johnson

    2005-01-01

    Cellulose is one of many important polymers in plants. Cellulose is made of repeat units of the monomer glucose. Cellulose is a major industrial biopolymer in the forest products, textile, and chemical industries. It also forms a large portion of the biomass useful in the generation of energy. Moreover, cellulose-based biomass is a renewable energy source that can be used for the generation of ethanol as a fuel. Cellulose is synthesized by a variety of living organisms such as plants and algae. It is the major component of plant cell walls with secondary cell walls having a much higher content of cellulose. The relationship between cellulose and lignin biosynthesis is complicated, but it is confirmed that inhibition of lignin biosynthesis in transgenic trees will increase cellulose biosynthesis and plant growth. Cellulose accumulation may be increased by down-regulating 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL, EC 6.2.1.12) as shown in transgenic aspen. There is no similar reports on down-regulating 4CL in transgenic conifers. Based on our established Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system in loblolly pine, we are able to produce antisense 4-CL transgenic loblolly pine which is predicted to have increasing cellulose accumulation. The overall objective of this project is to genetically engineer forest tree species such as loblolly pine with reduced amount of lignin and increased cellulose content. The research strategy includes: (1) isolate the 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene from loblolly pine seedlings by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RACE-PCR) techniques from the cDNA library; (2) construct binary expression vectors with antisense 4CL coding sequences and introduce antisense constructs of the 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene cloned from loblolly pine into the loblolly pine to down regulate the 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene expression; (3) study the

  1. Microfibrillated cellulose: morphology and accessibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrick, F.W.; Casebier, R.L.; Hamilton, J.K.; Sandberg, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is prepared by subjecting dilute slurries of cellulose fibers to repeated high-pressure homogenizing action. A highly microfibrillated product will have a gel-like appearance at 2% concentration in water. Such gels have pseudoplastic viscosity properties and are very fluid when stirred at high shear rate. The relative viscosity of 2% MFC dispersions may be used as a measure of the degree of homogenization or microfibrillation of a given wood cellulose pulp. The water retention value of an MFC product can also be used as an indicator for degree of homogenization. Structurally, MFC appears to be a web of interconnected fibrils and microfibrils, the latter having diameters in the range 10-100 nm as observed in scanning and transmission electron micrographs. Chemical studies have revealed that MFC is only moderately degraded, while being greatly expanded in surface area. The accessibility of cellulose in MFC is only moderately degraded, while being greatly expanded in surface area. The accessibility of cellulose in MFC toward chemical reagents is greatly increased. Higher reactivity was demonstrated in dilute cupriethylenediamine solubility, triphenylmethylation, acetylation, periodate oxidation, and mineral acid and cellulase enzyme hydrolysis rates. 16 references, 8 figures, 7 tables.

  2. The cellulose synthase companion proteins act non-redundantly with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1/POM2 and CELLULOSE SYNTHASE 6

    OpenAIRE

    Endler, Anne; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Edwin R Lampugnani; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellulose is a cell wall constituent that is essential for plant growth and development, and an important raw material for a range of industrial applications. Cellulose is synthesized at the plasma membrane by massive cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes that track along cortical microtubules in elongating cells of Arabidopsis through the activity of the protein CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 (CSI1). In a recent study we identified another family of proteins that also are associated ...

  3. Experimental Evolution of Trichoderma citrinoviride for Faster Deconstruction of Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Travisano, Michael; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2016-01-01

    Engineering faster cellulose deconstruction is difficult because it is a complex, cooperative, multi-enzyme process. Here we use experimental evolution to select for populations of Trichoderma citrinoviride that deconstruct up to five-fold more cellulose. Ten replicate populations of T. citrinoviride were selected for growth on filter paper by serial culture. After 125 periods of growth and transfer to fresh media, the filter paper deconstruction increased an average of 2.5 fold. Two populations were examined in more detail. The activity of the secreted cellulase mixtures increased more than two-fold relative to the ancestor and the largest increase was in the extracellular β-glucosidase activity. qPCR showed at least 16-fold more transcribed RNA for egl4 (endoglucanase IV gene), cbh1 (cellobiohydrolase I gene) and bgl1 (extracellular β-glucosidase I gene) in selected populations as compared to the ancestor, and earlier peak expressions of these genes. Deep sequencing shows that the regulatory strategies used to alter cellulase secretion differ in the two strains. The improvements in cellulose deconstruction come from earlier expression of all cellulases and increased relative amount of β-glucosidase, but with small increases in the total secreted protein and therefore little increase in metabolic cost. PMID:26820897

  4. Microbial Cellulose Assembly in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. Malcolm, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Based on evidence indicating a possible correlation between hypo-gravity conditions and alteration of cellulose production by the gram negative bacterium, Acetobacter xylinum, a ground-based study for a possible long term Space Shuttle flight has been conducted. The proposed experiment for A. xylinum aboard the Shuttle is the BRIC (Biological Research in a Canister), a metal container containing spaces for nine Petri plates. Using a common experimental design, the cellulose production capability as well as the survivability of the A. xylinum strains NQ5 and AY201 have been described. It should now be possible to use the BRIC for the first long term microgravity experiments involving the biosynthesis of cellulose.

  5. Chemical modification of cellulose for electrospinning applications

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Ferrer, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to develop technology for producing cellulose fatty acid esters that later will be used to produce fibrous materials by means of electrospinning. Main material of the study is cellulose-stearate which is a polymer synthesised by reaction between stearoyl chloride and cellulose. The experimental part consists of synthesis of it by chemical modification of cellulose using ionic liquid as a reaction media. In addition, ionic liquid is also synthesised from the beginning....

  6. Filtration properties of bacterial cellulose membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Janika

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose has the same molecular formula as cellulose from plant origin, but it is characterized by several unique properties including high purity, crystallinity and mechanical strength. These properties are dependent on parameters such as the bacterial strain used, the cultivation conditions and post-growth processing. The possibility to achieve bacterial cellulose membranes with different properties by varying these parameters could make bacterial cellulose an interesting materi...

  7. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Omar P. Troncoso; Solene Commeaux; Torres, Fernando G.

    2012-01-01

    Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC) has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received...

  8. A Molecular Description of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, Joshua T.; Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Zimmer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, and certain organisms from bacteria to plants and animals synthesize cellulose as an extracellular polymer for various biological functions. Humans have used cellulose for millennia as a material and an energy source, and the advent of a lignocellulosic fuel industry will elevate it to the primary carbon source for the burgeoning renewable energy sector. Despite the biological and societal importance of cellulose, the molecular mechanism by ...

  9. The multicellular morphotypes of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli produce cellulose as the second component of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogaj, X; Nimtz, M; Rohde, M; Bokranz, W; Römling, U

    2001-03-01

    Production of cellulose has been thought to be restricted to a few bacterial species such as the model organism Acetobacter xylinus. We show by enzymatic analysis and mass spectrometry that, besides thin aggregative fimbriae, the second component of the extracellular matrix of the multicellular morphotype (rdar) of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli is cellulose. The bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ and bcsC genes responsible for cellulose biosynthesis are not regulated by AgfD, the positive transcriptional regulator of the rdar morphotype. Transcription of the bcs genes was not co-expressed with the rdar morphotype under any of the environmental conditions examined. However, cellulose biosynthesis was turned on by the sole expression of adrA, a gene encoding a putative transmembrane protein regulated by agfD, indicating a novel pathway for the activation of cellulose synthesis. The co-expression of cellulose and thin aggregative fimbriae leads to the formation of a highly hydrophobic network with tightly packed cells aligned in parallel in a rigid matrix. As the production of cellulose would now appear to be a property widely distributed among bacteria, the function of the cellulose polymer in bacteria will have to be considered in a new light. PMID:11260463

  10. The trafficking and behavior of cellulose synthase and a glimpse of potential cellulose synthesis regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Logan BASHLINE; Juan DU; Ying GU

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis is a topic of intensive research not only due to the significance of cellulose in the integrity of plant cell walls,but also due to the potential of using cellulose,a natural carbon source,in the production ot biofuels.Characterization of the composition,regulation,and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) is critical to an understanding of cellulose biosynthesis as well as the characterization of additional proteins that contribute to the production of cellulose either through direct interactions with CSCs or through indirect mechanisms.In this review,a highlight of a few proteins that appear to affect cellulose biosynthesis,which includes:KORRIGAN (KOR),Cellulose Synthase-Interactive Protein 1 (CSI1),and the poplar microtubule-associated protein,PttMAP20,will accompany a description of cellulose synthase (CESA) behavior and a discussion of CESA trafficking compartments that might act in the regulation of cellulose biosynthesis.

  11. Adsorption and desorption of cellulose derivatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Cellulose derivatives, in particular carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) are used in many (industrial) applications. The aim of this work is to obtain insight into the adsorption mechanism of cellulose derivatives on solid-liquid interfaces.In chapter 1 of this thesis we discuss some appl

  12. Iodine catalyzed acetylation of starch and cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starch and cellulose, earth's most abundant biopolymers, are of tremendous economic importance. Over 90% of cotton and 50% of wood are made of cellulose. Wood and cotton are the major resources for all cellulose products such as paper, textiles, construction materials, cardboard, as well as such c...

  13. Bioengineering cellulose-hemicellulose networks in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obembe, O.

    2006-01-01

    The interactions between cellulose and hemicellulose in the cell walls are important in the industrial application of the cellulose (natural) fibres. We strive to modify these interactions (i) by interfering with cellulose biosynthesis and (ii) by direct interference of the

  14. AcsA-AcsB: The core of the cellulose synthase complex from Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, John B; Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Kao, Teh-hui; Tien, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, produces cellulose of exceptionally high crystallinity in comparison to the cellulose of higher plants. This bacterial cellulose is synthesized and extruded into the extracellular medium by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). The catalytic component of this complex is encoded by the gene AcsAB. However, several other genes are known to encode proteins critical to cellulose synthesis and are likely components of the bacterial CSC. We have purified an active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB from G. hansenii ATCC23769 to homogeneity by two different methods. With the purified protein, we have determined how it is post-translationally processed, forming the active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB. Additionally, we have performed steady-state kinetic studies on the AcsA-AcsB complex. Finally through mutagenesis studies, we have explored the roles of the postulated CSC proteins AcsC, AcsD, and CcpAx. PMID:26672449

  15. Ionic Liquids and Cellulose: Dissolution, Chemical Modification and Preparation of New Cellulosic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Isik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to its abundance and a wide range of beneficial physical and chemical properties, cellulose has become very popular in order to produce materials for various applications. This review summarizes the recent advances in the development of new cellulose materials and technologies using ionic liquids. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids has been used to develop new processing technologies, cellulose functionalization methods and new cellulose materials including blends, composites, fibers and ion gels.

  16. Impact of Biofield Treatment on Chemical and Thermal Properties of Cellulose and Cellulose Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose being an excellent biopolymer has cemented its place firmly in many industries as a coating material, textile, composites, and biomaterial applications. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of biofield treatment on physicochemical properties of cellulose and cellulose acetate. The cellulose and cellulose acetate were exposed to biofield and further the chemical and thermal properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction study asserted that the biofield treatment did...

  17. Automated Yeast Mating Protocol Using Open Reading Frames from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome to Improve Yeast Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineering the industrial ethanologen Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars from lignocellulosic biomass is critical for commercializing cellulosic fuel ethanol production. Approaches to engineer pentose-fermenting yeasts have required expression of additional genes. We implemented a...

  18. High performance cellulose nanocomposites: comparing the reinforcing ability of bacterial cellulose and nanofibrillated cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, K. Y.; Tammelin, T.; Schulfter, K.; Kiiskinen, H.; Samela, J.; Bismarck, A.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the surface and bulk properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and bacterial cellulose (BC), as well as their reinforcing ability in polymer nanocomposites. BC possesses higher critical surface tension of 57 mN m(-1) compared to NFC (41 mN m(-1)). The thermal degradation temperature in both nitrogen and air atmosphere of BC was also found to be higher than that of NFC. These results are in good agreement with the higher crystallinity of BC as determined by XRD, meas...

  19. Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

    2000-05-07

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  20. Production of Bacterial Cellulose from Alternate Feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David Neil; Hamilton, Melinda Ann

    2000-05-01

    Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS & HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

  1. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization. PMID:25837659

  2. Polymorphy in native cellulose: recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a number of earlier studies, the authors developed a model of cellulose structure based on the existence of two stable, linearly ordered conformations of the cellulose chain that are dominant in celluloses I and II, respectively. The model rests on extensive Raman spectral observations together with conformational considerations and solid-state 13C-NMR studies. More recently, they have proposed, on the basis of high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR observations, that native celluloses are composites of two distinct crystalline forms that coexist in different proportions in all native celluloses. In the present work, they examine the Raman spectra of the native celluloses, and reconcile their view of conformational differences with the new level of crystalline polymorphy of native celluloses revealed in the solid-state 13C-NMR investigations

  3. Cellulase induction in Trichoderma reesei by cellulose requires its own basal expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle-Urioste, J C; Escobar-Vera, J; El-Gogary, S; Henrique-Silva, F; Torigoi, E; Crivellaro, O; Herrera-Estrella, A; El-Dorry, H

    1997-04-11

    The induction of cellulases by cellulose, an insoluble polymer, in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is puzzling. We previously proposed a mechanism that is based on the presence of low levels of cellulase in the uninduced fungus; this basal cellulase activity would digest cellulose-releasing oligosaccharides that could enter the cell and trigger expression of cellulases. We now present experiments that lend further support to this model. We show here that transcripts of two members of the cellulase system, cbh1 and egl1, are present in uninduced T. reesei cells. These transcripts are induced at least 1100-fold in the presence of cellulose. We also show that a construct containing the hygromycin B resistance-encoding gene driven by the cbh1 promoter confers hygromycin B resistance to T. reesei cells grown in the absence of cellulose. Moreover, cellulose-induced production of the cbh1 transcript was suppressed when antisense RNA against three members of the cellulase system was expressed in vivo. Experiments are presented indicating that extracellular cellulase activity is the rate-limiting event in induction of synthesis of the cellulase transcripts by cellulose. The results reveal a critical requirement for basal expression of the cellulase system for induction of synthesis of its own transcripts by cellulose. PMID:9092563

  4. Surface modification of cellulose fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Naceur Belgacem

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Several approaches to the modification of cellulose fibres are described, namely: (i physical treatments such as corona or plasma treatments under different atmospheres; (ii grafting with hydrophobic molecules using well-known sizing compounds; (iii grafting with bi-functional molecules, leaving one of the functions available for further exploitation; and (iv grafting with organometallic compounds. The modified surfaces were characterized by elemental analysis, contact angle measurements, inverse gas chromatography, X-ray photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy, wettability, etc. These different tools provided clear-cut evidence of the occurrence of chemical reactions between the grafting agent used and the hydroxy functions of the cellulose surface, as well as of the existence of covalent bonding in the ensuing composite materials between the matrix and the fibres through the use of doubly reactive coupling agents.

  5. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  6. Cell adhesion on cellulose nanofibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Liljeström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) is an emerging biomaterial suitable for medical research. CNF hydrogel has been used as a three dimensional platforms for cell culture. This thesis aims to understand how human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells interact with CNF. Measurements were performed with Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation in order to quantify cell adsorption on CNF. Furthermore, the effect of the cell medium on the viscoelastic properties of CNF and on cell-CNF interactions were ...

  7. Lowering costs of microbial cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Pajuelo, María González; Bungay, Henry; Hogg, Tim; Vasconcelos, Isabel

    1997-01-01

    We have been conducting research with Acetobacter xylinium for microbial conversion of sugars to cellulose. A rotating disk biological contactor should lower costs considerably because its production rates are greater than for the usual method of surface culture. Another major cost saving comes from replacing expensive sugars in the medium with sugars derived from wastes. Extracts of spent grapes from wastes of Portuguese wine factories supply suitable sugars for good production of micr...

  8. The Cellulase KORRIGAN Is Part of the Cellulose Synthase Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vain, T.; Crowell, E.F.; Timpano, H.; Biot, E.; Desprez, T.; Mansoori Zangir, N.; Trindade, L.M.; Pagant, S.; Robert, S.; Hofte, H.; Gonneau, M.; Vernhettes, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth and organ formation depend on the oriented deposition of load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Cellulose is synthesized by a large relative molecular weight cellulose synthase complex (CSC), which comprises at least three distinct cellulose synthases. Cellulose synthesis

  9. Cellulose-binding domains: tools for innovation in cellulosic fibre production and modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quentin, M.G.E.; Valk, van der H.C.P.M.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Jong, de E.

    2003-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of cellulose, nature's most abundant macromolecule, and therefore represent a renewable resource of special technical importance. Cellulose degrading enzymes involved in plant cell wall loosening (expansins), or produced by plant pathogenic microorganisms (cellulases),

  10. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Sasaki, Kengo; den Haan, Riaan; Inokuma, Kentaro; Ogino, Chiaki; van Zyl, Willem H; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell surface. The cellulase-displaying yeast strain exhibited clear cell-to-cellulose adhesion and a "tearing" cellulose degradation pattern; the adhesion ability correlated with enhanced surface area and roughness of the target cellulose fibers, resulting in higher hydrolysis efficiency. The engineered yeast directly produced ethanol from rice straw despite a more than 40% decrease in the required enzyme dosage for high-density fermentation. Thus, improved cell-to-cellulose interactions provided a novel strategy for increasing cellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a mechanism for promoting the feasibility of cellulosic biofuel production. PMID:27079382

  11. Effects of reaction conditions on cellulose structures synthesized in vitro by bacterial cellulose synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Sugiyama, Junji; Imai, Tomoya

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was synthesized by cellulose synthases extracted from the Komagataeibacter xylinus (formerly known as Gluconacetobacter xylinus). The effects of temperature and centrifugation of the reaction solution on the synthesis products were investigated. Cellulose with number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) roughly in the range 60-80 and cellulose II crystal structure was produced under all conditions. The amount of cellulose varied with temperature and centrifugation, and the centrifugation at 2000 × g also slightly reduced the DPn. Cellulose production was maximal around the temperature 35 °C and without centrifugation. At higher temperatures and during centrifugation at 2000 × g the proteins started to denature, causing differences also in the morphology of the cellulosic aggregates, as seen with electron microscopy. These observations serve as a basis for discussions about the factors affecting the structure formation and chain length of in vitro synthesized cellulose. PMID:26572398

  12. Micromechanics and poroelasticity of hydrated cellulose networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Sanchez, P; Rincon, Mauricio; Wang, D; Brulhart, S; Stokes, J R; Gidley, M J

    2014-06-01

    The micromechanics of cellulose hydrogels have been investigated using a new rheological experimental approach, combined with simulation using a poroelastic constitutive model. A series of mechanical compression steps at different strain rates were performed as a function of cellulose hydrogel thickness, combined with small amplitude oscillatory shear after each step to monitor the viscoelasticity of the sample. During compression, bacterial cellulose hydrogels behaved as anisotropic materials with near zero Poisson's ratio. The micromechanics of the hydrogels altered with each compression as water was squeezed out of the structure, and microstructural changes were strain rate-dependent, with increased densification of the cellulose network and increased cellulose fiber aggregation observed for slower compressive strain rates. A transversely isotropic poroelastic model was used to explain the observed micromechanical behavior, showing that the mechanical properties of cellulose networks in aqueous environments are mainly controlled by the rate of water movement within the structure. PMID:24784575

  13. Cellulose Synthases and Synthesis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne Endler; Staffan Persson

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are complex structures composed of high-molecular-weight polysaccharides,proteins,and lignins. Among the wall polysaccharides,cellulose,a hydrogen-bonded β-1,4-linked glucan microfibril,is the main load-bearing wall component and a key precursor for industrial applications. Cellulose is synthesized by large multi-meric cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes,tracking along cortical microtubules at the plasma membrane. The only known components of these complexes are the cellulose synthase proteins. Recent studies have identified tentative interaction partners for the CesAs and shown that the migratory patterns of the CesA complexes depend on phosphorylation status. These advances may become good platforms for expanding our knowledge about cellulose synthesis in the near future. In addition,our current understanding of cellulose chain polymerization in the context of the CesA complex is discussed.

  14. CELLULOSE POWDER FROM OLIVE INDUSTRY SOLID WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman A. Hamed,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a method for extracting cellulose from olive industry solid waste has been developed. The method involves subjecting solid olive waste to kraft pulping, followed by multistep bleaching processes. The totally free chlorine chemical bleaching sequence APEP was the most effective and gave an average cellulose yield of about 35%. The extracted cellulose was extensively characterized using FTIR, EMS, HPLC, and viscometry. Our key finding in this study is that the extracted cellulose was found to have physio-chemical properties that are similar to those of conventional microcrystalline cellulose (MCC. This is important, as our results show how lignocellulosic agricultural wastes can be utilized to produce high value cellulose powder.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces reticuli, an efficient degrader of crystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberg, Daniel; Al-Dilaimi, Arwa; Busche, Tobias; Wedderhoff, Ina; Schrempf, Hildgund; Kalinowski, Jörn; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío

    2016-03-20

    We report the complete, GC-rich genome sequence of the melanin producer Streptomyces reticuli Tü 45 (S. reticuli) that targets and degrades highly crystalline cellulose by the concerted action of a range of biochemically characterized proteins. It consists of a linear 8.3 Mb chromosome, a linear 0.8 Mb megaplasmid, a linear 94 kb plasmid and a circular 76 kb plasmid. Noteworthy, the megaplasmid is the second largest known Streptomyces plasmid. Preliminary analysis reveals, among others, 43 predicted gene clusters for the synthesis of secondary metabolites and 456 predicted genes for binding and degradation of cellulose, other polysaccharides and carbohydrate-containing compounds. PMID:26851387

  16. Size Effects of Nano-crystalline Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Kang LI; Xiao Fang LI; Yong JIANG; Mei Zhen ZENG; En Yong DING

    2003-01-01

    Natural cellulose with the crystal form of cellulose Ⅰ, when treated with condensed lye(e.g. 18%NaOH), can change into new crystal form of cellulose Ⅱ. But the nano-crystallinecellulose(NCC) can do it when only treated with dilute lye (e.g. 1%NaOH) at room temperatureand even can dissolve into slightly concentrated lye (e.g. 4%NaOH).

  17. Bulk and interfacial properties of cellulose ethers

    OpenAIRE

    Bodvik, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    This work summarizes several studies that all concern cellulose ethers of the types methylcellulose (MC) hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and ethyl(hydroxyethyl)cellulose (EHEC). They share the feature of negative temperature response, as they are soluble in water at room temperature but phase separate and sometimes form gels at high temperatures. The different types of viscosity transitions occurring in these three cellulose ethers are well-known. However, earlier studies have not solved ...

  18. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Satoshi; Numakawa, Tetsuya; Kubo, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechani...

  19. Drag Reduction of Bacterial Cellulose Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Ogata; Tetsuya Numakawa; Takuya Kubo

    2011-01-01

    Drag reduction due to bacterial cellulose suspensions with small environmental loading was investigated. Experiments were carried out by measuring the pressure drop in pipe flow. It was found that bacterial cellulose suspensions give rise to drag reduction in the turbulent flow range. We observed a maximum drag reduction ratio of 11% and found that it increased with the concentration of the bacterial cellulose suspension. However, the drag reduction effect decreased in the presence of mechani...

  20. Cellulose biosynthesis and function in bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, P; Mayer, R; Benziman, M

    1991-01-01

    The current model of cellulose biogenesis in plants, as well as bacteria, holds that the membranous cellulose synthase complex polymerizes glucose moieties from UDP-Glc into beta-1,4-glucan chains which give rise to rigid crystalline fibrils upon extrusion at the outer surface of the cell. The distinct arrangement and degree of association of the polymerizing enzyme units presumably govern extracellular chain assembly in addition to the pattern and width of cellulose fibril deposition. Most e...

  1. Liquid crystalline cellulose derivatives for mirrorless lasing

    OpenAIRE

    Wenzlik, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis cholesteric films made of liquid crystalline cellulose derivatives with improved optical properties were prepared. The choice of the solvent, hydrogen bond influencing additives, the synthetic realization of a very high degree of substitution on the cellulosic polymer and the use of mechanical stirring at the upper concentration limit of the liquid crystalline range were the basis for an improved alignment of the applied cellulose tricarbamates. In combination with a tuned subs...

  2. Lyocell, The New Generation of Regenerated Cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Éva Borbély

    2008-01-01

    For the majority of the last century, commercial routes to regenerated cellulosefibres have coped with the difficulties of making a good cellulose solution by using an easyto dissolve derivative (e.g. xanthane in the case of viscose rayon) or complex (e.g.cuprammonium rayon). For the purposes of this paper, advanced cellulosic fibres aredefined as those made from a process involving direct dissolution of cellulose. The firstexamples of such fibres have now been generically designaed as lyocel...

  3. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  4. Alteration of in vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by carboxymethylcellulose and other cellulose derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    In vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by the Gram-negative bacterium Acetobacter xylinum can be altered by incubation in carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), a negatively charged water-soluble cellulose derivative, and also by incubation in a variety of neutral, water-soluble cellulose derivatives. In the presence of all of these substituted celluloses, normal fasciation of microfibril bundles to form the typical twisting ribbon is prevented. Alteration of ribbon assembly is most extensive in the presen...

  5. An Investigation of Cellulose Digesting Bacteria in the Panda Gut Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M.; Leung, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) diet consists primarily of bamboo leaves, stems and shoots. However, the Giant Panda lacks genes for the enzymes needed to digest cellulose, the core component of bamboo. Thus, it is hypothesized that the cellulolytic digestion necessary for maintaining the Giant Panda diet is carried out by microbial symbionts in the panda gut microbiota. Fecal microbiota is used as surrogate index for gut microbiota since the Giant Panda is listed by the World Conservation Union as a Threatened Species. Two bacterial isolates with potential cellulolytic activity were isolated from Giant Panda fecal samples and cultured on selective media CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose) agar and CMC-Congo Red agar using various methods of inoculation. After incubation, clearance zones around colonies were observed and used as qualitative assays for cellulose digestion. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 16S rRNA gene was completed and species identification was done based on the BLAST result of 16S rRNA sequence obtained using Sanger sequencing. Once the cellulase activity is confirmed, genomic DNA of the bacteria will be extracted and used for whole genome shotgun sequencing. Illumina next generation sequencing platform will be adopted as it yields high-throughput information, providing a better understanding of cellulose digestion and the molecular genetic pathways to renewable sources of biofuels. Researchers have identified multiple cellulose-digesting microbes in the Giant Panda gut, but few have applied such bacteria in converting cellulose into glucose to create biofuel. Cellulosic ethanol, a biofuel, is produced through the fermentation of lignocellulosic biomasses. This anaerobic process is aided by cellulose-digesting enzymes. Certain microbes, such as those present in the Giant Panda gut, can produce enzymes that cleave the glycosidic bonds of cellulose (C6H10O5) into glucose molecules (C6H12O6), which can then be fermented into ethanol

  6. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43N/mm(2) and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. PMID:27127053

  7. Carboxymethylation of Cellulose by Microwave irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Cellulose may be readily converted into ethers involving primary and secondary alcohol groups in each monomer unit and the glycosidic bonds. However, these reactions are rather more complicated than with simple substances, because the stereochemistry of the cellulose molecule is such that the vast majority of its hydroxyl groups form intra-chain hydrogen bonds or inter-chain hydrogen bonds with contiguous molecules. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has played an important part in the commercial uses of cellulose derivatives. CMC becomes alkali and water soluble. The polarity can, in fact, be increased by introduction of ionizing groups, ie carboxymethyl group. CMC is generally produced by the reaction of alkali cellulose with chloroacetic acid.

  8. Chemo-catalytic valorization of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palkovits, R. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie

    2012-07-01

    Cellulose can be utilized as carbon source for the production of novel platform molecules as well as fuel motifs. Promising transformation strategies cover the hydrolytic hydrogenation or hydrogenolysis of cellulose to sugar alcohols, the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose followed by dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural or levulinic acid and the further hydrogenation of levulinic acid to {gamma}-valerolactone. Main challenges result from the high degree of functionalization of cellulosic feedstocks. In line, processes are carried out in liquid phase utilizing rather polar solvents and aiming for a tailored defunctionalisation of these oxygen rich compounds. Consequently, such transformations require novel strategies concerning the development of suitable catalysts and appropriate process concepts. (orig.)

  9. Simultaneous cellulose conversion and hydrogen production assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV-light photocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guan; Ni, Chengsheng; Huang, Xiubing; Welgamage, Aakash; Lawton, Linda A.; Robertson, Peter K. J.; Irvine, John T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of cellulose to sugars and carbon dioxide with simultaneous production of hydrogen assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV or solar light irradiation was achieved upon immobilization of cellulose onto a TiO2 photocatalyst. This approach enables production of hydrogen from water without using valuable sacrificial agents, and provides the possibility for recovering sugars as liquid fuels.

  10. Simultaneous cellulose conversion and hydrogen production assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV-light photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan; Ni, Chengsheng; Huang, Xiubing; Welgamage, Aakash; Lawton, Linda A; Robertson, Peter K J; Irvine, John T S

    2016-01-28

    Photocatalytic conversion of cellulose to sugars and carbon dioxide with simultaneous production of hydrogen assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV or solar light irradiation was achieved upon immobilization of cellulose onto a TiO2 photocatalyst. This approach enables production of hydrogen from water without using valuable sacrificial agents, and provides the possibility for recovering sugars as liquid fuels. PMID:26661296

  11. High Performance Regenerated Cellulose Membranes from Trimethylsilyl Cellulose

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Ola

    2013-05-01

    Regenerated cellulose (RC) membranes are extensively used in medical and pharmaceutical separation processes due to their biocompatibility, low fouling tendency and solvent resistant properties. They typically possess ultrafiltration and microfiltration separation characteristics, but recently, there have been attempts to widen their pool of applications in nanofiltration processes. In this work, a novel method for preparing high performance composite RC membranes was developed. These membranes reveal molecular weight cut-offs (MWCO) of less than 250 daltons, which possibly put them ahead of all commercial RC membranes and in competition with high performance nanofiltration membranes. The membranes were prepared by acidic hydrolysis of dip-coated trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC) films. TMSC, with a degree of silylation (DS) of 2.8, was prepared from microcrystalline cellulose by reaction with hexamethyldisilazane under the homogeneous conditions of LiCl/DMAC solvent system. Effects of parameters, such as coating solution concentration and drying rates, were investigated. It was concluded that higher TMSC concentrations as well as higher solvent evaporation rates favor better MWCOs, mainly due to increase in the selective layer thickness. Successful cross-linking of prepared membranes with glyoxal solutions, in the presence of boric acid as a catalyst, resulted in MWCOs less than 250 daltons. The suitability of this crosslinking reaction for large scale productions was already proven in the manufacturing of durable-press fabrics. For us, the inexpensive raw materials as well as the low reaction times and temperatures were of interest. Moreover, the non-toxic nature of glyoxal is a key advantage in medical and pharmaceutical applications. The membranes prepared in this work are strong candidates for separation of small organic solutes from organic solvents streams in pharmaceutical industries. Their hydrophilicity, compared to typical nanofiltration membranes, offer

  12. Development and characterization of an oat TILLING-population and identification of mutations in lignin and β-glucan biosynthesis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanand Vivekanand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oat, Avena sativa is the sixth most important cereal in the world. Presently oat is mostly used as feed for animals. However, oat also has special properties that make it beneficial for human consumption and has seen a growing importance as a food crop in recent decades. Increased demand for novel oat products has also put pressure on oat breeders to produce new oat varieties with specific properties such as increased or improved β-glucan-, antioxidant- and omega-3 fatty acid levels, as well as modified starch and protein content. To facilitate this development we have produced a TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes population of the spring oat cultivar SW Belinda. Results Here a population of 2600 mutagenised M2 lines, producing 2550 M3 seed lots were obtained. The M2 population was initially evaluated by visual inspection and a number of different phenotypes were seen ranging from dwarfs to giants, early flowering to late flowering, leaf morphology and chlorosis. Phloroglucinol/HCl staining of M3 seeds, obtained from 1824 different M2 lines, revealed a number of potential lignin mutants. These were later confirmed by quantitative analysis. Genomic DNA was prepared from the M2 population and the mutation frequency was determined. The estimated mutation frequency was one mutation per 20 kb by RAPD-PCR fingerprinting, one mutation per 38 kb by MALDI-TOF analysis and one mutation per 22.4 kb by DNA sequencing. Thus, the overall mutation frequency in the population is estimated to be one mutation per 20-40 kb, depending on if the method used addressed the whole genome or specific genes. During the investigation, 6 different mutations in the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (AsPAL1 gene and 10 different mutations in the cellulose synthase-like (AsCslF6 β-glucan biosynthesis gene were identified. Conclusion The oat TILLING population produced in this work carries, on average, hundreds of mutations in every individual

  13. Pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb

    Sugars are the feedstocks for many promising advanced cellulosic biofuels. Traditional sugars derived from starch and sugar crops are limited in their availability. In principle, more plentiful supply of sugars can be obtained from depolymerization of cellulose, the most abundant form of biomass in the world. Breaking the glycosidic bonds between the pyranose rings in the cellulose chain to liberate glucose has usually been pursued by enzymatic hydrolysis although a purely thermal depolymerization route to sugars is also possible. Fast pyrolysis of pure cellulose yields primarily levoglucosan, an anhydrosugar that can be hydrolyzed to glucose. However, naturally occurring alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM) in biomass are strongly catalytic toward ring-breaking reactions that favor formation of light oxygenates over anhydrosugars. Removing the AAEM by washing was shown to be effective in increasing the yield of anhydrosugars; but this process involves removal of large amount of water from biomass that renders it energy intensive and thereby impractical. In this work passivation of the AAEM (making them less active or inactive) using mineral acid infusion was explored that will increase the yield of anhydrosugars from fast pyrolysis of biomass. Mineral acid infusion was tried by previous researchers, but the possibility of chemical reactions between infused acid and AAEM in the biomass appears to have been overlooked, possibly because metal cations might be expected to already be substantially complexed to chlorine or other strong anions that are found in biomass. Likewise, it appears that previous researchers assumed that as long as AAEM cations were in the biomass, they would be catalytically active regardless of the nature of their complexion with anions. On the contrary, we hypothesized that AAEM can be converted to inactive or less active salts using mineral acids. Various biomass feedstocks were infused with mineral (hydrochloric, nitric, sulfuric and

  14. An Outer Membrane Protein Involved in the Uptake of Glucose Is Essential for Cytophaga hutchinsonii Cellulose Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Xia; Yang, Tengteng; Zhang, Weixin; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2016-03-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii specializes in cellulose digestion by employing a collection of novel cell-associated proteins. Here, we identified a novel gene locus, CHU_1276, that is essential for C. hutchinsonii cellulose utilization. Disruption of CHU_1276 in C. hutchinsonii resulted in complete deficiency in cellulose degradation, as well as compromised assimilation of cellobiose or glucose at a low concentration. Further analysis showed that CHU_1276 was an outer membrane protein that could be induced by cellulose and low concentrations of glucose. Transcriptional profiling revealed that CHU_1276 exerted a profound effect on the genome-wide response to both glucose and Avicel and that the mutant lacking CHU_1276 displayed expression profiles very different from those of the wild-type strain under different culture conditions. Specifically, comparison of their transcriptional responses to cellulose led to the identification of a gene set potentially regulated by CHU_1276. These results suggest that CHU_1276 plays an essential role in cellulose utilization, probably by coordinating the extracellular hydrolysis of cellulose substrate with the intracellular uptake of the hydrolysis product in C. hutchinsonii. PMID:26773084

  15. [Audiometry in the cellulose industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, C R; Milano, L; Pedulla, P; Carlesi, G; Bacaloni, A; Monaco, E

    1993-01-01

    A noise level dosimetry and audiometric testing were conducted in a cellulose factory to determine the hazardous noise level and the prevalence of noise induced hearing loss among the exposed workers. The noise level was recorded up to 90 db (A) in several working areas. 18 workers, potentially exposed to noise injury, evidenced a significant hearing loss. While no evidence of noise injury was recorded in a control group of 100 subjects. This finding suggest a strict relationship between audiometric tests, the noise level recorded in the working place and the working seniority of exposed employers. PMID:7720969

  16. Cellulose and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes in Fusarium commune transcriptome and functional characterization of three identified xylanases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuhong, Huang; Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Specific enzymes from plant-pathogenic microbes demonstrate high effectiveness for natural lignocellulosic biomass degradation and utilization. The secreted lignocellulolytic enzymes of Fusarium species have not been investigated comprehensively, however. In this study we compared cellulose...... and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes of classical fungal enzyme producers with those of Fusarium species. The results indicated that Fusarium species are robust cellulose and hemicellulose degraders. Wheat bran, carboxymethylcellulose and xylan-based growth media induced a broad spectrum of lignocellulolytic enzymes...... in Fusarium commune. Prediction of the cellulose and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes in the F. commune transcriptome using peptide pattern recognition revealed 147 genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and six genes encoding lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (AA9 and AA11), including all relevant cellulose...

  17. Two proteins of the Dictyostelium spore coat bind to cellulose in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Brown, R D; West, C M

    1998-07-28

    The spore coat of Dictyostelium contains nine different proteins and cellulose. Interactions between protein and cellulose were investigated using an in vitro binding assay. Proteins extracted from coats with urea and 2-mercaptoethanol could, after removal of urea by gel filtration, efficiently bind to particles of cellulose (Avicel), but not Sephadex or Sepharose. Two proteins, SP85 and SP35, were enriched in the reconstitution, and they retained their cellulose binding activities after purification by ion exchange chromatography under denaturing conditions to suppress protein--protein interactions. Neither protein exhibited cellulase activity, though under certain conditions SP85 copurified with a cellulase activity which appeared after germination. Amino acid sequencing indicated that SP85 and SP35 are encoded by the previously described pspB and psvA genes. This was confirmed for SP85 by showing that natural M(r) polymorphisms correlated with changes in the number of tetrapeptide-encoding sequence repeats in pspB. Using PCR to reconstruct missing elements from the recombinogenic middle region of pspB, SP85 was shown to consist of three sequence domains separated by two groups of the tetrapeptide repeats. Expression of partial pspB cDNAs in Escherichia coli showed that cellulose-binding activity resided in the Cys-rich COOH-terminal domain of SP85. This cellulose-binding activity can explain SP85's ultrastructural colocalization with cellulose in vivo. Amino acid composition and antibody binding data showed that SP35 is derived from the Cys-rich N-terminal region of the previously described psvA protein. SP85 and SP35 may link other proteins to cellulose during coat assembly and germination. PMID:9692967

  18. Rheological characterization of microcrystalline cellulose and silicified microcrystalline cellulose wet masses using a mixer torque rheometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, P; Schaefer, T; Hellén, L; Juppo, A M; Yliruusi, J

    1999-10-25

    The rheological properties of silicified microcrystalline cellulose (Prosolv 50) were compared with those of standard grades of microcrystalline cellulose (Emcocel 50 and Avicel PH 101). Cellulose samples were analyzed using nitrogen adsorption together with particle size, flowability, density and swelling volume studies. The rheological behaviour of the wet powder masses was studied as a function of mixing time using a mixer torque rheometer (MTR). Silicified microcrystalline cellulose exhibited improved flow characteristics and increased specific surface area compared to standard microcrystalline cellulose grades. Although the silicification process affected the swelling properties and, furthermore, the mixing kinetics of microcrystalline cellulose, the source of the microcrystalline cellulose had a stronger influence than silicification on the liquid requirement at peak torque. PMID:10518674

  19. Effect of rheological properties of dissolved cellulose/microfibrillated cellulose blend suspensions on film forming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikoski, Eve; Rissanen, Marja; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-03-30

    Enzymatically treated cellulose was dissolved in a NaOH/ZnO solvent system and mixed together with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in order to find the threshold in which MFC fibers form a percolation network within the dissolved cellulose solution and in order to improve the properties of regenerated cellulose films. In the aqueous state, correlations between the rheological properties of dissolved cellulose/MFC blend suspensions and MFC fiber concentrations were investigated and rationalized. In addition, rheological properties of diluted MFC suspensions were characterized and a correlation with NaOH concentration was found, thus partly explaining the flow properties of dissolved cellulose/MFC blend suspensions. Finally, based on results from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), MFC addition had strengthening/plasticizing effect on regenerated cellulose films if low concentrations of MFC, below the percolation threshold (5.5-6 wt%, corresponding to 0.16-0.18 wt% of MFC in the blend suspensions), were used. PMID:25563945

  20. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. Keywords: sources of cellulose, mechanical properties, liquid crystalline nature, surface modification, nanocomposites 

  1. Identification of novel glycosyl hydrolases with cellulolytic activity against crystalline cellulose from metagenomic libraries constructed from bacterial enrichment cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Toshio; Kamei, Ichiro; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2014-01-01

    To obtain cellulases that are capable of degrading crystalline cellulose and cedar wood, metagenomic libraries were constructed from raw soil sample which was covered to pile of cedar wood sawdust or from its enrichment cultures. The efficiency of screening of metagenomic library was improved more than 3 times by repeating enrichment cultivation using crystalline cellulose as a carbon source, compared with the library constructed from raw soil. Four cellulase genes were obtained from the meta...

  2. Radiation pretreatment of cellulose for energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Rosa, A. M.; Dela Mines, A. S.; Banzon, R. B.; Simbul-Nuguid, Z. F.

    The effect of radiation pretreatment of agricultural cellulosic wastes was investigated through hydrolytic reactions of cellulose. Gamma irradiation significantly increased the acid hydrolysis of rice straw, rice hull and corn husk. The yields of reducing sugar were higher with increasing radiation dose in these materials. The observed radiation effect varied with the cellulosic material but it correlated with neither the cellulose content nor the lignin content. Likewise, the radiation pretreatment accelerated the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw and rice hull by cellulase. The irradiated rice straw appeared to be a better growth medium for the cellulolytic microorganism, Myrothecium verrucaria, than the non-irradiated material. This was attributed to increased digestibility of the cellulose by the microorganism.

  3. Radiation pretreatment of cellulose for energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of radiation pretreatment of agricultural cellulosic wastes was investigated through hydrolytic reactions of cellulose. Gamma irradiation significantly increased the acid hydrolysis of rice straw, rice hull and corn husk. The yields of reducing sugar were higher with increasing radiation dose in these materials. The observed radiation effect varied with the cellulose material but it correlated with neither the cellulose content nor the lignin content. Likewise, the radiation pretreatment accelerated the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw and rice hull by cellulase. The irradiated rice straw appeared to be a better growth medium for the cellulolytic microorganism, Myrothecium verrucaria, than the non-irradiated material. This was attributed to increased digestibility of the cellulose by the microorganism. (author)

  4. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  5. Photophysics of alloxazines on cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Marek; Sikorska, Ewa; Khmelinskii, Igor V; Gonzalez-Moreno, Rafael; Bourdelande, José L; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    2002-09-01

    We report the UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and transient absorption spectra of selected methylalloxazines adsorbed on cellulose from a polar solvent. The ground-state properties of these probe molecules in the cellulose matrix are similar to those in polar protic solvents. Fluorescence decay data allowed identification of three emitting species for every molecule studied, excluding 1-methyllumichrome which lacks the capacity to rearrange into an isoalloxazinic form. The short-lived emission component was attributed to the neutral form of the molecule, and the two longer-lived components were assigned to the two distinct deprotonated monoanionic forms resulting from dissociation at the respective N(3) and N(1) nitrogen atoms. The two monoanions coexist due to their very similar pKa, values. Transient absorption experiments detected two species created by the laser pulse in these systems. The short-lived species was identified as the triplet excited state, and the long-lived species as the semireduced radical, formed by hydrogen atom or proton transfer from the glycosidic unit to the alloxazine carbonyl group. PMID:12665311

  6. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  7. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  8. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  9. Simulations of Cellulose Translocation in the Bacterial Cellulose Synthase Suggest a Regulatory Mechanism for the Dimeric Structure of Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-05-01

    The processive cycle of the bacterial cellulose synthase (Bcs) includes the addition of a single glucose moiety to the end of a growing cellulose chain followed by the translocation of the nascent chain across the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation and its precise location within the processive cycle are not well understood. In particular, the molecular details of how a polymer (cellulose) whose basic structural unit is a dimer (cellobiose) can be constructed by adding one monomer (glucose) at a time are yet to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to the shed light on these questions. We find that translocation forward by one glucose unit is quite favorable energetically, giving a free energy stabilization of greater than 10 kcal mol-1. In addition, there is only a small barrier to translocation, implying that translocation is not rate limiting within the Bcs processive cycle (given experimental rates for cellulose synthesis in vitro). Perhaps most significantly, our results also indicate that steric constraints at the transmembrane tunnel entrance regulate the dimeric structure of cellulose. Namely, when a glucose molecule is added to the cellulose chain in the same orientation as the acceptor glucose, the terminal glucose freely rotates upon forward motion, thus suggesting a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose. We characterize both the conserved and non-conserved enzyme-polysaccharide interactions that drive translocation, and find that 20 of the 25 residues that strongly interact with the translocating cellulose chain in the simulations are well conserved, mostly with polar or aromatic side chains. Our results also allow for a dynamical analysis of the role of the so-called 'finger helix' in cellulose translocation that has been observed structurally. Taken together, these findings aid in the elucidation of the translocation steps of the Bcs

  10. Pharmacopoeial and physicochemical properties of α-cellulose and microcrystalline cellulose powders derived from cornstalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwuemeka P Azubuike

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suitable α-cellulose and microcrystalline cellulose powders for use in the pharmaceutical industry can be derived from agricultural wastes. Aims: The pharmacopoeial and physicochemical properties of cornstalk α-cellulose (CCC and cornstalk microcrystalline cellulose powders (MCCC were compared to a commercial brand of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH101 to evaluate their usefulness as pharmaceutical excipients. Settings and Design: Physicochemical properties of an excipient play a very crucial role in the functions of the excipient; hence, these properties were evaluated and compared with a commercial brand. Materials and Methods: α-cellulose was extracted from cornstalks. Modification of this α-cellulose powder was carried out by its partial hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid (HCl to obtain a microcrystalline cellulose powder. Their pharmacopoeial, physicochemical and microbiological properties were evaluated using standard methods. Statistical Analysis: OriginPro 8 SR2 v. 0891 (B891 software (OriginLab Corporation USA was used for statistical evaluation. One-way analysis of variance was used to differentiate between samples and decide where significant differences were established. Results: The yield of α-cellulose from the cornstalks was 32.5%w/w and that of microcrystalline cellulose 26%w/w. All the cellulose samples met all the pharmacopoeial parameters that were carried out. The comparison of physicochemical properties of the CCC, MCCC and Avicel PH101 suggests that the microcrystalline celluloses might have better flow and compression properties than the CCC sample. The three cellulose powders were of high microbial excipient quality. For almost all parameters evaluated, it was generally observed that the MCCC has similar characteristics to Avicel PH101. Conclusions: MCCC can be a suitable alternative to the expensive Avicel PH101as pharmaceutical excipients.

  11. Transcriptomic and genomic analysis of cellulose fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Babu [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 wild-type strain to hydrolyze cellulose and ferment the degradation products directly to ethanol and other metabolic byproducts makes it an attractive candidate for consolidated bioprocessing of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. In this study, whole-genome microarrays were used to investigate the expression of C. thermocellum mRNA during growth on crystalline cellulose in controlled replicate batch fermentations. A time-series analysis of gene expression revealed changes in transcript levels of {approx}40% of genes ({approx}1300 out of 3198 ORFs encoded in the genome) during transition from early-exponential to late-stationary phase. K-means clustering of genes with statistically significant changes in transcript levels identified six distinct clusters of temporal expression. Broadly, genes involved in energy production, translation, glycolysis and amino acid, nucleotide and coenzyme metabolism displayed a decreasing trend in gene expression as cells entered stationary phase. In comparison, genes involved in cell structure and motility, chemotaxis, signal transduction and transcription showed an increasing trend in gene expression. Hierarchical clustering of cellulosome-related genes highlighted temporal changes in composition of this multi-enzyme complex during batch growth on crystalline cellulose, with increased expression of several genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in degradation of non-cellulosic substrates in stationary phase. Overall, the results suggest that under low substrate availability, growth slows due to decreased metabolic potential and C. thermocellum alters its gene expression to (i) modulate the composition of cellulosomes that are released into the environment with an increased proportion of enzymes than can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides other than cellulose, (ii) enhance signal transduction and chemotaxis mechanisms perhaps to sense the oligosaccharide hydrolysis products

  12. Degradation of cellulose by basidiomycetous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrian, Petr; Valásková, Vendula

    2008-05-01

    Cellulose is the main polymeric component of the plant cell wall, the most abundant polysaccharide on Earth, and an important renewable resource. Basidiomycetous fungi belong to its most potent degraders because many species grow on dead wood or litter, in environment rich in cellulose. Fungal cellulolytic systems differ from the complex cellulolytic systems of bacteria. For the degradation of cellulose, basidiomycetes utilize a set of hydrolytic enzymes typically composed of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase and beta-glucosidase. In some species, the absence of cellobiohydrolase is substituted by the production of processive endoglucanases combining the properties of both of these enzymes. In addition, systems producing hydroxyl radicals based on cellobiose dehydrogenase, quinone redox cycling or glycopeptide-based Fenton reaction are involved in the degradation of several plant cell wall components, including cellulose. The complete cellulolytic complex used by a single fungal species is typically composed of more than one of the above mechanisms that contribute to the utilization of cellulose as a source of carbon or energy or degrade it to ensure fast substrate colonization. The efficiency and regulation of cellulose degradation differs among wood-rotting, litter-decomposing, mycorrhizal or plant pathogenic fungi and yeasts due to the different roles of cellulose degradation in the physiology and ecology of the individual groups. PMID:18371173

  13. Recycling of cellulosic fibers by enzymatic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, K M; Dadashian, F; Montazer, M

    2012-02-01

    In this research, enzymatic treatment as an environmental friendly process has been used for recycling process of old cellulosic wastes such as cotton, viscose, and lyocell. Cellulase hydrolyses cellulosic chains and shortens cellulosic fibers. This study investigates to detect the optimum enzyme concentration and time of treatments for suitable changes of length and weight loss. The main purposes of this article are shortening of cellulosic fibers and evaluating of enzymatic treatment in different kind of cellulosic fibers. According to the data of experiments, with the increase of enzyme concentration and the treatment time, the length and weight loss percentage of the cellulosic fibers has been decreased. The length and weight loss percentage of treated viscose is more than that of lyocell and cotton fibers. Optimized condition, reaction time, and enzyme concentration have been determined by mean length of treated cellulosic samples. Suitable longitudinal distribution of fiber for papermaking industries is in the range of 0 to 4 mm. Optimum enzyme concentration and treatment time for recycling cotton, lyocell, and viscose fibers are 2% and 48 h for cotton and lyocell and 0.5% and 48 h for viscose, respectively. According to the data of experiment, the length of treated fibers is appropriate for its usage as a raw material in papermaking industries. PMID:22161212

  14. A novel cellulose hydrogel prepared from its ionic liquid solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lu; LIN ZhangBi; YANG Xiao; WAN ZhenZhen; CUI ShuXun

    2009-01-01

    A novel cellulose hydrogel is prepared by regenerating cellulose from its ionic liquid solution. The transparency cellulose hydrogel presents a good chemical stability and an acceptable mechanical property. This non-toxic cellulose hydrogel should be biocompatibie and may be useful in the future as a biomaterial.

  15. Colonization of Crystalline Cellulose by Clostridium cellulolyticum ATCC 35319

    OpenAIRE

    Gelhaye, E.; Gehin, A; Petitdemange, H.

    1993-01-01

    Cellulose colonization by Clostridium cellulolyticum was studied by using [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation. The colonization process indicated that a part of the bacterial population was released from cellulose to the liquid phase before binding and colonizing another adhesion site of the cellulose. We postulate that cellulose colonization occurs according to the following process: adhesion, colonization, release, and readhesion.

  16. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Neng; DING Enyong; CHENG Rongshi

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the dispersibility of cellulose nanocrystal(CNC) particles,three difierent grafted reactions of acetylation,hydroxyethylation and hydroxypropylation were introduced to modify the CNC surface.The main advantages of these methods were the simple and easily controlled reaction conditions,and the dispersibility of the resulting products was distinctly improved.The properties of the modified CNC were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR),13 C nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR),transmission electron microscopy(TEM)and thermogravimetric analyses(TGA).The results indicated mat after desiccation,the modification products could be dispersed again in the proper solvents by ultrasonic treatments,and the diameter of their particles had no obvious changes.However,their thermal degradation behaviors were quite different.The initial decomposition temperature of the modified products via hydroxyethylation or hydroxypropylation was lower than that of modified products via acetylation.

  17. Cellulose-Enriched Microbial Communities from Leaf-Cutter Ant (Atta colombica) Refuse Dumps Vary in Taxonomic Composition and Degradation Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Gina R; Johnson, Amanda L; Soto, Rolando D Moreira; Perry, Kailene; Book, Adam J; Horn, Heidi A; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A; Currie, Cameron R

    2016-01-01

    Deconstruction of the cellulose in plant cell walls is critical for carbon flow through ecosystems and for the production of sustainable cellulosic biofuels. Our understanding of cellulose deconstruction is largely limited to the study of microbes in isolation, but in nature, this process is driven by microbes within complex communities. In Neotropical forests, microbes in leaf-cutter ant refuse dumps are important for carbon turnover. These dumps consist of decaying plant material and a diverse bacterial community, as shown here by electron microscopy. To study the portion of the community capable of cellulose degradation, we performed enrichments on cellulose using material from five Atta colombica refuse dumps. The ability of enriched communities to degrade cellulose varied significantly across refuse dumps. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of enriched samples identified that the community structure correlated with refuse dump and with degradation ability. Overall, samples were dominated by Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria. Half of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) across samples were classified within genera containing known cellulose degraders, including Acidovorax, the most abundant OTU detected across samples, which was positively correlated with cellulolytic ability. A representative Acidovorax strain was isolated, but did not grow on cellulose alone. Phenotypic and compositional analyses of enrichment cultures, such as those presented here, help link community composition with cellulolytic ability and provide insight into the complexity of community-based cellulose degradation. PMID:26999749

  18. Cellulose-Enriched Microbial Communities from Leaf-Cutter Ant (Atta colombica) Refuse Dumps Vary in Taxonomic Composition and Degradation Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Gina R.; Johnson, Amanda L.; Soto, Rolando D. Moreira; Perry, Kailene; Book, Adam J.; Horn, Heidi A.; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    Deconstruction of the cellulose in plant cell walls is critical for carbon flow through ecosystems and for the production of sustainable cellulosic biofuels. Our understanding of cellulose deconstruction is largely limited to the study of microbes in isolation, but in nature, this process is driven by microbes within complex communities. In Neotropical forests, microbes in leaf-cutter ant refuse dumps are important for carbon turnover. These dumps consist of decaying plant material and a diverse bacterial community, as shown here by electron microscopy. To study the portion of the community capable of cellulose degradation, we performed enrichments on cellulose using material from five Atta colombica refuse dumps. The ability of enriched communities to degrade cellulose varied significantly across refuse dumps. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of enriched samples identified that the community structure correlated with refuse dump and with degradation ability. Overall, samples were dominated by Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria. Half of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) across samples were classified within genera containing known cellulose degraders, including Acidovorax, the most abundant OTU detected across samples, which was positively correlated with cellulolytic ability. A representative Acidovorax strain was isolated, but did not grow on cellulose alone. Phenotypic and compositional analyses of enrichment cultures, such as those presented here, help link community composition with cellulolytic ability and provide insight into the complexity of community-based cellulose degradation. PMID:26999749

  19. Cellulose-Enriched Microbial Communities from Leaf-Cutter Ant (Atta colombica Refuse Dumps Vary in Taxonomic Composition and Degradation Ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina R Lewin

    Full Text Available Deconstruction of the cellulose in plant cell walls is critical for carbon flow through ecosystems and for the production of sustainable cellulosic biofuels. Our understanding of cellulose deconstruction is largely limited to the study of microbes in isolation, but in nature, this process is driven by microbes within complex communities. In Neotropical forests, microbes in leaf-cutter ant refuse dumps are important for carbon turnover. These dumps consist of decaying plant material and a diverse bacterial community, as shown here by electron microscopy. To study the portion of the community capable of cellulose degradation, we performed enrichments on cellulose using material from five Atta colombica refuse dumps. The ability of enriched communities to degrade cellulose varied significantly across refuse dumps. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of enriched samples identified that the community structure correlated with refuse dump and with degradation ability. Overall, samples were dominated by Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria. Half of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs across samples were classified within genera containing known cellulose degraders, including Acidovorax, the most abundant OTU detected across samples, which was positively correlated with cellulolytic ability. A representative Acidovorax strain was isolated, but did not grow on cellulose alone. Phenotypic and compositional analyses of enrichment cultures, such as those presented here, help link community composition with cellulolytic ability and provide insight into the complexity of community-based cellulose degradation.

  20. Comparison of a fungal (family I) and bacterial (family II) cellulose-binding domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomme, P; Driver, D P; Amandoron, E A; Miller, R. C.; Antony, R.; Warren, J.; Kilburn, D G

    1995-01-01

    A family II cellulose-binding domain (CBD) of an exoglucanase/xylanase (Cex) from the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi was replaced with the family I CBD of cellobiohydrolase I (CbhI) from the fungus Trichoderma reesei. Expression of the hybrid gene in Escherichia coli yielded up to 50 mg of the hybrid protein, CexCBDCbhI, per liter of culture supernatant. The hybrid was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on cellulose. The relative association constants (Kr) for the binding of Cex,...

  1. Lyocell, The New Generation of Regenerated Cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Borbély

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available For the majority of the last century, commercial routes to regenerated cellulosefibres have coped with the difficulties of making a good cellulose solution by using an easyto dissolve derivative (e.g. xanthane in the case of viscose rayon or complex (e.g.cuprammonium rayon. For the purposes of this paper, advanced cellulosic fibres aredefined as those made from a process involving direct dissolution of cellulose. The firstexamples of such fibres have now been generically designaed as lyocell fibres todistinguish them from rayons, and the first commercial lyocell fibre is Courtaulds’ Tencel.

  2. Preparation of membranes from cellulose obtained of sugarcane bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, cellulose obtained from sugarcane bagasse to produce both cellulose and acetylated cellulose to prepare asymmetric membranes. Membranes was procedure used a mixture of materials of DMAc/ LiCl systemic in different conditions. Cellulose and acetylated cellulose were characterized by thermogravimetric (TG), Xray diffraction (XRD) and scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Observed less stability thermal of acetylated cellulose when compared of cellulose. All membranes procedure were asymmetric, characterized by presence of a dense skin and porous support can be observed. SEM showed that the morphology of the superficial of membranes depends on the method preparation. (author)

  3. Hydrolyzability of xylan after adsorption on cellulose: Exploration of xylan limitation on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Kena; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-09-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, the dissolved xylan would re-adsorb on cellulose, and then inhibits the cellulose hydrolysis by cellulases. However, the hydrolyzability of xylan adsorbed on cellulose is not clear. In this work, the adsorption behavior of xylans on celluloses and the hydrolysis of adsorbed xylan by xylanase (XYL) were investigated. The results indicated that the adsorption of beechwood xylan (BWX) and oat spelt xylan (OSX) on Avicel was conformed to Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm. Higher ion strength increased the adsorption of BWX on Avicel, but not that of OSX. Both BWX and OSX adsorbed on Avicel and corn stover after dilute acid pretreatment (CS-DA) could be hydrolyzed by XYL. Compared to OSX, BWX adsorbed on cellulosic materials could be more easily hydrolyzed by XYL. Thus, supplementation of XYL could hydrolyze the xylan adsorbed on cellulose and potentially improved hydrolysis efficiency of lignocelluloses. PMID:27185150

  4. Homogeneous preparation of cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) and cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) from sugarcane bagasse cellulose in ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kelin; Wang, Ben; Cao, Yan; Li, Huiquan; Wang, Jinshu; Lin, Weijiang; Mu, Chaoshi; Liao, Dankui

    2011-05-25

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAP) were prepared homogeneously in a 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) ionic liquid system from sugarcane bagasse (SB). The reaction temperature, reaction time, and molar ratio of butyric (propionic) anhydride/anhydroglucose units in the cellulose affect the butyryl (B) or propionyl (P) content of CAB or CAP samples. The (13)C NMR data revealed the distribution of the substituents of CAB and CAP. The thermal stability of sugar cane bagasse cellulose was found by thermogravimetric analysis to have decreased after chemical modification. After reaction, the ionic liquid was effectively recycled and reused. This study provides a new way for high-value-added utilization of SB and realizing the objective of turning waste into wealth. PMID:21452895

  5. Genetic evidence that cellulose synthase activity influences microtubule cortical array organization

    OpenAIRE

    Paredez, A.; S. Persson; Ehrhardt, D; Somerville, C

    2008-01-01

    To identify factors that influence cytoskeletal organization we screened for Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that show hypersensitivity to the microtubule destabilizing drug oryzalin. We cloned the genes corresponding to two of the 131 mutant lines obtained. The genes encoded mutant alleles of PROCUSTE1 and KORRIGAN, which both encode proteins that have previously been implicated in cellulose synthesis. Analysis of microtubules in the mutants revealed that both mutants have altere...

  6. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liu

    Full Text Available Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1, a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  7. Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

    1977-08-01

    A bibliographic review of 195 references is presented outlining the history of the research into the mechanisms of cellulose pyrolysis. Topics discussed are: initial product identification, mechanism of initial formation of levoglucosan, from cellulose and from related compounds, decomposition of cellulose to other compounds, formation of aromatics, pyrolysis of levoglucosan, crosslinking of cellulose, pyrolytic reactions of cellulose derivatives, and the effects of inorganic salts on the pyrolysis mechanism. (JSR)

  8. Preparation, characterisation and wetting of fluorinated cellulose surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Aulin, Christian

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with the wetting by oil mixtures of two different model cellulose surfaces. The surfaces studied were a regenerated cellulose (RG) surface prepared by spin-coating, and a film consisting of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) of Poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and a carboxymethylated Microfibrillated Cellulose (MFC). After coating or covalently modifying the cellulose surfaces with various amounts of fluorosurfactants, the fluorinated cellulose films were used to follow the spreadin...

  9. Cellulosic Bionanocomposites: A Review of Preparation, Properties and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Alain Dufresne; Gilberto Siqueira; Julien Bras

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biomass material in nature. Extracted from natural fibers, its hierarchical and multi-level organization allows different kinds of nanoscaled cellulosic fillers—called cellulose nanocrystals or microfibrillated cellulose (MFC)—to be obtained. Recently, such cellulose nanoparticles have been the focus of an exponentially increasing number of works or reviews devoted to understanding such materials and their applications. Major studies over the last decades have s...

  10. Spray-Dried Cellulose Nanofibers as Novel Tablet Excipient

    OpenAIRE

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laaksonen, Timo; Putkisto, Kaisa; Laukkanen, Antti; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of cellulose nanofibers (also referred as microfibrillated cellulose, nanocellulose, nanofibrillated, or nanofibrillar cellulose) as novel tabletting material. For this purpose, physical and mechanical properties of spray-dried cellulose nanofibers (CNF) were examined, and results were compared to those of two commercial grades of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), Avicel PH101 and Avicel PH102, which are the most commonly and widely used...

  11. Hydrolytic and Oxidative Mechanisms Involved in Cellulose Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Nutt, Anu

    2006-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose is an important process in nature. This thesis has focused on the degradation of cellulose by enzymes from two cellulose-degrading fungi, Hypocrea jecorina and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, including both the action of the individual enzymes and their synergistic interplay. The end-preference of cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose was studied. Cellobiohydrolases belonging to glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 7 were found to hydrolyse cellulose proce...

  12. Role of bacterial cellulose fibrils in Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Matthysse, A G

    1983-01-01

    During the attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to carrot tissue culture cells, the bacteria synthesize cellulose fibrils. We examined the role of these cellulose fibrils in the attachment process by determining the properties of bacterial mutants unable to synthesize cellulose. Such cellulose-minus bacteria attached to the carrot cell surface, but, in contrast to the parent strain, with which larger clusters of bacteria were seen on the plant cell, cellulose-minus mutant bacteria were att...

  13. Fabrication of polyaniline/carboxymethyl cellulose/cellulose nanofibrous mats and their biosensing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI nanorods have been grown onto the surface of CMC/cellulose nanofibers for the fabrication of biosensor substrate material. • The proposed laccase biosensor exhibited a low detection limit and high sensitivity in the detection of catechol. • Hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers are the promising material in the design of high-efficient biosensors. - Abstract: We report a facile approach to synthesizing and immobilizing polyaniline nanorods onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified cellulose nanofibers for their biosensing application. Firstly, the hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers were fabricated by in situ polymerization of aniline on the CMC-modified cellulose nanofiber. Subsequently, the PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibrous mat modified with laccase (Lac) was used as biosensor substrate material for the detection of catechol. PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers with highly conductive and three dimensional nanostructure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimum conditions, the Lac/PANI/CMC/cellulose/glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited a fast response time (within 8 s), a linear response range from 0.497 μM to 2.27 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 0.374 μM (3σ). The developed biosensor also displayed good repeatability, reproducibility as well as selectivity. The results indicated that the composite mat has potential application in enzyme biosensors

  14. Fabrication of polyaniline/carboxymethyl cellulose/cellulose nanofibrous mats and their biosensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiapeng, E-mail: firgexiao@sina.cn; Pang, Zengyuan, E-mail: pangzengyuan1212@163.com; Yang, Jie, E-mail: young1993@126.com; Huang, Fenglin, E-mail: flhuang@jiangnan.edu.cn; Cai, Yibing, E-mail: yibingcai@jiangnan.edu.cn; Wei, Qufu, E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI nanorods have been grown onto the surface of CMC/cellulose nanofibers for the fabrication of biosensor substrate material. • The proposed laccase biosensor exhibited a low detection limit and high sensitivity in the detection of catechol. • Hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers are the promising material in the design of high-efficient biosensors. - Abstract: We report a facile approach to synthesizing and immobilizing polyaniline nanorods onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified cellulose nanofibers for their biosensing application. Firstly, the hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers were fabricated by in situ polymerization of aniline on the CMC-modified cellulose nanofiber. Subsequently, the PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibrous mat modified with laccase (Lac) was used as biosensor substrate material for the detection of catechol. PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers with highly conductive and three dimensional nanostructure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimum conditions, the Lac/PANI/CMC/cellulose/glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited a fast response time (within 8 s), a linear response range from 0.497 μM to 2.27 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 0.374 μM (3σ). The developed biosensor also displayed good repeatability, reproducibility as well as selectivity. The results indicated that the composite mat has potential application in enzyme biosensors.

  15. Rapid saccharification for production of cellulosic biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Seok; Wi, Seung Gon; Lee, Soo Jung; Lee, Yoon-Gyo; Kim, Yeong-Suk; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2014-04-01

    The economical production of biofuels is hindered by the recalcitrance of lignocellulose to processing, causing high consumption of processing enzymes and impeding hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. We determined the major rate-limiting factor in the hydrolysis of popping pre-treated rice straw (PPRS) by examining cellulase adsorption to lignin and cellulose, amorphogenesis of PPRS, and re-hydrolysis. Based on the results, equivalence between enzyme loading and the open structural area of cellulose was required to significantly increase productive adsorption of cellulase and to accelerate enzymatic saccharification of PPRS. Amorphogenesis of PPRS by phosphoric acid treatment to expand open structural area of the cellulose fibers resulted in twofold higher cellulase adsorption and increased the yield of the first re-hydrolysis step from 13% to 46%. The total yield from PPRS was increased to 84% after 3h. These results provide evidence that cellulose structure is one of major effects on the enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:24607460

  16. Carboxymethylation of Cellulose by Microwave irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE; Jun

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose may be readily converted into ethers involving primary and secondary alcohol groups in each monomer unit and the glycosidic bonds. However, these reactions are rather more complicated than with simple substances, because the stereochemistry of the cellulose molecule is such that the vast majority of its hydroxyl groups form intra-chain hydrogen bonds or inter-chain hydrogen bonds with contiguous molecules. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has played an important part in the commercial uses of cellulose derivatives. CMC becomes alkali and water soluble. The polarity can, in fact, be increased by introduction of ionizing groups, ie carboxymethyl group. CMC is generally produced by the reaction of alkali cellulose with chloroacetic acid.……

  17. Cellulosic ethanol is ready to go

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M. [SunOpta BioProcess Group, Brampton, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    A corporate overview of the SunOpta organization was presented. The organization includes three divisions, notably organic food, industrial minerals, and a bioprocess group. It is a Canadian organization that has experienced over 60 per cent growth per year since 1999. The presentation provided a history of the bioprocess group from 1973 to 2003. The presentation also illustrated the biomass process from wood, straw or corn stover to cellulosic ethanol and acetone and butanol. Several images were presented. The production of xylitol from oat hulls and birch and from ryegrass straw to linerboard was also illustrated. Last, the presentation illustrated the biomass production of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin extraction as well as the ammonia pretreatment of cellulosics. The presentation also listed several current and future developments such as an expansion plan and implementation of cellulosic ethanol. Economic success was defined as requiring proximity to market; high percentage concentration to distillation; and co-located within existing infrastructure. figs.

  18. Cellulose whisker/epoxy resin nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Liming; Weder, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    New nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanofibers or “whiskers” and an epoxy resin were prepared. Cellulose whiskers with aspect ratios of ∼10 and ∼84 were isolated from cotton and sea animals called tunicates, respectively. Suspensions of these whiskers in dimethylformamide were combined with an oligomeric difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with an epoxide equivalent weight of 185−192 and a diethyl toluenediamine-based curing agent. Thin films were produced by casting these mixtu...

  19. Nanopores Structure in Electrospun Bacterial Cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Basmaji; Gabriel Molina de Olyveira; Ligia Maria Manzine Costa; Lauro Xavier Filho

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has established to be a remarkably versatile biomaterial and can be used in wide variety of applied scientific endeavours, especially for medical devices, lately, bacterial cellulose mats are used in the treatment of skin conditions such as burns and ulcers, because of the morphology of fibrous biopolymers serving as a support for cell proliferation, its pores allow gas exchange between the organism and the environment. Moreover, the nanostructure and morphological si...

  20. Cellulose composite structures – by design

    OpenAIRE

    Winkworth-Smith, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis was to investigate different mechanical and chemical pre-treatments which can dramatically change the properties of native cellulose and add alternative routes to structure formation. Ball milled cellulose, which had a reduced crystallinity, degree of polymerisation and degradation temperature, was rehydrated in excess water resulting in recrystallisation. Fully amorphous samples recrystallised to the more thermodynamically stable type II polymorph...

  1. Nanosized Cellulose Fibrils as Stabilizer of Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Xhanari, Klodian

    2011-01-01

    Pickering emulsions have been a subject of research for many years due to their practical applications not only in everyday life products but also in industry. The stability of these emulsions is due to the irreversible adsorption of colloid particles at the oil/water interface which prevents droplet coalescence. Cellulose materials are among the different types of particles used as stabilizers. Most of the studies report the use of native cellulose as stabilizer of oil-in-water emulsions due...

  2. Production of Cellulosic Polymers from Agricultural Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Israel, A. U.; I. B. Obot; Umoren, S. A.; Mkpenie, V.; Asuquo, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    Cellulosic polymers namely cellulose, di-and triacetate were produced from fourteen agricultural wastes; Branch and fiber after oil extraction from oil palm (Elais guineensis), raffia, piassava, bamboo pulp, bamboo bark from raphia palm (Raphia hookeri), stem and cob of maize plant (Zea mays), fruit fiber from coconut fruit (Cocos nucifera), sawdusts from cotton tree (Cossypium hirsutum), pear wood (Manilkara obovata), stem of Southern gamba green (Andropogon tectorus), sugarcane baggase (Sac...

  3. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Cate, Jamie H.; Yang, Feng; Glass, Louise

    2014-11-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

  4. Impairment of cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria by two acidic herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Stefanie; Drake, Harold L; Kolb, Steffen

    2012-02-01

    Herbicides have the potential to impair the metabolism of soil microorganisms. The current study addressed the toxic effect of bentazon and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on aerobic and anaerobic Bacteria that are involved in cellulose and cellobiose degradation in an agricultural soil. Aerobic saccharide degradation was reduced at concentrations of herbicides above environmental values. Microbial processes (e.g. fermentations, ferric iron reduction) that were linked to anaerobic cellulose and cellobiose degradation were reduced in the presence of both herbicides at concentrations above and at those that occur in crop field soil. 16S rRNA gene transcript numbers of total Bacteria, and selected bacterial taxa (Clostridia [Group I], Planctomycetaceae, and two uncultivated taxa of Bacteroidetes) decreased more in anoxic than in oxic cellulose-supplemented soil microcosms in the presence of both herbicides. Collectively, the results suggested that the metabolism of anaerobic cellulose-degrading Bacteria was impaired by typical in situ herbicide concentrations, whereas in situ concentrations did not impair metabolism of aerobic cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria. PMID:22098368

  5. Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

    1996-09-01

    Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

  6. Biohydrogen, bioelectricity and bioalcohols from cellulosic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissila, M.

    2013-03-01

    The demand for renewable energy is increasing due to increasing energy demand and global warming associated with increasing use of fossil fuels. Renewable energy can be derived from biological production of energy carriers from cellulosic biomass. These biochemical processes include biomass fermentation to hydrogen, methane and alcohols, and bioelectricity production in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The objective of this study was to investigate the production of different energy carriers (hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, bioelectricity) through biochemical processes. Hydrogen production potential of a hot spring enrichment culture from different sugars was determined, and hydrogen was produced continuously from xylose. Cellulolytic and hydrogenic cultures were enriched on cellulose, cellulosic pulp materials, and on silage at different process conditions. The enrichment cultures were further characterized. The effect of acid pretreatment on hydrogen production from pulp materials was studied and compared to direct pulp fermentation to hydrogen. Electricity and alcohol(s) were simultaneously produced from xylose in MFCs and the exoelectrogenic and alcohologenic enrichment cultures were characterized. In the end, the energy yields obtained from different biochemical processes were determined and compared. In this study, cultures carrying out simultaneous cellulose hydrolysis and hydrogen fermentation were enriched from different sources at different operational conditions. These cultures were successfully utilized for cellulose to hydrogen fermentation in batch systems. Based on these results further research should be conducted on continuous hydrogen production from cellulosic materials.

  7. Nanofibrillar cellulose films for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laukkanen, Antti; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) (also referred to as cellulose nanofibers, nanocellulose, microfibrillated, or nanofibrillated cellulose) has gotten recent and wide attention in various research areas. Here, we report the application of nanofibrillar cellulose as a matrix-former material for long-lasting (up to three months) sustained drug delivery. Film-like matrix systems with drug loadings between 20% and 40% were produced by a filtration method. This simple production method had an entrapment efficacy>90% and offers a possibility for the film thickness adjustment as well as applicability in the incorporation of heat sensitive compounds. The films had excellent mechanical properties suitable for easy handling and shape tailoring of the drug release systems. They were characterized in terms of the internal morphology, and the physical state of the encapsulated drug. The drug release was assessed by dissolution tests, and suitable mathematical models were used to explain the releasing kinetics. The drug release was sustained for a three month period with very close to zero-order kinetics. It is assumed that the nanofibrillar cellulose film sustains the drug release by forming a tight fiber network around the incorporated drug entities. The results indicate that the nanofibrillar cellulose is a highly promising new material for sustained release drug delivery applications. PMID:22750440

  8. Cellulose fractionation with IONCELL-P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, A M; Monshizadeh, A; Hummel, M; Roselli, A; Sixta, H

    2016-10-01

    IONCELL-P is a solvent fractionation process, which can separate pulps almost quantitatively into pure cellulose and hemicellulose fractions using IL-water mixtures. In this work the role of the molecular weight of cellulose on its solubility in ionic liquid-water mixtures is studied. The aim of this study was to understand and identify the determining factors of this IONCELL-P fractionation. Cotton linters (CL) served as model cellulose substrate and was degraded by ozone treatment to adjust the molecular weight to that of hemicelluloses and low molar mass cellulose in commercial pulps. The ozone treated CLs were subjected to the IONCELL-P process using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([emim][OAc]) and water mixtures with a water content between 13.5 and 19wt%. Based on the molar mass distributions of dissolved and undissolved cellulose the effect of the molecular weight of cellulose in IL-water mixture appears to be a key factor in the fractionation process. PMID:27312618

  9. Isolation of cellulose microfibrils - An enzymatic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sain, M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation methods and applications of cellulose microfibrils are expanding rapidly due to environmental benefits and specific strength properties, especially in bio-composite science. In this research, we have success-fully developed and explored a novel bio-pretreatment for wood fibre that can substantially improve the microfibril yield, in comparison to current techniques used to isolate cellulose microfibrils. Microfibrils currently are isolated in the laboratory through a combination of high shear refining and cryocrushing. A high energy requirement of these procedures is hampering momentum in the direction of microfibril isolation on a sufficiently large scale to suit potential applications. Any attempt to loosen up the microfibrils by either complete or partial destruction of the hydrogen bonds before the mechanical process would be a step forward in the quest for economical isolation of cellulose microfibrils. Bleached kraft pulp was treated with OS1, a fungus isolated from Dutch Elm trees infected with Dutch elm disease, under different treatment conditions. The percentage yield of cellulose microfibrils, based on their diameter, showed a significant shift towards a lower diameter range after the high shear refining, compared to the yield of cellulose microfibrils from untreated fibres. The overall yield of cellulose microfibrils from the treated fibres did not show any sizeable decrease.

  10. Cellulose nanofibers from Curaua fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curaua is a plant from Amazon region whose leaves were used by the indians of the region to make nets, ropes, fishing wires, etc., due to their high mechanical resistance. Nowadays, some industries, mainly textile and automobile, have increased their interest on these fibers to prepare polymer composites, because their properties could be compared to composites with glass fibers. In this work, cellulose nanofibers were obtained from curaua fibers, which were submitted to alkaline treatment with a solution of NaOH 5%. Nanofibers, in watery suspension, were characterized morphologically by TEM and AFM, and they show needle like format and the ratio L/D of 14. The suspension was dried by freeze dried process, in vacuum and air circulation oven, and these nanofibers were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, presenting high crystalline index, and by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), which showed that nanofibers have poorer thermal stability than the treated fiber, but they can reach values next to the ones of the original fibers, depending on the drying process of the suspension. (author)

  11. Degradation of γ-irradiated cellulose by the accumulating culture of a cellulose bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility of degradation of γ-irradiated cellulose by the accumulating culture of an anaerobic cellulose bacterium has been investigated. Cellulose irradiation by γ-quanta (Co60) has been carried out using the RKh-30 device with 35.9 Gy/min dose rate. Radiation monitoring has been carried out by the standard ferrosulfate method. Samples have been irradiated in dry state or when water presenting with MGy. It is detected that the accumulating culture with the growth on the irradiated cellulose has a lag-phase, which duration reduces when the cellulose cleaning by flushing with distillation water. The culture has higher growth and substrate consumption rate when growing by cellulose irradiated in comparison with non-irradiated one. The economical coefficient is the same in using both the irradiated and non-irradiated cellulose. The quantity of forming reducing saccharides, organic acids, methane and carbon dioxide is the same both when cultivating by irradiated cellulose and by non-irradiated. pH of the culture liquid is shifted to the acid nature in the process of growth

  12. Preparation of cellulose II and IIII films by allomorphic conversion of bacterial cellulose I pellicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural changes resulting from the conversion of native cellulose I (Cel I) into allomorphs II (Cel II) and IIII (Cel IIII) have usually been studied using powder samples from plant or algal cellulose. In this work, the conversion of Cel I into Cel II and Cel IIII was performed on bacterial cellulose films without any mechanical disruption. The surface texture of the films was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the morphology of the constituting cellulose ribbons, by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural changes were characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy as well as X-ray and electron diffraction. The allomorphic change into Cel II and Cel IIII resulted in films with different crystallinity, roughness and hydrophobic/hydrophilicity surface and the films remained intact during all process of allomorphic conversion. - Highlights: • Description of a method to modify the allomorphic structure of bacterial cellulose films • Preparation of films with specific morphologies and hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface characters • First report on cellulose III films from bacterial cellulose under swelling conditions • Detailed characterization of cellulose II and III films with complementary techniques • Development of films with specific properties as potential support for cells, enzymes, and drugs

  13. Cellulose-clay layered nanocomposite films fabricated from aqueous cellulose/LiOH/urea solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Quanling; Wu, Chun-Nan; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2014-01-16

    Transparent and flexible cellulose-clay (montmorillonite, MTM) nanocomposite films are prepared from cellulose/LiOH/urea solutions. The results show that the composites possess intercalated nanolayered structures. Almost no Na ions are present in MTM, probably because they are substituted by Li ions. The nanocomposite films possess high mechanical strength and gas barrier properties, and lower coefficients of thermal expansion than those of the original cellulose film. In particular, the composite film of 85% cellulose and 15% MTM has the highest tensile strength and Young's modulus 161 and 180% greater than those of the 100% cellulose film, and coefficient of thermal expansion and oxygen permeability at 50-75% RH decrease to 60 and 42-33%, respectively. Moreover, the initial hydrophilic nature of cellulose film changes to somewhat hydrophobic through incorporation of hydrophilic MTM platelets. This is probably because the orientation of cellulose chains on the film surface changes by the formation of numerous hydrogen bonds between cellulose molecules and MTM platelets. PMID:24188852

  14. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Sasaki, Kengo; den Haan, Riaan; Inokuma, Kentaro; Ogino, Chiaki; van Zyl, Willem H.; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell surface. The cellulase-displaying yeast strain exhibited clear cell-to-cellulose adhesion and a “tearing” cellulose degradation pattern; the adhesion ability correlated with enhanced surface area and roughness of the target cellulose fibers, resulting in higher hydrolysis efficiency. The engineered yeast directly produced ethanol from rice straw despite a more than 40% decrease in the required enzyme dosage for high-density fermentation. Thus, improved cell-to-cellulose interactions provided a novel strategy for increasing cellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a mechanism for promoting the feasibility of cellulosic biofuel production. PMID:27079382

  15. Laser cleaning of particulates from paper: Comparison between sized ground wood cellulose and pure cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visible laser cleaning of charcoal particulates from yellow acid mechanical ground wood cellulose paper was compared with that from bleached sulphite softwood cellulose paper. About one order of magnitude of fluence range is available for a cleaning dynamics between the cleaning threshold and the destruction threshold for two laser pulses. Wood cellulose paper exhibited a higher destruction threshold of the original paper than that of the contaminated specimen because of heat transfer from the hot or evaporating charcoal particulates. In contrast, the contaminated bleached cellulose paper exhibited a higher destruction threshold due to shading by the particulates. The graphite particles are not only detached thermo-mechanically, but also by evaporation or combustion. A cleaning effect was found also outside the illuminated areas due to lateral blasting. Infrared measurements revealed dehydration/dehydrogenation reactions and cross-links by ether bonds together with structural changes of the cellulose chain arrangement and the degree of crystallinity.

  16. Laser cleaning of particulates from paper: Comparison between sized ground wood cellulose and pure cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arif, S.; Kautek, W., E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at

    2013-07-01

    Visible laser cleaning of charcoal particulates from yellow acid mechanical ground wood cellulose paper was compared with that from bleached sulphite softwood cellulose paper. About one order of magnitude of fluence range is available for a cleaning dynamics between the cleaning threshold and the destruction threshold for two laser pulses. Wood cellulose paper exhibited a higher destruction threshold of the original paper than that of the contaminated specimen because of heat transfer from the hot or evaporating charcoal particulates. In contrast, the contaminated bleached cellulose paper exhibited a higher destruction threshold due to shading by the particulates. The graphite particles are not only detached thermo-mechanically, but also by evaporation or combustion. A cleaning effect was found also outside the illuminated areas due to lateral blasting. Infrared measurements revealed dehydration/dehydrogenation reactions and cross-links by ether bonds together with structural changes of the cellulose chain arrangement and the degree of crystallinity.

  17. Acid hydrolysis of cellulosic fibres: Comparison of bleached kraft pulp, dissolving pulps and cotton textile cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Anna; Theliander, Hans; Brelid, Harald

    2016-01-20

    The behaviour of different cellulosic fibres during acid hydrolysis has been investigated and the levelling-off degree of polymerisation (LODP) has been determined. The study included a bleached kraft pulp (both never-dried and once-dried) and two dissolving pulps (once-dried). Additionally, cotton cellulose from new cotton sheets and sheets discarded after long-time use was studied. Experimental results from the investigation, together with results found in literature, imply that ultrastructural differences between different fibres affect their susceptibility towards acid hydrolysis. Drying of a bleached kraft pulp was found to enhance the rate of acid hydrolysis and also result in a decrease in LODP. This implies that the susceptibility of cellulosic fibres towards acid hydrolysis is affected by drying-induced stresses in the cellulose chains. In cotton cellulose, it was found that use and laundering gave a substantial loss in the degree of polymerisation (DP), but that the LODP was only marginally affected. PMID:26572472

  18. Surface modification of cellulose by PCL grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquet, Olivier; Krouit, Mohammed; Bras, Julien [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes Papetiers (UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG), Grenoble INP-Pagora, 461 Rue de la papeterie, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Thielemans, Wim [Driving Innovation in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (DICE), School of Chemistry and Process and Environmental Research Division - Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur, E-mail: Naceur.Belgacem@efpg.inpg.fr [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes Papetiers (UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG), Grenoble INP-Pagora, 461 Rue de la papeterie, F-38402 St Martin d' Heres (France)

    2010-02-15

    Two cellulosic substrates (microcrystalline cellulose, MCC, and bleached kraft softwood pulps, BSK) were grafted by polycaprolactone (PCL) chains with different molecular weights, following a three-step procedure using non-swelling conditions in order to limit the reaction to their surface. First, one of the two OH PCL ends was blocked by phenyl isocyanate and the reaction product (adduct 1) was subsequently reacted with 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (adduct 2) to provide it with an NCO function, capable of reacting with cellulose. The ensuing PCL-grafted cellulosic materials were characterized by weight gain, elemental analysis, contact angle measurements, attenuated total reflexion-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and biodegradation tests. The modification was proven to occur by the presence of nitrogen atoms in the elemental analysis tests and XPS spectra of modified and soxhlet-extracted cellulose. The contact angle measurements have also shown that the surface became as hydrophobic as PCL itself. The polar component of the surface energy of cellulosic substrates before treatment was found to be about 32 and 10 mJ m{sup -2}, for MCC and BSK, respectively. This value vanished to practically zero after grafting with different PCLs. The strategy proposed in the present work is original since, to the best of our knowledge, this paper reports for the first time the chemical 'grafting onto' of the cellulose surface by PCL macromolecular structures, with the aim of obtaining fibre-matrix co-continuous fully sustainable and biodegradable composite materials.

  19. An Investigation of Cellulose Digesting Bacteria in the Camel Feces Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, V.; Leung, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    Research Question: Is there a bacteria in camel feces that digests cellulose material and can be used for waste to energy projects? Fossil fuels are the current main resource of energy in the modern world. However, as the demand for fuel increases, biofuels have been proposed as an alternative energy source that is a more sustainable form of liquid fuel generation from living things or waste, commonly known as biofuels and ethanol. The Camelus dromedarius', also known as Arabian camel, diet consist of grass, grains, wheat and oats as well desert vegetation in their natural habitat. However, as the Arabian camel lacks the enzymes to degrade cellulose, it is hypothesized that cellulose digestion is performed by microbial symbionts in camel microbiota. Fecal samples were collected from the Camelus dromedarius in United Arab Emirates and diluted 10-7 times. The diluted sample was then streaked onto a Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose plate, and inoculated onto CMC and Azure-B plates. Afterwards, Congo Red was used for staining in order to identify clearance zones of single colonies that may potentially be used as a qualitative assays for cellulose digestion. Then the colonies undergo polymerase chain reaction amplification to produce amplified RNA fragments. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene is identified based on BLAST result using Sanger Sequencing. Amongst the three identified microbes: Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Escherichia coli, both Bacillus and Staphylococcus are cellulose-digesting microbes, and through the fermentation of lignocellulosic, biomasses can be converted into cellulosic ethanol (Biofuel). According to the Improvements in Life Cycle Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Corn-Ethanol by Adam J. Liska, ""Ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 40-50% when compared directly to gasoline." The determination of bacterial communities that are capable of efficiently and effectively digesting cellulose materials requires that the bacteria be first

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on starch and cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation is reported of the effects of ionizing radiation both on macromolecular systems generally and on polysaccharides, starch and cellulose. Attention is focused on changes in the physical and physico-chemical properties of starch and cellulose, such as starch swelling, gelation, viscosity, solubility, reaction with iodine, UV, IR and ESR spectra, chemical changes resulting from radiolysis and from the effect of amylases on irradiated starch, changes in cellulose fibre strength, water absorption, stain affinity, and also the degradation of cellulose by radiation and the effect of cellulases on irradiated cellulose. Practical applications of the findings concerning cellulose degradation are discussed. (author)

  1. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Xu, Tao [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress

  2. EndB, a Multidomain Family 44 Cellulase from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17, Binds to Cellulose via a Novel Cellulose-Binding Module and to Another R. flavefaciens Protein via a Dockerin Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Marco T.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Kirby, James; Scott, Karen P.; Flint, Harry J.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes in Ruminococcus spp. bind to cellulose are not fully understood. The product of the newly isolated cellulase gene endB from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17 was purified as a His-tagged product after expression in Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind directly to crystalline cellulose. The ability to bind cellulose is shown to be associated with a novel cellulose-binding module (CBM) located within a region of 200 amino acids that is unrelated to known protein sequences. EndB (808 amino acids) also contains a catalytic domain belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 44 and a C-terminal dockerin-like domain. Purified EndB is also shown to bind specifically via its dockerin domain to a polypeptide of ca. 130 kDa present among supernatant proteins from Avicel-grown R. flavefaciens that attach to cellulose. The protein to which EndB attaches is a strong candidate for the scaffolding component of a cellulosome-like multienzyme complex recently identified in this species (S.-Y. Ding et al., J. Bacteriol. 183:1945–1953, 2001). It is concluded that binding of EndB to cellulose may occur both through its own CBM and potentially also through its involvement in a cellulosome complex. PMID:11571138

  3. Biocompatibility of Bacterial Cellulose Based Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar P. Troncoso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Some bacteria can synthesize cellulose when they are cultivated under adequate conditions. These bacteria produce a mat of cellulose on the top of the culture medium, which is formed by a three-dimensional coherent network of pure cellulose nanofibers. Bacterial cellulose (BC has been widely used in different fields, such as the paper industry, electronics and tissue engineering due to its remarkable mechanical properties, conformability and porosity. Nanocomposites based on BC have received much attention, because of the possibility of combining the good properties of BC with other materials for specific applications. BC nanocomposites can be processed either in a static or an agitated medium. The fabrication of BC nanocomposites in static media can be carried out while keeping the original mat structure obtained after the synthesis to form the final nanocomposite or by altering the culture media with other components. The present article reviews the issue of biocompatibility of BC and BC nanocomposites. Biomedical aspects, such as surface modification for improving cell adhesion, in vitro and in vivo studies are given along with details concerning the physics of network formation and the changes that occur in the cellulose networks due to the presence of a second phase. The relevance of biocompatibility studies for the development of BC-based materials in bone, skin and cardiovascular tissue engineering is also discussed.

  4. Cellulose multilayer Membranes manufacture with Ionic liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Livazovic, S.

    2015-05-09

    Membrane processes are considered energy-efficient for water desalination and treatment. However most membranes are based on polymers prepared from fossil petrochemical sources. The development of multilayer membranes for nanofiltration and ultrafiltration, with thin selective layers of naturally available cellulose has been hampered by the availability of non-aggressive solvents. We propose the manufacture of cellulose membranes based on two approaches: (i) silylation, coating from solutions in tetrahydrofuran, followed by solvent evaporation and cellulose regeneration by acid treatment; (ii) casting from solution in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolum acetate ([C2mim]OAc), an ionic liquid, followed by phase inversion in water. By these methods porous supports could be easily coated with semi-crystalline cellulose. The membranes were hydrophilic with contact angles as low as 22.0°, molecular weight cut-off as low as 3000 g mol-1 with corresponding water permeance of 13.8 Lm−2 h−1 bar−1. Self-standing cellulose membranes were also manufactured without porous substrate, using only ionic liquid as green solvent. This membrane was insoluble in water, tetrahydrofuran, hexane, N,N-dimethylformamide, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and N,N-dimethylacetamide.

  5. Clean conversion of cellulose into fermentable glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Zhuang, Junping; Lin, Lu; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2009-01-01

    We studied the process of conversion of microcrystalline-cellulose into fermentable glucose in the formic acid reaction system using cross polarization/magic angle spinning (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that formic acid as an active agent was able to effectively penetrate into the interior space of the cellulose molecules, thus collapsing the rigid crystalline structure and allowing hydrolysis to occur easily in the amorphous zone as well as in the crystalline zone. The microcrystalline-cellulose was hydrolyzed using formic acid and 4% hydrochloric acid under mild conditions. The effects of hydrochloric acid concentration, the ratio of solid to liquid, temperature (55-75 degrees C) and retention time (0-9 h), and the concentration of glucose were analyzed. The hydrolysis velocities of microcrystalline-cellulose were 6.14 x 10(-3) h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 2.94 x 10(-2) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, and 6.84x10(-2) h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The degradation velocities of glucose were 0.01 h(-1) at 55 degrees C, 0.14 h(-1) at 65 degrees C, 0.34 h(-1) at 75 degrees C. The activation energy of microcrystalline-cellulose hydrolysis was 105.61 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of glucose degradation was 131.37 kJ/mol. PMID:19409478

  6. Production of cellulose and curli fimbriae by members of the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Bokranz, Werner; Nimtz, Manfred; Römling, Ute

    2003-07-01

    Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. isolated from the human gut were investigated for the biosynthesis of cellulose and curli fimbriae (csg). While Citrobacter spp. produced curli fimbriae and cellulose and Enterobacter spp. produced cellulose with various temperature-regulatory programs, Klebsiella spp. did not show pronounced expression of those extracellular matrix components. Investigation of multicellular behavior in two Citrobacter species and Enterobacter sakazakii showed an extracellular matrix, cell clumping, pellicle formation, and biofilm formation associated with the expression of cellulose and curli fimbriae. In those three strains, the csgD-csgBA region and the cellulose synthase gene bcsA were conserved. PCR screening for the presence of csgD, csgA and bcsA revealed that besides Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca, all species investigated harbored the genetic information for expression of curli fimbriae and cellulose. Since Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. are frequently found to cause biofilm-related infections such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, the human gut could serve as a reservoir for dissemination of biofilm-forming isolates. PMID:12819107

  7. The interactions between cationic cellulose and Gemini surfactant in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shaojing; Cheng, Fa; Chen, Yu; Wei, Yuping

    2016-05-01

    Due to the extensive application of cationic cellulose in cosmetic, drug delivery and gene therapy, combining the improvement effect of surfactant-cellulose complexes, to investigate the properties of cellulose in aqueous solution is an important topic from both scientific and technical views. In this study, the phase behavior, solution properties and microstructure of Gemini surfactant sodium 5-nonyl-2-(4-(4-nonyl-2-sulfonatophenoxy)butoxy)phenyl sulfite (9-4-9)/cationic cellulose (JR400, the ammonium groups are directly bonded to the hydroxyethyl substituent with a degree substitution of 0.37) mixture was investigated using turbidity, fluorescence spectrophotometer and shear rheology techniques. As a control, the interaction of corresponding monovalent surfactant, sodium 2-ethoxy-5-nonylbenzenesulfonate (9-2) with JR400 in aqueous solution was also studied. Experimental results showed that 9-4-9/JR400 mixture has lower critical aggregation concentration (CAC) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) (about one order of magnitude) than 9-2/JR400 mixture. A low concentration of Gemini surfactant 9-4-9 appeared to induce an obvious micropolarity and viscosity value variation of the mixture, while these effects required a high concentration of corresponding monovalent one. Furthermore, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements illuminated the formation and collapse procedure of network structure of the 9-4-9/JR400 mixture, which resulted in the increase and decrease of viscosity. These results suggest that the molecular structure of the surfactant has a great effect on its interaction with cationic cellulose. Moreover, the Gemini surfactant/cationic cellulose mixture may be used as a potencial stimuli-responsive drug delivery vector which not only load hydrophilic drugs, but also deliver hydrophobic substances. PMID:26876997

  8. POLYETHERSULFONE COMPOSITE MEMBRANE BLENDED WITH CELLULOSE FIBRILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Qu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyethersulfone (PES is a common material used for ultrafiltration (UF membranes, which has good chemical resistance, high mechanical properties, and wide temperature tolerances. The hydrophobic property of the PES membrane seriously limits its application. Cellulose fibrils are composed of micro-sized and nano-sized elements, which have high hydrophilicity, strength, and biodegradation. A composite membrane was prepared by the phase inversion induced by an immersion process. The characteristics of the composite membrane were investigated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The pure water flux of the composite membrane increased dramatically with the increase of cellulose firbils. Mean pore size and porosity were significantly increased. Both mechanical properties and hydrophilicity were enhanced due to the addition of the cellulose firbils.

  9. Prospects for Irradiation in Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Saini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Second generation bioethanol production technology relies on lignocellulosic biomass composed of hemicelluloses, celluloses, and lignin components. Cellulose and hemicellulose are sources of fermentable sugars. But the structural characteristics of lignocelluloses pose hindrance to the conversion of these sugar polysaccharides into ethanol. The process of ethanol production, therefore, involves an expensive and energy intensive step of pretreatment, which reduces the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and makes feedstock more susceptible to saccharification. Various physical, chemical, biological, or combined methods are employed to pretreat lignocelluloses. Irradiation is one of the common and promising physical methods of pretreatment, which involves ultrasonic waves, microwaves, γ-rays, and electron beam. Irradiation is also known to enhance the effect of saccharification. This review explains the role of different radiations in the production of cellulosic ethanol.

  10. Prospects for Irradiation in Cellulosic Ethanol Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Anita; Aggarwal, Neeraj K; Sharma, Anuja; Yadav, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Second generation bioethanol production technology relies on lignocellulosic biomass composed of hemicelluloses, celluloses, and lignin components. Cellulose and hemicellulose are sources of fermentable sugars. But the structural characteristics of lignocelluloses pose hindrance to the conversion of these sugar polysaccharides into ethanol. The process of ethanol production, therefore, involves an expensive and energy intensive step of pretreatment, which reduces the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and makes feedstock more susceptible to saccharification. Various physical, chemical, biological, or combined methods are employed to pretreat lignocelluloses. Irradiation is one of the common and promising physical methods of pretreatment, which involves ultrasonic waves, microwaves, γ-rays, and electron beam. Irradiation is also known to enhance the effect of saccharification. This review explains the role of different radiations in the production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:26839707

  11. Magnetic alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers under magnetic fields are reported. Static and rotating magnetic fields were used to align cellulose fibers with sizes ranging from millimeter to nanometer sizes. Cellulose fibers of the millimeter order, which were prepared for papermaking, and much smaller fibers with micrometer to nanometer sizes prepared by the acid hydrolysis of larger ones underwent magnetic alignment. Under a rotating field, a uniaxial alignment of fibers was achieved. The alignment was successfully fixed by the photopolymerization of a UV-curable resin precursor used as matrix. A monodomain chiral nematic film was prepared from an aqueous suspension of nanofibers. Using a field modulator inserted in a homogeneous magnetic field, simultaneous alignment and patterning were achieved

  12. Magnetic alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Kimura and Tsunehisa Kimura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers under magnetic fields are reported. Static and rotating magnetic fields were used to align cellulose fibers with sizes ranging from millimeter to nanometer sizes. Cellulose fibers of the millimeter order, which were prepared for papermaking, and much smaller fibers with micrometer to nanometer sizes prepared by the acid hydrolysis of larger ones underwent magnetic alignment. Under a rotating field, a uniaxial alignment of fibers was achieved. The alignment was successfully fixed by the photopolymerization of a UV-curable resin precursor used as matrix. A monodomain chiral nematic film was prepared from an aqueous suspension of nanofibers. Using a field modulator inserted in a homogeneous magnetic field, simultaneous alignment and patterning were achieved

  13. Magnetic alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Fumiko; Kimura, Tsunehisa [Division of Forest and Biomaterials Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: tkimura@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-04-01

    The alignment and patterning of cellulose fibers under magnetic fields are reported. Static and rotating magnetic fields were used to align cellulose fibers with sizes ranging from millimeter to nanometer sizes. Cellulose fibers of the millimeter order, which were prepared for papermaking, and much smaller fibers with micrometer to nanometer sizes prepared by the acid hydrolysis of larger ones underwent magnetic alignment. Under a rotating field, a uniaxial alignment of fibers was achieved. The alignment was successfully fixed by the photopolymerization of a UV-curable resin precursor used as matrix. A monodomain chiral nematic film was prepared from an aqueous suspension of nanofibers. Using a field modulator inserted in a homogeneous magnetic field, simultaneous alignment and patterning were achieved.

  14. Sulfated cellulose thin films with antithrombin affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose thin films were chemically modified by in situ sulfation to produce surfaces with anticoagulant characteristics. Two celluloses differing in their degree of polymerization (DP: CEL I (DP 215–240 and CEL II (DP 1300–1400 were tethered to maleic anhydride copolymer (MA layers and subsequently exposed to SO3•NMe3 solutions at elevated temperature. The impact of the resulting sulfation on the physicochemical properties of the cellulose films was investigated with respect to film thickness, atomic composition, wettability and roughness. The sulfation was optimized to gain a maximal surface concentration of sulfate groups. The scavenging of antithrombin (AT by the surfaces was determined to conclude on their potential anticoagulant properties.

  15. Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose with high antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Achraf; Boufi, Sami

    2015-10-20

    Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose (C-NFC) has been prepared via a high pressure homogenization using quaternized cellulose fibers with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. It has been shown that the quaternization of dried softwood pulp facilitated the defibrillation processes and prevented clogging of the homogenizer. The effects of the trimethylammonium chloride content on the fibrillation yield, the transparency degree of the gel, the rheological behavior of the NFC suspension and their electrokinetic properties were investigated. AFM observation showed that the NFC suspension consisted of individualized cellulose I nanofibrils 4-5nm in width and length in the micronic scale. In addition to their strong reinforcing potential, the inclusion of C-NFC into a polymer matrix was shown to efficiently enhance the antibacterial activity. The reinforcing potential of C-NFC, studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), was compared to anionic NFC and the difference was explained in terms of the nanofibrils capacities to build up a strong networks held by hydrogen bonding. PMID:26256179

  16. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose Iβ and cellulose II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sunghyun; French, Alfred D; Condon, Brian D; Concha, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose Iβ materials simply based on intensity at 18° 2θ in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16° 2θ intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and the degree of polymorphic conversion, we simulated the diffraction patterns of cotton celluloses (Iβ and II) and compared the simulated amorphous fractions with the Segal values. The diffraction patterns of control and mercerized cottons, respectively, were simulated with perfect crystals of cellulose Iβ (1.54° FWHM) and cellulose II (2.30° FWHM) as well as 10% and 35% amorphous celluloses. Their Segal amorphous fractions were 15% and 31%, respectively. The higher Segal amorphous fraction for control cotton was attributed to the peak overlap. Although the amorphous fraction was set in the simulation, the peak overlap induced by the increase of FWHM further enhanced the Segal amorphous intensity of cellulose Iβ. For cellulose II, the effect of peak overlap was smaller; however the lower reflection of the amorphous cellulose scattering in its Segal amorphous location resulted in smaller Segal amorphous fractions. Despite this underestimation, the relatively good agreement of the Segal method with the simulation for mercerized cotton was attributed to the incomplete conversion to cellulose II. The (1-10) and (110) peaks of cellulose Iβ remained near the Segal amorphous location of cellulose II for blends of control and mercerized cotton fibers. PMID:26453844

  17. Relaxation properties of natural and artificial cellulose materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to relaxation properties of natural and artificial cellulose materials. Therefore the dielectric properties of natural and artificial cellulose materials depending on influence of frequency and temperature are studied.

  18. Preparation and evaluation of cellulose-dissolving magnetic ionic liquid

    OpenAIRE

    MURAOKA, Jin; Kamiya, Noriho; Ito, Yuji; ムラオカ, ジン; カミヤ, ノリホ; イトウ, ユウジ; 村岡, 仁; 神谷, 典穂; 伊東, 祐二

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquids have attracted attention as potential pretreatment agents in cellulosic biomass processing. Here we report on a new magnetic ionic liquid that can dissolve crystalline cellulose and be collected by a magnet.

  19. Carboxymethyl ethers of cellulose obtained from secondary products of fine-stapled cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is devoted to synthesis and properties of carboxymethyl ethers of cellulose obtained from secondary products of fine-stapled cotton. The investigation of extraction conditions of cellulose on the quality of carboxymethyl ethers of cellulose is conducted. The qualitative characteristics of cotton cellulose are considered. The synthesis of carboxymethyl ethers of cellulose from obtained cellulose is described.

  20. Effect of γ-radiation on the saccharification of cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma radiation on the acid and saccharification of agricultural cellulosic wastes was investigated. Radiation doses of 200 KGy and higher significantly increased the saccharification of rice straw, rice hull and corn husk. The observed radiation effects varied with the cellulosic material. Rice straw exhibited the greatest radiosensitivity while rice hull showed the least susceptibility to gamma radiation. Possible mechanisms for the radiation-induced degradation of cellulose and agricultural cellulosic wastes are discussed. (author)

  1. The pressure-volume-temperature relationship of cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Jallabert, Bastien; Vaca Medina, Guadalupe; Cazalbou, Sophie; Rouilly, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Pressure–volume–temperature (PVT) mea- surements of a-cellulose with different water contents, were performed at temperatures from 25 to 180 °C and pressures from 19.6 to 196 MPa. PVT measurements allowed observation of the combined effects of pressure and temperature on the specific volume during cellulose thermo-compression. All isobars showed a decrease in cellulose specific volume with temperature. This densification is associated with a transition process of the cellulose, occurring at a...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation study of polyelectrolyte adsorption on cellulose surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Biermann, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of two polyelectrolyte ((carboxy methyl) cellulose and poly(acrylate) in water on crystalline cellulose is studied in this work. The multi-component problem has been splitted up into simulations of solutions of the polyelectrolyte (polyanions including sodium counterions) in water, into simulations of the interface of crystalline cellulose towards water. Finally polyelectrolyte-cellulose systems were studied. Molecular dynamics simulations of diluted (_ 2:5 weight percent) aque...

  3. Microbial Cellulose Production from Bacteria Isolated from Rotten Fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Rangaswamy, B.E.; Vanitha, K. P.; Hungund, Basavaraj S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cellulose, an exopolysaccharide produced by bacteria, has unique structural and mechanical properties and is highly pure compared to plant cellulose. Present study represents isolation, identification, and screening of cellulose producing bacteria and further process optimization. Isolation of thirty cellulose producers was carried out from natural sources like rotten fruits and rotten vegetables. The bacterial isolates obtained from rotten pomegranate, rotten sweet potato, and rott...

  4. Review: current international research into cellulose nanofibres and nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Eichhorn, S. J.; Dufresne, A; Aranguren, M.; Marcovich, N. E.; Capadona, J R; Rowan, S. J.; Weder, Christoph; Thielemans, W.; Roman, M.; Renneckar, S.; Gindl, W.; Veigel, S.; Keckes, J.; Yano, H.; Abe, K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent progress made in the area of cellulose nanofibre-based nanocomposites. An introduction into the methods used to isolate cellulose nanofibres (nanowhiskers, nanofibrils) is given, with details of their structure. Following this, the article is split into sections dealing with processing and characterisation of cellulose nanocomposites and new developments in the area, with particular emphasis on applications. The types of cellulose nanofibres covered a...

  5. Continuous Cellulosic Bioethanol Fermentation by Cyclic Fed-Batch Cocultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, He-Long; He, Qiang; He, Zhili; Hemme, Christopher L.; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-01-01

    Cocultivation of cellulolytic and saccharolytic microbial populations is a promising strategy to improve bioethanol production from the fermentation of recalcitrant cellulosic materials. Earlier studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of cocultivation in enhancing ethanolic fermentation of cellulose in batch fermentation. To further enhance process efficiency, a semicontinuous cyclic fed-batch fermentor configuration was evaluated for its potential in enhancing the efficiency of cellulose...

  6. Characterising the cellulose synthase complexes of cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoori Zangir, N.

    2012-01-01

    One of the characteristics of the plant kingdom is the presence of a structural cell wall. Cellulose is a major component in both the primary and secondary cell walls of plants. In higher plants cellulose is synthesized by so called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as the c

  7. Structural differences of xylans affect their interaction with cellulose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabel, M.A.; Borne, van den H.; Vincken, J.P.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The affinity of xylan to cellulose is an important aspect of many industrial processes, e.g. production of cellulose, paper making and bio-ethanol production. However, little is known about the adsorption of structurally different xylans to cellulose. Therefore, the adsorption of various xylans to b

  8. Cyanobacterial cellulose synthesis in the light of the photanol concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Schuurmans; H.C.P. Matthijs; L.J. Stal; K.J. Hellingwerf

    2014-01-01

    The detailed knowledge already available about cellulose synthases and their regulation, plus emerging insights into the process of cellulose secretion in cyanobacteria make cellulose an attractive polymer for the application of the photanol concept in an economically viable production process. By v

  9. 16 CFR 501.6 - Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. 501... REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS UNDER PART 500 § 501.6 Cellulose sponges, irregular dimensions. Variety packages of cellulose sponges of irregular dimensions, are exempted from the requirements of § 500.25 of...

  10. The Perspectives for Genetically Modified Cellulosic Ethanol in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Blahova, Pavla; Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    This paper connects the biofuels literature with genetic modifications literature by considering the potential of genetic modifications for increasing the efficiency of cellulosic biofuels production. This is done for one particular case through analyzing the effect of genetically modified corn adoption on overall yields of corn for silage. Our econometric model confirms that the use of genetically modified corn with inserted MON810 gene increases the overall corn biomass yield in the product...

  11. Sucrose synthase affects carbon partitioning to increase cellulose production and altered cell wall ultrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Heather D.; Yan, Jimmy; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene under the control of 2 promoters was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata). Analysis of RNA transcript abundance, enzyme activity, cell wall composition, and soluble carbohydrates revealed significant changes in the transgenic lines. All lines showed significantly increased SuSy enzyme activity in developing xylem. This activity manifested in altered secondary cell wall cellulose content per dry weight in...

  12. Loosenin, a novel protein with cellulose-disrupting activity from Bjerkandera adusta

    OpenAIRE

    Segovia Lorenzo; Cuervo-Soto Laura I; Martínez-Anaya Claudia; Quiroz-Castañeda Rosa E; Folch-Mallol Jorge L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Expansins and expansin-like proteins loosen cellulose microfibrils, possibly through the rupture of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Together with the use of lignocellulolytic enzymes, these proteins are potential molecular tools to treat plant biomass to improve saccharification yields. Results Here we describe a new type of expansin-related fungal protein that we have called loosenin. Its corresponding gene, loos1, from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta, was cloned and ...

  13. Cellulose chain binding free energy drives the processive move of cellulases on the cellulose surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Shujun; Song, Xiangfei; Yao, Lishan

    2016-09-01

    Processivity is essential for cellulases in their catalysis of cellulose hydrolysis. But what drives the processive move is not well understood. In this work, we use Trichoderma reesei Cel7B as a model system and show that its processivity is directly correlated to the binding free energy difference of a cellulose chain occupying the binding sites -7 to +2 and that occupying sites -7 to -1. Several mutants that have stronger interactions with glycosyl units in sites +1 and +2 than the wild type enzyme show higher processivity. The results suggest that after the release of the product cellobiose located in sites +1 and +2, the enzyme pulls the cellulose chain to fill the vacant sites, which propels its processive move on the cellulose surface. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1873-1880. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928155

  14. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose IB and cellulose II

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose IB materials simply based on intensity at 18o 20 in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16o 2O intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and th...

  15. Use of Cellulose and Oxidized Cellulose Nanocrystals from Olive Stones in Chitosan Bionanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Abou-Zeid, Ragab E.; Hassan, Enas A.; Fedia Bettaieb; Ramzi Khiari; Mohammad L. Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl- (TEMPO-) oxidized cellulose nanocrystals (CNC-TEMPO) were prepared from olive stones. The prepared nanocrystals were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and carboxylic groups content determination. The prepared nanocrystals were used as reinforcing elements in chitosan nanocomposites, which were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and tensile ...

  16. Viscoelastic evaluation of topical creams containing microcrystalline cellulose/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as stabilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Adeyeye, Moji Christianah; Jain, Ashwinkumar C.; Ghorab, Mohamed K. M.; Reilly, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the viscoelastic properties of topical creams containing various concentrations of microcrystalline cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (Avicel® CL-611) as a stabilizer. Avicel CL-611 was used at 4 different levels (1%, 2%, 4%, and 6% dispersion) to prepare topical creams, and hydrocortisone acetate was used as a model drug. The viscoelastic properties such as loss modulus (G), storage modulus (G), and loss tangent (tan δ) of these creams were...

  17. LUFFA CYLINDRICA AS A LIGNOCELLULOSIC SOURCE OF FIBER, MICROFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE, AND CELLULOSE NANOCRYSTALS

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto Siqueira; Julien Bras; Alain Dufresne

    2010-01-01

    In this work the annual plant called Luffa cylindrica (LC) has been characterized and used to prepare macroscopic lignocellulosic fibers and cellulosic nanoparticles, viz. microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and whiskers, each of which can be used as a reinforcing phase in bionanocomposites. The morphological, chemical, and physical properties of LC fibers were first characterized. The contents of lignin, hemicellulose, and other constituents were determined, and scanning electron microscopy (SE...

  18. Engineering of a novel cellulose-adherent cellulolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae for cellulosic biofuel production

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Liu; Shih-Hsin Ho; Kengo Sasaki; Riaan den Haan; Kentaro Inokuma; Chiaki Ogino; van Zyl, Willem H; Tomohisa Hasunuma; Akihiko Kondo

    2016-01-01

    Cellulosic biofuel is the subject of increasing attention. The main obstacle toward its economic feasibility is the recalcitrance of lignocellulose requiring large amount of enzyme to break. Several engineered yeast strains have been developed with cellulolytic activities to reduce the need for enzyme addition, but exhibiting limited effect. Here, we report the successful engineering of a cellulose-adherent Saccharomyces cerevisiae displaying four different synergistic cellulases on the cell ...

  19. Environmental sustainability of cellulosic energy cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The environmental sustainability of bioenergy production depends on both direct and indirect effects of the production systems to produce bioenergy feedstocks. This chapter evaluates what is known about the environmental sustainability of cellulosic bioenergy crop production for the types of produc...

  20. Herstellung und Beurteilung funktionalisierter Cellulose-Tiefenfilterschichten

    OpenAIRE

    Lösch, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Gegenstand dieser Arbeit ist die Entwicklung funktionalisierter Cellulose-Tiefenfilterschichten. Dazu werden kommerzielle Kationenaustauscher in einer Kugelmühle nass zerkleinert und bei der Herstellung in die Tiefenfilterschichten eingebettet. Die mechanischen Eigenschaften und das Filtrationsverhalten dieser Schichten sind vergleichbar mit kommerziellen Produkten. Der maximale, technisch einsetzbare Masseanteil an Ionenaustauscher beträgt dabei ca. 40 %. In Durchströmungsversuchen wird die...

  1. Formation of asymmetric cellulose acetate membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, H.; Altena, F.W.; Smolders, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Cellulose acetate membranes were prepared from casting solutions containing dioxane as a solvent and varying concentrations (up to 6%) of maleic acid as an additive. Coagulation took place in water at different temperatures. The effect of these variables on membrane structure and membrane properties

  2. Evaluation of drug interactions with nanofibrillar cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laukkanen, Antti; Hellman, Maarit; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-11-01

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) (also referred to as cellulose nanofibers, nanocellulose, microfibrillated, or nanofibrillated cellulose) has recently gotten wide attention in various research areas and it has also been studied as excipient in formulation of the pharmaceutical dosage forms. Here, we have evaluated the interactions between NFC and the model drugs of different structural characteristics (size, charge, etc.). The series of permeation studies were utilized to evaluate the ability of the drugs in solution to diffuse through the thin, porous, dry NFC films. An incubation method was used to determine capacity of binding of chosen model drugs to NFC as well as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to study thermodynamics of the binding process. A genetically engineered fusion protein carrying double cellulose binding domain was used as a positive control since its affinity and capacity of binding for NFC have already been reported. The permeation studies revealed the size dependent diffusion rate of the model drugs through the NFC films. The results of both binding and ITC studies showed that the studied drugs bind to the NFC material and indicated the pH dependence of the binding and electrostatic forces as the main mechanism. PMID:23774185

  3. Chemistry, Technology and Aplications of Oxidized Celluloses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelka, P.; Sopuch, T.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Suchý, P.; Masteikova, R.; Bajerová, M.; Gajdziok, J.; Milichovský, M.; Švorčík, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, C (2010), s. 205-245. ISBN 978-1-608-76-388-7 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : oxidation * cellulose * in-vitro Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=14049

  4. Methacrylate hydrogels reinforced with bacterial cellulose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobzová, Radka; Dušková-Smrčková, Miroslava; Michálek, Jiří; Karpushkin, Evgeny; Gatenholm, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 7 (2012), s. 1193-1201. ISSN 0959-8103 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400500902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : bacterial cellulose * methacrylate hydrogel * composite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.125, year: 2012

  5. Exploring the Nature of Cellulose Microfibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ying [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Burger, Christian [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ma, Hongyang [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Chu, Benjamin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Hsiao, Benjamin S. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Ultrathin cellulose microfibril fractions were extracted from spruce wood powder using combined delignification, TEMPO-catalyzed oxidation, and sonication processes. Small-angle X-ray scattering of these microfibril fractions in a “dilute” aqueous suspension (concentration 0.077 wt %) revealed that their shape was in the form of nanostrip with 4 nm width and only about 0.5 nm thicknesses. We found that these dimensions were further confirmed by TEM and AFM measurements. The 0.5 nm thickness implied that the nanostrip could contain only a single layer of cellulose chains. At a higher concentration (0.15 wt %), SAXS analysis indicated that these nanostrips aggregated into a layered structure. The X-ray diffraction of samples collected at different preparation stages suggested that microfibrils were delaminated along the (110) planes from the Iβ cellulose crystals. Moreover, the degree of oxidation and solid-state 13C NMR characterizations indicated that, in addition to the surface molecules, some inner molecules of microfibrils were also oxidized, facilitating the delamination into cellulose nanostrips.

  6. HPMC reinforced with different cellulose nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic polymers, made almost entirely from chemicals derived from crude oil, are widely used as primary packaging in the food industry causing environmental issues. Hydroxypropyl Methyl Cellulose (HPMC) can be used as bio-based packaging material. In this study, the application of nanotechnology ...

  7. [Insights into engineering of cellulosic ethanol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Guojun; Wu, Guoqing; Lin, Xin

    2014-06-01

    For energy security, air pollution concerns, coupled with the desire to sustain the agricultural sector and revitalize the rural economy, many countries have applied ethanol as oxygenate or fuel to supplement or replace gasoline in transportation sector. Because of abundant feedstock resources and effective reduction of green-house-gas emissions, the cellulosic ethanol has attracted great attention. With a couple of pioneers beginning to produce this biofuel from biomass in commercial quantities around the world, it is necessary to solve engineering problems and complete the economic assessment in 2015-2016, gradually enter the commercialization stage. To avoid "competing for food with humans and competing for land with food", the 1st generation fuel ethanol will gradually transit to the 2nd generation cellulosic ethanol. Based on the overview of cellulosic ethanol industrialization from domestic and abroad in recent years, the main engineering application problems encountered in pretreatment, enzymes and enzymatic hydrolysis, pentose/hexose co-fermentation strains and processes, equipment were discussed from chemical engineering and biotechnology perspective. The development direction of cellulosic ethanol technology in China was addressed. PMID:25212000

  8. Nanomanufacturing metrology for cellulosic nanomaterials: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the metrology and standards for advanced manufacturing of cellulosic nanomaterials (or basically, wood-based nanotechnology) is imperative to the success of this rising economic sector. Wood-based nanotechnology is a revolutionary technology that will create new jobs and strengthen America's forest-based economy through industrial development and expansion. It allows this, previously perceived, low-tech industry to leap-frog directly into high-tech products and processes and thus improves its current economic slump. Recent global investments in nanotechnology programs have led to a deeper appreciation of the high performance nature of cellulose nanomaterials. Cellulose, manufactured to the smallest possible-size ( 2 nm x 100 nm), is a high-value material that enables products to be lighter and stronger; have less embodied energy; utilize no catalysts in the manufacturing, are biologically compatible and, come from a readily renewable resource. In addition to the potential for a dramatic impact on the national economy - estimated to be as much as $250 billion worldwide by 2020 - cellulose-based nanotechnology creates a pathway for expanded and new markets utilizing these renewable materials. The installed capacity associated with the US pulp and paper industry represents an opportunity, with investment, to rapidly move to large scale production of nano-based materials. However, effective imaging, characterization and fundamental measurement science for process control and characterization are lacking at the present time. This talk will discuss some of these needed measurements and potential solutions.

  9. African perspective on cellulosic ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensah, Edem Cudjoe; Kemausuor, Francis; Miezah, Kodwo;

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge to commercial production of cellulosic ethanol pertains to the cost-effective breakdown of the complex and recalcitrant structure of lignocellulose into its components via pretreatment, the cost of enzymes for hydrolysis and fermentation, and the conversion rate of C5 sugars to ...

  10. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ECONOMICAL BACTERIAL CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssni El-Saied

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the economical production of bacterial cellulose (BC by Gluconacetobacter subsp. Xylinus (ATCC 10245 in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks cultivated under static conditions. The fermentation media used contained food industrial by-product liquors, such as black strap molasses solution and corn steep liquor (CSL, which represents some of the most economical carbon and nitrogen sources. However, because of the presence of undesirable components in molasses (such as coloring substances, heavy metals, and other compounds that may act as inhibitors, and in order to eliminate them, crude molasses has been treated with an acid, as an attempt to increase BC productivity. The amount of BC produced using these carbon and nitrogen sources was determined and compared to that produced using previously reported fermentation media. The characterizations of the bacterial cellulose (BC pellicles obtained using either conventional or by-product media were studied by thermal and spectral techniques and compared to those of plant-derived cellulose such as cotton linter, viscose pulp, and microcrystalline cellulose.

  11. Essays concerning the cellulosic biofuel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosburg, Alicia Sue

    Despite market-based incentives and mandated production, the U.S. cellulosic biofuel industry has been slow to develop. This dissertation explores the economic factors that have limited industry development along with important economic tradeoffs that will be encountered with commercial-scale production. The first essay provides an overview of the policies, potential, and challenges of the biofuel industry, with a focus on cellulosic biofuel. The second essay considers the economics of cellulosic biofuel production. Breakeven models of the local feedstock supply system and biofuel refining process are constructed to develop the Biofuel Breakeven (BioBreak) program, a stochastic, Excel-based program that evaluates the feasibility of local biofuel and biomass markets under various policy and market scenarios. An application of the BioBreak program is presented using expected market conditions for 14 local cellulosic biofuel markets that vary by feedstock and location. The economic costs of biofuel production identified from the BioBreak application are higher than frequently anticipated and raise questions about the potential of cellulosic ethanol as a sustainable and economical substitute for conventional fuels. Program results also are extended using life-cycle analysis to evaluate the cost of reducing GHG emissions by substituting cellulosic ethanol for conventional fuel. The third essay takes a closer look at the economic trade-offs within the biorefinery industry and feedstock production processes. A long-run biomass production through bioenergy conversion cost model is developed that incorporates heterogeneity of biomass suppliers within and between local markets. The model builds on previous literature by treating biomass as a non-commoditized feedstock and relaxes the common assumption of fixed biomass density and price within local markets. An empirical application is provided for switchgrass-based ethanol production within U.S. crop reporting districts

  12. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-11-22

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  13. Rheology Behavior of Cellulose/NMMO/Water Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾广新; 胡赛珠; 邵惠丽; 沈弋弋; 胡学超

    2001-01-01

    Rheology properties of cellulose/NMMO/water solution are important parameters for spinning. The storage and loss modulus and viscosity of the solution decrease with increasing water concentration of solvent in certain range. Flow-activation energy of two kinds of cellulose solution is quite different in view of their molecular weight. The molecular weigh distribution of cellulose samples can be characterized by the value of Gc/c Since the different cellulose samples have different MWD and DP, the relations of the first normal stress difference N1 vs. shear rate are different. Moreover, the rheology properties of cellulose solution produced by twin-screw extruder process are also investigated.

  14. Cellulose-Microtubule Uncoupling Proteins Prevent Lateral Displacement of Microtubules during Cellulose Synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zengyu; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Zhang, Yi; Somssich, Marc; Zhang, Youjun; Fernie, Alisdair R; Persson, Staffan

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is the major contributor to plant morphogenesis. Cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). Nascent cellulose microfibrils become entangled in the cell wall, and further catalysis therefore drives the CSC forward through the membrane: a process guided by cortical microtubules via the protein CSI1/POM2. Still, it is unclear how the microtubules can withstand the forces generated by the motile CSCs to effectively direct CSC movement. Here, we identified a family of microtubule-associated proteins, the cellulose synthase-microtubule uncouplings (CMUs), that located as static puncta along cortical microtubules. Functional disruption of the CMUs caused lateral microtubule displacement and compromised microtubule-based guidance of CSC movement. CSCs that traversed the microtubules interacted with the microtubules via CSI1/POM2, which prompted the lateral microtubule displacement. Hence, we have revealed how microtubules can withstand the propulsion of the CSCs during cellulose biosynthesis and thus sustain anisotropic plant cell growth. PMID:27477947

  15. 大青杨纤维素合酶PuCesA6全长基因的获得及分析%Cloning and sequence analysis of full-length cellulose synthase gene PuCesA6 from Populus ussuriensis Kom.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许雷; 刘一星; 方连玉

    2011-01-01

    为给大青杨纤维素方面的基因改良提供基础,以大青杨叶片总DNA为模板,根据已登录的欧洲颤杨PtrCesA6序列保守区段设计2对引物进行PCR扩增,将得到的2个片段克隆到pMD18-T载体中.测序后拼接2片段,结果显示,该基因全长5 760 bp,与欧洲颤杨的PtrCesA6全长cDNA的相似性为99%,证明克隆的序列为纤维素合酶基因全长序列,将该基因命名为PuCesA6.将该全长序列与GenBank中登录的欧洲颤杨、玉米、拟南芥、棉花、新西兰辐射松、大麦、马铃薯、小麦、百日草各纤维素合酶共34条全长序列进行系统进化树分析.结果表明,PuCesA6和PtrCesA6聚为一类,与其它各类CesA都是分开的,单子叶与双子叶的CesA序列也未分别聚类.%In order to provide basis for cellulose synthase gene modification in Populus ussuriensis Kom., Two pairs of specific primers were used to amplify genomic DNA from leaves of P.ussuriensis Kom.by touch down polymerase-chain reaction (TD-PCR), according to conservative regions of CesA gene.Two bands of CesA gene were obtained and cloned into pMD18-T vector.According to the result of sequencing, 5 760 bp was named as PuCesA6.Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of PuCesA6 with PtrcesA6 from P.tremuloides showed 99 % identity.The result of phylogenetic analysis of comparing PuCesA6 gene with those of P.tremuloides, Zea may, Arabidopsis thaliana, Gossypium hirsutum, Pinups radiata D.Don, Hordeum vulgare putative, Solanum tuberosum, Triticum aestivum and Zinnia elegans from GenBank indicated that PuCesA6 and PtrCesA6 were closely grouped but separate from the others.CesA sequences represent monocotyledon and dicotyledon were not grouped respectively.

  16. The Synthesis of a Novel Cellulose Physical Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiufang Duan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose possessing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD was used as a host molecule and cellulose possessing ferrocene (Fc as a guest polymer. Infrared spectra, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV, and contact angle analysis were used to characterise the material structure and the inclusion behaviour. The results showed that the β-CD-cellulose and the Fc-cellulose can form inclusion complexes. Moreover, ferrocene oxidation, and reduction of state can be adjusted by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO as an oxidant and glutathione (GSH as a reductant. In this study, a physical gel based on β-CD-cellulose/Fc-cellulose was formed under mild conditions in which autonomous healing between cut surfaces occurred after 24 hours. The physical gel can be controlled in the sol-gel transition. The compressive strength of the Fc-cellulose/β-CD-cellulose gel increased with increased cellulose concentration. The host-guest interaction between the side chains of cellulose could strengthen the gel. The cellulose physical gel may eventually be used as a stimulus-responsive, healing material in biomedical applications.

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 356524372 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VAEENVSQRYEKEVMEFGNSSPMLTLLATLALLNLFCLLGMLLKQVFISEGGLRIYETMALQVLLSGVLVLINVPVYQGLYLRKDKGRLPISVAMKLGL...LEEKSKALASCTYEENTLWGKKMGLQYGCAVEDVITGLSIKCRGWKSVYYNPQRRAFLGVAPTTLPEALVQHKRWSEGGFQIVLSKYSPAWYAYGLISPGLQM...ALRVIYEVEFHGLDGLGGPFYIGTGCFHRREILCGRKFNDQYKNDWKEYKNIDHMKEGSLHE...SNFATAVVIFSSLDAVLGIRFVIDKEDFFSHNVQYEGDRVHASFVVIKVDTSWQHTHEGVDLSVKGPSGEPIKDFHDMTSEIFEFVARNSGPYRFCFINKSPYHE...47 3847:1647 PREDICTED: cellulose synthase-like protein E1-like Glycine max MAEEESYPLFETRRAKGRVIYTIFSLSLFVGILFIWVYRVSHIPREG

  18. Assessing nano cellulose developments using science and technology indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanez, Douglas Henrique; Amaral, Roniberto Morato do; Faria, Leandro Innocentini Lopes de; Gregolin, Jose Angelo Rodrigues, E-mail: douglasmilanez@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Informacao Tecnologica em Materiais. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2013-11-01

    This research aims to examine scientific and technological trends of developments in nano cellulose based on scientometric and patent indicators obtained from the Science Citation Index and Derwent Innovations Index in 2001-2010. The overall nano cellulose activity indicators were compared to nanotechnology and other selected nano materials. Scientific and technological future developments in nano cellulose were forecasted using extrapolation growth curves and the main countries were also mapped. The results showed that nano cellulose publications and patent documents have increased rapidly over the last five years with an average growth rate higher than that of nanotechnology and fullerene. The USA, Japan, France, Sweden and Finland all played a significant role in nano cellulose development and the extrapolation growth curves suggested that nano cellulose scientific and technological activities are still emerging. Finally, the evidence from this study recommends monitoring nano cellulose S and T advances in the coming years. (author)

  19. Assessing nano cellulose developments using science and technology indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aims to examine scientific and technological trends of developments in nano cellulose based on scientometric and patent indicators obtained from the Science Citation Index and Derwent Innovations Index in 2001-2010. The overall nano cellulose activity indicators were compared to nanotechnology and other selected nano materials. Scientific and technological future developments in nano cellulose were forecasted using extrapolation growth curves and the main countries were also mapped. The results showed that nano cellulose publications and patent documents have increased rapidly over the last five years with an average growth rate higher than that of nanotechnology and fullerene. The USA, Japan, France, Sweden and Finland all played a significant role in nano cellulose development and the extrapolation growth curves suggested that nano cellulose scientific and technological activities are still emerging. Finally, the evidence from this study recommends monitoring nano cellulose S and T advances in the coming years. (author)

  20. The effect of deuteration on the structure of bacterial cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bali, Garima [Georgia Institute of Technology; Foston, Marcus [Georgia Institute of Technology; O' Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL; He, Junhong [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo generated deuterated bacterial cellulose, cultivated from 100% deuterated glycerol in D2O medium, was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid dissolution and 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A solution NMR method of the dissolved cellulose was used to determine that this bacterial cellulose had 85 % deuterium incorporation. Acetylation and 1H and 2H NMR of deuterated bacterial cellulose indicated near equal deuteration at all sites of the glucopyranosyl ring except C-6 which was partly deuterated. Despite the high level of deuterium incorporation there were no significant differences in the molecular and morphological properties were observed for the deuterated and protio bacterial cellulose samples. The highly deuterated bacterial cellulose presented here can be used as a model substrate for studying cellulose biopolymer properties via future small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies.

  1. Method and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Burke, Murray J.; Hillier, Sunalie N.

    2015-09-08

    Methods and apparatus for treating, pre-treating, preparing and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, such as for ethanol production, are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to methods and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock by mixing and heating the cellulosic feedstock and/or by moistening and heating the cellulosic feedstock. The invention also relates to a holding tank, and a method of utilizing the holding tank whereby bridging may be reduced or eliminated and may result in a product stream from autohydrolysis or hydrolysis having an improved yield. The invention further relates to methods and apparatus for obtaining and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, which may be used for the subsequent production of a fermentable sugar stream from the cellulose and hemicellulose in the cellulosic feedstock wherein the fermentable sugar stream may be used for subsequent ethanol production. The invention also relates to a method and apparatus for withdrawing one or more feedstock stream from a holding tank.

  2. Characterization of cellulose extracted from oil palm empty fruit bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisak, Muhammad Asri Abdul; Daik, Rusli; Ramli, Suria

    2015-09-01

    Recently, cellulose has been studied by many researchers due to its promising properties such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, hydrophilicity and robustness. Due to that it is applied in many fields such as paper, film, drug delivery, membranes, etc. Cellulose can be extracted from various plants while oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) is the one of its sources. In this study, cellulose was extracted by chemical treatments which involved the use of formic acid and hydrogen peroxide to remove hemicellulose and lignin components. Maximum yield was 43.22%. Based on the FT-IR spectra, the peak of wax (1735 cm-1), hemicellulose (1375 cm-1) and lignin (1248 cm-1 and 1037 cm-1) were not observed in extracted cellulose. TGA analysis showed that the extracted cellulose starts to thermally degrade at 340 °C. The SEM analysis suggested that the cellulose extracted from OPEFB was not much different from commercial cellulose.

  3. Mechanism of cellobiose inhibition in cellulose hydrolysis by cellobiohydrolase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Yue; WU; Bin; YAN; Baixu; GAO; Peiji

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study of cellobiose inhibition in cellulose hydrolysis by synergism of cellobiohydrolyse I and endoglucanase I is presented. Cellobiose is the structural unit of cellulose molecules and also the main product in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. It has been identified that cellobiose can strongly inhibit hydrolysis reaction of cellulase, whereas it has no effect on the adsorption of cellulase on cellulose surface. The experimental data of FT-IR spectra, fluorescence spectrum and circular dichroism suggested that cellobiose can be combined with tryptophan residue located near the active site of cellobiohydrolase and then form steric hindrance, which prevents cellulose molecule chains from diffusing into active site of cellulase. In addition, the molecular conformation of cellobiohydrolase changes after cellobiose binding, which also causes most of the non-productive adsorption. Under these conditions, microfibrils cannot be separated from cellulose chains, thus further hydrolysis of cellulose can hardly proceed.

  4. Characterization of cellulose and other exopolysaccharides produced from Gluconacetobacter strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-22

    This study characterized the cellulosic and non-cellulosic exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by four Gluconacetobacter strains. The yields of bacterial cellulose and water-soluble polysaccharides were dependent on both carbon source and Gluconacetobacter strain. The carbon substrate also affected the composition of the free EPS. When galactose served as an exclusive carbon source, Gluconacetobacter xylinus (G. xylinus) ATCC 53524 and ATCC 700178 produced a distinct alkaline stable crystalline product, which influenced the crystallization of cellulose. Gluconacetobacter hansenii (G. hansenii) ATCC 23769 and ATCC 53582, however, did not exhibit any significant change in cellulose crystal properties when galactose was used as the carbon source. Microscopic observation further confirmed significant incorporation of EPS into the cellulose composites. The cellulosic network produced from galactose medium showed distinctive morphological and structural features compared to that from glucose medium. PMID:25439946

  5. Outer Membrane Proteins of Fibrobacter succinogenes with Potential Roles in Adhesion to Cellulose and in Cellulose Digestion▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Hyun-Sik; Qi, Meng; Gong, Joshua; Egbosimba, Emmanuel E.; Forsberg, Cecil W.

    2007-01-01

    Comparative analysis of binding of intact glucose-grown Fibrobacter succinogenes strain S85 cells and adhesion-defective mutants AD1 and AD4 to crystalline and acid-swollen (amorphous) cellulose showed that strain S85 bound efficiently to both forms of cellulose while mutant Ad1 bound to acid-swollen cellulose, but not to crystalline cellulose, and mutant Ad4 did not bind to either. One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) of outer membrane cellulose binding proteins and of outer membr...

  6. Purification and characterization of a cellulose-binding {beta}-glucosidase from cellulose-degrading cultures of phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymar, E.S.; Li, B.; Renganathan, V. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science & Technology, Portland, OR (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Extracellular {beta}-glucosidase from cellulose-degrading cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium was purified by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography, and by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) using a Mono Q anion-exchange column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (SDS-PAGE) analysis of FPLC-purified {beta}-glucosidase indicated the presence of three enzyme forms with molecular weights of 96,000, 98,000, and 114,000. On further fractionation with a microcrystalline cellulose column, the 114,000-molecular-weight {beta}-glucosidase, which had 82% of the {beta}-glucosidase activity, was bound to cellulose. The {beta}-glucosidases with molecular weights of 96,000 and 98,000 did not bind to cellulose. The cellulose-bound {beta}-glucosidase was eluted completely from the cellulose matrix with water. Cellulose-bound {beta}-glucosidase catalyzed p-nitrophenylglucoside hydrolysis, suggesting that the catalytic site is not involved in cellulose binding. When the cellulose-binding form was incubated with papain for 20 h, no decrease in the enzyme activity was observed; however, approximately 74% of the papain-treated glucosidase did not bind to microcrystalline cellulose. SDS-PAGE analysis of the nonbinding glucosidase produced by papain indicated the presence of three bands with molecular weights in the range of 95,000 to 97,000. On the basis of these results, we propose that the low-molecular-weight (96,000 and 98,000) non-cellulose-binding {beta}-glucosidase forms are most probably formed from the higher-molecular-weight (114,000) cellulose-binding {beta}-glucosidase via extracellular proteolytic hydrolysis. Also, it appears that the extracellular {beta}-glucosidase from P. chrysosporium might be organized into two domains, a cellulose-binding domain and a catalytic domain. Kinetic characterization of the cellulose-binding form is also presented. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A facile route to prepare cellulose-based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qin; Chen, Chen; Rosswurm, Katelyn; Yao, Tianming; Janaswamy, Srinivas

    2016-09-20

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable and biodegradable material available in nature. Its insoluble character in water as well as common organic and inorganic liquids, however, curtails the wholesome utility. The continuous rise for biodegradable products based on cellulose coupled with its intrinsic ability to form a viable substitute for the petroleum-based materials necessitates the critical need for solubilizing the cellulose. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility of ZnCl2 solutions, especially the 64-72% concentrations, to dissolve cellulose. FTIR results suggest that Zn(2+) ions promote Zn⋯O3H interactions, which in-turn weaken the intrinsic O3H⋯O5 hydrogen bonds that are responsible for strengthening the cellulose chains. Interestingly, Ca(2+) ions promote interactions among the Zn-cellulose chains leading to the formation of nano fibrils and yield gelling solutions. The tensile strength of the Ca(2+) added Zn-cellulose films increases by around 250% compared to the Zn-cellulose films. Overall, utilization of inorganic salt solutions to solubilize and crosslink cellulose is cost-effective, recyclable and certainly stands out tall among the other available systems. More importantly, the proposed protocol is simple and is a "green" process, and thus its large-scale adaptability is quite feasible. We strongly believe that the outcome opens up a new window of opportunities for cellulose in the biomedical, pharmaceutical, food and non-food applications. PMID:27261751

  8. Tertiary phase diagram of cellulose, ionic liquid and organic solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Henderson, Doug; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert M.; Wang, Howard

    Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer on earth, and widely used in products from clothing to paper. Fundamental understanding of molecular solutions of cellulose is the key to realize advanced technologies beyond cellulose fibers. It has been reported that certain ionic liquid/organic solvent mixtures dissolve cellulose. In this study, the tertiary phase diagram of microcrystalline cellulose, 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and dimethylformamide (DMF) mixtures has been determined using optical cloud point method and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Data indicate that a molar ratio of EMIMAc to cellulose repeating unit equal or greater than 3 is necessary but not sufficient in forming one-phase homogeneous solutions. A miscibility gap exists in the dilute regime, where a minimum of 5 mol% of EMIM Ac in DMF is needed to form homogenous solutions. SANS show that cellulose chains adopt Gaussian-like conformation in homogenous solutions. The solutions exhibit the characteristics of upper critical solution temperature. Clustering of cellulose chains occurs at low EMIMAc/DMF or EMIMAc/cellulose ratio, or at low temperatures. The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixture is discussed.

  9. Extensional viscosity of microfibrillated cellulose suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Tobias; Rigdahl, Mikael; Stading, Mats; Levenstam Bragd, Emma

    2014-02-15

    The extensional properties of micro fibrillated cellulose (MFC)-suspensions at different fibril concentrations and with different amounts of added sodium chloride were evaluated. The MFC-suspensions were obtained by diluting a stock solution consisting of 0.95 wt.% cellulose with either deionized water or sodium chloride solution, giving a series of different concentrations and sodium chloride contents. The extensional viscosities of the suspensions were measured utilizing contraction flow geometry. Here the specimens were forced through a hyperbolic nozzle and the required pressure drop over the nozzle was measured. The extensional viscosity exhibited an extensional-thinning behaviour over the extensional strain rates used. Furthermore the extensional viscosity decreased with decreasing concentration of the suspensions, in similarities with the shear properties of the specimens. For the suspensions containing sodium chloride, the extensional viscosity appeared to increase when the concentration of sodium chloride was increased. But excessive amounts of added sodium chloride promoted an agglomeration of the suspensions. PMID:24507298

  10. Reinforced plastics and aerogels by nanocrystalline cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a rigid rod-like nanoscale material, can be produced from cellulosic biomass in powder, liquid, or gel forms by acid and chemical hydrolysis. Owing to its unique and exceptional physicochemical properties, the incorporation of a small amount of NCC into plastic enhances the mechanical strength of the latter by several orders of magnitudes. Carbohydrate-based NCC poses no serious environmental concerns, providing further impetus for the development and applications of this green and renewable biomaterial to fabricate lightweight and biodegradable composites and aerogels. Surface functionalization of NCC remains the main focus of NCC research to tailor its properties for dispersion in hydrophilic or hydrophobic media. It is of uttermost importance to develop tools and protocols for imaging of NCC in a complex matrix and quantify its reinforcement effect.

  11. Process Dependence of Cellulose Nanofiber Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Doug; Zhang, Xin; Mao, Yimin; Jang, Soo-Hwan; Hu, Liangbing; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) are the most abundant natural nanomaterial on earth with potential applications in renewable energy, polymer nanocomposites and flexible electronics. CNF can be produced through TEMPO oxidation which separates the hierarchical structure of cellulose fibers into smaller micro- and nanofibers by altering their surface chemistry, inducing a repulsive electrostatic charge on the fibers. This work will examine the structural evolution of CNF during production. Samples were prepared by removing and quenching aliquots during the TEMPO reaction. The fibers were washed, filtered and re-dispersed into D2O for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The SANS data was analyzed to track the changes in the CNF structure as a function of reaction time.

  12. Microfibrillated cellulose, a new cellulose product: properties, uses, and commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turbak, A.F.; Snyder, F.W.; Sandberg, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    A new form of cellulose, which is expanded to a smooth gel when dispersed in polar liquids, is produced by a unique, rapid, physical treatment of wood cellulose pulps. A 2% suspension of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in water has thixotropic viscosity properties and is a stable gel on storage, or when subjected to freeze-thaw cycles. At this concentration, MFC is an excellent suspending medium for other solids and an emulsifying base for organic liquids. In laboratory tests, microfibrillated cellulose has been demonstrated to have wide utility in the preparation of foods such as low-calorie whipped toppings, cake frostings, salad dressings, gravies, and sauces. At 0.3% cellulose concentration in ground meats, MFC helps retain juices during cooking. Tests were also conducted in formulating paints, emulsions, and cosmetics and in the use of MFC as a binder for nonwoven textiles and as a mineral suspending agent. From economic studies, it is estimated that a 2% MFC dispersion can be produced for about 1.5 cents/lb, total cost. 6 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  13. SPECIFIC INTERACTION ACTING AT A CELLULOSE-BINDING DOMAIN/CELLULOSE INTERFACE FOR PAPERMAKING APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Yokota

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Specific and strong cellulose-binding characteristics were utilized for promoting retention of additives in contaminated papermaking systems. Cellulose-binding domain (CBD of cellulase derived from Trichoderma viride was separated by digestion with papain, and then introduced into anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM through a condensation reaction using water-soluble carbodiimide. The CBD-modified A-PAM (CBD-A-PAM showed good retention on pulp fibers, resulting in high tensile strength paper sheets. The effect remained almost unchanged in the presence of model interfering substances such as ligninsulfonate and Ca2+ ions, whereas commercial cationic paper-strengthening polymer became ineffective. The cellulose-binding force of CBD was quantitatively determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM in the liquid state. Histidine-tagged CBD protein was obtained using Escherichia coli via an expression of CBD derived from Cellulomonas fimi, and immobilized on a gold-coated AFM probe. A strong attractive force was detected only at a CBD/cellulose interface, even when Ca2+ ions were present in high concentration. Direct estimation of CBD affinity for cellulose substrate by AFM would provide significant information on the interfacial interactions useful for the functional design of papermaking additives.

  14. Effects of konjac glucomannan, inulin and cellulose on acute colonic responses to genotoxic azoxymethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Tzu; Yang, Lien-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Ling

    2014-07-15

    Mice were fed low-fibre, or that supplemented with soluble fibre (konjac glucomannan, KGM; inulin), or insoluble fibre (cellulose) to determine how these three fibres modulated the acute colonic responses to an azoxymethane (AOM) treatment. Results indicated that KGM and inulin exerted greater anti-genotoxic effects compared to cellulose and up-regulated the gene expressions of glutathione S-transferase and antioxidant enzymes. The apoptotic index in the distal colon was the greatest and the expression of Bcl-2 was the lowest in the KGM group 24h after the AOM treatment. On the other hand, the proliferative index and expression of Cyclin D1 were lower in all fibre groups. Furthermore, KGM increased cecal short-chain fatty acid contents, and both KGM and inulin increased fecal probiotic concentrations. This study suggested that soluble fibres were more effective than cellulose on ameliorating AOM-induced genotoxicity by up-regulating antioxidant enzyme genes, and enhancing epithelium apoptosis by down-regulating Bcl-2. PMID:24594189

  15. End-functionalization of cellulose nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lundahl, Meri

    2014-01-01

    Regioselective modification of nanocelluloses can have intriguing applications in self-assembled material synthesis. In this thesis, cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were selectively functionalized at their reducing ends with thiol and maleimide groups. For thiol end-functionalization, a protocol was developed based on NHS/EDC-catalyzed coupling of NaClO2-oxidized CNCs with NH2 (CH2)6 SH in water. Maleimide end-functionalization was achieved by reacting end-thiolated CNCs (CNC SH) with a homobifu...

  16. Nanofibrillated Cellulose Surface Modification: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Julien Bras,; Mohamed Naceur Belgacem; Karim Missoum

    2013-01-01

    Interest in nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) has increased notably over recent decades. This bio-based nanomaterial has been used essentially in bionanocomposites or in paper thanks to its high mechanical reinforcement ability or barrier property respectively. Its nano-scale dimensions and its capacity to form a strong entangled nanoporous network have encouraged the emergence of new high-value applications. It is worth noting that chemical surface modification of this material can be a key fa...

  17. Characterization of Cellulose Microfibrils Obtained from Hemp

    OpenAIRE

    Šutka, Anna; Kukle, Silvija; Gravitis, Janis; Grave, Laima

    2013-01-01

    Microfibrillated cellulose was extracted from hemp fibres using steam explosion pretreatment and high-intensity ultrasonic treatment (HIUS). The acquired results after steam explosion treatment and water and alkali treatments are discussed and interpreted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the microstructure of hemp fibres before and after each treatment. A fibre size analyser was used to analyse the dimensions of the untr...

  18. Cellulose nanocrystals : surface modification and advanced materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The present work focuses on the properties of cellulose nanocrystals, their surface modification and development of advanced materials. Diverse approaches are employed on these nanoscaled substrates aiming to modify their surface properties and extend their use in highly sophisticated applications, such as postsulfation and desulfation, polymer grafting and adsorption, selective oxidation, molecular grafting, and ‘host-guest' inclusion. On the basis of surface modifications, properties analys...

  19. PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ECONOMICAL BACTERIAL CELLULOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Houssni El-Saied; Ahmed I. El-Diwany; Altaf H. Bast; Nagwa A. Atwa; Dina E. El-Ghwas

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigates the economical production of bacterial cellulose (BC) by Gluconacetobacter subsp. Xylinus (ATCC 10245) in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks cultivated under static conditions. The fermentation media used contained food industrial by-product liquors, such as black strap molasses solution and corn steep liquor (CSL), which represents some of the most economical carbon and nitrogen sources. However, because of the presence of undesirable components in molasses (such as colo...

  20. Modulation of the cellulose content of tuber cell walls by antisense expression of different potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) CesA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, Ronald J F J; Tzitzikas, Emmanouil N; Bakx, Edwin J; Straatman-Engelen, Irma; Bush, Maxwell S; McCann, Maureen C; Schols, Henk A; Visser, Richard G F; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2004-03-01

    Four potato cellulose synthase (CesA) homologs (StCesA1, 2, 3 and 4) were isolated by screening a cDNA library made from developing tubers. Based on sequence comparisons and the fact that all four potato cDNAs were isolated from this single cDNA-library, all four StCesA clones are likely to play a role in primary cell wall biosynthesis. Several constructs were generated to modulate cellulose levels in potato plants in which the granule-bound starch synthase promoter was used to target the modification to the tubers. The StCesA3 was used for up- and down-regulation of the cellulose levels by sense (SE-StCesA3) and antisense (AS-StCesA3) expression of the complete cDNA. Additionally, the class-specific regions (CSR) of all four potato cellulose synthase genes were used for specific down-regulation (antisense) of the corresponding CesA genes (csr1, 2, 3 and 4). None of the transformants showed an overt developmental phenotype. Sections of tubers were screened for altered cell wall structure by Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) and exploratory Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and those plants discriminating from WT plants were analysed for cellulose content and monosaccharide composition. Several transgenic lines were obtained with mainly decreased levels of cellulose. These results show that the cellulose content in potato tubers can be reduced down to 40% of the WT level without affecting normal plant development, and that constructs based on the CSR alone are specific and sufficient to down-regulate cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:15003416

  1. Tritium concentrations in tree ring cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of tritium (tissue bound tritium; TBT) concentration in tree rings are presented and discussed. Such measurement is expected to provide a useful means of estimating the tritium level in the environment in the past. The concentration of tritium bound in the tissue (TBT) in a tree ring considered to reflect the environmental tritium level in the area at the time of the formation of the ring, while the concentration of tritium in the free water in the tissue represents the current environmental tritium level. First, tritium concentration in tree ring cellulose sampled from a cedar tree grown in a typical environment in Fukuoka Prefecture is compared with the tritium concentration in precipitation in Tokyo. Results show that the year-to-year variations in the tritium concentration in the tree rings agree well with those in precipitation. The maximum concentration, which occurred in 1963, is attibuted to atmospheric nuclear testing which was performed frequently during the 1961 - 1963 period. Measurement is also made of the tritium concentration in tree ring cellulose sampled from a pine tree grown near the Isotope Center of Kyushu University (Fukuoka). Results indicate that the background level is higher probably due to the release of tritium from the facilities around the pine tree. Thus, measurement of tritium in tree ring cellulose clearly shows the year-to-year variation in the tritium concentration in the atmosphere. (N.K.)

  2. Drying of Pigment-Cellulose Nanofibril Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Timofeev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new substrate containing cellulose nanofibrils and inorganic pigment particles has been developed for printed electronics applications. The studied composite structure contains 80% fillers and is mechanically stable and flexible. Before drying, the solids content can be as low as 20% due to the high water binding capacity of the cellulose nanofibrils. We have studied several drying methods and their effects on the substrate properties. The aim is to achieve a tight, smooth surface keeping the drying efficiency simultaneously at a high level. The methods studied include: (1 drying on a hot metal surface; (2 air impingement drying; and (3 hot pressing. Somewhat surprisingly, drying rates measured for the pigment-cellulose nanofibril substrates were quite similar to those for the reference board sheets. Very high dewatering rates were observed for the hot pressing at high moisture contents. The drying method had significant effects on the final substrate properties, especially on short-range surface smoothness. The best smoothness was obtained with a combination of impingement and contact drying. The mechanical properties of the sheets were also affected by the drying method and associated temperature.

  3. Printed optically transparent graphene cellulose electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinar, Dogan; Knopf, George K.; Nikumb, Suwas; Andrushchenko, Anatoly

    2016-02-01

    Optically transparent electrodes are a key component in variety of products including bioelectronics, touch screens, flexible displays, low emissivity windows, and photovoltaic cells. Although highly conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) films are often used in these electrode applications, the raw material is very expensive and the electrodes often fracture when mechanically stressed. An alternative low-cost material for inkjet printing transparent electrodes on glass and flexible polymer substrates is described in this paper. The water based ink is created by using a hydrophilic cellulose derivative, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), to help suspend the naturally hydrophobic graphene (G) sheets in a solvent composed of 70% DI water and 30% 2-butoxyethanol. The CMC chain has hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional sites which allow adsorption on G sheets and, therefore, permit the graphene to be stabilized in water by electrostatic and steric forces. Once deposited on the functionalized substrate the electrical conductivity of the printed films can be "tuned" by decomposing the cellulose stabilizer using thermal reduction. The entire electrode can be thermally reduced in an oven or portions of the electrode thermally modified using a laser annealing process. The thermal process can reduce the sheet resistance of G-CMC films to high optical transparency.

  4. 21 CFR 177.1400 - Hydroxyethyl cellulose film, water-insoluble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydroxyethyl cellulose film, water-insoluble. 177... cellulose film, water-insoluble. Water-insoluble hydroxyethyl cellulose film may be safely used for... cellulose film consists of a base sheet manufactured by the ethoxylation of cellulose under...

  5. Single-domain flavoenzymes trigger lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for oxidative degradation of cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajova, Sona; Mathieu, Yann; Beccia, Maria Rosa; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Biaso, Frédéric; Fanuel, Mathieu; Ropartz, David; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Record, Eric; Rogniaux, Hélène; Henrissat, Bernard; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of plant biomass has been recently revolutionized by the discovery of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) that carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These very powerful enzymes are abundant in fungal saprotrophs. LPMOs require activation by electrons that can be provided by cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs), but as some fungi lack CDH-encoding genes, other recycling enzymes must exist. We investigated the ability of AA3_2 flavoenzymes secreted under lignocellulolytic conditions to trigger oxidative cellulose degradation by AA9 LPMOs. Among the flavoenzymes tested, we show that glucose dehydrogenase and aryl-alcohol quinone oxidoreductases are catalytically efficient electron donors for LPMOs. These single-domain flavoenzymes display redox potentials compatible with electron transfer between partners. Our findings extend the array of enzymes which regulate the oxidative degradation of cellulose by lignocellulolytic fungi. PMID:27312718

  6. Biodegradation evaluation of bacterial cellulose, vegetable cellulose and poly (3-hydroxybutyrate in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen Brasil Schröpfer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the inappropriate disposal of polymeric materials has increased due to industrial development and increase of population consumption. This problem may be minimized by using biodegradable polymers, such as bacterial cellulose and poly(hydroxybutyrate, from renewable resources. This work was aimed at monitoring and evaluating degradation of bacterial cellulose, vegetable cellulose and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate using Thermogravimetric Analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Controlled mass polymer samples were buried in pots containing soil. Samples were removed in 30 day intervals up to 180 days. The results show that the mass of the polymer increased in the first month when in contact with the soil but then it was degraded as evidenced by mass loss and changes on the sample surface.

  7. LUFFA CYLINDRICA AS A LIGNOCELLULOSIC SOURCE OF FIBER, MICROFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE, AND CELLULOSE NANOCRYSTALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Siqueira

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work the annual plant called Luffa cylindrica (LC has been characterized and used to prepare macroscopic lignocellulosic fibers and cellulosic nanoparticles, viz. microfibrillated cellulose (MFC and whiskers, each of which can be used as a reinforcing phase in bionanocomposites. The morphological, chemical, and physical properties of LC fibers were first characterized. The contents of lignin, hemicellulose, and other constituents were determined, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM observations were performed to investigate the surface morphology of the LC fibers. Sugars contents were determined by ionic chromatography, and it was shown that glucose was the main sugar present in the residue. MFC and whiskers were prepared after chemical treatments (NaOH and NaClO2, purifying cellulose by eliminating lignin and hemicellulose. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and SEM made it possible to determine the dimensions of LC whiskers and MFC. Tensile tests were carried out to investigate the mechanical properties of LF nanoparticles.

  8. Biocomposite cellulose-alginate films: promising packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirviö, Juho Antti; Kolehmainen, Aleksi; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Niinimäki, Jouko; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2014-05-15

    Biocomposite films based on cellulose and alginate were produced using unmodified birch pulp, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and birch pulp derivate, nanofibrillated anionic dicarboxylic acid cellulose (DCC), having widths of fibres ranging from 19.0 μm to 25 nm as cellulose fibre materials. Ionically cross-linked biocomposites were produced using Ca(2+) cross-linking. Addition of micro- and nanocelluloses as a reinforcement increased the mechanical properties of the alginate films remarkably, e.g. addition of 15% of NFC increased a tensile strength of the film from 70.02 to 97.97 MPa. After ionic cross-linking, the tensile strength of the film containing 10% of DCC was increased from 69.63 to 125.31 MPa. The biocomposite films showed excellent grease barrier properties and reduced water vapour permeability (WVP) after the addition of cellulose fibres, except when unmodified birch pulp was used. PMID:24423542

  9. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O' Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  10. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O' Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  11. Extraction and characterization of cellulose nano whiskers from balsa wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study cellulose nano whiskers were obtained from balsa wood. For this purpose, fibers of balsa wood were subjected to hydrolysis reactions for lignin and hemi cellulose digestion and acquisition of nano-scale cellulose. Cellulose nano crystals obtained had medium length and thickness of 176 nm and 7 nm respectively. Infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction showed that the process used for extracting nano whiskers could digest nearly all the lignin and hemi cellulose from the balsa fiber and still preserve the aspect ratio and crystallinity, satisfactory enough for future application in polymer nano composites. Thermogravimetry showed that the onset temperature of thermal degradation of cellulose nano crystals (226 degree C) was higher than the temperature of the balsa fiber (215 degree C), allowing its use in molding processes with many polymers from the molten state.(author)

  12. Cellulose-Based Bio- and Nanocomposites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susheel Kalia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose macro- and nanofibers have gained increasing attention due to the high strength and stiffness, biodegradability and renewability, and their production and application in development of composites. Application of cellulose nanofibers for the development of composites is a relatively new research area. Cellulose macro- and nanofibers can be used as reinforcement in composite materials because of enhanced mechanical, thermal, and biodegradation properties of composites. Cellulose fibers are hydrophilic in nature, so it becomes necessary to increase their surface roughness for the development of composites with enhanced properties. In the present paper, we have reviewed the surface modification of cellulose fibers by various methods. Processing methods, properties, and various applications of nanocellulose and cellulosic composites are also discussed in this paper.

  13. Effect of Surface Attachment on Synthesis of Bacterial Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Barbara R [ORNL; O' Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter spp. synthesize a pure form of hydrophilic cellulose that has several industrial specialty applications. Literature reports have concentrated on intensive investigation of static and agitated culture in liquid media containing high nutrient concentrations optimized for maximal cellulose production rates. The behavior of these bacteria on semisolid and solid surfaces has not been specifically addressed. The species Gluconacetobacter hansenii was examined for cellulose synthesis and colony morphology on a range of solid supports, including cotton linters, and on media thickened with agar, methyl cellulose, or gellan. The concentration and chemical structure of the thickening agent were found to be directly related to the formation of contiguous cellulose pellicules. Viability of the bacteria following freezer storage was improved when the bacteria were frozen in their cellulose pellicules.

  14. Nanocellulose patents trends: a comprehensive review on patents on cellulose nanocrystals, microfibrillated and bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charreau, Hernan; Foresti, Maria L; Vazquez, Analia

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose nanoparticles (i.e. cellulose elements having at least one dimension in the 1-100 nm range) have received increasing attention during the last decade. This is not only evident in academic articles, but it is also manifested by the increasing number of nanocellulose patents that are published every year. In the current review, nanocellulose patents are reviewed using specific software which provides valuable information on the annual number of patents that have been published throughout the years, main patent owners, most prolific inventors, and patents on the field that have received more citations. Patent statistics on rod-like cellulose nanoparticles extracted from plants by acid hydrolysis (nanocrystals), mechanical treatment leading to microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), and microbially produced nanofibrils (bacterial cellulose, BC) are analyzed in detail. The aim of the current review is to provide researchers with patent information which may help them in visualizing the evolution of nanocellulose technology, both as a whole and also divided among the different nanosized particles that are currently the subject of outstanding scientific attention. Then, patents are not only analyzed by their content, but also by global statistics which will reveal the moment at which different cellulose nanoparticles technologies achieved a breakthrough, the relative interest received by different nanocellulose particles throughout the years, the companies that have been most interested in this technology, the most prolific inventors, and the patents that have had more influence in further developments. It is expected that the results showing the explosion that nanocellulose technology is experiencing in current days will still bring more research on the topic and contribute to the expansion of nanocellulosics applications. PMID:22747719

  15. Ductile all-cellulose nanocomposite films fabricated from core-shell structured cellulose nanofibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Per A; Berglund, Lars A; Wågberg, Lars

    2014-06-01

    Cellulosic materials have many desirable properties such as high mechanical strength and low oxygen permeability and will be an important component in a sustainable biomaterial-based society, but unfortunately they often lack the ductility and formability offered by petroleum-based materials. This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of nanocomposite films made of core-shell modified cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) surrounded by a shell of ductile dialcohol cellulose, created by heterogeneous periodate oxidation followed by borohydride reduction of the native cellulose in the external parts of the individual fibrils. The oxidation with periodate selectively produces dialdehyde cellulose, and the process does not increase the charge density of the material. Yet the modified cellulose fibers could easily be homogenized to CNFs. Prior to film fabrication, the CNF was shown by atomic force microscopy to be 0.5-2 μm long and 4-10 nm wide. The films were fabricated by filtration, and besides uniaxial tensile testing at different relative humidities, they were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and oxygen permeability. The strength-at-break at 23 °C and 50% RH was 175 MPa, and the films could, before rupture, be strained, mainly by plastic deformation, to about 15% and 37% at 50% RH and 90% RH, respectively. This moisture plasticization was further utilized to form a demonstrator consisting of a double-curved structure with a nominal strain of 24% over the curvature. At a relative humidity of 80%, the films still acted as a good oxygen barrier, having an oxygen permeability of 5.5 mL·μL/(m(2)·24 h·kPa). These properties indicate that this new material has a potential for use as a barrier in complex-shaped structures and hence ultimately reduce the need for petroleum-based plastics. PMID:24773125

  16. Characterization of Cellulose Microfibers Isolated from Rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Junidah Lamaming; Nurul Hasin Sharudin; Rokiah Hashim; Othman Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose microfibers were isolated by chemical treatment followed by acid hydrolysis using sulphuric acid. The chemical compositions for extractive, holocellulose, cellulose and lignin were determined. The functional group of raw particles and cellulose microfibers of rubberwood were determined using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Morphological studies were viewed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate physical changes of the fibers after acid hydrolysis. T...

  17. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Barbara R.; O' Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  18. A study on paper recycling effects on cellulose properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Halil

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is the main structural element of paper, one of the most important natural polimers that producted by plants. The water-cellulose interactions that causing swelling with water intake or shrinkage with water removal is very key issue for formation of sheet. However, during paper recycling, cellulose is undergoes some changes and swelling properties in water decreases irreversible. As a result of these modifications, plasticity and elastic properties of fibers modified. Once dried cel...

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MICRO-FIBRILLATED CELLULOSE REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chun-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) is produced from naturally occurring, abundant and sustainable fibres of cellulose through mechanical treatments. It has been studied as a possible replacement for synthetic fibres in engineering composites, since it has many advantages that can enhance their mechanical properties.MFC and epoxy resin composites were prepared with varying weight fractions for three different sources of cellulose fibre (softwood Kraft pulp, hardwood Kraft pulp and recycled newsp...

  20. Factors Involved in Hydrolysis of Microcrystalline Cellulose by Acetivibrio cellulolyticus†

    OpenAIRE

    MacKenzie, C. Roger; Girishchandra B Patel; Bilous, Doris

    1987-01-01

    Acetivibrio cellulolyticus cellulase obtained by the water elution of residual cellulose from the growth medium was compared with the cellulase activity present in culture supernatants. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that water elution released most of the protein bands which adhered to undigested cellulose from the culture medium. The enzyme in the culture supernatant and that eluted from residual cellulose had specific activities for Avicel hydr...

  1. Method for providing a nanocellulose involving modifying cellulose fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ankerfors, Mikael; Lindström, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for the manufacturing of nanocellulose. The method includes a first modification of the cellulose material, where the cellulose fibres are treated with an aqueous electrolyte-containing solution of an amphoteric cellulose derivative. The modification is followed by a mechanical treatment. By using this method for manufacturing nanocellulose, clogging of the mechanical apparatus is avoided. Also disclosed is nanocellulose manufactured in accordance with ...

  2. New developments of enzymatic treatments on cellulosic fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Su-Yeon; Zille, Andrea; Vasconcelos, Andreia; Paulo, Artur Cavaco

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the recent and non-conventional enzyme bioconversions of cellulosic fibers. Cellulosic fibers are the largest market of textile industry and also represent the most successful market for enzymes base processes in the textile area. The new enzyme developments presented on this paper include the strength recovering in resin-crosslinked fabrics, phosphorylation for better antiflame retardancy, coating and funcionalization of cellulosic fabrics.

  3. Derivatization-free gel permeation chromatography elucidates enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Engel Philip; Hein Lea; Spiess Antje C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The analysis of cellulose molecular weight distributions by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) is a powerful tool to obtain detailed information on enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis, supporting the development of economically viable biorefinery processes. Unfortunately, due to work and time consuming sample preparation, the measurement of cellulose molecular weight distributions has a limited applicability until now. Results In this work we present a new method to analyze ce...

  4. Cellulose Ester / Polyolefin Binary Blends : Rheology, Morphology and Impact Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Besson, François; Vanhille, Aurélie; Budtova, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Due to depletion of fossil resources and global environmental respect awareness, interest in biobased plastic materials is tremendously growing. Direct extraction of vegetal polymers like cellulose followed by a chemical modification to bring new properties is one of the paths to produce a bioplastic. Progressively replaced by oil-based polymers in the sixties, thermoplastic cellulose esters are now reconsidered for various materials applications. To improve mechanical weaknesses of cellulose...

  5. Blends of dissolved cellulose with acrylic acid copolymers or microfibrillated cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Saarikoski, Eve

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to develop dissolved cellulose (dissolved in NaOH/ZnO) based blends with acrylic acid copolymers (poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (PE-co-AA) or poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PAA-co-AA)) or microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in the way they could be used in injection molding or for film/coating applications. This thesis summarizes the research reported in five publications supported by some unpublished results. Rheological studies done in the contexts of this work...

  6. Continuous cellulosic bioethanol fermentation by cyclic fed-batch cocultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, He-Long; He, Qiang; He, Zhili; Hemme, Christopher L; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-03-01

    Cocultivation of cellulolytic and saccharolytic microbial populations is a promising strategy to improve bioethanol production from the fermentation of recalcitrant cellulosic materials. Earlier studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of cocultivation in enhancing ethanolic fermentation of cellulose in batch fermentation. To further enhance process efficiency, a semicontinuous cyclic fed-batch fermentor configuration was evaluated for its potential in enhancing the efficiency of cellulose fermentation using cocultivation. Cocultures of cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum LQRI and saccharolytic Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus strain X514 were tested in the semicontinuous fermentor as a model system. Initial cellulose concentration and pH were identified as the key process parameters controlling cellulose fermentation performance in the fixed-volume cyclic fed-batch coculture system. At an initial cellulose concentration of 40 g liter(-1), the concentration of ethanol produced with pH control was 4.5-fold higher than that without pH control. It was also found that efficient cellulosic bioethanol production by cocultivation was sustained in the semicontinuous configuration, with bioethanol production reaching 474 mM in 96 h with an initial cellulose concentration of 80 g liter(-1) and pH controlled at 6.5 to 6.8. These results suggested the advantages of the cyclic fed-batch process for cellulosic bioethanol fermentation by the cocultures. PMID:23275517

  7. Effects of Ethanol Pulping on the Length of Bamboo Cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Yang; Liao Junhe; Luo Xuegang

    2006-01-01

    On the conditions of different ethanol concentration, acids and catalyzers, the effects of ethanol pulping on the cellulose length of bamboo were studied. The results indicates that ethanol pulping has remarkable effects on the length of cellulose, which is clearly reduced with adding ethanol and acid. The margin of length of cellulose become smaller with the increase of the catalyzer. When the ethanol concentration was 70%, the concentration of acid was 0.3% and some NaOH was used as catalyzer, the length of cellulose was the longest.

  8. Wetting kinetics of oil mixtures on fluorinated model cellulose surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulin, Christian; Shchukarev, Andrei; Lindqvist, Josefina; Malmström, Eva; Wågberg, Lars; Lindström, Tom

    2008-01-15

    The wetting of two different model cellulose surfaces has been studied; a regenerated cellulose (RG) surface prepared by spin-coating, and a novel multilayer film of poly(ethyleneimine) and a carboxymethylated microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). The cellulose films were characterized in detail using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM indicates smooth and continuous films on a nanometer scale and the RMS roughness of the RG cellulose and MFC surfaces was determined to be 3 and 6 nm, respectively. The cellulose films were modified by coating with various amounts of an anionic fluorosurfactant, perfluorooctadecanoic acid, or covalently modified with pentadecafluorooctanyl chloride. The fluorinated cellulose films were used to follow the spreading mechanisms of three different oil mixtures. The viscosity and surface tension of the oils were found to be essential parameters governing the spreading kinetics on these surfaces. XPS and dispersive surface energy measurements were made on the cellulose films coated with perfluorooctadecanoic acid. A strong correlation was found between the surface concentration of fluorine, the dispersive surface energy and the contact angle of castor oil on the surface. A dispersive surface energy less than 18 mN/m was required in order for the cellulose surface to be non-wetting (theta e>90 degrees ) by castor oil. PMID:17964593

  9. Graft Copolymerization Of Methyl Methacrylate Onto Agave Cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and Agave cellulose was prepared and the grafting reaction conditions were optimized by varying the reaction time and temperature, and ratio of monomer to cellulose. The resulting graft copolymers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results showed that the optimal conditions were at a temperature of 45 degree Celsius for 90 min with ratio monomer to cellulose at 1:1 (g/ g). An additional peak at 1738 cm-1 which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted cellulose, respectively. Grafting of MMA onto cellulose enhanced its thermal stability and SEM observation further furnished evidence of grafting MMA onto Agave cellulose with increasing cellulose diameter and surface roughness. (author)

  10. Characterization of Bacterial Cellulose by Gluconacetobacter hansenii CGMCC 3917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xianchao; Ullah, Niamat; Wang, Xuejiao; Sun, Xuchun; Li, Chenyi; Bai, Yun; Chen, Lin; Li, Zhixi

    2015-10-01

    In this study, comprehensive characterization and drying methods on properties of bacterial cellulose were analyzed. Bacterial cellulose was prepared by Gluconacetobacter hansenii CGMCC 3917, which was mutated by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment. Bacterial cellulose is mainly comprised of cellulose Iα with high crystallinity and purity. High-water holding and absorption capacity were examined by reticulated structure. Thermogravimetric analysis showed high thermal stability. High tensile strength and Young's modulus indicated its mechanical properties. The rheological analysis showed that bacterial cellulose had good consistency and viscosity. These results indicated that bacterial cellulose is a potential food additive and also could be used for a food packaging material. The high textural stability during freeze-thaw cycles makes bacterial cellulose an effective additive for frozen food products. In addition, the properties of bacterial cellulose can be affected by drying methods. Our results suggest that the bacterial cellulose produced from HHP-mutant strain has an effective characterization, which can be used for a wide range of applications in food industry. PMID:26352877

  11. Investigation of Bacterial Cellulose Biosynthesis Mechanism in Gluconoacetobacter hansenii

    OpenAIRE

    Mohite, Bhavna V.; Patil, Satish V

    2014-01-01

    The present study explores the mechanism of cellulose biosynthesis in Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The cellulose synthase enzyme was purified as membrane fraction and solubilized by treatment with 0.1% digitonin. The enzyme was separated by native-gel electrophoresis and β -D-glucan analysis was carried out using in vitro gel assay. The cellulose synthase has glycoprotein nature and composed two polypeptide subunits of 93 KDa and 85 KDa. The confirmation of β -1,4-glucan (cellulose) was perfo...

  12. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  13. Nanofibrillated Cellulose (NFC): A High-Value Co-Product that Improves the Economics of Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    OpenAIRE

    Qiong Song; William T. Winter; Biljana M. Bujanovic; Thomas E. Amidon

    2014-01-01

    Cellulosic ethanol is a sustainable alternative to petroleum as a transportation fuel, which could be made biologically from agricultural and forestry residues, municipal waste, or herbaceous and woody crops. Instead of putting efforts on steps overcoming the natural resistance of plants to biological breakdown, our study proposes a unique pathway to improve the outcome of the process by co-producing high-value nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), offering a new economic leverage for cellulosic e...

  14. Engineering control of bacterial cellulose production using a genetic toolkit and a new cellulose-producing strain

    OpenAIRE

    Florea, Michael; Hagemann, Henrik; Santosa, Gabriella; Abbott, James; Micklem, Chris N.; Spencer-Milnes, Xenia; de Arroyo Garcia, Laura; Paschou, Despoina; Lazenbatt, Christopher; Kong, Deze; Chughtai, Haroon; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.; Kitney, Richard; Reeve, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose is a remarkable material that is malleable, biocompatible, and over 10-times stronger than plant-based cellulose. It is currently used to create materials for tissue engineering, medicine, defense, electronics, acoustics, and fabrics. We describe here a bacterial strain that is readily amenable to genetic engineering and produces high quantities of bacterial cellulose in low-cost media. To reprogram this organism for biotechnology applications, we created a set of genetic ...

  15. Biological production of organic solvents from cellulosic wastes. Six-month progress report, June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forro, J.R.; Nolan, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following studies: production of cellulose by culturing Thermoactinomyces YX and derived mutants; the development of mutation techniques; cellulose mutant screening techniques; quantification of cellulose mutants; and alternate enhancement techniques. (JGB)

  16. Chemical modification of viscose fibres by adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose and click chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Anufrijeva, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Functionalization of cellulosic materials to achieve new and advanced properties is a widely explored research area. This thesis is focused on the novel approach for modification of cellulosic materials by the combination of adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) onto cellulose surface and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” reaction. The literature part gives an overview on the basics of cellulose chemistry, chemical functionalization of cellulose, as wel...

  17. Impact of the supramolecular structure of cellulose on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Peciulyte, Ausra; Karlström, Katarina; Larsson, Per Tomas; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis is reduced by the structural properties of cellulose. Although efforts have been made to explain the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by considering the interaction of cellulolytic enzymes with cellulose or the changes in the structure of cellulose during enzymatic hydrolysis, the process of cellulose hydrolysis is not yet fully understood. We have analysed the characteristics of the complex supramolecular structure of cellulose ...

  18. Composite edible films based on hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose reinforced with microcrystalline cellulose nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been stated that hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) based films have promising applications in the food industry because of their environmental appeal, low cost, flexibility and transparency. Nevertheless, their mechanical and moisture barrier properties should be improved. The aim of th...

  19. Chromophores in cellulosics, XI: isolation and identification of residual chromophores from bacterial cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton or linen fabrics and paper, as well as other items composed chiefly of cellulose, tend to change to a yellow or brown color as they age. The change in color is usually accompanied by increased brittleness and loss of strength, as well. A cause of these phenomena is thought to be the formation...

  20. Chromosphores in cellulosics, XI: isoloation and identification of residual chromophores from bacterial cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the present work, bacterial cellulose (BC) was analyzed for its chromophore content with the chromophore release and identification (CRI) method. In aged BC, seven chromophores were unambiguously identified, despite their very low (ppb) presence. The compounds contain 2-hydroxy-[1,4]benzoquinone,...

  1. Mineralization of cellulose in frozen boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Segura, Javier; Sparrman, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Soils of high-latitude ecosystems store a large fraction of the global soil carbon. In boreal forests, the microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) during winter can affect the ecosystems net carbon balance. Recent research has shown that microorganisms in the organic surface layer of boreal forest soil can mineralize and grow on simple, soluble monomeric substrates under frozen conditions. However, any substantial impacts of microbial activity in frozen soils on long-term soil carbon balances ultimately depends on whether soil microorganisms can utilize and grow the more complex, polymeric constituents of SOM. In order to evaluate the potential for soil microorganisms to metabolize carbon polymers at low temperatures, we incubated boreal forest soil samples amended with [13C]-cellulose and studied the microbial catabolic and anabolic utilization of the substrate under frozen and unfrozen conditions (-4 and +4°C). Freezing of the soil markedly reduced microbial utilization of the cellulose. The [13C]-CO2 production rate in the samples at +4°C were 0.52 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1 while rates in the frozen samples (-4°C) were 0.01 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1. However, newly synthetized [13C]-enriched cell membrane lipids, PLFAs, were detected in soil samples incubated both above and below freezing, confirming that cellulose can sustain also anabolic activity of the microbial populations under frozen conditions. The reduced metabolic rates induced by freezing indicate constraints on exoenzymatic activity, as well as substrate diffusion rates that we can attribute to reduced liquid water content of the frozen soil. We conclude that the microbial population in boreal forest soil has the capacity to metabolize, and grow, on polymeric substrates at temperatures below zero, which involves maintaining exoenzymatic activity in frozen soils. This capacity manifests the importance of SOM mineralization during the winter season and its importance for the net carbon balance of

  2. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Cellulose Stabilized Copper Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Aminu Musa; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Saiman Mohd Izham; Kamyar Shameli; Hannatu Abubakar Sani

    2016-01-01

    A chemical reduction method was employed for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles stabilized by nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) using different concentrations of copper salt in aqueous solution under atmospheric air. CuSO4·5H2O salt and hydrazine were used as metal ion precursor and reducing agent, respectively. Ascorbic acid and aqueous NaOH were also used as an antioxidant and a pH moderator, respectively. The number of CuNPs increased with increasing concentration of the precursor salt. T...

  3. Electrospun cellulose nitrate and polycaprolactone blended nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartker, Steven; Hassan, Mohamed; Stogsdill, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Pure cellulose nitrate (CN) and blends of CN and polycaprolactone were electrospun to form nonwoven mats. Polymers were dissolved in a mixed solvent system of tetrahydrofuran and N,N-dimethylformamide. The concentrations were varied to obtain sub-micron and nanoscale fiber mats. Fiber mats were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, contact angle analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The fiber morphology, surface chemistry and contact angle data show that these electrospun materials are suitable for applications including biosensing, biomedical and tissue engineering.

  4. A Sorption Hysteresis Model For Cellulosic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The equilibrium concentration of adsorbed water in cellulosic materials is dependent on the history of the variations of vapor pressure in the ambient air, i.e. sorption hysteresis. Existing models to describe this phenomenon such as the independent domain theory have numerical drawbacks and....../or imply accounting for the entire history variations of every material point. This paper presents a sorption hysteresis model based on a state formulation and expressed in closed-form solutions, which makes it suitable for implementation into a numerical method....

  5. Mechanical Properties of Cellulose Microfiber Reinforced Polyolefin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    Cellulose microfiber (CeF) has been expected as a reinforcement of polymer because of its high modulus and strength and lower cost. In the present study, mechanical properties of CeF/polyolefin were investigated. Tensile modulus increased with increasing CeF content. On the other hand, tensile strength decreased. Fatigue properties were also investigated with acoustic emission measurement. Stiffness of the composites gradually decreased with loading. Drastic decrease in stiffness was observed just before the final fracture. Based on the Mori-Tanaka's theory, the method to calculate modulus of CeF were proposed to evaluate dispersion of CeF.

  6. Disruption of ATCSLD5 results in reduced growth, reduced xylan and homogalacturonan synthase activity and altered xylan occurrence in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Jensen, Jacob Krüger; Harholt, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    Members of a large family of cellulose synthase-like genes (CSLs) are predicted to encode glycosyl transferases (GTs) involved in the biosynthesis of plant cell walls. The CSLA and CSLF families are known to contain mannan and glucan synthases, respectively, but the products of other CSLs are...... unknown. Here we report the effects of disrupting ATCSLD5 expression in Arabidopsis. Both stem and root growth were significantly reduced in ATCSLD5 knock-out plants, and these plants also had increased susceptibility to the cellulose synthase inhibitor isoxaben. Antibody and carbohydrate-binding module......, and the possible role(s) of this gene and other ATCSLDs in cell wall biosynthesis are discussed....

  7. Structural basis for entropy-driven cellulose binding by a type-A cellulose-binding module (CBM) and bacterial expansin

    OpenAIRE

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Yennawar, Neela H.; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Components of modular cellulases, type-A cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) bind to crystalline cellulose and enhance enzyme effectiveness, but structural details of the interaction are uncertain. We analyzed cellulose binding by EXLX1, a bacterial expansin with ability to loosen plant cell walls and whose domain D2 has type-A CBM characteristics. EXLX1 strongly binds to crystalline cellulose via D2, whereas its affinity for soluble cellooligosaccharides is weak. Calorimetry indicated cellulose...

  8. Improvement of tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose by expression of ADH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Horie, Kenta; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Hot-compressed water treatment of cellulose and hemicellulose for subsequent bioethanol production is a novel, economically feasible, and nonhazardous method for recovering sugars. However, the hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and hemicellulose inhibit subsequent ethanol fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this problem, we engineered a yeast strain with improved tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. We first determined that glycolaldehyde has a greater inhibitory effect than 5-HMF and furfural and a combinational effect with them. On the basis of the hypothesis that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol should detoxify glycolaldehyde, we developed a strain overexpressing the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH1. The ADH1-overexpressing strain exhibits an improved fermentation profile in a glycolaldehyde-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 30 ± 1.9% when the control strain is used; this ratio increases to 77 ± 3.6% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. A glycolaldehyde treatment and the overexpression of ADH1 cause changes in the fermentation products so as to balance the metabolic carbon flux and the redox status. Finally, the ADH1-overexpressing strain shows a statistically significantly improved fermentation profile in a hot-compressed water-treated cellulose-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 33 ± 0.85% when the control strain is used but increases to 72 ± 1.7% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. These results show that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is a promising strategy to decrease the toxicity of hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. This is the first report on the improvement of yeast tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and glycolaldehyde. PMID:22311646

  9. Improvement of tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose by expression of ADH1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakody, Lahiru N.; Horie, Kenta; Kitagaki, Hiroshi [Saga Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Hayashi, Nobuyuki [Saga Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Biochemistry and Food Science

    2012-04-15

    Hot-compressed water treatment of cellulose and hemicellulose for subsequent bioethanol production is a novel, economically feasible, and nonhazardous method for recovering sugars. However, the hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and hemicellulose inhibit subsequent ethanol fermentation by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To overcome this problem, we engineered a yeast strain with improved tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. We first determined that glycolaldehyde has a greater inhibitory effect than 5-HMF and furfural and a combinational effect with them. On the basis of the hypothesis that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol should detoxify glycolaldehyde, we developed a strain overexpressing the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH1. The ADH1-overexpressing strain exhibits an improved fermentation profile in a glycolaldehyde-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 30 {+-} 1.9% when the control strain is used; this ratio increases to 77 {+-} 3.6% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. A glycolaldehyde treatment and the overexpression of ADH1 cause changes in the fermentation products so as to balance the metabolic carbon flux and the redox status. Finally, the ADH1-overexpressing strain shows a statistically significantly improved fermentation profile in a hot-compressed water-treated cellulose-containing medium. The conversion ratio of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is 33 {+-} 0.85% when the control strain is used but increases to 72 {+-} 1.7% in the case of the ADH1-overexpressing strain. These results show that the reduction of glycolaldehyde to ethylene glycol is a promising strategy to decrease the toxicity of hot-compressed water-treated cellulose. This is the first report on the improvement of yeast tolerance to hot-compressed water-treated cellulose and glycolaldehyde.

  10. Cellulose microfibril deposition: coordinated activity at the plant plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.J.; Mulder, B.; Vos, J.W.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Plant cell wall production is a membrane-bound process. Cell walls are composed of cellulose microfibrils, embedded inside a matrix of other polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The cell wall matrix is extruded into the existing cell wall by exocytosis. This same process also inserts the cellulose syn

  11. Approaches to new derivatives of cellulose as designed pharmaceutical excipients

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz Brigitte; Loppert Renate; Praznik Werner; Unger Frank Michael; Kahlig Hanspeter; Viernstein Helmut

    2003-01-01

    Recently, our group initiated a synthetic program directed at new derivatives of cellulose intended as novel pharmaceutical excipients. With several notable exceptions, the attempted regioselective introduction of chemical functionality into natural cellulose by direct chemical modification will result in heterogeneous products that are difficult to characterize and the preparation of which is insufficiently reproduceable. Approaches to the chemical polymerization of appropriate glucose monom...

  12. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  13. Addressing Cellulose Acetate Microfilm from a British Library perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Shenton

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about cellulose acetate microfilm from the British Library perspective. It traces how acetate microfilm became an issue for the British Library and describes cellulose acetate deterioration. This is followed by details of what has already been done about the situation and what action is planned for the future.

  14. Bioconversion of cellulose. Work progress for FY 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, C. R.; Blanch, H. W.

    1981-03-01

    Progress is reported on the following: kinetic and mechanistic studies on cellulose enzymes, yeast nutrition, models of yeast growth and ethanol inhibition, by product inhibition in cell recycle and vacuum fermentation, hollow fiber reactor, thermodynamics of ethanol water systems, novel ethanol water separations, and simultaneous and sequential cellulose fermenting organisms.

  15. Cellulose-Lignin interactions during slow and fast pyrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbers, T.J.; Wang, Z.; Pecha, B.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Pelaez-Samaniego, M.R.; Garcia-Perez, M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between lignin and cellulose during the slow pyrolysis of their blends were studied by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fast pyrolysis was studied using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (Py–GC/MS). Crystalline cellulose

  16. Dual morphology (fibres and particles) cellulosic filler for WPC materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Marco; Tirillò, Jacopo; Quitadamo, Alessia; Santulli, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Wood-plastic composites (WPC) were fabricated by using a polyethylene (PE) matrix and filling it with wood flour in the amount of 30 wt.%, and compared with the same composites with further amount of 10 wt.% of cellulosic recycled fibres added. The materials were produced by turbomixing and subsequent moulding under pressure. Mechanical properties of both WPC and WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres were evaluated through mechanical and physical-chemical tests. Tensile tests clarified that a moderate reduction is strength is observed with the bare introduction of wood flour with respect to the neat PE matrix, whilst some recovery is offered by the addition of recycled cellulose fibres. Even more promisingly, the elastic modulus of PE matrix is substantially improved by the addition of wood flour (around 8% on average) and much more so with the further addition of recycled cellulose (around 20% on average). The fracture surfaces from the tensile test were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicating a reduction in microporosity as an effect of added cellulose. The water absorption test and the hardness measure (Shore D) were also performed. SEM analysis underlined the weak interface between both wood particle and cellulosic recycled fibres and matrix. The water absorption test showed a higher mass variation for pure WPC than WPC with cellulosic recycled fibres. The hardness measurement showed that the presence of cellulosic recycled fibres improves both superficial hardness of the composite and temperature resistance.

  17. Biomimetic design of a bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone healing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the design and synthesis of bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for bone healing applications using a biomimetic approach. Bacterial cellulose (BC) with various surface morphologies (pellicles and tubes) was negatively charged by the adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to initiate nucleation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp). The cdHAp was grown in vitro via dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF) treatments over a one week period. Characterization of the mineralized samples was done with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The amount of cdHAp observed varied among different samples. XPS demonstrated that the atomic presence of calcium and phosphorus ranged from 0.44 at.% to 7.71 at.% Ca and 0.27 at.% to 11.18 at.% P. The Ca/P overall ratio ranged from 1.22 to 1.92. FESEM images showed that the cdHAp crystal size increased with increasing nanocellulose fibril density. To determine the viability of the scaffolds in vitro, the morphology and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase gene expression. The presence of cdHAp crystals on BC surfaces resulted in increased cell attachment.

  18. Biomimetic design of a bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone healing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Kristen A., E-mail: kazimmer@vt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); LeBlanc, Jill M.; Sheets, Kevin T.; Fox, Robert W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Gatenholm, Paul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the design and synthesis of bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for bone healing applications using a biomimetic approach. Bacterial cellulose (BC) with various surface morphologies (pellicles and tubes) was negatively charged by the adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to initiate nucleation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp). The cdHAp was grown in vitro via dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF) treatments over a one week period. Characterization of the mineralized samples was done with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The amount of cdHAp observed varied among different samples. XPS demonstrated that the atomic presence of calcium and phosphorus ranged from 0.44 at.% to 7.71 at.% Ca and 0.27 at.% to 11.18 at.% P. The Ca/P overall ratio ranged from 1.22 to 1.92. FESEM images showed that the cdHAp crystal size increased with increasing nanocellulose fibril density. To determine the viability of the scaffolds in vitro, the morphology and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase gene expression. The presence of cdHAp crystals on BC surfaces resulted in increased cell attachment.

  19. Loosenin, a novel protein with cellulose-disrupting activity from Bjerkandera adusta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segovia Lorenzo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansins and expansin-like proteins loosen cellulose microfibrils, possibly through the rupture of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Together with the use of lignocellulolytic enzymes, these proteins are potential molecular tools to treat plant biomass to improve saccharification yields. Results Here we describe a new type of expansin-related fungal protein that we have called loosenin. Its corresponding gene, loos1, from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta, was cloned and heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. LOOS1 is distantly related to plant expansins through the shared presence of a DPBB domain, however domain II found in plant expansins is absent. LOOS1 binds tightly to cellulose and chitin, and we demonstrate that cotton fibers become susceptible to the action of a commercial cellulase following treatment with LOOS1. Natural fibers of Agave tequilana also become susceptible to hydrolysis by cellulases after loosenin treatment. Conclusions LOOS1 is a new type of protein with disrupting activity on cellulose. LOOS1 binds polysaccharides, and given its enhancing properties on the action of hydrolytic enzymes, LOOS1 represents a potential additive in the production of fermentable sugars from lignocellulose.

  20. Cellulose-reinforced composites: from micro-to nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Dufresne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the most relevant advances in the fields of: i cellulose fibres surface modification; ii cellulose fibres-based composite materials; and iii nanocomposites based on cellulose whiskers or starch platelet-like nanoparticles. The real breakthroughs achieved in the first topic concern the use of solvent-free grafting process (plasma and the grafting of the matrix at the surface of cellulose fibres through isocyanate-mediated grafting or thanks to "click chemistry". Concerning the second topic, it is worth to mention that for some cellulose/matrix combination and in the presence of adequate aids or specific surface treatment, high performance composite materials could be obtained. Finally, nanocomposites allow using the semi-crystalline nature and hierarchical structure of lignocellulosic fibres and starch granules to more deeply achieve this goal profitably exploited by Mother Nature

  1. Physical properties of agave cellulose graft polymethyl methacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Noor Afizah; Ahmad, Ishak; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Anuar, Farah Hannan

    2013-11-01

    The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate and Agave cellulose was prepared and their structural analysis and morphology were investigated. The grafting reaction was carried out in an aqueous medium using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The structural analysis of the graft copolymers was carried out by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The graft copolymers were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). An additional peak at 1732 cm-1 which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted Agave cellulose, respectively. Another evidence of grafting showed in the FESEM observation, where the surface of the grafted cellulose was found to be roughed than the raw one.

  2. Physical properties of agave cellulose graft polymethyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosli, Noor Afizah; Ahmad, Ishak; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Anuar, Farah Hannan [Polymer Research Centre (PORCE), School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate and Agave cellulose was prepared and their structural analysis and morphology were investigated. The grafting reaction was carried out in an aqueous medium using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The structural analysis of the graft copolymers was carried out by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The graft copolymers were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). An additional peak at 1732 cm{sup −1} which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted Agave cellulose, respectively. Another evidence of grafting showed in the FESEM observation, where the surface of the grafted cellulose was found to be roughed than the raw one.

  3. Loosening Xyloglucan Accelerates the Enzymatic Degradation of Cellulose in Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rumi Kaida; Tomomi Kaku; Kei'ichi Baba; Masafumi Oyadomari; Takashi Watanabe; Koji Nishida; Toshiji Kanaya; Ziv Shani; Oded Shoseyov; Takahisa Hayashi

    2009-01-01

    In order to create trees in which cellulose, the most abundant component in biomass, can be enzymatically hydrolyzed highly for the production of bioethanol, we examined the saccharification of xylem from several transgenic poplars, each overexpressing either xyloglucanase, cellulase, xylanase, or galactanase. The level of cellulose degradation achieved by a cellulase preparation was markedly greater in the xylem overexpressing xyloglucanase and much greater in the xylems overexpressing xylanase and cellulase than in the xylem of the wild-type plant. Although a high degree of degradation occurred in all xylems at all loci, the crystalline region of the cellulose microfibrUs was highly degraded in the xylem overexpressing xyloglucanase. Since the complex between microfibrils and xyloglucans could be one region that is particularly resistant to cellulose degradation, loosening xyloglucan could facilitate the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in wood.

  4. Physical properties of agave cellulose graft polymethyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grafting polymerization of methyl methacrylate and Agave cellulose was prepared and their structural analysis and morphology were investigated. The grafting reaction was carried out in an aqueous medium using ceric ammonium nitrate as an initiator. The structural analysis of the graft copolymers was carried out by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The graft copolymers were also characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). An additional peak at 1732 cm−1 which was attributed to the C=O of ester stretching vibration of poly(methyl methacrylate), appeared in the spectrum of grafted Agave cellulose. A slight decrease of crystallinity index upon grafting was found from 0.74 to 0.68 for cellulose and grafted Agave cellulose, respectively. Another evidence of grafting showed in the FESEM observation, where the surface of the grafted cellulose was found to be roughed than the raw one

  5. In-situ glyoxalization during biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cristina; Cordeiro, Nereida; Faria, Marisa; Zuluaga, Robin; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Filpponen, Ilari; Velez, Lina; Rojas, Orlando J; Gañán, Piedad

    2015-08-01

    A novel method to synthesize highly crosslinked bacterial cellulose (BC) is reported. The glyoxalization is started in-situ, in the culture medium during biosynthesis of cellulose by Gluconacetobacter medellensis bacteria. Strong crosslinked networks were formed in the contact areas between extruded cellulose ribbons by reaction with the glyoxal precursors. The crystalline structure of cellulose was preserved while the acidic component of the surface energy was reduced. As a consequence, its predominant acidic character and the relative contribution of the dispersive component increased, endowing the BC network with a higher hydrophobicity. This route for in-situ crosslinking is expected to facilitate other modifications upon biosynthesis of cellulose ribbons by microorganisms and to engineer the strength and surface energy of their networks. PMID:25933519

  6. The Solubility of Natural Cellulose After DBD Plasma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; ZENG Fengcai; CHEN Bingqiang

    2008-01-01

    Natural cellulose was treated by an atmospheric DBD plasma. The solubility of cel-lulose in a diluted alkaline solution after the plasma treatment was investigated. The properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spec-troscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the surface of cellulose treated by the argon DBD plasma was significantly etched, and the relevant force of hy-drogen bonding was decreased. This might be the essential reason for the solubility improvement of natural cellulose in the diluted alkaline solution. Through a comparison of two discharge modes, the atmospheric DBD plasma gun and the parallel plate capacitively coupled DBD plasma, it wasfound that the atmospheric DBD plasma gun was more effective in fragmentizing the cellulose due to its production of a high energy plasma based on its special structure [6] .

  7. Cellulose nanocrystals isolated from oil palm trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaming, Junidah; Hashim, Rokiah; Sulaiman, Othman; Leh, Cheu Peng; Sugimoto, Tomoko; Nordin, Noor Afeefah

    2015-01-01

    In this study cellulose nanocrystals were isolated from oil palm trunk (Elaeis guineensis) using acid hydrolysis method. The morphology and size of the nanocrystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the nanocrystals isolated from raw oil palm trunk (OPT) fibers and hot water treated OPT fibers had an average diameter of 7.67 nm and 7.97 nm and length of 397.03 nm and 361.70 nm, respectively. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy indicated that lignin and hemicellulose contents decreased. It seems that lignin was completely removed from the samples during chemical treatment. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that cellulose nanocrystals after acid hydrolysis had higher thermal stability compared to the raw and hot water treated OPT fibers. The X-ray diffraction analysis increased crystallinity of the samples due to chemical treatment. The crystalline nature of the isolated nanocrystals from raw and hot water treated OPT ranged from 68 to 70%. PMID:25965475

  8. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes: laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 10 references, 17 figures, 4 tables

  9. Radiation induced crosslinking of cellulose ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of high-energy radiation on four ethers of cellulose: carboxymethyl (CMC); hydroxypropyl (HPC), hydroxyethyl (HEC) and methylcellulose (MC) were investigated. Polymers are irradiated in solid state and in aqueous solutions at various concentrations. Degree of substitution (DS) of the derivatives, the concentration of their aqueous solutions and irradiation conditions had a significant impact on the obtained products. Irradiation of polymers in solid state and in diluted aqueous solutions resulted in their degradation. However, it was found that for concentrated solutions gel formation occurred. Paste-like form of the initial material, when water plasticizes the bulk of polymer as well as the high dose rate, what prevents oxygen penetration of the polymer during irradiation, have been found favourable for hydrogel formation. Up to 95% of gel fraction was obtained from solutions of CMC with concentration over 50% irradiated by γ-rays or electron beam. It was pointed out that the ability to the formation of the three-dimensional network is related to the DS of anhydroglucose units and a type of chemical group introduced to main chain of cellulose. Produced hydrogels swelled markedly in water. Despite of the crosslinked structure they underwent degradation by the action of cellulase enzyme or microorganisms from compost, and can be included into the group of biodegradable materials. (author)

  10. CELLULOSE DECOMPOSTION IN TROPICAL PEAT SWAMPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hjh Dulima Jali

    2003-01-01

    Given that organic soil is a complex substrate and there are many environmental factors which directly or indirectly control its decomposition processes, the use of standard substrate simplify the system in that the effect of substrate quality could be eliminated and influence of certain environmental conditions such as edaphic factors, acidity and moisture could be focused on. In addition to the forest floor, decomposition potential down the peat profile can also be examined. Cotton strip assay was used to estimate decomposition potentials in tropical peat swamp occupied by different Shorea Albida peat swamp forest communities, The' Alan Batu' , the ' Alan Bunga' , the' Alan Padang' and the 'mixed Alan'forest communities. Greatest decay rates on the peat surface took place during the wet period. The moist condition of the wet months appeared to favour the growth and stimulate activities of decomposer population and soil invertebrates.Generally, 50% of cotton tensile loss is achieved after four weeks of exposure. The results suggest that cellulose decomposition is influenced by the environmental variables of hydrological regime, water-table fluctuation, aeration, moisture availability,waterlogging and the resultant anaerobiosis, peat depths, and micro-sites characteristics. Decomposition of cellulose is inhibited by waterlogging and the resultant anaerobiosis in thelower segment of the cotton strip during wet periods and under dry conditions in the surface segment of the cotton strip during periods of less rain.

  11. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiji, Roya R; Xu, Xin; Reifenberger, Ronald; Raman, Arvind; Rudie, Alan; Moon, Robert J

    2010-03-16

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a "green" nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs is performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM experiments involving high-resolution dynamic mode imaging and jump-mode measurements were performed on individual CNCs under ambient conditions with 30% relative humidity (RH) and under a N(2) atmosphere with 0.1% RH. A procedure was also developed to calculate the CNC transverse elastic modulus (E(T)) by comparing the experimental force-distance curves measured on the CNCs with 3D finite element calculations of tip indentation on the CNC. The E(T) of an isolated CNC was estimated to be between 18 and 50 GPa at 0.1% RH; however, the associated crystallographic orientation of the CNC could not be determined. CNC properties were reasonably uniform along the entire CNC length, despite variations along the axis of 3-8 nm in CNC height. The range of RH used in this study was found to have a minimal effect on the CNC geometry, confirming the resistance of the cellulose crystals to water penetration. CNC flexibility was also investigated by using the AFM tip as a nanomanipulator. PMID:20055370

  12. A novel biochemical route for fuels and chemicals production from cellulosic biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Fan

    Full Text Available The conventional biochemical platform featuring enzymatic hydrolysis involves five key steps: pretreatment, cellulase production, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, and product recovery. Sugars are produced as reactive intermediates for subsequent fermentation to fuels and chemicals. Herein, an alternative biochemical route is proposed. Pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulase production is consolidated into one single step, referred to as consolidated aerobic processing, and sugar aldonates are produced as the reactive intermediates for biofuels production by fermentation. In this study, we demonstrate the viability of consolidation of the enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulase production steps in the new route using Neurospora crassa as the model microorganism and the conversion of cellulose to ethanol as the model system. We intended to prove the two hypotheses: 1 cellulose can be directed to produce cellobionate by reducing β-glucosidase production and by enhancing cellobiose dehydrogenase production; and 2 both of the two hydrolysis products of cellobionate--glucose and gluconate--can be used as carbon sources for ethanol and other chemical production. Our results showed that knocking out multiple copies of β-glucosidase genes led to cellobionate production from cellulose, without jeopardizing the cellulose hydrolysis rate. Simulating cellobiose dehydrogenase over-expression by addition of exogenous cellobiose dehydrogenase led to more cellobionate production. Both of the two hydrolysis products of cellobionate: glucose and gluconate can be used by Escherichia coli KO 11 for efficient ethanol production. They were utilized simultaneously in glucose and gluconate co-fermentation. Gluconate was used even faster than glucose. The results support the viability of the two hypotheses that lay the foundation for the proposed new route.

  13. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  14. Role of Fimbriae, Flagella and Cellulose on the Attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 to Plant Cell Wall Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S F Tan

    Full Text Available Cases of foodborne disease caused by Salmonella are frequently associated with the consumption of minimally processed produce. Bacterial cell surface components are known to be important for the attachment of bacterial pathogens to fresh produce. The role of these extracellular structures in Salmonella attachment to plant cell walls has not been investigated in detail. We investigated the role of flagella, fimbriae and cellulose on the attachment of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and a range of isogenic deletion mutants (ΔfliC fljB, ΔbcsA, ΔcsgA, ΔcsgA bcsA and ΔcsgD to bacterial cellulose (BC-based plant cell wall models [BC-Pectin (BCP, BC-Xyloglucan (BCX and BC-Pectin-Xyloglucan (BCPX] after growth at different temperatures (28°C and 37°C. We found that all three cell surface components were produced at 28°C but only the flagella was produced at 37°C. Flagella appeared to be most important for attachment (reduction of up to 1.5 log CFU/cm2 although both cellulose and fimbriae also aided in attachment. The csgD deletion mutant, which lacks both cellulose and fimbriae, showed significantly higher attachment as compared to wild type cells at 37°C. This may be due to the increased expression of flagella-related genes which are also indirectly regulated by the csgD gene. Our study suggests that bacterial attachment to plant cell walls is a complex process involving many factors. Although flagella, cellulose and fimbriae all aid in attachment, these structures are not the only mechanism as no strain was completely defective in its attachment.

  15. Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase on Cellulose/Cellulose Acetate Membrane and its Detection by Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yi He ZHANG; Zheng Yu YANG

    2004-01-01

    Cellulose/cellulose acetate membranes were prepared and functionalized by introducing amino group on it, and then immobilized the glucose oxidase (Gox) on the functionalizd membrane. SECM was applied for the detection of enzyme activity immobilized on the membrane. Immobilized biomolecules on such membranes was combined with analysis apparatus and can be used in bioassays.

  16. Preparation of cellulose II and III{sub I} films by allomorphic conversion of bacterial cellulose I pellicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria-Tischer, Paula C.S., E-mail: paula.tischer@pq.cnpq.br [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); UMR 5628 (LMGP), CNRS and Grenoble Institute of Technology, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Tischer, Cesar A. [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CIME Nanotech, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Heux, Laurent [Université Grenoble Alpes, Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Le Denmat, Simon; Picart, Catherine [UMR 5628 (LMGP), CNRS and Grenoble Institute of Technology, 3 Parvis Louis Néel, F-38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Sierakowski, Maria-R. [BioPol, Departamento de Química, UFPR, Cx. Postal 19081, 81531-980 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); and others

    2015-06-01

    The structural changes resulting from the conversion of native cellulose I (Cel I) into allomorphs II (Cel II) and III{sub I} (Cel III{sub I}) have usually been studied using powder samples from plant or algal cellulose. In this work, the conversion of Cel I into Cel II and Cel III{sub I} was performed on bacterial cellulose films without any mechanical disruption. The surface texture of the films was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the morphology of the constituting cellulose ribbons, by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural changes were characterized using solid-state NMR spectroscopy as well as X-ray and electron diffraction. The allomorphic change into Cel II and Cel III{sub I} resulted in films with different crystallinity, roughness and hydrophobic/hydrophilicity surface and the films remained intact during all process of allomorphic conversion. - Highlights: • Description of a method to modify the allomorphic structure of bacterial cellulose films • Preparation of films with specific morphologies and hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface characters • First report on cellulose III films from bacterial cellulose under swelling conditions • Detailed characterization of cellulose II and III films with complementary techniques • Development of films with specific properties as potential support for cells, enzymes, and drugs.

  17. Tunable Semicrystalline Thin Film Cellulose Substrate for High-Resolution, In-Situ AFM Characterization of Enzymatic Cellulose Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganner, Thomas; Roŝker, Stephanie; Eibinger, Manuel; Kraxner, Johanna; Sattelkow, Jürgen; Rattenberger, Johannes; Fitzek, Harald; Chernev, Boril; Grogger, Werner; Nidetzky, Bernd; Plank, Harald

    2015-12-23

    In the field of enzymatic cellulose degradation, fundamental interactions between different enzymes and polymorphic cellulose materials are of essential importance but still not understood in full detail. One technology with the potential of direct visualization of such bioprocesses is atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to its capability of real-time in situ investigations with spatial resolutions down to the molecular scale. To exploit the full capabilities of this technology and unravel fundamental enzyme-cellulose bioprocesses, appropriate cellulose substrates are decisive. In this study, we introduce a semicrystalline-thin-film-cellulose (SCFTC) substrate which fulfills the strong demands on such ideal cellulose substrates by means of (1) tunable polymorphism via variable contents of homogeneously sized cellulose nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous cellulose matrix; (2) nanoflat surface topology for high-resolution and high-speed AFM; and (3) fast, simple, and reproducible fabrication. The study starts with a detailed description of SCTFC preparation protocols including an in-depth material characterization. In the second part, we demonstrate the suitability of SCTFC substrates for enzymatic degradation studies by combined, individual, and sequential exposure to TrCel6A/TrCel7A cellulases (Trichoderma reesei) to visualize synergistic effects down to the nanoscale. PMID:26618709

  18. Optimization of cellulose acrylate and grafted 4-vinylpyridine and 1-vinylimidazole synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojanić Vaso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of cellulose acrylate synthesis by reaction with sodium cellulosate and acryloyl chloride was carried out. Optimal conditions for conducting the synthesis reaction of cellulose acrylate were as follows: the molar ratio of cellulose/potassium-t-butoxide/acryloyl chloride was 1:3:10 and the optimal reaction time was 10 h. On the basis of elemental analysis with optimal conditions for conducting the reaction of cellulose acrylate, the percentage of substitution of glucose units in cellulose Y = 80.7%, and the degree of substitution of cellulose acrylate DS = 2.4 was determined. The grafting reaction of acrylate vinyl monomers onto cellulose in acetonitrile with initiator azoisobutyronitrile (AIBN in a nitrogen atmosphere was performed, by mixing for 5 h at acetonitrile boiling temperature. Radical copolymerization of synthesized cellulose acrylate and 4-vinylpyridine, 1-vinylimidazole, 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone and 9-vinylcarbazole, cellulose-poly-4-vinylpyridine (Cell-PVP, cellulose-poly-1- vinylimidazole (Cell-PVIm and cellulose-poly-1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (Cell-P1V2P and cellulose-poly-9-vinylcarbazole (Cell-P9VK were synthesized. Acrylate cellulose and cellulose grafted copolymers were confirmed by IR spectroscopy, based on elementary analysis and the characteristics of grafted copolymers of cellulose were determined. The mass share of grafted copolymers, X, the relationship of derivative parts/cellulose vinyl group, Z, and the degree of grafting copolymers of cellulose (mass% were determined. In reaction of methyl iodide and cellulose-poly-4-vinylpyridine (Cell-PVP the cellulose-1-methyl-poly-4-vinylpyridine iodide (Cell-1-Me-PVPJ was synthesized. Cellulose acrylate and grafted copolymers were obtained with better thermal, electrochemical and ion-emulation properties for bonding of noble metals Au, Pt, Pd from water solutions. The synthesis optimization of cellulose acrylate was applied as a model for the synthesis of grafted

  19. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  20. Water dispersible microbicidal cellulose acetate phthalate film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP has been used for several decades in the pharmaceutical industry for enteric film coating of oral tablets and capsules. Micronized CAP, available commercially as "Aquateric" and containing additional ingredients required for micronization, used for tablet coating from water dispersions, was shown to adsorb and inactivate the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1, herpesviruses (HSV and other sexually transmitted disease (STD pathogens. Earlier studies indicate that a gel formulation of micronized CAP has a potential as a topical microbicide for prevention of STDs including the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The objective of endeavors described here was to develop a water dispersible CAP film amenable to inexpensive industrial mass production. Methods CAP and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC were dissolved in different organic solvent mixtures, poured into dishes, and the solvents evaporated. Graded quantities of a resulting selected film were mixed for 5 min at 37°C with HIV-1, HSV and other STD pathogens, respectively. Residual infectivity of the treated viruses and bacteria was determined. Results The prerequisites for producing CAP films which are soft, flexible and dispersible in water, resulting in smooth gels, are combining CAP with HPC (other cellulose derivatives are unsuitable, and casting from organic solvent mixtures containing ≈50 to ≈65% ethanol (EtOH. The films are ≈100 µ thick and have a textured surface with alternating protrusions and depressions revealed by scanning electron microscopy. The films, before complete conversion into a gel, rapidly inactivated HIV-1 and HSV and reduced the infectivity of non-viral STD pathogens >1,000-fold. Conclusions Soft pliable CAP-HPC composite films can be generated by casting from organic solvent mixtures containing EtOH. The films rapidly reduce the infectivity of several STD pathogens, including HIV-1. They are converted into

  1. Interfacial Properties of Ethyl Cellulose/Cellulose Acetate Blends by HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Su-lian; ZHOU Ning-guo; ZHANG Xiu-zhen; ZHANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    The high performance liquid chromatography method (HPLC) with ethyl cellulose/cellulose acetate (EC/CA)blends and EC as column packing material, and small molecular weight compound as probe molecules was employed to measure the retention volume (VR) and equilibrium distribution coefficient (K) of both inorganic and organic solutes. The interfacial separation properties of EC/CA blends were characterized by the HPLC data. The effects of the blends on the inteffacial adsorption properties, hydrophilicity, affinity, polar and non-polar parameters of EC membrane materials were studied subsequently. The research results indicate that the interfacial adsorption properties and hydrophilicity of EC have been improved by solution blending with CA. The alloys are superior to EC in the separation efficiency for non-dissociable polar organic solute. The EC/CA alloy (80:20, ω) is suitable for desalting and desaccharifying.

  2. Optimization of upstream and development of cellulose hydrolysis process for cellulosic bio-ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is optimization of upstream and development of cellulose hydrolysis process for cellulosic bio-ethanol production. The 2nd year Research scope includes: 1) Optimization of pre-treatment conditions for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and 2) Demonstration of enzymatic hydrolysis by recombinant enzymes. To optimize the pretreatment, we applied two processes: a wet process (wet milling + popping), and dry process (popping + dry milling). Out of these, the wet process presented the best glucose yield with a 93.1% conversion, while the dry process yielded 69.6%, and the unpretreated process yielded <20%. The recombinant cellulolytic enzymes showed very high specific activity, about 80-1000 times on CMC and 13-70 times on filter paper at pH 3.5 and 55 .deg. C

  3. Cellulosic Bionanocomposites: A Review of Preparation, Properties and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Dufresne

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose is the most abundant biomass material in nature. Extracted from natural fibers, its hierarchical and multi-level organization allows different kinds of nanoscaled cellulosic fillers—called cellulose nanocrystals or microfibrillated cellulose (MFC—to be obtained. Recently, such cellulose nanoparticles have been the focus of an exponentially increasing number of works or reviews devoted to understanding such materials and their applications. Major studies over the last decades have shown that cellulose nanoparticles could be used as fillers to improve mechanical and barrier properties of biocomposites. Their use for industrial packaging is being investigated, with continuous studies to find innovative solutions for efficient and sustainable systems. Processing is more and more important and different systems are detailed in this paper depending on the polymer solubility, i.e., (i hydrosoluble systems, (ii non-hydrosoluble systems, and (iii emulsion systems. This paper intends to give a clear overview of cellulose nanoparticles reinforced composites with more than 150 references by describing their preparation, characterization, properties and applications.

  4. Biological evaluation of nanosilver incorporated cellulose pulp for hygiene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha Sankar, P C; Ramakrishnan, Reshmi; Rosemary, M J

    2016-04-01

    Cellulose pulp has a visible market share in personal hygiene products such as sanitary napkins and baby diapers. However it offers good surface for growth of microorganisms. Huge amount of research is going on in developing hygiene products that do not initiate microbial growth. The objective of the present work is to produce antibacterial cellulose pulp by depositing silver nanopowder on the cellulose fiber. The silver nanoparticles used were of less than 100 nm in size and were characterised using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction studies. Antibacterial activity of the functionalized cellulose pulp was proved by JIS L 1902 method. The in-vitro cytotoxicity, in-vivo vaginal irritation and intracutaneous reactivity studies were done with silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp for introducing a new value added product to the market. Cytotoxicity evaluation suggested that the silver nanoparticle incorporated cellulose pulp is non-cytotoxic. No irritation and skin sensitization were identified in animals tested with specific extracts prepared from the test material in the in-vivo experiments. The results indicated that the silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp meets the requirements of the standard practices recommended for evaluating the biological reactivity and has good biocompatibility, hence can be classified as a safe hygiene product. PMID:26838891

  5. Enhanced cellulose degradation using cellulase-nanosphere complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Blanchette

    Full Text Available Enzyme catalyzed conversion of plant biomass to sugars is an inherently inefficient process, and one of the major factors limiting economical biofuel production. This is due to the physical barrier presented by polymers in plant cell walls, including semi-crystalline cellulose, to soluble enzyme accessibility. In contrast to the enzymes currently used in industry, bacterial cellulosomes organize cellulases and other proteins in a scaffold structure, and are highly efficient in degrading cellulose. To mimic this clustered assembly of enzymes, we conjugated cellulase obtained from Trichoderma viride to polystyrene nanospheres (cellulase:NS and tested the hydrolytic activity of this complex on cellulose substrates from purified and natural sources. Cellulase:NS and free cellulase were equally active on soluble carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC; however, the complexed enzyme displayed a higher affinity in its action on microcrystalline cellulose. Similarly, we found that the cellulase:NS complex was more efficient in degrading natural cellulose structures in the thickened walls of cultured wood cells. These results suggest that nanoparticle-bound enzymes can improve catalytic efficiency on physically intractable substrates. We discuss the potential for further enhancement of cellulose degradation by physically clustering combinations of different glycosyl hydrolase enzymes, and applications for using cellulase:NS complexes in biofuel production.

  6. Cellulose supplementation early in life ameliorates colitis in adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorottya Nagy-Szakal

    Full Text Available Decreased consumption of dietary fibers, such as cellulose, has been proposed to promote the emergence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD: Crohn disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC] where intestinal microbes are recognized to play an etiologic role. However, it is not known if transient fiber consumption during critical developmental periods may prevent consecutive intestinal inflammation. The incidence of IBD peaks in young adulthood indicating that pediatric environmental exposures may be important in the etiology of this disease group. We studied the effects of transient dietary cellulose supplementation on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS colitis susceptibility during the pediatric period in mice. Cellulose supplementation stimulated substantial shifts in the colonic mucosal microbiome. Several bacterial taxa decreased in relative abundance (e.g., Coriobacteriaceae [p = 0.001], and other taxa increased in abundance (e.g., Peptostreptococcaceae [p = 0.008] and Clostridiaceae [p = 0.048]. Some of these shifts persisted for 10 days following the cessation of cellulose supplementation. The changes in the gut microbiome were associated with transient trophic and anticolitic effects 10 days following the cessation of a cellulose-enriched diet, but these changes diminished by 40 days following reversal to a low cellulose diet. These findings emphasize the transient protective effect of dietary cellulose in the mammalian large bowel and highlight the potential role of dietary fibers in amelioration of intestinal inflammation.

  7. Comparative Structural and Computational Analysis Supports Eighteen Cellulose Synthases in the Plant Cellulose Synthesis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, B Tracy; Mansouri, Katayoun; Singh, Abhishek; Du, Juan; Davis, Jonathan K; Lee, Jung-Goo; Slabaugh, Erin; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; O'Neill, Hugh; Roberts, Eric M; Roberts, Alison W; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Haigler, Candace H

    2016-01-01

    A six-lobed membrane spanning cellulose synthesis complex (CSC) containing multiple cellulose synthase (CESA) glycosyltransferases mediates cellulose microfibril formation. The number of CESAs in the CSC has been debated for decades in light of changing estimates of the diameter of the smallest microfibril formed from the β-1,4 glucan chains synthesized by one CSC. We obtained more direct evidence through generating improved transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and image averages of the rosette-type CSC, revealing the frequent triangularity and average cross-sectional area in the plasma membrane of its individual lobes. Trimeric oligomers of two alternative CESA computational models corresponded well with individual lobe geometry. A six-fold assembly of the trimeric computational oligomer had the lowest potential energy per monomer and was consistent with rosette CSC morphology. Negative stain TEM and image averaging showed the triangularity of a recombinant CESA cytosolic domain, consistent with previous modeling of its trimeric nature from small angle scattering (SAXS) data. Six trimeric SAXS models nearly filled the space below an average FF-TEM image of the rosette CSC. In summary, the multifaceted data support a rosette CSC with 18 CESAs that mediates the synthesis of a fundamental microfibril composed of 18 glucan chains. PMID:27345599

  8. CARS and SHG microscopy for the characterization of bacterial cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika; Brackmann, Christian; Bodin, Aase; Åkeson, Madeleine; Gatenholm, Paul

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a protocol employing dual-mode non-linear microscopy for the monitoring of the biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose at a single-fiber level, with the fundamental aim to achieve a product with material properties similar to those of human blood vessels. Grown in a tubular geometry it could then be used as a natural and biocompatible source of replacement tissue in conjunction with cardiovascular surgery. The bacteria (Acetobacter xylinum) were selectively visualized based on the CH2 vibration of its organic macromolecular contents by the Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) process and, simultaneously, the non-centrosymmetrically ordered, birefringent cellulose fibers were depicted by the Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) process. This dual-channel detection approach allows the monitoring of cellulose-fiber formation in vivo and to determine the influence of e.g. different growth conditions on fiber thickness and orientation, their assembling into higher-order structures and overall network density. The bacterial and fiber distributions were monitored in a simple microscope cultivation chamber, as well as in samples harvested during the actual fermentation process of tubular cellulose grafts. The CARS and SHG co-localization images reveal that highest bacterial population densities can be observed in the surface regions of the cellulose tissue, where the primary growth presumably takes place. The cellulose network morphology was also compared with that of human arteries and veins, from which we conclude that the cellulose matrix is comparatively homogeneous in contrast to the wavy band-like supra-formations of collagen in the native tissue. This prompts for sophisticated fermentation methods by which tunnels and pores of appropriate sizes and shapes can be introduced in the cellulose network in a controllable way. With this protocol we hope to contribute to the fundamental knowledge required for optimal production of bioengineered cellulose

  9. Terahertz Properties of Cellulose Nanocrystals and Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnio, B. N.; Ahvazi, B.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation properties of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films, a CNC powder, and a dissolving pulp film are examined using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The relative permittivity (real component) of the CNC samples are found to vary between 1.78 and 3.81, over the frequency range of 0.2-1.5 THz, despite the fact that they are made from the same linear chain of glucose monomers. The results show that the permittivity is strongly dependent on the source from which the CNC glucose monomers are extracted, as well as on the drying process used. The THz loss tangent (0.043 < tan( δ) < 0.145), absorption coefficient (3.5 cm-1 < α < 63.7 cm-1), and growth-varying permittivity, combined with other appealing thermal and mechanical characteristic of CNC, make such material attractive for use in both passive and potential THz bandwidth electronic components.

  10. Engineering microporosity in bacterial cellulose scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckdahl, Henrik; Esguerra, Maricris; Delbro, Dick; Risberg, Bo; Gatenholm, Paul

    2008-08-01

    The scaffold is an essential component in tissue engineering. A novel method to prepare three-dimensional (3D) nanofibril network scaffolds with controlled microporosity has been developed. By placing paraffin wax and starch particles of various sizes in a growing culture of Acetobacter xylinum, bacterial cellulose scaffolds of different morphologies and interconnectivity were prepared. Paraffin particles were incorporated throughout the scaffold, while starch particles were found only in the outermost area of the resulting scaffold. The porogens were successfully removed after culture with bacteria and no residues were detected with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) or Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). Resulting scaffolds were seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and investigated using histology and organ bath techniques. SMC were selected as the cell type since the main purpose of the resulting scaffolds is for tissue engineered blood vessels. SMCs attached to and proliferated on and partly into the scaffolds. PMID:18615821

  11. Nanofibrillated cellulose from tobacco industry wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzzin, Glaiton; Godinho, Marcelo; Dettmer, Aline; Zattera, Ademir José

    2016-09-01

    Tobacco stems waste underwent steam explosion pulping for nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) production. In order to obtain NFC hydrogels, the pulp obtained by steam explosion was bleached and refined in a grinder employing specific energy of up to 5067kWh/t. Eucalyptus kraft pulp was processed under the same conditions to produce NFC hydrogels, later used in order to compare with NFC hydrogels from tobacco stems waste. According to statistical analysis, the optimum tobacco stems pulping condition was obtained with a severity index of log3.0 and active alkali of 16.25%. These conditions allowed obtaining a bleached pulp with Schopper Riegler degree of 46. Electronic microscopy with field emission showed a higher presence of nanofibers in the tobacco stems pulp than in commercial eucalyptus kraft pulp, both after refining. Thermal analysis indicated that tobacco stems pulp degrade at lower temperatures than eucalyptus kraft pulp. FTIR analysis did not indicate chemical bonding differences between the two pulps. PMID:27185117

  12. Third Generation Biofuels via Direct Cellulose Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Levin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP is a system in which cellulase production, substrate hydrolysis, and fermentation are accomplished in a single process step by cellulolytic microorganisms. CBP offers the potential for lower biofuel production costs due to simpler feedstock processing, lower energy inputs, and higher conversion efficiencies than separate hydrolysis and fermentation processes, and is an economically attractive near-term goal for “third generation” biofuel production. In this review article, production of third generation biofuels from cellulosic feedstocks will be addressed in respect to the metabolism of cellulolytic bacteria and the development of strategies to increase biofuel yields through metabolic engineering.

  13. Registration probability of alphas in cellulose nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Registration 'thresholds' of alpha particles in cellulose nitrate plastic present a statistical behaviour. The effect depends on etching conditions. It is particularly large in strong etching conditions, in which registration is transposed to high energies: up to 7.7 MeV for the conditions and energies studied. 'Registration probability' expresses more adequately the effect of registration constraints. The study of registration probability indicates that the 'target theory' can describe the effect. The parameters of target theory, m (number of targets) and D0 (the equivalent of biological dose D37) were found to be: m = 5 and D0 = 3 x 107 erg cm-3. Dose distribution around the trajectory of alphas of various energies is estimated. It is also deduced that track development takes place when the required dose for registration is deposited at a distance r >= 20 A from particle trajectory. (author)

  14. Copper removal using electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Amir; Safari, Salman; Yang, Han; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-06-01

    Removal of heavy metal ions such as copper using an efficient and low-cost method with low ecological footprint is a critical process in wastewater treatment, which can be achieved in a liquid phase using nanoadsorbents such as inorganic nanoparticles. Recently, attention has turned toward developing sustainable and environmentally friendly nanoadsorbents to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media. Electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC), which can be prepared from wood fibers through periodate/chlorite oxidation, has been shown to have a high charge content and colloidal stability. Here, we show that ENCC scavenges copper ions by different mechanisms depending on the ion concentration. When the Cu(II) concentration is low (C0≲200 ppm), agglomerates of starlike ENCC particles appear, which are broken into individual starlike entities by shear and Brownian motion, as evidenced by photometric dispersion analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. On the other hand, at higher copper concentrations, the aggregate morphology changes from starlike to raftlike, which is probably due to the collapse of protruding dicarboxylic cellulose (DCC) chains and ENCC charge neutralization by copper adsorption. Such raftlike structures result from head-to-head and lateral aggregation of neutralized ENCCs as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to starlike aggregates, the raftlike structures grow gradually and are prone to sedimentation at copper concentrations C0≳500 ppm, which eliminates a costly separation step in wastewater treatment processes. Moreover, a copper removal capacity of ∼185 mg g(-1) was achieved thanks to the highly charged DCC polyanions protruding from ENCC. These properties along with the biorenewability make ENCC a promising candidate for wastewater treatment, in which fast, facile, and low-cost removal of heavy metal ions is desired most. PMID:25950624

  15. Fabrication of Piezoelectric Cellulose Paper and Audio Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-Hwan Kim; Sungryul Yun; Joo-Hyung Kim; Jaehwan Kim

    2009-01-01

    We report the fabrication process of piezoelectric cellulose paper and the enhancement method of its piezoelectric property.Stretching method with different wet-drawing ratios was introduced to increase the piezoelectric property of cellulose paper during regeneration process. It is observed that the Young's modulus and the piezoelectric charge constants are very dependent on the drawing ratio and the direction of nanofibrils of piezoelectric paper. Using the enhanced piezoelectric property, we prove that the flexible regenerated piezoelectric cellulose can be applied to the potential acoustic applications such as thin piezoelectric paper speaker.

  16. EFFECT BLEACHING REAGENT ON THE QUALITY OF FLAX CELLULOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Дейкун, Ірина Михайлівна

    2015-01-01

    The paper studies the impact of bleaching chemicals such as chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide and chlorine on the product yield, residual lignin content, a-cellulose, viscosity, ash content and whiteness of flax natron cellulose for chemical processing.It was found that one-step processing of flax pulp with chlorine dioxide consumption rate 0,3…0,5 % and with hydrogen peroxide consumption rate 2…3 % by weight of abs. dry cellulose is more effective than treatment with chlorine water at chlo...

  17. Sustainable green composites of thermoplastic starch and cellulose fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnuay Wattanakornsiri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Green composites have gained renewed interest as environmental friendly materials and as biodegradable renewable resources for a sustainable development. This review provides an overview of recent advances in green composites based on thermoplastic starch (TPS and cellulose fibers. It includes information about compositions, preparations, and properties of starch, cellulose fibers, TPS, and green composites based on TPS and cellulose fibers. Introduction and production of these recyclable composites into the material market would be important for environmental sustainability as their use can decrease the volume of petroleum derived plastic waste dumps. Green composites are comparable cheap and abundant, but further research and development is needed for a broader utilization.

  18. Natural Composites: Cellulose Fibres and the related Performance of Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Madsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Biobased materials are becoming of increasing interest as potential structural materials for the future. A useful concept in this context is the fibre reinforcement of materials by stiff and strong fibres. The biobased resources can contribute with cellulose fibres and biopolymers. This offers...... in stiffness, on the packing ability of cellulose fibres and the related maximum fibre volume fraction in composites, on the moisture sorption of cellulose fibres and the related mass increase and (large) hygral strains induced, and on the mechanical performance of composites....

  19. Cellulose Electro-Active Paper: From Discovery to Technology Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar eAbas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose electro-active paper (EAPap is an attractive material of electro-active polymers (EAPs family due to its smart characteristics. EAPap is thin cellulose film coated with metal electrodes on both sides. Its large displacement output, low actuation voltage and low power consumption can be used for biomimetic sensors/actuators and electromechanical system. Because cellulose EAPap is ultra-lightweight, easy to manufacture, inexpensive, biocompatible, and biodegradable, it has been employed for many applications such as bending actuator, vibration sensor, artificial muscle, flexible speaker, and can be advantageous in areas such as micro-insect robots, micro-flying objects, microelectromechanical systems, biosensors, and flexible displays.

  20. NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-11-01

    Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

  1. PPLA-cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposite prepared by in situ polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This work reports the preparation and and characterization of a PLLA-cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposite obtained by in situ polymerization. The nanocomposite was prepared by ring opening polymerization of the lactide dimer in the presence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and the as-obtained materials was characterized using FTIR, DSC, XRD and TGA measurements. The incorporation of cellulose nanocrystals in PLLA using this method improved the thermal stability and increased the crystallinity of PLLA. These results indicate that the incorporation of CNCs by in situ polymerization improve thermal properties and has potential to improve also mechanical properties of this biodegradable polymer. (author)

  2. Preliminary Research on Structure and Properties of Nano-cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The structure of bacterial cellulose (BC) produced by Acetobacter xylinum NUST4 (A.xylinum NUST4) under static (SBC) and shake culture condition (ABC) was studied by means of transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectrum (FT-IR). It was revealed that BC is Ⅰ crystal cellulose and the proportion of cellulose Ⅰα exceeds 80% and BC diameter is 10-80 nm.Mechanical properties and water absorption capacity were also determined. These properties could result from crystalline and nanometer structure of BC.

  3. Bacterial cellulose synthesis mechanism of facultative anaerobe Enterobacter sp. FY-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kaihua; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Bing; Chen, Sibin; Zhao, Qianqian; Chen, Yueqing; Li, Guoqiang; Ma, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. FY-07 can produce bacterial cellulose (BC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three potential BC synthesis gene clusters (bcsI, bcsII and bcsIII) of Enterobacter sp. FY-07 have been predicted using genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis, in which bcsIII was confirmed as the main contributor to BC synthesis by gene knockout and functional reconstitution methods. Protein homology, gene arrangement and gene constitution analysis indicated that bcsIII had high identity to the bcsI operon of Enterobacter sp. 638; however, its arrangement and composition were same as those of BC synthesizing operon of G. xylinum ATCC53582 except for the flanking sequences. According to the BC biosynthesizing process, oxygen is not directly involved in the reactions of BC synthesis, however, energy is required to activate intermediate metabolites and synthesize the activator, c-di-GMP. Comparative transcriptome and metabolite quantitative analysis demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions genes involved in the TCA cycle were downregulated, however, genes in the nitrate reduction and gluconeogenesis pathways were upregulated, especially, genes in three pyruvate metabolism pathways. These results suggested that Enterobacter sp. FY-07 could produce energy efficiently under anaerobic conditions to meet the requirement of BC biosynthesis. PMID:26911736

  4. The unique architecture and function of cellulose-interacting proteins in oomycetes revealed by genomic and structural analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larroque Mathieu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oomycetes are fungal-like microorganisms evolutionary distinct from true fungi, belonging to the Stramenopile lineage and comprising major plant pathogens. Both oomycetes and fungi express proteins able to interact with cellulose, a major component of plant and oomycete cell walls, through the presence of carbohydrate-binding module belonging to the family 1 (CBM1. Fungal CBM1-containing proteins were implicated in cellulose degradation whereas in oomycetes, the Cellulose Binding Elicitor Lectin (CBEL, a well-characterized CBM1-protein from Phytophthora parasitica, was implicated in cell wall integrity, adhesion to cellulosic substrates and induction of plant immunity. Results To extend our knowledge on CBM1-containing proteins in oomycetes, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis on 60 fungi and 7 oomycetes genomes leading to the identification of 518 CBM1-containing proteins. In plant-interacting microorganisms, the larger number of CBM1-protein coding genes is expressed by necrotroph and hemibiotrophic pathogens, whereas a strong reduction of these genes is observed in symbionts and biotrophs. In fungi, more than 70% of CBM1-containing proteins correspond to enzymatic proteins in which CBM1 is associated with a catalytic unit involved in cellulose degradation. In oomycetes more than 90% of proteins are similar to CBEL in which CBM1 is associated with a non-catalytic PAN/Apple domain, known to interact with specific carbohydrates or proteins. Distinct Stramenopile genomes like diatoms and brown algae are devoid of CBM1 coding genes. A CBM1-PAN/Apple association 3D structural modeling was built allowing the identification of amino acid residues interacting with cellulose and suggesting the putative interaction of the PAN/Apple domain with another type of glucan. By Surface Plasmon Resonance experiments, we showed that CBEL binds to glycoproteins through galactose or N-acetyl-galactosamine motifs. Conclusions This study

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-12-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-12-0025 ref|NP_186955.1| CSLD3 (CELLULOSE ... SYNTHASE-LIKE 3); cellulose ... synthase/ transf ... opsis thaliana] gb|AAF26119.1|AC012328_22 putative cellulose ... synthase catalytic subunit [Arabidopsis thaliana] ... gb|AAG60543.1|AF232907_1 cellulose ... synthase-like CSLD3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAK2 ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ATHA-01-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ATHA-01-0023 ref|NP_186955.1| CSLD3 (CELLULOSE ... SYNTHASE-LIKE 3); cellulose ... synthase/ transf ... opsis thaliana] gb|AAF26119.1|AC012328_22 putative cellulose ... synthase catalytic subunit [Arabidopsis thaliana] ... gb|AAG60543.1|AF232907_1 cellulose ... synthase-like CSLD3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAK2 ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-10-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-10-0021 ref|NP_186955.1| CSLD3 (CELLULOSE ... SYNTHASE-LIKE 3); cellulose ... synthase/ transf ... opsis thaliana] gb|AAF26119.1|AC012328_22 putative cellulose ... synthase catalytic subunit [Arabidopsis thaliana] ... gb|AAG60543.1|AF232907_1 cellulose ... synthase-like CSLD3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAK2 ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ATHA-05-0009 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ATHA-05-0009 ref|NP_186955.1| CSLD3 (CELLULOSE ... SYNTHASE-LIKE 3); cellulose ... synthase/ transf ... opsis thaliana] gb|AAF26119.1|AC012328_22 putative cellulose ... synthase catalytic subunit [Arabidopsis thaliana] ... gb|AAG60543.1|AF232907_1 cellulose ... synthase-like CSLD3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAK2 ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-06-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-06-0033 ref|NP_186955.1| CSLD3 (CELLULOSE ... SYNTHASE-LIKE 3); cellulose ... synthase/ transf ... opsis thaliana] gb|AAF26119.1|AC012328_22 putative cellulose ... synthase catalytic subunit [Arabidopsis thaliana] ... gb|AAG60543.1|AF232907_1 cellulose ... synthase-like CSLD3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAK2 ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ATHA-03-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ATHA-03-0002 ref|NP_186955.1| CSLD3 (CELLULOSE ... SYNTHASE-LIKE 3); cellulose ... synthase/ transf ... opsis thaliana] gb|AAF26119.1|AC012328_22 putative cellulose ... synthase catalytic subunit [Arabidopsis thaliana] ... gb|AAG60543.1|AF232907_1 cellulose ... synthase-like CSLD3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gb|AAK2 ...

  11. Using Cellulosic Ethanol to ‘Go Green’: What Price for Carbon?

    OpenAIRE

    Miranowski, John A.; Rosburg, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    The revised Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS2) mandates that cellulosic biofuels be part of the liquid transportation fuel mix and contribute to reducing our carbon footprint. Unfortunately, since no commercial cellulosic biorefinery exists and cellulosic biomass production is typically smaller scale than conventional crop production, limited knowledge exists of the actual costs of producing cellulosic biomass and converting it to cellulosic ethanol. Understanding of the implications of RFS2 req...

  12. Cellulose Assemblies Produced by Acetobacter Xylinum (FUNDAMENTAL MATERIAL PROPERTIES-Molecular Dynamic Characteristics)

    OpenAIRE

    Hirai, Asako; Horii, Fumitaka

    2000-01-01

    Structures of cellulose assemblies produced by Acetobacter xylinum under various conditions have been studied mainly by transmission electron microscopy. Native cellulose crystals are composites of cellulose Iα and Iβ . Twisted-ribbn cellulose assemblies produced in the HS medium at 28 °C were rich in cellulose Iα . On the contrary, splayed microfibrils produced in the presence of CMC at 28 °C were rich in Iβ . Not only the ribbon assembly but also the bundle of splayed microfibrils was deter...

  13. Parallel-up structure evidences the molecular directionality during biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Makiko; Helbert, William; Imai, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Junji; Henrissat, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    The “parallel-up” packing in cellulose Iα and Iβ unit cells was experimentally demonstrated by a combination of direct-staining the reducing ends of cellulose chains and microdiffraction-tilting electron crystallographic analysis. Microdiffraction investigation of nascent bacterial cellulose microfibrils showed that the reducing end of the growing cellulose chains points away from the bacterium, and this provides direct evidence that polymerization by the cellulose synthase takes place at the...

  14. Structure of the Cellulose Synthase Complex of Gluconacetobacter hansenii at 23.4 Å Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Du; Venkata Vepachedu; Sung Hyun Cho; Manish Kumar; B Tracy Nixon

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial crystalline cellulose is used in biomedical and industrial applications, but the molecular mechanisms of synthesis are unclear. Unlike most bacteria, which make non-crystalline cellulose, Gluconacetobacter hansenii extrudes profuse amounts of crystalline cellulose. Its cellulose synthase (AcsA) exists as a complex with accessory protein AcsB, forming a 'terminal complex' (TC) that has been visualized by freeze-fracture TEM at the base of ribbons of crystalline cellulose. The catalyt...

  15. Screening of the effective cellulose-degradable strain and its application in the production of cellulose bioethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-fei Gao; Dai-di Fan; Pei Ma; Yan-e Luo; Xiao-xuan Ma; Chen-hui Zhu; Jun-feng Hui

    2009-01-01

    Strains from the cellulose-containing environment were collected. Primary screening(by filter-paper Hutchison solid culture medium and sodium carboxymethylcellulose solid culture medium) and reelection(by filter-paper inorganic salt culture medium and sodium carboxymethylcellulosc Congo red coltnre medium) indicated that five strains obtained were best suited for high performance cellulose degradation. Determination of sodium carboxymethylcellulose activity(CMCA) and filter paper activity(FPA) was accomplished for each of the five. The strongest of the five in CMCA and FPA was applied to the production of cellulose bioethanol by separate hydrolysis and fermentation(SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation(SSF) respectively.

  16. Poroelastic Mechanical Effects of Hemicelluloses on Cellulosic Hydrogels under Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Cersosimo, Julie; Wang, Dongjie; Flanagan, Bernadine; Stokes, Jason R.; Gidley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Hemicelluloses exhibit a range of interactions with cellulose, the mechanical consequences of which in plant cell walls are incompletely understood. We report the mechanical properties of cell wall analogues based on cellulose hydrogels to elucidate the contribution of xyloglucan or arabinoxylan as examples of two hemicelluloses displaying different interactions with cellulose. We subjected the hydrogels to mechanical pressures to emulate the compressive stresses experienced by cell walls in planta. Our results revealed that the presence of either hemicellulose increased the resistance to compression at fast strain rates. However, at slow strain rates, only xyloglucan increased composite strength. This behaviour could be explained considering the microstructure and the flow of water through the composites confirming their poroelastic nature. In contrast, small deformation oscillatory rheology showed that only xyloglucan decreased the elastic moduli. These results provide evidence for contrasting roles of different hemicelluloses in plant cell wall mechanics and man-made cellulose-based composite materials. PMID:25794048

  17. X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure the thickness of the cellulose nitrate layer of the commonly used LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). The present work is devoted to the investigation whether the X-ray radiation involved in EDXRF spectrometry will induce degradation of the cellulose nitrate. For this purpose, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to examine the nitrate functions (at the wavenumber 1598 cm-1) and the glycosidic bonds (at 1146 cm-1) for various irradiation time involved in the EDXRF spectrometry. No significant changes were observed even for X-ray irradiation up to 3000 live seconds, which was equivalent for 10 separate scans and should be far more than enough for a determination of the cellulose nitrate layer thickness. Therefore, EDXRF remains a fast and non-destructive method to measure the active layer thickness of the cellulose nitrate SSNTD

  18. Synthesis and properties of fluorescent cotton cellulose labeled with norfloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To expand the application of cellulose in the field of fluorescence techniques, the cotton cellulose was labeled with norfloxacin (Cell-NF) via a three-step reaction, involving alkali treatment, epoxy activation, and opening of the epoxy rings with norfloxacin molecules. And the coordination complexes of Cell-NF with rare earth ions terbium (Cell-NF-Tb) and europium (Cell-NF-Eu) were obtained. The products were detected by IR, TG, XPS, UV and fluorescence spectra. Results showed that the norfloxacin content of the labeled cellulose was about 6.73 w‰ and the start temperature of decomposition of the Cell-NF was raised by 40°C compared with the stock cotton cellulose. When excited at 340 nm, the Cell-NF, Cell-NF-Tb, and Cell-NF-Eu in the solid state could emit violet (430 nm), green (549 nm) and red (620 nm) light, respectively.

  19. Preparation of succinylated cellulose membranes for functionalization purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Viana, Renato M; Faria-Tischer, Paula C S; Tischer, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    The anhydroglucose chains of cellulose possess hydroxyls that facilitate different chemical modification strategies to expand on, or provide new applications for membranes produced by the bacteria Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Conjugation with biomolecules such as proteins, especially by the amine groups, is of great value and interest for the production of biomaterial derivatives from bacterial cellulose. To assist in these modifications, cellulose was succinylated in order to prevent steric hindrance and to create an attachment point for conjugation. Bacterial cellulose membranes were first treated in dichloromethane and reacted with succinic anhydride through a series of conditions. The membrane structure remained intact after these first processes and the product was confirmed by Infra-Red spectroscopy and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and atomic force microscopy. Hydrolyzed collagen was used as a model protein of interest to be conjugated to these membranes, which furnished a biomaterial functionalized over its surface. PMID:27185111

  20. Microfibrillated cellulose and new nanocomposite materials: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siró, Istvan; Plackett, David

    2010-01-01

    continuing research and are commercially interesting in terms of new products from the pulp and paper industry and the agricultural sector. Cellulose nanofibers can be extracted from various plant sources and, although the mechanical separation of plant fibers into smaller elementary constituents has......Due to their abundance, high strength and stiffness, low weight and biodegradability, nano-scale cellulose fiber materials (e.g., microfibrillated cellulose and bacterial cellulose) serve as promising candidates for bio-nanocomposite production. Such new high-value materials are the subject of...... typically required high energy input, chemical and/or enzymatic fiber pre-treatments have been developed to overcome this problem. A challenge associated with using nanocellulose in composites is the lack of compatibility with hydrophobic polymers and various chemical modification methods have been explored...

  1. Macromolecular organization of xyloglucan and cellulose in pea epicotyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xyloglucan is known to occur widely in the primary cell walls of higher plants. This polysaccharide in most dicots possesses a cellulose-like main chain with three of every four consecutive residues substituted with xylose and minor addition of other sugars. Xyloglucan and cellulose metabolism is regulated by different processes; since different enzyme systems are probably required for the synthesis of their 1,4-β-linkages. A macromolecular complex composed of xyloglucan and cellulose only was obtained from elongating regions of etiolated pea stems. It was examined by light microscopy using iodine staining, by radioautography after labeling with [3H]fructose, by fluorescence microscopy using a fluorescein-lectin (fructose-binding) as probe, and by electron microscopy after shadowing. The techniques all demonstrated that the macromolecule was present in files of cell shapes, referred to here as cell-wall ghosts, in which xyloglucan was localized both on and between the cellulose microfibrils

  2. Optimization of cellulose materials radiolysis and enzyme hydrolysis in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of dose rate (0.71 kGy/h to 5.43 kGy/h) on the degree of cellulose polymerization irradiated with a dose of 300 kGy was followed. It was inexpressive. The study of the post effect manifesting itself as a reduction in the degree of cellulose polymerization irradiated with 100 kGy was conducted. In dried cellulose after 56 days as much as 30% decline in polymerization was found, in cellulose not dried after 112 days 11% decline in polymerization was found. The optimum mass ratio substrate - enzyme solution for wheat straw hydrolysis (1:5) was found. Hydrolysis of wheat straw irradiated with a dose of 1 MGy yielded these results: the capacity of resulted sugars in substrate 35.6%; sugars concentration in reactive mixture 60 mg/ml. (author)

  3. Cellulosic Fibers: Effect of Processing on Fiber Bundle Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Madsen, Bo; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Lilholt, Hans

    2011-01-01

    A range of differently processed cellulosic fibers from flax and hemp plants were investigated to study the relation between processing of cellulosic fibers and fiber bundle strength. The studied processing methods are applied for yarn production and include retting, scutching, carding, and...... cottonization. There was a monotonically decreasing relationship between the strength and the number of processing steps, which was well fitted by an exponential regression line. The reduction factor was determined to be 0.27, indicating that the fiber bundle strength was on average reduced by 27% per...... processing step at the applied conditions. No large changes in cellulose content and crystallinity were observed, so the reduction in strength must be explained by other changes in the fiber ultrastructure. Altogether, the study presents a quantitative basis for reduction in strength of cellulosic fibers due...

  4. Direct microwave-assisted hydrothermal depolymerization of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiajun; De bruyn, Mario; Budarin, Vitaliy L; Gronnow, Mark J; Shuttleworth, Peter S; Breeden, Simon; Macquarrie, Duncan J; Clark, James H

    2013-08-14

    A systematic investigation of the interaction of microwave irradiation with microcrystalline cellulose has been carried out, covering a broad temperature range (150 → 270 °C). A variety of analytical techniques (e.g., HPLC, (13)C NMR, FTIR, CHN analysis, hydrogen-deuterium exchange) allowed for the analysis of the obtained liquid and solid products. Based on these results a mechanism of cellulose interaction with microwaves is proposed. Thereby the degree of freedom of the cellulose enclosed CH2OH groups was found to be crucial. This mechanism allows for the explanation of the different experimental observations such as high efficiency of microwave treatment; the dependence of the selectivity/yield of glucose on the applied microwave density; the observed high glucose to HMF ratio; and the influence of the degree of cellulose crystallinity on the results of the hydrolysis process. The highest selectivity toward glucose was found to be ~75% while the highest glucose yield obtained was 21%. PMID:23895516

  5. Preparation and characterization of gelatin scaffold containing microorganism fermented cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Youn Mook; Gwon, Hui Jeong; Park, Jong Seok; Nho, Young Chang; Lee, Byeong Heon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Yeong; Lee, Jong Dae; Song, Sung Gi [Quegenbiotech, Co., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Cellulose, chitin, chitosan and hyaluronic acid are well known as polysaccharides. These polysaccharides have many effects on cell growth and differentiation. Cell activation increases with increasing the polysaccharides concentration. In this study, gelatin scaffold containing microorganism fermented cellulose, citrus gel were prepared by using irradiation technique. Physical properties of the scaffolds were investigated as a function of the concentrations of gelatin and citrus gel and the cell attachment, cell morphology and inflammation of the scaffolds also were characterized for regeneration of skin tissue.

  6. Experimental Evolution of Trichoderma citrinoviride for Faster Deconstruction of Cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hui; Travisano, Michael; Kazlauskas, Romas J.

    2016-01-01

    Engineering faster cellulose deconstruction is difficult because it is a complex, cooperative, multi-enzyme process. Here we use experimental evolution to select for populations of Trichoderma citrinoviride that deconstruct up to five-fold more cellulose. Ten replicate populations of T. citrinoviride were selected for growth on filter paper by serial culture. After 125 periods of growth and transfer to fresh media, the filter paper deconstruction increased an average of 2.5 fold. Two populati...

  7. Self-supported silver nanoparticles containing bacterial cellulose membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrated bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes obtained from cultures of Acetobacter xylinum were used in the preparation of silver nanoparticles containing cellulose membranes. In situ preparation of Ag nanoparticles was achieved from the hydrolytic decomposition of silver triethanolamine (TEA) complexes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic silver particles with mean diameter of 8 nm well adsorbed onto the BC fibriles

  8. Evaluating Models of Cellulose Degradation by Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    OpenAIRE

    Burnet, Meagan C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Neumann, Anthony P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Suen, Garret; Callister, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 is an anaerobic non-cellulosome utilizing cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from the cow rumen microbial community. Efforts to elucidate its cellulolytic machinery have resulted in the proposal of numerous models which involve cell-surface attachment via a combination of cellulose-binding fibro-slime proteins and pili, the production of cellulolytic vesicles, and the entry of cellulose fibers into the periplasmic space. Here, we used a combination of RNA-...

  9. Self-supported silver nanoparticles containing bacterial cellulose membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barud, Hernane S.; Barrios, Celina; Regiani, Thais; Marques, Rodrigo F.C. [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil); Verelst, Marc; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales, CEMES, UPR No. 8011 - Universite Toulouse III, B.P. 94347, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Messaddeq, Younes [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Institute of Chemistry-UNESP, CP 355, Zip 14801-970, Araraquara, SP, 14801-970 (Brazil)], E-mail: sidney@iq.unesp.br

    2008-05-01

    Hydrated bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes obtained from cultures of Acetobacter xylinum were used in the preparation of silver nanoparticles containing cellulose membranes. In situ preparation of Ag nanoparticles was achieved from the hydrolytic decomposition of silver triethanolamine (TEA) complexes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns both lead to the observation of spherical metallic silver particles with mean diameter of 8 nm well adsorbed onto the BC fibriles.

  10. Functionalization of cellulose acetate fibers with engineered cutinases

    OpenAIRE

    Matamá, Maria Teresa; Araújo, Rita; Gübitz, Georg M.; Casal, Margarida; Paulo, Artur Cavaco

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we describe for the first time the specific role of cutinase on surface modification of cellulose acetate fibers. Cutinase exhibits acetyl esterase activity on diacetate and triacetate of 0.010 U and 0.007 U, respectively. An increase on the hydroxyl groups at the fiber surface of 25% for diacetate and 317% for triacetate, after a 24 h treatment, is estimated by an indirect assay. Aiming at further improvement of cutinase affinity toward cellulose acetate, chimeric cutina...

  11. How cellulose stretches: synergism between covalent and hydrogen bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Altaner, Clemens M.; Thomas, Lynne H.; Fernandes, Anwesha N; Jarvis, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose is the most familiar and most abundant strong biopolymer, but the reasons for its outstanding mechanical performance are not well understood. Each glucose unit in a cellulose chain is joined to the next by a covalent C–O–C linkage flanked by two hydrogen bonds. This geometry suggests some form of cooperativity between covalent and hydrogen bonding. Using infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we show that mechanical tension straightens out the zigzag conformation of the cellul...

  12. Production of bacterial cellulose and enzyme from waste fiber sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Cavka, Adnan; Guo, Xiang; Tang, Shui-Jia; Winestrand, Sandra; Jönsson, Leif J.; Hong, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a highly crystalline and mechanically stable nanopolymer, which has excellent potential as a material in many novel applications, especially if it can be produced in large amounts from an inexpensive feedstock. Waste fiber sludge, a residue with little or no value, originates from pulp mills and lignocellulosic biorefineries. A high cellulose and low lignin content contributes to making the fiber sludge suitable for bioconversion, even without a thermoc...

  13. Cellulose digestion in heterotmes indicola, Wasmann and Coptotermes HIEMI Wasmann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Misra

    1960-07-01

    Full Text Available High activities of cellulose and cellobiase have been found in the gut extracts of the worker caste of two species of Heterotermes indicola, Wasmann and Coptotermes heimi, Wasmann. The properties of the two enzymes from H. Indicola have been investigated. It has been found that the soldier caste of these termites is capable of splitting cellobiose while incapable of breaking down cellulose into simpler sugars.

  14. Cellulose based transition metal nano-composites : structuring and development

    OpenAIRE

    Glatzel, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. In this work it has been used, in various forms ranging from wood to fully processed laboratory grade microcrystalline cellulose, to synthesise a variety of metal and metal carbide nanoparticles and to establish structuring and patterning methodologies that produce highly functional nano-hybrids. To achieve this, the mechanisms governing the catalytic processes that bring about graphitised carbons in the presence of iron have been investigat...

  15. Chemical Compounds Recovery in Carboxymethyl Cellulose Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    P.-H. Rao; W.-Q. Zhang; Yao, W.; A.-Y. Zhu; J.-L. Xia; Y.-F. Tan; T.-Z. Liu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) is a kind of cellulose ether widely used in industrial production. CMC wastewater usually have high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and salinity (>10 %), which result from organic and inorganic by-products during CMC production. It is significant that the wastewater is pretreated to decrease salinity and recover valuable organics before biochemical methods are employed. In this paper, distillation-extraction method was used to pretreat CMC wastewater and recover val...

  16. Adsorption studies on cellulose surfaces by combinations of interfacial techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Eronen, Paula

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the adsorption of various polymers on cellulose surfaces was studied in detail at molecular level. Special attention was paid on the interactions between renewable polysaccharides and different nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) grades. Polymer or nanoparticle adsorption in aqueous medium was explored as a strategy to functionalize NFC. The role of pulp raw material and chemical pre-treatment on the NFC properties was clarified via indirect adsorption studies with ultrathin NFC fil...

  17. Cellulose nanorods in liquid crystalline elastomers for improved actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Pontes, Rita Valério

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays a central role in ‘tailoring’ materials’ properties and thus improving its performances for a wide range of applications. Coupling nature nano-objects with nanotechnology results in materials with enhanced functionalities. The main objective of this master thesis was the synthesis of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCCs) and its further incorporation in a cellulosic matrix, in order to produce a stimuli-responsive material to moisture. The induced behaviour (bending/unbendi...

  18. Chemical Modification of Microfibrillated Cellulose: Effects on Film Barrier Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rodionova, Galina

    2011-01-01

    A global demand for environmental sustainability is a strong driving force towards the development of enhanced barrier concepts and the use of new materials, especially for packaging applications. Abundant and renewable, cellulosic fibers have been widely used as one of the main constituents in the fiber-based packaging. However, the porous and hydrophilic structure of cellulose network requires the use of barrier polymer coatings to create an additional resistance against water, water vapors...

  19. Cellulose fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites: Processing and Product Charateristics

    OpenAIRE

    Razaina Mat TAIB

    1998-01-01

    Cellulose Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites: Process and Product Characterization Razaina Mat Taib ( Abstract ) Steam exploded fibers from Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood were assessed in terms of (a) their impact on torque during melt processing of a thermoplastic cellulose ester (plasticized CAB); (b) their fiber incorporation and dispersion characteristics in a CAB-based composite by SEM and image analysis, respectively; and (c) their impact on the me...

  20. Viscosity sinergism of hydrozypropmethyl and carboxy methyl cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Katona Jaroslav M.; Sovilj Verica J.; Petrović Lidija B.

    2008-01-01

    Rheology modifiers are common constituents of food, cosmetic and pharmaceutic products. Often, by using two or more of them, better control of the product rheological properties can be achieved. In this work, rheological properties of hydroxypropymethyl cellulose (HPMC) and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) solutions of different concentrations were investigated and compared to the flow properties of 1% HPMC/NaCMC binary mixtures at various HPMC/NaCMC mass ratios. Solutions of HPMC and N...

  1. Electrospun nanosized cellulose fibers using ionic liquids at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, Mara G.; Teles, Ana Rita R.; Ferreira, Rute A. S.; Carlos, Luís D.; José A. Lopes-da-Silva; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at replacing the noxious solvents commonly employed, ionic-liquid-based solvents have been recently explored as novel non-volatile and non-flammable media for the electrospinning of polymers. In this work, nanosized and biodegradable cellulose fibers were obtained by electrospinning at room temperature using a pure ionic liquid or a binary mixture of two selected ionic liquids. The electrospinning of 8 wt% cellulose in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate medium (a low viscosity and roo...

  2. FRACTIONATION OF HYDROLYZED MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE BY ULTRAFILTRATION MEMBRANE

    OpenAIRE

    NGUYEN HUYNH THAO THY; RAJESH NITHYANANDAM

    2016-01-01

    Bioethanol process using cellulosic materials have been emerging an interesting field with a high potential of replacing petroleum-based fuel, as a future alternative. This work emphasised on improvement of enzymatic hydrolysis of alkaline NaOH-pretreated cellulose by applying an ultrafiltration membrane 10 kDa cutoff in order to minimise sugar inhibition on enzymes, reuse enzyme in hydrolysis and recover sugar for the subsequent fermentation. An improvement in the methodology of the enzymati...

  3. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    OpenAIRE

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis ...

  4. Novel transparent nanocomposite films based on chitosan and bacterial cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Susana C. M.; Oliveira, Lúcia; Freire, Carmen S. R.; Silvestre, Armando J. D.; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Gandini, Alessandro; Desbriéres, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    New nanocomposite films based on different chitosan matrices (two chitosans with different DPs and one water soluble derivative) and bacterial cellulose were prepared by a fully green procedure by casting a water based suspension of chitosan and bacterial cellulose nanofibrils. The films were characterized by several techniques, namely SEM, AFM, X-ray diffraction, TGA, tensile assays and visible spectroscopy. They were highly transparent, flexible and displayed better mechanical properties th...

  5. Morphological and Thermal Properties of Cellulose Nanofibrils Reinforced Epoxy Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Aydemir

    2015-01-01

    Epoxy resins have gained attention as important adhesives because they are structurally stable, inert to most chemicals, and highly resistant to oxidation. Different particles can be added to adhesives to improve their properties. In this study, cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), which have superior mechanical properties, were used as the reinforcing agent. Cellulose nanofi brils were added to epoxy in quantities of 1 %, 2 % and 3 % by weight to prepare nanocomposites. Morphological characterizati...

  6. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Pircher, N.; Veigel, S.; Aigner, N; Nedelec, J. M.; Rosenau, T.; Liebner, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating...

  7. Application of Molecular Techniques to Elucidate the Influence of Cellulosic Waste on the Bacterial Community Structure at a Simulated Low-Level-Radioactive-Waste Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-level radioactive waste sites, including those at various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, frequently contain cellulosic waste in the form of paper towels, cardboard boxes, or wood contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides such as chromium and uranium. To understand how the soil microbial community is influenced by the presence of cellulosic waste products, multiple soil samples were obtained from a non-radioactive model low-level waste test pit at the Idaho National Laboratory. Samples were analyzed using 16S rDNA clone libraries and 16S rRNA gene microarray (PhyloChip) analyses. Both the clone library and PhyloChip results revealed changes in the bacterial community structure with depth. In all samples, the PhyloChip detected significantly more unique Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), and therefore more relative diversity, than the clone libraries. Calculated diversity indices suggest that diversity is lowest in the Fill (F) and Fill Waste (FW) layers and greater in the Wood Waste (WW) and Waste Clay (WC) layers. Principal coordinates analysis and lineage specific analysis determined that Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria phyla account for most of the significant differences observed between the layers. The decreased diversity in the FW layer and increased members of families containing known cellulose degrading microorganisms suggests the FW layer is an enrichment environment for cellulose degradation. Overall, these results suggest that the presence of the cellulosic material significantly influences the bacterial community structure in a stratified soil system.

  8. BcsA and BcsB form the catalytically active core of bacterial cellulose synthase sufficient for in vitro cellulose synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Omadjela, Okako; Narahari, Adishesh; Strumillo, Joanna; Mélida, Hugo; Mazur, Olga; Bulone, Vincent; Zimmer, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, primarily formed by vascular plants, but also by some bacteria. Bacterial extracellular polysaccharides, such as cellulose and alginate, are an important component of biofilms, which are multicellular, usually sessile, aggregates of bacteria. Biofilms exhibit a greater resistance to antimicrobial treatments compared with isolated bacteria and thus are a particular concern to human health. Cellulose synthases synthesize cellulose by polymeriz...

  9. Electron beam processing of sugar cane bagasse to cellulose hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarcane bagasse has been considered as a substrate for single cell protein, animal feed, and renewable energy production. Sugarcane bagasse generally contain up to 45% glucose polymer cellulose, 40% hemicelluloses, and 20% lignin. Pure cellulose is readily depolymerised by radiation, but in biomass, the cellulose is intimately bonded with lignin, that protect it from radiation effects. The objective of this study is the evaluation of the electron beam irradiation as a pre-treatment to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in order to facilitate its fermentation and improves the production of ethanol biofuel. Samples of sugarcane bagasse were obtained in sugar/ethanol Iracema Mill sited in Piracicaba, Brazil, and were irradiated using Radiation Dynamics Electron Beam Accelerator with 1.5 MeV energy and 37kW, in batch systems. The applied absorbed doses of the fist sampling, Bagasse A, were 20 kGy, 50 kGy, 100 kGy and 200 kGy. After the evaluation the preliminary obtained results, it was applied lower absorbed doses in the second assay: 5 kGy, 10 kGy, 20 kGy, 30 kGy, 50 kGy, 70 kGy, 100 kGy and 150 kGy. The electron beam processing took to changes in the sugarcane bagasse structure and composition, lignin and cellulose cleavage. The yield of enzymatic hydrolyzes of cellulose increase about 40 % with 30 kGy of absorbed dose. (author)

  10. Continous monitoring of cellulase action on microcrystalline cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, S.M.; Wood, P.M. (Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1992-09-01

    Cellobiose oxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used for continuous monitoring of cellulase action on microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). Two protocols are described, the parameter monitored being either the decline in electrode potential as ferricyanide is reduced or consumption of dioxygen. Most experiments used a commercial cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei and ferricyanide as acceptor. Within 1 min of an addition of cellulase, ferricyanide reduction reached a steady rate. This was converted into a rate of production of substrate for cellobiose oxidase, in [mu]mol.min[sup -1]. Experiments were conducted either with a constant concentration of cellulase and increasing Avicel, or with constant Avicel and increasing cellulase. Kinetic analysis of the experiments with constant cellulase indicated a K[sub m] of 4.8 [+-] 1.0 (g cellulose).1[sup -1], which was close to the value predicted from binding studies. The specific activity of the cellulase was measured as 375 [+-] 25 [mu]mol.(g cellulase)[sup -1].min[sup -1] in experiments with a high cellulose concentration, but was less than half this value when the cellulose was saturated with cellulase. The maximal rate of cellulose degradation was 9.6 [+-] 1.3 [mu]mol.(g cellulose)[sup -1].min[sup -1]. (orig.).

  11. Chemical and cellulose crystallite changes in Pinus radiata during torrefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact on the chemical composition and changes to the cellulose crystallites in Pinus radiata wood chips under light (ca. 230 °C), mild (ca. 260 °C), and severe (290+ °C) torrefaction temperatures at a range of times was examined by solid state 13C CP-MAS and Dipolar Dephased NMR spectroscopy, TGA, and synchrotron based X-ray diffraction. Results indicated the decomposition of hemicelluloses into furfurals at the lowest temperature with little modification to the lignin or cellulose. De-polymerisation of lignin and cellulose was observed as torrefaction severity increased. The increased hydrophobicity under light and mild torrefaction severity was attributed to a combination of thermo-chemical modifications to hemicelluloses and lignin, along with cellulose crystal lattice changes. The observed decrease in hydrophobicity under severe torrefaction conditions was attributed to the degradation of cellulose crystallites. -- Highlights: •It was shown that the torrefaction process has an optimum temperature – time regime with respect to increased hydrophobicity. •Changes to the proportion of ether linkages in lignin after torrefaction were determined by solid state NMR. •Changes to cellulose crystallites after torrefaction were determined by X-ray diffraction. •We relate the hydrophobicity of torrefied wood to changes in wood polymer interactions

  12. Observing cellulose biosynthesis and membrane translocation in crystallo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jacob L W; McNamara, Joshua T; Fischer, Michael; Rich, Jamie; Chen, Hong-Ming; Withers, Stephen G; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-03-17

    Many biopolymers, including polysaccharides, must be translocated across at least one membrane to reach their site of biological function. Cellulose is a linear glucose polymer synthesized and secreted by a membrane-integrated cellulose synthase. Here, in crystallo enzymology with the catalytically active bacterial cellulose synthase BcsA-BcsB complex reveals structural snapshots of a complete cellulose biosynthesis cycle, from substrate binding to polymer translocation. Substrate- and product-bound structures of BcsA provide the basis for substrate recognition and demonstrate the stepwise elongation of cellulose. Furthermore, the structural snapshots show that BcsA translocates cellulose via a ratcheting mechanism involving a 'finger helix' that contacts the polymer's terminal glucose. Cooperating with BcsA's gating loop, the finger helix moves 'up' and 'down' in response to substrate binding and polymer elongation, respectively, thereby pushing the elongated polymer into BcsA's transmembrane channel. This mechanism is validated experimentally by tethering BcsA's finger helix, which inhibits polymer translocation but not elongation. PMID:26958837

  13. The Cellulose System in the Cell Wall of Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim; Herth; Vuong; Chanzy

    1996-11-01

    The cellulose system of the cell wall of Micrasterias denticulata and Micrasterias rotata was analyzed by diffraction contrast transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and X-ray analysis. The studies, achieved on disencrusted cell ghosts, confirmed that the cellulose microfibrils occurred in crisscrossed bands consisting of a number of parallel ribbon-like microfibrils. The individual microfibrils had thicknesses of 5 nm for a width of around 20 nm, but in some instances, two or three microfibrils merged into one another to yield larger monocrystalline domains reaching up to 60 nm in lateral size. The orientation of the cellulose of Micrasterias is very unusual, as it was found that in the cell wall, the equatorial crystallographic planes of cellulose having a d-spacing of 0.60 nm [(11;0) in the Ibeta cellulose unit cell defined by Sugiyama et al., 1991, Macromolecules 24, 4168-4175] were oriented perpendicular to the cell wall surface. Up to now, such orientation has been found only in Spirogyra, another member of the Zygnemataceae group. The unusual structure of the secondary wall cellulose of Micrasterias may be tentatively correlated with the unique organization of the terminal complexes, which in this alga occur as hexagonal arrays of rosettes. PMID:8986649

  14. Hairy cellulose nanocrystalloids: a novel class of nanocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Theo G M; Sheikhi, Amir

    2016-08-18

    Nanomaterials have secured such a promising role in today's life that imagining the modern world without them is almost impossible. A large fraction of nanomaterials is synthesized from environmentally-dangerous elements such as heavy metals, which have posed serious side-effects to ecosystems. Despite numerous advantages of synthetic nanomaterials, issues such as renewability, sustainability, biocompatibility, and cost efficiency have drawn significant attention towards natural products such as cellulose-based nanomaterials. Within the past decade, nanocelluloses, most remarkably nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), have successfully been used for a wide spectrum of applications spanning from nanocomposites, packaging, and mechanical and rheological property modifications, to chemical catalysis and organic templating. Yet, there has been little effort to introduce fundamentally new polysaccharide-based nanomaterials. We have been able to develop the first kind of cellulose-based nanoparticles bearing both crystalline and amorphous regions. These nanoparticles comprise a crystalline body, similar to conventional NCC, but with polymer chains protruding from both ends; therefore, these particles are called hairy cellulose nanocrystalloids (HCNC). In this article, we touch on the philosophy of HCNC synthesis, the striking superiority over existing nanocelluloses, and applications of this novel class of nanocelluloses. We hope that the emergence of hairy cellulose nanocrystalloids extends the frontiers of sustainable, green nanotechnology. PMID:27453347

  15. Mechanics of Cellulose Synthase Complexes in Living Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehfroosh, Nina; Liu, Derui; Ramos, Kieran P.; Yang, Xiaoli; Goldner, Lori S.; Baskin, Tobias I.

    The polymer cellulose is one of the major components of the world's biomass with unique and fascinating characteristics such as its high tensile strength, renewability, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. Because of these distinctive aspects, cellulose has been the subject of enormous scientific and industrial interest, yet there are still fundamental open questions about cellulose biosynthesis. Cellulose is synthesized by a complex of transmembrane proteins called ``Cellulose Synthase A'' (CESA) in the plasma membrane. Studying the dynamics and kinematics of the CESA complex will help reveal the mechanism of cellulose synthesis and permit the development and validation of models of CESA motility. To understand what drives these complexes through the cell membrane, we used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and variable angle epi-fluorescence microscopy to track individual, fluorescently-labeled CESA complexes as they move in the hypocotyl and root of living plants. A mean square displacement analysis will be applied to distinguish ballistic, diffusional, and other forms of motion. We report on the results of these tracking experiments. This work was funded by NSF/PHY-1205989.

  16. Microbial Cellulose Production from Bacteria Isolated from Rotten Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Rangaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cellulose, an exopolysaccharide produced by bacteria, has unique structural and mechanical properties and is highly pure compared to plant cellulose. Present study represents isolation, identification, and screening of cellulose producing bacteria and further process optimization. Isolation of thirty cellulose producers was carried out from natural sources like rotten fruits and rotten vegetables. The bacterial isolates obtained from rotten pomegranate, rotten sweet potato, and rotten potato were identified as Gluconacetobacter sp. RV28, Enterobacter sp. RV11, and Pseudomonas sp. RV14 through morphological and biochemical analysis. Optimization studies were conducted for process parameters like inoculum density, temperature, pH, agitation, and carbon and nitrogen sources using Gluconacetobacter sp. RV28. The strain produced 4.7 g/L of cellulose at optimum growth conditions of temperature (30°C, pH (6.0, sucrose (2%, peptone (0.5%, and inoculum density (5%. Characterization of microbial cellulose was done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM.

  17. Water-repellent cellulose fiber networks with multifunctional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S; Fragouli, Despina; Attanasio, Agnese; Sorce, Barbara; Bertoni, Giovanni; Brescia, Rosaria; Di Corato, Riccardo; Pellegrino, Teresa; Kalyva, Maria; Sabella, Stefania; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate a simple but highly efficient technique to introduce multifunctional properties to cellulose fiber networks by wetting them with ethyl-cyanoacrylate monomer solutions containing various suspended organic submicrometer particles or inorganic nanoparticles. Solutions can be applied on cellulosic surfaces by simple solution casting techniques or by dip coating, both being suitable for large area applications. Immediately after solvent evaporation, ethyl-cyanoacrylate starts cross-linking around cellulose fibers under ambient conditions because of naturally occurring surface hydroxyl groups and adsorbed moisture, encapsulating them with a hydrophobic polymer shell. Furthermore, by dispersing various functional particles in the monomer solutions, hydrophobic ethyl-cyanoacrylate nanocomposites with desired functionalities can be formed around the cellulose fibers. To exhibit the versatility of the method, cellulose sheets were functionalized with different ethyl-cyanoacrylate nanocomposite shells comprising submicrometer wax or polytetrafluoroethylene particles for superhydophobicity, MnFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles for magnetic activity, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots for light emission, and silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial activity. Morphological and functional properties of each system have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, detailed contact angle measurements, light emission spectra and E. coli bacterial growth measurements. A plethora of potential applications can be envisioned for this technique, such as food and industrial packaging, document protection, catalytic cellulosic membranes, textronic (electrofunctional textiles), electromagnetic devices, authentication of valuable documents, and antimicrobial wound healing products to name a few. PMID:21902239

  18. A single molecule study of cellulase hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-San; Luo, Yonghua; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Smith, Steve; Ding, Shi-You

    2010-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I), a processive exoglucanase secreted by Trichoderma reesei, is one of the key enzyme components in a commercial cellulase mixture currently used for processing biomass to biofuels. CBH I contains a family 7 glycoside hydrolase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), and a highlyglycosylated linker peptide. It has been proposed that the CBH I cellulase initiates the hydrolysis from the reducing end of one cellulose chain and successively cleaves alternate β-1,4-glycosidic bonds to release cellobiose as its principal end product. The role each module of CBH I plays in the processive hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose has yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, we use a single-molecule approach that combines optical (Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy, or TIRF-M) and non-optical (Atomic Force Microscopy, or AFM) imaging techniques to analyze the molecular motion of CBM tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBM and CBH I. The preliminary results have revealed a confined nanometer-scale movement of the TrCBM1-GFP bound to cellulose, and decreases in cellulose crystal size as well as increases in surface roughness during CBH I hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  19. Structure and dynamics of a complex of cellulose with EDA: insights into the action of amines on cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Daisuke [ORNL; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS); Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Parthasarathi, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University; Wada, Masahisa [University of Tokyo, Japan; Langan, Paul [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The neutron structure of a complex of EDA with cellulose has been determined to reveal the location of hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen bonding. EDA disrupts the hydrogen bonding pattern of naturally occurring cellulose by accepting a strong hydrogen bond from the O6 hydroxymethyl group as the conformation of this group is rotated from tg to gt. The O3-H O5 intrachain hydrogen bond commonly found in cellulose allomorphs is observed to be disordered in the neutron structure, and quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations show that O3 prefers to donate to EDA. The hydrogen bonding arrangement is highly dynamic with bonds continually being formed and broken thus explaining the difficulty in locating all of the hydrogen atoms in the neutron scattering density maps. Comparison with other polysaccharide-amine complexes supports a common underlying mechanism for amine disruption of cellulose.

  20. Screening of the effective cellulose-degradable strain and its application in the production of cellulose bioethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Strains from the cellulose-containing environment were collected. Primary screening(by filter-paper Hutchison solid culture medium and sodium carboxymethylcellulose solid culture medium) and reelection(by filter-paper inorganic salt culture medium and sodium carboxymethylcellulose Congo red culture medium) indicated that five strains obtained were best suited for high performance cellulose degradation. Determination of sodium carboxymethylcellulose activity(CMCA) and filter paper activity(FPA) was accomplis...

  1. Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

  2. Cellulose-Based Membranes for Solutes Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokhina, T. S.; Yushkin, A. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Antonov, S. V.; Volkov, A. V.

    This work was focused on investigation of industrial cellophane film as a membrane material for solvent nanofiltration. The effect of conditioning of cellophane membranes by stepwise changing of composition of ethanol-water binary mixtures (from ethanol to water and from water to ethanol) was studied. It was shown that such treatment leads to an increase of ethanol permeability more than two orders of magnitude over initial untreated film samples. Treated cellophane membranes possess the ethanol permeability coefficient comparable with the values for highly permeability glassy polymers. Investigation of cellophane swelling in water ethanol solutions allowed to conclude that during the treatment formation of porous in the film takes place due to increase of inter chain distances. Observed high ethanol permeability connected with the fact that formed porous structure remains after the replacement of water with ethanol. Also it was shown that rejection coefficients of a number of dyes (MW 350) were in good agreement with the degree of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and ability of the solvent to form hydrogen bonding with the solute molecules. It was demonstrated that cellulose-based membranes can be complimentary for other type of the membranes in fractionation of multi-components solutions.

  3. Nanocrystalline cellulose for covert optical encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Ping; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Kirk, Andrew G.; Andrews, Mark P.

    2012-02-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose solid films derived from spruce pulp exhibit iridescence when cast from chiral nematic aqueous phase suspensions of the nanocrystals. Iridescence is a color travel phenomenon that might have potential for overt encryption as an anti-counterfeiting measure. The iridescent phase also offers an intrinsic level of covert encryption by virtue of the fact that films of NCC reflect left-circularly polarized light. Addition of TINOPAL, an optical brightening agent (OBA), adds a third level of (covert) encryption potential since the chromophore exhibits strong fluorescence when excited at ultra-violet wavelengths. The overall result is a selectively polarizing fluorescent iridescent film. We study the impact of additions of OBA on NCC iridescence, optical activity, and physical structure variation with polarized optical microscopy, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and zeta potential analysis. Increasing OBA additions increase the chiral nematic pitch of NCC films, and this in turn alters chiral nematic domain structure in the solid film. Under low concentration conditions defined by our experiments, OBA yields intense UV fluorescence, without compromising the visible light iridescent properties of the film. The potential security offered by NCC and its optical responses can be authenticated using a UV light source such as is commonly used for banknote verification, a circular polarizer in conjunction with an iridescent feature which can be verified by the eye or by chiral spectrometry.

  4. Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuzens, J.E.

    1997-11-19

    The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

  5. Antibacterial paperboard packaging using microfibrillated cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoine, Nathalie; Desloges, Isabelle; Manship, Brigitte; Bras, Julien

    2015-09-01

    The industry and consumers are focusing more and more on the development of biodegradable and lightweight food-packaging materials, which could better preserve the quality of the food and improve its shelf-life. In an attempt to meet these requirements, this study presents a novel bio-substrate able to contain active bio-molecules for future food-packaging applications. Based on a paperboard substrate, the development of an antibacterial bio-packaging material is, therein, achieved using a chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) solution as a model of an antibacterial molecule, mixed with microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and used as coating onto paperboard samples. AFM and FE-SEM analyses were performed to underline the nanoporous MFC network able to trap and to progressively release the CHX molecules. The release study of CHX was conducted in an aqueous medium and showed a lower proportion (20 %) of CHX released when using MFC. This led to the constant release of low amounts of CHX over 40 h. Antibacterial tests were carried out to assess the preservation of the antibacterial activity of the samples after the release studies. Samples remained active against Bacillus subtilis, with better results being obtained when MFC was used. The preservation of the quality of a model food was finally evaluated paving the way for future promising applications in the food packaging industry. PMID:26344972

  6. Grafted cellulose for PAHs removal present in industrial discharge waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euvrard, Elise; Druart, Coline; Poupeney, Amandine; Crini, Nadia; Vismara, Elena; Lanza, Tommaso; Torri, Giangiacomo; Gavoille, Sophie; Crini, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Keywords: cellulose; biosorbent; PAHs; polycontaminated wastewaters; trace levels. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chemicals essentially formed during incomplete combustion of organic materials from anthropogenic activities, were present in all compartments of the ecosystem, air, water and soil. Notably, a part of PAHs found in aquatic system was introduced through industrial discharge waters. Since the Water Framework Directive has classified certain PAHs as priority hazardous substances, industrials are called to take account this kind of organic pollutants in their global environmental concern. Conventional materials such as activated carbons definitively proved their worth as finishing treatment systems but remained costly. In this study, we proposed to use cellulose grafted with glycidyl methacrylate [1] for the removal of PAHs present in discharge waters of surface treatment industries. Firstly, to develop the device, we worked with synthetic solutions containing 16 PAHs at 500 ng/L. Two types of grafted cellulose were tested over a closed-loop column with a concentration of 4g cellulose/L: cellulose C2 with a hydroxide group and cellulose C4 with an amine group. No PAH was retained by the raw cellulose whereas abatement percentages of PAHs were similar between C2 and C4 (94% and 98%, respectively, for the sum of the 16 PAHs) with an experiment duration of 400 min (corresponding to about 20 cycles through grafted cellulose). Secondly, to determine the shorter time to abate the amount maximum of PAHs through the system, a kinetic was realized from 20 min (one cycle) to 400 min with C4. The steady state (corresponding to about 95% of abatement of the total PAHs) was reached at 160 min. Finally, the system was then tested with real industrial discharge waters containing both mineral and organic compounds. The results indicated that the abatement percentage of PAHs was similar between C2 and C4, corroborating the tests with synthetic solution. In return

  7. Unfolding type gastroretentive film of Cinnarizine based on ethyl cellulose and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shakuntla; Nagpal, Kalpana; Singh, S K; Mishra, D N

    2014-03-01

    The present work was based on the development and characterization of unfolding type gastro retentive dosage form appropriate for controlled release of Cinnarizine (CNZ), a drug with narrow therapeutic window. The drug loaded polymer film of biological macromolecules, i.e., ethyl cellulose (EC) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC K15) was folded into hard gelatin capsules. The film was folded in different patterns for characterizing their unfolding behavior. The polymeric film revealed a fast release during the first hour followed by a more gradual drug release during a 12-h period following a non-Fickian diffusion process. Tensile strength of polymeric film was optimized using different amount (0.2-0.7 ml) of polyethylene glycol (PEG 400). Various physical parameters were studied for evaluating their performance as a gastroretentive dosage form. Drug and polymers were found to be compatible as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study and scanning electron micrograph (SEM) study revealed uniform dispersion of CNZ in polymeric matrices. The results indicate that unfolding type gastro retentive drug delivery system holds lots of potential for drug having stability problems in alkaline pH or are which mainly absorbed in acidic pH. PMID:24370473

  8. Characterization of microcrystalline cellulose and silicified microcrystalline cellulose wet masses using a powder rheometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, P; Schaefer, T; Podczeck, F; Newton, M; Hellén, L; Yliruusi, J

    2001-05-01

    A powder rheometer has been used to study the properties of wet powder masses and the results have been compared to the mixer torque rheometer (MTR). Two different microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) grades (Avicel and Emcocel) and silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC, Prosolv) were used as model powders. The wet massing behaviour of one material (Prosolv) was studied by the powder rheometer using liquid addition experiments, while the rheological properties of wet granules were studied using both the powder rheometer and the MTR. In water addition measurements the torque behaved in a similar way to MTR measurements and the maximum value of ZTL (zero torque limit) was achieved at the capillary state of wet mass. The wet granules exhibited different behaviour in the powder rheometer and the MTR experiments, which indicates that these rheometers involve different shear forces or they measure different properties of the wet granules. Emcocel wet masses achieved the capillary state at lower liquid amount than Avicel and Prosolv masses, which indicates that Emcocel is not able to hold as much water in the internal structure as Avicel and Prosolv. The powder rheometer proved to be a sensitive piece of equipment, which can be used to study both dry and wet powder masses. It was able to distinguish wet granules from wet powder masses after liquid addition, whereas the MTR could not. However, before the powder rheometer can be properly utilised in wet powder mass studies, the problem of torque overload requires resolution. PMID:11297898

  9. Effects of microcrystalline cellulose on functional properties of hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose microcomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, N; McHugh, T H

    2007-01-01

    Edible films and coatings in foods can be used to increase shelf-life and improve organoleptic characteristics of foods by avoiding deterioration of food components and therefore promoting preservation of the final product. This study is the first to investigate the use of different size fillers for the purpose of preparing edible composite films with fillers HPMC (hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose) based films with the inclusion of different size MCC (microcrystalline cellulose) fillers were studied. The water vapor permeability of the control HPMC film was 1.2 +/- 0.2 g-mm/kPa-h-m2 and did not show a significant change with the addition of fillers. A comparison of mechanical properties of the films with a tensile test showed that tensile strength of the control film, which was prepared using a 3 wt% HPMC solution, increased from 29.7 +/- 1.6 MPa to 70.1 +/- 7.9 MPa with the addition of 500-nm size particles, while it increased only to 37.4 +/- 5.5 MPa with the addition of 3-microm size particles. Also important is that the elongation percentage of the control film did not decrease significantly with the addition of submicron size fillers to the HPMC films. This study showed that the increased surface area per weight of smaller size MCC fillers compared to their larger size counterparts was highly beneficial in terms of film mechanical property improvement. PMID:17995880

  10. Pectin/carboxymethyl cellulose/microfibrillated cellulose composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, Neethu; Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Park, In-Kyu; Elain, Anne; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2013-10-15

    Highly porous three-dimensional scaffolds made of biopolymers are of great interest in tissue engineering applications. A novel scaffold composed of pectin, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) were synthesised using lyophilisation technique. The optimised scaffold with 0.1% MFC, C(0.1%), showed highest compression modulus (~3.987 MPa) and glass transition temperature (~103 °C). The pore size for the control scaffold, C(0%), was in the range of 30-300 μm while it was significantly reduced to 10-250 μm in case of C(0.1%). Using micro computed tomography, the porosity of C(0.1%) was estimated to be 88%. C(0.1%) showed excellent thermal stability and lower degradation rate compared to C(0%). The prepared samples were also characterised using XRD and FTIR. C(0.1%) showed controlled water uptake ability and in vitro degradation in PBS. It exhibited highest cell viability on NIH3T3 fibroblast cell line. These results suggest that these biocompatible composite scaffolds can be used for tissue engineering applications. PMID:23987424

  11. Application of ethyl cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose and octadecanol for wax based floating solid dispersion pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Shuang-Shuang; He, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to develop and optimize the wax based floating sustained-release dispersion pellets for a weakly acidic hydrophilic drug protocatechuic acid to achieve prolonged gastric residence time and improved bioavailability. This low-density drug delivery system consisted of octadecanol/microcrystalline cellulose mixture matrix pellet cores prepared by extrusion-spheronization technique, coated with drug/ethyl cellulose 100cp solid dispersion using single-step fluid-bed coating method. The formulation-optimized pellets could maintain excellent floating state without lag time and sustain the drug release efficiently for 12h based on non-Fickian transport mechanism. Observed by SEM, the optimized pellet was the dispersion-layered spherical structure containing a compact inner core. DSC, XRD and FTIR analysis revealed drug was uniformly dispersed in the amorphous molecule form and had no significant physicochemical interactions with the polymer dispersion carrier. The stability study of the resultant pellets further proved the rationality and integrity of the developed formulation. PMID:27185125

  12. Bacterial cellulose and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin membranes for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuyu; Qiu, Liying; Cui, Jing; Wei, Qufu

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) and bacterial cellulose-vaccarin (BC-Vac) membranes were successfully produced in large scale. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinum. BC-Vac membranes were prepared by immersing BC in vaccarin solution. The surface morphologies of BC and BC-Vac membranes were examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an atomic force microscopy (AFM). The images showed that BC-Vac exhibited the characteristic 3D nanofibrillar network of BC matrix but there was adhesion between fibers. The mechanical properties of BC and BC-Vac membranes were evaluated and the results indicated that the adding of drug vaccarin into the BC membranes increased the malleability indicated by the increment in elongation at break compared with BC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was conducted to confirm the incorporation of vaccarin in BC-Vac and investigate the hydroxyl interactions between BC and drug vaccarin. Cell viability and cell attachment studies demonstrated that BC and BC-Vac membranes had no cytotoxicity and could be a good carrier for cell growth. The wound healing performance was examined in vivo by rat skin models. Histological observations revealed that wounds treated with BC-Vac epithelialized and regenerated faster than treated with BC. Therefore, BC-Vac was considered as a potential candidate for wound dressing materials. PMID:26652377

  13. The Cer-cqu gene cluster determines three key players in a β-diketone synthase polyketide pathway synthesizing aliphatics in epicuticular waxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Lizette Marais; Adamski, Nikolai M.; Christensen, Caspar Elo;

    2016-01-01

    identification of mutants in their synthesis or transport. The present study discloses three such Eceriferum (cer) genes in barley - Cer-c, Cer-q and Cer-u - known to be tightly linked and functioning in a biochemical pathway forming dominating amounts of β-diketone and hydroxy-β-diketones plus some esterified...... five candidates, of which three were missing in apparent cer-cqu triple mutants. Sequencing more than 50 independent mutants for each gene confirmed their identification. Cer-c is a chalcone synthase-like polyketide synthase, designated diketone synthase (DKS), Cer-q is a lipase/carboxyl transferase...... affect overall protein structure or specific active site residues. The rich diversity of identified mutations will facilitate future studies of three key enzymes involved in synthesis of plant apoplast waxes....

  14. Ultrafiltration and Nanofiltration Multilayer Membranes Based on Cellulose

    KAUST Repository

    Livazovic, Sara

    2016-06-09

    Membrane processes are considered energy-efficient for water desalination and treatment. However most membranes are based on polymers prepared from fossil petrochemical sources. The development of multilayer membranes for nanofiltration and ultrafiltration, with thin selective layers of naturally available cellulose, has been hampered by the availability of non-aggressive solvents. We propose the manufacture of cellulose membranes based on two approaches: (i) silylation, coating from solutions in tetrahydrofuran, followed by solvent evaporation and cellulose regeneration by acid treatment; (ii) casting from solution in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolum acetate ([C2mim]OAc), an ionic liquid, followed by phase inversion in water. In the search for less harsh, greener membrane manufacture, the combination of cellulose and ionic liquid is of high interest. Due to the abundance of OH groups and hydrophilicity, cellulose-based membranes have high permeability and low fouling tendency. Membrane fouling is one of the biggest challenges in membrane industry and technology. Accumulation and deposition of foulants onto the surface reduce membrane efficiency and requires harsh chemical cleaning, therefore increasing the cost of maintenance and replacement. In this work the resistance of cellulose 5 membranes towards model organic foulants such as Suwanee River Humic Acid (SRHA) and crude oil have been investigated. Cellulose membrane was tested in this work for oil-water (o/w) separation and exhibited practically 100 % oil rejection with good flux recovery ratio and membrane resistivity. The influence of anionic, cationic and ionic surfactant as well as pH and crude oil concentration on oil separation was investigated, giving a valuable insight in experimental and operational planning.

  15. Evaluating the effect of potassium on cellulose pyrolysis reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes modifications to an existing cellulose pyrolysis mechanism in order to include the effect of potassium on product yields and composition. The changes in activation energies and pre-exponential factors due to potassium were evaluated based on the experimental data collected from pyrolysis of cellulose samples treated with different levels of potassium (0–1% mass fraction). The experiments were performed in a pyrolysis reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the collected data revealed that cellulose pyrolysis products could be divided into two groups: anhydrosugars and other fragmentation products (hydroxyacetaldehyde, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, acetyl compounds). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was used to extract the time resolved concentration score profiles of principal components. Kinetic tests revealed that potassium apparently inhibits the formation of anhydrosugars and catalyzes char formation. Therefore, the oil yield predicted at 500 °C decreased from 87.9% from cellulose to 54.0% from cellulose with 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment. The decrease in oil yield was accompanied by increased yield of char and gases produced via a catalyzed dehydration reaction. The predicted char and gas yield from cellulose were 3.7% and 8.4%, respectively. Introducing 0.5% mass fraction potassium treatment resulted in an increase of char yield to 12.1% and gas yield to 33.9%. The validation of the cellulose pyrolysis mechanism with experimental data from a fluidized-bed reactor, after this correction for potassium, showed good agreement with our results, with differences in product yields of up to 5%

  16. Characterization of a filamentous biofilm community established in a cellulose-fed microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotta Yasuaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are devices that exploit microorganisms to generate electric power from organic matter. Despite the development of efficient MFC reactors, the microbiology of electricity generation remains to be sufficiently understood. Results A laboratory-scale two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC was inoculated with rice paddy field soil and fed cellulose as the carbon and energy source. Electricity-generating microorganisms were enriched by subculturing biofilms that attached onto anode electrodes. An electric current of 0.2 mA was generated from the first enrichment culture, and ratios of the major metabolites (e.g., electric current, methane and acetate became stable after the forth enrichment. In order to investigate the electrogenic microbial community in the anode biofilm, it was morphologically analyzed by electron microscopy, and community members were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene clone-library analyses. Electron microscopy revealed that filamentous cells and rod-shaped cells with prosthecae-like filamentous appendages were abundantly present in the biofilm. Filamentous cells and appendages were interconnected via thin filaments. The clone library analyses frequently detected phylotypes affiliated with Clostridiales, Chloroflexi, Rhizobiales and Methanobacterium. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization revealed that the Rhizobiales population represented rod-shaped cells with filamentous appendages and constituted over 30% of the total population. Conclusion Bacteria affiliated with the Rhizobiales constituted the major population in the cellulose-fed MFC and exhibited unique morphology with filamentous appendages. They are considered to play important roles in the cellulose-degrading electrogenic community.

  17. Improve the flame retardancy of cellulose fibers by grafting zinc ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, KeKe; Zong, Lu; Tan, Yeqiang; Ji, Quan; Yun, Weicai; Shi, Ran; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-01-20

    Zinc ion as the only flame retardant of cellulose fibers was successfully grafted onto cellulose fibers. Grafting maleic anhydride onto cellulose fibers via homogeneous acylation reaction between N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) as the first step. Then, graft zinc ion onto the formed cellulose fibers was conducted with zinc carbonate. The resulting copolymers were characterized by FTIR. Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of zinc-ion-modified cellulose fibers (cellulose-Zn fibers) was investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), cone calorimeter (CONE), XRD, TG and SEM. Zinc ion could effectively improve flame retardancy and thermal degradation when its content increases up to 4.96 wt%. PMID:26572337

  18. Bacterial cellulose-kaolin nanocomposites for application as biomedical wound healing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanna, Dwi; Alam, Catharina; Toivola, Diana M.; Alam, Parvez

    2013-12-01

    This short communication provides preliminary experimental details on the structure-property relationships of novel biomedical kaolin-bacterial cellulose nanocomposites. Bacterial cellulose is an effective binding agent for kaolin particles forming reticulated structures at kaolin-cellulose interfaces and entanglements when the cellulose fraction is sufficiently high. The mechanical performance of these materials hence improves with an increased fraction of bacterial cellulose, though this also causes the rate of blood clotting to decrease. These composites have combined potential as both short-term (kaolin) and long-term (bacterial cellulose) wound healing materials.

  19. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals via supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals and terpyridine-modified perylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Surfaces of cellulose nanocrystals were modified with terpyridine ligands. ► Fluorescent nanocrystals could be obtained via self-assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals. ► Further self-assembly of azide-functionalized terpyridine onto the fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals was possible to obtain nanocellulosic material with expected use in bioimaging. - Abstract: Due to their natural origin, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity, cellulose nanocrystals are promising candidates for applications in nanomedicine. Highly fluorescent nanocellulosic material was prepared via surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals with 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine side chains followed by supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals (CTP) via RuIII/RuII reduction. The prepared terpyridine-modified cellulose-RuII-terpyridine-modified perylene (CTP-RuII-PeryTP) fluorescent nanocrystals were characterized using cross-polarized/magic angle spin 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV–visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, further self-assembly of terpyridine units with azide functional groups onto CTP-RuII-PeryTP was possible via repeating the RuIII/RuII reduction protocol to prepare supramolecular fluorescent nanocrystals with azide functionality (CTP-RuII-PeryTP-RuII-AZTP). The prepared derivative may have potential application in bio-imaging since the terminal azide groups can be easily reacted with antigens via “Click” chemistry reaction.

  20. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals via supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals and terpyridine-modified perylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Mohammad L., E-mail: mlhassan2004@yahoo.com [Cellulose and Paper Department and Center of Excellence for Advanced Sciences, Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Group, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo 12622 (Egypt); Moorefield, Charles M.; Elbatal, Hany S. [Maurice Morton Institute for Polymer Science, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Newkome, George R. [Maurice Morton Institute for Polymer Science, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Departments of Polymer Science and Chemistry, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Modarelli, David A.; Romano, Natalie C. [Department of Chemistry and The Center for Laser and Optical Spectroscopy, University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surfaces of cellulose nanocrystals were modified with terpyridine ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescent nanocrystals could be obtained via self-assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further self-assembly of azide-functionalized terpyridine onto the fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals was possible to obtain nanocellulosic material with expected use in bioimaging. - Abstract: Due to their natural origin, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity, cellulose nanocrystals are promising candidates for applications in nanomedicine. Highly fluorescent nanocellulosic material was prepared via surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals with 2,2 Prime :6 Prime ,2 Double-Prime -terpyridine side chains followed by supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals (CTP) via Ru{sup III}/Ru{sup II} reduction. The prepared terpyridine-modified cellulose-Ru{sup II}-terpyridine-modified perylene (CTP-Ru{sup II}-PeryTP) fluorescent nanocrystals were characterized using cross-polarized/magic angle spin {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, further self-assembly of terpyridine units with azide functional groups onto CTP-Ru{sup II}-PeryTP was possible via repeating the Ru{sup III}/Ru{sup II} reduction protocol to prepare supramolecular fluorescent nanocrystals with azide functionality (CTP-Ru{sup II}-PeryTP-Ru{sup II}-AZTP). The prepared derivative may have potential application in bio-imaging since the terminal azide groups can be easily reacted with antigens via 'Click' chemistry reaction.