WorldWideScience

Sample records for cellular tissue properties

  1. Mechanical properties and cellular response of novel electrospun nanofibers for ligament tissue engineering: Effects of orientation and geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Trujillo, Nathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Helen O; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are a promising material for ligamentous tissue engineering, however weak mechanical properties of fibers to date have limited their clinical usage. The goal of this work was to modify electrospun nanofibers to create a robust structure that mimics the complex hierarchy of native tendons and ligaments. The scaffolds that were fabricated in this study consisted of either random or aligned nanofibers in flat sheets or rolled nanofiber bundles that mimic the size scale of fascicle units in primarily tensile load bearing soft musculoskeletal tissues. Altering nanofiber orientation and geometry significantly affected mechanical properties; most notably aligned nanofiber sheets had the greatest modulus; 125% higher than that of random nanofiber sheets; and 45% higher than aligned nanofiber bundles. Modifying aligned nanofiber sheets to form aligned nanofiber bundles also resulted in approximately 107% higher yield stresses and 140% higher yield strains. The mechanical properties of aligned nanofiber bundles were in the range of the mechanical properties of the native ACL: modulus=158±32MPa, yield stress=57±23MPa and yield strain=0.38±0.08. Adipose derived stem cells cultured on all surfaces remained viable and proliferated extensively over a 7 day culture period and cells elongated on nanofiber bundles. The results of the study suggest that aligned nanofiber bundles may be useful for ligament and tendon tissue engineering based on their mechanical properties and ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and elongation.

  2. Imaging in cellular and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hanry

    2013-01-01

    Details on specific imaging modalities for different cellular and tissue engineering applications are scattered throughout articles and chapters in the literature. Gathering this information into a single reference, Imaging in Cellular and Tissue Engineering presents both the fundamentals and state of the art in imaging methods, approaches, and applications in regenerative medicine. The book underscores the broadening scope of imaging applications in cellular and tissue engineering. It covers a wide range of optical and biological applications, including the repair or replacement of whole tiss

  3. Effect of the internal microstructure in rapid-prototyped polycaprolactone scaffolds on physical and cellular properties for bone tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hojun; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2012-09-01

    Biomedical scaffolds should be designed to optimize their inter-microstructure to enable cell infiltration and nutrient/waste transport. To acquire these properties, several structural parameters, such as pore size, pore shape, porosity, pore interconnectivity, permeability, and tortuosity are required. In this study, we explored the effect of tortuosity on the viable cell proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like-cells (MG63) in polycaprolactone scaffolds. For analysis, we designed four different scaffolds of various tortuosities ranging from 1.0 to 1.3 under the same porosity (56 %) and 100 % pore interconnectivity. The pore size of the scaffolds was set as 150 and 300 µm, and a mixture of these sizes. We found that despite the porosity being same, the elastic modulus was dependent on the pore size of the scaffolds due to the distributed stress concentration. In addition, the relative water movement within scaffolds was also related to the internal microstructure. Cell viability and Ca2+ deposition of the cell-seeded scaffolds showed that the proliferation of viable cells and mineralization in the scaffolds with appropriate tortuosity (1.2) was relatively high compared to those of the scaffolds displaying low (1.05 and 1.1) or high (1.3) tortuosity. Our findings indicated that the internal microstructure of the scaffolds may influence not only the physical properties, but in addition the cellular behavior.

  4. Cellular interactions with tissue-engineered microenvironments and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi

    Tissue-engineered hydrogels composed of intermolecularlly crosslinked hyaluronan (HA-DTPH) and fibronectin functional domains (FNfds) were applied as a physiological relevant ECM mimic with controlled mechanical and biochemical properties. Cellular interactions with this tissue-engineered environment, especially physical interactions (cellular traction forces), were quantitatively measured by using the digital image speckle correlation (DISC) technique and finite element method (FEM). By correlating with other cell functions such as cell morphology and migration, a comprehensive structure-function relationship between cells and their environments was identified. Furthermore, spatiotemporal redistribution of cellular traction stresses was time-lapse measured during cell migration to better understand the dynamics of cell mobility. The results suggest that the reinforcement of the traction stresses around the nucleus, as well as the relaxation of nuclear deformation, are critical steps during cell migration, serving as a speed regulator, which must be considered in any dynamic molecular reconstruction model of tissue cell migration. Besides single cell migration, en masse cell migration was studied by using agarose droplet migration assay. Cell density was demonstrated to be another important parameter to influence cell behaviors besides substrate properties. Findings from these studies will provide fundamental design criteria to develop novel and effective tissue-engineered constructs. Cellular interactions with rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were also studied. These particles can penetrate easily through the cell membrane and impair cell function, with the latter being more damaging. The exposure to nanoparticles was found to decrease cell area, cell proliferation, motility, and contractility. To prevent this, a dense grafted polymer brush coating was applied onto the nanoparticle surface. These modified nanoparticles failed to adhere to and penetrate

  5. Cellular signalling properties in microcircuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Wallén, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Molecules and cells are the signalling elements in microcircuits. Recent studies have uncovered bewildering diversity in postsynaptic signalling properties in all areas of the vertebrate nervous system. Major effort is now being invested in establishing the specialized signalling properties at th...

  6. Investigation of microstructure, mechanical properties and cellular viability of poly(L-lactic acid) tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by different thermally induced phase separation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud; Medley, John; Kwon, Hyock Ju

    2013-01-01

    Two thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) methods have been used to fabricate biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) tissue engineering scaffolds each with fibrous (F-TIPS) and porous (P-TIPS) microstructures. Three levels of PLLA concentration (3, 5 and 7 wt%) were employed in each fabrication method and both wet and dry specimens were studied. Simple compression testing revealed that an elastic-plastic representation of the mechanical behavior was possible for all specimens. Both elastic and plastic moduli were higher for the P-TIPS, for higher polymer concentration, and might be somewhat higher for dry as opposed to wet specimens. For F-TIPS specimens, permanent deformation occurred successively during cyclic deformation but a "memory effect" simplified the behavior. Although F-TIPS microstructure better resembled the natural extracellular matrix, human osteosarcoma fibroblast cells showed more consistent viability in the P-TIPS scaffolds under our unloaded test protocols. Biodegradation in cell culture medium resulted in a decreased elastic moduli for F-TIPS specimens. Information presented regarding the microstructure, mechanical properties and cell viability of these PLLA scaffolds that should help reduce the number of iterations involved in developing tissue engineering products.

  7. Engineering cellular fibers for musculoskeletal soft tissues using directed self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Koppes, Ryan A; Chrisey, Douglas B; Corr, David T

    2013-05-01

    Engineering strategies guided by developmental biology may enhance and accelerate in vitro tissue formation for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this study, we looked toward embryonic tendon development as a model system to guide our soft tissue engineering approach. To direct cellular self-assembly, we utilized laser micromachined, differentially adherent growth channels lined with fibronectin. The micromachined growth channels directed human dermal fibroblast cells to form single cellular fibers, without the need for a provisional three-dimensional extracellular matrix or scaffold to establish a fiber structure. Therefore, the resulting tissue structure and mechanical characteristics were determined solely by the cells. Due to the self-assembly nature of this approach, the growing fibers exhibit some key aspects of embryonic tendon development, such as high cellularity, the rapid formation (within 24 h) of a highly organized and aligned cellular structure, and the expression of cadherin-11 (indicating direct cell-to-cell adhesions). To provide a dynamic mechanical environment, we have also developed and characterized a method to apply precise cyclic tensile strain to the cellular fibers as they develop. After an initial period of cellular fiber formation (24 h postseeding), cyclic strain was applied for 48 h, in 8-h intervals, with tensile strain increasing from 0.7% to 1.0%, and at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. Dynamic loading dramatically increased cellular fiber mechanical properties with a nearly twofold increase in both the linear region stiffness and maximum load at failure, thereby demonstrating a mechanism for enhancing cellular fiber formation and mechanical properties. Tissue engineering strategies, designed to capture key aspects of embryonic development, may provide unique insight into accelerated maturation of engineered replacement tissue, and offer significant advances for regenerative medicine applications in tendon

  8. A dynamic cellular vertex model of growing epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao-Zhen; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2017-03-01

    Intercellular interactions play a significant role in a wide range of biological functions and processes at both the cellular and tissue scales, for example, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cancer invasion. In this paper, a dynamic cellular vertex model is presented to study the morphomechanics of a growing epithelial monolayer. The regulating role of stresses in soft tissue growth is revealed. It is found that the cells originating from the same parent cell in the monolayer can orchestrate into clustering patterns as the tissue grows. Collective cell migration exhibits a feature of spatial correlation across multiple cells. Dynamic intercellular interactions can engender a variety of distinct tissue behaviors in a social context. Uniform cell proliferation may render high and heterogeneous residual compressive stresses, while stress-regulated proliferation can effectively release the stresses, reducing the stress heterogeneity in the tissue. The results highlight the critical role of mechanical factors in the growth and morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and help understand the development and invasion of epithelial tumors.

  9. Controlled cellular energy conversion in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Plant, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue serves as a model system for nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) since a) it has as a primary physiological function the conversion of chemical energy to heat; and b) preliminary data from other tissues involved in NST (e.g., muscle) indicate that parallel mechanisms may be involved. Now that biochemical pathways have been proposed for brown fat thermogenesis, cellular models consistent with a thermodynamic representation can be formulated. Stated concisely, the thermogenic mechanism in a brown fat cell can be considered as an energy converter involving a sequence of cellular events controlled by signals over the autonomic nervous system. A thermodynamic description for NST is developed in terms of a nonisothermal system under steady-state conditions using network thermodynamics. Pathways simulated include mitochondrial ATP synthesis, a Na+/K+ membrane pump, and ionic diffusion through the adipocyte membrane.

  10. Biomechanical properties of soft tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾衍钧; 许传青; 杨坚; 徐小虎

    2003-01-01

    Viscoelasticity is the primary mechanical property of bio-soft tissues. It has been widely applied in basic research of biological tissues including cornea, lung, heart and blood vessels. Along with the development of tissue engineering research, the evaluation of soft tissue viscoelasticity is becoming more and more important. In this paper, using the Whittaker function, we give an approximate power series of the exponential integral E1(x) and the parameters c, ?1 and ?2 of the generalized relaxation function G(t) and generalized creep function J(t). With expanded skin as an example, the relationship between stress relaxation, creep and stress-strain finite deformation are studied.

  11. Cellular and tissue expression of DAPIT, a phylogenetically conserved peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kontro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available DAPIT (Diabetes Associated Protein in Insulin-sensitive Tissues is a small, phylogenetically conserved, 58 amino acid peptide that was previously shown to be down-regulated at mRNA level in insulin-sensitive tissues of type 1 diabetes rats. In this study we characterize a custom made antibody against DAPIT and confirm the mitochondrial presence of DAPIT on cellular level. We also show that DAPIT is localized in lysosomes of HUVEC and HEK 293T cells. In addition, we describe the histological expression of DAPIT in several tissues of rat and man and show that it is highly expressed especially in cells with high aerobic metabolism and epithelial cells related to active transport of nutrients and ions. We propose that DAPIT, in addition to indicated subunit of mitochondrial F-ATPase, is also a subunit of lysosomal V-ATPase suggesting that it is a common component in different proton pumps.

  12. Cellular and Matrix Contributions to Tissue Construct Stiffness Increase with Cellular Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, J. Pablo; Genin, Guy M.; Pryse, Kenneth M.; Elson, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanics of bio-artificial tissue constructs result from active and passive contributions of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). We delineated these for a fibroblast-populated matrix (FPM) consisting of chick embryo fibroblast cells in a type I collagen ECM through mechanical testing, mechanical modeling, and selective biochemical elimination of tissue components. From a series of relaxation tests, we found that contributions to overall tissue mechanics from both cells and ECM increase exponentially with the cell concentration. The force responses in these relaxation tests exhibited a logarithmic decay over the 3600 second test duration. The amplitudes of these responses were nearly linear with the amplitude of the applied stretch. The active component of cellular forces rose dramatically for FPMs containing higher cell concentrations. PMID:16874557

  13. Bioprinting Cellularized Constructs Using a Tissue-specific Hydrogel Bioink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Aleksander; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Seol, Young-Joon; Forsythe, Steven D; Bishop, Colin; Shupe, Thomas; Soker, Shay; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-21

    Bioprinting has emerged as a versatile biofabrication approach for creating tissue engineered organ constructs. These constructs have potential use as organ replacements for implantation in patients, and also, when created on a smaller size scale as model "organoids" that can be used in in vitro systems for drug and toxicology screening. Despite development of a wide variety of bioprinting devices, application of bioprinting technology can be limited by the availability of materials that both expedite bioprinting procedures and support cell viability and function by providing tissue-specific cues. Here we describe a versatile hyaluronic acid (HA) and gelatin-based hydrogel system comprised of a multi-crosslinker, 2-stage crosslinking protocol, which can provide tissue specific biochemical signals and mimic the mechanical properties of in vivo tissues. Biochemical factors are provided by incorporating tissue-derived extracellular matrix materials, which include potent growth factors. Tissue mechanical properties are controlled combinations of PEG-based crosslinkers with varying molecular weights, geometries (linear or multi-arm), and functional groups to yield extrudable bioinks and final construct shear stiffness values over a wide range (100 Pa to 20 kPa). Using these parameters, hydrogel bioinks were used to bioprint primary liver spheroids in a liver-specific bioink to create in vitro liver constructs with high cell viability and measurable functional albumin and urea output. This methodology provides a general framework that can be adapted for future customization of hydrogels for biofabrication of a wide range of tissue construct types.

  14. 75 FR 65640 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Tumor Vaccines and Biotechnology Branch, Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center...

  15. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Radbruch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo—ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging—and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice.

  16. 78 FR 44133 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... on guidance documents issued from the Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center...

  17. 77 FR 65693 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... Register of October 17, 2012, FDA announced that a meeting of the Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies..., Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. On...

  18. ELF (extremely-low-frequency) field interactions at the animal, tissue and cellular levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1990-10-01

    A description is given of the fundamental physical properties of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, and the mechanisms through which these fields interact with the human body at a macroscopic level. Biological responses to ELF fields at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels are summarized, including new evidence that ELF field exposure produces alterations in gene expression and the cytoplasmic concentrations of specific proteins.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaal, Mate; Bovtun, Viktor; Stark, Wolfgang; Erhard, Anton; Yakymenko, Yuriy; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets (PP FEs) were studied at low frequencies (0.3-33 Hz) by dynamic mechanical analysis and at high frequencies (250 kHz) by laser Doppler vibrometry. Relaxation behavior of the in-plane Young's modulus ( Y11 ' ˜ 1500 MPa at room temperature) was observed and attributed to the viscoelastic response of polypropylene matrix. The out-of-plane Young's modulus is very small ( Y33 ' ≈ 0.1 MPa) at low frequencies, frequency- and stress-dependent, evidencing nonlinear viscoelastic response of PP FEs. The high-frequency mechanical response of PP FEs is shown to be linear viscoelastic with Y33 ' ≈ 0.8 MPa. It is described by thickness vibration mode and modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator with one degree of freedom. Frequency dependence of Y33 * in the large dynamic strain regime is described by the broad Cole-Cole relaxation with a mean frequency in kHz range attributed to the dynamics of the air flow between partially closed air-filled voids in PP FEs. Switching-off the relaxation contribution causes dynamic crossover from the nonlinear viscoelastic regime at low frequencies to the linear viscoelastic regime at high frequencies. In the small strain regime, contribution of the air flow seems to be insignificant and the power-law response, attributed to the mechanics of polypropylene cell walls and closed air voids, dominates in a broad frequency range. Mechanical relaxation caused by the air flow mechanism takes place in the sound and ultrasound frequency range (10 Hz-1 MHz) and, therefore, should be taken into account in ultrasonic applications of the PP FEs deal with strong exciting or receiving signals.

  20. 77 FR 63840 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and..., Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, and...

  1. 78 FR 79699 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General..., Tissue, and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), FDA. On February...

  2. Effective electromechanical properties of cellular piezoelectret: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Ping Wan; Zheng Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Due to the large quasi-piezoelectric d33 coefficient in the film thickness direction,cellular piezoelectret has emerged as a new kind of compliant electromechanical transducer materials.The macroscopic piezoelectric effect of cellular piezoelectret is closely related to the void microstructures as well as the material constants of host polymer.Complex void microstructures are usually encountered in the optimum design of cellular piezoelectret polymer film with advanced piezoelectric properties.Analysis of the effective electromechanical properties is generally needed.This article presents an overview of the recent progress on theoretical models and numerical simulation for the effective electromechanical properties of cellular piezoelectret.Emphasis is placed on our own works of cellular piezoelectret published in past several years.

  3. Laser Direct Writing of Idealized Cellular and Biologic Constructs for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R.; Corr, David T.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    Conventional tissue engineering typically involves homogenously seeding cells into a scaffold, then manipulating the scaffold either mechanically, using bioreactors, or chemically, using growth factors, in an attempt to tailor the mechanical and biological properties of the engineered tissue. The material composition of the scaffold gives the construct its initial strength; then the scaffold either remodels or dissolves when implanted in the body. An ideal tissue replacement scaffold would be biocompatible, biodegradable, implantable, and would match the strength of the tissue it is replacing, and would remodel by natural mechanisms [1]. Finding or creating scaffold materials that meet all these specifications while providing an environment for cell attachment and proliferation is one of the main goals of conventional tissue engineering. Popular current scaffold materials include poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) [2] and collagen [3]. Typically, the utilization of scaffolds in tissue engineering employs a top-down approach in which cells are seeded homogenously into the scaffold, then incubated in vitro prior to implantation. Scaffold properties, such as geometric dimensions (e.g., thickness) and cellular in-growth, are limited by the diffusion of nutrients, since these scaffolds do not incorporate vascular structures to transport nutrients and remove wastes deep into the scaffold as in native tissue [4]. Although seeded scaffolds have proven successful in some cases, there remains the need to have greater control of cell placement as well as the placement of additional features such as vascular structures, multiple cell types, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins that will aid in the fabrication of the next generation of engineered tissues.

  4. 75 FR 66381 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... Lentiviral Vector Based Gene Therapy Products. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  5. 78 FR 15726 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  6. 76 FR 18768 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  7. 76 FR 22405 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... gene therapy products for the treatment of retinal disorders. Topics to be considered include...

  8. 76 FR 64951 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  9. Evaluation of tissue optical properties from light distribution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Lun; Chang, Ming; Hsieh, Jui-Hsiang; Yang, Yi-Fong; Chou, Yi-Sheong

    2000-06-01

    Images of light distribution in biological soft tissue we used to study the optical characteristics of tissue. The light distribution image was taken under a microscope with light injected through a pinhole close to the edge of the top surface. Images taken on skin, fat, and muscle tissues were compared to study the effect of cellular structure and temperature on the light intensity distribution. Monte Carlo simulation with the same conditions was also performed to simulate the light intensity distribution in tissue for comparison. The anisotropy scattering of light in tissue is affected by the tissue microscopic structure, such as the direction of muscle tissue fibers. The change in optical properties of fat and muscle tissue with temperature was observed. The two-dimensional light distribution images offer more information than general reflectance and transmission measurements. By matching the simulated light intensity distribution with the light distribution image, the optical properties of biological tissue could be estimated. This method might be applied in tissue engineering as an economic way for evaluating the microscopic structure of tissue.

  10. Cellular proliferation and regeneration following tissue damage. Progress report. [Eyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, C.V.

    1976-10-01

    Results are reported from a study of wound healing in tissues of the eye, particularly lens, cornea, and surrounding tissues. The reactions of these tissues to mechanical injuries, as well as injuries induced by chemotoxic agents were studied. It is postulated that a better understanding of the basic reactions of the eye to injurious agents may be of importance in the evaluation of potential environmental hazards.

  11. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  12. 77 FR 73472 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  13. Cellular origin and procoagulant activity of tissue factor-exposing microparticles in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Berckmans, R.J.; Böing, A.N.; Sturk, A.; Büller, H.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Nieuwland, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In patients with cancer, tissue factor-exposing microparticles (TF-exposing MP) have been associated with disease progression and thrombosis. The cellular origin and coagulant activity of TF-exposing MP, however, remain disputed. Therefore, we investigated the cellular origin of the TF-e

  14. On the Cellular Indecomposable Property of Semi-Fredholm Operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guozheng CHENG; Xiang FANG

    2012-01-01

    The authors prove that an operator with the cellular indecomposable property has no singular points in the semi-Fredholm domain,by applying the 4 × 4 matrix model of semi-Fredholm operators due to Fang in 2004. This result fills a gap in the result of Olin and Thomson in 1984.

  15. Cellular and Porous Materials Thermal Properties Simulation and Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; de Lemos, Marcelo J S

    2008-01-01

    Providing the reader with a solid understanding of the fundamentals as well as an awareness of recent advances in properties and applications of cellular and porous materials, this handbook and ready reference covers all important analytical and numerical methods for characterizing and predicting thermal properties. In so doing it directly addresses the special characteristics of foam-like and hole-riddled materials, combining theoretical and experimental aspects for characterization purposes.

  16. Characterizing the elastic properties of tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Akhtar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of life of ageing populations is increasingly determined by age-related changes to the mechanical properties of numerous biological tissues. Degradation and mechanical failure of these tissues has a profound effect on human morbidity and mortality. Soft tissues have complex and intricate structures and, similar to engineering materials, their mechanical properties are controlled by their microstructure. Thus age-relate changes in mechanical behavior are determined by changes in the properties and relative quantities of microstructural tissue components. This review focuses on the cardiovascular system; it discusses the techniques used both in vivo and ex vivo to determine the age-related changes in the mechanical properties of arteries.

  17. Actomyosin-mediated cellular tension drives increased tissue stiffness and beta-catenin activation to induce epidermal hyperplasia and tumor growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samuel, M.S.; Lopez, J.I.; McGhee, E.J.; Croft, D.R.; Strachan, D.; Timpson, P.; Munro, J.; Schroder, E.; Zhou, J.; Brunton, V.; Barker, N.; Clevers, H.; Sansom, O.J.; Anderson, K.I.; Weaver, V.M.; Olson, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors and associated stroma manifest mechanical properties that promote cancer. Mechanosensation of tissue stiffness activates the Rho/ROCK pathway to increase actomyosin-mediated cellular tension to re-establish force equilibrium. To determine how actomyosin tension affects tissue homeostasis and

  18. PCL/alginate composite scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: fabrication, characterization, and cellular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Bok; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2015-02-09

    Alginates have been used widely in biomedical applications because of good biocompatibility, low cost, and rapid gelation in the presence of calcium ions. However, poor mechanical properties and fabrication-ability for three-dimensional shapes have been obstacles in hard-tissue engineering applications. To overcome these shortcomings of alginates, we suggest a new composite system, consisting of a synthetic polymer, poly(ε-caprolactone), and various weight fractions (10-40 wt %) of alginate. The fabricated composite scaffolds displayed a multilayered 3D structure, consisting of microsized composite struts, and they provided a 100% offset for each layer. To show the feasibility of the scaffold for hard tissue regeneration, the composite scaffolds fabricated were assessed not only for physical properties, including surface roughness, tensile strength, and water absorption and wetting, but also in vitro osteoblastic cellular responses (cell-seeding efficiency, cell viability, fluorescence analyses, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineralization) by culturing with preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1). Due to the alginate components in the composites, the scaffolds showed significantly enhanced wetting behavior, water-absorption (∼12-fold), and meaningful biological activities (∼2.1-fold for cell-seeding efficiency, ∼2.5-fold for cell-viability at 7 days, ∼3.4-fold for calcium deposition), compared with a pure PCL scaffold.

  19. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  20. Predicting bulk mechanical properties of cellularized collagen gels using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, C B; Putnam, A J; Tromberg, B J; George, S C

    2010-12-01

    Cellularized collagen gels are a common model in tissue engineering, but the relationship between the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties is only partially understood. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an ideal non-invasive tool for examining collagen microstructure, cellularity and crosslink content in these gels. In order to identify robust image parameters that characterize microstructural determinants of the bulk elastic modulus, we performed serial MPM and mechanical tests on acellular and cellularized (normal human lung fibroblasts) collagen hydrogels, before and after glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Following gel contraction over 16 days, cellularized collagen gel content approached that of native connective tissues (∼200 mg ml⁻¹). Young's modulus (E) measurements from acellular collagen gels (range 0.5-12 kPa) exhibited a power-law concentration dependence (range 3-9 mg ml⁻¹) with exponents from 2.1 to 2.2, similar to other semiflexible biopolymer networks such as fibrin and actin. In contrast, cellularized collagen gel stiffness (range 0.5-27 kPa) produced concentration-dependent exponents of 0.7 uncrosslinked and 1.1 crosslinked (range ∼5-200 mg ml⁻¹). The variation in E of cellularized collagen hydrogels can be explained by a power-law dependence on robust image parameters: either the second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) (matrix component) skewness (R²=0.75, exponents of -1.0 and -0.6, respectively); or alternatively the SHG and TPF (matrix component) speckle contrast (R²=0.83, exponents of -0.7 and -1.8, respectively). Image parameters based on the cellular component of TPF signal did not improve the fits. The concentration dependence of E suggests enhanced stress relaxation in cellularized vs. acellular gels. SHG and TPF image skewness and speckle contrast from cellularized collagen gels can predict E by capturing mechanically relevant information on collagen fiber, cell and crosslink density.

  1. 76 FR 81513 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends to make...

  2. QUANTIFICATION OF TISSUE PROPERTIES IN SMALL VOLUMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. MOURANT; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The quantification of tissue properties by optical measurements will facilitate the development of noninvasive methods of cancer diagnosis and detection. Optical measurements are sensitive to tissue structure which is known to change during tumorigenesis. The goals of the work presented in this paper were to verify that the primary scatterers of light in cells are structures much smaller than the nucleus and then to develop an optical technique that can quantify parameters of structures the same size as the scattering features in cells. Polarized, elastic back-scattering was found to be able to quantify changes in scattering properties for turbid media consisting of scatterers of the size found in tissue.

  3. Cell patch seeding and functional analysis of cellularized scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P R Anil [Division of Implant Biology, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695012 (India); Varma, H K [Bioceramics Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695012 (India); Kumary, T V [Division of Implant Biology, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695012 (India)

    2007-03-01

    Cell seeding has a direct impact on the final structure and function of tissue constructs, especially for applications like tissue engineering and regeneration. In this study seeding cell patches retrieved from the thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) surface were used to generate in vitro tissue constructs. Porous and dense bone substitute materials were cellularized using osteoblast cells by a patch transfer and a trypsin method. The function and proliferation of cells was analyzed after 7 days of culture. The relative cell growth rate was found to be higher in cellularized porous hydroxyapatite (PHA) than in dense hydroxyapatite. Live-dead staining confirmed viable cells inside the pores of PHA. Increased alkaline phosphatase activity of cells transferred by the cell patch over the trypsin method revealed the significance of cell patch seeding. This novel method of generating tissue constructs by cell patch seeding was successful in cellularizing scaffolds with intact cell function.

  4. Cell patch seeding and functional analysis of cellularized scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, P R; Varma, H K; Kumary, T V

    2007-03-01

    Cell seeding has a direct impact on the final structure and function of tissue constructs, especially for applications like tissue engineering and regeneration. In this study seeding cell patches retrieved from the thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) surface were used to generate in vitro tissue constructs. Porous and dense bone substitute materials were cellularized using osteoblast cells by a patch transfer and a trypsin method. The function and proliferation of cells was analyzed after 7 days of culture. The relative cell growth rate was found to be higher in cellularized porous hydroxyapatite (PHA) than in dense hydroxyapatite. Live-dead staining confirmed viable cells inside the pores of PHA. Increased alkaline phosphatase activity of cells transferred by the cell patch over the trypsin method revealed the significance of cell patch seeding. This novel method of generating tissue constructs by cell patch seeding was successful in cellularizing scaffolds with intact cell function.

  5. Revisions to Exceptions Applicable to Certain Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    : The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency or we) is issuing this final rule to amend certain regulations regarding donor eligibility, including the screening and testing of donors of particular human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products (HCT/Ps), and related labeling. This final rule is in response to our enhanced understanding in this area and in response to comments from stakeholders regarding the importance of embryos to individuals and couples seeking access to donated embryos.

  6. PhosphoregDB: The tissue and sub-cellular distribution of mammalian protein kinases and phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Harukazu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases and protein phosphatases are the fundamental components of phosphorylation dependent protein regulatory systems. We have created a database for the protein kinase-like and phosphatase-like loci of mouse http://phosphoreg.imb.uq.edu.au that integrates protein sequence, interaction, classification and pathway information with the results of a systematic screen of their sub-cellular localization and tissue specific expression data mined from the GNF tissue atlas of mouse. Results The database lets users query where a specific kinase or phosphatase is expressed at both the tissue and sub-cellular levels. Similarly the interface allows the user to query by tissue, pathway or sub-cellular localization, to reveal which components are co-expressed or co-localized. A review of their expression reveals 30% of these components are detected in all tissues tested while 70% show some level of tissue restriction. Hierarchical clustering of the expression data reveals that expression of these genes can be used to separate the samples into tissues of related lineage, including 3 larger clusters of nervous tissue, developing embryo and cells of the immune system. By overlaying the expression, sub-cellular localization and classification data we examine correlations between class, specificity and tissue restriction and show that tyrosine kinases are more generally expressed in fewer tissues than serine/threonine kinases. Conclusion Together these data demonstrate that cell type specific systems exist to regulate protein phosphorylation and that for accurate modelling and for determination of enzyme substrate relationships the co-location of components needs to be considered.

  7. Composition, structure and mechanical properties of several natural cellular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The stem piths of sunflower, kaoliang and corn are natural cellular materials. In this paper, the contents of the compositions of these piths are determined and their cell shapes and structures are examined through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Further research is conducted in the effects of the compositions and structures of the piths on the mechanical properties after testing the partial mechanical properties. The results show that the total cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin content of each sample approaches 75% of the dry mass of its primary cell walls. With the fall of R value, a parameter relative to the contents of the main compositions, the flexibilities of the cellular piths descend while their stresses and rigidities increase. The basic cell shape making up the sunflower pith is approximately a tetrakaidehedron. The stem piths of kaoliang and corn are made up of cells close to hexangular prisms and a few tubular ones which can observably reinforce their mechanical properties in the axial directions.

  8. Cellular Responses to the Metal-Binding Properties of Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Lisa; Harthill, Jean; Patel, Kashyap; Bacon, Sandra; Hamilton, D. Lee; Macrae, Katherine; McDougall, Gordon; Wang, Huan-Huan; Xue, Lin; Jiang, Hua; Sakamoto, Kei; Prescott, Alan R.; Rena, Graham

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, the antihyperglycemic biguanide metformin has been used extensively in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, despite continuing uncertainty over its direct target. In this article, using two independent approaches, we demonstrate that cellular actions of metformin are disrupted by interference with its metal-binding properties, which have been known for over a century but little studied by biologists. We demonstrate that copper sequestration opposes known actions of metformin not only on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent signaling, but also on S6 protein phosphorylation. Biguanide/metal interactions are stabilized by extensive π-electron delocalization and by investigating analogs of metformin; we provide evidence that this intrinsic property enables biguanides to regulate AMPK, glucose production, gluconeogenic gene expression, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial copper binding. In contrast, regulation of S6 phosphorylation is prevented only by direct modification of the metal-liganding groups of the biguanide structure, supporting recent data that AMPK and S6 phosphorylation are regulated independently by biguanides. Additional studies with pioglitazone suggest that mitochondrial copper is targeted by both of these clinically important drugs. Together, these results suggest that cellular effects of biguanides depend on their metal-binding properties. This link may illuminate a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms enabling antihyperglycemic drug action. PMID:22492524

  9. Cellular adaptation to biomechanical stress across length scales in tissue homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Penney M; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-09-15

    Human tissues are remarkably adaptable and robust, harboring the collective ability to detect and respond to external stresses while maintaining tissue integrity. Following injury, many tissues have the capacity to repair the damage - and restore form and function - by deploying cellular and molecular mechanisms reminiscent of developmental programs. Indeed, it is increasingly clear that cancer and chronic conditions that develop with age arise as a result of cells and tissues re-implementing and deregulating a selection of developmental programs. Therefore, understanding the fundamental molecular mechanisms that drive cell and tissue responses is a necessity when designing therapies to treat human conditions. Extracellular matrix stiffness synergizes with chemical cues to drive single cell and collective cell behavior in culture and acts to establish and maintain tissue homeostasis in the body. This review will highlight recent advances that elucidate the impact of matrix mechanics on cell behavior and fate across these length scales during times of homeostasis and in disease states.

  10. Tissue Engineering and Cellular Regeneration at NASA Report to Regenetech SAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A project overview describing three dimensional tissue models is shown. The topics include: 1) cellular regeneration; 2) haemopoietic replacement; 3) novel vaccine development; 4) pharmacology and toxicology interventions; 5) development of synthetic viruses; and 6) molecular genetics and proteomics of recapitulated models.

  11. Cellular burdens and biological effects on tissue level caused by inhaled radon progenies

    CERN Document Server

    Madas, Balázs G; Farkas, Árpád; Szőke, István

    2014-01-01

    In the case of radon exposure, the spatial distribution of deposited radioactive particles is highly inhomogeneous in the central airways. The objective of this research is to investigate the consequences of this heterogeneity regarding cellular burdens in the bronchial epithelium and to study the possible biological effects on tissue level. Applying a computational fluid dynamics program, the deposition distribution of inhaled radon daughters has been determined in a bronchial airway model for 23 minutes of work in the New Mexico uranium mine corresponding to 0.0129 WLM exposure. A numerical epithelium model based on experimental data has been utilized in order to quantify cellular hits and doses. Finally, a carcinogenesis model considering cell death induced cell cycle shortening has been applied to assess the biological responses. Computations present, that cellular dose may reach 1.5 Gy, which is several orders of magnitude higher than tissue dose. The results are in agreement with the histological findin...

  12. Passive mechanical properties of ovine rumen tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Stephen J.; Cater, John E.; Walker, Cameron G.; Amirapu, Satya; Waghorn, Garry C.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical and structural properties of ovine rumen tissue have been determined using uniaxial tensile testing of tissue from four animals at five rumen locations and two orientations. Animal and orientation did not have a significant effect on the stress-strain response, but there was a significant difference between rumen locations. Histological studies showed two orthogonal muscle layers in all regions except the reticulum, which has a more isotropic structure. A quasi-linear viscoelastic model was fitted to the relaxation stage for each region. Model predictions of the ramp stage had RMS errors of 13-24% and were within the range of the experimental data.

  13. Study of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni antioxidant activities and cellular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Cecilia; Graziano, Sara; Zimmermann, Benno F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the antioxidant activities, cytotoxicity and proliferative properties in Stevia rebaudiana leaves and stems. Leaves extracts exhibited a higher antioxidant activity than stems extract, through oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. Stevioside and rebaudioside A, the main sweetening metabolites in stevia leaves, exhibited a low ORAC value in comparison with plant extracts, while did not elicit any CAA. Stevia rebaudiana did not exhibit toxicity against HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) human cells. No proliferative nor catalase modulations were observed in cells treated with such extracts. Our findings support the promising role of stevia that, apart from its sweetness, can act as a source of antioxidants, even at the intracellular level. This activity makes S. rebaudiana crude extract an interesting resource of natural sweetness with antioxidant properties which may find numerous applications in foods and nutritional supplements industries.

  14. X-ray micro-tomography for investigations of brain tissues on cellular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Thalmann, Peter; Zanette, Irene; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Bikis, Christos; Hipp, Alexander; Hieber, Simone E.; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    X-ray imaging in absorption contrast mode is well established for hard tissue visualization. However, performance for lower density materials is limited due to a reduced contrast. Our aim is three-dimensional (3D) characterization of micro-morphology of human brain tissues down to (sub-)cellular resolution within a laboratory environment. Using the laboratory-based microtomography (μCT) system nanotom m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH, Wunstorf, Germany) and synchrotron radiation at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK), we have acquired 3D data with a resolution down to 0.45 μm for visualization of a human cerebellum specimen down to cellular level. We have shown that all selected modalities, namely laboratory-based absorption contrast micro-tomography (LBμCT), synchrotron radiation based in-line single distance phase contrast tomography (SDPR) and synchrotron radiation based single-grating interferometry (GI), can reach cellular resolution for tissue samples with a size in the mm-range. The results are discussed qualitatively in comparison to optical microscopy of haematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained sections. As phase contrast yields to a better data quality for soft tissues and in order to overcome restrictions of limited beamline access for phase contrast measurements, we have equipped the μCT system nanotom m with a double-grating phase contrast set-up. Preliminary experimental results of a knee sample consisting of a bony part and a cartilage demonstrate that phase contrast data exhibits better quality compared to absorption contrast. Currently, the set-up is under adjustment. It is expected that cellular resolution would also be achieved. The questions arise (1) what would be the quality gain of laboratory-based phase contrast in comparison to laboratory-based absorption contrast tomography and (2) could laboratory-based phase contrast data provide comparable results to synchrotron radiation based

  15. [Quantitative analysis of tissue and cellular components of the specialized internodal conductive pathways of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovich, E R

    1983-11-01

    A light-optic and electron-microscopic study of internodal specialized pathways in the rat interatrial cardiac septum is reported. The topography of conductive pathways is described. Morphometric investigation yielded comparative quantitative characteristics of tissue and cellular composition of the working and conductive septal myocardium. A single type of myocytes was demonstrated in specialized conductive pathways. The findings were compared with those obtained in other species. Principles of identification of specialized conductive pathways are discussed.

  16. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration as revealed by studies in Xenopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Survival of any living organism critically depends on its ability to repair and regenerate damaged tissues and/or organs during its lifetime following injury, disease, or aging. Various animal models from invertebrates to vertebrates have been used to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of wound healing and tissue regeneration. It is hoped that such studies will form the framework for identifying novel clinical treatments that will improve the healing and regenerative capacity of humans. Amongst these models, Xenopus stands out as a particularly versatile and powerful system. This review summarizes recent findings using this model, which have provided fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for efficient and perfect tissue repair and regeneration.

  17. Mathematical modeling of ultrasound in tissue engineering: From bioreactors to the cellular scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Tobias M.

    Tissue engineering seeks to provide a means to treat injuries that are beyond the body's natural ability to repair without the issues associated with allografts. Autologous cells are cultured in a bioreactor which controls the cellular environment (including mechanical stimulation) for optimal tissue growth. We investigate ultrasound as an effective means of mechanical stimulation by predicting the ultrasonic field in a bioreactor, as well as ultrasonic bioeffects at the cellular level. The Transfer Matrix Angular Spectrum Approach was found to be the most accurate and computationally efficient bioreactor model. Three critical factors influence experimental results: (1) the diameter of the tissue engineering scaffold greatly affects the ultrasonic field; (2) the position of the ultrasonic transducer and liquid level in the tissue culture well determines the maximum pressure amplitude in the bioreactor, but the pressure can be controlled by measuring the transducer input electrical impedance and manipulating the applied voltage; and (3) the position of pressure nodes are influenced by ultrasonic frequency and liquid level; this will affect the response of cells to applied ultrasound. On the cellular level, it was shown that chondrocytes respond to ultrasound with frequency dependence. A predicted resonance frequency near 5MHz matched experimental results showing maximum expression of load inducible genes at 5MHz. Mechanical stresses are concentrated near the nucleus at resonance, alluding to the possibility that the nucleus may directly sense ultrasonic stimulation. We postulate that ultrasound influences the transport of p-ERK to the nucleus or causes minor chromatin reorganization, leading to the observed frequency dependent gene expression. We linked in vitro ultrasonic stimulation to in vivo mechanical stimulation generated by natural movement. The chondrocyte's response to impact is under-damped, and the cell oscillates with a frequency close to the model

  18. [Regulatory role of mechanical stress response in cellular function: development of new drugs and tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Kazutaka; Matsuda, Takehisa; Oike, Masahiro; Obara, Kazuo; Laher, Ismail; Sugiura, Seiryo; Ohata, Hisayuki; Nakayama, Koichi

    2003-02-01

    The investigation of mechanotransduction in the cardiovascular system is essentially important for elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in not only the maintenance of hemodynamic homeostasis but also etiology of cardiovascular diseases including arteriosclerosis. The present review summarizes the latest research performed by six academic groups, and presented at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Pharmacological Society. Technology of cellular biomechanics is also required for research and clinical application of a vascular hybrid tissue responding to pulsatile stress. 1) Vascular tissue engineering: Design of pulsatile stress-responsive scaffold and in vivo vascular wall reconstruction (T. Matsuda); 2) Cellular mechanisms of mechanosensitive calcium transients in vascular endothelium (M. Oike et al.); 3) Cross-talk of stimulation with fluid flow and lysophosphatidic acid in vascular endothelial cells (K. Momose et al.); 4) Mechanotransduction of vascular smooth muscles: Rate-dependent stretch-induced protein phosphorylations and contractile activation (K. Obara et al.); 5) Lipid mediators in vascular myogenic tone (I. Laher et al.); and 6) Caldiomyocyte regulates its mechanical output in response to mechanical load (S. Sugiura et al.).

  19. Some Properties of Fractals Generated by Linear Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪天佳

    2003-01-01

    Fractals and cellular automata are both significant areas of research in nonlinear analysis. This paper studies a class of fractals generated by cellular automata. The patterns produced by cellular automata give a special sequence of sets in Euclidean space. The corresponding limit set is shown to be a fractal and the dimension is independent of the choice of the finite initial seed. As opposed to previous works, the fractals here do not depend on the time parameter.

  20. Dielectric properties of tissues and biological materials: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, K R; Schwan, H P

    1989-01-01

    We critically review bulk electrical properties of tissues and other biological materials, from DC to 20 GHz, with emphasis on the underlying mechanisms responsible for the properties. We summarize the classical principles behind dielectric relaxation and critically review recent developments in this field. Special topics include a summary of the significant recent advances in theories of counterion polarization effects, dielectric properties of cancer vs. normal tissues, properties of low-water-content tissues, and macroscopic field-coupling considerations. Finally, the dielectric properties of tissues are summarized as empirical correlations with tissue water content in other compositional variables; in addition, a comprehensive table is presented of dielectric properties. The bulk electrical properties of tissues are needed for many bioengineering applications of electric fields or currents, and they provide insight into the basic mechanisms that govern the interaction of electric fields with tissue.

  1. Adiposoft: automated software for the analysis of white adipose tissue cellularity in histological sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarraga, Miguel; Campión, Javier; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Boqué, Noemí; Moreno, Haritz; Martínez, José Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín; Ortiz-de-Solórzano, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    The accurate estimation of the number and size of cells provides relevant information on the kinetics of growth and the physiological status of a given tissue or organ. Here, we present Adiposoft, a fully automated open-source software for the analysis of white adipose tissue cellularity in histological sections. First, we describe the sequence of image analysis routines implemented by the program. Then, we evaluate our software by comparing it with other adipose tissue quantification methods, namely, with the manual analysis of cells in histological sections (used as gold standard) and with the automated analysis of cells in suspension, the most commonly used method. Our results show significant concordance between Adiposoft and the other two methods. We also demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to distinguish the cellular composition of three different rat fat depots. Moreover, we found high correlation and low disagreement between Adiposoft and the manual delineation of cells. We conclude that Adiposoft provides accurate results while considerably reducing the amount of time and effort required for the analysis.

  2. A strategy for tissue self-organization that is robust to cellular heterogeneity and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, Alec E; Garbe, James C; Jee, Noel Y; Todhunter, Michael E; Broaders, Kyle E; Peehl, Donna M; Desai, Tejal A; LaBarge, Mark A; Thomson, Matthew; Gartner, Zev J

    2015-02-17

    Developing tissues contain motile populations of cells that can self-organize into spatially ordered tissues based on differences in their interfacial surface energies. However, it is unclear how self-organization by this mechanism remains robust when interfacial energies become heterogeneous in either time or space. The ducts and acini of the human mammary gland are prototypical heterogeneous and dynamic tissues comprising two concentrically arranged cell types. To investigate the consequences of cellular heterogeneity and plasticity on cell positioning in the mammary gland, we reconstituted its self-organization from aggregates of primary cells in vitro. We find that self-organization is dominated by the interfacial energy of the tissue-ECM boundary, rather than by differential homo- and heterotypic energies of cell-cell interaction. Surprisingly, interactions with the tissue-ECM boundary are binary, in that only one cell type interacts appreciably with the boundary. Using mathematical modeling and cell-type-specific knockdown of key regulators of cell-cell cohesion, we show that this strategy of self-organization is robust to severe perturbations affecting cell-cell contact formation. We also find that this mechanism of self-organization is conserved in the human prostate. Therefore, a binary interfacial interaction with the tissue boundary provides a flexible and generalizable strategy for forming and maintaining the structure of two-component tissues that exhibit abundant heterogeneity and plasticity. Our model also predicts that mutations affecting binary cell-ECM interactions are catastrophic and could contribute to loss of tissue architecture in diseases such as breast cancer.

  3. Some Properties of topological pressure on cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Chang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the ergodicity and the power rule of the topological pressure of a cellular automaton. If a cellular automaton is either leftmost or rightmost premutive (due to the terminology given by Hedlund [Math.~Syst.~Theor.~3, 320-375, 1969], then it is ergodic with respect to the uniform Bernoulli measure. More than that, the relation of topological pressure between the original cellular automaton and its power rule is expressed in a closed form. As an application, the topological pressure of a linear cellular automaton can be computed explicitly.

  4. Optical scatter imaging of cellular and mitochondrial swelling in brain tissue models of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee James

    2001-08-01

    The severity of brain edema resulting from a stroke can determine a patient's survival and the extent of their recovery. Cellular swelling is the microscopic source of a significant part of brain edema. Mitochondrial swelling also appears to be a determining event in the death or survival of the cells that are injured during a stroke. Therapies for reducing brain edema are not effective in many cases and current treatments of stroke do not address mitochondrial swelling at all. This dissertation is motivated by the lack of a complete understanding of cellular swelling resulting from stroke and the lack of a good method to begin to study mitochondrial swelling resulting from stroke in living brain tissue. In this dissertation, a novel method of detecting mitochondrial and cellular swelling in living hippocampal slices is developed and validated. The system is used to obtain spatial and temporal information about cellular and mitochondrial swelling resulting from various models of stroke. The effect of changes in water content on light scatter and absorption are examined in two models of brain edema. The results of this study demonstrate that optical techniques can be used to detect changes in water content. Mie scatter theory, the theoretical basis of the dual- angle scatter ratio imaging system, is presented. Computer simulations based on Mie scatter theory are used to determine the optimal angles for imaging. A detailed account of the early systems is presented to explain the motivations for the system design, especially polarization, wavelength and light path. Mitochondrial sized latex particles are used to determine the system response to changes in scattering particle size and concentration. The dual-angle scatter ratio imaging system is used to distinguish between osmotic and excitotoxic models of stroke injury. Such distinction cannot be achieved using the current techniques to study cellular swelling in hippocampal slices. The change in the scatter ratio is

  5. Three dimensional multi-cellular muscle-like tissue engineering in perfusion-based bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerino, Giulia; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Grussenmeyer, Thomas; Melly, Ludovic; Massai, Diana; Banfi, Andrea; Martin, Ivan; Eckstein, Friedrich; Grapow, Martin; Marsano, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tissue engineering strategies often rely on the use of a single progenitor cell source to engineer in vitro biological models; however, multi-cellular environments can better resemble the complexity of native tissues. Previous described co-culture models used skeletal myoblasts, as parenchymal cell source, and mesenchymal or endothelial cells, as stromal component. Here, we propose instead the use of adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, which include both mesenchymal and endothelial cells, to better resemble the native stroma. Percentage of serum supplementation is one of the crucial parameters to steer skeletal myoblasts toward either proliferation (20%) or differentiation (5%) in two-dimensional culture conditions. On the contrary, three-dimensional (3D) skeletal myoblast culture often simply adopts the serum content used in monolayer, without taking into account the new cell environment. When considering 3D cultures of mm-thick engineered tissues, homogeneous and sufficient oxygen supply is paramount to avoid formation of necrotic cores. Perfusion-based bioreactor culture can significantly improve the oxygen access to the cells, enhancing the viability and the contractility of the engineered tissues. In this study, we first investigated the influence of different serum supplementations on the skeletal myoblast ability to proliferate and differentiate during 3D perfusion-based culture. We tested percentages of serum promoting monolayer skeletal myoblast-proliferation (20%) and differentiation (5%) and suitable for stromal cell culture (10%) with a view to identify the most suitable condition for the subsequent co-culture. The 10% serum medium composition resulted in the highest number of mature myotubes and construct functionality. Co-culture with stromal vascular fraction cells at 10% serum also supported the skeletal myoblast differentiation and maturation, hence providing a functional engineered 3D muscle model that resembles

  6. Overview about the localization of nanoparticles in tissue and cellular context by different imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Ostrowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing interest and recent developments in nanotechnology pose previously unparalleled challenges in understanding the effects of nanoparticles on living tissues. Despite significant progress in in vitro cell and tissue culture technologies, observations on particle distribution and tissue responses in whole organisms are still indispensable. In addition to a thorough understanding of complex tissue responses which is the domain of expert pathologists, the localization of particles at their sites of interaction with living structures is essential to complete the picture. In this review we will describe and compare different imaging techniques for localizing inorganic as well as organic nanoparticles in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments. The visualization techniques include well-established methods, such as standard light, fluorescence, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy as well as more recent developments, such as light and electron microscopic autoradiography, fluorescence lifetime imaging, spectral imaging and linear unmixing, superresolution structured illumination, Raman microspectroscopy and X-ray microscopy. Importantly, all methodologies described allow for the simultaneous visualization of nanoparticles and evaluation of cell and tissue changes that are of prime interest for toxicopathologic studies. However, the different approaches vary in terms of applicability for specific particles, sensitivity, optical resolution, technical requirements and thus availability, and effects of labeling on particle properties. Specific bottle necks of each technology are discussed in detail. Interpretation of particle localization data from any of these techniques should therefore respect their specific merits and limitations as no single approach combines all desired properties.

  7. Study on scattering properties of tissues with hyperosmotic chemical agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Optical properties of biological tissue are variable due to the changes of micro-structures and scattering constituents after hyperosmotic chemical agents permeates into tissue. The changes of optical properties of biological tissue are due to the refractive indices matching between the scatterers with high refractive index and the ground substances, which reduce scattering of tissue. The main reasons are that permeated semipermeable chemical agents with higher refractive index than the ground substances of tissuemakes the refractive index of ground substances of tissue higher by the enhancement of the permeated concentration. We studied on the collimated transmittance changes of light penetrating biological tissue after the hyperosmotic chemical agents administrates with different concentration.

  8. Tissue expression of Squamous Cellular Carcinoma Antigen (SCCA is inversely correlated to tumor size in HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangia Anita

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate squamous cellular carcinoma antigen (SCCA in serum and in tumoral and paired peritumoral tissues. We studied 27 patients with liver cirrhosis (LC and 55 with HCC: 20 with a single nodule 3 cm or multifocal (l-HCC. Methods Serum SCCA was measured by the ELISA kit, and in frozen tissues by immunohistochemistry, quantified with appropriate imaging analysis software and expressed in square microns. Continuous variables are reported as means and 95% confidence intervals. Comparisons between independent groups were performed with a generalized linear model and Tukey grouping. Pearson's correlation coefficients were determined to evaluate relations between markers. Qualitative variables were summarized as count and percentage. Statistical significance was set at p-value Results Serum SCCA values in LC patients were 0.41 (0.31–0.55 ng/ml and statistically different from both HCC groups: 1.6 (1.0–2.6 ng/ml in s-HCC, 2.2 (1.28–2.74 ng/ml in l-HCC. SCCA in hepatic tissue was 263.8 (176.6–394.01 μm2 in LC patients, statistically different from values in s-HCC: 1163.2 (863.6–1566.8 μm2 and l-HCC: 625.8 (534.5–732.6. All pairwise comparisons between groups yielded statistically significant differences. Tumoral SCCA resulted linearly related with nodule size, showing a statistically significant inverse relation between the two variables (b = -0.099, p = 0.024. Conclusion There was no statistically significant correlation between tissue and serum levels of SCCA. The significantly stronger expression of SCCA in smaller compared to larger HCC could be important for early HCC detection. However, the increased expression in peritumoral tissue could affect the significance of serological detection.

  9. Programming Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of 3D Hydrogel Cellular Microcultures via Direct Ink Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Joselle M; Badea, Adina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Gladman, A Sydney; Wetzel, David J; Popescu, Gabriel; Lewis, Jennifer A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2016-05-01

    3D hydrogel scaffolds are widely used in cellular microcultures and tissue engineering. Using direct ink writing, microperiodic poly(2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate) (pHEMA) scaffolds are created that are then printed, cured, and modified by absorbing 30 kDa protein poly-l-lysine (PLL) to render them biocompliant in model NIH/3T3 fibroblast and MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cell cultures. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) live cell imaging studies are carried out to quantify cellular motilities for each cell type, substrate, and surface treatment of interest. 3D scaffold mechanics is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), while their absorption kinetics are determined by confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) for a series of hydrated hydrogel films prepared from prepolymers with different homopolymer-to-monomer (Mr ) ratios. The observations reveal that the inks with higher Mr values yield relatively more open-mesh gels due to a lower degree of entanglement. The biocompatibility of printed hydrogel scaffolds can be controlled by both PLL content and hydrogel mesh properties.

  10. CELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF IMMUNOGLOBULINS WITH DIFFERENT ALLOTYPIC SPECIFICITIES IN RABBIT LYMPHOID TISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernis, Benvenuto; Chiappino, Gerolamo; Kelus, Andrew S.; Gell, Philip G. H.

    1965-01-01

    The cellular localization of allotypes in rabbit lymphoid tissues has been studied by immunofluorescence. In heterozygous animals the double staining for two allotypes controlled by allelic genes (A1 and A2; A4 and A5; A4 and A6) has shown the existence of two populations of plasma cells, one containing one allotype and the other the alternative one. The localization in different cells of immunoglobulins marked by allelic allotypic specificities has been confirmed by microspectrography of single cells. An exception to this rule was given by the presence in the germinal centers of lymphoid follicles of apparently uniform mixtures of products of the two allelic genes. Double staining for two allotypes controlled by genes at different loci showed, instead, the presence of many cells containing both allotypes; the number of these cells was highest in doubly homozygotes, in the other it was consistent with random association of non-allelic specificities. In addition double staining for one allotype and gamma G globulins in the lymphoid tissues of rabbits homozygous at the a or at the b locus, has shown the presence of cells containing immunoglobulins that lack one allotype. PMID:4159057

  11. Realistic numerical modelling of human head tissue exposure to electromagnetic waves from cellular phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarella, Gilles; Clatz, Olivier; Lanteri, Stéphane; Beaume, Grégory; Oudot, Steve; Pons, Jean-Philippe; Piperno, Sergo; Joly, Patrick; Wiart, Joe

    2006-06-01

    The ever-rising diffusion of cellular phones has brought about an increased concern for the possible consequences of electromagnetic radiation on human health. Possible thermal effects have been investigated, via experimentation or simulation, by several research projects in the last decade. Concerning numerical modeling, the power absorption in a user's head is generally computed using discretized models built from clinical MRI data. The vast majority of such numerical studies have been conducted using Finite Differences Time Domain methods, although strong limitations of their accuracy are due to heterogeneity, poor definition of the detailed structures of head tissues (staircasing effects), etc. In order to propose numerical modeling using Finite Element or Discontinuous Galerkin Time Domain methods, reliable automated tools for the unstructured discretization of human heads are also needed. Results presented in this article aim at filling the gap between human head MRI images and the accurate numerical modeling of wave propagation in biological tissues and its thermal effects. To cite this article: G. Scarella et al., C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  12. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  13. The development of the orbital fasciae and cellular tissue spaces at an early stage of human ontogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkrobanets A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the orbital fasciae and cellular tissue spaces during the embryonic and prefetal periods of ontogenesis has been studied by means of the morphological research methods. It has been established that the said structures develop from the mesenchyme, surrounding the eyeballs germ and optic nerve. The forming of the cellular tissue spaces proceed simultaneously with the development of the orbital walls and the musculo-fascial complex of the oculomotor muscles and roughly takes shape by the end of the 10-th week. In the course of this period certain contents of the spaces and a topographical arrangement of their components were formed.

  14. Dielectric properties of low-water-content tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S R; Foster, K R

    1985-09-01

    The dielectric properties of two low-water-content tissues, bone marrow and adipose tissue, were measured from 1 kHz to 1 GHz. From 1 kHz to 13 MHz, the measurements were performed using a parallel-plate capacitor method. From 10 MHz to 1 GHz, a reflection coefficient technique using an open-ended coaxial transmission line was employed. The tissue water contents ranged from 1 to almost 70% by weight. The dielectric properties correlate well with the values predicted by mixture theory. Comparison with previous results from high-water-content tissues suggests that bone marrow and adipose tissues contain less motionally altered water per unit dry volume than do the previously studied tissues with lower lipid fractions. The high degree of structural heterogeneity of these tissues was reflected in the large scatter of the data, a source of uncertainty that should be considered in practical applications of the present data.

  15. β-Amyloid pathogenesis: Chemical properties versus cellular levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    , or aggregation propensities. Cytotoxicity correlates inversely with total Aβ42 (R2=0.65, P =.016) and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios (R2=0.76, P=.005), i.e., chemical properties that increase Aβ42 also reduce toxicity. The complexity and heterogeneity of data reveal the need to understand these phenotypes better, e.......g., by focusing on the chemical properties of the involved Aβ species....

  16. Crosslinked fibrin gels for tissue engineering: two approaches to improve their properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Martínez, Tatiana C; Luque-Guillén, Victoria; González-García, Cristina; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis; Gallego-Ferrer, Gloria

    2015-02-01

    Fibrin is a protein that can be used as an ideal scaffolding material to promote tissue regeneration. In order to enhance its physical properties in this study a natural crosslinker, genipin (GP), was employed with the aim to obtain a hydrogel with tuneable properties for tissue engineering applications. The fibrin gel was crosslinked by two different methods using four concentrations of GP to get a stable hydrogel network. Crosslinking density, mechanical properties, swelling, and enzymatic degradation of the hydrogels were tested for each GP content and method employed. The method I: Crosslinking after gel formation promotes a high crosslinking and retains the gel shape for long term whilst the method II: Simultaneous gel formation and crosslinking improves the mechanical properties of the gel. This study confirms the use of GP at different concentrations as a suitable crosslinker of fibrin that promotes the cellular viability of L929 for 21 days of in vitro culture.

  17. Free Radical Scavenging and Cellular Antioxidant Properties of Astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, Janina; Matsugo, Seiichi; Yokokawa, Haruka; Koshida, Yutaro; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Seidel, Ulrike; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Rimbach, Gerald; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba

    2016-01-14

    Astaxanthin is a coloring agent which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture nutrition. Recently, potential health benefits of astaxanthin have been discussed which may be partly related to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. Our electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping data suggest that synthetic astaxanthin is a potent free radical scavenger in terms of diphenylpicryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and galvinoxyl free radicals. Furthermore, astaxanthin dose-dependently quenched singlet oxygen as determined by photon counting. In addition to free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching properties, astaxanthin induced the antioxidant enzyme paroxoanase-1, enhanced glutathione concentrations and prevented lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes. Present results suggest that, beyond its coloring properties, synthetic astaxanthin exhibits free radical scavenging, singlet oxygen quenching, and antioxidant activities which could probably positively affect animal and human health.

  18. Free Radical Scavenging and Cellular Antioxidant Properties of Astaxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Dose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin is a coloring agent which is used as a feed additive in aquaculture nutrition. Recently, potential health benefits of astaxanthin have been discussed which may be partly related to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. Our electron spin resonance (ESR and spin trapping data suggest that synthetic astaxanthin is a potent free radical scavenger in terms of diphenylpicryl-hydrazyl (DPPH and galvinoxyl free radicals. Furthermore, astaxanthin dose-dependently quenched singlet oxygen as determined by photon counting. In addition to free radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching properties, astaxanthin induced the antioxidant enzyme paroxoanase-1, enhanced glutathione concentrations and prevented lipid peroxidation in cultured hepatocytes. Present results suggest that, beyond its coloring properties, synthetic astaxanthin exhibits free radical scavenging, singlet oxygen quenching, and antioxidant activities which could probably positively affect animal and human health.

  19. Use of hybrid discrete cellular models for identification of macroscopic nutrient loss in reaction-diffusion models of tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristotelous, Andreas C; Haider, Mansoor A

    2014-08-01

    Macroscopic models accounting for cellular effects in natural or engineered tissues may involve unknown constitutive terms that are highly dependent on interactions at the scale of individual cells. Hybrid discrete models, which represent cells individually, were used to develop and apply techniques for modeling diffusive nutrient transport and cellular uptake to identify a nonlinear nutrient loss term in a macroscopic reaction-diffusion model of the system. Flexible and robust numerical methods were used, based on discontinuous Galerkin finite elements in space and a Crank-Nicolson temporal discretization. Scales were bridged via averaging operations over a complete set of subdomains yielding data for identification of a macroscopic nutrient loss term that was accurately captured via a fifth-order polynomial. Accuracy of the identified macroscopic model was demonstrated by direct, quantitative comparisons of the tissue and cellular scale models in terms of three error norms computed on a mesoscale mesh.

  20. Galvanic apparent internal impedance: an intrinsic tissue property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alex; Rabinowitch, Haim D; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-11-01

    Using basic galvanic cell principles, the ability of tissues to generate electrical current through electrolysis was characterized. Studying Zn/Cu electrolysis in animal organs revealed a fundamental and measurable tissue-specific property - the galvanic apparent internal impedance (GAII), that is most likely related to the salt bridge function of tissues delineated by electrodes. Further to the fundamental knowledge acquired, GAII enables a new diagnostic method to distinguish between tissue types and to determine their health status without a need for expensive calibration, as often required when external power source is used. We demonstrated the GAII sensitivity in detecting tissue ablation with microwave heating or irreversible electroporation. The results open the way for a novel, inexpensive self-powered tissue diagnostic system for a wide range of applications such as minimally invasive tissue health status, ischemia, hydration, real time intra-operative control of minimally invasive surgery, medical imaging, virtual biopsy and many others.

  1. Intermittent straining accelerates the development of tissue properties in engineered heart valve tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubbens, M.P.; Mol, A.; Boerboom, R.A.; Bank, R.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves lack sufficient amounts of functionally organized structures and consequently do not meet in vivo mechanical demands. To optimize tissue architecture and hence improve mechanical properties, various in vitro mechanical conditioning protocols have been proposed, of whic

  2. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes.

  3. Controlled inflation of voids in cellular polymer ferroelectrets: Optimizing electromechanical transducer properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, M.; Wirges, W.; Gerhard-Multhaupt, R.; Dansachmüller, M.; Schwödiauer, R.; Bauer-Gogonea, S.; Bauer, S.; Paajanen, M.; Minkkinen, H.; Raukola, J.

    2004-01-01

    When exposed to sufficiently high electric fields, polymer-foam electret materials with closed cells exhibit ferroelectric-like behavior and may therefore be called ferroelectrets. In cellular ferroelectrets, the influence of the cell size and shape distributions on the application-relevant properties is not yet understood. Therefore, controlled inflation experiments were carried out on cellular polypropylene films, and the resulting elastical and electromechanical parameters were determined. The elastic modulus in the thickness direction shows a minimum with a corresponding maximum in the electromechanical transducer coefficient. The resonance frequency shifts as a function of the elastic modulus and the relative density of the inflated cellular films. Therefore, the transducer properties of cellular ferroelectrets can be optimized by means of controlled inflation.

  4. Detergent-enzymatic decellularization of swine blood vessels: insight on mechanical properties for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegata, Alessandro F; Asnaghi, M Adelaide; Stefani, Ilaria; Maestroni, Anna; Maestroni, Silvia; Dominioni, Tommaso; Zonta, Sandro; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Mantero, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Small caliber vessels substitutes still remain an unmet clinical need; few autologous substitutes are available, while synthetic grafts show insufficient patency in the long term. Decellularization is the complete removal of all cellular and nuclear matters from a tissue while leaving a preserved extracellular matrix representing a promising tool for the generation of acellular scaffolds for tissue engineering, already used for various tissues with positive outcomes. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of a detergent-enzymatic decellularization protocol on swine arteries in terms of cell removal, extracellular matrix preservation, and mechanical properties. Furthermore, the effect of storage at -80°C on the mechanical properties of the tissue is evaluated. Swine arteries were harvested, frozen, and decellularized; histological analysis revealed complete cell removal and preserved extracellular matrix. Furthermore, the residual DNA content in decellularized tissues was far low compared to native one. Mechanical testings were performed on native, defrozen, and decellularized tissues; no statistically significant differences were reported for Young's modulus, ultimate stress, compliance, burst pressure, and suture retention strength, while ultimate strain and stress relaxation of decellularized vessels were significantly different from the native ones. Considering the overall results, the process was confirmed to be suitable for the generation of acellular scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

  5. Detergent-Enzymatic Decellularization of Swine Blood Vessels: Insight on Mechanical Properties for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegata, Alessandro F.; Asnaghi, M. Adelaide; Stefani, Ilaria; Maestroni, Anna; Maestroni, Silvia; Dominioni, Tommaso; Zonta, Sandro; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Mantero, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Small caliber vessels substitutes still remain an unmet clinical need; few autologous substitutes are available, while synthetic grafts show insufficient patency in the long term. Decellularization is the complete removal of all cellular and nuclear matters from a tissue while leaving a preserved extracellular matrix representing a promising tool for the generation of acellular scaffolds for tissue engineering, already used for various tissues with positive outcomes. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of a detergent-enzymatic decellularization protocol on swine arteries in terms of cell removal, extracellular matrix preservation, and mechanical properties. Furthermore, the effect of storage at −80°C on the mechanical properties of the tissue is evaluated. Swine arteries were harvested, frozen, and decellularized; histological analysis revealed complete cell removal and preserved extracellular matrix. Furthermore, the residual DNA content in decellularized tissues was far low compared to native one. Mechanical testings were performed on native, defrozen, and decellularized tissues; no statistically significant differences were reported for Young's modulus, ultimate stress, compliance, burst pressure, and suture retention strength, while ultimate strain and stress relaxation of decellularized vessels were significantly different from the native ones. Considering the overall results, the process was confirmed to be suitable for the generation of acellular scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering. PMID:23865072

  6. Detergent-Enzymatic Decellularization of Swine Blood Vessels: Insight on Mechanical Properties for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro F. Pellegata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small caliber vessels substitutes still remain an unmet clinical need; few autologous substitutes are available, while synthetic grafts show insufficient patency in the long term. Decellularization is the complete removal of all cellular and nuclear matters from a tissue while leaving a preserved extracellular matrix representing a promising tool for the generation of acellular scaffolds for tissue engineering, already used for various tissues with positive outcomes. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of a detergent-enzymatic decellularization protocol on swine arteries in terms of cell removal, extracellular matrix preservation, and mechanical properties. Furthermore, the effect of storage at −80°C on the mechanical properties of the tissue is evaluated. Swine arteries were harvested, frozen, and decellularized; histological analysis revealed complete cell removal and preserved extracellular matrix. Furthermore, the residual DNA content in decellularized tissues was far low compared to native one. Mechanical testings were performed on native, defrozen, and decellularized tissues; no statistically significant differences were reported for Young’s modulus, ultimate stress, compliance, burst pressure, and suture retention strength, while ultimate strain and stress relaxation of decellularized vessels were significantly different from the native ones. Considering the overall results, the process was confirmed to be suitable for the generation of acellular scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

  7. Metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases in mesothelial cells. Cellular differentiation influences expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, B C; Santana, A; Xu, Q P; Petersen, M J; Campbell, E J; Hoidal, J R; Welgus, H G

    1993-04-01

    Mesothelial cells play a critical role in the remodeling process that follows serosal injury. Although mesothelial cells are known to synthesize a variety of extracellular matrix components including types I, III, and IV collagens, their potential to participate in matrix degradation has not been explored. We now report that human pleural and peritoneal mesothelial cells express interstitial collagenase, 72- and 92-kD gelatinases (type IV collagenases), and the counterregulatory tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP). Our initial characterization of the mesothelial cell metalloenzymes and TIMP has revealed: (a) they are likely identical to corresponding molecules secreted by other human cells; (b) they are secreted rather than stored in an intracellular pool; (c) a primary site of regulation occurs at a pretranslational level; (d) phorbol myristate acetate, via activation of protein kinase C, upregulates expression of collagenase, 92-kD gelatinase, and TIMP, but has no effect on expression of 72-kD gelatinase; and (e) lipopolysaccharide fails to upregulate the biosynthesis of either metalloproteinases or TIMP. Of particular interest is the observation that the state of cellular differentiation has a striking influence on the expression of metalloenzymes and TIMP, such that epitheloid cells display a more matrix-degradative phenotype (increased 92-kD gelatinase and decreased TIMP) than their fibroblastoid counterparts. We speculate that mesothelial cells directly participate in the extracellular matrix turnover that follows serosal injury via elaboration of metalloproteinases and TIMP. Additionally, the reactive cuboidal mesothelium which is characteristic of the early response to serosal injury may manifest a matrix-degenerative phenotype favoring normal repair rather than fibrosis.

  8. Changes in cellular mechanical properties during onset or progression of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciasca, Gabriele; Papi, Massimiliano; Minelli, Eleonora; Palmieri, Valentina; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development represents a multistep process starting with specific mutations that affect proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. These mutations confer a selective growth advantage to colonic epithelial cells that form first dysplastic crypts, and then malignant tumours and metastases. All these steps are accompanied by deep mechanical changes at the cellular and the tissue level. A growing consensus is emerging that such modifications are not merely a by-product of the malignant progression, but they could play a relevant role in the cancer onset and accelerate its progression. In this review, we focus on recent studies investigating the role of the biomechanical signals in the initiation and the development of CRC. We show that mechanical cues might contribute to early phases of the tumour initiation by controlling the Wnt pathway, one of most important regulators of cell proliferation in various systems. We highlight how physical stimuli may be involved in the differentiation of non-invasive cells into metastatic variants and how metastatic cells modify their mechanical properties, both stiffness and adhesion, to survive the mechanical stress associated with intravasation, circulation and extravasation. A deep comprehension of these mechanical modifications may help scientist to define novel molecular targets for the cure of CRC.

  9. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  10. Scaffolds and tissue regeneration: An overview of the functional properties of selected organic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Márcia A; Alves, Thais F R; de Lima, Renata; Oliveira, José M; Vila, Marta M D C; Balcão, Victor M; Severino, Patrícia; Chaud, Marco V

    2016-10-01

    Tissue engineering plays a significant role both in the re-establishment of functions and regeneration of organic tissues. Success in manufacturing projects for biological scaffolds, for the purpose of tissue regeneration, is conditioned by the selection of parameters such as the biomaterial, the device architecture, and the specificities of the cells making up the organic tissue to create, in vivo, a microenvironment that preserves and further enhances the proliferation of a specific cell phenotype. To support this approach, we have screened scientific publications that show biomedical applications of scaffolds, biomechanical, morphological, biochemical, and hemodynamic characteristics of the target organic tissues, and the possible interactions between different cell matrices and biological scaffolds. This review article provides an overview on the biomedical application of scaffolds and on the characteristics of the (bio)materials commonly used for manufacturing these biological devices used in tissue engineering, taking into consideration the cellular specificity of the target tissue. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1483-1494, 2016.

  11. Dynamic Properties of Human Bronchial Airway Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Pallai, Prathap; Corrigan, Chris J; Lee, Tak H

    2011-01-01

    Young's Modulus and dynamic force moduli were measured on human bronchial airway tissues by compression. A simple and low-cost system for measuring the tensile-strengh of soft bio-materials has been built for this study. The force-distance measurements were undertaken on the dissected bronchial airway walls, cartilages and mucosa from the surgery-removed lungs donated by lung cancer patients with COPD. Young's modulus is estimated from the initial slope of unloading force-displacement curve and the dynamic force moduli (storage and loss) are measured at low frequency (from 3 to 45 Hz). All the samples were preserved in the PBS solution at room temperature and the measurements were perfomed within 4 hours after surgery. Young's modulus of the human bronchial airway walls are fond ranged between 0.17 and 1.65 MPa, ranged between 0.25 to 1.96 MPa for cartilages, and between 0.02 to 0.28 MPa for mucosa. The storage modulus are found varying 0.10 MPa with frequency while the loss modulus are found increasing from ...

  12. Using a Virtual Tissue Culture System to Assist Students in Understanding Life at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauglin, Jacqueline S.; Seaquist, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    In every biology course ever taught in the nation's classrooms, and in every biology book ever published, students are taught about the "cell." The cell is as fundamental to biology as the atom is to chemistry. Truly, everything an organism does occurs fundamentally at the cellular level. Beyond memorizing the cellular definition, students are not…

  13. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Hino, Yuki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  14. An improved instrumental characterization of mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van; Castro-Prada, E.M.; Luyten, H.; Lichtendonk, W.; Hamer, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed study was performed to simultaneously measure the mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid foods. Different critical aspects are discussed in order to assess optimal test conditions. These are primarily data sampling rate, microphone positioning, frequency spectrum of i

  15. Correlation between the mechanical and histological properties of liver tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Başdoğan, Çağatay; Yarpuzlu, Berkay; Ayyıldız, Mehmet; Tok, Olgu Enis; Aktaş, Ranan Gülhan

    2014-01-01

    In order to gain further insight into the mechanisms of tissue damage during the progression of liver diseases as well as the liver preservation for transplantation, an improved understanding of the relation between the mechanical and histological properties of liver is necessary. We suggest that this relation can only be established truly if the changes in the states of those properties are investigated dynamically as a function of post mortem time. In this regard, we first perform mechanica...

  16. Chemical linkage to injected tissues is a distinctive property of oxidized avidin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita De Santis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that the oxidized avidin, named AvidinOX®, resides for weeks within injected tissues as a consequence of the formation of Schiff's bases between its aldehyde groups and tissue protein amino groups. We also showed, in a mouse pre-clinical model, the usefulness of AvidinOX for the delivery of radiolabeled biotin to inoperable tumors. Taking into account that AvidinOX is the first oxidized glycoprotein known to chemically link to injected tissues, we tested in the mouse a panel of additional oxidized glycoproteins, with the aim of investigating the phenomenon. We produced oxidized ovalbumin and mannosylated streptavidin which share with avidin glycosylation pattern and tetrameric structure, respectively and found that neither of them linked significantly to cells in vitro nor to injected tissues in vivo, despite the presence of functional aldehyde groups. The study, extended to additional oxidized glycoproteins, showed that the in vivo chemical conjugation is a distinctive property of the oxidized avidin. Relevance of the high cationic charge of avidin into the stable linkage of AvidinOX to tissues is demonstrated as the oxidized acetylated avidin lost the property. Plasmon resonance on matrix proteins and cellular impedance analyses showed in vitro that avidin exhibits a peculiar interaction with proteins and cells that allows the formation of highly stable Schiff's bases, after oxidation.

  17. Adrenergic regulation of cellular plasticity in brown, beige/brite and white adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Vanesa D; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of brown adipose tissue in adult humans along with the recognition of adipocyte heterogeneity and plasticity of white fat depots has renewed the interest in targeting adipose tissue for therapeutic benefit. Adrenergic activation is a well-established means of recruiting catabolic adipocyte phenotypes in brown and white adipose tissues. In this article, we review mechanisms of brown adipocyte recruitment by the sympathetic nervous system and by direct β-adrenergic receptor activation. We highlight the distinct modes of brown adipocyte recruitment in brown, beige/brite, and white adipose tissues, UCP1-independent thermogenesis, and potential non-thermogenic, metabolically beneficial effects of brown adipocytes.

  18. Interactions between remodelling, architecture and tissue properties in cancellous bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. van der Linden (Jacqueline)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the research projects described in this thesis was to gain more insight in the regulation of bone remodeling and in the interactions between bone remodeling, architecture and bone tissue properties. The most striking changes during aging and osteoporosis take place in cancello

  19. The Study Of Properties Of The Word Of Mouth Marketing Using Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Styczeń Agnieszka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibility of using cellular automata, to study the properties of word of mouth (w-o-m marketing. Cellular automata allow to analyze the dynamics of changes in views and attitudes in social groups based on local interactions between people in small groups of friends, family members etc. The proposed paper shows the possibility of modelling the dynamics of word of mouth mechanism, if the basic assumptions of this process are: different size groups where this phenomenon occurs, and varied access to information. On the competing firms market, the dependence of the w-o-m mechanism dynamics on the model parameters is shown

  20. Antimicrobial properties of nudibranchs tissues extracts from South Andaman, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kota Veeraswamy Reddy; Raju Mohanraju; Kada Narayana Murthy; Chatragadda Ramesh; Perumal Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of tissues extracts of different nudibranchs such asPhyllidia varicosa, Plakobranchus ocellatus, Phyllidiella rosans andHalgerda stricklandi against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: Nudibranchs tissue samples were subjected to organic solvent extraction for antimicrobial activity by well diffusion method. Results: The crude extract 50μL (0.2 mg) ofPhyllidia varicosa showed the maximum inhibitory zone (22 mm) againstShigella flexneri.Plakobranchus ocellatus extract of 50μL (0.2 mg) showed the maximum inhibitory zone againstShigella flexneri (22 mm) and Staphylococcus aureus (19 mm) and no significant activity was found against the fungal pathogens. Conclusions:This work reveals that nudibranch tissues contain the antimicrobial secondary metabolites, which leads the significant activity against bacterial pathogens and further emphasizes detailed study on novel drug discovery from nudibranch tissues against certain human bacterial infections.

  1. A mathematical model representing cellular immune development and response to Salmonella of chicken intestinal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, D.; Bannink, A.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create a dynamic mathematical model of the development of the cellular branch of the intestinal immune system of poultry during the first 42 days of life and of its response towards an oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The system elements were

  2. Cellular Automata on Graphs: Topological Properties of ER Graphs Evolved towards Low-Entropy Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Thorsten Hütt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular automata (CA are a remarkably  efficient tool for exploring general properties of complex systems and spatiotemporal patterns arising from local rules. Totalistic cellular automata,  where the update  rules depend  only on the density of neighboring states, are at the same time a versatile  tool for exploring  dynamical  processes on graphs. Here we briefly review our previous results on cellular automata on graphs, emphasizing some systematic relationships between network architecture and dynamics identified in this way. We then extend the investigation  towards graphs obtained in a simulated-evolution procedure, starting from Erdő s–Rényi (ER graphs and selecting for low entropies of the CA dynamics. Our key result is a strong association of low Shannon entropies with a broadening of the graph’s degree distribution.

  3. Elastic, permeability and swelling properties of human intervertebral disc tissues: A benchmark for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; DeLucca, John F; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-06-27

    The aim of functional tissue engineering is to repair and replace tissues that have a biomechanical function, i.e., connective orthopaedic tissues. To do this, it is necessary to have accurate benchmarks for the elastic, permeability, and swelling (i.e., biphasic-swelling) properties of native tissues. However, in the case of the intervertebral disc, the biphasic-swelling properties of individual tissues reported in the literature exhibit great variation and even span several orders of magnitude. This variation is probably caused by differences in the testing protocols and the constitutive models used to analyze the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the human lumbar disc annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) biphasic-swelling properties using a consistent experimental protocol and analyses. The testing protocol was composed of a swelling period followed by multiple confined compression ramps. To analyze the confined compression data, the tissues were modeled using a biphasic-swelling model, which augments the standard biphasic model through the addition of a deformation-dependent osmotic pressure term. This model allows considering the swelling deformations and the contribution of osmotic pressure in the analysis of the experimental data. The swelling stretch was not different between the disc regions (AF: 1.28±0.16; NP: 1.73±0.74; CEP: 1.29±0.26), with a total average of 1.42. The aggregate modulus (Ha) of the extra-fibrillar matrix was higher in the CEP (390kPa) compared to the NP (100kPa) or AF (30kPa). The permeability was very different across tissue regions, with the AF permeability (64 E(-16)m(4)/Ns) higher than the NP and CEP (~5.5 E(-16)m(4)/Ns). Additionally, a normalized time-constant (3000s) for the stress relaxation was similar for all the disc tissues. The properties measured in this study are important as benchmarks for tissue engineering and for modeling the disc's mechanical

  4. Imaging of the elastic properties of tissue--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Parker, K J; Lerner, R M; Levinson, S F

    1996-01-01

    Recently, a number of methods have been developed that make it possible to image the elastic properties of soft tissues. Because certain types of tissues such as malignant lesions, for example, have elastic properties that are markedly different from surrounding tissues, elasticity imaging could provide a significant adjunct to current diagnostic ultrasonic methods. Further, elasticity imaging techniques could be used to augment the study of tissues that change their elastic properties, such as skeletal and cardiac muscle. In this paper, we survey some of the previous work done in the related field of biomechanics, and we review measurement techniques from the 1950s to the 1980s. Different approaches to elastic imaging and signal processing are then discussed and a lexicography for elastic imaging is introduced. It is hoped that this nomenclature will provide a meaningful categorization of various approaches and will make evident the inherent parameters displayed and conditions applied in deriving the resulting images. Key assumptions and signal processing approaches are also reviewed. Finally, directions for future work are suggested.

  5. Comparative analysis of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in human based on network topologies and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Shiyuan; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Xiaowen; Zuo, Yongchun; Sun, Dianjun; Lv, Yingli

    2016-06-01

    Housekeeping genes are genes that are turned on most of the time in almost every tissue to maintain cellular functions. Tissue-selective genes are predominantly expressed in one or a few biologically relevant tissue types. Benefitting from the massive gene expression microarray data obtained over the past decades, the properties of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes can now be investigated on a large-scale manner. In this study, we analyzed the topological properties of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Furthermore, we compared the biological properties and amino acid usage between these two gene groups. The results indicated that there were significant differences in topological properties between housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in the PPI network, and housekeeping genes had higher centrality properties and may play important roles in the complex biological network environment. We also found that there were significant differences in multiple biological properties and many amino acid compositions. The functional genes enrichment and subcellular localizations analysis was also performed to investigate the characterization of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes. The results indicated that the two gene groups showed significant different enrichment in drug targets, disease genes and toxin targets, and located in different subcellular localizations. At last, the discriminations between the properties of two gene groups were measured by the F-score, and expression stage had the most discriminative index in all properties. These findings may elucidate the biological mechanisms for understanding housekeeping and tissue-selective genes and may contribute to better annotate housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in other organisms.

  6. Effects of physicochemical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles on cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Baek, M.; Chung, H. E.; Choi, S. J.

    2011-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have been used as a source of zinc, an essential trace element in food industry and also widely applied to various cosmetic products. However, there are few researches demonstrating that the cellular uptake behaviours of ZnO with respect to the physicochemical characteristics such as particle size and surface charge in human cells. In this study, we evaluated the cellular uptake of ZnO with two different sizes (20 and 70 nm) and different charges (positive and negative). Human lung epithelial cells were exposed to ZnO for a given time, and then the uptake amount of ZnO was measured with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The results showed that the smaller sized ZnO could more easily enter the cells than the larger sized ZnO. In terms of surface charge, positively charged ZnO showed high cellular uptake compared to ZnO with negative charge. The internalization pathway of positively charged ZnO nanoparticles was determined to be primarily related to the energy-dependent endocytosis. It is, therefore, concluded that the particle size and surface charge of ZnO nanoparticles are critical factors influencing on their cellular uptake. Understanding the cellular uptake behaviours of nanoparticles with respect to physicochemical properties may be important to predict their toxicity potential on human.

  7. Synchrony of plant cellular circadian clocks with heterogeneous properties under light/dark cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masaaki; Muranaka, Tomoaki; Ito, Shogo; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2017-03-22

    Individual cells in a plant can work independently as circadian clocks, and their properties are the basis of various circadian phenomena. The behaviour of individual cellular clocks in Lemna gibba was orderly under 24-h light/dark cycles despite their heterogeneous free-running periods (FRPs). Here, we reveal the entrainment habits of heterogeneous cellular clocks using non-24-h light/dark cycles (T-cycles). The cellular rhythms of AtCCA1::LUC under T = 16 h cycles showed heterogeneous entrainment that was associated with their heterogeneous FRPs. Under T = 12 h cycles, most cells showed rhythms having ~24-h periods. This suggested that the lower limit of entrainment to the light/dark cycles of heterogeneous cellular circadian clocks is set to a period longer than 12 h, which enables them to be synchronous under ~24-h daily cycles without being perturbed by short light/dark cycles. The entrainment habits of individual cellular clocks are likely to be the basis of the circadian behaviour of plant under the natural day-night cycle with noisy environmental fluctuations. We further suggest that modifications of EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) in individual cells deviate the entrainability to shorter T-cycles possibly by altering both the FRPs and light responsiveness.

  8. Determination of the mechanical properties of solid and cellular polymeric dosage forms by diametral compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2016-07-25

    At present, the immediate-release solid dosage forms, such as the oral tablets and capsules, are granular solids. They release drug rapidly and have adequate mechanical properties, but their manufacture is fraught with difficulties inherent in processing particulate matter. Such difficulties, however, could be overcome by liquid-based processing. Therefore, we have recently introduced polymeric cellular (i.e., highly porous) dosage forms prepared from a melt process. Experiments have shown that upon immersion in a dissolution medium, the cellular dosage forms with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as excipient and with predominantly open-cell topology disintegrate by exfoliation, thus enabling rapid drug release. If the volume fraction of voids of the open-cell structures is too large, however, their mechanical strength is adversely affected. At present, the common method for determining the tensile strength of brittle, solid dosage forms (such as select granular forms) is the diametral compression test. In this study, the theory of diametral compression is first refined to demonstrate that the relevant mechanical properties of ductile and cellular solids (i.e., the elastic modulus and the yield strength) can also be extracted from this test. Diametral compression experiments are then conducted on PEG-based solid and cellular dosage forms. It is found that the elastic modulus and yield strength of the open-cell structures are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of the non-porous solids, but still are substantially greater than the stiffness and strength requirements for handling the dosage forms manually. This work thus demonstrates that melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms that release drug rapidly can be designed and manufactured to have adequate mechanical properties.

  9. Exploring Cellular Interactions of Liposomes Using Protein Corona Fingerprints and Physicochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Arafeh; Palchetti, Sara; Pozzi, Daniela; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Caracciolo, Giulio; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-03-22

    To control liposomes fate and transport upon contact with biofluids, it is essential to consider several parameters affecting the synthetic and biological identity of liposomes, as well as liposome-protein corona (PC) aspects. As a powerful tool in this data mining adventure, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approach is used to correlate physicochemical properties of liposomes and their PC fingerprints to multiple quantified biological responses. In the present study, the relationship between cellular interactions of a set of structurally diverse liposomal formulations and their physicochemical and PC properties has been investigated via linear and nonlinear QSAR models. Significant parameters affecting cellular uptake and cell viability of liposomes in two important cancer cell lines (PC3 and HeLa) have been identified. The developed QSARs have the capacity to be implemented in advanced targeted delivery of liposomal drugs.

  10. Regulation of Cellular Response Pattern to Phosphorus Ion is a New Target for the Design of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Wang, Fangjuan; Zeng, Wen; Sun, Jun; Li, Li; Yang, Mingcan; Sun, Jiansen; Wu, Yangxiao; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhu, Chuhong

    2015-05-01

    Regulation of cellular response pattern to phosphorus ion (PI) is a new target for the design of tissue-engineered materials. Changing cellular response pattern to high PI can maintain monocyte/macrophage survival in TEBV and the signal of increasing PI can be converted by klotho to the adenosine signals through the regulation of energy metabolism in monocytes/macrophages.

  11. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular l...

  12. Cellular and molecular players in adipose tissue inflammation in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Lee, Jongsoon

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that inflammation is an important pathogenic mediator of the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. It is now generally accepted that tissue-resident immune cells play a major role in the regulation of this obesity-induced inflammation. The roles that adipose tissue (AT)-resident immune cells play have been particularly extensively studied. AT contains most types of immune cells and obesity increases their numbers and activation levels, particularly in AT macrophages (ATMs). Other pro-inflammatory cells found in AT include neutrophils, Th1 CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, DCs, and mast cells. However, AT also contains anti-inflammatory cells that counter the pro-inflammatory immune cells that are responsible for the obesity-induced inflammation in this tissue. These anti-inflammatory cells include regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs), Th2 CD4 T cells, and eosinophils. Hence, AT inflammation is shaped by the regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory immune cell homeostasis, and obesity skews this balance towards a more pro-inflammatory status. Recent genetic studies revealed several molecules that participate in the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. In this review, the cellular and molecular players that participate in the regulation of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance are discussed, with particular attention being placed on the roles of the cellular players in these pathogeneses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  13. Omega-3 PUFA of marine origin limit diet-induced obesity in mice by reducing cellularity of adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzickova, Jana; Rossmeisl, Martin; Prazak, Tomas; Flachs, Pavel; Sponarova, Jana; Veck, Marek; Tvrzicka, Eva; Bryhn, Morten; Kopecky, Jan

    2004-12-01

    Omega-3 PUFA of marine origin reduce adiposity in animals fed a high-fat diet. Our aim was to learn whether EPA and DHA could limit development of obesity and reduce cellularity of adipose tissue and whether other dietary FA could influence the effect of EPA/DHA. Weight gain induced by composite high-fat diet in C57BL/6J mice was limited when the content of EPA/DHA was increased from 1 to 12% (wt/wt) of dietary lipids. Accumulation of adipose tissue was reduced, especially of the epididymal fat. Low ratio of EPA to DHA promoted the effect. A higher dose of EPA/DHA was required to reduce adiposity when admixed to diets that did not promote obesity, the semisynthetic high-fat diets rich in EFA, either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3 n-3, the precursor of EPA and DHA) or linoleic (18:2 n-6) acid. Quantification of adipose tissue DNA revealed that except for the diet rich in ALA the reduction of epididymal fat was associated with 34-50% depression of tissue cellularity, similar to the 30% caloric restriction in the case of the high-fat composite diet. Changes in plasma markers and adipose gene expression indicated improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism due to EPA/DHA even in the context of the diet rich in ALA. Our results document augmentation of the antiadipogenic effect of EPA/DHA during development of obesity and suggest that EPA/DHA could reduce accumulation of body fat by limiting both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of fat cells. Increased dietary intake of EPA/DHA may be beneficial regardless of the ALA intake.

  14. A surface wave elastography technique for measuring tissue viscoelastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    A surface wave elastography method is proposed to study the viscoelastic properties of skin by measuring the surface wave speed and attenuation on the skin. Experiments were carried out on porcine skin tissues. The surface wave speed is measured by the change of phase with distance. The wave attenuation is measured by the decay of wave amplitude with distance. The change of viscoelastic properties with temperature was studied at room and body temperatures. The wave speed was 1.83m/s at 22°C but reduced to 1.52m/s at 33°C. The viscoelastic ratio was almost constant from 22°C to 33°C. Fresh and decayed tissues were studied. The wave speed of the decayed tissue increased from 1.83m/s of fresh state to 2.73m/s. The viscoelastic ratio was 0.412/mm at the decayed state compared to 0.215/mm at the fresh state. More tissue samples are needed to study these viscoelastic parameters according to specific applications.

  15. Interactions between remodelling, architecture and tissue properties in cancellous bone

    OpenAIRE

    Linden, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the research projects described in this thesis was to gain more insight in the regulation of bone remodeling and in the interactions between bone remodeling, architecture and bone tissue properties. The most striking changes during aging and osteoporosis take place in cancellous bone. For this reason, the research presented in this thesis focussed on bone remodeling in cancellous bone. We used computer modeling, finite element calculations and in vivo labeled bone speci...

  16. Tissue architecture and function: dynamic reciprocity via extra- and intra-cellular matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-12-23

    Mammary gland development, functional differentiation, and homeostasis are orchestrated and sustained by a balance of biochemical and biophysical cues from the organ's microenvironment. The three-dimensional microenvironment of the mammary gland, predominantly 'encoded' by a collaboration between the extracellular matrix (ECM), hormones, and growth factors, sends signals from ECM receptors through the cytoskeletal intracellular matrix to nuclear and chromatin structures resulting in gene expression; the ECM in turn is regulated and remodeled by signals from the nucleus. In this chapter, we discuss how coordinated ECM deposition and remodeling is necessary for mammary gland development, how the ECM provides structural and biochemical cues necessary for tissue-specific function, and the role of the cytoskeleton in mediating the extra - to intracellular dialogue occurring between the nucleus and the microenvironment. When operating normally, the cytoskeletal-mediated dynamic and reciprocal integration of tissue architecture and function directs mammary gland development, tissue polarity, and ultimately, tissue-specific gene expression. Cancer occurs when these dynamic interactions go awry for an extended time.

  17. Three-dimensional immersive virtual reality for studying cellular compartments in 3D models from EM preparations of neural tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Cali, Corrado

    2015-07-14

    Advances for application of electron microscopy to serial imaging are opening doors to new ways of analyzing cellular structure. New and improved algorithms and workflows for manual and semiautomated segmentation allow to observe the spatial arrangement of the smallest cellular features with unprecedented detail in full three-dimensions (3D). From larger samples, higher complexity models can be generated; however, they pose new challenges to data management and analysis. Here, we review some currently available solutions and present our approach in detail. We use the fully immersive virtual reality (VR) environment CAVE (cave automatic virtual environment), a room where we are able to project a cellular reconstruction and visualize in 3D, to step into a world created with Blender, a free, fully customizable 3D modeling software with NeuroMorph plug-ins for visualization and analysis of electron microscopy (EM) preparations of brain tissue. Our workflow allows for full and fast reconstructions of volumes of brain neuropil using ilastik, a software tool for semiautomated segmentation of EM stacks. With this visualization environment, we can walk into the model containing neuronal and astrocytic processes to study the spatial distribution of glycogen granules, a major energy source that is selectively stored in astrocytes. The use of CAVE was key to observe a nonrandom distribution of glycogen, and led us to develop tools to quantitatively analyze glycogen clustering and proximity to other subcellular features. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein extraction and 2-DE of water- and lipid-soluble proteins from bovine pericardium, a low-cellularity tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Leigh G; Choe, Leila; Lee, Kelvin H; Reardon, Kenneth F; Orton, E Christopher

    2008-11-01

    Bovine pericardium (BP) is an important biomaterial used in the production of glutaraldehyde-fixed heart valves and tissue-engineering applications. The ability to perform proteomic analysis on BP is useful for a range of studies, including investigation of immune rejection after implantation. However, proteomic analysis of fibrous tissues such as BP is challenging due to their relative low-cellularity and abundance of extracellular matrix. A variety of methods for tissue treatment, protein extraction, and fractionation were investigated with the aim of producing high-quality 2-DE gels for both water- and lipid-soluble BP proteins. Extraction of water-soluble proteins with 3-(benzyldimethylammonio)-propanesulfonate followed by n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside extraction and ethanol precipitation for lipid-soluble proteins provided the best combination of yield, spot number, and resolution on 2-DE gels (Protocol E2). ESI-quadrupole/ion trap or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS protein identifications were performed to confirm bovine origin and appropriate subcellular prefractionation of resolved proteins. Twenty-five unique, predominantly cytoplasmic bovine proteins were identified from the water-soluble fraction. Thirty-two unique, predominantly membrane bovine proteins were identified from the lipid-soluble fraction. These results demonstrated that the final protocol produced high-quality proteomic data from this important tissue for both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins.

  19. Biosynthetic hydrogels--studies on chemical and physical characteristics on long-term cellular response for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-07-01

    Biosynthetic hydrogels can meet the drawbacks caused by natural and synthetic ones for biomedical applications. In the current article we present a novel biosynthetic alginate-poly(propylene fumarate) copolymer based chemically crosslinked hydrogel scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Partially crosslinked PA hydrogel and fully cross linked PA-A hydrogel scaffolds were prepared. The influence of chemical and physical (morphology and architecture of hydrogel) characteristics on the long term cellular response was studied. Both these hydrogels were cytocompatible and showed no genotoxicity upon contact with fibroblast cells. Both PA and PA-A were able to resist deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species and sustain the viability of L929 cells. The hydrogel incubated oxidative stress induced cells were capable of maintaining the intra cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) expression to the normal level confirmed their protective effect. Relatively the PA hydrogel was found to be unstable in the cell culture medium. The PA-A hydrogel was able to withstand appreciable cyclic stretching. The cyclic stretching introduced complex macro and microarchitectural features with interconnected pores and more structured bound water which would provide long-term viability of around 250% after the 24th day of culture. All these qualities make PA-A hydrogel form a potent candidate for cardiac tissue engineering.

  20. The mechanical properties of human adipose tissues and their relationships to the structure and composition of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouli, Nadia; Mansfield, Jessica; Green, Ellen; Bell, James; Knight, Beatrice; Liversedge, Neil; Tham, Ji Chung; Welbourn, Richard; Shore, Angela C; Kos, Katarina; Winlove, C Peter

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion in obesity is characterized by cellular growth and continuous extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling with increased fibrillar collagen deposition. It is hypothesized that the matrix can inhibit cellular expansion and lipid storage. Therefore, it is important to fully characterize the ECM's biomechanical properties and its interactions with cells. In this study, we characterize and compare the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous and omental tissues, which have different physiological functions. AT was obtained from 44 subjects undergoing surgery. Force/extension and stress/relaxation data were obtained. The effects of osmotic challenge were measured to investigate the cellular contribution to tissue mechanics. Tissue structure and its response to tensile strain were determined using nonlinear microscopy. AT showed nonlinear stress/strain characteristics of up to a 30% strain. Comparing paired subcutaneous and omental samples (n = 19), the moduli were lower in subcutaneous: initial 1.6 ± 0.8 (means ± SD) and 2.9 ± 1.5 kPa (P = 0.001), final 11.7 ± 6.4 and 32 ± 15.6 kPa (P matrix fibers. These results suggest that subcutaneous AT has greater capacity for expansion and recovery from mechanical deformation than omental AT.

  1. Cellular and molecular responses of periodontal connective tissue cells to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is present in elevated proportions and numbers in dental bacterial biofilms of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. This variant of periodontal disease, occurring in adolescents and young adults, is characterized by rapid and severe destruction of the connective tissues and bone supporting the teeth, eventually culminating in tooth loss. The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is a newly discovered bacterial protein toxin, uniquely present in A....

  2. Clarification properties of trash and stalk tissues from sugar cane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Gillian; Grisham, Michael; Antoine, April

    2010-01-13

    The effect of the U.S. and worldwide change from burnt to unburnt (green) sugar cane harvesting on processing and the use of sugar cane leaves and tops as a biomass source has not been fully characterized. Sugar cane whole-stalks were harvested from the first ratoon (repeat) crop of five commercial, Louisiana sugar cane varieties (LCP 85-384, HoCP 96-540, L 97-128, L 99-226, and L 99-233). Replicated sample tissues of brown, dry leaves (BL), green leaves (GL), growing point region (GPR), and stalk (S) were separated. Composite juice from each tissue type was clarified following a hot lime clarification process operated by most U.S. factories. Only GPR and GL juices foamed on heating and followed the normal settling behavior of factory sugar cane juice, although GL was markedly slower than GPR. GPR juice aided settling. S juice tended to thin out rather than follow normal settling and exhibited the most unwanted upward motion of flocs. Most varietal variation in settling, mud, and clarified juice (CJ) characteristics occurred for GL. The quality rather than the quantity of impurities in the different tissues mostly affected the volume of mud produced: After 30 min of settling, mud volume per unit tissue juice degrees Brix (% dissolved solids) varied markedly among the tissues (S 1.09, BL 11.3, GPR 3.0, and GL 3.1 mL/degrees Brix). Heat transfer properties of tissue juices and CJs are described. Clarification was unable to remove all BL cellulosic particles. GL and BL increased color, turbidity, and suspended particles in CJs with BL worse than GL. This will make the future attainment of very high pol (VHP) raw sugar in the U.S. more difficult. Although optimization of factory unit processes will alleviate extra trash problems, economical strategies to reduce the amount of green and brown leaves processed need to be identified and implemented.

  3. Insight into the impact of dietary saturated fat on tissue-specific cellular processes underlying obesity-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enos, Reilly T; Velázquez, Kandy T; Murphy, E Angela

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of three high-fat diets (HFDs), differing in the percentage of total calories from saturated fat (SF) (6%, 12%, 24%) but identical in total fat (40%), for a 16-week period in mice on a variety of tissue-specific cellular processes believed to be at the root of obesity-related diseases. Specifically, we examined ectopic lipid accumulation, oxidative capacity [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) mRNA and protein; mtDNA; Cox IV and cytochrome C protein; citrate synthase activity; and gene expression of fission 1, mitofusin (Mfn) 1 and Mfn2], oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (binding immunoglobulin protein, activating transcription factor 6-p50, p-eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha and x-box binding protein 1 spliced protein), inflammatory [p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p-nuclear factor kappa-B, p-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) and insulin signaling (p-Akt), and inflammation [tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6, F4/80, toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 gene expression] in various tissues, including the adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle and heart. In general, adipose and hepatic tissues were the only tissues which displayed evidence of dysfunction. All HFDs down-regulated adipose, cardiac and hepatic PGC-1α mRNA and hepatic citrate synthase activity, and induced adipose tissue oxidative stress, whereas only the 6%-SF and 12%-SF diet produced hepatic steatosis. However, compared to the 6%-SF and 24%-SF diets, consumption of the 12%-SF diet resulted in the greatest degree of dysregulation (hepatic ER and oxidative stress, JNK activation, increased F4/80 gene expression and down-regulation of adipose tissue Akt signaling). These findings suggest that the saturated fatty acid composition of an HFD can greatly influence the processes responsible for obesity-related diseases - nonalcoholic fatty

  4. A REVIEW OF CELLULARIZATION STRATEGIES FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING OF WHOLE ORGANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E Scarritt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of whole organ decellularization, extracellular matrix scaffolds suitable for organ engineering were generated from numerous tissues, including the heart, lung, liver, kidney and pancreas, for use as alternatives to traditional organ transplantation. Biomedical researchers now face the challenge of adequately and efficiently recellularizing these organ scaffolds. Herein, an overview of whole organ decellularization and a thorough review of the current literature for whole organ recellularization are presented. The cell types, delivery methods, and bioreactors employed for recellularization are discussed along with commercial and clinical considerations, such as immunogenicity, biocompatibility, and FDA regulation.

  5. Identification of rheological properties of human body surface tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevicius, Vincas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Marozas, Vaidotas

    2014-04-11

    According to World Health Organization obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century. It has tripled since the 1980s and the numbers of those affected continue to rise at an alarming rate, especially among children. There are number of devices that act as a prevention measure to boost person's motivation for physical activity and its levels. The placement of these devices is not restricted thus the measurement errors that appear because of the body rheology, clothes, etc. cannot be eliminated. The main objective of this work is to introduce a tool that can be applied directly to process measured accelerations so human body surface tissue induced errors can be reduced. Both the modeling and experimental techniques are proposed to identify body tissue rheological properties and prelate them to body mass index. Multi-level computational model composed from measurement device model and human body surface tissue rheological model is developed. Human body surface tissue induced inaccuracies can increase the magnitude of measured accelerations up to 34% when accelerations of the magnitude of up to 27 m/s(2) are measured. Although the timeframe of those disruptions are short - up to 0.2 s - they still result in increased overall measurement error.

  6. Positive impact of sucrose supplementation during slow freezing of cat ovarian tissues on cellular viability, follicle morphology, and DNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpradit, Nae; Comizzoli, Pierre; Srisuwatanasagul, Sayamon; Chatdarong, Kaywalee

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the study were to (1) examine and optimize the impact of sucrose during slow freezing and (2) compare the results of two freezing methods (slow freezing and vitrification) on cellular viability (germinal and stromal cells), follicle morphology, DNA integrity, and gap junction protein expression (connexin 43 [Cx 43]). Different sucrose supplementations (0, 0.1, and 0.3 M) in standard freezing medium were compared before and after slow freezing. Ovarian tissue slow frozen using 0.1- (4.0 ± 0.4) or 0.3-M sucrose (3.9 ± 0.5) yielded better follicular viability (number of positive follicles per 0.0625 mm(2)) than the group without sucrose (1.9 ± 0.2; P sucrose-treated groups (0.1 M, 47.4% and 0.3 M, 43.5%) than the group without sucrose (0 M, 33.8%; P sucrose groups (0.1 M, 1.2% and 0.3 M, 1.9%) than the group without sucrose (7.7%; P sucrose concentrations. In terms of the freezing methods used, vitrified ovarian tissues had fewer viable follicles (3.2 ± 0.6) than the slow-freezing method (4.6 ± 0.6; P sucrose supplementation and slow-freezing method on the follicular viability, follicular histologic appearances of follicles, and apoptosis of the follicles and stromal cells in cat ovarian tissues.

  7. Cellular Prion Protein Promotes Regeneration of Adult Muscle Tissue ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Roberto; Massimino, Maria Lina; Sandri, Marco; Sorgato, M. Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that the conversion of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, into its anomalous conformer, PrPSc, is central to the onset of prion disease. However, both the mechanism of prion-related neurodegeneration and the physiologic role of PrPC are still unknown. The use of animal and cell models has suggested a number of putative functions for the protein, including cell signaling, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Given that skeletal muscles express significant amounts of PrPC and have been related to PrPC pathophysiology, in the present study, we used skeletal muscles to analyze whether the protein plays a role in adult morphogenesis. We employed an in vivo paradigm that allowed us to compare the regeneration of acutely damaged hind-limb tibialis anterior muscles of mice expressing, or not expressing, PrPC. Using morphometric and biochemical parameters, we provide compelling evidence that the absence of PrPC significantly slows the regeneration process compared to wild-type muscles by attenuating the stress-activated p38 pathway, and the consequent exit from the cell cycle, of myogenic precursor cells. Demonstrating the specificity of this finding, restoring PrPC expression completely rescued the muscle phenotype evidenced in the absence of PrPC. PMID:20679477

  8. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun;

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several...... body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS......://www.mapuproteome.com using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic...

  9. Measurements of optical polarization properties in dental tissues and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María M.

    2011-05-01

    Since biological tissues can have the intrinsic property of altering the polarization of incident light, optical polarization studies are important for a complete characterization. We have measured the polarized light scattered off of different dental tissues and biomaterials for a comparative study of their optical polarization property. The experimental setup was composed by a He-Ne laser, two linear polarizers and a detection system based on a photodiode. The laser beam was passed through one linear polarizer placed in front of the sample, beyond which the second linear polarizer (analyzer) and the photodiode detector were placed. First, the maximum laser-light intensity (reference condition) was attained without the sample in the laser path. Then, the sample was placed between the two polarizers and the polarization shift of the scattered laser light was determined by rotating the analyzer until the reference condition was reached. Two dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and two human dental tissues (enamel and dentine) were analyzed under repeatability conditions at three different locations on the sample: 20 measurements of the shift were taken and the average value and the uncertainty associated were calculated. For the human dentine the average value of the polarization shift found was 7 degrees, with an associated uncertainty of 2 degrees. For the human enamel and both dental-resin composites the average shift values were found to be similar to their corresponding uncertainties (2 degrees). The results suggest that although human dentine has notable polarization properties, dental-resin composites and human enamel do not show significant polarization shifts.

  10. Nanoscalar modifications to polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds: Effect on cellular behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Heather M.

    Polymeric scaffolds provide a surface that can facilitate cell growth and tissue morphogenesis. Of particular interest is the role of nanoscalar features on cell behavior. Nanoscale topographies can be generated on two-dimensional polymeric substrates via reactive ion etching. The magnitude and morphology of the resultant surfaces can be tailored by varying the gas media, etching time and power used. Nanofibrillar surfaces were produced on polyethylene terephthalate films via oxygen-plasma etching. These nanofibrils were dimensionally similar to collagen fibers. Cells cultured on nanofibrillar surfaces were shown to have a disrupted cytoskeleton, lower levels of cell-substrate signaling, reduced strength of adhesion and an inhibition of lipid droplet coalescence. The results suggest that cells can detect nanoscalar surface topographies and alter their function in response to these environmental stimuli. While nanofibrillar surfaces can be considered pseudo-three dimensional, they cannot produce 3-D cell structures. Thus truly three dimensional scaffolds must be fabricated to determine the role of nanoscalar fibers on cell organization and function. Electrospinning was employed to generate 3-D meshes of polycaprolactone, a common biodegradable polymer. These nonwoven meshes were comprised of 500 nm fibers with an average pore size of 5 mum. In addition to forming mats of nonwoven fibers, electrospinning technology can also produce tubular scaffolds. These tubular scaffolds were seeded with human vascular smooth muscle cells and cultured for two days. After 2 days in culture, cells assumed a helical orientation around the lumen of the tube, an architecture which closely mimics natural blood vessels. Thus electrospun scaffolds facilitate the growth and organization of cell populations in a manner which imitates the natural tissue.

  11. Condensed cellular seeded collagen gel as an improved biomaterial for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Rath, Ralf; Gavénis, Karsten; Andereya, Stefan; Mumme, Torsten; Albrand, Monique; Stoffel, Marcus; Weichert, Dieter; Schneider, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation based on collagen gel as matrix scaffold has become a clinically applied treatment for focal defects of articular cartilage. However, the low biomechanical properties of collagen gel makes intraoperative handling difficult and creates the risk of early damages to the vulnerable implant. The aim of the study was to create a stabilized form of collagen gel and to evaluate its biomechanical and biochemical properties.Collagen type-I gel was seeded with human articular chondrocytes. 20 samples were subject to condensation which was achieved mechanically by compression and filtration. Control samples were left uncondensed. From both types of gels 10 samples were used for initial biomechanical evaluation by means of unconfined compression and 10 samples were cultivated under standard conditions in vitro. Following cultivation the samples were evaluated by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. The proliferation rate was calculated and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR.The biomechanical tests revealed a higher force carrying capacity of the condensed specimens. Strain rate dependency and relaxation was seen in both types of collagen gel representing viscoelastic material properties. Cells embedded within the condensed collagen gel were able to produce extracellular matrix proteins and showed proliferation.Condensed collagen gel represents a mechanically improved type of biomaterial which is suitable for three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  12. Cyanoacrylic tissue glues: Biochemical properties and their usage in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyıldız, Sema Nur; Ayyıldız, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Tissue adhesives are being used in medical and cosmetic industries and first aid for a long time. But their everyday usage has not been widespread. Only case report information is available about their usage. Despite good and meaningful results after they were used, there is lack of standard information that gives idea of about in which cases they could be helpful. Nowadays, cyanoacrylates are used in the surgery more frequently. In this review, we wanted to oversee the biochemical properties and the urological utilisation areas of cyanoacrylates. PMID:28270946

  13. Wide-field multiphoton imaging of cellular dynamics in thick tissue by temporal focusing and patterned illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, O. D.; Aubé, B.; Pagès, S.; Koninck, P. De; Côté, D.

    2011-01-01

    Wide-field temporal focusing is a novel technique that provides optical sectioning for imaging without the need for beam scanning. However, illuminating over large areas greatly reduces the photon density which limits the technique applicability to small regions, precluding functional imaging of cellular networks. Here we present a strategy that combines beam shaping and temporal focusing of amplified pulses (>1 µJ/pulse) for fast imaging of cells from the central nervous system in acute slices. Multiphoton video-rate imaging over total areas as wide as 4800 µm2 with an optical sectioning under 10 µm at 800 nm is achieved with our setup, leading to imaging of calcium dynamics of multiple cells simultaneously in thick tissue. PMID:21412473

  14. Validity of the Cauchy-Born rule applied to discrete cellular-scale models of biological tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-04-30

    The development of new models of biological tissues that consider cells in a discrete manner is becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to continuum methods based on partial differential equations, although formal relationships between the discrete and continuum frameworks remain to be established. For crystal mechanics, the discrete-to-continuum bridge is often made by assuming that local atom displacements can be mapped homogeneously from the mesoscale deformation gradient, an assumption known as the Cauchy-Born rule (CBR). Although the CBR does not hold exactly for noncrystalline materials, it may still be used as a first-order approximation for analytic calculations of effective stresses or strain energies. In this work, our goal is to investigate numerically the applicability of the CBR to two-dimensional cellular-scale models by assessing the mechanical behavior of model biological tissues, including crystalline (honeycomb) and noncrystalline reference states. The numerical procedure involves applying an affine deformation to the boundary cells and computing the quasistatic position of internal cells. The position of internal cells is then compared with the prediction of the CBR and an average deviation is calculated in the strain domain. For center-based cell models, we show that the CBR holds exactly when the deformation gradient is relatively small and the reference stress-free configuration is defined by a honeycomb lattice. We show further that the CBR may be used approximately when the reference state is perturbed from the honeycomb configuration. By contrast, for vertex-based cell models, a similar analysis reveals that the CBR does not provide a good representation of the tissue mechanics, even when the reference configuration is defined by a honeycomb lattice. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of these results for concurrent discrete and continuous modeling, adaptation of atom-to-continuum techniques to biological

  15. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhim, Munira A

    2012-08-22

    The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "non-targeted responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell

  16. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Helinor J.; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M.; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml-1). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells.

  17. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  18. Tissue and cellular tropism, pathology and pathogenesis of Ebola and Marburg viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, Roosecelis Brasil; Ng, Dianna L; Greer, Patricia W; Rollin, Pierre E; Zaki, Sherif R

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viruses and Marburg viruses include some of the most virulent and fatal pathogens known to humans. These viruses cause severe haemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates in the range 25-90%. The diagnosis of filovirus using formalin-fixed tissues from fatal cases poses a significant challenge. The most characteristic histopathological findings are seen in the liver; however, the findings overlap with many other viral and non-viral haemorrhagic diseases. The need to distinguish filovirus infections from other haemorrhagic fevers, particularly in areas with multiple endemic viral haemorrhagic agents, is of paramount importance. In this review we discuss the current state of knowledge of filovirus infections and their pathogenesis, including histopathological findings, epidemiology, modes of transmission and filovirus entry and spread within host organisms. The pathogenesis of filovirus infections is complex and involves activation of the mononuclear phagocytic system, with release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, endothelial dysfunction, alterations of the innate and adaptive immune systems, direct organ and endothelial damage from unrestricted viral replication late in infection, and coagulopathy. Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of filovirus infections has rapidly increased in the past few years, many questions remain unanswered.

  19. Monitoring cellular behaviour using Raman spectroscopy for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, A R; Burke, G A; Meenan, B J

    2010-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to determine the chemical composition of materials for over 70 years. Recent spectacular advances in laser and CCD camera technology creating instruments with higher sensitivity and lower cost have initiated a strong resurgence in the technique, ranging from fundamental research to process control methodology. One such area of increased potential is in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM), where autologous cell culture, stem cell biology and growth of human cells on biomaterial scaffolds are of high importance. Traditional techniques for the in vitro analysis of biochemical cell processes involves cell techniques such as fixation, lysis or the use of radioactive or chemical labels which are time consuming and can involve the perpetuation of artefacts. Several studies have already shown the potential of Raman spectroscopy to provide useful information on key biochemical markers within cells, however, many of these studies have utilised micro- or confocal Raman to do this, which are not suited to the rapid and non-invasive monitoring of cells. For this study a versatile fit-for-purpose Raman spectrometer was used, employing a macro-sampling optical platform (laser spot size 100 mum at focus on the sample) to discriminate between different TERM relevant cell types and viable and non-viable cells. The results clearly show that the technique is capable of obtaining Raman spectra from live cells in a non-destructive, rapid and non-invasive manner, however, in these experiments it was not possible to discriminate between different cell lines. Despite this, notable differences were observed in the spectra obtained from viable and non-viable cells, showing significant changes in the spectral profiles of protein, DNA/RNA and lipid cell constituents after cell death. It is evident that the method employed here shows significant potential for further utilisation in TERM, providing data directly from live cells that fits within a

  20. Cellular Microcultures: Programming Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of 3D Hydrogel Cellular Microcultures via Direct Ink Writing (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 9/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Joselle M; Badea, Adina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Gladman, A Sydney; Wetzel, David J; Popescu, Gabriel; Lewis, Jennifer A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2016-05-01

    R. Nuzzo and co-workers show on page 1025 how compositional differences in hydrogels are used to tune their cellular compliance by controlling their polymer mesh properties and subsequent uptake of the protein poly-l-lysine (green spheres in circled inset). The cover image shows pyramid micro-scaffolds prepared using direct ink writing (DIW) that differentially direct fibroblast and preosteoblast growth in 3D, depending on cell motility and surface treatment.

  1. PGS:Gelatin Nanofibrous Scaffolds with Tunable Mechanical and Structural Properties for Engineering Cardiac Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Shin, Su-Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge in cardiac tissue engineering is the development of biomimetic grafts that can potentially promote myocardial repair and regeneration. A number of approaches have used engineered scaffolds to mimic the architecture of the native myocardium tissue and precisely regulate cardiac cell functions. However previous attempts have not been able to simultaneously recapitulate chemical, mechanical, and structural properties of the myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we utilized an electrospinning approach to fabricate elastomeric biodegradable poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS):gelatin scaffolds with a wide range of chemical composition, stiffness and anisotropy. Our findings demonstrated that through incorporation of PGS, it is possible to create nanofibrous scaffolds with well-defined anisotropy that mimics the left ventricular myocardium architecture. Furthermore, we studied attachment, proliferation, differentiation and alignment of neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast cells (CFs) as well as protein expression, alignment, and contractile function of cardiomyocyte (CMs) on PGS:gelatin scaffolds with variable amount of PGS. Notably, aligned nanofibrous scaffold, consisting of 33 wt. % PGS, induced optimal synchronous contractions of CMs while significantly enhanced cellular alignment. Overall, our study suggests that the aligned nanofibrous PGS:gelatin scaffold support cardiac cell organization, phenotype and contraction and could potentially be used to develop clinically relevant constructs for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:23747008

  2. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis

    2016-02-09

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer.

  3. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular level with different light sources and dosimetry principles for clinical application of low level laser therapy. Different application techniques and methods currently in use for clinical treatment has also been reviewed.

  4. The rheological properties of silated hydroxypropylmethylcellulose tissue engineering matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimi, Ahmed; Tassin, Jean François; Quillard, Sophie; Axelos, Monique A V; Weiss, Pierre

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the rheological properties of silated hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC-Si) used in biomaterials domain as a three-dimensional synthetic matrix for tissue engineering. The HPMC-Si is an HPMC grafted with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). HPMC and HPMC-Si were studied. It is shown that although silanization reduces the hydrodynamic volume in dilute solution, it does not affect significantly the rheological behavior of the concentrated solutions. The HPMC-Si viscous solution (pH 12.8) cross-links by decreasing the pH using an acid buffer, since HPMC-Si solution transforms into an elastic state. The kinetics of cross-linking and final elastic properties is influenced by several parameters such as polymer concentration, pH and temperature. pH and temperature play an important role in the silanol condensation, mainly responsible for network formation. The study of the gelation process revealed the dependence of the final concentration of HPMC-Si hydrogel on cross-linking kinetics and viscoelastic properties. The percolation theory was applied to determine gel point and to discuss the dependence of storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli on frequency. Results showed that both G' and G'' exhibit a power-law behavior with an exponent (0.68) which extends over the entire frequency range. This method is the only one to characterize the time where a liquid viscous phase shifts to hydrogel with elastic properties. In this case it was about 23 min for a final pH of 7.4.

  5. Cellular transcripts of chicken brain tissues in response to H5N1 and Newcastle disease virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramaniam Vinod RMT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly-pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 and Newcastle disease (ND viruses are the two most important poultry viruses in the world, with the ability to cause classic central nervous system dysfunction in poultry and migratory birds. To elucidate the mechanisms of neurovirulence caused by these viruses, a preliminary study was design to analyze host's cellular responses during infections of these viruses. Methods An improved mRNA differential display technique (Gene Fishing™ was undertaken to analyze differentially expressed transcripts regulated during HPAI H5N1 and velogenic neurotropic NDV infections of whole brain of chickens. The identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs was made possible as this technique uses annealing control primers that generate reproducible, authentic and long PCR products that are detectable on agarose gels. Results Twenty-three genes were identified to be significantly regulated during infections with both viruses, where ten of the genes have been selected for validation using a TaqMan® based real time quantitative PCR assay. Some of the identified genes demonstrated to be key factors involving the cytoskeletal system, neural signal transduction and protein folding during stress. Interestingly, Septin 5, one of the genes isolated from HPAI H5N1-infected brain tissues has been reported to participate in the pathogenic process of Parkinson's disease. Conclusions In this limited study, the differentially expressed genes of infected brain tissues regulated by the viruses were found not to be identical, thus suggesting that their neurovirulence and neuropathogenesis may not share similar mechanisms and pathways.

  6. Cellular localization of Y-box binding protein 1 in brain tissue of rats, macaques, and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Anja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is considered to be one of the key regulators of transcription and translation. However, so far only limited knowledge exists regarding its cellular distribution in the adult brain. Results Analysis of YB-1 immunolabelling as well as double-labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN in rat brain tissue revealed a predominant neuronal expression in the dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis pyramidal cell layer, layer III of the piriform cortex as well as throughout all layers of the parahippocampal cortex. In the hilus of the hippocampus single neurons expressed YB-1. The neuronal expression pattern was comparable in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex of adult macaques and humans. Double-labelling of YB-1 with the endothelial cell marker Glut-1, the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein, and the astrocytic marker GFAP did not indicate a co-localization. Following status epilepticus in rats, no induction of YB-1 occurred in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrates that YB-1 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the adult brain of rats, macaques and humans. Lack of a co-localization with Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein argues against a direct role of YB-1 in the regulation of blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein.

  7. NR4A3 rearrangement reliably distinguishes between the clinicopathologically overlapping entities myoepithelial carcinoma of soft tissue and cellular extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flucke, Uta; Tops, Bastiaan B. J.; Verdijk, Marian A. J.; van Cleef, Patricia J. H.; van Zwam, Peter H.; Slootweg, Pieter J.; Bovee, Judith V. M. G.; Riedl, Robert G.; Creytens, David H.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; Mentzel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Myoepithelial carcinoma of soft tissue (MEC) and cellular extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (cEMC) share striking similarities. In this paper, we compare ten MECs with five cEMCs. MEC patients had an equal gender distribution. The age range was 15-76 years (mean, 42 years). Tumours were located on

  8. NR4A3 rearrangement reliably distinguishes between the clinicopathologically overlapping entities myoepithelial carcinoma of soft tissue and cellular extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flucke, U.; Tops, B.B.J.; Verdijk, M.A.J.; Cleef, P.J. van; Zwam, P.H. van; Slootweg, P.J.; Bovee, J.V.; Riedl, R.G.; Creytens, D.H.; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.; Mentzel, T.

    2012-01-01

    Myoepithelial carcinoma of soft tissue (MEC) and cellular extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (cEMC) share striking similarities. In this paper, we compare ten MECs with five cEMCs. MEC patients had an equal gender distribution. The age range was 15-76 years (mean, 42 years). Tumours were located on

  9. Highly Ordered 1D Fullerene Crystals for Concurrent Control of Macroscopic Cellular Orientation and Differentiation toward Large-Scale Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Kosuke; Kasuya, Yuki; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Ji, Qingmin; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Sakai, Hideki; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2015-07-15

    A highly aligned 1D fullerene whisker (FW) scaffold in a centimeter area is fabricated by interfacial alignment. The resulting aligned FW scaffold enables concurrent control over cellular orientation and differentiation to muscle cells. This aligned FW scaffold is made by a facile method, and hence the substrate is a promising alternative to other cell scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  10. Effect of surface properties of silica nanoparticles on their cytotoxicity and cellular distribution in murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagano Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surface properties are often hypothesized to be important factors in the development of safer forms of nanomaterials (NMs. However, the results obtained from studying the cellular responses to NMs are often contradictory. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the surface properties of silica nanoparticles and their cytotoxicity against a murine macrophage cell line (RAW264.7. The surface of the silica nanoparticles was either unmodified (nSP70 or modified with amine (nSP70-N or carboxyl groups (nSP70-C. First, the properties of the silica nanoparticles were characterized. RAW264.7 cells were then exposed to nSP70, nSP70-N, or nSP70-C, and any cytotoxic effects were monitored by analyzing DNA synthesis. The results of this study show that nSP70-N and nSP70-C have a smaller effect on DNA synthesis activity by comparison to unmodified nSP70. Analysis of the intracellular localization of the silica nanoparticles revealed that nSP70 had penetrated into the nucleus, whereas nSP70-N and nSP70-C showed no nuclear localization. These results suggest that intracellular localization is a critical factor underlying the cytotoxicity of these silica nanoparticles. Thus, the surface properties of silica nanoparticles play an important role in determining their safety. Our results suggest that optimization of the surface characteristics of silica nanoparticles will contribute to the development of safer forms of NMs.

  11. Traffic Accident Propagation Properties and Control Measures for Urban Links Based on Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-sheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of urban transport and the sharp increase in vehicle population, traffic accidents form one of the most important causes of urban traffic congestion other than the imbalance between traffic supply and demand. Traffic congestion causes severe problems, such as environment contamination and energy dissipation. Therefore, it would be useful to analyze the congestion propagation characteristics after traffic accidents. Numerical analysis and computer simulation were two of the typical methods used at present to study the traffic congestion propagation properties. The latter was more widespread as it is more consistent with the actual traffic flow and more visual than the former. In this paper, an improved cellular automata (CA model was presented to analyze traffic congestion propagation properties and to evaluate control strategies. In order to apply them to urban traffic flow simulation, the CA models have been improved and expanded on. Computer simulations were built for congestion not only extending to the upstream intersection, but also the upstream intersection and the entire road network, respectively. Congestion propagation characteristics after road traffic accidents were obtained, and controls of different severities and durations were analyzed. The results provide the theoretical foundation and practical means for the control of congestion.

  12. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  13. Modeling mechanical behaviors of composites with various ratios of matrixeinclusion properties using movable cellular automaton method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Yu. SMOLIN; E.V. SHILKO; S.V. ASTAFUROV; I.S. KONOVALENKO; S.P. BUYAKOVA; S.G. PSAKHIE

    2015-01-01

    Two classes of composite materials are considered: classical metaleceramic composites with reinforcing hard inclusions as well as hard ceramics matrix with soft gel inclusions. Movable cellular automaton method is used for modeling the mechanical behaviors of such different heterogeneous materials. The method is based on particle approach and may be considered as a kind of discrete element method. The main feature of the method is the use of many-body forces of inter-element interaction within the formalism of simply deformable element approximation. It was shown that the strength of reinforcing particles and the width of particle-binder interphase boundaries had determining influence on the service characteristics of metaleceramic composite. In particular, the increasing of strength of carbide inclusions may lead to significant increase in the strength and ultimate strain of composite material. On the example of porous zirconia ceramics it was shown that the change in the mechanical properties of pore surface leads to the corresponding change in effective elastic modulus and strength limit of the ceramic sample. The less is the pore size, the more is this effect. The increase in the elastic properties of pore surface of ceramics may reduce its fracture energy.

  14. Awakened by cellular stress: isolation and characterization of a novel population of pluripotent stem cells derived from human adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Heneidi

    Full Text Available Advances in stem cell therapy face major clinical limitations, particularly challenged by low rates of post-transplant cell survival. Hostile host factors of the engraftment microenvironment such as hypoxia, nutrition deprivation, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and reactive oxygen species can each contribute to unwanted differentiation or apoptosis. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new population of adipose tissue (AT derived pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress-Enduring (Muse Cells, which are isolated using severe cellular stress conditions, including long-term exposure to the proteolytic enzyme collagenase, serum deprivation, low temperatures and hypoxia. Under these conditions, a highly purified population of Muse-AT cells is isolated without the utilization of cell sorting methods. Muse-AT cells grow in suspension as cell spheres reminiscent of embryonic stem cell clusters. Muse-AT cells are positive for the pluripotency markers SSEA3, TR-1-60, Oct3/4, Nanog and Sox2, and can spontaneously differentiate into mesenchymal, endodermal and ectodermal cell lineages with an efficiency of 23%, 20% and 22%, respectively. When using specific differentiation media, differentiation efficiency is greatly enhanced in Muse-AT cells (82% for mesenchymal, 75% for endodermal and 78% for ectodermal. When compared to adipose stem cells (ASCs, microarray data indicate a substantial up-regulation of Sox2, Oct3/4, and Rex1. Muse-ATs also exhibit gene expression patterns associated with the down-regulation of genes involved in cell death and survival, embryonic development, DNA replication and repair, cell cycle and potential factors related to oncogenecity. Gene expression analysis indicates that Muse-ATs and ASCs are mesenchymal in origin; however, Muse-ATs also express numerous lymphocytic and hematopoietic genes, such as CCR1 and CXCL2, encoding chemokine receptors and ligands involved in stem cell

  15. Awakened by cellular stress: isolation and characterization of a novel population of pluripotent stem cells derived from human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneidi, Saleh; Simerman, Ariel A; Keller, Erica; Singh, Prapti; Li, Xinmin; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Advances in stem cell therapy face major clinical limitations, particularly challenged by low rates of post-transplant cell survival. Hostile host factors of the engraftment microenvironment such as hypoxia, nutrition deprivation, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and reactive oxygen species can each contribute to unwanted differentiation or apoptosis. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new population of adipose tissue (AT) derived pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress-Enduring (Muse) Cells, which are isolated using severe cellular stress conditions, including long-term exposure to the proteolytic enzyme collagenase, serum deprivation, low temperatures and hypoxia. Under these conditions, a highly purified population of Muse-AT cells is isolated without the utilization of cell sorting methods. Muse-AT cells grow in suspension as cell spheres reminiscent of embryonic stem cell clusters. Muse-AT cells are positive for the pluripotency markers SSEA3, TR-1-60, Oct3/4, Nanog and Sox2, and can spontaneously differentiate into mesenchymal, endodermal and ectodermal cell lineages with an efficiency of 23%, 20% and 22%, respectively. When using specific differentiation media, differentiation efficiency is greatly enhanced in Muse-AT cells (82% for mesenchymal, 75% for endodermal and 78% for ectodermal). When compared to adipose stem cells (ASCs), microarray data indicate a substantial up-regulation of Sox2, Oct3/4, and Rex1. Muse-ATs also exhibit gene expression patterns associated with the down-regulation of genes involved in cell death and survival, embryonic development, DNA replication and repair, cell cycle and potential factors related to oncogenecity. Gene expression analysis indicates that Muse-ATs and ASCs are mesenchymal in origin; however, Muse-ATs also express numerous lymphocytic and hematopoietic genes, such as CCR1 and CXCL2, encoding chemokine receptors and ligands involved in stem cell homing. Being

  16. Paramyxovirus Infection Mimics In Vivo Cellular Dynamics in Three-Demensional Human Bronchio-Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatly, Anne M.; Lin, Yen-Huei; McCarthy, Maureen; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z.; Quiroz, Jorge; Nowak, Becky M.; Lerch, Robert A.; Udem, Stephen A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    , cotton rat, guinea pig, ferret, and hamster) fail to accurately imitate viral replication and human disease states (8). Lacking an authentic model has impeded the development and evaluation of live, attenuated vaccine candidates. Development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tissue culture model that reproduces characteristics of the HRE, the primary target of RSV and PIV3, would aid in predicting clinical attenuation and safety of vaccine candidates. Successful tissue engineering of a 3D human intestinal model using novel NASA technology inspired the development of a tri-culture 3D model for the HRE. Sequential layering of primary mesenchymal cells (comprised of normal human fibroblasts and endothelial cells) followed by BEAS-2B epithelial cells derived from human bronchi and tracheae were recapitulated on Cultisphere and/or cytodex3 microcarriers in cylindrical vessels that rotate horizontally creating an organized epithelial structure. Horizontal rotation randomizes the gravity vector modeling aspects of microgravity. Mesenchymal and epithelial cells grown under these conditions reproduce the structural organization, multi-cellular complexity, and differentiation state of the HRE. The opportunity to study respiratory viruses in a nasal epithelium model is invaluable because the most promising respiratory virus vaccine candidates are live attenuated viruses for intranasal administration. Here we characterize the interactions of respiratory viruses and epithelial cells grown under modeled microgravity in comparison to gravity-ladened monolayers. 3D HBE TLAs and traditional monolayers (2D) are infected at 35 C, the upper temperature of the upper HRE, to simulate in vivo infection conditions. Growth kinetics of wild type (wt) RSV and PIV3 viruses were compared in 2D and 3D cells to that of strains attenuated in humans or rhesus macaques. This novel 3D HBE model also offers an opportunity to study whether the epithelial cell function, especially in host defenses

  17. Reverberant shear wave fields and estimation of tissue properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kevin J.; Ormachea, Juvenal; Zvietcovich, Fernando; Castaneda, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    The determination of shear wave speed is an important subject in the field of elastography, since elevated shear wave speeds can be directly linked to increased stiffness of tissues. MRI and ultrasound scanners are frequently used to detect shear waves and a variety of estimators are applied to calculate the underlying shear wave speed. The estimators can be relatively simple if plane wave behavior is assumed with a known direction of propagation. However, multiple reflections from organ boundaries and internal inhomogeneities and mode conversions can create a complicated field in time and space. Thus, we explore the mathematics of multiple component shear wave fields and derive the basic properties, from which efficient estimators can be obtained. We approach this problem from the historic perspective of reverberant fields, a conceptual framework used in architectural acoustics and related fields. The framework can be recast for the alternative case of shear waves in a bounded elastic media, and the expected value of displacement patterns in shear reverberant fields are derived, along with some practical estimators of shear wave speed. These are applied to finite element models and phantoms to illustrate the characteristics of reverberant fields and provide preliminary confirmation of the overall framework.

  18. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N R; Gazguez, E; Bidault, L; Guilbert, T; Vias, C; Vian, E; Watanabe, Y; Muller, L; Germain, S; Bondurand, N; Dufour, S; Fleury, V

    2016-02-18

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  19. Thermal property of biological tissues characterized by piezoelectric photoacoustic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chunming; ZHANG Shuyi; CHEN Yan; SHUI Xiuji; YANG Yuetao

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic piezoelectric method based on a simplified thermoelastic theory is employed to determine thermal diffusivities of biological tissues. The thermal diffusivities of porcine tissues with different preparation conditions, including fresh, dry and specially prepared conditions, are characterized. Comparing the experimental evaluated diffusivities of the tissues in three conditions with each other, it can be seen that the diffusivities of the fresh tissues are the biggest and the diffusivities of the specially prepared tissues are bigger than that of the dry ones generally. The results show that the piezoelectric photoacoustic method is especially effective for determining macro-effective (average) thermal diffusivities of biological materials with micro- inhomogeneity and easy to be performed, which can provide useful information for researching thermal characters of biological tissues.

  20. Biological Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular and Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Glüer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles (SPIO are used in different ways as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: Particles with high nonspecific uptake are required for unspecific labeling of phagocytic cells whereas those that target specific molecules need to have very low unspecific cellular uptake. We compared iron-oxide particles with different core materials (magnetite, maghemite, different coatings (none, dextran, carboxydextran, polystyrene and different hydrodynamic diameters (20–850 nm for internalization kinetics, release of internalized particles, toxicity, localization of particles and ability to generate contrast in MRI. Particle uptake was investigated with U118 glioma cells und human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, which exhibit different phagocytic properties. In both cell types, the contrast agents Resovist, B102, non-coated Fe3O4 particles and microspheres were better internalized than dextran-coated Nanomag particles. SPIO uptake into the cells increased with particle/iron concentrations. Maximum intracellular accumulation of iron particles was observed between 24 h to 36 h of exposure. Most particles were retained in the cells for at least two weeks, were deeply internalized, and only few remained adsorbed at the cell surface. Internalized particles clustered in the cytosol of the cells. Furthermore, all particles showed a low toxicity. By MRI, monolayers consisting of 5000 Resovist-labeled cells could easily be visualized. Thus, for unspecific cell labeling, Resovist and microspheres show the highest potential, whereas Nanomag particles are promising contrast agents for target-specific labeling.

  1. Simian virus 40 late proteins possess lytic properties that render them capable of permeabilizing cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Robert; Rusan, Nasser M; Wilbuer, Anne-Kathrin; Norkin, Leonard C; Wadsworth, Patricia; Hebert, Daniel N

    2006-07-01

    Many nonenveloped viruses have evolved an infectious cycle that culminates in the lysis or permeabilization of the host to enable viral release. How these viruses initiate the lytic event is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the simian virus 40 progeny accumulated at the nuclear envelope prior to the permeabilization of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membranes at a time which corresponded with the release of the progeny. The permeabilization of these cellular membranes temporally correlated with late protein expression and was not observed upon the inhibition of their synthesis. To address whether one or more of the late proteins possessed an inherent capacity to induce membrane permeabilization, we examined the permeability of Escherichia coli that separately expressed the late proteins. VP2 and VP3, but not VP1, caused the permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, VP3 expression resulted in bacterial cell lysis. These findings demonstrate that VP3 possesses an inherent lytic property that is independent of eukaryotic signaling or cell death pathways.

  2. The influence of freezing and tissue porosity on the material properties of vegetable tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Ralfs, J D

    2002-01-01

    Tissue porosity and fluid flow have been shown to be important parameters affecting the mechanical and sensorial behaviour of edible plant tissues. The quantity of fluid and the manner with which it was released on compression of the plant tissue were also important regarding the sensory perception and a good indication of any structural damage resulting from freezing, for example. Potato, carrot and Chinese water chestnut were used to study the effects freezing has on model plant tissues. Mechanical and structural measurements of the plant tissue were correlated with sensory analysis. Conventional freezing was shown to cause severe structural damage predominantly in the form of cavities between or through cells, resulting in decreases in mechanical strength and stiffness, and samples that were perceived in the mouth as 'soft' and 'wet'. The location and size of the cavities formed from ice crystals, depended on the particular plant tissue being frozen, the processing it was subjected to prior to freezing, th...

  3. Measuring metabolism and biophysical flux in the tissue, cellular and sub-cellular domains: recent developments in self-referencing amperometry for physiological sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, D Marshall

    2007-02-15

    Ultimately, advances in genomics, proteomics and metabolomics will be realized by combining these approaches with biophysical sensors for understanding the functional and structural (physiological) aspects of sub-cellular systems (cytomics). Therefore, the emergence of the new fields of cytomics and physiomics will require new technologies to probe the functional realm of living cells. While amperometric sensors have been used, their sensitivity and reliability are significantly improved through the development of new strategies and data acquisition systems for the operation of the sensors. This includes the application of the principles of the vibrating or self-referencing microsensor to the operation of amperometric sensors. The development of self-referencing amperometry (SRA) is significant because it effectively converts static concentration sensors into dynamic biophysical sensors that directly monitor physiological flux. SRA has been developed for analytes such as O2, NO, H2O2 and ascorbate. These sensors have been validated against non-biological microscopic flux sources that were theoretically modeled, before being applied to biological research. This new sensor technology has been shown, through research in a wide variety of biological and biomedical research projects, to be an important new tool in the arsenal of the cell biologist. SRA technology has been adapted through SRA-H2O2 and SRA-NADH sensors, for electrochemically coupled enzyme based self-referencing biosensors (SRB) for glucose, glutamate and ethanol. These developments in self-referencing sensor technologies offer great promise in extending electroanalytical chemistry and biosensor technologies from the micro to the nanoscale where researchers can study physiology at the sub-cellular and organellar levels.

  4. Fabrication, characterization and cellular compatibility of poly(hydroxy alkanoate composite nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Masaeli

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering techniques using a combination of polymeric scaffolds and cells represent a promising approach for nerve regeneration. We fabricated electrospun scaffolds by blending of Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB and Poly (3-hydroxy butyrate-co-3- hydroxyvalerate (PHBV in different compositions in order to investigate their potential for the regeneration of the myelinic membrane. The thermal properties of the nanofibrous blends was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, which indicated that the melting and glass temperatures, and crystallization degree of the blends decreased as the PHBV weight ratio increased. Raman spectroscopy also revealed that the full width at half height of the band centered at 1725 cm(-1 can be used to estimate the crystalline degree of the electrospun meshes. Random and aligned nanofibrous scaffolds were also fabricated by electrospinning of PHB and PHBV with or without type I collagen. The influence of blend composition, fiber alignment and collagen incorporation on Schwann cell (SCs organization and function was investigated. SCs attached and proliferated over all scaffolds formulations up to 14 days. SCs grown on aligned PHB/PHBV/collagen fibers exhibited a bipolar morphology that oriented along the fiber direction, while SCs grown on the randomly oriented fibers had a multipolar morphology. Incorporation of collagen within nanofibers increased SCs proliferation on day 14, GDNF gene expression on day 7 and NGF secretion on day 6. The results of this study demonstrate that aligned PHB/PHBV electrospun nanofibers could find potential use as scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering applications and that the presence of type I collagen in the nanofibers improves cell differentiation.

  5. Amyloid-β–Induced Changes in Molecular Clock Properties and Cellular Bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Grimm, Amandine; Eckert, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Ageing is an inevitable biological process that results in a progressive structural and functional decline, as well as biochemical alterations that altogether lead to reduced ability to adapt to environmental changes. As clock oscillations and clock-controlled rhythms are not resilient to the aging process, aging of the circadian system may also increase susceptibility to age-related pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Besides the amyloid-beta protein (Aβ)-induced metabolic decline and neuronal toxicity in AD, numerous studies have demonstrated that the disruption of sleep and circadian rhythms is one of the common and earliest signs of the disease. In this study, we addressed the questions of whether Aβ contributes to an abnormal molecular circadian clock leading to a bioenergetic imbalance. For this purpose, we used different oscillator cellular models: human skin fibroblasts, human glioma cells, as well as mouse primary cortical and hippocampal neurons. We first evaluated the circadian period length, a molecular clock property, in the presence of different Aβ species. We report here that physiologically relevant Aβ1–42 concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 nM induced an increase of the period length in human skin fibroblasts, human A172 glioma cells as well as in mouse primary neurons whereas the reverse control peptide Aβ42-1, which is devoid of toxic action, did not influence the circadian period length within the same concentration range. To better understand the underlying mechanisms that are involved in the Aβ-related alterations of the circadian clock, we examined the cellular metabolic state in the human primary skin fibroblast model. Notably, under normal conditions, ATP levels displayed circadian oscillations, which correspond to the respective circadian pattern of mitochondrial respiration. In contrast, Aβ1–42 treatment provoked a strong dampening in the metabolic oscillations of ATP levels as well as mitochondrial respiration and

  6. Scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach based on phase-contrast microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to study scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach, we collect images for human gastric specimens by using phase-contrast microscope. The images were processed by the way of mathematics morphology. The equivalent particle size distribution of tissues can be obtained. Combining with Mie scattering theory, the scattering properties of tissues can be calculated. Assume scattering of light in biological tissue can be seen as separate scattering events by different particles, total scattering properties can be equivalent to as scattering sum of particles with different diameters. The results suggest that scattering coefficient of the cancerous tissue is significantly higher than that of normal tissue. The scattering phase function is different especially in the backscattering area. Those are significant clinical benefits to diagnosis cancerous tissue

  7. Modelling the electrical properties of bladder tissue--quantifying impedance changes due to inflammation and oedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D C; Smallwood, R H; Keshtar, A; Wilkinson, B A; Hamdy, F C; Lee, J A

    2005-06-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy has been developed as a potential method for the diagnosis of carcinoma in epithelial tissues. An understanding of the influence of structural changes in the tissue on the properties measured using this technique is essential for interpreting measured data and optimization of probe design. In contrast to other tissue types, carcinoma in situ of the bladder gives rise to an increase in electrical impedance over the kHz-MHz frequency range in comparison to normal tissue. Finite element models of the urothelium and the underlying superficial lamina propria have been constructed and solved in order to ascertain the influence of structural changes associated with malignancy, oedema and inflammation on the measured electrical properties of the tissue. Sensitivity analysis of results from a composite tissue model suggests that the increase in lymphocyte density in the lamina propria associated with an inflammatory response to the infiltration of urine into the tissue may explain these unusual electrical properties.

  8. How to deal with visco-elastic properties of cellular tissues during osmotic dehydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, L.; Betoret, N.; Fito, P.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, vacuum impregnated apple discs with different isotonic solutions (sucrose and trehalose) were equilibrated during osmotic dehydration (55°Brix glucose at 40 °C). Changes in sample composition (water and soluble solid contents), weight and volume are analysed. A mathematical model is pr

  9. Surface properties of lipoplexes modified with mannosylerythritol lipid-a and tween 80 and their cellular association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wuxiao; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Qi, Xianrong; Kitamoto, Dai; Maitani, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    The surface properties of cationic liposomes and lipoplexes largely determine the cellular association and gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we measured the surface properties, such as zeta potentials, surface pH and hydration levels of MHAPC- and OH-Chol-lipoplexes and their cellular association, without and with the modification of biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) or Tween 80 (MHAPC=N,N-methyl hydroxyethyl aminopropane carbamoyl cholesterol; OH-Chol=cholesteryl-3beta-carboxyamindoethylene-N-hydroxyethylamine). Compared to OH-Chol-lipoplexes, the higher cellular association of MHAPC-lipoplexes correlated with the significantly higher zeta potentials, lower surface pH levels and "drier" surface, as evaluated by the generalized polarization of laurdan. Both MEL-A and Tween 80 modification of MHAPC-lipoplexes did not significantly change zeta potentials and surface pH levels, while MEL-A modification of OH-Chol-lipoplexes seriously decreased them. MEL-A hydrated the liposomal surface of MHAPC-lipoplexes but dehydrated that of OH-Chol-lipoplexes, while Tween 80 hydrated those of MHAPC- and OH-Chol-lipoplexes. In all, cationic liposomes composed of lipids with secondary and tertiary amine exhibited different surface properties and cellular associations of lipoplexes, and modification with surfactants further enlarged their difference. The strong hydration ability of Tween 80 may relate to the low cellular association of lipoplexes, while the dehydration of MEL-A-modified OH-Chol-lipoplexes seemed to compensate the negative zeta potential for the cellular association of lipoplexes.

  10. The cellular prion protein interacts with the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase in membrane microdomains of bioaminergic neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ermonval

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, is GPI anchored and abundant in lipid rafts. The absolute requirement of PrP(C in neurodegeneration associated to prion diseases is well established. However, the function of this ubiquitous protein is still puzzling. Our previous work using the 1C11 neuronal model, provided evidence that PrP(C acts as a cell surface receptor. Besides a ubiquitous signaling function of PrP(C, we have described a neuronal specificity pointing to a role of PrP(C in neuronal homeostasis. 1C11 cells, upon appropriate induction, engage into neuronal differentiation programs, giving rise either to serotonergic (1C11(5-HT or noradrenergic (1C11(NE derivatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The neuronal specificity of PrP(C signaling prompted us to search for PrP(C partners in 1C11-derived bioaminergic neuronal cells. We show here by immunoprecipitation an association of PrP(C with an 80 kDa protein identified by mass spectrometry as the tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP. This interaction occurs in lipid rafts and is restricted to 1C11-derived neuronal progenies. Our data indicate that TNAP is implemented during the differentiation programs of 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE cells and is active at their cell surface. Noteworthy, TNAP may contribute to the regulation of serotonin or catecholamine synthesis in 1C11(5-HT and 1C11(NE bioaminergic cells by controlling pyridoxal phosphate levels. Finally, TNAP activity is shown to modulate the phosphorylation status of laminin and thereby its interaction with PrP. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of a novel PrP(C partner in lipid rafts of neuronal cells favors the idea of a role of PrP in multiple functions. Because PrP(C and laminin functionally interact to support neuronal differentiation and memory consolidation, our findings introduce TNAP as a functional protagonist in the PrP(C-laminin interplay. The partnership between TNAP and PrP(C in neuronal cells may

  11. Influence of tissue- and cell-scale extracellular matrix distribution on the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today's tissue- engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the extracellular matrix (ECM) content, as this is thought to determine the load-bearing properties of the cartilage. However, there ar

  12. Assays of normal tissue injury and their cellular interpretation. Proceedings of the 12th L. H. Gray conference, Manchester, 2-5 September, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.; Moore, J.V.; Hume, W.J. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    Some of the questions posed were: 1) Can target cell populations be defined in the tissue for specific types of injury 2) Are there qualitative differences in the target-cell populations for different cytotoxic agents, e.g. resistant subpopulations of cells 3) What is the cellular basis to the volume effect (i.e. greater injury per unit volume with increasing volume of tissue treated) 4) What is the contribution of intracellular repair of potentially-lethal damage to the sparing of injury in late-responding tissues 5) What are the contributions of repopulation by colony-forming cells and cells with very limited division potential to the sparing of injury in the late-responding tissues 6) How well is functional (effector) cell number correlated with overall capacity for function 7) What is the contribution of stromal (including vascular) injury in the response of the parenchyma. A total of 90 contributions considered these questions and others, in the following sections: the alimentary canal, skin, germinal tissue, vascular tissue, neuromuscular and glandular tissues, kidneys, bladder and liver, and lungs, models and strategy.

  13. Viscoelastic properties of bovine orbital connective tissue and fat: constitutive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Lawrence; Gupta, Vijay; Lee, Choongyeop; Kavehpore, Pirouz; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-12-01

    Reported mechanical properties of orbital connective tissue and fat have been too sparse to model strain-stress relationships underlying biomechanical interactions in strabismus. We performed rheological tests to develop a multi-mode upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model of these tissues under shear loading. From 20 fresh bovine orbits, 30 samples of connective tissue were taken from rectus pulley regions and 30 samples of fatty tissues from the posterior orbit. Additional samples were defatted to determine connective tissue weight proportion, which was verified histologically. Mechanical testing in shear employed a triborheometer to perform: strain sweeps at 0.5-2.0 Hz; shear stress relaxation with 1% strain; viscometry at 0.01-0.5 s(-1) strain rate; and shear oscillation at 1% strain. Average connective tissue weight proportion was 98% for predominantly connective tissue and 76% for fatty tissue. Connective tissue specimens reached a long-term relaxation modulus of 668 Pa after 1,500 s, while corresponding values for fatty tissue specimens were 290 Pa and 1,100 s. Shear stress magnitude for connective tissue exceeded that of fatty tissue by five-fold. Based on these data, we developed a multi-mode UCM model with variable viscosities and time constants, and a damped hyperelastic response that accurately described measured properties of both connective and fatty tissues. Model parameters differed significantly between the two tissues. Viscoelastic properties of predominantly connective orbital tissues under shear loading differ markedly from properties of orbital fat, but both are accurately reflected using UCM models. These viscoelastic models will facilitate realistic global modeling of EOM behavior in binocular alignment and strabismus.

  14. Quantification of collagen fiber organization in biological tissues at cellular and molecular scales using second-harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambekar Ramachandra Rao, Raghu

    sclera of the eye in order to investigate their properties of transparency and opacity, respectively. We find from chi2-SHG imaging that there is no statistical difference in the values of d elements between cornea and sclera, indicating that the underlying collagen structure generating SHG from the two is similar at the level of detection of SHG microscopy. However, the difference lies in the spatial organization of these collagen fibers as observed from FT-SHG imaging. We find that cornea contains lamellae with patches of ordered and uniform diameter collagen fibers with axial order, which could be the reason for its transparent behavior. Conversely, there are no lamellae in sclera (i.e., no axial order), and fibers are thicker, denser, have inconsistent diameters, and possess relatively inhomogeneous orientations, leading to its opaque nature. We also utilized the two techniques to assess differences in stromal collagen fibers for several human breast tissue conditions: normal, hyperplasia, dysplasia, and malignant. Using FT-SHG imaging, we note differences between malignant and other pathological conditions through the metric A.I. ratio. Using generalized chi2-SHG imaging, we observe structural changes in collagen at the molecular scale, and a particular d element showed a more sensitive differentiation between breast tissue conditions, except between hyperplasia and normal/dysplasia. We also find that the trigonal symmetry (3m) is a more appropriate model to describe collagen fibers in malignant tissues as opposed to the conventionally used hexagonal symmetry (C6). Furthermore, the percentage of abnormal collagen fibers could potentially be used as a metric for differentiating breast tissue conditions. We also introduce a technique for extending chi2-SHG to fibers with curvature which is useful for generating chi2-image maps (in terms of d elements) instead of the conventional SHG intensity images. The spatial variations in d elements will provide additional

  15. Molecular, cellular and pharmaceutical aspects of autologous grafts for peri-implant hard and soft tissue defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiayu; Hao, Yongming; Zhao, Wei; Lv, Chengqi; Zou, Derong

    2016-12-01

    The lack of supporting hard and soft tissues always prevents the rehabilitation with dental implants. Among various hard and soft tissue augmentation procedures, autologous grafts have been considered to be the gold standard. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, dental tissue and adipose tissue have been described as promising alternatives for bone regeneration in the field of dental implantation. Mucosal cells, gingival fibroblasts and dental progenitor cells (DPS) can enhance peri-implant soft tissue augmentation and regenerate periodontal tissues around dental implants. Obtained from patients, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) are enriched in autologous platelets, which contain a great deal of growth factors and cytokines that are conducive to the regeneration of both hand and soft tissues around dental implants. Pharmaceutical treatments for osteoporosis and diabetes should be locally applied with implant procedures to restrict the resorption of autologous bone grafts and reduction of bone volume. Although autografts hold great potentials for dental implants, new approaches should also be explored with minimally invasion donor sites methods such as tissue engineering combined with autologous three factors and bio-3D printing involving self-assembling cell aggregates.

  16. Raising the standard: changes to the Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Craig; Velickovic, Zlatibor; Brown, Ross; Larsen, Stephen; Macpherson, Janet L; Gibson, John; Rasko, John E J

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, manufacture of blood, tissues and biologicals must comply with the federal laws and meet the requirements of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Manufacturing Principles as outlined in the current Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). The Therapeutic Goods Order (TGO) No. 88 was announced concurrently with the new cGMP, as a new standard for therapeutic goods. This order constitutes a minimum standard for human blood, tissues and cellular therapeutic goods aimed at minimising the risk of infectious disease transmission. The order sets out specific requirements relating to donor selection, donor testing and minimisation of infectious disease transmission from collection and manufacture of these products. The Therapeutic Goods Manufacturing Principles Determination No. 1 of 2013 references the human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products 2013 (2013 cGMP). The name change for the 2013 cGMP has allowed a broadening of the scope of products to include human cellular therapy products. It is difficult to directly compare versions of the code as deletion of some clauses has not changed the requirements to be met, as they are found elsewhere amongst the various guidelines provided. Many sections that were specific for blood and blood components are now less prescriptive and apply to a wider range of cellular therapies, but the general overall intent remains the same. Use of 'should' throughout the document instead of 'must' allows flexibility for alternative processes, but these systems will still require justification by relevant logical argument and validation data to be acceptable to TGA. The cGMP has seemingly evolved so that specific issues identified at audit over the last decade have now been formalised in the new version. There is a notable risk management approach applied to most areas that refer to process justification and decision making. These requirements commenced on 31 May 2013 and a 12 month

  17. Intraluminal mapping of tissue viscoelastic properties using laser speckle rheology catheter (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Hosoda, Masaki; Tshikudi, Diane M.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-03-01

    A number of disease conditions including coronary atherosclerosis, peripheral artery disease and gastro-intestinal malignancies are associated with alterations in tissue mechanical properties. Laser speckle rheology (LSR) has been demonstrated to provide important information on tissue mechanical properties by analyzing the time scale of temporal speckle intensity fluctuations, which serves as an index of tissue viscoelasticity. In order to measure the mechanical properties of luminal organs in vivo, LSR must be conducted via a miniature endoscope or catheter. Here we demonstrate the capability of an omni-directional LSR catheter to quantify tissue mechanical properties over the entire luminal circumference without the need for rotational motion. Retracting the catheter using a motor-drive assembly enables the reconstruction of cylindrical maps of tissue mechanical properties. The performance of the LSR catheter is tested using a luminal phantom with mechanical moduli that vary in both circumferential and longitudinal directions. 2D cylindrical maps of phantom viscoelastic properties are reconstructed over four quadrants of the coronary circumference simultaneously during catheter pullback. The reconstructed cylindrical maps of the decorrelation time constants easily distinguish the different gel components of the phantom with different viscoelastic moduli. The average values of decorrelation times calculated for each gel component of the phantom show a strong correspondence with the viscoelastic moduli measured via standard mechanical rheometry. These results highlight the capability for cylindrical mapping of tissue viscoelastic properties using LSR in luminal organs using a miniature catheter, thus opening the opportunity for improved diagnosis of several disease conditions.

  18. Determination of tissue optical properties in PDT treated Head & Neck patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Sharikova, Anna V.; Cengel, Keith A.; Ahn, Peter; Busch, Theresa M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Determination of optical properties (absorption (μa) and scattering (μs′) coefficients) in human tissue is important when it comes to accurate calculation of fluence rate in and around tissue area. ALA application to the tissue induces production of protoporphyrin IX when activated by red light. Changes in the tissue optical properties can send information such as treatment outcome and tissue drug concentration. Patients in this study were treated with PDT for head and neck mucosal dysplasia. They were enrolled in a phase I study of escalating light doses and oral ALA with 60mg/kg. Red light at 630nm was administered to the tumor from a laser. The light dose was escalated from 50–200J/cm2 with a measured fluence rate at tissue surface of 100mW/cm2. We developed a light detection device for the purpose of determining optical properties in vivo using the semi-infinite method. The light detection device consists of two parallel, placed 5mm apart. In one of the catheters a 2 mm long linear diffusing light source is placed while in the second catheter, a calibrated isotropic detector is placed. The detector is scanned along the length of the light source containing catheter. Scans are done with the device placed on the treatment area (tumor) and on the normal tissue. Optical properties were measured in-vivo before and after PDT delivery for both normal tissue and tumor. PMID:25999648

  19. "Thin" property and controversial subject matter: Yanner v. Eaton and property rights in human tissue and embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Lyria Bennett; Gollan, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    This article examines the definitions of "property" offered by the majority of the High Court of Australia in the case of Yanner v Eaton (1999) 201 CLR 351, which involved a statute giving the Crown "property" in fauna. It argues that the majority judges in that case endorsed a flexible or "thin" conception of property that is consistent with recognition of property in "things" such as excised human tissue and in vitro human embryos, despite the many differences between such "things" and ordinary chattels. A similar flexible conception of property was also an important factor in the United Kingdom case of Yearworth v North Bristol NHS Trust[2010] QB 1.

  20. Effect of solid distribution on elastic properties of open-cell cellular solids using numerical and experimental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2014-09-01

    Effect of solid distribution between edges and vertices of three-dimensional cellular solid with an open-cell structure was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Finite element analysis (FEA) with continuum elements and appropriate periodic boundary condition was employed to calculate the elastic properties of cellular solids using tetrakaidecahedral (Kelvin) unit cell. Relative densities between 0.01 and 0.1 and various values of solid fractions were considered. In order to validate the numerical model, three scaffolds with the relative density of 0.08, but different amounts of solid in vertices, were fabricated via 3-D printing technique. Good agreement was observed between numerical simulation and experimental results. Results of numerical simulation showed that, at low relative densities (numerical simulation and considering the relative density and solid fraction in vertices, empirical relations were derived for Young׳s modulus and Poisson׳s ratio.

  1. Simulation of the dependence of spatial fluence profiles on tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Medical laser applications are promoted as safe, effective treatments for a multiplicity of concerns, ranging from hyperthermal skin rejuvenation to subcutaneous tumor ablation. Chromophore and structural protein concentration and distribution within a patient's tissue vary from patient to patient and dictate the interaction of incident radiative energy of a specific wavelength with the target tissue. Laser parameters must be matched to tissue optical and thermal properties in order to achieve the desired therapeutic results without inducing unnecessary tissue damage, although accurate tissue optical properties are not always measured prior to and during laser therapies. A weighted variable step size Monte Carlo simulation of laser irradiation of skin tissue was used to determine the effects of variations in absorption (μa) and scattering coefficients (μs) and the degree of anisotropy (g) on the radiant energy transport per mm2 in response to steady-state photon propagation. The three parameters were varied in a factorial experimental design for the ranges of 0.25/mm isolate their impacts on the overall fluence distribution. Box plots of the resulting fluence profiles were created and compared to identify ranges in which optical property variance could be considered to significantly impact the spatial variance of fluence within the simulation volume. Results indicated that accurate prediction of the fluence profiles that will be achieved by any given medical laser treatment is unlikely without pre-treatment assessment of the tissue optical properties of individual patients.

  2. Lunar Dust and Lunar Simulant Activation, Monitoring, Solution and Cellular Toxicity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, A.S.; Wallace, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, many undesirable situations were encountered that must be mitigated prior to returning humans to the moon. Lunar dust (that part of the lunar regolith less than 20 m in diameter) was found to produce several problems with astronaut s suits and helmets, mechanical seals and equipment, and could have conceivably produced harmful physiological effects for the astronauts. For instance, the abrasive nature of the dust was found to cause malfunctions of various joints and seals of the spacecraft and suits. Additionally, though efforts were made to exclude lunar dust from the cabin of the lunar module, a significant amount of material nonetheless found its way inside. With the loss of gravity correlated with ascent of the lunar module from the lunar surface to rendezvous with the command module, much of the major portions of the contaminating soil and dust began to float, irritating the astronaut s eyes and being inhaled into their lungs. Our goal has been to understand some of the properties of lunar dust that could lead to possible hazards for humans. Due to the lack of an atmosphere, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. In order to understand the possible toxic effects of the reactive dust, it is necessary to reactivate the dust, as samples returned during the Apollo missions were exposed to the atmosphere of the Earth. We have used grinding and UV exposure to mimic some of the processes occurring on the Moon. The level of activation has been monitored using two methods: fluorescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). These techniques allow the monitoring of hydroxyl radical production in solution. We have found that grinding of lunar dust produces 2-3 times the concentration of hydroxyl radicals as lunar simulant and 10 times that of quartz. Exposure

  3. Surface modification and property analysis of biomedical polymers used for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zuwei; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2007-11-15

    The response of host organism in macroscopic, cellular and protein levels to biomaterials is, in most cases, closely associated with the materials' surface properties. In tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and many other biomedical fields, surface engineering of the bio-inert synthetic polymers is often required to introduce bioactive species that can promote cell adhesion, proliferation, viability and enhanced ECM-secretion functions. Up to present, a large number of surface engineering techniques for improving biocompatibility have been well established, the work of which generally contains three main steps: (1) surface modification of the polymeric materials; (2) chemical and physical characterizations; and (3) biocompatibility assessment through cell culture. This review focuses on the principles and practices of surface engineering of biomedical polymers with regards to particular aspects depending on the authors' research background and opinions. The review starts with an introduction of principles in designing polymeric biomaterial surfaces, followed by introduction of surface modification techniques to improve hydrophilicity, to introduce reactive functional groups and to immobilize functional protein molecules. The chemical and physical characterizations of the modified biomaterials are then discussed with emphasis on several important issues such as surface functional group density, functional layer thickness, protein surface density and bioactivity. Three most commonly used surface composition characterization techniques, i.e. ATR-FTIR, XPS, SIMS, are compared in terms of their penetration depth. Ellipsometry, CD, EPR, SPR and QCM's principles and applications in analyzing surface proteins are introduced. Finally discussed are frequently applied methods and their principles to evaluate biocompatibility of biomaterials via cell culture. In this section, current techniques and their developments to measure cell adhesion, proliferation, morphology

  4. A descriptive study to provide evidence of the teratogenic and cellular effects of sibutramine and ephedrine on cardiac- and liver-tissue of chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Hester Magdalena; Van Der Schoor, Ciska; Taute, Helena; Bester, Megan Jean

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to drugs during pregnancy is a major concern, as some teratogenic compounds can influence normal foetal development. Although the use of drugs during pregnancy should generally be avoided, exposure of the developing foetus to teratogens may occur unknowingly since these compounds may be hidden in products that are being marketed as "all natural." The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible teratogenic and cellular effects of sibutramine-a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor used in the treatment of obesity-on the heart and liver tissue of chick embryos. Ephedrine was used as a positive control. The chick embryo model was chosen because it has been used in studying developmental and experimental biology and teratology with great success. The embryos were exposed to three different concentrations of sibutramine and ephedrine respectively. The results obtained revealed that both compounds exhibited embryotoxicity when compared to the control groups. Liver and heart tissue of the exposed embryos was severely affected by these compounds in a dose-related manner. Morphology similar to that of muscle dystrophy was observed in the heart, where the muscle tissue was infiltrated by adipose and connective tissue. Severe liver steatosis was also noted. A more in-depth investigation into the molecular pathways involved might provide more information on the exact mechanism of toxicity of these products influencing embryonic development.

  5. Cellular Automata Simulations of Thermal and Electrical Transport Properties of Thin-Film Polymer/CNTs Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Alex; Iannacchione, Germano; Georgiev, Georgi; Cebe, Peggy

    2014-03-01

    A computational algorithm has been developed to simulate the transport properties of oriented and un-oriented thin film nanocomposites of isotactic Polypropylene (iPP) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with increasing CNT concentration. Our goal is to be able to design materials with optimal properties using simulations. We use cellular automata approach in Matlab simulation environment. The percolation threshold is reproduced in the simulations, matching experimental data. Upon percolation, the thermal transport in the films increases sharply, more so for the electrical than for the thermal conductivity, due to the larger difference in the electric conductivities of the CNTs and the polymer. To verify the simulation, the thin-film samples were sheared in the melt at 200 C at 1 Hz in a Linkan microscope shearing hot stage. The thermal and electrical conductivity measurements were performed on the same cell arrangement with the transport perpendicular to the thin-film plane using a DC method. The thermal and electrical conductivity are higher for the un-sheared as compared to the sheared samples with stronger temperature dependence for the latter as compared to the former. Our cellular automata simulations provide information about the microstructure-macroscopic property relation in the thin film nanocomposites and can be extended to simulations of other important materials.

  6. Simple Empirical Model for Identifying Rheological Properties of Soft Biological Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of soft biological tissue is a key issue for mechanical systems used in the healthcare field. We propose a simple empirical model using Fractional Dynamics and Exponential Nonlinearity (FDEN) to identify the rheological properties of soft biological tissue. The model is derived from detailed material measurements using samples isolated from porcine liver. We conducted dynamic viscoelastic and creep tests on liver samples using a rheometer. The experimental results indicated that biological tissue has specific properties: i) power law increases in storage elastic modulus and loss elastic modulus with the same slope; ii) power law gain decrease and constant phase delay in the frequency domain over two decades; iii) log-log scale linearity between time and strain relationships under constant force; and iv) linear and log scale linearity between strain and stress relationships. Our simple FDEN model uses only three dependent parameters and represents the specific propertie...

  7. Tissue and cellular localization of tannins in Tunisian dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Hédi; Alvarado, Camille; Bouchet, Brigitte; Kalthoum-Chérif, Jamila; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika; Guyot, Sylvain

    2014-07-16

    A histological approach including light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to provide accurate information on the localization of condensed tannins in the edible tissues and in the stone of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Light microscopy was carried out on fresh tissues after staining by 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) for a specific detection of condensed tannins. Thus, whether under light microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM), results showed that tannins are not located in the epidermis but more deeply in the mesocarp in the vacuole of very large cells. Regarding the stones, tannins are found in a specific cell layer located at 50 μm from the sclereid cells of the testa.

  8. Awakened by Cellular Stress: Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Population of Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Human Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh Heneidi; Simerman, Ariel A; Erica Keller; Prapti Singh; Xinmin Li; Dumesic, Daniel A; Gregorio Chazenbalk

    2013-01-01

    Advances in stem cell therapy face major clinical limitations, particularly challenged by low rates of post-transplant cell survival. Hostile host factors of the engraftment microenvironment such as hypoxia, nutrition deprivation, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and reactive oxygen species can each contribute to unwanted differentiation or apoptosis. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new population of adipose tissue (AT) derived pluripotent stem cells, termed Mul...

  9. A method for quantifying mechanical properties of tissue following viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Lam

    Full Text Available Viral infection and replication involves the reorganization of the actin network within the host cell. Actin plays a central role in the mechanical properties of cells. We have demonstrated a method to quantify changes in mechanical properties of fabricated model three-dimensional (3D connective tissue following viral infection. Using this method, we have characterized the impact of infection by the human herpesvirus, cytomegalovirus (HCMV. HCMV is a member of the herpesvirus family and infects a variety of cell types including fibroblasts. In the body, fibroblasts are necessary for maintaining connective tissue and function by creating mechanical force. Using this 3D connective tissue model, we observed that infection disrupted the cell's ability to generate force and reduced the cumulative contractile force of the tissue. The addition of HCMV viral particles in the absence of both viral gene expression and DNA replication was sufficient to disrupt tissue function. We observed that alterations of the mechanical properties are, in part, due to a disruption of the underlying complex actin microfilament network established by the embedded fibroblasts. Finally, we were able to prevent HCMV-mediated disruption of tissue function by the addition of human immune globulin against HCMV. This study demonstrates a method to quantify the impact of viral infection on mechanical properties which are not evident using conventional cell culture systems.

  10. Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) head tissues: physical properties and CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldevilla, Melissa S; McKenna, Megan F; Wiggins, Sean M; Shadwick, Robert E; Cranford, Ted W; Hildebrand, John A

    2005-06-01

    Tissue physical properties from a Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) neonate head are reported and compared with computed tomography (CT) X-ray imaging. Physical properties measured include longitudinal sound velocity, density, elastic modulus and hysteresis. Tissues were classified by type as follows: mandibular acoustic fat, mandibular blubber, forehead acoustic fat (melon), forehead blubber, muscle and connective tissue. Results show that each class of tissues has unique, co-varying physical properties. The mandibular acoustic fats had minimal values for sound speed (1350+/-10.6 m s(-1)) and mass density (890+/-23 kg m(-3)). These values increased through mandibular blubber (1376+/-13 m s(-1), 919+/-13 kg m(-3)), melon (1382+/-23 m s(-1), 937+/-17 kg m(-3)), forehead blubber (1401+/-7.8 m s(-1), 935+/-25 kg m(-3)) and muscle (1517+/-46.8 m s(-1), 993+/-58 kg m(-3)). Connective tissue had the greatest mean sound speed and density (1628+/-48.7 m s(-1), 1087+/-41 kg m(-3)). The melon formed a low-density, low-sound-speed core, supporting its function as a sound focusing organ. Hounsfield unit (HU) values from CT X-ray imaging are correlated with density and sound speed values, allowing HU values to be used to predict these physical properties. Blubber and connective tissues have a higher elastic modulus than acoustic fats and melon, suggesting more collagen structure in blubber and connective tissues. Blubber tissue elastic modulus is nonlinear with varying stress, becoming more incompressible as stress is increased. These data provide important physical properties required to construct models of the sound generation and reception mechanisms in Ziphius cavirostris heads, as well as models of their interaction with anthropogenic sound.

  11. Properties and cellular effects of particulate matter from direct emissions and ambient sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wenjie; Su, Shu; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Xi; Chen, Yilin; Shen, Guofeng; Liu, Junfeng; Cheng, Hefa; Wang, Xilong; Wu, Shuiping; Zeng, Eddy; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2016-10-14

    The pollution of particulate matter (PM) is of great concern in China and many other developing countries. It is generally recognized that the toxicity of PM is source and property dependent. However, the relationship between PM properties and toxicity is still not well understood. In this study, PM samples from direct emissions of wood, straw, coal, diesel combustion, cigarette smoking and ambient air were collected and characterized for their physicochemical properties. Their expression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and levels of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) was measured using a RAW264.7 cell model. Our results demonstrated that the properties of the samples from different origins exhibited remarkable differences. Significant increases in ROS were observed when the cells were exposed to PMs from biomass origins, including wood, straw and cigarettes, while increases in TNF-α were found for all the samples, particularly those from ambient air. The most important factor associated with ROS generation was the presence of water-soluble organic carbon, which was extremely abundant in the samples that directly resulted from biomass combustion. Metals, endotoxins and PM size were the most important properties associated with increases in TNF-α expression levels. The association of the origins of PM particles and physicochemical properties with cytotoxic properties is illustrated using a cluster analysis.

  12. Small and intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels confer distinctive patterns of distribution in human tissues and differential cellular localisation in the colon and corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao Xiang; Gorman, Shelby A; Benson, Bill; Singh, Kuljit; Hieble, J Paul; Michel, Martin C; Tate, Simon N; Trezise, Derek J

    2004-06-01

    The SK/IK family of small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contains four members, SK1, SK2, SK3 and IK1, and is important for the regulation of a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal functions. In this study we have analysed the distribution of these channels in human tissues and their cellular localisation in samples of colon and corpus cavernosum. SK1 mRNA was detected almost exclusively in neuronal tissues. SK2 mRNA distribution was restricted but more widespread than SK1, and was detected in adrenal gland, brain, prostate, bladder, liver and heart. SK3 mRNA was detected in almost every tissue examined. It was highly expressed in brain and in smooth muscle-rich tissues including the clitoris and the corpus cavernosum, and expression in the corpus cavernosum was upregulated up to 5-fold in patients undergoing sex-change operations. IK1 mRNA was present in surface-rich, secretory and inflammatory cell-rich tissues, highest in the trachea, prostate, placenta and salivary glands. In detailed immunohistochemical studies of the colon and the corpus cavernosum, SK1-like immunoreactivity was observed in the enteric neurons. SK3-like immunoreactivity was observed strongly in smooth muscle and vascular endothelium. IK1-like immunoreactivity was mainly observed in inflammatory cells and enteric neurons of the colon, but absent in corpus cavernosum. These distinctive patterns of distribution suggest that these channels are likely to have different biological functions and could be specifically targeted for a number of human diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome, hypertension and erectile dysfunction.

  13. Review of the cellular and biological principles of distraction osteogenesis: An in vivo bioreactor tissue engineering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, K; Kunchur, R; Farhadieh, R

    2016-02-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a widely used technique in plastic and orthopaedic surgery. During the process, mechanical force is applied to fractured bone to enhance the regenerative processes and induce new bone formation. Although there is an abundance of literature on the clinical process of DO, there is a distinct lack of focus on the underlying biological principles governing this process. DO follows the basic premises of tissue engineering. The mechanical stress stimulates mesenchymal stem cell differentiation down an osteoblastic lineage on a matrix background. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the current knowledge of the molecular mechanism governing this process.

  14. Comparative study on antiproliferation properties and cellular antioxidant activities of commonly consumed food legumes against nine human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baojun; Chang, Sam K C

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this work were to compare health promoting effects of commonly consumed food legumes in terms of cancer cell proliferation inhibitory effects and cellular antioxidant activities (CAA). The CAA was evaluated by fluorescence microplate reader based on in vitro animal cell cultivation. Antiproliferative properties were assayed by MTT method using in vitro cell culture system. Phytochemicals (including total phenolic, procyanidin, saponin and phytic acid) and chemical antioxidant activities (including DPPH free radical scavenging activity, oxygen radical absorbing capacity, peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PRSC)) were also determined for comparison purposes. The results showed that different types of legumes possessed considerable variations in their phytochemicals, as well as chemical and cellular antioxidant activities. Adzuki bean exhibited the strongest antiproliferative properties in a dose-dependent manner against all digestive system cancer cell lines (CAL27, AGS, HepG2, SW480 and Caco-2), ovary cancer cell SK-OV-3 and breast cancer cell MCF-7 among all legumes tested. Black soybean exhibited the highest saponin, phytic acid content, PRSC values, and the strongest CAA values. These results indicate that commonly consumed food legumes may serve as an excellent dietary source of natural antioxidants for health promotion and cancer prevention.

  15. Oxygen deprivation and the cellular response to hypoxia in adipocytes - perspectives on white and brown adipose tissues in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayhurn, Paul; Alomar, Suliman Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Relative hypoxia has been shown to develop in white adipose tissue depots of different types of obese mouse (genetic, dietary), and this leads to substantial changes in white adipocyte function. These changes include increased production of inflammation-related adipokines (such as IL-6, leptin, Angptl4, and VEGF), an increase in glucose utilization and lactate production, and the induction of fibrosis and insulin resistance. Whether hypoxia also occurs in brown adipose tissue depots in obesity has been little considered. However, a recent study has reported low pO2 in brown fat of obese mice, this involving mitochondrial loss and dysfunction. We suggest that obesity-linked hypoxia may lead to similar alterations in brown adipocytes as in white fat cells - particularly changes in adipokine production, increased glucose uptake and lactate release, and insulin resistance. This would be expected to compromise thermogenic activity and the role of brown fat in glucose homeostasis and triglyceride clearance, underpinning the development of the metabolic syndrome. Hypoxia-induced augmentation of lactate production may also stimulate the "browning" of white fat depots through recruitment of UCP1 and the development of brite adipocytes.

  16. Noninvasive Measurement of Ear Cartilage Elasticity on the Cellular Level: A New Method to Provide Biomechanical Information for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Ernst Jan; van der Laan, Koen; Helder, Marco N.; Mullender, Margriet G.; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Background: An important feature of auricular cartilage is its stiffness. To tissue engineer new cartilage, we need objective tools to provide us with the essential biomechanical information to mimic optimal conditions for chondrogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) development. In this study, we used an optomechanical sensor to investigate the elasticity of auricular cartilage ECM and tested whether sensitivity and measurement reproducibility of the sensor would be sufficient to accurately detect (subtle) differences in matrix compositions in healthy, diseased, or regenerated cartilage. Methods: As a surrogate model to different cartilage ECM compositions, goat ears (n = 9) were subjected to different degradation processes to remove the matrix components elastin and glycosaminoglycans. Individual ear samples were cut and divided into 3 groups. Group 1 served as control and was measured within 2 hours after animal death and at 24 and 48 hours, and groups 2 and 3 were measured after 24- and 48-h hyaluronidase or elastase digestion. Per sample, 9 consecutive measurements were taken ±300 μm apart. Results: Good reproducibility was seen between consecutive measurements with an overall interclass correlation coefficient average of 0.9 (0.81–0.98). Although degradation led to variable results, overall, a significant difference was seen between treatment groups after 48 hours (control, 4.2 MPa [±0.5] vs hyaluronidase, 2.0 MPa [±0.3], and elastase, 3.0 MPa [±0.4]; both P development of tissue-engineered auricular cartilage.

  17. Measurements of the linear elastic properties of the face soft tissues using an aspiration device

    OpenAIRE

    Luboz, Vincent; Promayon, Emmanuel; Payan, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Maxillo-facial surgeries have a direct impact on the face shape and appearance. The anatomical variations in the face soft tissues (skin thickness, skin or muscle material parameters…) make it hard to predict the face final shape accurately. Biomechanical modeling could help in this prediction by simulating the soft tissue displacement following the bone remodeling and therefore the patient's face visible outcome. Measuring the variation of the skin properties across a...

  18. Linear Elastic Properties of the Facial Soft Tissues Using an Aspiration Device: Towards Patient Specific Characterization.

    OpenAIRE

    Luboz, Vincent; Promayon, Emmanuel; Payan, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Biomechanical modeling of the facial soft tissue behavior is needed in aesthetic or maxillo-facial surgeries where the simulation of the bone displacements cannot accurately predict the visible outcome on the patient's face. Because these tissues have different nature and elastic properties across the face, depending on their thickness, and their content in fat or muscle, individualizing their mechanical parameters could increase the simulation accuracy. Using a specif...

  19. Temporal evolution of mechanical properties of skeletal tissue regeneration in rabbits. An experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Mokoko, Didier; Chabrand, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Various mathematical models represent the effects of local mechanical environment on the regulation of skeletal regeneration. Their relevance relies on an accurate description of the evolving mechanical properties of the regenerating tissue. The object of this study was to develop an experimental model which made it possible to characterize the temporal evolution of the structural and mechanical properties during unloaded enchondral osteogenesis in the New Zealand rabbit, a standard animal model for studies of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. A 25mm segment of tibial diaphysis was removed sub-periosteally from rabbits. The defect was repaired by the preserved periosteum. An external fixator was applied to prevent mechanical loading during osteogenesis. The regenerated skeletal tissues were studied by CT scan, histology and mechanical tests. The traction tests between 7 to 21 days post-surgery were done on formaldehyde-fixated tissue allowing to obtain force/displacement curves. The viscoelastic properties of ...

  20. Characterization and assessment of hyperelastic and elastic properties of decellularized human adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Fuetterer, Lydia; Reza Mousavi, Seyed; Armstrong, Ryan C; Flynn, Lauren E; Samani, Abbas

    2014-11-28

    Decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) has shown potential as a regenerative scaffold for plastic and reconstructive surgery to augment or replace damaged or missing adipose tissue (e.g. following lumpectomy or mastectomy). The mechanical properties of soft tissue substitutes are of paramount importance in restoring the natural shape and appearance of the affected tissues, and mechanical mismatching can lead to unpredictable scar tissue formation and poor implant integration. The goal of this work was to assess the linear elastic and hyperelastic properties of decellularized human adipose tissue and compare them to those of normal breast adipose tissue. To assess the influence of the adipose depot source on the mechanical properties of the resultant decellularized scaffolds, we performed indentation tests on DAT samples sourced from adipose tissue isolated from the breast, subcutaneous abdominal region, omentum, pericardial depot and thymic remnant, and their corresponding force-displacement data were acquired. Elastic and hyperelastic parameters were estimated using inverse finite element algorithms. Subsequently, a simulation was conducted in which the estimated hyperelastic parameters were tested in a real human breast model under gravity loading in order to assess the suitability of the scaffolds for implantation. Results of these tests showed that in the human breast, the DAT would show similar deformability to that of native normal tissue. Using the measured hyperelastic parameters, we were able to assess whether DAT derived from different depots exhibited different intrinsic nonlinearities. Results showed that DAT sourced from varying regions of the body exhibited little intrinsic nonlinearity, with no statistically significant differences between the groups.

  1. Studying the distribution of deep Raman spectroscopy signals using liquid tissue phantoms with varying optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    In this study we employed large volume liquid tissue phantoms, consisting of a scattering agent (Intralipid), an absorption agent (Indian ink) and a synthesized calcification powder (calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP)) similar to that found in cancerous tissues (e.g. breast and prostate), to simulate human tissues. We studied experimentally the magnitude and origin of Raman signals in a transmission Raman geometry as a function of optical properties of the medium and the location of calcifications within the phantom. The goal was to inform the development of future noninvasive cancer screening applications in vivo. The results provide insight into light propagation and Raman scattering distribution in deep Raman measurements, exploring also the effect of the variation of relative absorbance of laser and Raman photons within the phantoms. Most notably when modeling breast and prostate tissues it follows that maximum signals is obtained from the front and back faces of the tissue with the central region contributing less to the measured spectrum.

  2. Exercise decreases lipogenic gene expression in adipose tissue and alters adipocyte cellularity during weight regain after weight loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Danielle Giles

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is a potent strategy to facilitate long-term weight maintenance. In addition to increasing energy expenditure and reducing appetite, exercise also favors the oxidation of dietary fat, which likely helps prevent weight re-gain. It is unclear whether this exercise-induced metabolic shift is due to changes in energy balance, or whether exercise imparts additional adaptations in the periphery that limit the storage and favor the oxidation of dietary fat. To answer this question, adipose tissue lipid metabolism and related gene expression were studied in obese rats following weight loss and during the first day of relapse to obesity. Mature, obese rats were weight-reduced for 2 weeks with or without daily treadmill exercise (EX. Rats were weight maintained for 6 weeks, followed by relapse on: a ad libitum low fat diet (LFD, b ad libitum LFD plus EX, or c a provision of LFD to match the positive energy imbalance of exercised, relapsing animals. 24h retention of dietary- and de novo-derived fat were assessed directly using 14C palmitate/oleate and 3H20, respectively. Exercise decreased the size, but increased the number of adipocytes in both retroperitoneal (RP and subcutaneous (SC adipose depots, and prevented the relapse-induced increase in adipocyte size. Further, exercise decreased the expression of genes involved in lipid uptake (CD36 & LPL, de novo lipogenesis (FAS, ACC1, and triacylglycerol synthesis (MGAT & DGAT in RP adipose during relapse following weight loss. This was consistent with the metabolic data, whereby exercise reduced retention of de novo-derived fat even when controlling for the positive energy imbalance. The decreased trafficking of dietary fat to adipose tissue with exercise was explained by reduced energy intake which attenuated energy imbalance during refeeding. Despite having decreased expression of lipogenic genes, the net retention of de novo-derived lipid was higher in both the RP and SC adipose of exercising

  3. Laser Induced Heat Diffusion Limited Tissue Coagulation Problem and General Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Lubashevsky, I A; Priezzhev, A V

    2001-01-01

    Previously we have developed a free boundary model for local thermal coagulation induced by laser light absorption when the tissue region affected directly by laser light is sufficiently small and heat diffusion into the surrounding tissue governs the necrosis growth. In the present paper surveying the obtained results we state the point of view on the necrosis formation under these conditions as the basis of an individual laser therapy mode exhibiting specific properties. In particular, roughly speaking, the size of the resulting necrosis domain is determined by the physical characteristics of the tissue and its response to local heating, and by the applicator form rather than the treatment duration and the irradiation power.

  4. Tailoring the ligand shell for the control of cellular uptake and optical properties of nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Ostermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this short review, the main challenges in the use of hydrophobic nanoparticles in biomedical application are addressed. It is shown how to overcome the different issues by the use of a polymeric encapsulation system, based on an amphiphilic polyisoprene-block-poly(ethylene glycol diblock copolymer. On the basis of this simple molecule, the development of a versatile and powerful phase transfer strategy is summarized, focusing on the main advantages like the adjustable size, the retained properties, the excellent shielding and the diverse functionalization properties of the encapsulated nanoparticles. Finally, the extraordinary properties of these encapsulated nanoparticles in terms of toxicity and specificity in a broad in vitro test is demonstrated.

  5. Cellular properties of principal neurons in the rat entorhinal cortex. II. The medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Cathrin B; Witter, Menno P

    2012-06-01

    Principal neurons in different medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) layers show variations in spatial modulation that stabilize between 15 and 30 days postnatally. These in vivo variations are likely due to differences in intrinsic membrane properties and integrative capacities of neurons. The latter depends on inputs and thus potentially on the morphology of principal neurons. In this comprehensive study, we systematically compared the morphological and physiological characteristics of principal neurons in all MEC layers of newborn rats before and after weaning. We recorded simultaneously from up to four post-hoc morphologically identified MEC principal neurons in vitro. Neurons in L(ayer) I-LIII have dendritic and axonal arbors mainly in superficial layers, and LVI neurons mainly in deep layers. The dendritic and axonal trees of part of LV neurons diverge throughout all layers. Physiological properties of principal neurons differ between layers. In LII, most neurons have a prominent sag potential, resonance and membrane oscillations. Neurons in LIII and LVI fire relatively regular, and lack sag potentials and membrane oscillations. LV neurons show the most prominent spike-frequency adaptation and highest input resistance. The data indicate that adult-like principal neuron types can be differentiated early on during postnatal development. The results of the accompanying paper, in which principal neurons in the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) were described (Canto and Witter,2011), revealed that significant differences between LEC and MEC exist mainly in LII neurons. We therefore systematically analyzed changes in LII biophysical properties along the mediolateral axis of MEC and LEC. There is a gradient in properties typical for MEC LII neurons. These properties are most pronounced in medially located neurons and become less apparent in more laterally positioned ones. This gradient continues into LEC, such that in LEC medially positioned neurons share some properties

  6. The Protein Corona of Plant Virus Nanoparticles Influences their Dispersion Properties, Cellular Interactions, and In Vivo Fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitek, Andrzej S; Wen, Amy M; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-04-06

    Biomolecules in bodily fluids such as plasma can adsorb to the surface of nanoparticles and influence their biological properties. This phenomenon, known as the protein corona, is well established in the field of synthetic nanotechnology but has not been described in the context of plant virus nanoparticles (VNPs). The interaction between VNPs derived from Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and plasma proteins is investigated, and it is found that the VNP protein corona is significantly less abundant compared to the corona of synthetic particles. The formed corona is dominated by complement proteins and immunoglobulins, the binding of which can be reduced by PEGylating the VNP surface. The impact of the VNP protein corona on molecular recognition and cell targeting in the context of cancer and thrombosis is investigated. A library of functionalized TMV rods with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide ligands targeting integrins or fibrin(ogen) show different dispersion properties, cellular interactions, and in vivo fates depending on the properties of the protein corona, influencing target specificity, and non-specific scavenging by macrophages. Our results provide insight into the in vivo properties of VNPs and suggest that the protein corona effect should be considered during the development of efficacious, targeted VNP formulations.

  7. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes: Implications for cellular properties and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100µm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages ...

  8. A Comprehensive Review of Punica granatum (Pomegranate) Properties in Toxicological, Pharmacological, Cellular and Molecular Biology Researches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Arastoo, Mohammad; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Punica granatum (Pg), commonly known as pomegranate (Pg), is a member of the monogeneric family, Punicaceae, and is mainly found in Iran which is considered to be its primary centre of origin. Pg and its chemical components possess various pharmacological and toxicological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory (by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines), anti-cancer and anti-angiogenesis activities. They also show inhibitory effects on invasion/motility, cell cycle, apoptosis, and vital enzymes such as cyclooxygenase (COX), lipooxygenase (LOX), cytochrome P450 (CYP450), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), carbonic anhydrase (CA), 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSDs) and serine protease (SP). Furthermore, they can stimulate cell differentiation and possess anti-mutagenic effects. Pg can also interfere with several signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT, mTOR, PI3K, Bcl-X, Bax, Bad, MAPK, ERK1/2, P38, JNK, and caspase. However, the exact mechanisms for its pharmacological and toxicological properties remain to be unclear and need further evaluation. These properties strongly suggest a wide range use of Pg for clinical applications. This review will discuss the areas for which Pg has shown therapeutic properties in different mechanisms.

  9. A Comprehensive Review of Punica granatum (Pomegranate) Properties in Toxicological, Pharmacological, Cellular and Molecular Biology Researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Arastoo, Mohammad; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Punica granatum (Pg), commonly known as pomegranate (Pg), is a member of the monogeneric family, Punicaceae, and is mainly found in Iran which is considered to be its primary centre of origin. Pg and its chemical components possess various pharmacological and toxicological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory (by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines), anti-cancer and anti-angiogenesis activities. They also show inhibitory effects on invasion/motility, cell cycle, apoptosis, and vital enzymes such as cyclooxygenase (COX), lipooxygenase (LOX), cytochrome P450 (CYP450), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), carbonic anhydrase (CA), 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSDs) and serine protease (SP). Furthermore, they can stimulate cell differentiation and possess anti-mutagenic effects. Pg can also interfere with several signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT, mTOR, PI3K, Bcl-X, Bax, Bad, MAPK, ERK1/2, P38, JNK, and caspase. However, the exact mechanisms for its pharmacological and toxicological properties remain to be unclear and need further evaluation. These properties strongly suggest a wide range use of Pg for clinical applications. This review will discuss the areas for which Pg has shown therapeutic properties in different mechanisms. PMID:24250463

  10. In-vivo and label-free imaging of cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin by using second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eung Jang; Kim, Boram; Ahn, Hong-Gyu; Park, Seung-Han; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Sangyoup

    2015-02-01

    A video-rate multimodal microscope, which can obtain second- and third- harmonic generation (SHG and THG) images simultaneously, is developed for investigating cellular and tissue structures in mouse ear skin. By utilizing in-vivo video-rate epi-detected SHG and THG microscopy, we successfully demonstrate that combined images of subcutaneous cellular components and peripheral nerve fibers, together with the collagen fiber, in the mouse ear pinna can be obtained without employing fluorescent probes. We also show that the flow of red blood cells and the diameter change of arteriole-like blood vessels can be visualized with femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1036 nm. In particular, the epi-THG contrast images of the blood-vessel walls display clearly the difference between the arteriole-like and the venule capillary-like blood-vessel types. We should emphasize that our newly-developed microscope system has a unique feature in that it can produce simultaneous in-vivo label-free SHG and THG images in contrast to the conventional confocal and two-photon microscopes.

  11. Altered distributions of bone tissue mineral and collagen properties in women with fragility fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen Xiang; Lloyd, Ashley A; Burket, Jayme C; Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Donnelly, Eve

    2016-03-01

    Heterogeneity of bone tissue properties is emerging as a potential indicator of altered bone quality in pathologic tissue. The objective of this study was to compare the distributions of tissue properties in women with and without histories of fragility fractures using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) imaging. We extended a prior study that examined the relationship of the mean FTIR properties to fracture risk by analyzing in detail the widths and the tails of the distributions of FTIR properties in biopsies from fracture and non-fracture cohorts. The mineral and matrix properties of cortical and trabecular iliac crest tissue were compared in biopsies from women with a history of fragility fracture (+Fx; n=21, age: mean 54±SD 15y) and with no history of fragility fracture (-Fx; n=12, age: 57±5y). A subset of the patients included in the -Fx group were taking estrogen-plus-progestin hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (-Fx+HRT n=8, age: 58±5y) and were analyzed separately from patients with no history of HRT (-Fx-HRT n=4, age: 56±7y). When the FTIR parameter mean values were examined by treatment group, the trabecular tissue of -Fx-HRT patients had a lower mineral:matrix ratio (M:M) and collagen maturity (XLR) than that of -Fx+HRT patients (-22% M:M, -18% XLR) and +Fx patients (-17% M:M, -18% XLR). Across multiple FTIR parameters, tissue from the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail (5th percentile) values than that from the -Fx+HRT or +Fx groups. In trabecular collagen maturity and crystallinity (XST), the -Fx-HRT group had smaller low-tail values than those in the -Fx+HRT group (-16% XLR, -5% XST) and the +Fx group (-17% XLR, -7% XST). The relatively low values of trabecular mineral:matrix ratio and collagen maturity and smaller low-tail values of collagen maturity and crystallinity observed in the -Fx-HRT group are characteristic of younger tissue. Taken together, our data suggest that the presence of newly formed tissue that includes small/imperfect crystals

  12. Extraction of optical properties and prediction of light distribution in rat brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimipour, Mehdi; Baumgartner, Ryan; Liu, Yuming; Jacques, Steven L.; Eliceiri, Kevin; Pashaie, Ramin

    2014-07-01

    Predicting the distribution of light inside any turbid media, such as biological tissue, requires detailed information about the optical properties of the medium, including the absorption and scattering coefficients and the anisotropy factor. Particularly, in biophotonic applications where photons directly interact with the tissue, this information translates to system design optimization, precision in light delivery, and minimization of unintended consequences, such as phototoxicity or photobleaching. In recent years, optogenetics has opened up a new area in deep brain stimulation with light and the method is widely adapted by researchers for the study of the brain circuitries and the dynamics of neurological disorders. A key factor for a successful optogenetic stimulation is delivering an adequate amount of light to the targeted brain objects. The adequate amount of light needed to stimulate each brain object is identified by the tissue optical properties as well as the type of opsin expressed in the tissue, wavelength of the light, and the physical dimensions of the targeted area. Therefore, to implement a precise light delivery system for optogenetics, detailed information about the optical properties of the brain tissue and a mathematical model that incorporates all determining factors is needed to find a good estimation of light distribution in the brain. In general, three measurements are required to obtain the optical properties of any tissue, namely diffuse transmitted light, diffuse reflected light, and transmitted ballistic beam. In this report, these parameters were measured in vitro using intact rat brain slices of 500 μm thickness via a two-integrating spheres optical setup. Then, an inverse adding doubling method was used to extract the optical properties of the tissue from the collected data. These experiments were repeated to cover the whole brain tissue with high spatial resolution for the three different cuts (transverse, sagittal, and coronal

  13. Tensile properties, collagen content, and crosslinks in connective tissues of the immature knee joint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram V Eleswarapu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major connective tissues of the knee joint act in concert during locomotion to provide joint stability, smooth articulation, shock absorption, and distribution of mechanical stresses. These functions are largely conferred by the intrinsic material properties of the tissues, which are in turn determined by biochemical composition. A thorough understanding of the structure-function relationships of the connective tissues of the knee joint is needed to provide design parameters for efforts in tissue engineering. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive characterization of the tensile properties, collagen content, and pyridinoline crosslink abundance of condylar cartilage, patellar cartilage, medial and lateral menisci, cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments (analogous to anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in humans, respectively, medial and lateral collateral ligaments, and patellar ligament from immature bovine calves. Tensile stiffness and strength were greatest in the menisci and patellar ligament, and lowest in the hyaline cartilages and cruciate ligaments; these tensile results reflected trends in collagen content. Pyridinoline crosslinks were found in every tissue despite the relative immaturity of the joints, and significant differences were observed among tissues. Notably, for the cruciate ligaments and patellar ligament, crosslink density appeared more important in determining tensile stiffness than collagen content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine tensile properties, collagen content, and pyridinoline crosslink abundance in a direct head-to-head comparison among all of the major connective tissues of the knee. This is also the first study to report results for pyridinoline crosslink density that suggest its preferential role over collagen in determining tensile stiffness for certain tissues.

  14. Chitosan fibers with improved biological and mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Mohammad Z; Bou-Akl, Therese H; Blowytsky, Oksana; Walters, Henry L; Matthew, Howard W T

    2013-04-01

    The low mechanical properties of hydrogel materials such as chitosan hinder their broad utility for tissue engineering applications. Previous research efforts improved the mechanical properties of chitosan fiber through chemical and physical modifications; however, unfavorable toxicity effects on cells were reported. In this paper, we report the preparation of chitosan fibers with improved mechanical and biocompatibility properties. The structure-property relationships of extruded chitosan fibers were explored by varying acetic acid (AA) concentration, ammonia concentration, annealing temperature and degree of heparin crosslinking. Results showed that optimizing AA concentration to 2vol% improved fiber strength and stiffness by 2-fold. Extruding chitosan solution into 25wt% of ammonia solution reduced fiber diameters and improved fiber strength by 2-fold and stiffness by 3-fold, due to an increase in crystallinity as confirmed by XRD. Fiber annealing further reduced fiber diameter and improved fiber strength and stiffness as temperature increased. Chitosan fibers crosslinked with heparin had increased diameter but lower strength and stiffness properties and higher breaking strain values. When individual parameters were combined, further improvement in fiber mechanical properties was achieved. All mechanically improved fibers and heparin crosslinked fibers promoted valvular interstitial cells (VIC) attachment and growth over 10 day cultures. Our results demonstrate the ability to substantially improve the mechanical properties of chitosan fibers without adversely affecting their biological properties. The investigated treatments offer numerous advantages over previous physical/chemical modifications and thus are expected to expand the utility of chitosan fibers with tunable mechanical properties in various tissue engineering applications.

  15. Bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles: preparation, cellular uptake, tissue distribution, and anticancer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan YR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Peihao Yin,1,* Yan Wang,1,* YanYan Qiu,1 LiLi Hou,1 Xuan Liu,1 Jianmin Qin,1 Yourong Duan,2 Peifeng Liu,2 Ming Qiu,3 Qi Li11Department of Clinical Oncology, Putuo Hospital and Interventional Cancer Institute of Integrative Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China; 2Shanghai Cancer Institute, Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China; 3Department of General Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent studies have shown that bufalin has a good antitumor effect but has high toxicity, poor water solubility, a short half-life, a narrow therapeutic window, and a toxic dose that is close to the therapeutic dose, which all limit its clinical application. This study aimed to determine the targeting efficacy of nanoparticles (NPs made of methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, poly-L-lysine (PLL, and cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD loaded with bufalin, ie, bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles (BNPs, in SW620 colon cancer-bearing mice.Methods: BNPs showed uniform size. The size, shape, zeta potential, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, and release of these nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The tumor targeting, cellular uptake, and growth-inhibitory effect of BNPs in vivo were tested.Results: BNPs were of uniform size with an average particle size of 164 ± 84 nm and zeta potential of 2.77 mV. The encapsulation efficiency was 81.7% ± 0.89%, and the drug load was 3.92% ± 0.16%. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that although the blank NPs were nontoxic, they enhanced the cytotoxicity of bufalin in BNPs. Drug release experiments showed that the release of the drug was prolonged and sustained. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that BNPs could effectively bind to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In the SW620

  16. Cellular organization of pre-mRNA splicing factors in several tissues. Changes in the uterus by hormone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George-Téllez, R; Segura-Valdez, M L; González-Santos, L; Jiménez-García, L F

    2002-05-01

    In the mammalian cell nucleus, splicing factors are distributed in nuclear domains known as speckles or splicing factor compartments (SFCs). In cultured cells, these domains are dynamic and reflect transcriptional and splicing activities. We used immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy to monitor whether splicing factors in differentiated cells display similar features. Speckled patterns are observed in rat hepatocytes, beta-cells, bronchial and intestine epithelia and also in three cell types of the uterus. Moreover, the number, distribution and sizes of the speckles vary among them. In addition, we studied variations in the circular form (shape) of speckles in uterine cells that are transcriptionally modified by a hormone action. During proestrus of the estral cycle, speckles are irregular in shape while in diestrus I they are circular. Experimentally, in castrated rats luminal epithelial cells show a pattern where speckles are dramatically rounded, but they recover their irregular shape rapidly after an injection of estradiol. The same results were observed in muscle and gland epithelial cells of the uterus. We concluded that different speckled patterns are present in various cells types in differentiated tissues and that these patterns change in the uterus depending upon the presence or absence of hormones such as estradiol.

  17. Electrospun Polymeric Scaffolds with Enhanced Biomimetic Properties for Tissue Engineering Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This PhD Thesis is focused on the development of fibrous polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications and on the improvement of scaffold biomimetic properties. Scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning, which allows to obtain scaffolds made of polymeric micro or nanofibers. Biomimetism was enhanced by following two approaches: (1) the use of natural biopolymers, and (2) the modification of the fibers surface chemistry. Gelatin was chosen for its bioactive properties and cellu...

  18. Cellular uptake and organ accumulation of amphipolar metallocorroles with cytoprotective and cytotoxic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Zoya; Kuperschmidt, Lana; Youdim, Moussa B H; Gross, Zeev

    2011-05-01

    We report here an investigation that focuses on the organ distribution of metal complexes that are chelated by the amphipolar corrole whose macrocycle is decorated by two sulphonic acid head groups, which are emerging potential therapeutics against cancer (the cytotoxic Ga chelate) and diseases that are characterized by excessive production of ROS and RNS (the cytoprotective Mn and Fe derivatives). We show that the intraperitoneally injected fluorescent gallium(III) derivative accumulates in tissues sections of the kidney, liver, lung, heart, and pancreas. It also reaches the brain blood vessels, but does not cross the blood brain barrier. These findings are of prime importance for future in vivo studies on disease models, as they point toward a large utility of this kind of corrole chelates for treating cancer, neurodegenerative diseases characterized by "leaking BBB", cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

  19. The Effect of Structural Design on Mechanical Properties and Cellular Response of Additive Manufactured Titanium Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wieding

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of segmental defects in long bones remains a challenging task in orthopedic surgery. Although autologous bone is still the ‘Gold Standard’ because of its high biocompatibility, it has nevertheless been associated with several disadvantages. Consequently, artificial materials, such as calcium phosphate and titanium, have been considered for the treatment of bone defects. In the present study, the mechanical properties of three different scaffold designs were investigated. The scaffolds were made of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V, fabricated by means of an additive manufacturing process with defined pore geometry and porosities of approximately 70%. Two scaffolds exhibited rectangular struts, orientated in the direction of loading. The struts for the third scaffold were orientated diagonal to the load direction, and featured a circular cross-section. Material properties were calculated from stress-strain relationships under axial compression testing. In vitro cell testing was undertaken with human osteoblasts on scaffolds fabricated using the same manufacturing process. Although the scaffolds exhibited different strut geometry, the mechanical properties of ultimate compressive strength were similar (145–164 MPa and in the range of human cortical bone. Test results for elastic modulus revealed values between 3.7 and 6.7 GPa. In vitro testing demonstrated proliferation and spreading of bone cells on the scaffold surface.

  20. Nanosilicon carbide/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites: structural, mechanical and in vitro cellular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Saeed; Ebadzadeh, Touraj; Ahmadzadeh-Asl, Shaghayegh

    2010-07-01

    In this study, bioceramic nanocomposites were synthesized by sintering compacted bodies of hydroxyapatite (HA) mixed with 5 or 15 wt% nanosilicon carbide at 1,100 or 1,200 degrees C in a reducing atmosphere. Pure hydroxyapatite was also prepared for comparison. Phase compositions, structural and physical properties of the composites were studied using appropriate techniques. Some in vitro biological properties of the composites were also investigated by using newrat calvaria osteoblastic cells. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that tricalcium phosphate (TCP) comprising negligible alpha-TCP and considerable beta-TCP were formed in composites during sintering meanwhile hydroxyapatite and silicon carbide (SiC) were also existed in the composition. Based on the results, that composite made of 5 wt% nanosilicon carbide exhibited higher bending strength, fracture toughness and bulk density than pure HA and composite with 15 wt% silicon carbide. The scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that the addition of nanosilicon carbide suppressed the grain growth and yielded a feature of island-type clusters consisting of blistered calcium phosphate (HA and TCP) and SiC grains. Also, in this study, better proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase activity were observed for the osteoblastic cells seeded on top of the composites compared to pure HA. Overall, the results indicated that the composite of 95 wt% hydroxyapatite and 5 wt% SiC exhibited better mechanical and biological properties than pure HA and further addition of SiC failed strength and toughness.

  1. Integrating-Sphere Measurements for Determining Optical Properties of Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, A. M.; Cardona, J. C.; Garzón, I.; Oliveira, A. C.; Ghinea, R.; Alaminos, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    Surgical procedures carried out in the oral and maxillofacial region can result in large tissue defects. Accounting for the shortage of oral mucosa to replace the excised tissues, different models of an organotypic substitute of the oral mucosa generated by tissue engineering have recently been proposed. In this work, the propagation of light radiation through artificial human oral mucosa substitutes based on fibrin-agarose scaffolds (fibrin, fibrin-0.1% agarose, fibrin-0.2%agarose) is investigated, and their optical properties are determined using the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method based on integrating-sphere measurements. Similar values for the absorption and scattering coefficients between the fibrin and fibrin-0.1% agarose bioengineered tissues and the native oral mucosa were found. These results suggest the adequacy of these biomaterials for potential clinical use in human oral mucosa applications. These optical properties represent useful references and data for applications requiring the knowledge of the light transport through this type of tissues, applications used in clinical practice. It also provides a new method of information analysis for the quality control of the development of the artificial nanostructured oral mucosa substitutes and its comparison with native oral mucosa tissues.

  2. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  3. Determination of scattering properties and damage thresholds in tissue using ultrafast laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Chris; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast laser surgery of tissue requires precise knowledge of the tissue's optical properties to control the extent of subsurface ablation. Here, we present a method to determine the scattering lengths, ℓs, and fluence thresholds, Fth, in multilayered and turbid tissue by finding the input energies required to initiate ablation at various depths in each tissue layer. We validated the method using tissue-mimicking phantoms and applied it to porcine vocal folds, which consist of an epithelial (ep) layer and a superficial lamina propia (SLP) layer. Across five vocal fold samples, we found ℓ=51.0±3.9 μm, F=1.78±0.08 J/cm2, ℓ=26.5±1.6 μm, and F=1.14±0.12 J/cm2. Our method can enable personalized determination of tissue optical properties in a clinical setting, leading to less patient-to-patient variability and more favorable outcomes in operations, such as femto-LASIK surgery.

  4. Hydrodynamic theory of tissue shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Popović, Marko; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements. We identify a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We show that anisotropic deformation of tissue and cells can arise from two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven cellular rearrangements. These two active processes result in distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  5. Effects of surface modification on the mechanical and structural properties of nanofibrous poly(ε-caprolactone)/forsterite scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, M; Fathi, M H; Edris, H

    2013-12-01

    Composite scaffolds consisting of polymers reinforced with ceramic nanoparticles are widely applied for hard tissue engineering. However, due to the incompatible polarity of ceramic nanoparticles with polymers, they tend to agglomerate in the polymer matrix which results in undesirable effects on the integral properties of composites. In this research, forsterite (Mg2SiO4) nanoparticles was surface esterified by dodecyl alcohol and nanofibrous poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL)/modified forsterite scaffolds were developed through electrospinning technique. The aim of this research was to investigate the properties of surface modified forsterite nanopowder and PCL/modified forsterite scaffolds, before and after hydrolytic treatment, as well as the cellular attachment and proliferation. Results demonstrated that surface modification of nanoparticles significantly enhanced the tensile strength and toughness of scaffolds upon 1.5- and 4-folds compared to unmodified samples, respectively, due to improved compatibility between matrix and filler. Hydrolytic treatment of scaffolds also modified the bioactivity and cellular attachment and proliferation due to greatly enhanced hydrophilicity of the forsterite nanoparticles after this process compared to surface modified samples. Results suggested that surface modification of forsterite nanopowder and hydrolytic treatment of the developed scaffolds were effective approaches to address the issues in the formation of composite fibers and resulted in development of bioactive composite scaffolds with ideal mechanical and structural properties for bone tissue engineering applications.

  6. Phloroglucinol: antioxidant properties and effects on cellular oxidative markers in human HepG2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéguineur, Benoît; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia; Martín, Maria Angeles; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura

    2012-08-01

    Phloroglucinol is an ubiquitous secondary metabolite encountered in a free state or polymerised as phlorotannins in brown macroalgae, and present in higher plants. FRAP and TEAC assays measured the antioxidant properties of phloroglucinol in non-biological conditions. Additionally, the biological effects of phloroglucinol (4-400 μM) were scrutinised using cellular oxidative stress markers, such as the generation of ROS, antioxidant defences (concentration of GSH and activities of GPx, GR and GST), and levels of MDA as a marker for lipid peroxidation. The direct effect was assessed immediately after an incubation period, whereas for the protective effect, the incubation period was followed by 3-h treatment with the pro-oxidant t-BOOH. The results indicated that despite having a higher radical scavenging capacity than Trolox after 30 min, phloroglucinol was not a suitable antioxidant standard for phlorotannins. Regarding the biological effects, phloroglucinol had no impact on cell viability, reduced levels of ROS and increased antioxidant defences in the direct treatment for most concentrations. The results of the protective effect were mitigated as phloroglucinol failed to protect from ROS generation but evoked a significant recovery of the stress-altered cellular antioxidant defences to restful conditions. Additionally, MDA levels were greatly reduced, preventing a radical chain oxidation.

  7. [Using atomic force microscopy to analyze morphological changes and mechanical properties caused by cellular exposure to low doses of pesticides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Abbate, N; Lasalvia, M; Perna, G; D'Antonio, P; Quartucci, G; Gallo, C; Capozzi, V

    2012-01-01

    A commercial pesticide is usually composed of active ingredients and formulants. Among the active ingredients, Deltamethrin is a pyrethroid chemical widely used for synthesizing pesticides products which are very effective in damaging the central nervous system of pests. In this work, we analyze, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), cellular morphological changes induced by exposure to a Deltamethrin-based commercial pesticide (Decaflow). AFM microscopy, in addition to the well-known characterization of the cellular topography, has the ability to monitor interesting biomechanical parameters of the surface as roughness and elastic modulus. In particular, we exposed normal human keratinocytes for 24 hours at different solutions of Decaflow, well below the threshold of cytotoxicity. The AFM images of exposed cells show alterations of surface cell shape. Moreover exposed cells are characterized by an increase of the value of membrane roughness. The mechanical properties of cells are also modified after Decaflow exposure, as confirmed by a decrease of the elasticity modulus with increasing the concentration of pesticide.

  8. Mechanical models of the cellular cytoskeletal network for the analysis of intracellular mechanical properties and force distributions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-12-01

    The cytoskeleton, which is the major mechanical component of cells, supports the cell body and regulates the cellular motility to assist the cell in performing its biological functions. Several cytoskeletal network models have been proposed to investigate the mechanical properties of cells. This review paper summarizes these models with a focus on the prestressed cable network, the semi-flexible chain network, the open-cell foam, the tensegrity, and the granular models. The components, material parameters, types of connection joints, tension conditions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are evaluated from a structural and biological point of view. The underlying mechanisms that are associated with the morphological changes of spreading cells are expected to be simulated using a cytoskeletal model; however, it is still paid less attention most likely due to the lack of a suitable cytoskeletal model that can accurately model the spreading process. In this review article, the established cytoskeletal models are hoped to provide useful information for the development of future cytoskeletal models with different degrees of cell attachment for the study of the mechanical mechanisms underlying the cellular behaviors in response to external stimulations.

  9. Lectin histochemistry shows the comparative biosynthesis and cellular biodistribution of alpha L-fucose residues in some tissues of tetrapoda representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaad, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Fucose is a monosaccharide that plays several immunological roles. This study investigated the comparative biosynthesis and cellular biodistribution of fucose residues in some tissues of tetrapoda representatives using lectin histochemistry. In this study, the mouse was used as a representative for mammalian, pigeon for avian, lizard for reptilian, and toad for amphibians. The localization of the fucose residues was seen in several cell types of mice ileum, such as villi microfold (M) cells, goblet cells, some of intestinal crypts cells, and lamina propria cells. In other tetrapoda representatives, fucose was only seen in M cells of lizard ileum and some cells of villi lamina propria of pigeon, lizard, and toad. It was also observed in the pancreatic acinar cells of the mouse and some cell aggregations of pancreatic parenchyma of the lizard. Contrarily, it was not seen either in pigeon or in toad pancreases parenchyma. Spleen of all animals showed the fucose residues in some splenic cells in the red pulp only, barring the white pulp. The liver parenchyma of all tetrapoda representatives hadn't fucose residues. The fucose cellular biodistribution in some cells of tetrapoda representatives differed based on the cell type. In the mouse, it was highly seen in the apical cytoplasm of the villi M cells as well as in the cup-like part of goblet cells. In addition, it was seen as "rings" in the granule membranes of the Ulex europeaus agglutinin I (UEAI(+)) cells in the intestinal crypts cells. Furthermore, the UEAI(+) cells in the lamina propria showed fucose granules in their cytoplasm. There is no clear evidence about the relation between the cellular biosynthesis of fucose residues and mucosal immune cells. The role of fucose residues in the pancreatic acinar cells are not well understood and need further investigations. In this study, fucose residues were synthesized in several types of cells in the mouse ileum, spleen and pancreas as compared with other tetrapoda. The

  10. Integrated automated nanomanipulation and real-time cellular surface imaging for mechanical properties characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Zareian, Ramin; Jalili, Nader

    2012-10-01

    Surface microscopy of individual biological cells is essential for determining the patterns of cell migration to study the tumor formation or metastasis. This paper presents a correlated and effective theoretical and experimental technique to automatically address the biophysical and mechanical properties and acquire live images of biological cells which are of interest in studying cancer. In the theoretical part, a distributed-parameters model as the comprehensive representation of the microcantilever is presented along with a model of the contact force as a function of the indentation depth and mechanical properties of the biological sample. Analysis of the transfer function of the whole system in the frequency domain is carried out to characterize the stiffness and damping coefficients of the sample. In the experimental section, unlike the conventional atomic force microscope techniques basically using the laser for determining the deflection of microcantilever's tip, a piezoresistive microcantilever serving as a force sensor is implemented to produce the appropriate voltage and measure the deflection of the microcantilever. A micromanipulator robotic system is integrated with the MATLAB® and programmed in such a way to automatically control the microcantilever mounted on the tip of the micromanipulator to achieve the topography of biological samples including the human corneal cells. For this purpose, the human primary corneal fibroblasts are extracted and adhered on a sterilized culture dish and prepared to attain their topographical image. The proposed methodology herein allows an approach to obtain 2D quality images of cells being comparatively cost effective and extendable to obtain 3D images of individual cells. The characterized mechanical properties of the human corneal cell are furthermore established by comparing and validating the phase shift of the theoretical and experimental results of the frequency response.

  11. Characterization of biomechanical properties of agar based tissue mimicking phantoms for ultrasound stiffness imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Seshadri, Suresh

    2014-07-01

    Pathological changes of the body have been observed to change the mechanical properties of soft tissue types which can be imaged by ultrasound elastography. Though initial clinical results using ultrasound elastography in detection of tumors are promising, quantification of signal to noise ratio, resolution and strain image patterns are the best achieved under a controlled study using phantoms with similar biomechanical properties of normal and abnormal tissues. The purpose of this work is to characterize the biomechanical properties of agar based tissue mimicking phantoms by varying the agar concentration from 1.7 to 6.6% by weight and identify the optimum property to be used in classification of cancerous tissues. We performed quasi-static uniaxial compression test under a strain rate of 0.5mm/min up to 15% strain and measured Young's modulus of phantom samples which are from 50kPa to 450kPa. Phantoms show nonlinear stress-strain characteristics at finite strain which were characterized using hyperelastic parameters by fitting Neo-Hookean, Mooney Rivlin, Ogden and Veronda Westmann models. We also investigated viscoelastic parameters of the samples by conducting oscillatory shear rheometry at various precompression levels (2-5%). Loss modulus values are always less than storage modulus which represents the behavior of soft tissues. The increase in agar concentration increases the shear modulus of the samples as well as decreases the linear viscoelastic region. The results suggest that dynamic shear modul are more promising than linear and nonlinear elastic modul in differentiation of various classes of abnormal tissues.

  12. Enhanced cellular activities of polycaprolactone/alginate-based cell-laden hierarchical scaffolds for hard tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HyeongJin; Kim, GeunHyung

    2014-09-15

    Biomedical scaffolds have been widely investigated because they are essential for support and promotion of cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation in three-dimensional (3D) structures. An ideal scaffold should be highly porous to enable efficient nutrient and oxygen transfer and have a 3D structure that provides optimal micro-environmental conditions for the seeded cells to obtain homogeneous growth after a long culture period. In this study, new hierarchical osteoblast-like cell (MG-63)-laden scaffolds consisting of micro-sized struts/inter-layered micro-nanofibres and cell-laden hydrogel struts with mechanically stable and biologically superior properties were introduced. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was used as a sacrificial component to generate pores within the cell-laden hydrogel struts to attain a homogeneous cell distribution and rapid cell growth in the scaffold interior. The alginate-based cell-laden struts with PEO induced fast/homogeneous cell release, in contrast to nonporous cell-laden struts. Various weight fractions (0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 3.5 wt%) of PEO were used, of which 2 wt% PEO in the cell-laden strut resulted in the most appropriate cell release and enhanced biological activities (cell proliferation and calcium deposition), compared to nonporous cell-laden struts.

  13. Physicochemical Properties and Cellular Responses of Strontium-Doped Gypsum Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Pouria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes some physical, structural, and biological properties of gypsum bioceramics doped with various amounts of strontium ions (0.19–2.23 wt% and compares these properties with those of a pure gypsum as control. Strontium-doped gypsum (gypsum:Sr was obtained by mixing calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and solutions of strontium nitrate followed by washing the specimens with distilled water to remove residual salts. Gypsum was the only phase found in the composition of both pure and gypsum:Sr, meanwhile a shift into lower diffraction angles was observed in the X-ray diffraction patterns of doped specimens. Microstructure of all gypsum specimens consisted of many rod-like small crystals entangled to each other with more elongation and higher thickness in the case of gypsum:Sr. The Sr-doped sample exhibited higher compressive strength and lower solubility than pure gypsum. A continuous release of strontium ions was observed from the gypsum:Sr during soaking it in simulated body fluid for 14 days. Compared to pure gypsum, the osteoblasts cultured on strontium-doped samples showed better proliferation rate and higher alkaline phosphatase activity, depending on Sr concentration. These observations can predict better in vivo behavior of strontium-doped gypsum compared to pure one.

  14. RESEARCH ON THE INFLUENCE OF BLOWING AGENT ON SELECTED PROPERTIES OF EXTRUDED CELLULAR PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Garbacz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As a part of a more comprehensive research project, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the type and content of blowing agents in the polymeric materials being processed on the structure and selected physical and mechanical properties of the obtained extrusion parts. In the experiment, the content of the blowing agent (0–2.0% by mass, fed into the processed polymer were adopted as a variable factor. In the studies presented in the article, the blowing agents of endothermic decomposition characteristics (Hydrocerol BIH 70, Hydrocerol BM 70 and the exothermic decomposition characteristics (PLC 751 occurring in the granulated form with a diameter of 1.2 to 1.8 mm were used. Based on the results of investigating porosity, porous structure image analysis as well as microscopic examination of the structure, it has been found that the favorable content of the blowing agent in the polymeric material should be of up to 0.8% by mass. With such a content of the blowing agent in the polymeric material, favorable strength properties are retained in porous parts, the pore distribution is uniform and the pores have similar sizes.

  15. The effect of osteoporosis treatments on fatigue properties of cortical bone tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry R. Brock

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed for treatment of osteoporosis. Long-term use of bisphosphonates has been correlated to atypical femoral fractures (AFFs. AFFs arise from fatigue damage to bone tissue that cannot be repaired due to pharmacologic treatments. Despite fatigue being the primary damage mechanism of AFFs, the effects of osteoporosis treatments on fatigue properties of cortical bone are unknown. To examine if fatigue-life differences occur in bone tissue after different pharmacologic treatments for osteoporosis, we tested bone tissue from the femurs of sheep given a metabolic acidosis diet to induce osteoporosis, followed by treatment with a selective estrogen reception modulator (raloxifene, a bisphosphonate (alendronate or zoledronate, or parathyroid hormone (teriparatide, PTH. Beams of cortical bone tissue were created and tested in four-point bending fatigue to failure. Tissue treated with alendronate had reduced fatigue life and less modulus loss at failure compared with other treatments, while tissue treated with PTH had a prolonged fatigue life. No loss of fatigue life occurred with zoledronate treatment despite its greater binding affinity and potency compared with alendronate. Tissue mineralization measured by microCT did not explain the differences seen in fatigue behavior. Increased fatigue life with PTH suggests that current treatment methods for AFF could have beneficial effects for restoring fatigue life. These results indicate that fatigue life differs with each type of osteoporosis treatment.

  16. Organ and tissue level properties are more sensitive to age than osteocyte lacunar characteristics in rat cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Nina; Bach-Gansmo, Fiona Linnea; Birkbak, Mie Elholm;

    2016-01-01

    of bone on the organ and tissue level, whereas features on the nano- and micrometer scale are much less explored. We investigated the age-related development of organ and tissue level bone properties such as bone volume, bone mineral density, and load to fracture and correlated these with osteocyte...... orientation with animal age. Hence, the evolution of organ and tissue level properties with age in rat cortical bone is not accompanied by related changes in osteocyte lacunar properties. This suggests that bone microstructure and bone matrix material properties and not the geometric properties...

  17. A biphasic scaffold based on silk and bioactive ceramic with stratified properties for osteochondral tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao Jiao; Kim, Kyungsook; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Guo, Jin; Kaplan, David L; Zreiqat, Hala

    2015-07-14

    Significant clinical challenges encountered in the effective long-term treatment of osteochondral defects have inspired advancements in scaffold-based tissue engineering techniques to aid repair and regeneration. This study reports the development of a biphasic scaffold produced via a rational combination of silk fibroin and bioactive ceramic with stratified properties to satisfy the complex and diverse regenerative requirements of osteochondral tissue. Structural examination showed that the biphasic scaffold contained two phases with different pore morphologies to match the cartilage and bone segments of osteochondral tissue, which were joined at a continuous interface. Mechanical assessment showed that the two phases of the biphasic scaffold imitated the load-bearing behaviour of native osteochondral tissue and matched its compressive properties. In vitro testing showed that different compositions in the two phases of the biphasic scaffold could direct the preferential differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the chondrogenic or osteogenic lineage. By featuring simple and reproducible fabrication and a well-integrated interface, the biphasic scaffold strategy established in this study circumvented the common problems experienced with integrated scaffold designs and could provide an effective approach for the regeneration of osteochondral tissue.

  18. Effects of sample preparation on the optical properties of breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Fay A.

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of biological tissue should be determined in vivo whenever possible. However, for those instances when in vivo studies are impractical, too expensive or inappropriate, and when blood flow is not an issue, the ability to perform in vitro studies then becomes invaluable. Optical absorption spectroscopy shows that it may be possible to obtain meaningful information about the optical properties of human breast tissue from in vitro samples if strict preparation and measuring protocols are used. That a strict protocol for storing and handling tissue is critical can be seen from our observations of changes in the optical absorption spectra that occur in response to formalin fixation, the passage of time, application of stains and dyes, and storage in growth medium of the excised tissue. In vivo optical absorption spectroscopy measurements have been made on human breast cancer xenografts and compared with in vitro measurements on breast biopsies prepared according to precise collection and treatment protocols. There is a 'window of opportunity' before time dependent changes in the UV optical absorption spectra of the excised tissue specimens occur. This time window of opportunity widens at longer wavelengths with the least changes occurring in the optical spectra in the NIR.

  19. Increased inflammatory properties of adipose tissue macrophages recruited during diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumeng, Carey N; Deyoung, Stephanie M; Bodzin, Jennifer L; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Although recent studies show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) participate in the inflammatory changes in obesity and contribute to insulin resistance, the properties of these cells are not well understood. We hypothesized that ATMs recruited to adipose tissue during a high-fat diet have unique inflammatory properties compared with resident tissue ATMs. Using a dye (PKH26) to pulse label ATMs in vivo, we purified macrophages recruited to white adipose tissue during a high-fat diet. Comparison of gene expression in recruited and resident ATMs using real-time RT-PCR and cDNA microarrays showed that recruited ATMs overexpress genes important in macrophage migration and phagocytosis, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Many of these genes were not induced in ATMs from high-fat diet-fed CCR2 knockout mice, supporting the importance of CCR2 in regulating recruitment of inflammatory ATMs during obesity. Additionally, expression of Apoe was decreased, whereas genes important in lipid metabolism, such as Pparg, Adfp, Srepf1, and Apob48r, were increased in the recruited macrophages. In agreement with this, ATMs from obese mice had increased lipid content compared with those from lean mice. These studies demonstrate that recruited ATMs in obese animals represent a subclass of macrophages with unique properties.

  20. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  1. Anticancer Properties of PPARα-Effects on Cellular Metabolism and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Grabacka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs have lately attracted much attention as therapeutic targets. Previously, PPAR ligands were associated with the treatment of diabetes, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases, as they modulate the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, PPAR ligands have been also considered as potential anticancer agents, with relatively low systemic toxicity. The emerging evidence for antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiinflammatory and potential antimetastatic properties of PPARα ligands prompted us to discuss possible roles of PPARα in tumor suppression. PPARα activation can target cancer cells energy balance by blocking fatty acid synthesis and by promoting fatty acid β-oxidation. In the state of limited nutrient availability, frequently presents in the tumor microenvironment, PPARα cooperates with AMP-dependent protein kinase in: (i repressing oncogenic Akt activity, (ii inhibiting cell proliferation, and (iii forcing glycolysis-dependent cancer cells into “metabolic catastrophe.” Other potential anticancer effects of PPARα include suppression of inflammation, and upregulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs, which attenuates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation. In conclusion, there are strong premises that the low-toxic and well-tolerated PPAR ligands should be considered as new therapeutic agents to fight disseminating cancer, which represents the major challenge for modern medicine and basic research.

  2. Anticancer Properties of PPARalpha-Effects on Cellular Metabolism and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabacka, Maja; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have lately attracted much attention as therapeutic targets. Previously, PPAR ligands were associated with the treatment of diabetes, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases, as they modulate the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, PPAR ligands have been also considered as potential anticancer agents, with relatively low systemic toxicity. The emerging evidence for antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiinflammatory and potential antimetastatic properties of PPARalpha ligands prompted us to discuss possible roles of PPARalpha in tumor suppression. PPARalpha activation can target cancer cells energy balance by blocking fatty acid synthesis and by promoting fatty acid beta-oxidation. In the state of limited nutrient availability, frequently presents in the tumor microenvironment, PPARalpha cooperates with AMP-dependent protein kinase in: (i) repressing oncogenic Akt activity, (ii) inhibiting cell proliferation, and (iii) forcing glycolysis-dependent cancer cells into "metabolic catastrophe." Other potential anticancer effects of PPARalpha include suppression of inflammation, and upregulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which attenuates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation. In conclusion, there are strong premises that the low-toxic and well-tolerated PPAR ligands should be considered as new therapeutic agents to fight disseminating cancer, which represents the major challenge for modern medicine and basic research.

  3. Effects of the composite nanovesicles on the physical properties and cellular adhesion of chitosan films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionzo, Maria I Z; Lorenzini, Giulia C; Tomedi, Joelson; Pranke, Patricia; Silveira, Nádya P

    2012-04-01

    Chitosan films were prepared by the casting of a chitosan gel in absence and presence of composite nanovesicles. The microscopy images showed the occurrence of agglomerates on the surface and internal pores when the nanovesicles were added to the films, differently from the smooth surface of the pure chitosan films. Despite the hydrophobic character that composite nanovesicles gave to the chitosan films, as showed by the reduction of the water permeation at prolonged times, there was a reduction on the contact angle values for these samples related to the roughness of the surface. The peak of water desorption observed on calorimetric analysis of chitosan was shifted to higher values when the nanovesicles were added to the films. Furthermore, the desappearance of Tg on the films containing nanovesicles denoted their plastifier effect in the chitosan film. The swelling results showed higher water diffusion at the first times for the films containing nanovesicles because of the pores observed by microscopy. However, at prolonged times, there was a reduction on the swelling because of the lipofilic composition of the nanovesicles. Furthermore, the presence of nanovesicles led to a reduction on the water content in the chitosan films. Due to the effect on the physical properties of the chitosan films, the addition of nanovesicles on discrete concentrations contributed to the cell adhesion.

  4. Relevant aspects in the surface properties in titanium dental implants for the cellular viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Ortega, E; Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; Monsalve-Guil, L; España-López, A; Jiménez-Guerra, A; Garzón, I; Alaminos, M; Gil, F J

    2016-07-01

    Roughness and topographical features are the most relevant of the surface properties for a dental implant for its osseointegration. For that reason, we studied the four surfaces more used in titanium dental implants: machined, sandblasted, acid etching and sandblasted plus acid etching. The roughness and wettability (contact angle and surface free energy) was studied by means 3D-interferometric microscope and sessile drop method. Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were obtained from small oral mucosa biopsies and were used for cell cultures. To analyze cell integrity, we first quantified the total amount of DNA and LDH released from dead cells to the culture medium. Then, LIVE/DEAD assay was used as a combined method assessing cell integrity and metabolism. All experiments were carried out on each cell type cultured on each Ti material for 24h, 48h and 72h. To evaluate the in vivo cell adhesion capability of each Ti surface, the four types of discs were grafted subcutaneously in 5 Wistar rats. Sandblasted surfaces were significantly rougher than acid etching and machined. Wettability and surface free energy decrease when the roughness increases in sand blasted samples. This fact favors the protein adsorption. The DNA released by cells cultured on the four Ti surfaces did not differ from that of positive control cells (p>0.05). The number of cells per area was significantly lower (pimplants is able to significantly increase bone contact and bone growth with very good osseointegration results in vivo.

  5. Fast Monte Carlo inversion for extracting the optical properties of tubular tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijuan Zhao; Xiaoqing Zhou; Julan Liang; Shunqi Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of absorption coefficient μa and scattering coefficient μs is very important for applications of diffuse optical tomography and near infrared spectroscopy. Aiming at the early cancer detection of cervix and stomach, we present a fast inverse Monte-Carlo scheme for extracting μa and μs of a tubular tissue from the measurement on frequency domain. Results show that the computation time for reconstructing one set of μa and μs is less than 1 rain and the relative errors in reconstruction axe less than ±10% for the optical properties of normal cervical tissue and precancerous lesions.

  6. Modeling mechanical behaviors of composites with various ratios of matrix–inclusion properties using movable cellular automaton method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Smolin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two classes of composite materials are considered: classical metal–ceramic composites with reinforcing hard inclusions as well as hard ceramics matrix with soft gel inclusions. Movable cellular automaton method is used for modeling the mechanical behaviors of such different heterogeneous materials. The method is based on particle approach and may be considered as a kind of discrete element method. The main feature of the method is the use of many-body forces of inter-element interaction within the formalism of simply deformable element approximation. It was shown that the strength of reinforcing particles and the width of particle-binder interphase boundaries had determining influence on the service characteristics of metal–ceramic composite. In particular, the increasing of strength of carbide inclusions may lead to significant increase in the strength and ultimate strain of composite material. On the example of porous zirconia ceramics it was shown that the change in the mechanical properties of pore surface leads to the corresponding change in effective elastic modulus and strength limit of the ceramic sample. The less is the pore size, the more is this effect. The increase in the elastic properties of pore surface of ceramics may reduce its fracture energy.

  7. Influence of processing conditions on strut structure and compressive properties of cellular lattice structures fabricated by selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Chunlei, E-mail: c.qiu@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yue, Sheng [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Adkins, Nicholas J.E.; Ward, Mark; Hassanin, Hany [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lee, Peter D., E-mail: peter.lee@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip J., E-mail: p.j.withers@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Attallah, Moataz M., E-mail: m.m.attallah@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-25

    AlSi10Mg cellular lattice structures have been fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM) using a range of laser scanning speeds and powers. The as-fabricated strut size, morphology and internal porosity were investigated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) and correlated to the compressive properties of the structure. Strut diameter was found to increase monotonically with laser power while the porosity was largest at intermediate powers. Laser scanning speed was found to thicken the struts only at slow rates while the porosity was largest at intermediate speeds. High speed imaging showed the melt pool to be larger at high laser powers. Further the melt pool shape was found to vary cyclically over time, steadily growing before becoming increasingly instable and irregularly shaped before abruptly falling in size due to splashing of molten materials and the process repeating. Upon compressive loading, lattice deformation was homogeneous prior to the peak stress before falling sharply due to the creation of a (one strut wide) shear band at around 45° to the compression axis. The specific yield strength expressed as the yield stress/(yield stress of the aluminium × relative density) is not independent of processing conditions, suggesting that further improvements in properties can be achieved by process optimisation. Lattice struts failed near nodes by a mixture of ductile and brittle fracture.

  8. Cole-Cole parameters for the dielectric properties of porcine tissues as a function of age at microwave frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, A; Gabriel, C

    2010-08-01

    We have applied the Cole-Cole expression to the dielectric properties of tissues in the frequency range 0.4-10 GHz. The data underpinning the model relate to pig tissue as a function of age. Altogether, we provide the Cole-Cole parameters for 14 tissue types at three developmental stages.

  9. Cole-Cole parameters for the dielectric properties of porcine tissues as a function of age at microwave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyman, A; Gabriel, C, E-mail: Azadeh.peyman@hpa.org.u [MCL-P, 17B Woodford Road, London E18 2EL (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-07

    We have applied the Cole-Cole expression to the dielectric properties of tissues in the frequency range 0.4-10 GHz. The data underpinning the model relate to pig tissue as a function of age. Altogether, we provide the Cole-Cole parameters for 14 tissue types at three developmental stages. (note)

  10. A fiber optic approach for in vivo minimally invasive study of tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilev, Ilko K.; Waynant, Ronald W.; Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Anders, Juanita

    2004-06-01

    Based on a fiber-optic approach, we present a fundamental in vivo study of optical properties and light transmission characteristics of single and multiple tissue layers and blood in a Sprague Dawley rat model. In our experiments, we utilize either coherent laser sources with various energy and spectral characteristics or incoherent light sources in a broadband spectral range covering the visible and near-infrared (from 400 nm to 1200 nm). The measurement techniques are based on a simple minimally invasive fiber-optic light delivery system that provides an effective method for homogeneously and precisely controlling the light irradiation of the tissue medium as well as being a highly sensitive detector of the tissue's scattered light. The delivery-sensor probes are placed into different tissue layers (skin, sub-cutaneous connective and deep connective tissue, back muscle, bone and spinal cord) and blood, and broadband spectral transmission characteristics of these media are measured in vivo. The transmission spectra are analyzed in order to determine the specificity of interaction of different tissues with light. The main goal is to determine the most effective coherent or incoherent light sources and their optimal parameters that might be used for minimally invasive therapeutic and optical diagnostics techniques.

  11. Photoresponsive Polysaccharide-Based Hydrogels with Tunable Mechanical Properties for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, Giuseppe E; Carrion, Bita; Coleman, Rhima M; Ostrowski, Alexis D

    2016-06-15

    Photoresponsive hydrogels were obtained by coordination of alginate-acrylamide hybrid gels (AlgAam) with ferric ions. The photochemistry of Fe(III)-alginate was used to tune the chemical composition, mechanical properties, and microstructure of the materials upon visible light irradiation. The photochemical treatment also induced changes in the swelling properties and transport mechanism in the gels due to the changes in material composition and microstructure. The AlgAam gels were biocompatible and could easily be dried and rehydrated with no change in mechanical properties. These gels showed promise as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering, where the photochemical treatment could be used to tune the properties of the material and ultimately change the growth and extracellular matrix production of chondrogenic cells. ATDC5 cells cultured on the hydrogels showed a greater than 2-fold increase in the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) in the gels irradiated for 90 min compared to the dark controls. Our method provides a simple photochemical tool to postsynthetically control and adjust the chemical and mechanical environment in these gels, as well as the pore microstructure and transport properties. By changing these properties, we could easily access different levels of performance of these materials as substrates for tissue engineering.

  12. In vivo endoscopic tissue diagnostics based on spectroscopic absorption, scattering, and phase function properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thueler, Philippe; Charvet, Igor; Bevilacqua, Frederic; St Ghislain, M; Ory, G; Marquet, Pierre; Meda, Paolo; Vermeulen, Ben; Depeursinge, Christian

    2003-07-01

    A fast spectroscopic system for superficial and local determination of the absorption and scattering properties of tissue (480 to 950 nm) is described. The probe can be used in the working channel of an endoscope. The scattering properties include the reduced scattering coefficient and a parameter of the phase function called gamma, which depends on its first two moments. The inverse problem algorithm is based on the fit of absolute reflectance measurements to cubic B-spline functions derived from the interpolation of a set of Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm's robustness was tested with simulations altered with various amounts of noise. The method was also assessed on tissue phantoms of known optical properties. Finally, clinical measurements performed endoscopically in vivo in the stomach of human subjects are presented. The absorption and scattering properties were found to be significantly different in the antrum and in the fundus and are correlated with histopathologic observations. The method and the instrument show promise for noninvasive tissue diagnostics of various epithelia.

  13. Cellular responses to stress: comparison of a family of 71--73-kilodalton proteins rapidly synthesized in rat tissue slices and canavanine-treated cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, L E; White, F P

    1981-08-01

    Cultured rat embryo cells exposed to the L-arginine analogue L-canavanine rapidly accumulated a major 71 kilodalton polypeptide and several minor ones (110, 95, 88, and 78 kilodaltons). Canavanine-treated cultures contained elevated levels of translatable mRNA encoding P71, and the stimulated synthesis of this protein was blocked by actinomycin D, suggesting that P71 is inducible. Rat embryo cells maintained under routine culture conditions synthesized only trace amounts of P71; however, they accumulated an abundant 73 kilodalton protein that was closely related to P71. No kinetic evidence of a precursor-product relationship between P73 and P71 was found. The peptide map of P71 from cultured cells was identical to the map of proteins with the same electrophoretic mobility isolated from incubated slices of rat telencephalon. Previous studies (White, '80a, b, c) have shown that the latter proteins are rapidly synthesized by cells associated with cerebral microvessels in incubated brain slices, but are not detectable in vivo. Herein we present evidence that the synthesis of P71 is not unique to brain slices. Incubated slices of heart, lung, thymus, kidney, spleen, and liver all accumulated an abundant 71 kilodalton size class. The peptide maps of P71 obtained from brain, heart, lung and thymus tissue were similar. The stimulated synthesis of P71 in brain, heart, and lung slices was inhibited strongly by the addition of actinomycin D at the start of incubation. The 71-73 kilodalton proteins of canavanine-treated rat embryo cells and incubated slices from seven different organs were compared in detail on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Eight charge variants were detected in extracts of lung, spleen, and thymus tissue, four in liver and heart, three in kidney, and two different pairs of variants in extracts of brain tissue and cultured cells. The possible significance of the rapid synthesis of a similar small set of proteins in tissue slices and cultured cells in

  14. Effects of formalin fixation on tissue optical properties of in-vitro brain samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-03-01

    Application of light spectroscopy based techniques for the detection of cancers have emerged as a promising approach for tumor diagnostics. In-vivo or freshly excised samples are normally used for point spectroscopic studies. However, ethical issues related to in-vivo studies, rapid decay of surgically excised tissues and sample availability puts a limitation on in-vivo and in-vitro studies. There has been a few studies reported on the application of formalin fixed samples with good discrimination capability. Usually formalin fixation is performed to prevent degradation of tissues after surgical resection. Fixing tissues in formalin prevents cell death by forming cross-linkages with proteins. Previous investigations have revealed that washing tissues fixed in formalin using phosphate buffered saline is known to reduce the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. But this could not be the case with reflectance measurements. Hemoglobin is a principal absorbing medium in biological tissues in the visible range. Formalin fixation causes hemoglobin to seep out from red blood cells. Also, there could be alterations in the refractive index of tissues when fixed in formalin. In this study, we propose to investigate the changes in tissue optical properties between freshly excised and formalin fixed brain tissues. The results indicate a complete change in the spectral profile in the visible range where hemoglobin has its maximum absorption peaks. The characteristic bands of oxy-hemoglobin at 540, 580 nm and deoxy-hemoglobin at 555 nm disappear in the case of samples fixed in formalin. In addition, an increased spectral intensity was observed for the wavelengths greater than 650 nm where scattering phenomena are presumed to dominate.

  15. Time-resolved photoacoustic measurement for evaluation of viscoelastic properties of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Conggui; Liu, Hongwei; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-11-01

    In this letter, we proposed a method for viscoelastic characterization of biological tissues based on time-resolved photoacoustic measurement. The theoretical and experimental study was performed on the influence of viscoelasticity effects on photoacoustic generation. Taking the time delay between the photoacoustic signal and the exciting laser, the viscoelasticity distribution of biological tissues can be mapped. To validate our method, gelatin phantoms with different densities were measured. We also applied this method in discrimination between fat and liver to confirm the usefulness of the viscoelastic evaluation. Furthermore, pilot experiments were performed on atherosclerosis artery from an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse to show the viscoelastic characterization of atherosclerotic plaque. Our results demonstrate that this technique has the potential for visualizing the biomechanical properties and lesions of biological tissues.

  16. Effect of mechanical tissue properties on thermal damage in skin after IR-laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, M.; Mischler, Ch.; Romano, V.; Forrer, M.; Müller, O. M.; Weber, H. P.

    1991-04-01

    The damage created instantaneously in dorsal skin and in the subjacent skeletal muscle layer after CO2 and Er3+ laser incisions is histologically and ultrastructurally investigated. Light microscopical examinations show an up to three times larger damage zone in the subcutaneous layer of skeletal muscle than in the connective tissue above. The extent of thermally altered muscle tissue is classified by different zones and characterized by comparison to long time heating injuries. The unexpectedly large damage is a result of the change of elastic properties occurring abruptly at the transition between different materials. This leads to a discontinuity of the cutting dynamics that reduces the ejection of tissue material. We show that the degree of thermal damage originates from the amount of hot material that is not ejected out of the crater acting as a secondary heat source.

  17. A genetic algorithm for optimizing multi-pole Debye models of tissue dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, J.; Robinson, M. P.

    2012-10-01

    Models of tissue dielectric properties (permittivity and conductivity) enable the interactions of tissues and electromagnetic fields to be simulated, which has many useful applications in microwave imaging, radio propagation, and non-ionizing radiation dosimetry. Parametric formulae are available, based on a multi-pole model of tissue dispersions, but although they give the dielectric properties over a wide frequency range, they do not convert easily to the time domain. An alternative is the multi-pole Debye model which works well in both time and frequency domains. Genetic algorithms are an evolutionary approach to optimization, and we found that this technique was effective at finding the best values of the multi-Debye parameters. Our genetic algorithm optimized these parameters to fit to either a Cole-Cole model or to measured data, and worked well over wide or narrow frequency ranges. Over 10 Hz-10 GHz the best fits for muscle, fat or bone were each found for ten dispersions or poles in the multi-Debye model. The genetic algorithm is a fast and effective method of developing tissue models that compares favourably with alternatives such as the rational polynomial fit.

  18. A genetic algorithm for optimizing multi-pole Debye models of tissue dielectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, J; Robinson, M P

    2012-10-01

    Models of tissue dielectric properties (permittivity and conductivity) enable the interactions of tissues and electromagnetic fields to be simulated, which has many useful applications in microwave imaging, radio propagation, and non-ionizing radiation dosimetry. Parametric formulae are available, based on a multi-pole model of tissue dispersions, but although they give the dielectric properties over a wide frequency range, they do not convert easily to the time domain. An alternative is the multi-pole Debye model which works well in both time and frequency domains. Genetic algorithms are an evolutionary approach to optimization, and we found that this technique was effective at finding the best values of the multi-Debye parameters. Our genetic algorithm optimized these parameters to fit to either a Cole-Cole model or to measured data, and worked well over wide or narrow frequency ranges. Over 10 Hz-10 GHz the best fits for muscle, fat or bone were each found for ten dispersions or poles in the multi-Debye model. The genetic algorithm is a fast and effective method of developing tissue models that compares favourably with alternatives such as the rational polynomial fit.

  19. Determination of the optical properties of vascular tissues: potential applications in vascular-targeting photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongbin; Chen, Ping; Lin, Lie; Huang, Zheng; Tang, Guoqing; Xu, Heping

    2007-11-01

    It has been proven that photodynamic therapy (PDT) is effective in treating various malignant and non-malignant diseases. In the treatment of certain non-malignant vascular diseases, such as wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and port wine stains (PWS), unlike in the treatment of malignant solid tumors, light irradiation usually starts immediately after the intravenous (IV) injection of photosensitizers while the photosensitizers is mainly circulating inside blood vessels. Under such vascular-targeting action mode, photoreactions between photosensitizers and light can selectively destruct the vascular tissues. Light distribution is complex so that it is important to understand the optical properties of targeted vessels and surrounding tissues. To better determine the optical properties of vascular tissues, we developed a tissue-simulating phantom and adopted frequency-domain measurement of phase difference. Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in blood vessels were estimated and light distribution was simulated by the Monte Carlo method. These determinations are essential for the implication of better light dosimetry models in clinical photodynamic therapy and vascular-targeting PDT, in particular.

  20. Some Properties of Purified and Non-purified Rumen Tissue Arginase in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    ERİŞİR, Mine; OZAN, Sema Temizer

    1998-01-01

    Some biochemical properties of purified and non-purified rumen tissue arginase were compared. Homogenization, heating, treatment with aceton, precipitation with ammonium sulfate, dialysis, several centrifugations, gel filtration on sephadex G-200 processes were utilized in the purification procedure of the enzyme. It was found that pre-incubation temperature (60 °C) of arginase and Km (4mM) to its substrate, L-arginine, did not change before and after purification. While pre-incubation peri...

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Connecting Tissue and Cellular Distribution to Whole Animal Pharmacokinetics and Potential Implications for Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Guo, Hans; Liao, Jianshan; Christodolu, Nikolas; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-09-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates exhibit complex pharmacokinetics due to their combination of macromolecular and small molecule properties. These issues range from systemic concerns, such as deconjugation of the small molecule drug during the long antibody circulation time or rapid clearance from nonspecific interactions, to local tumor tissue heterogeneity, cell bystander effects, and endosomal escape. Mathematical models can be used to study the impact of these processes on overall distribution in an efficient manner, and several types of models have been used to analyze varying aspects of antibody distribution including physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models and tissue-level simulations. However, these processes are quantitative in nature and cannot be handled qualitatively in isolation. For example, free antibody from deconjugation of the small molecule will impact the distribution of conjugated antibodies within the tumor. To incorporate these effects into a unified framework, we have coupled the systemic and organ-level distribution of a PBPK model with the tissue-level detail of a distributed parameter tumor model. We used this mathematical model to analyze new experimental results on the distribution of the clinical antibody-drug conjugate Kadcyla in HER2-positive mouse xenografts. This model is able to capture the impact of the drug-antibody ratio (DAR) on tumor penetration, the net result of drug deconjugation, and the effect of using unconjugated antibody to drive ADC penetration deeper into the tumor tissue. This modeling approach will provide quantitative and mechanistic support to experimental studies trying to parse the impact of multiple mechanisms of action for these complex drugs.

  2. Nanoassemblies of Tissue-Reactive, Polyoxazoline Graft-Copolymers Restore the Lubrication Properties of Degraded Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgese, Giulia; Cavalli, Emma; Müller, Mischa; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Benetti, Edmondo M

    2017-03-13

    Osteoarthritis leads to an alteration in the composition of the synovial fluid, which is associated with an increase in friction and the progressive and irreversible destruction of the articular cartilage. In order to tackle this degenerative disease, there has been a growing interest in the medical field to establish effective, long-term treatments to restore cartilage lubrication after damage. Here we develop a series of graft-copolymers capable of assembling selectively on the degraded cartilage, resurfacing it, and restoring the lubricating properties of the native tissue. These comprise a polyglutamic acid backbone (PGA) coupled to brush-forming, poly-2-methyl-2-oxazoline (PMOXA) side chains, which provide biopassivity and lubricity to the surface, and to aldehyde-bearing tissue-reactive groups, for the anchoring on the degenerated cartilage via Schiff bases. Optimization of the graft-copolymer architecture (i.e., density and length of side chains and amount of tissue-reactive functions) allowed a uniform passivation of the degraded cartilage surface. Graft-copolymer-treated cartilage showed very low coefficients of friction within synovial fluid, reestablishing and in some cases improving the lubricating properties of the natural cartilage. Due to these distinctive properties and their high biocompatibility and stability under physiological conditions, cartilage-reactive graft-copolymers emerge as promising injectable formulations to slow down the progression of cartilage degradation, which characterizes the early stages of osteoarthritis.

  3. Linear elastic properties of the facial soft tissues using an aspiration device: towards patient specific characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luboz, V; Promayon, E; Payan, Y

    2014-11-01

    Biomechanical modeling of the facial soft tissue behavior is needed in aesthetic or maxillo-facial surgeries where the simulation of the bone displacements cannot accurately predict the visible outcome on the patient's face. Because these tissues have different nature and elastic properties across the face, depending on their thickness, and their content in fat or muscle, individualizing their mechanical parameters could increase the simulation accuracy. Using a specifically designed aspiration device, the facial soft tissues deformation is measured at four different locations (cheek, cheekbone, forehead, and lower lip) on 16 young subjects. The stiffness is estimated from the deformations generated by a set of negative pressures using an inverse analysis based on a Neo Hookean model. The initial Young's modulus of the cheek, cheekbone, forehead, and lower lip are respectively estimated to be 31.0 kPa±4.6, 34.9 kPa±6.6, 17.3 kPa±4.1, and 33.7 kPa±7.3. Significant intra-subject differences in tissue stiffness are highlighted by these estimations. They also show important inter-subject variability for some locations even when mean stiffness values show no statistical difference. This study stresses the importance of using a measurement device capable of evaluating the patient specific tissue stiffness during an intervention.

  4. Towards the feasibility of using ultrasound to determine mechanical properties of tissues in a bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Joseph M.; Gu, Di-Win Marine; Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Althans, Jake; Abdalian, Sarah; Schluchter, Mark D.; Liu, Yiying; Welter, Jean F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our ultimate goal is to non-destructively evaluate mechanical properties of tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage using ultrasound (US). We used agarose gels as surrogates for TE cartilage. Previously, we showed that mechanical properties measured using conventional methods were related to those measured using US, which suggested a way to non-destructively predict mechanical properties of samples with known volume fractions. In this study, we sought to determine whether the mechanical properties of samples, with unknown volume fractions could be predicted by US. Methods Aggregate moduli were calculated for hydrogels as a function of SOS, based on concentration and density using a poroelastic model. The data were used to train a statistical model, which we then used to predict volume fractions and mechanical properties of unknown samples. Young's and storage moduli were measured mechanically. Results The statistical model generally predicted the Young's moduli in compression to within mechanically measured value. We defined positive linear correlations between the aggregate modulus predicted from US and both the storage and Young's moduli determined from mechanical tests. Conclusions Mechanical properties of hydrogels with unknown volume fractions can be predicted successfully from US measurements. This method has the potential to predict mechanical properties of TE cartilage non-destructively in a bioreactor. PMID:25092421

  5. Biocompatible magnetite nanoparticles with varying silica-coating layer for use in biomedicine: physicochemical and magnetic properties, and cellular compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajendra K; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Patel, Kapil D; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are considered highly useful in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. However, MNPs require surface modification to promote dispersibility in aqueous solutions and thus biocompatibility. In this article, the authors modified MNPs with inorganic silica layer to create silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles (MNP@Si) via sol-gel process. Synthesis involves hydrolysis and condensation steps using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in methanol/ polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution and ammonia catalyst. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, crystalline phase, chemical-bond structure, surface charge and magnetic properties: in particular, the MNP@Si size was easily tunable through alteration of the Fe(3) O(4) -to-TEOS ratio. As this ratio increased, the MNP@Si size decreased from 270 to 15 nm whilst maintaining core 12-nm MNP particle size, indicating decrease in thickness of the silica coating. All MNP@Si, in direct contrast to uncoated MNPs, showed excellent stability in aqueous solution. The particles' physicochemical and magnetic properties systematically varied with size (coating thickness), and the zeta potential diminished toward negative values, while magnetization increased as the coating thickness decreased. 15-nm MNP@Si showed excellent magnetization (about 64.1 emu/g), almost comparable to that of uncoated MNPs (70.8 emu/g). Preliminary in vitro assays confirmed that the silica layer significantly reduced cellular toxicity as assessed by increase in cell viability and reduction in reactive oxygen species production during 48 h of culture. Newly-developed MNP@Si, with a high capacity for magnetization, water-dispersibility, and diminished cell toxicity, may be potentially useful in diverse biomedical applications, including delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic biomolecules.

  6. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoforms with N-terminal (His)6- or FLAG-tag retain their kinetic properties and cellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Camilla Wendel; Hauge, Anne; Zaganas, Ioannis; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Plaitakis, Andreas; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a crucial enzyme on the crossroads of amino acid and energy metabolism and it is operating in all domains of life. According to current knowledge GDH is present only in one functional isoform in most animals, including mice. In addition to this housekeeping enzyme (hGDH1 in humans), humans and apes have acquired a second isoform (hGDH2) with a distinct tissue expression profile. In the current study we have cloned both mouse and human GDH constructs containing FLAG and (His)6 small genetically-encoded tags, respectively. The hGDH1 and hGDH2 constructs containing N-terminal (His)6 tags were successfully expressed in Sf9 cells and the recombinant proteins were isolated to ≥95 % purity in a two-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation and Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. To explore whether the presence of the FLAG and (His)6 tags affects the cellular localization and functionality of the GDH isoforms, we studied the subcellular distribution of the expressed enzymes as well as their regulation by adenosine diphosphate monopotassium salt (ADP) and guanosine-5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP). Through immunoblot analysis of the mitochondrial and cytosolic fraction of the HEK cells expressing the recombinant proteins we found that neither FLAG nor (His)6 tag disturbs the mitochondrial localization of GDH. The addition of the small tags to the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial mouse GDH1 or human hGDH1 and hGDH2 did not change the ADP activation or GTP inhibition pattern of the proteins as compared to their untagged counterparts. However, the addition of FLAG tag to the C-terminus of the mouse GDH left the recombinant protein fivefold less sensitive to ADP activation. This finding highlights the necessity of the functional characterization of recombinant proteins containing even the smallest available tags.

  7. Mechanical and mineral properties of osteogenesis imperfecta human bones at the tissue level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Laurianne; Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Pernelle, Kélig; Hoc, Thierry

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by an increase in bone fragility on the macroscopic scale, but few data are available to describe the mechanisms involved on the tissue scale and the possible correlations between these scales. To better understand the effects of OI on the properties of human bone, we studied the mechanical and chemical properties of eight bone samples from children suffering from OI and compared them to the properties of three controls. High-resolution computed tomography, nanoindentation and Raman microspectroscopy were used to assess those properties. A higher tissue mineral density was found for OI bone (1.131 gHA/cm3 vs. 1.032 gHA/cm3, p=0.032), along with a lower Young's modulus (17.6 GPa vs. 20.5 GPa, p=0.024). Obviously, the mutation-induced collagen defects alter the collagen matrix, thereby affecting the mineralization. Raman spectroscopy showed that the mineral-to-matrix ratio was higher in the OI samples, while the crystallinity was lower, suggesting that the mineral crystals were smaller but more abundant in the case of OI. This change in crystal size, distribution and composition contributes to the observed decrease in mechanical strength.

  8. Extruded collagen fibres for tissue engineering applications: effect of crosslinking method on mechanical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enea, Davide; Henson, Frances; Kew, Simon; Wardale, John; Getgood, Alan; Brooks, Roger; Rushton, Neil

    2011-06-01

    Reconstituted collagen fibres are promising candidates for tendon and ligament tissue regeneration. The crosslinking procedure determines the fibres' mechanical properties, degradation rate, and cell-fibre interactions. We aimed to compare mechanical and biological properties of collagen fibres resulting from two different types of crosslinking chemistry based on 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyllaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC). Fibres were crosslinked with either EDC or with EDC and ethylene-glycol-diglycidyl-ether (EDC/EGDE). Single fibres were mechanically tested to failure and bundles of fibres were seeded with tendon fibroblasts (TFs) and cell attachment and proliferation were determined over 14 days in culture. Collagen type I and tenascin-C production were assessed by immunohistochemistry and dot-blotting. EDC chemistry resulted in fibres with average mechanical properties but the highest cell proliferation rate and matrix protein production. EDC/EGDE chemistry resulted in fibres with improved mechanical properties but with a lower biocompatibility profile. Both chemistries may provide useful structures for scaffolding regeneration of tendon and ligament tissue and will be evaluated for in vivo tendon regeneration in future experiments.

  9. Effects of surface modification on the mechanical and structural properties of nanofibrous poly(ε-caprolactone)/forsterite scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharaziha, M., E-mail: Kharaziha.ma@yahoo.com [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, M.H. [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Edris, H. [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Composite scaffolds consisting of polymers reinforced with ceramic nanoparticles are widely applied for hard tissue engineering. However, due to the incompatible polarity of ceramic nanoparticles with polymers, they tend to agglomerate in the polymer matrix which results in undesirable effects on the integral properties of composites. In this research, forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) nanoparticles was surface esterified by dodecyl alcohol and nanofibrous poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL)/modified forsterite scaffolds were developed through electrospinning technique. The aim of this research was to investigate the properties of surface modified forsterite nanopowder and PCL/modified forsterite scaffolds, before and after hydrolytic treatment, as well as the cellular attachment and proliferation. Results demonstrated that surface modification of nanoparticles significantly enhanced the tensile strength and toughness of scaffolds upon 1.5- and 4-folds compared to unmodified samples, respectively, due to improved compatibility between matrix and filler. Hydrolytic treatment of scaffolds also modified the bioactivity and cellular attachment and proliferation due to greatly enhanced hydrophilicity of the forsterite nanoparticles after this process compared to surface modified samples. Results suggested that surface modification of forsterite nanopowder and hydrolytic treatment of the developed scaffolds were effective approaches to address the issues in the formation of composite fibers and resulted in development of bioactive composite scaffolds with ideal mechanical and structural properties for bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Forsterite nanopowder was surface modified with dodecyl alcohol. • Nanofibrous PCL/forsterite scaffolds were developed through electrospinning. • Composite scaffolds were treated in boiled water to remove the dodecyl chains. • Surface modification resulted in improved mechanical properties. • Hydrolytic treatment

  10. [Viscoelastic properties of isolated papillary muscle: contributions of connective tissue skeleton and intracellular matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protsenko, Iu L; Kobelev, A V; Lukin, O N; Balakin, A A; Smoliuk, L T

    2009-07-01

    Peculiarities of viscoelastic behavior of rabbit papillary muscle in passive state are studied by transversal versus longitudinal deformation curves, stress-strain and hysteresis curves, and stress relaxation curves under ramp stretching. The papillary muscle was chosen because of mostly longitudinal orientation of fibers and its elongated shape, which both make it as an appropriate model for uniaxial tests. The problem of evaluation of connective tissue protein structures and intracellular matrix contribution into the properties under consideration is solved by using the maceration method to remove intracellular structures. The different contribution of intracellular and extracellular protein features into total properties of a papillary muscle leads to nonlinearity of myocardial viscoelastic properties, such as the increase of differential elastic module and relaxation time with deformation.

  11. Nanoreinforced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering: Biomaterials that are Compatible with Load-Bearing and Electroactive Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Thakur, Ashish; Pennisi, Christian Pablo

    2017-01-01

    , mechanical, and electrical properties. Here, recent advances in the fabrication and application of nanocomposite hydrogels in tissue engineering applications are described, with specific attention toward skeletal and electroactive tissues, such as cardiac, nerve, bone, cartilage, and skeletal muscle......Given their highly porous nature and excellent water retention, hydrogel-based biomaterials can mimic critical properties of the native cellular environment. However, their potential to emulate the electromechanical milieu of native tissues or conform well with the curved topology of human organs...

  12. Fabrication of viable centimeter-sized 3D tissue constructs with microchannel conduits for improved tissue properties through assembly of cell-laden microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Houyong; Chen, Maiqin; Wang, Xiu; Mei, Yang; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Wen-Song

    2014-06-01

    Bottom-up approaches have emerged as a new philosophy in tissue engineering, enabling precise control over tissue morphogenesis at the cellular level. We previously prepared large bone-like tissues using cell-laden microbeads (microtissues) by following a modular approach to ensure cell viability. However, a long-term culture of such avascular macroscopic tissues (macrotissues) has not been evaluated. In the present study, microtissues were fabricated by cultivating human fibroblasts on Cytopore-2 microbeads in spinner flasks for 16 days. We then examined the long-term perfusion culture for macrotissues. Specifically, following assembly in a perfusion chamber for 15 days, cell death was found to be prominent at a depth of 500 µm from the surface of macrotissues towards the interior, suggesting that there was a new mass transfer limit leading to cell death instead of tissue maturation. Subsequently, we developed a strategy by incorporating microchannel structures in centimeter-sized tissue constructs to promote mass transport. By installing glass rods (1 mm diameter, 1 mm wall-to-wall spacing) in the perfusion chamber, stable microchannel architectures were introduced during the microtissue assembly process. Based on live/dead assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), these channelled macrotissues (length × diameter, 1.6 × 2.0 cm) demonstrated high cell viability and compact packing of microbeads. Comparative biochemical analysis further suggested a more homogeneous spatial distribution of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in the channelled macrotissues than in solid ones. Viable 3D large tissues can therefore be prepared by assembling cell-laden microbeads in conjunction with microchannel carving, meeting clinical needs in tissue repair.

  13. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging: Characterizing the mechanical properties of tissues using their transient response to localized force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Congdon, Amy N.; Frinkely, Kristin D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2004-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging utilizes brief, high energy, focused acoustic pulses to generate radiation force in tissue, and conventional diagnostic ultrasound methods to detect the resulting tissue displacements in order to image the relative mechanical properties of tissue. The magnitude and spatial extent of the applied force is dependent upon the transmit beam parameters and the tissue attenuation. Forcing volumes are on the order of 5 mm3, pulse durations are less than 1 ms, and tissue displacements are typically several microns. Images of tissue displacement reflect local tissue stiffness, with softer tissues (e.g., fat) displacing farther than stiffer tissues (e.g., muscle). Parametric images of maximum displacement, time to peak displacement, and recovery time provide information about tissue material properties and structure. In both in vivo and ex vivo data, structures shown in matched B-mode images are in good agreement with those shown in ARFI images, with comparable resolution. Potential clinical applications under investigation include soft tissue lesion characterization, assessment of focal atherosclerosis, and imaging of thermal lesion formation during tissue ablation procedures. Results from ongoing studies will be presented. [Work supported by NIH Grant R01 EB002132-03, and the Whitaker Foundation. System support from Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.

  14. Development of Chitosan Scaffolds with Enhanced Mechanical Properties for Intestinal Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhem, Elie; Bitar, Khalil N

    2015-10-13

    Massive resections of segments of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lead to intestinal discontinuity. Functional tubular replacements are needed. Different scaffolds were designed for intestinal tissue engineering application. However, none of the studies have evaluated the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. We have previously shown the biocompatibility of chitosan as a natural material in intestinal tissue engineering. Our scaffolds demonstrated weak mechanical properties. In this study, we enhanced the mechanical strength of the scaffolds with the use of chitosan fibers. Chitosan fibers were circumferentially-aligned around the tubular chitosan scaffolds either from the luminal side or from the outer side or both. Tensile strength, tensile strain, and Young's modulus were significantly increased in the scaffolds with fibers when compared with scaffolds without fibers. Burst pressure was also increased. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was maintained as demonstrated by the adhesion of smooth muscle cells around the different kinds of scaffolds. The chitosan scaffolds with fibers provided a better candidate for intestinal tissue engineering. The novelty of this study was in the design of the fibers in a specific alignment and their incorporation within the scaffolds.

  15. Development of Chitosan Scaffolds with Enhanced Mechanical Properties for Intestinal Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Zakhem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Massive resections of segments of the gastrointestinal (GI tract lead to intestinal discontinuity. Functional tubular replacements are needed. Different scaffolds were designed for intestinal tissue engineering application. However, none of the studies have evaluated the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. We have previously shown the biocompatibility of chitosan as a natural material in intestinal tissue engineering. Our scaffolds demonstrated weak mechanical properties. In this study, we enhanced the mechanical strength of the scaffolds with the use of chitosan fibers. Chitosan fibers were circumferentially-aligned around the tubular chitosan scaffolds either from the luminal side or from the outer side or both. Tensile strength, tensile strain, and Young’s modulus were significantly increased in the scaffolds with fibers when compared with scaffolds without fibers. Burst pressure was also increased. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was maintained as demonstrated by the adhesion of smooth muscle cells around the different kinds of scaffolds. The chitosan scaffolds with fibers provided a better candidate for intestinal tissue engineering. The novelty of this study was in the design of the fibers in a specific alignment and their incorporation within the scaffolds.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells from Discarded Neonatal Sternal Tissue: In Vitro Characterization and Angiogenic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous and nonautologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs are being evaluated as proangiogenic agents for ischemic and vascular disease in adults but not in children. A significant number of newborns and infants with critical congenital heart disease who undergo cardiac surgery already have or are at risk of developing conditions related to inadequate tissue perfusion. During neonatal cardiac surgery, a small amount of sternal tissue is usually discarded. Here we demonstrate that MSCs can be isolated from human neonatal sternal tissue using a nonenzymatic explant culture method. Neonatal sternal bone MSCs (sbMSCs were clonogenic, had a surface marker expression profile that was characteristic of bone marrow MSCs, were multipotent, and expressed pluripotency-related genes at low levels. Neonatal sbMSCs also demonstrated in vitro proangiogenic properties. Sternal bone MSCs cooperated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to form 3D networks and tubes in vitro. Conditioned media from sbMSCs cultured in hypoxia also promoted HUVEC survival and migration. Given the neonatal source, ease of isolation, and proangiogenic properties, sbMSCs may have relevance to therapeutic applications.

  17. Monitoring of tissue optical properties using OCT: application for blood glucose analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Eledrisi, Mohsen S.; Ashitkov, Taras V.; Motamedi, Massoud; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2002-07-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of tissue optical properties in real time could significantly improve diagnostics and management of various diseases. Recently we proposed to use high- resolution Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique for measurement of tissue scattering coefficient at the depth of up to 1mm. Our pilot studies performed in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that measurement of tissue scattering with this technique can potentially be applied for noninvasive monitoring of blood glucose concentration. High resolution and coherent photon detection of the OCT technique allowed detection of glucose-induced changes in the scattering coefficient. In this paper we report results of in vivo studies performed in dog, New Zealand rabbits, and first human subjects. OCT system with the wavelength of 1300 nm was used in our experiments. OCT signal slope was measured and compared with actual blood glucose concentration. Bolus glucose injections and glucose clamping administrations were used in animal studies. OCT signals were recorded form human subjects during oral glucose tolerance test. Results obtained form both animal and human studies show good correlation between slope of the OCT signals and actual blood glucose concentration measured using standard glucometesr. Sensitivity and accuracy of blood glucose concentrations monitoring with the OCT is discussed. Obtained result suggest that OCT is a promising technique for noninvasive monitoring of tissue analytes including glucose.

  18. Optoacoustic 3D visualization of changes in physiological properties of mouse tissues from live to postmortem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Richard; Ermiliov, Sergey A.; Liopo, Anton V.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2012-02-01

    Using the method of 3D optoacoustic tomography, we studied changes in tissues of the whole body of nude mice as the changes manifested themselves from live to postmortem. The studies provided the necessary baseline for optoacoustic imaging of necrotizing tissue, acute and chronic hypoxia, and reperfusion. They also establish a new optoacoustic model of early postmortem conditions of the whole mouse body. Animals were scanned in a 37°C water bath using a three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography system previously shown to provide high contrast maps of vasculature and organs based on changes in the optical absorbance. The scans were performed right before, 5 minutes after, 2 hours and 1 day after a lethal injection of KCl. The near-infrared laser wavelength of 765 nm was used to evaluate physiological features of postmortem changes. Our data showed that optoacoustic imaging is well suited for visualization of both live and postmortem tissues. The images revealed changes of optical properties in mouse organs and tissues. Specifically, we observed improvements in contrast of the vascular network and organs after the death of the animal. We associated these with reduced optical scattering, loss of motion artifacts, and blood coagulation.

  19. Spatial organization and correlation properties quantify structural changes on mesoscale of parenchymatous plant tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valous, N. A.; Delgado, A.; Sun, D.-W., E-mail: dawen.sun@ucd.ie [School of Biosystems Engineering, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland); Drakakis, K. [Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-02-14

    The study of plant tissue parenchyma's intercellular air spaces contributes to the understanding of anatomy and physiology. This is challenging due to difficulty in making direct measurements of the pore space and the complex mosaic of parenchymatous tissue. The architectural complexity of pore space has shown that single geometrical measurements are not sufficient for characterization. The inhomogeneity of distribution depends not only on the percentage content of phase, but also on how the phase fills the space. The lacunarity morphometric, as multiscale measure, provides information about the distribution of gaps that correspond to degree of spatial organization in parenchyma. Additionally, modern theories have suggested strategies, where the focus has shifted from the study of averages and histograms to the study of patterns in data fluctuations. Detrended fluctuation analysis provides information on the correlation properties of the parenchyma at different spatial scales. The aim is to quantify (with the aid of the aforementioned metrics), the mesostructural changes—that occur from one cycle of freezing and thawing—in the void phase of pome fruit parenchymatous tissue, acquired with X-ray microcomputed tomography. Complex systems methods provide numerical indices and detailed insights regarding the freezing-induced modifications upon the arrangement of cells and voids. These structural changes have the potential to lead to physiological disorders. The work can further stimulate interest for the analysis of internal plant tissue structures coupled with other physico-chemical processes or phenomena.

  20. Tissue expression of squamous cellular carcinoma antigen and Ki67 in hepatocellular carcinoma-correlation with prognosis: A historical prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmilovitz-Weiss Hemda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squamous cellular carcinoma antigen (SCCA is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC tissue and in sera of HCC patients. Our aim was to assess hepatic SCCA immunostaining in a series of HCCs and to correlate its presence with cell proliferation, apoptosis and clinical outcome. Methods Sixty-one HCC patients were included. Liver specimens were obtained either by biopsy (n = 17 or surgically (resection 27, transplantation 17. Immunostaining for AFP, Ki-67, SCCA and TUNEL assay were performed. Results SCCA staining was detected in 83.6% of specimens. A statistical significant correlation was found between negative SCCA staining and mortality (p = 0.026 and a higher immunostaining score for Ki67 (p = 0.017. Positive SCCA staining was associated with well and moderate differentiated tumors (p = 0.022. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, Ki67 and TUNEL assay were found to be significant independent predictors of negative SCCA immunostaining. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.87. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a significant difference between the patient group with positive versus negative SCCA immunostaining relating to survival time (p = 0.0106. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis demonstrated that Ki67 immunostaining and liver transplantation or resection were independently associated with mortality. Conclusions SCCA is overexpressed in HCC. SCCA status is associated with cell proliferation, apoptosis and survival. SCCA and Ki67 staining can predict survival. Our study results support a potential association of negative SCCA expression with other markers of poor outcome in HCC. More studies are needed to clarify the role of SCCA in HCC and expand the knowledge of the SCCA antigen in HCC patients.

  1. Chitosan-gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering: physico-chemical properties and biological response of buffalo embryonic stem cells and transfectant of GFP-buffalo embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Han, W W; Saikhun, J; Pholpramoo, C; Misra, R D K; Kitiyanant, Y

    2009-11-01

    The favorable cellular response of newly developed cell line, buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells to three-dimensional biodegradable chitosan-gelatin composite scaffolds with regard to stem-cell-based tissue engineering is described. Chitosan-gelatin composites were characterized by a highly porous structure with interconnected pores, and the mechanical properties were significantly enhanced. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction study indicated increased amorphous content in the scaffold on the addition of gelatin to chitosan. To develop a transfectant of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-buffalo ES cell, transfection of GFP plasmid to the cell was carried out via the electroporation procedure. In comparison with pure chitosan, cell spreading and proliferation were greater in highly visualized GFP-expressing cell-chitosan-gelatin scaffold constructs. The relative comparison of biological response involving cell proliferation and viability on the scaffolds suggests that blending of gelatin in chitosan improved cellular efficiency. Studies involving scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy, histological observations and flow cytometer analysis of the constructs implied that the polygonal cells attached to and penetrated the pores, and proliferated well, while maintaining their pluripotency during the culture period for 28days. Chitosan-gelatin scaffolds were cytocompatible with respect to buffalo ES cells. The study underscores for the first time that chitosan-gelatin scaffolds are promising candidates for ES-cell-based tissue engineering.

  2. Dynamical properties of the brain tissue under oscillatory shear stresses at large strain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjema, F.; Khelidj, B.; Lounis, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this experimental work, we study the viscoelastic behaviour of in vitro brain tissue, particularly the white matter, under oscillatory shear strain. The selective vulnerability of this tissue is the anisotropic mechanical properties of theirs different regions lead to a sensitivity to the angular shear rate and magnitude of strain. For this aim, shear storage modulus (G‧) and loss modulus (G″) were measured over a range of frequencies (1 to 100 Hz), for different levels of strain (1 %, to 50 %). The mechanical responses of the brain matter samples showed a viscoelastic behaviour that depend on the correlated strain level and frequency range and old age sample. The samples have been showed evolution behaviour by increasing then decreasing the strain level. Also, the stiffness anisotropy of brain matter was showed between regions and species.

  3. Shoulder surgeon and autologous cellular regeneration - From bench to bed: Part one- the link between the human fibroblast, connective tissue disorders and shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Toit Don

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of autologous cell regeneration (ACR is a facet of cell therapy and regenerative medicine. It is initiated when activated autologous platelet rich plasma alone (PRP, containing cytokines or growth factors, is injected into the dermis or other structure in order to initiate a regenerative or antiaging process. The recipients resident cells at the target zone are activated by biologically active growth factors, derived from the activated platelets in the PRP through a paracrine effect. The platelet gel that contains the fibrin and clumped platelets, releases growth factors that influences activation of macrophages and stem cells in the recipient site. Tissue regeneration is facilitated by stem cell proliferation and differentiation. The PRP that has sealant and wound healing properties, may shift the wound healing cascade to the left, thereby speeding up tissue regeneration and remodelling by the use of the recipients own plasma. Both the fibroblast and myofibroblast play key roles in the wound healing cascade. The fibroblast, of mesenchymal origin, plays a pivotal role in the formation of the extracellular matrix and deposition of collagen. A failure of organised fibroblast function results in important and disabling disease processes and conditions such as chronic ischaemic heart disease and remodelling of the heart, lung fibrosis, fibromatosis, solar aged-face, keloids, hypertrophic scar formation, nodular fasciitis, inguinal hernia, Dupuytren′s disease and scleroderma. More recent additions include frozen shoulder and the captured shoulder. In aesthetic medicine, one of the prime functions of fractional photothermolysis with lasers, intense pulsed light and radiofrequency devices, is to stimulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, by thermal energy thereby increasing collagen deposition which enhances facial rejuvenation. Platelet -rich plasma (REGENLAB PRP, REGENLAB-ACR possesses unique growth factors that stimulate, fibroblast

  4. Improving the mechanical properties of collagen-based membranes using silk fibroin for corneal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kai; Liu, Yang; Li, Weichang; Wang, Lin; Liu, Sa; Wang, Yingjun; Wang, Zhichong; Ren, Li

    2015-03-01

    Although collagen with outstanding biocompatibility has promising application in corneal tissue engineering, the mechanical properties of collagen-based scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This article describes a toughness reinforced collagen-based membrane using silk fibroin. The collagen-silk fibroin membranes based on collagen [silk fibroin (w/w) ratios of 100:5, 100:10, and 100:20] were prepared by using silk fibroin and cross-linking by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide. These membranes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and their optical property, and NaCl and tryptophan diffusivity had been tested. The water content was found to be dependent on the content of silk fibroin, and CS10 membrane (loading 10 wt % of silk fibroin) performed the optimal mechanical properties. Also the suture experiments have proved CS10 has high suture retention strength, which can be sutured in rabbit eyes integrally. Moreover, the composite membrane proved good biocompatibility for the proliferation of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Lamellar keratoplasty shows that CS10 membrane promoted complete epithelialization in 35 ± 5 days, and their transparency is restored quickly in the first month. Corneal rejection reaction, neovascularization, and keratoconus are not observed. The composite films show potential for use in the field of corneal tissue engineering.

  5. Adhesive properties of laminated alginate gels for tissue engineering of layered structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Lee, Christopher S D; Cabodi, Mario; Stroock, Abraham D; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2008-06-01

    A significant challenge in tissue engineering is the creation of tissues with stratified morphology or embedded microstructures. This study investigated methods to fabricate composite gels from separately deposited alginate layers and examined the effects of processing methods on the mechanics of adhesion. Laminated alginate gels were created through a three step process which included: treatment of the interfaces with citrate; annealing of the gels to allow for molecular rearrangement of the alginate chains; and exposure to a CaCl(2) to crosslink the alginate sheets. Process variables included volume and concentration of applied citrate, annealing time, incubation time in CaCl(2), and CaCl(2) concentration. Laminated sheets were tested in lap-shear geometry to characterize failure phenomena and mechanical properties. The site of failure within the gel depended on the integrity of the interface, with weaker gels delaminating and gels with mechanical properties similar to that of bulk gels failing randomly throughout the thickness. Citrate volume, citrate concentration, CaCl(2) incubation time, and CaCl(2) concentration altered the mechanical properties of the laminated alginate sheets, while annealing time had little effect on all measured parameters. This study demonstrates the integration of separately fabricated alginate layers to create mechanically or chemically anisotropic or heterogeneous structures.

  6. Influence of skin tissue properties on the radial reference point for glucose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Kexin; Ding, Lijun; Shi, Zhenzhi; Chen, Wenliang

    2009-02-01

    A reference position where the diffuse reflectance light intensity is insensitive to the variation of glucose concentration exists in the radial detection space for glucose measurement in the scattering medium such as skin. The signal measured in this position could be used as an inside reference to evaluate the influence on spectrum caused by other interferential factors. The relationship between the position of radial reference point and the skin tissue property is studied in this paper. Three-layer skin models with different optical parameters are designed to get sample sets at 1200~1700nm. In these sets, μa, μs and g of dermis varies respectively, so does the depth of epidermis or dermis. The distribution rule of dispersion of diffuse reflectance light intensity in the radial space is confirmed with the glucose concentration changes. And the distribution property of the radial reference position in every sample set is obtained through Monte Carlo simulation. The result shows that the distance of radial reference position from light source is insensitive to the variation of absorption coefficient or the depth of dermis, but an increased scattering coefficient will shorten the distance; an increased anisotropy coefficient or depth of epidermis will lengthen it. On the basis of that, the optical probes with different structures are designed according to the skin tissue properties. So they could be used for the measurement of corresponding patients, which enhances the practicability of floating reference method greatly.

  7. Microfibril orientation dominates the microelastic properties of human bone tissue at the lamellar length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Granke

    Full Text Available The elastic properties of bone tissue determine the biomechanical behavior of bone at the organ level. It is now widely accepted that the nanoscale structure of bone plays an important role to determine the elastic properties at the tissue level. Hence, in addition to the mineral density, the structure and organization of the mineral nanoparticles and of the collagen microfibrils appear as potential key factors governing the elasticity. Many studies exist on the role of the organization of collagen microfibril and mineral nanocrystals in strongly remodeled bone. However, there is no direct experimental proof to support the theoretical calculations. Here, we provide such evidence through a novel approach combining several high resolution imaging techniques: scanning acoustic microscopy, quantitative scanning small-Angle X-ray scattering imaging and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography. We find that the periodic modulations of elasticity across osteonal bone are essentially determined by the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and to a lesser extent only by the particle size and density. Based on the strong correlation between the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and the collagen molecules, we conclude that the microfibril orientation is the main determinant of the observed undulations of microelastic properties in regions of constant mineralization in osteonal lamellar bone. This multimodal approach could be applied to a much broader range of fibrous biological materials for the purpose of biomimetic technologies.

  8. Chondroprotective supplementation promotes the mechanical properties of injectable scaffold for human nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Berit L; Maxwell, Thomas W; Deng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    A result of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is no longer able to withstand applied load leading to pain and disability. The objective of this study is to fabricate a tissue-engineered injectable scaffold with chondroprotective supplementation in vitro to improve the mechanical properties of a degenerative NP. Tissue-engineered scaffolds were fabricated using different concentrations of alginate and calcium chloride and mechanically evaluated. Fabrication conditions were based on structural and mechanical resemblance to the native NP. Chondroprotective supplementation, glucosamine (GCSN) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), were added to scaffolds at concentrations of 0:0µg/mL (0:0-S), 125:100µg/mL (125:100-S), 250:200µg/mL (250:200-S), and 500:400µg/mL (500:400-S), GCSN and CS, respectively. Scaffolds were used to fabricate tissue-engineered constructs through encapsulation of human nucleus pulposus cells (HNPCs). The tissue-engineered constructs were collected at days 1, 14, and 28 for biochemical and biomechanical evaluations. Confocal microscopy showed HNPC viability and rounded morphology over the 28 day period. MTT analysis resulted in significant increases in cell proliferation for each group. Collagen type II ELISA quantification and compressive aggregate moduli (HA) showed increasing trends for both 250:200-S and the 500:400-S groups on Day 28 with significantly greater HA compared to 0:0-S group. Glycosaminoglycan and water content decreased for all groups. Results indicate the increased mechanical properties of the 250:200-S and the 500:400-S was due to production of a functional matrix. This study demonstrated potential for a chondroprotective supplemented injectable scaffold to restore biomechanical function of a degenerative disc through the production of a mechanically functional matrix.

  9. Correlation of particle properties with cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xinhui [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liang, Tong [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Changsheng [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yuan, Yuan, E-mail: yyuan@ecust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Qian, Jiangchao, E-mail: jiangchaoqian@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Three types of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAPNs) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method by changing microwave power (from 200 to 300 W) or using calcination treatment: L200 (200 W, lyophilization), L300 (300 W, lyophilization) and C200 (200 W, lyophilization & calcination). Their physiochemical properties were characterized and correlated with cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer cells (MGC80-3). The major differences among these HAPN preparations were their size and specific surface area, with the L200 showing a smaller size and higher specific surface area. Although all HAPNs inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of cancer cells, L200 exhibited the greatest toxicity. All types of HAPNs were internalized through energy-dependent pathways, but the L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells. Inhibitor studies with dynasore and methyl-β-cyclodextrin suggested that caveolae-mediated endocytosis and, to a much lesser extent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, were involved in cellular uptake of the various preparations, whereas the inhibition of endocytosis was more obvious for L200. Using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HAPNs and laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we found that all forms of nanoparticles were present in the cytoplasm, and some L200 HAPNs were even found within nuclei. Treatment with all HAPN preparations led to the increase in the intracellular calcium level with the highest level detected for L200. - Highlights: • Three types of HAPNs (L200, L300 and C200) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method. • L200 exhibited the greatest cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer (MGC80-3) cells. • L200 showed a smaller size and higher specific surface area. • The L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells through energy-dependent pathways. • L200 caused the most significant increase in the intracellular calcium level.

  10. Optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue determined by Kubelka-Munk method in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Jiang Wei; Da Xing; Guo-Yong Wu; Ying Jin; Huai-Min Gu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm,532 nm, 808 nm wavelengths of laser irradiation.METHODS: A double-integrating-sphere system, the basic principle of measuring technology of light radiation, and an optical model of biological tissues were used in the study.RESULTS: The results of measurement showed that there were no significant differences in the absorption coefficients of human normal small intestine tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm,496.5 nm laser in the Kubelka-Munk two-flux model (P>0.05).The absorption coefficients of the tissue at 514.5 nm, 532 nm,808 nm laser irradiation were obviously increased with the decrease of these wavelengths. The scattering coefficients of the tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation were increased with the decrease of these wavelengths.The scattering coefficients at 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm, 532 nm laser irradiation were obviously increased with the increase of these wavelengths. The scattering coefficient of the tissue at 532 nm laser irradiation was bigger than that at 808 nm.There were no significant differences in the total attenuation coefficient of the tissue at 476.5 nm and 488 nm laser irradiation (P>0.05). The total attenuation coefficient of the tissue at 488 nm, 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm, 532 nm, 808 nm laser irradiation was obviously increased with the decrease of these wavelengths, and their effective attenuation coefficient revealed the same trend. There were no significant differences among the forward scattered photon fluxe,backward scattered photon fiuxe, and total scattered photon fiuxe of the tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation. They were all obviously increased with attenuation of tissue thickness. The attenuations of forward and backward scattered photon fluxes, and the total scattered photon fiuxe of the tissue at 514.5 nm laser irradiation were slower than those at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation

  11. Mechanical properties and in vitro behavior of nanofiber-hydrogel composites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Dan; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Stahl, Benjamin; Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogel-based biomaterial systems have great potential for tissue reconstruction by serving as temporary scaffolds and cell delivery vehicles for tissue engineering (TE). Hydrogels have poor mechanical properties and their rapid degradation limits the development and application of hydrogels in TE. In this study, nanofiber reinforced composite hydrogels were fabricated by incorporating electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/gelatin 'blend' or 'coaxial' nanofibers into gelatin hydrogels. The morphological, mechanical, swelling and biodegradation properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were evaluated and the results indicated that the moduli and compressive strengths of the nanofiber reinforced hydrogels were remarkably higher than those of pure gelatin hydrogels. By increasing the amount of incorporated nanofibers into the hydrogel, the Young's modulus of the composite hydrogels increased from 3.29 ± 1.02 kPa to 20.30 ± 1.79 kPa, while the strain at break decreased from 66.0 ± 1.1% to 52.0 ± 3.0%. Compared to composite hydrogels with coaxial nanofibers, those with blend nanofibers showed higher compressive strength and strain at break, but with lower modulus and energy dissipation properties. Biocompatibility evaluations of the nanofiber reinforced hydrogels were carried out using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) by cell proliferation assay and immunostaining analysis. The nanocomposite hydrogel with 25 mg ml(-1) PCL/gelatin 'blend' nanofibers (PGB25) was found to enhance cell proliferation, indicating that the 'nanocomposite hydrogels' might provide the necessary mechanical support and could be promising cell delivery systems for tissue regeneration.

  12. Effect of anti-sclerostin therapy and osteogenesis imperfecta on tissue-level properties in growing and adult mice while controlling for tissue age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Lloyd, William R; Salemi, Joseph D; Marini, Joan C; Caird, Michelle S; Morris, Michael D; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2016-03-01

    Bone composition and biomechanics at the tissue-level are important contributors to whole bone strength. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a candidate anabolic therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis that increases bone formation, bone mass, and bone strength in animal studies, but its effect on bone quality at the tissue-level has received little attention. Pre-clinical studies of Scl-Ab have recently expanded to include diseases with altered collagen and material properties such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Scl-Ab on bone quality by determining bone material composition and tissue-level mechanical properties in normal wild type (WT) tissue, as well as mice with a typical OI Gly➔Cys mutation (Brtl/+) in type I collagen. Rapidly growing (3-week-old) and adult (6-month-old) WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated for 5weeks with Scl-Ab. Fluorescent guided tissue-level bone composition analysis (Raman spectroscopy) and biomechanical testing (nanoindentation) were performed at multiple tissue ages. Scl-Ab increased mineral to matrix in adult WT and Brtl/+ at tissue ages of 2-4wks. However, no treatment related changes were observed in mineral to matrix levels at mid-cortex, and elastic modulus was not altered by Scl-Ab at any tissue age. Increased mineral-to-matrix was phenotypically observed in adult Brtl/+ OI mice (at tissue ages>3wks) and rapidly growing Brtl/+ (at tissue ages>4wks) mice compared to WT. At identical tissue ages defined by fluorescent labels, adult mice had generally lower mineral to matrix ratios and a greater elastic modulus than rapidly growing mice, demonstrating that bone matrix quality can be influenced by animal age and tissue age alike. In summary, these data suggest that Scl-Ab alters the matrix chemistry of newly formed bone while not affecting the elastic modulus, induces similar changes between Brtl/+ and WT mice, and provides new insight into the interaction between tissue age and

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis.

  14. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xin; LI Dao-bing; XU Feng; WANG Yan; ZHU Yu-chun; LI Hong; WANG Kun-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study.This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells.Methods We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition.Results The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90±1.22)% vs. (93.14±1.78)%, P >0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41±1.49)% vs.(92.61±1.34)%, P >0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane.Conclusions This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder.Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth

  15. Tissue electrical property mapping from zero echo-time magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bulumulla, Selaka; Wiesinger, Florian; Sacolick, Laura; Sun, Wei; Hancu, Ileana

    2015-02-01

    The capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce spatially resolved estimation of tissue electrical properties (EPs) in vivo has been a subject of much recent interest. In this work we introduce a method to map tissue EPs from low-flip-angle, zero-echo-time (ZTE) imaging. It is based on a new theoretical formalism that allows calculation of EPs from the product of transmit and receive radio-frequency (RF) field maps. Compared to conventional methods requiring separation of the transmit RF field (B(1)(+)) from acquired MR images, the proposed method has such advantages as: 1) reduced theoretical error, 2) higher acquisition speed, and 3) flexibility in choice of different transmit and receive RF coils. The method is demonstrated in electrical conductivity and relative permittivity mapping in a salt water phantom, as well as in vivo measurement of brain conductivity in healthy volunteers. The phantom results show the validity and scan-time efficiency of the proposed method applied to a piece-wise homogeneous object. Quality of in vivo EP results was limited by reconstruction errors near tissue boundaries, which highlights need for image segmentation in EP mapping in a heterogeneous medium. Our results show the feasibility of rapid EP mapping from MRI without B(1)(+) mapping.

  16. Mathematical modeling of uniaxial mechanical properties of collagen gel scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Uniaxial Mechanical Properties of Collagen Gel Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro M. Irastorza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.. When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  18. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra M Ohri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+ macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14, or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES (median 92.7 months and 20 patients with poor survival (PS (median 7.7 months. RESULTS: The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (p<0.001, NM-iNOS (p = 0.02 and NM-MRP 8/14 (p = 0.02 was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (p<0.001. There was more NM-CD163 expression (p = 0.04 but less NM-iNOS (p = 0.002 and MRP 8/14 (p = 0.01 expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR p<0.001, 65.0% versus 14.6% (NM-iNOS p = 0.003, and 54.3% versus 22.2% (NM-MRP 8/14 p = 0.04, as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41 and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  19. Mechanical properties of human autologous tubular connective tissues (human biotubes) obtained from patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yasuhide; Kaneko, Yoshiyuki; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Okumura, Noriko

    2016-10-01

    Completely autologous in vivo tissue-engineered connective tissue tubes (Biotubes) have promise as arterial vascular grafts in animal implantation studies. In this clinical study of patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) (n = 11; age: 39-83 years), we evaluated human Biotubes' (h-Biotubes) mechanical properties to determine whether Biotubes with feasibility as vascular grafts could be formed in human bodies. We extracted PD catheters, embedded for 4-47 months, and obtained tubular connective tissues as h-Biotubes (internal diameter: 5 mm) from around the catheter' silicone tubular parts. h-Biotubes were composed mainly of collagen with smooth luminal surfaces. The average wall thickness was 278 ± 178 μm. No relationship was founded between the tubes' mechanical properties and patients' ages or PD catheter embedding periods statistically. However, the elastic modulus (2459 ± 970 kPa) and tensile strength (623 ± 314 g) of h-Biotubes were more than twice as great as those from animal Biotubes, formed from the same PD catheters by embedding in the beagle subcutaneous pouches for 1 month, or beagle arteries. The burst strength (6338 ± 1106 mmHg) of h-Biotubes was almost the same as that of the beagle thoracic or abdominal aorta. h-Biotubes could be formed in humans over a 4-month embedding period, and they satisfied the mechanical requirements for application as vascular grafts. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1431-1437, 2016.

  20. Poly(amido-amine)-based hydrogels with tailored mechanical properties and degradation rates for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, Federico; Tocchio, Alessandro; Tamplenizza, Margherita; Gerges, Irini; Pistis, Valentina; Recenti, Rossella; Bortolin, Monica; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Argentiere, Simona; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Poly(amido-amine) (PAA) hydrogels containing the 2,2-bisacrylamidoacetic acid-4-amminobutyl guanidine monomeric unit have a known ability to enhance cellular adhesion by interacting with the arginin-glycin-aspartic acid (RGD)-binding αVβ3 integrin, expressed by a wide number of cell types. Scientific interest in this class of materials has traditionally been hampered by their poor mechanical properties and restricted range of degradation rate. Here we present the design of novel biocompatible, RGD-mimic PAA-based hydrogels with wide and tunable degradation rates as well as improved mechanical and biological properties for biomedical applications. This is achieved by radical polymerization of acrylamide-terminated PAA oligomers in both the presence and absence of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate. The degradation rate is found to be precisely tunable by adjusting the PAA oligomer molecular weight and acrylic co-monomer concentration in the starting reaction mixture. Cell adhesion and proliferation tests on Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells show that PAA-based hydrogels have the capacity to promote cell adhesion up to 200% compared to the control. Mechanical tests show higher compressive strength of acrylic chain containing hydrogels compared to traditional PAA hydrogels.

  1. Influence of Bottom Ash Replacements as Fine Aggregate on the Property of Cellular Concrete with Various Foam Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchara Onprom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on evaluating the feasibility of utilizing bottom ash from coal burning power plants as a fine aggregate in cellular concrete with various foam contents. Flows of all mixtures were controlled within 45 ± 5% and used foam content at 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70% by volume of mixture. Bottom ash from Mae Moh power plant in Thailand was used to replace river sand at the rates of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% by volume of sand. Compressive strength, water absorption, and density of cellular concretes were determined at the ages of 7, 14, and 28 days. Nonlinear regression technique was developed to construct the mathematical models for predicting the compressive strength, water absorption, and density of cellular concrete. The results revealed that the density of cellular concrete decreased while the water absorption increased with an increase in replacement level of bottom ash. From the experimental results, it can be concluded that bottom ash can be used as fine aggregate in the cellular concrete. In addition, the nonlinear regression models give very high degree of accuracy (R2>0.99.

  2. Advanced demodulation technique for the extraction of tissue optical properties and structural orientation contrast in the spatial frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Kyle P.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a method for extracting spatial frequency information content from biological tissue, which is used to calculate tissue optical properties and determine tissue structural orientation. This demodulation method employs a two-dimensional Hilbert transform using a spiral phase function in Fourier space. The approach presented here allows for the determination of tissue optical properties using a single frame of data for each modulation frequency, increasing imaging speed by two to threefold versus conventional, three-phase spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI). This new single-phase Hilbert transform approach recovers optical property and scattering orientation index values within 1% and 10% of three-phase SFDI, respectively. These results suggest that, using the Hilbert demodulation technique, SFDI data acquisition speed can be increased significantly while preserving data quality, which will help us move forward toward the implementation of a real-time SFDI platform.

  3. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  4. Tailoring Mechanical Properties of Collagen-Based Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering: The Effects of pH, Temperature and Ionic Strength on Gelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Achilli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Collagen gels have been widely studied for applications in tissue engineering because of their biological implications. Considering their use as scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering, the main limitation has always been related to their low mechanical properties. During the process of in vitro self-assembly, which leads to collagen gelation, the size of the fibrils, their chemical interactions, as well as the resulting microstructure are regulated by three main experimental conditions: pH, ionic strength and temperature. In this work, these three parameters were modulated in order to increase the mechanical properties of collagen gels. The effects on the gelation process were assessed by turbidimetric and scanning electron microscopy analyses. Turbidity measurements showed that gelation was affected by all three factors and scanning electron images confirmed that major changes occurred at the microstructural level. Mechanical tests showed that the compressive and tensile moduli increased by four- and three-fold, respectively, compared to the control. Finally, viability tests confirmed that these gels are suitable as scaffolds for cellular adhesion and proliferation.

  5. Effect of tumor therapeutic irradiation on the mechanical properties of teeth tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraenzel, W. [Dept. of Physics, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany); Gerlach, R. [Univ. Clinic and Policlinic for Radiation Therapy, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany); Hein, H.J. [Univ. Clinic and Policlinic for Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany); Schaller, H.G. [Dept. of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Tumor irradiation of the head-neck area is accompanied by the development of a so-called radiation caries in the treated patients. In spite of conservative therapeutic measures, the process results in tooth destruction. The present study investigated the effects of irradiation on the demineralization and remineralization of the dental tissue. For this purpose, retained third molars were prepared and assigned either to a test group, which was exposed to fractional irradiation up to 60 Gy, or to a non-irradiated control group. Irradiated and non-irradiated teeth were then demineralized using acidic hydroxyl-cellulose gel; afterwards the teeth were remineralized using either Bifluorid12 {sup registered} or elmex gelee {sup registered}. The nanoindentation technique was used to measure the mechanical properties, hardness and elasticity, of the teeth in each of the conditions. The values were compared to the non-irradiated control group. Irradiation decreased dramatically the mechanical parameters of enamel and dentine. In non-irradiated teeth, demineralization had nearly the same effects of irradiation on the mechanical properties. In irradiated teeth, the effects of demineralization were negligible in comparison to non-irradiated teeth. Remineralization with Bifluorid12 {sup registered} or elmex gelee {sup registered} led to a partial improvement of the mechanical properties of the teeth. The enamel was more positively affected, by remineralization than the dentine. (orig.)

  6. Characteristics of cellular composition of periodontal pockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiuk, Petro; Hasiuk, Nataliya; Kindiy, Dmytro; Ivanchyshyn, Victoriya; Kalashnikov, Dmytro; Zubchenko, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The development of inflammatory periodontal disease in young people is an urgent problem of today's periodontology, and requires a development of new methods that would give an opportunity not only to diagnose but also for prognosis of periodontitis course in a given patients contingent. Results Cellular structure of periodontal pockets is presented by hematogenous and epithelial cells. Our results are confirmed by previous studies, and show that the penetration of periodontal pathogens leads to formation in periodontal tissue of a highly active complex compounds—cytokines that are able to modify the activity of neutrophils and reduce their specific antibacterial properties. Cytokines not only adversely affect the periodontal tissues, but also cause further activation of cells that synthesized them, and inhibit tissue repair and process of resynthesis of connective tissue by fibroblasts. Conclusion Neutrophilic granulocytes present in each of the types of smear types, but their functional status and quantitative composition is different. The results of our cytological study confirmed the results of immunohistochemical studies, and show that in generalized periodontitis, an inflammatory cellular elements with disorganized epithelial cells and connective tissue of the gums and periodontium, and bacteria form specific types of infiltration in periodontal tissues. PMID:28180007

  7. Preparation and mechanical property of a novel 3D porous magnesium scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Xiao-Wu; Li, Ji-Guang; Sun, Xu-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Porous magnesium has been recently recognized as a biodegradable metal for bone substitute applications. A novel porous Mg scaffold with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected pores and with a porosity of 33-54% was produced by the fiber deposition hot pressing (FDHP) technology. The microstructure and morphologies of the porous Mg scaffold were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the effects of porosities on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the porous Mg were investigated. Experimental results indicate that the measured Young's modulus and compressive strength of the Mg scaffold are ranged in 0.10-0.37 GPa, and 11.1-30.3 MPa, respectively, which are fairly comparable to those of cancellous bone. Such a porous Mg scaffold having a 3D interconnected network structure has the potential to be used in bone tissue engineering.

  8. Measuring the linear and nonlinear elastic properties of brain tissue with shear waves and inverse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Li, Guoyang; Qian, Lin-Xue; Liang, Si; Destrade, Michel; Cao, Yanping

    2015-10-01

    We use supersonic shear wave imaging (SSI) technique to measure not only the linear but also the nonlinear elastic properties of brain matter. Here, we tested six porcine brains ex vivo and measured the velocities of the plane shear waves induced by acoustic radiation force at different states of pre-deformation when the ultrasonic probe is pushed into the soft tissue. We relied on an inverse method based on the theory governing the propagation of small-amplitude acoustic waves in deformed solids to interpret the experimental data. We found that, depending on the subjects, the resulting initial shear modulus [Formula: see text] varies from 1.8 to 3.2 kPa, the stiffening parameter [Formula: see text] of the hyperelastic Demiray-Fung model from 0.13 to 0.73, and the third- [Formula: see text] and fourth-order [Formula: see text] constants of weakly nonlinear elasticity from [Formula: see text]1.3 to [Formula: see text]20.6 kPa and from 3.1 to 8.7 kPa, respectively. Paired [Formula: see text] test performed on the experimental results of the left and right lobes of the brain shows no significant difference. These values are in line with those reported in the literature on brain tissue, indicating that the SSI method, combined to the inverse analysis, is an efficient and powerful tool for the mechanical characterization of brain tissue, which is of great importance for computer simulation of traumatic brain injury and virtual neurosurgery.

  9. Controlling thermal gelation properties of novel Tetronic RTM hydrogel-based tissue adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejos, Martin Fernando

    The advancement in laparoscopic and robotic surgeries is calling for innovation in wound closure methods where the classical mechanical ligatures are proving very challenging due to reduction in surgical spaces, even for seasoned surgeons. Tissue adhesives have been investigated as an alternative and/or adjuvant method to address some of these unmet needs. Previously in our lab, Sanders and co-workers developed a successful synthetic adhesive by modifying Tetronic 1107 to incorporate acrylate (ACR) for chemical crosslinking and N-hydroxisuccinimide (NHS) to enhance tissue bonding, improving the seminal work done by Cho et al. However, solutions of modified T1107 would undergo reverse thermal gelation below room temperature, imposing a usability limitation since they could gel while being handled, and a functional limitation because if the material gelled to fast it would not make a good contact with the microstructure of the underlying tissues. Therefore, the main objective of this master's thesis research is to further improve the performance of these Tetronic-based adhesives by controlling the gelation temperature of these polymeric systems. To control the gelation temperatures of functionalized T1107 blends solutions, the acrylated version of a lower molecular Tetronic, T304, was incorporated into these polymers blends. This strategy proved to be effective to control de gelation temperature of the Tetronic-based adhesives, and also extended their degradation times. However, increased amounts of T304-ACR were correlated with lower adhesive strengths. With the right blend ratio, these three properties can be balanced to yield a mechanically strong adhesive, with a useful degradation profile and controlled gelation temperature.

  10. Nanohydroxyapatite Effect on the Degradation, Osteoconduction and Mechanical Properties of Polymeric Bone Tissue Engineered Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Shima; Nayyer, Leila; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Statistical reports show that every year around the world approximately 15 million bone fractures occur; of which up to 10% fail to heal completely and hence lead to complications of non-union healing. In the past, autografts or allografts were used as the “gold standard” of treating such defects. However, due to various limitations and risks associated with these sources of bone grafts, other avenues have been extensively investigated through which bone tissue engineering; in particular engineering of synthetic bone graft substitutes, has been recognised as a promising alternative to the traditional methods. METHODS A selective literature search was performed. RESULTS Bone tissue engineering offers unlimited supply, eliminated risk of disease transmission and relatively low cost. It could also lead to patient specific design and manufacture of implants, prosthesis and bone related devices. A potentially promising building block for a suitable scaffold is synthetic nanohydroxyapatite incorporated into synthetic polymers. Incorporation of nanohydroxyapatite into synthetic polymers has shown promising bioactivity, osteoconductivity, mechanical properties and degradation profile compared to other techniques previously considered. CONCLUSION Scientific research, through extensive physiochemical characterisation, in vitro and in vivo assessment has brought together the optimum characteristics of nanohydroxyapatite and various types of synthetic polymers in order to develop nanocomposites of suitable nature for bone tissue engineering. The aim of the present article is to review and update various aspects involved in incorporation of synthetic nanohydroxyapatite into synthetic polymers, in terms of their potentials to promote bone growth and regeneration in vitro, in vivo and consequently in clinical applications. PMID:28217213

  11. Chitosan-Based Matrices Prepared by Gamma Irradiation for Tissue Regeneration: Structural Properties vs. Preparation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimiro, Maria Helena; Lancastre, Joana J H; Rodrigues, Alexandra P; Gomes, Susana R; Rodrigues, Gabriela; Ferreira, Luís M

    2017-02-01

    In the last decade, new generations of biopolymer-based materials have attracted attention, aiming its application as scaffolds for tissue engineering. These engineered three-dimensional scaffolds are designed to improve or replace damaged, missing, or otherwise compromised tissues or organs. Despite the number of promising methods that can be used to generate 3D cell-instructive matrices, the innovative nature of the present work relies on the application of ionizing radiation technology to form and modify surfaces and matrices with advantage over more conventional technologies (room temperature reaction, absence of harmful initiators or solvents, high penetration through the bulk materials, etc.), and the possibility of preparation and sterilization in one single step. The current chapter summarizes the work done by the authors in the gamma radiation processing of biocompatible and biodegradable chitosan-based matrices for skin regeneration. Particular attention is given to the correlation between the different preparation conditions and the final polymeric matrices' properties. We therefore expect to demonstrate that instructive matrices produced and improved by radiation technology bring to the field of skin regenerative medicine a supplemental advantage over more conservative techniques.

  12. Structure-property evaluation of thermally and chemically gelling injectable hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenseair, Adam K; Boere, Kristel W M; Tzouanas, Stephanie N; Vo, Tiffany N; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2012-09-10

    The impact of synthesis and solution formulation parameters on the swelling and mechanical properties of a novel class of thermally and chemically gelling hydrogels combining poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based thermogelling macromers containing pendant epoxy rings with polyamidoamine-based hydrophilic and degradable diamine cross-linking macromers was evaluated. Through variation of network hydrophilicity and capacity for chain rearrangement, the often problematic tendency of thermogelling hydrogels to undergo significant syneresis was addressed. The demonstrated ability to tune postformation dimensional stability easily at both the synthesis and formulation stages represents a significant novel contribution toward efforts to utilize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based polymers as injectable biomaterials. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility of the hydrogel system under relevant conditions was established while demonstrating time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity at high solution osmolality. Such injectable in situ forming degradable hydrogels with tunable water content are promising candidates for many tissue-engineering applications, particularly for cell delivery to promote rapid tissue regeneration in non-load-bearing defects.

  13. Relationships between tissue properties and operational parameters of a dental handpiece during simulated cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongyan; Lau, Andrew; Heo, Young C; Lin, Lianshan; Delong, Ralph; Fok, Alex

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted on the development of an intelligent dental handpiece with functionality to detect subtle changes in mechanical properties of tooth tissue during milling. Such equipment would be able to adopt changes in cutting parameters and make real-time measurements to avoid tooth tissue damage caused by overexertion and overextension of the cutting tool. A modified dental handpiece, instrumented with strain gauges, microphone, displacement sensor, and air pressure sensor, was mounted to a linear movement table and used to mill three to four cavities in >50 bovine teeth. Extracted sound frequency and density were analyzed along with force, air pressure, and displacement for correlations and trends. Experimental results showed a high correlation (coefficient close to 0.7) between the feed force, the rotational frequency, and the averaged gray scale. These results could form the basis of a feedback control system to improve the safety of dental cutting procedures. This article is written in memory of Dr Hongyan Sun, who passed away in 2011 at a young age of 37.

  14. Investigating Tissue Optical Properties and Texture Descriptors of the Retina in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boglárka Enikő Varga

    Full Text Available To assess the differences in texture descriptors and optical properties of retinal tissue layers in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and to evaluate their usefulness in the detection of neurodegenerative changes using optical coherence tomography (OCT image segmentation.38 patients with MS were examined using Stratus OCT. The raw macular OCT data were exported and processed using OCTRIMA software. The enrolled eyes were divided into two groups, based on the presence of optic neuritis (ON in the history (MSON+ group, n = 36 and MSON- group, n = 31. Data of 29 eyes of 24 healthy subjects (H were used as controls. A total of seven intraretinal layers were segmented and thickness as well as optical parameters such as contrast, fractal dimension, layer index and total reflectance were measured. Mixed-model ANOVA analysis was used for statistical comparisons.Significant thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer complex (GCL+IPL and ganglion cell complex (GCC, RNFL+GCL+IPL was observed between study groups in all comparisons. Significant difference was found in contrast in the RNFL, GCL+IPL, GCC, inner nuclear layer (INL and outer plexiform layer when comparing MSON+ to the other groups. Higher fractal dimension values were observed in GCL+IPL and INL layers when comparing H vs. MSON+ groups. A significant difference was found in layer index in the RNFL, GCL+IPL and GCC layers in all comparisons. A significant difference was observed in total reflectance in the RNFL, GCL+IPL and GCC layers between the three examination groups.Texture and optical properties of the retinal tissue undergo pronounced changes in MS even without optic neuritis. Our results may help to further improve the diagnostic efficacy of OCT in MS and neurodegeneration.

  15. Chemical Characterization, Free Radical Scavenging, and Cellular Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of a Stilbenoid-Rich Root Extract of Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Ewald, Philipp; Yasui, Yoshiaki; Yokokawa, Haruka; Wagner, Anika E; Matsugo, Seiichi; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are receiving increasing attention due to their potential health benefits. However, most studies concerning the bioactivity of stilbenoids were conducted with pure compounds, for example, resveratrol. The aim of this study was to characterize a complex root extract of Vitis vinifera in terms of its free radical scavenging and cellular antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses of the root extract of Vitis vinifera identified seven stilbenoids including two monomeric (resveratrol and piceatannol), two dimeric (trans-ɛ-viniferin and ampelopsin A), one trimeric (miyabenol C), and two tetrameric (r-2-viniferin = vitisin A and r-viniferin = vitisin B) compounds which may mediate its biological activity. Electron spin resonance and spin trapping experiments indicate that the root extract scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, galvinoxyl, and superoxide free radicals. On a cellular level it was observed that the root extract of Vitis vinifera protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage and induces Nrf2 and its target genes heme oxygenase-1 and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Furthermore, the root extract could induce the antiatherogenic hepatic enzyme paraoxonase 1 and downregulate proinflammatory gene expression (interleukin 1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase) in macrophages. Collectively our data suggest that the root extract of Vitis vinifera exhibits free radical scavenging as well as cellular antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  16. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  17. Engineering graded tissue interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer E; Burns, Kellie L; Le Doux, Joseph M; Guldberg, Robert E; García, Andrés J

    2008-08-26

    Interfacial zones between tissues provide specialized, transitional junctions central to normal tissue function. Regenerative medicine strategies focused on multiple cell types and/or bi/tri-layered scaffolds do not provide continuously graded interfaces, severely limiting the integration and biological performance of engineered tissue substitutes. Inspired by the bone-soft tissue interface, we describe a biomaterial-mediated gene transfer strategy for spatially regulated genetic modification and differentiation of primary dermal fibroblasts within tissue-engineered constructs. We demonstrate that zonal organization of osteoblastic and fibroblastic cellular phenotypes can be engineered by a simple, one-step seeding of fibroblasts onto scaffolds containing a spatial distribution of retrovirus encoding the osteogenic transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1. Gradients of immobilized retrovirus, achieved via deposition of controlled poly(L-lysine) densities, resulted in spatial patterns of transcription factor expression, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralized matrix deposition. Notably, this graded distribution of mineral deposition and mechanical properties was maintained when implanted in vivo in an ectopic site. Development of this facile and robust strategy is significant toward the regeneration of continuous interfacial zones that mimic the cellular and microstructural characteristics of native tissue.

  18. Preparation and mechanical property of a novel 3D porous magnesium scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xue [Institute of Materials Physics and Chemistry, College of Sciences, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture Engineering of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Li, Xiao-Wu, E-mail: xwli@mail.neu.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Physics and Chemistry, College of Sciences, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture Engineering of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Li, Ji-Guang; Sun, Xu-Dong [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture Engineering of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Porous magnesium has been recently recognized as a biodegradable metal for bone substitute applications. A novel porous Mg scaffold with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected pores and with a porosity of 33–54% was produced by the fiber deposition hot pressing (FDHP) technology. The microstructure and morphologies of the porous Mg scaffold were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the effects of porosities on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the porous Mg were investigated. Experimental results indicate that the measured Young's modulus and compressive strength of the Mg scaffold are ranged in 0.10–0.37 GPa, and 11.1–30.3 MPa, respectively, which are fairly comparable to those of cancellous bone. Such a porous Mg scaffold having a 3D interconnected network structure has the potential to be used in bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel porous Mg was produced by a fiber deposition hot pressing technology. • The porous Mg has a 3D interconnected network structure with a porosity of 33-54%. • Mechanical properties of the porous Mg are comparable to those of cancellous bone.

  19. A study on improving mechanical properties of porous HA tissue engineering scaffolds by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jing [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Xiao Suguang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Lu Xiong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang Jianxin [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Weng Jie [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2006-12-15

    Various interconnected porous hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic scaffolds are universally used to induct the tissue growth for bone repair and replacement, and serve to support the adhesion, transfer, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Impregnation of polyurethane sponges with a ceramic slurry is adopted to produce highly porous HA ceramic scaffolds with a 3D interconnected structure. However, high porosity always accompanies a decrease in the strength of the HA ceramic scaffolds. Therefore, it is significant to improve the strength of the HA ceramic scaffolds with highly interconnected porosity so that they are more suitable in clinical applications. In this work, highly porous HA ceramic scaffolds are first produced by the polymer impregnation approach, and subsequently further sintered by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The phase composition, macro- and micro-porous structure, sintering and mechanical properties of the porous HA scaffolds are investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nanoindentation analysis and compressive test. The experimental results show that the nanohardness and compressive strength of HIP-sintered porous HA ceramics are higher than those of commonly sintered HA scaffolds. The HIP technique can effectively improve the sintering property and densification of porous HA ceramic scaffolds, so inducing an increase in the compression strength.

  20. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  1. Quantifying the motion of magnetic particles in excised tissue: Effect of particle properties and applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sandip, E-mail: sandip.d.kulkarni@gmail.com [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ramaswamy, Bharath; Horton, Emily; Gangapuram, Sruthi [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Nacev, Alek [Weinberg Medical Physics, LLC (United States); Depireux, Didier [The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shimoji, Mika [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shapiro, Benjamin [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a method to investigate how magnetic particle characteristics affect their motion inside tissues under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Particles are placed on top of freshly excised tissue samples, a calibrated magnetic field is applied by a magnet underneath each tissue sample, and we image and quantify particle penetration depth by quantitative metrics to assess how particle sizes, their surface coatings, and tissue resistance affect particle motion. Using this method, we tested available fluorescent particles from Chemicell of four sizes (100 nm, 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm diameter) with four different coatings (starch, chitosan, lipid, and PEG/P) and quantified their motion through freshly excised rat liver, kidney, and brain tissues. In broad terms, we found that the applied magnetic field moved chitosan particles most effectively through all three tissue types (as compared to starch, lipid, and PEG/P coated particles). However, the relationship between particle properties and their resulting motion was found to be complex. Hence, it will likely require substantial further study to elucidate the nuances of transport mechanisms and to select and engineer optimal particle properties to enable the most effective transport through various tissue types under applied magnetic fields.

  2. In vitro assessment of the agonist properties of the novel 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor ligand, CUMI-101 (MMP), in rat brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, Nicola; Christie, Isabel [Neurosciences Centre of Excellence for Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline, Harlow, CM19 5AW Essex (United Kingdom); Rabiner, Eugenii Alfredovich, E-mail: eugenii_a_rabiner@gsk.co [GSK Clinical Imaging Centre, London Hammersmith Hospital-IC, W12 0NN London (United Kingdom); Laruelle, Marc; Watson, Jeannette [Neurosciences Centre of Excellence for Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline, Harlow, CM19 5AW Essex (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: Development of agonist positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for the 5-HT neurotransmitter system is an important target to enable the understanding of human 5-HT function in vivo. [{sup 11}C]CUMI-101, proposed as the first 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor agonist PET ligand, has been reported to behave as a potent 5-HT{sub 1A} agonist in a cellular system stably expressing human recombinant 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors. In this study, we investigate the agonist properties of CUMI-101 in rat brain tissue. Methods: [{sup 35}S]-GTP{gamma}S binding studies were used to determine receptor function in HEK (human embryonic kidney) 293 cells transfected with human recombinant 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors and in rat cortex and rat hippocampal tissue, following administration of CUMI-101 and standard 5-HT1A antagonists (5-HT, 5-CT and 8-OH-DPAT). Results: CUMI-101 behaved as an agonist at human recombinant 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors (pEC{sub 50} 9.2). However, CUMI-101 did not show agonist activity in either rat cortex or hippocampus at concentrations up to 10 {mu}M. In these tissues, CUMI-behaved as an antagonist with pK{sub B}s of 9.2 and 9.3, respectively. Conclusions: Our studies demonstrate that as opposed to its behavior in human recombinant system, in rat brain tissue CUMI-101 behaves as a potent 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor antagonist.

  3. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  4. Functionally graded electrospun scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for vascular tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Vinoy [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Zhang Xing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Catledge, Shane A [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Vohra, Yogesh K [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Electrospun tubular scaffolds (4 mm inner diameter) based on bio-artificial blends of polyglyconate (Maxon (registered) ) and proteins such as gelatin and elastin having a spatially designed multilayer structure were prepared for use as vascular tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of scaffolds showed a random nanofibrous morphology with fiber diameter in the range of 200-400 nm for protein-blended Maxon, which mimics the nanoscale dimensions of collagen (50-500 nm). The scaffolds have a well interconnected pore structure and porosity up to 82%, with protein blending and multi-layering in contrast to electrospun Maxon (registered) scaffolds (67%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results confirmed the blended composition and crystallinity of fibers. Uniaxial tensile testing revealed a strength of 14.46 {+-} 0.42 MPa and a modulus of 15.44 {+-} 2.53 MPa with a failure strain of 322.5 {+-} 10% for a pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. The blending of polyglyconate with biopolymers decreased the tensile properties in general, with an exception of the tensile modulus (48.38 {+-} 2 MPa) of gelatin/Maxon mesh, which was higher than that of the pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. Trilayered tubular scaffolds of gelatin/elastin, gelatin/elastin/Maxon and gelatin/Maxon (GE-GEM-GM) that mimic the complex trilayer matrix structure of natural artery have been prepared by sequential electrospinning. Tensile testing under dry conditions revealed a tensile strength of 2.71 {+-} 0.2 MPa and a modulus of 20.4 {+-} 3 MPa with a failure strain of 140 {+-} 10%. However, GE-GEM-GM scaffolds tested under wet conditions after soaking in a phosphate buffered saline medium at 37 {sup 0}C for 24 h exhibited mechanical properties (2.5 MPa tensile strength and 9 MPa tensile modulus) comparable to those of native femoral artery.

  5. Functionally graded electrospun scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for vascular tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Vinoy; Zhang, Xing; Catledge, Shane A; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2007-12-01

    Electrospun tubular scaffolds (4 mm inner diameter) based on bio-artificial blends of polyglyconate (Maxon) and proteins such as gelatin and elastin having a spatially designed multilayer structure were prepared for use as vascular tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of scaffolds showed a random nanofibrous morphology with fiber diameter in the range of 200-400 nm for protein-blended Maxon, which mimics the nanoscale dimensions of collagen (50-500 nm). The scaffolds have a well interconnected pore structure and porosity up to 82%, with protein blending and multi-layering in contrast to electrospun Maxon scaffolds (67%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results confirmed the blended composition and crystallinity of fibers. Uniaxial tensile testing revealed a strength of 14.46 +/- 0.42 MPa and a modulus of 15.44 +/- 2.53 MPa with a failure strain of 322.5 +/- 10% for a pure Maxon scaffold. The blending of polyglyconate with biopolymers decreased the tensile properties in general, with an exception of the tensile modulus (48.38 +/- 2 MPa) of gelatin/Maxon mesh, which was higher than that of the pure Maxon scaffold. Trilayered tubular scaffolds of gelatin/elastin, gelatin/elastin/Maxon and gelatin/Maxon (GE-GEM-GM) that mimic the complex trilayer matrix structure of natural artery have been prepared by sequential electrospinning. Tensile testing under dry conditions revealed a tensile strength of 2.71 +/- 0.2 MPa and a modulus of 20.4 +/- 3 MPa with a failure strain of 140 +/- 10%. However, GE-GEM-GM scaffolds tested under wet conditions after soaking in a phosphate buffered saline medium at 37 degrees C for 24 h exhibited mechanical properties (2.5 MPa tensile strength and 9 MPa tensile modulus) comparable to those of native femoral artery.

  6. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad, E-mail: Tafazoli@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonakdar, Shahin [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds.

  7. Microscale Material Properties of Bone and the Mineralized Tissues of the Intervertebral Disc-Vertebral Body Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paietta, Rachel C.

    The objective of this dissertation is to understand the influences of material structure on the properties, function and failure of biological connective tissues. Biological interfaces are becoming an increasingly studied system within mechanics and tissue engineering as a model for attaching dissimilar materials. The elastic modulus of bone (≈ 20 GPa) and cartilage (≈ 0.1-1 MPa) differ over orders of magnitude, which should intuitively create high stress concentrations and failure at the interface. Yet, these natural interface systems rarely fail in vivo, and the mechanism by which loads are transferred between tissues has not yet been established. Tissue quality is one major contributor to the mechanical behavior of bone and cartilage, and is defined by properties such as collagen orientation, mineral volume fraction, porosity and tissue geometry. These properties have yet to be established at the bone-cartilage interface in the spine, and the lack of quantitative data on material microstructure and behavior limits treatments and tissue engineering construct design. In this dissertation, second harmonic generation imaging, quantitative backscattered scanning electron imaging and nanoindentation are combined to characterize micrometer scale tissue quality and modulus in both bone and calcified cartilage. These techniques are utilized to: 1) determine the hierarchical micrometer to millimeter scale properties of lamellar bone, 2) quantify changes throughout development and aging at the human intervertebral disc-vertebral body junction, and 3) explore compressive fractures at this interface. This work is the first to provide quantitative data on the mineral volume fraction, collagen orientation and modulus from the same, undecalcified sections of tissue to corroborate tissue structure and mineralization and describe quantitative parameters of the interface. The principal findings from this work indicate that the underlying matrix, or collagen, organization in

  8. Analysis of 3D Printed Diopside Scaffolds Properties for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting LIU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diopside exhibits favorable potential for bone repair on account of the good mechanical performance, bioactivity and biocompatibility. In this paper, diopside scaffolds with high pore interconnectivity were successfully fabricated by laser three-dimensional (3D printing. The microstructure and mechanical performance of the diopside scaffolds were studied. The experimental analysis indicated that diopside particles gradually fused together until a dense structure was built with an energy density increasing in the range between 2.4 and 4.8 J·mm-2. Meanwhile, compressive strength and fracture toughness increased gradually from 5.96 ± 0.88 MPa to 10.87 ± 0.55 MPa. However, mechanical properties decreased due to the appearance of voids when energy density were 5.4 and 6 J·mm-2. Simulated body fluid (SBF tests showed that apatite crystals formed on the diopside scaffolds surface, and the apatite crystals increased with soaking time. Cell culture tests indicated the scaffolds supported the adhesion and growth of MG-63 cells. The study suggested that diopside scaffolds fabricated by laser 3D printing are promising candidates for bone tissue engineering.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9845

  9. Antibacterial properties of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive: Does the polymerization reaction play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To ascertain if the polymerization reaction also contributes additionally to the antibacterial effects of two commonly used cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives. Materials and Methods: Fresh liquid ethyl-cyanoacrylate (EC and N-butyl-cyanoacrylate (BC adhesives were applied onto 6-mm sterile filter paper discs. In the first group, the adhesive-soaked discs were immediately placed onto confluent monolayer cultures of bacteria, allowing the polymerization reaction to proceed while in culture. In the second group, the adhesive-soaked disc was allowed to first polymerize prior to being placed onto the bacterial cultures. Four types of bacteria were studied: Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Escherichia coli , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Immediately after the discs were applied, the cultures were incubated at 35° C for 24 h. Bacterial inhibitory halos were measured in the cultures at the end of the incubation period. Results: For EC, exposure of the bacteria to the cyanoacrylate polymerization reaction increased the bacterial inhibitory halos in Streptococcus pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. For BC, it increased the bacterial inhibitory halos in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae . No inhibitory halos were observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bactericidal effect was higher in actively polymerizing EC, compared to previously polymerized EC in Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli ; however, no such differences were observed for BC. Conclusions: The polymerization reaction may also be an important factor in the antibacterial properties of EC and BC.

  10. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications.

  11. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber-hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber-hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering.

  12. Mathematical functions and their properties as relevant to the biomechanical modeling of cell and tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Amit

    2010-02-01

    The extrapolation of biological damage from a biomechanical model requires that a closed-form mathematical damage threshold function (DTF) be included in the model. A DTF typically includes a generic load variable, being the critical load (e.g., pressure, strain, temperature) causing irreversible tissue or cell damage, and a generic time variable, which represents the exposure to the load (e.g., duration, strain rate). Despite the central role that DTFs play in biomechanical studies, there is no coherent literature on how to formulate a DTF, excluding the field of heat-induced damage studies. This technical note describes six mathematical function types (Richards, Boltzmann, Morgan-Mercer-Flodin, Gompertz, Weibull, Bertalanffy) that are suitable for formulating a wide range of DTFs. These functions were adapted from the theory of restricted growth, and were fitted herein to describe biomechanical damage phenomena. Relevant properties of each adapted function type were extracted to allow efficient fitting of its parameters to empirical biomechanical data, and some practical examples are provided.

  13. Digital image correlation and finite element modelling as a method to determine mechanical properties of human soft tissue in vivo

    CERN Document Server

    Moerman, Kevin M; Evans, Sam L; Simms, Ciaran K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of human soft tissue are crucial for impact biomechanics, rehabilitation engineering and surgical simulation. Validation of these constitutive models using human data remains challenging and often requires the use of non-invasive imaging and inverse finite element (FE) analysis. Post processing data from imaging methods such as tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be challenging. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) however is a relatively straightforward imaging method and thus the goal of this study was to assess the use of DIC in combination with FE modelling to determine the bulk material properties of human soft tissue. Indentation experiments were performed on a silicone gel soft tissue phantom. A two camera DIC setup was then used to record the 3D surface deformation. The experiment was then simulated using a FE model.

  14. Action potential duration heterogeneity of cardiac tissue can be evaluated from cell properties using Gaussian Green's function approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Defauw

    Full Text Available Action potential duration (APD heterogeneity of cardiac tissue is one of the most important factors underlying initiation of deadly cardiac arrhythmias. In many cases such heterogeneity can be measured at tissue level only, while it originates from differences between the individual cardiac cells. The extent of heterogeneity at tissue and single cell level can differ substantially and in many cases it is important to know the relation between them. Here we study effects from cell coupling on APD heterogeneity in cardiac tissue in numerical simulations using the ionic TP06 model for human cardiac tissue. We show that the effect of cell coupling on APD heterogeneity can be described mathematically using a Gaussian Green's function approach. This relates the problem of electrotonic interactions to a wide range of classical problems in physics, chemistry and biology, for which robust methods exist. We show that, both for determining effects of tissue heterogeneity from cell heterogeneity (forward problem as well as for determining cell properties from tissue level measurements (inverse problem, this approach is promising. We illustrate the solution of the forward and inverse problem on several examples of 1D and 2D systems.

  15. Coagulant activity and cellular origin of circulating tissue factor exposing microparticles in cancer patients - two forms of TF-exposing microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Boing, A. N.; Di Nisio, M.; Twint, D.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Nanayakkara, P.; Buller, H. R.; Nieuwland, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because plasma of cancer patients presenting with venous thrombosis contains high numbers of tissue factor (TF)-exposing microparticles (TF-MP1), TF-MP have been causally linked to the occurrence of venous thrombosis in cancer patients. The relationship between numbers of TF-exposing MP

  16. Optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver tissue measured ex-vivo with diffuse reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez-Ullah; Atif, M.; Firdous, S.; Mehmood, M. S.; Hamza, M. Y.; Imran, M.; Hussain, G.; Ikram, M.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver at 720, 740, 770, 810, 825 and 840 nm wavelengths of laser irradiation. So, we were able to evaluate these optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients) with ex-vivo study using Kubelka Munk Model (KMM) from the radial dependence of the diffuse reflectance with femtosecond pulsed laser in near IR region. These coefficients were significantly increased with coagulation. The penetration depths of the diffused light have been reported to a maximum value of 8.12 ± 0.36 mm in normal liver and 2.49 ± 0.17 mm in coagulated liver at 840 nm showing increasing behavior towards IR region. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to check the theoretical validation of measured optical properties of the tissue that showed a good match with our experimental results. We believe that these differences in optical properties will be helpful for the understanding arid optimal use of laser applications in medicine and differential diagnosis of tissues by using different optical methods. Especially for the investigation of biological tissue for photodynamic therapy (PDT), the knowledge of the specific optical properties and their thermo-induced changes is important.

  17. Using Design of Experiments Methods for Assessing Peak Contact Pressure to Material Properties of Soft Tissue in Human Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Bahraminasab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact pressure in the knee joint is a key element in the mechanisms of knee pain and osteoarthritis. Assessing the contact pressure in tibiofemoral joint is a challenging mechanical problem due to uncertainty in material properties. In this study, a sensitivity analysis of tibiofemoral peak contact pressure to the material properties of the soft tissue was carried out through fractional factorial and Box-Behnken designs. The cartilage was modeled as linear elastic material, and in addition to its elastic modulus, interaction effects of soft tissue material properties were added compared to previous research. The results indicated that elastic modulus of the cartilage is the most effective factor. Interaction effects of axial/radial modulus with elastic modulus of cartilage, circumferential and axial/radial moduli of meniscus were other influential factors. Furthermore this study showed how design of experiment methods can help designers to reduce the number of finite element analyses and to better interpret the results.

  18. The Investigation of the Antioxidative Properties of the Synthetic Organoselenium Compounds in Liver Tissue of Rat with Histological and Biochemical Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Selamoglu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Oxidative stress is described as the formation of toxic effect due to the deficiency of cellular antioxidative level toward the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The excess production of ROS or the decrease in the antioxidative defense system could be the cause for oxidative stress. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA that is known to be the major cause the increment in lipid peroxidation level and the oxidative damage in the rat liver. As a fundamental trace elements, selenium as a part of anti-oxidative defense system is responsible for the immune system as part of enzymes in defense system.  Methods:Organoselenium compounds [1-isopropyl-3- methylbenzimidazole-2-selenone (Se I and 1, 3-di-pmethoxybenzylpyrimidine- 2-selenone (Se II] that were prepared in the laboratories. The effects of synthetic organoselenium compounds (Se I and Se II against DMBA-induced changes in levels of some [catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and glutathione reductase (GR activities and total glutathione (GSH, malonedialdehyde (MDA] parameters in rat liver were investigated. Histopathological changes in the liver tissues of rats were examined by light microscopy. Results:Because the selenium has an anti-oxidative properties toward the damaged induced cells, organoselenium compounds prepared in our laboratories, Se I and Se II, have tested for chemically induced rat liver tissues. The results showed that endogen antioxidant enzymatic activities changes and the preventing of oxidative damage in lipid peroxidation are important findings in vivo of this research. Conclusion:Various changes were observed in liver tissue of rats in the all experimental groups.

  19. A new approach to fabrication of Cs/BG/CNT nanocomposite scaffold towards bone tissue engineering and evaluation of its properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, S. [Department of Nanotechnology Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movahedi, B., E-mail: b.movahedi@ast.ui.ac.ir [Department of Nanotechnology Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafieinia, M. [Biosensor Research Center, Department of Advanced Medical Technology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, 64716 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salehi, H. [Department of Anatomical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, 64716 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanocomposite scaffold was produced using a novel technique. • Bioactive glass, carbon nanotube and chitosan were used for fabrication of nanocomposite scaffold. • The compressive strength of the scaffold was near to the cancellous bone. • Biodegradability of the scaffolds in PBS shows the slow destruction. - Abstract: In the present study, bioactive glass (BG), carbon nanotube (CNT), and chitosan (Cs) were used with different ratios for the fabrication of nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering. BG was synthesized by sol–gel process and CNT was functionalized by immersing in sulfuric acid as well as nitric acid. Nanocomposite scaffold was produced using a novel technique, hot press, and salt leaching process and cross-linked by Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The optimum porosity of the scaffold with respect to the ratio of salt and precursor was kept around 70%. Mechanical properties of the scaffolds were increased by the addition of CNT and hence, the compressive strength of them with 4 wt% CNT was increased up to 5.95 ± 0.5 MPa. The nanocomposite scaffolds were characterized by FT-IR, SEM, XRD, and electrochemical analysis. Furthermore, scaffolds were immersed in PBS for evaluating the biodegradability, water absorption, and CNT release. The results indicated that water absorption of the scaffolds was increased by adding CNT to the scaffold. The amount of released CNT after 30 days was measured within 6 × 10{sup −4} and 1 × 10{sup −3} mg/ml. Attachment and proliferation of MG63 osteoblast cell line on Cs/BG/CNT scaffolds were investigated by MTT assay indicating no toxicity for this nanocomposite scaffolds. According to the results of the experiments, the nanocomposite scaffold with modified composition (Cs/BG/CNT, 80:20:2 wt%) was the best one in matters of mechanical, chemical, and cellular properties and also the most appropriate for trabecular bone tissue.

  20. [Immune competence of human tissue lymphocytes in contact with loosened hip joint prostheses. On the topic of cellular or humoral rejection reaction as the mechanism of loosening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K M; Löer, F; Hofstädter, F; Casser, H R

    1991-05-01

    In several investigations rejections were accused of being a possible cause for the loosening of hip endoprostheses. Using immunocytochemical techniques we studied the number and type of lymphocytes in the tissue adjacent to loosened hip endoprostheses. Tissue samples were taken from 18 patients being reoperated for a loosened endoprostheses. Impressive lymphocyte infiltrates were found in 4 of 18 patients (22%). These infiltrates only consisted of T-cells. In the other samples only few lymphocytes were detected belonging to T- and B-lymphocyte population, respectively. In our patients T-cell mediated rejections were of minor importance for the loosening of total hip replacement. B-cell accumulations were detected in none of the samples.

  1. Tissue-Mimicking Materials Using Segmented Polyurethane Gel and Their Acoustic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tomoji; Tanaka, Kouhei; Kondo, Toshio; Yasukawa, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Shikinami, Yasuo

    2012-07-01

    Accurate testing of an instrument by phantoms requires a tissue-mimicking material that has the acoustic velocity and density defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard, and furthermore the tissue-mimicking material must be stable over time. To achieve the tissue-mimicking materials with the desired acoustic velocity and density defined in the IEC standard, new materials have been developed. The form of tissue-mimicking materials reported comprised polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles dispersed in segmented polyurethane gel. They were stable over a period of 40 days and the changes in weight and acoustic velocity did not exceed 0.5%.

  2. Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2014-02-28

    Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation.

  3. Immunostimulatory properties and enhanced TNF- α mediated cellular immunity for tumor therapy by C60(OH)20 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Jiao, Fang; Qiu, Yang; Li, Wei; Qu, Ying; Tian, Chixia; Li, Yufeng; Bai, Ru; Lao, Fang; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2009-10-01

    Publications concerning the mechanism of biological activity, especially the immunological mechanism of C60(OH)20 nanoparticles, are relatively limited. However, the structure and characteristics of this carbon allotrope have been widely investigated. In this paper, we have demonstrated that water-soluble C60(OH)20 nanoparticles have an efficient anti-tumor activity in vivo, and show specific immunomodulatory effects to the immune cells, such as T cells and macrophages, both in vivo and in vitro. For example, C60(OH)20 nanoparticles can increase the production of T-helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokines (IL-2, IFN- γ and TNF-α), and decrease the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6) in serum samples. On the other hand, C60(OH)20 nanoparticles show almost no adverse effect to the viability of immune cells in vitro but stimulate the immune cells to release more cytokines, in particular TNF- α, which plays a key role in the cellular immune process to help eliminate abnormal cells. TNF- α production increased almost three-fold in treated T lymphocytes and macrophages. Accordingly, we conclude that C60(OH)20 nanoparticles have an efficient anti-tumor activity and this effect is associated with an increased CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio and the enhancement of TNF- α production. The data suggest that C60(OH)20 nanoparticles can improve the immune response to help to scavenge and kill tumor cells.

  4. Impedometric properties of the vulvar and vaginal tissues of ewes during the oestrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, L; Aizinbud, E; Tadmor, A; Schindler, H

    1981-01-01

    Tissue electrical conductance (G) and capacitance (C) were measured in vulvar and vaginal tissues of ewes by a spectroimpedographic method at frequencies from 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The calculated specific conductance (mumho/cm) at 100 kHz was 3082 +/- 20 (s.e.m.) in oestrus and 2153 +/- 16 in dioestrus (n = 8) (P standing heat.

  5. Changes in Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanoparticles in Cellular Environments are Modulated by Nanoparticle PEGylation and Serum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen L.; Jackson, Meredith A.; Lin, Adam Y.; Figueroa, Elizabeth R.; Hu, Ying S.; Evans, Emily R.; Asthana, Vishwaratn; Young, Joseph K.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2016-06-01

    When plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are internalized by cells and agglomerate within intracellular vesicles, their optical spectra can shift and broaden as a result of plasmonic coupling of NPs in close proximity to one another. For such optical changes to be accounted for in the design of plasmonic NPs for light-based biomedical applications, quantitative design relationships between designable factors and spectral shifts need to be established. Here we begin building such a framework by investigating how functionalization of gold NPs (AuNPs) with biocompatible poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG), and the serum conditions in which the NPs are introduced to cells impact the optical changes exhibited by NPs in a cellular context. Utilizing darkfield hyperspectral imaging, we find that PEGylation decreases the spectral shifting and spectral broadening experienced by 100 nm AuNPs following uptake by Sk-Br-3 cells, but up to a 33 ± 12 nm shift in the spectral peak wavelength can still occur. The serum protein-containing biological medium also modulates the spectral changes experienced by cell-exposed NPs through the formation of a protein corona on the surface of NPs that mediates NP interactions with cells: PEGylated AuNPs exposed to cells in serum-free conditions experience greater spectral shifts than in serum-containing environments. Moreover, increased concentrations of serum (10, 25, or 50 %) result in the formation of smaller intracellular NP clusters and correspondingly reduced spectral shifts after 5 and 10 h NP-cell exposure. However, after 24 h, NP cluster size and spectral shifts are comparable and become independent of serum concentration. By elucidating the impact of PEGylation and serum concentration on the spectral changes experienced by plasmonic NPs in cells, this study provides a foundation for the optical engineering of plasmonic NPs for use in biomedical environments.

  6. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  7. Connective Tissue Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connective tissue is the material inside your body that supports many of its parts. It is the "cellular ... their work. Cartilage and fat are examples of connective tissue. There are over 200 disorders that impact connective ...

  8. Universal quantifier derived from AFM analysis links cellular mechanical properties and cell-surface integration forces with microbial deposition and transport behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueyun; Wang, Xin; Onnis-Hayden, Annalisa; Wan, Kai-tak; Gu, April Z

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we employed AFM analysis combined with mathematical modeling for quantifying cell-surface contact mechanics and magnitude and range of cell-surface interaction forces for seven bacterial strains with a wide range of cell morphology, dimension, and surface characteristics. Comprehensive cell-surface characterization including surface charge, extracellular polymeric substance content, hydrophobicity, and cell-cell aggregation analyses were performed. Flow-through column tests were employed to determine the attachment efficiency and deposition-transport behavior of these bacterial strains. No statistically significant correlation between attachment efficiency and any single-cell surface property was identified. Single-cell characterization by atomic force microscopy (AFM) yielded the mechanical deformation and elastic modulus, penetration resistance to AFM probe penetration by cellular surface substances (CSS), range and magnitude of the repulsive-attractive intersurface forces, and geometry of each strain. We proposed and derived a universal dimensionless modified Tabor's parameter to integrate all these properties that account for their collective behavior. Results showed that the Tabor parameter derived from AFM analysis correlated well with experimentally determined attachment efficiency (α), which therefore is able to link microscale cell-surface properties with macroscale bacterial transport behavior. Results suggested that the AFM tests performed between a single cell and a surface captured the key quantities of the interactions between the cell and the surface that dictate overall cell attachment behavior. Tabor's parameter therefore can be potentially incorporated into the microbial transport model.

  9. Mechanical and biological properties of the micro-/nano-grain functionally graded hydroxyapatite bioceramics for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changchun; Deng, Congying; Chen, Xuening; Zhao, Xiufen; Chen, Ying; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) open the promising approach for bone tissue repair. In this study, a novel functionally graded hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic with micrograin and nanograin structure was fabricated. Its mechanical properties were tailored by composition of micrograin and nanograin. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the graded HA ceramics had similar mechanical property compared to natural bones. Their cytocompatibility was evaluated via fluorescent microscopy and MTT colorimetric assay. The viability and proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on ceramics indicated that this functionally graded HA ceramic had better cytocompatibility than conventional HA ceramic. This study demonstrated that functionally graded HA ceramics create suitable structures to satisfy both the mechanical and biological requirements of bone tissues.

  10. An experimental study on the mechanical properties of rat brain tissue using different stress-strain definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-07-01

    There are different stress-strain definitions to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue. However, there is no agreement as to which stress-strain definition should be employed to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. It is worth knowing that an optimize stress-strain definition of the brain tissue at different loading directions may have implications for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. This study is aimed to conduct a comparative study on different results are given by the various definitions of stress-strain and to recommend a specific definition when testing brain tissues. Prepared cylindrical samples are excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by applying load on both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Three stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress) and four strain definitions (Almansi-Hamel strain, Green-St. Venant strain, engineering strain, and true strain) are used to determine the elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain. The highest non-linear stress-strain relation is observed for the Almansi-Hamel strain definition and it may overestimate the elastic modulus at different stress definitions at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. The Green-St. Venant strain definition fails to address the non-linear stress-strain relation using different definitions of stress and triggers an underestimation of the elastic modulus. The results suggest the application of the true stress-true strain definition for characterization of the brain tissues mechanics since it gives more accurate measurements of the tissue's response using the instantaneous values.

  11. Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1: biochemical properties of a novel cellular target for anti-diabetic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagi Tamir

    Full Text Available Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1 (synonyms: Cisd2, Eris, Miner1, and Noxp70 is a [2Fe-2S] cluster protein immune-detected both in endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondrial outer membrane. It was implicated in human pathology (Wolfram Syndrome 2 and in BCL-2 mediated antagonization of Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depression of ER calcium stores. To gain insights about NAF-1 functions, we investigated the biochemical properties of its 2Fe-2S cluster and sensitivity of those properties to small molecules. The structure of the soluble domain of NAF-1 shows that it forms a homodimer with each protomer containing a [2Fe-2S] cluster bound by 3 Cys and one His. NAF-1 has shown the unusual abilities to transfer its 2Fe-2S cluster to an apo-acceptor protein (followed in vitro by spectrophotometry and by native PAGE electrophoresis and to transfer iron to intact mitochondria in cell models (monitored by fluorescence imaging with iron fluorescent sensors targeted to mitochondria. Importantly, the drug pioglitazone abrogates NAF-1's ability to transfer the cluster to acceptor proteins and iron to mitochondria. Similar effects were found for the anti-diabetes and longevity-promoting antioxidant resveratrol. These results reveal NAF-1 as a previously unidentified cell target of anti-diabetes thiazolidinedione drugs like pioglitazone and of the natural product resveratrol, both of which interact with the protein and stabilize its labile [2Fe-2S] cluster.

  12. Cellular injuries of spray-dried Lactobacillus spp. isolated from kefir and their impact on probiotic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golowczyc, Marina A; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula; De Antoni, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G

    2011-01-05

    The injuries caused by spray drying (SD) of three potential probiotic lactobacilli isolated from kefir grains and the impact on some probiotic properties, were evaluated. Results demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum 83114 and L. kefir 8321 showed a slight reduction of viability (0.11 and 0.29 log CFU/ml respectively) after SD process, and L. kefir 8348 was found to be more sensitive to the process with a reduction in viability of 0.70 log CFU/ml. Neither membrane damage, evaluated by increased sensitivity to NaCl, lysozyme, bile salt and penicillin G, nor changes in acidifying activity in MRS and milk by lactobacilli were detected after SD. L. plantarum 83114 and L. kefir 8321 after SD did not lose their capacity to adhere to intestinal cells. Nevertheless, L. kefir 8348 showed a significant loss of adhesion capacity after SD. In addition, rehydrated spray-dried L. kefir 8321 retained the ability to protect against Salmonella invasion of intestinal cells. This effect was observed when L. kefir is co-incubated with Salmonella before invasion assay. This work shows that the membrane integrity evaluated by indirect methods and some probiotic properties of lactobacilli isolated from kefir did not change significantly after SD, and these powders could be used in functional foods applications.

  13. Evaluation of clinical, antiinflammatory and antiinfective properties of amniotic membrane used for guided tissue regeneration: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Aravind Kumar; Rampalli Viswa Chandra; Aileni Amarender Reddy; Bavigadda Harish Reddy; Chakravarthy Reddy; Anumala Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the antiinflammatory, antiinfective and clinical properties of amniotic membrane (AM) when used for guided tissue regeneration (GTR) in contained interdental defects. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 subjects participated in this study. Two sites in each subject were randomly assigned into each of the following experimental groups; test group: AM with bone graft and control group: Bone graft only. Clinical parameters included rec...

  14. Cellular photobiology.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The various cell lines of the epidermis and dermis can be activated or conversely altered by actinic irradiations. Keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and connective tissue cells are the main targets. Peer reviewed

  15. Determining optical properties of epithelial tissues with an obliquely incident beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Shelley B.; Kim, Arnold D.

    2015-07-01

    We present a technique for determining the scattering coefficient of epithelial tissue from diffuse reflectance measurements due to an obliquely incident Gaussian beam. This method applies the convolution form of the diffuse reflectance as determined by the corrected diffusion approximation.

  16. Cell-laden photocrosslinked GelMA-DexMA copolymer hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Zhou, Lei; Liao, Jingwen; Tan, Ying; Ouyang, Kongyou; Ning, Chenyun; Ni, Guoxin; Tan, Guoxin

    2014-09-01

    To effectively repair or replace damaged tissues, it is necessary to design three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking scaffolds with tunable biomechanical properties close to the desired tissue application. In the present work, gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and dextran glycidyl methacrylate (DexMA) with tunable mechanical and biological properties were utilized to prepared novel bicomponent polymeric hydrogels by cross-linking polymerization using photoinitiation. We controlled the degree of substitution (DS) of glycidyl methacrylate in DexMA so that they could obtain relevant mechanical properties. The results indicated that copolymer hydrogels demonstrated a lower swelling ratio and higher compressive modulus as compared to the GelMA. Moreover, all of the hydrogels exhibited a honeycomb-like architecture, the pore sizes decreased as DS increased, and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in these hydrogels all exhibited excellent viability. These characteristics suggest a class of photocrosslinkable, tunable mechanically copolymer hydrogels that may find potential application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  17. Biocompatibility of a novel cyanoacrylate based tissue adhesive: cytotoxicity and biochemical property evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ju Lee

    Full Text Available Cyanoacrylate (CA is most widely used as a medical and commercial tissue adhesive because of easier wound closure, good cosmetic results and little discomfort. But, CA-based tissue adhesives have some limitations including the release of cytotoxic chemicals during biodegradation. In previous study, we made prepolymerized allyl 2-CA (PACA based tissue adhesive, resulting in longer chain structure. In this study, we investigated a biocompatibility of PACA as alternative tissue adhesive for medical application, comparing with that of Dermabond® as commercial tissue adhesive. The biocompatibility of PACA was evaluated for short-term (24 hr and long-term (3 and 7 days using conventional cytotoxicity (WST, neutral red, LIVE/DEAD and TUNEL assays, hematoxylin-eosin (H&E and Masson trichrome (MT staining. Besides we examined the biochemical changes in cells and DNA induced by PACA and Dermabond® utilizing Raman spectroscopy which could observe the denaturation and conformational changes in protein, as well as disintegration of the DNA/RNA by cell death. In particular, we analyzed Raman spectrum using the multivariate statistical methods including principal component analysis (PCA and support vector machine (SVM. As a result, PACA and Dermabond® tissue adhesive treated cells and tissues showed no difference of the cell viability values, histological analysis and Raman spectral intensity. Also, the classification analysis by means of PCA-SVM classifier could not discriminate the difference between the PACA and Dermabond® treated cells and DNA. Therefore we suggest that novel PACA might be useful as potential tissue adhesive with effective biocompatibility.

  18. Cellular adhesion responses to the heparin-binding (HepII) domain of fibronectin require heparan sulfate with specific properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahalingam, Yashithra; Gallagher, John T; Couchman, John R

    2006-01-01

    Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region of fibron......Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are required in development and postnatal repair. Important classes of ligands for HS include growth factors and extracellular matrix macromolecules. For example, the focal adhesion component syndecan-4 interacts with the III(12-14) region...... trap mutation in one of the two major glucosaminoglycan polymerases (EXT1). Several separate, specific properties of cell surface HS are therefore required in cell adhesion responses to the fibronectin HepII domain....

  19. The Neurovascular Properties of Dental Stem Cells and Their Importance in Dental Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Jessica; Bronckaers, Annelies; Dillen, Yörg; Gervois, Pascal; Vangansewinkel, Tim; Driesen, Ronald B.; Wolfs, Esther; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells. Given their straightforward and relatively easy isolation from extracted third molars, dental stem cells (DSCs) have become an attractive source of mesenchymal-like stem cells. Over the past decade, there have been numerous studies supporting the angiogenic, neuroprotective, and neurotrophic effects of the DSC secretome. Together with their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells and neural cell types, this makes DSCs suitable candidates for dental tissue engineering and nerve injury repair. PMID:27688777

  20. Accurate optical flow field estimation using mechanical properties of soft tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Karimi, Hirad; Samani, Abbas

    2009-02-01

    A novel optical flow based technique is presented in this paper to measure the nodal displacements of soft tissue undergoing large deformations. In hyperelasticity imaging, soft tissues maybe compressed extensively [1] and the deformation may exceed the number of pixels ordinary optical flow approaches can detect. Furthermore in most biomedical applications there is a large amount of image information that represent the geometry of the tissue and the number of tissue types present in the organ of interest. Such information is often ignored in applications such as image registration. In this work we incorporate the information pertaining to soft tissue mechanical behavior (Neo-Hookean hyperelastic model is used here) in addition to the tissue geometry before compression into a hierarchical Horn-Schunck optical flow method to overcome this large deformation detection weakness. Applying the proposed method to a phantom using several compression levels proved that it yields reasonably accurate displacement fields. Estimated displacement results of this phantom study obtained for displacement fields of 85 pixels/frame and 127 pixels/frame are reported and discussed in this paper.

  1. Tissue-resident Sca1+ PDGFRα+ mesenchymal progenitors are the cellular source of fibrofatty infiltration in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/17s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Paylor

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC is a disease of the heart involving myocardial dystrophy leading to fibrofatty scarring of the myocardium and is associated with an increased risk of both ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. It often affects the right ventricle but may also involve the left. Although there has been significant progress in understanding the role of underlying desmosomal genetic defects in AC, there is still a lack of data regarding the cellular processes involved in its progression. The development of cardiac fibrofatty scarring is known to be a principal pathological process associated with ventricular arrhythmias, and it is vital that we elucidate the role of various cell populations involved in the disease if targeted therapeutics are to be developed. The known role of mesenchymal progenitor cells in the reparative process of both the heart and skeletal muscle has provided inspiration for the identification of the cellular basis of fibrofatty infiltration in AC. Here we hypothesize that reparative processes triggered by myocardial degeneration lead to the differentiation of tissue-resident Sca1+ PDGFRα+ mesenchymal progenitors into adipocytes and fibroblasts, which compose the fibrofatty lesions characteristic of AC.

  2. Best Signal Quality in Cellular Networks: Asymptotic Properties and Applications to Mobility Management in Small Cell Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baccelli François

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The quickly increasing data traffic and the user demand for a full coverage of mobile services anywhere and anytime are leading mobile networking into a future of small cell networks. However, due to the high-density and randomness of small cell networks, there are several technical challenges. In this paper, we investigate two critical issues: best signal quality and mobility management. Under the assumptions that base stations are uniformly distributed in a ring-shaped region and that shadowings are lognormal, independent, and identically distributed, we prove that when the number of sites in the ring tends to infinity, then (i the maximum signal strength received at the center of the ring tends in distribution to a Gumbel distribution when properly renormalized, and (ii it is asymptotically independent of the interference. Using these properties, we derive the distribution of the best signal quality. Furthermore, an optimized random cell scanning scheme is proposed, based on the evaluation of the optimal number of sites to be scanned for maximizing the user data throughput.

  3. A novel progress of leg tissue properties modeling based on biomechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mo-nan

    2009-01-01

    To describe strategies for addressing technical aspects of computational modeling of leg tissue with the finite element (FE) method, a patient's leg sample was selected and scanned by CT at the direction parallel to the Frankfort Horizontal plane. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the human leg was developed using the actual geometry of the leg skeleton and soft tissues, which were obtained from 3 D reconstruction of CT images. All joints were defined as contact surfaces, which allow relative articulating movement. The major ligaments were simulated using tension-only truss elements by connecting the corresponding attachment points on the bone surfaces. The bony and ligamentons structures were embedded in a volume of soft tissues.The muscles were defined as non-linear viscoelastic material, and the skin, ligaments and tendons were defined as hyperelastic, while the bony structures were assumed to be Linearly elastic. The muhilayer FEM model conraining thighbone, tibia, fibula, kneecap, soft tissue was formed after meshing. Diverse forces were imposed on the FEM model. The results show that the muhilayer FEM model can represent tissue deformation more accurately.

  4. Fabrication of drug-loaded anti-infective guided tissue regeneration membrane with adjustable biodegradation property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jiajia; Shi, Rui; Niu, Yuzhao; Gong, Min; Coates, Phil; Crawford, Aileen; Chen, Dafu; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Liqun

    2015-11-01

    For guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membrane, synchronization of the membrane biodegradation rate and tissue regeneration rate is important. Besides, the major reason for GTR membrane failure in clinical application is infection which can be prevented by loading anti-bacterial drug. To realize the consistency in membrane degradation rate and tissue regeneration rate of the anti-infective membrane, we developed metronidazole-loaded electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-gelatin nanofiber membranes with different poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/gelatin ratios (95:5, 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40, and 50:50). Homogeneous nanofibers were successfully fabricated. The mechanical strength of the membranes increased with the poly(ɛ-caprolactone) content, while the hydrophilicity decreased. The controlled and sustained release of metronidazole from all the membranes prevented the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. At all poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/gelatin ratios, all the membranes presented good biocompatibility while the increase of gelatin content resulted in enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation. Subcutaneous implantation in rabbits for 8 months demonstrated that all the membranes showed good biocompatibility without infection. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed that the biodegradation rate of the membranes was accelerated with the increase of gelatin content. The biodegradation rate and biocompatibility of the membranes can be adjusted by changing the PCL/gelatin ratio. The optimal membrane can be chosen based on the patient and tissue type to realize the synchronization of membrane degradation with tissue regeneration for the best treatment effect.

  5. Engineering the cellular protein secretory pathway for enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of CERT and XBP1s genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Azam; Vaziri, Behrouz; Moazzami, Reza; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Kokabee, Leila; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2013-08-01

    Cell line development is the most critical and also the most time-consuming step in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this regard, a variety of vector and cell engineering strategies have been developed for generating high-producing mammalian cells; however, the cell line engineering approach seems to show various results on different recombinant protein producer cells. In order to improve the secretory capacity of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, we developed cell line engineering approaches based on the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) genes. For this purpose, CERT S132A, a mutant form of CERT that is resistant to phosphorylation, and XBP1s were overexpressed in a recombinant t-PA-producing CHO cell line. Overexpression of CERT S132A increased the specific productivity of t-PA-producing CHO cells up to 35%. In contrast, the heterologous expression of XBP1s did not affect the t-PA expression rate. Our results suggest that CERTS132A- based secretion engineering could be an effective strategy for enhancing recombinant t- PA production in CHO cells.

  6. DNA Binding and Photocleavage Properties, Cellular Uptake and Localization, and in-Vitro Cytotoxicity of Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Varying Lengths in Bridging Alkyl Linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Wu, Bao-Yan; Liu, Jin; Dai, Yong-Cheng; Wang, You-Jun; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    Two new dinuclear Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes containing three and ten methylene chains in their bridging linkers are synthesized and characterized. Their calf thymus DNA-binding and plasmid DNA photocleavage behaviors are comparatively studied with a previously reported, six-methylene-containing analog by absorption and luminescence spectroscopy, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA viscosity measurements, DNA thermal denaturation, and agarose gel electrophoresis analyses. Theoretical calculations applying the density functional theory (DFT) method for the three complexes are also performed to understand experimentally observed DNA binding properties. The results show that the two complexes partially intercalate between the base pairs of DNA. Cellular uptake and colocalization studies have demonstrated that the complexes could enter HeLa cells efficiently and localize within lysosomes. The in-vitro antitumor activity against HeLa and MCF-7 tumor cells of the complexes are studied by MTT cytotoxic analysis. A new method, high-content analysis (HCA), is also used to assess cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of the three complexes. The results show that the lengths of the alkyl linkers could effectively tune their biological properties and that HCA is suitable for rapidly identifying cytotoxicity and can be substituted for MTT assays to evaluate the cell cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents.

  7. Medawar's legacy to cellular immunology and clinical transplantation: a commentary on Billingham, Brent and Medawar (1956) 'Quantitative studies on tissue transplantation immunity. III. Actively acquired tolerance'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2015-04-19

    'Quantitative studies on tissue transplantation immunity. III. Actively acquired tolerance', published in Philosophical Transactions B in 1956 by Peter Medawar and his colleagues, PhD graduate Leslie Brent and postdoctoral fellow Rupert Billingham, is a full description of the concept of acquired transplantation tolerance. Their 1953 Nature paper (Billingham RE et al. 1953 Nature 172, 603-606. (doi:10.1038/172603a0)) had provided initial evidence with experimental results from a small number of neonatal mice, with mention of similar findings in chicks. The Philosophical Transactions B 1956 paper is clothed with an astonishing amount of further experimental detail. It is written in Peter Medawar's landmark style: witty, perceptive and full of images that can be recalled even when details of the supporting information have faded. Those images are provided not just by a series of 20 colour plates showing skin graft recipient mice, rats, rabbits, chickens and duck, bearing fur or plumage of donor origin, but by his choice of metaphor, simile and analogy to express the questions being addressed and the interpretation of their results, along with those of relevant published data and his prescient ideas of what the results might portend. This work influenced both immunology researchers and clinicians and helped to lay the foundations for successful transplantation programmes. It led to the award of a Nobel prize in 1960 to Medawar, and subsequently to several scientists who advanced these areas. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  8. Bioceramics for osteogenesis, molecular and cellular advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkiran, Hande

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable need for bone tissue replacement in clinical situations, its limited availability and some major drawbacks of autologous (from the patient) and allogeneic (from a donor) bone grafts are driving researchers to search for alternative approaches for bone repair. In order to develop an appropriate bone substitute, one should understand bone structure and properties and its growth, which will guide researchers to select the optimal conditions for tissue culture and implantation. It's well accepted that bioceramics are excellent candidates as bone replacement with osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction capacity. Therefore, the molecular and cellular interactions that take place at the surface of bioceramics and their relevance in osteogenesis excites many researchers to delve deeper into this line of research.

  9. Human rights and human tissue : The case of sperm as property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodwin, Morag; Brownsword, Roger; Yeung, Karen; Scotford, Eloise

    2016-01-01

    In a 2012 case from Canada, the Supreme Court of British Columbia held that sperm acquired and stored for the purposes of IVF could be considered shared marital property in the event of a separation. This case followed on from similar cases that accepted sperm as capable of being property. This chap

  10. Computational modeling of epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Rod

    2009-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on the computational modeling of epithelial tissues at all levels from subcellular to whole tissue. This review concentrates on behavior at the individual cell to whole tissue level, and particularly on organizational aspects, and provides an indication of where information from other areas, such as the modeling of angiogenesis, is relevant. The skin, and the lining of all of the body cavities (lung, gut, cervix, bladder etc) are epithelial tissues, which in a topological sense are the boundary between inside and outside the body. They are thin sheets of cells (usually of the order of 0.5 mm thick) without extracellular matrix, have a relatively simple structure, and contain few types of cells. They have important barrier, secretory and transport functions, which are essential for the maintenance of life, so homeostasis and wound healing are important aspects of the behavior of epithelial tissues. Carcinomas originate in epithelial tissues.There are essentially two approaches to modeling tissues--to start at the level of the tissue (i.e., a length scale of the order of 1 mm) and develop generalized equations for behavior (a continuum approach); or to start at the level of the cell (i.e., a length scale of the order of 10 µm) and develop tissue behavior as an emergent property of cellular behavior (an individual-based approach). As will be seen, these are not mutually exclusive approaches, and they come in a variety of flavors.

  11. Degradation properties and metabolic activity of alginate and chitosan polyelectrolytes for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Guarino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides are long monosaccharide units which are emerging as promising materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications due to their biocompatibility, mostly good availability and tailorable properties, by to the wide possibility to modify chemical composition, structure—i.e., linear chain or branching—and polymer source (animals, plants, microorganisms. For their peculiar behaviour as polyelectrolites, polysaccharides have been applied in various forms, such as injectable hydrogels or porous and fibrous scaffolds—alone or in combination with other natural or synthetic polymers—to design bioinspired platforms for the regeneration of different tissues (i.e., blood vessels, myocardium, heart valves, bone, articular and tracheal cartilage, intervertebral discs, menisci, skin, liver, skeletal muscle, neural tissue, urinary bladder as well as for encapsulation and controlled delivery of drugs for pharmaceutical devices. In this paper, we focus on the pH sensitive response and degradation behaviour of negative (i.e., alginate and positive (i.e., chitosan charged polysaccharides in order to discuss the differences in terms of metabolic activity of polyelectrolytes with different ionic strength for their use in drug delivery and tissue engineering area.

  12. Visible to near-infrared refractive properties of freshly-excised human-liver tissues: marking hepatic malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannios, Panagiotis; Toutouzas, Konstantinos G.; Matiatou, Maria; Stasinos, Konstantinos; Konstadoulakis, Manousos M.; Zografos, George C.; Moutzouris, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    The refractive index is an optical constant that plays a significant role in the description of light-matter interactions. When it comes to biological media, refraction is understudied despite recent advances in the field of bio-optics. In the present article, we report on the measurement of the refractive properties of freshly excised healthy and cancerous human liver samples, by use of a prism-coupling technique covering the visible and near-infrared spectral range. Novel data on the wavelength-dependent complex refractive index of human liver tissues are presented. The magnitude of the real and imaginary part of the refractive index is correlated with hepatic pathology. Notably, the real index contrast is pointed out as a marker of discrimination between normal liver tissue and hepatic metastases. In view of the current progress in optical biosensor technologies, our findings may be exploited for the development of novel surgical and endoscopic tools. PMID:27297034

  13. Current considerations concerning endodontically treated teeth: alteration of hard dental tissues and biomechanical properties following endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriu, Bogdan; Vârlan, Constantin; Suciu, Ioana; Vârlan, Virginia; Bodnar, Dana

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this general article is to present an overview of the current knowledge about composition and structural changes and also about specific biomechanical alterations related to vitality loss or endodontic therapy. For a long time, these issues have been controversially approached from a clinical standpoint and are therefore still confusing for many practitioners. Vitality loss or endodontic procedures seem to induce only negligible changes in hard dental tissue moisture. Physico-chemical properties of dentin can be modified by some of the endodontic chemical products used for chemo-mechanical debridement. On the other hand, tooth biomechanical behavior is affected, since tooth strength is reduced proportionally to coronal tissue loss, due to either pre-existent carious/non-carious lesions or cavity acces preparation, besides restorative procedures. The related literature shows the lack of accepted clinical standards and consensus regarding the optimal way of approaching the specific tooth biomechanics following endodontic therapy.

  14. Determination of optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro using integrating sphere techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Jiang Wei; Da Xing; Jian-Jun Lu; Huai-Min Gu; Guo-Yong Wu; Ying Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of the present study is to compare the optical properties of normal human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion, and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion in vitro at 476.5, 488, 496.5, 514.5 and 532 nm. We believe these differences in optical properties should help differential diagnosis of human colon tissues by using optical methods.METHODS: In vitro optical properties were investigated for four kinds of tissues: normal human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion, and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion. Tissue samples were taken from 13 human colons (13 adenomatous, 13 normal). From the normal human colons a total of 26 tissue samples, with a mean thickness of 0.40 mm, were used (13 from mucosa/submucosa and 13 from muscle layer/chorion), and from the adenomatous human bladders a total of 26 tissue samples, with a mean thickness of 0.40 mm, were used (13 from mucosa/submucosa and 13 from muscle layer/chorion). The measurements were performed using a double-integratingsphere setup and the optical properties were assessed from these measurements using the adding-doubling method that was considered reliable.RESULTS: The results of measurement showed that there were significant differences in the absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients between normal and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa at the same wavelength,and there were also significant differences in the two optical parameters between both colon muscle layer/chorion at the same wavelength. And there were large differences in the anisotropy factors between both colon mucosa/submucosa at the same wavelength, there were also large differences in the anisotropy factors between both colon muscle layer/chorion at the same wavelength.There were large differences in the value ranges of the absorption coefficients, scattering coefficients and anisotropy factors between both colon mucosa/submucosa,and there

  15. Physical Properties and Biocompatibility of a Core-Sheath Structure Composite Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuangjian Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds play a critical role in the practical realization of bone tissue engineering. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a core-sheath structure composite scaffold possesses admirable physical properties and biocompatibility in vitro. A novel scaffold composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid/β-tricalcium phosphate (PLGA/β-TCP skeleton wrapped with Type I collagen via low-temperature deposition manufacturing (LDM was prepared, and bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs were used to evaluate cell behavior on the scaffold. PLGA/β-TCP skeleton was chosen as the control group. Physical properties were evaluated by pority ratio, compressive strength, and Young’s modulus. Scanning electron microscope (SEM was used to study morphology of cells. Hydrophilicity was evaluated by water absorption ratio. Cell proliferation was tested by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay (MTT. Osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs was evaluated by alkaline phosphates activity (ALP. The results indicated that physical properties of the novel scaffold were as good as those of the control group, hydrophilicity was observably better (P<0.01 than that of control group, and abilities of proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on novel scaffold were significantly greater (P<0.05 than those of control group, which suggests that the novel scaffold possesses preferable characteristics and have high value in bone tissue engineering.

  16. Carbon nanotubes reinforced chitosan films: mechanical properties and cell response of a novel biomaterial for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, A; Zisimopoulou, A E; Koch, S; Rongen, L; Deligianni, D; Diamantouros, S; Athanassiou, G; Kokozidou, M; Mavrilas, D; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been proposed as fillers to reinforce polymeric biomaterials for the strengthening of their structural integrity to achieve better biomechanical properties. In this study, a new polymeric composite material was introduced by incorporating various low concentrations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into chitosan (CS), aiming at achieving a novel composite biomaterial with superior mechanical and biological properties compared to neat CS, in order to be used in cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Both mechanical and biological characteristics in contact with the two relevant cell types (endothelial cells and vascular myofibroblasts) were studied. Regarding the mechanical behavior of MWCNT reinforced CS (MWCNT/CS), 5 and 10 % concentrations of MWCNTs enhanced the mechanical behavior of CS, with that of 5 % exhibiting a superior mechanical strength compared to 10 % concentration and neat CS. Regarding biological properties, MWCNT/CS best supported proliferation of endothelial and myofibroblast cells, MWCNTs and MWCNT/CS caused no apoptosis and were not toxic of the examined cell types. Conclusively, the new material could be suitable for tissue engineering (TE) and particularly for cardiovascular TE applications.

  17. A photochemical crosslinking technology for tissue engineering: enhancement of the physico-chemical properties of collagen-based scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Barbara P.

    2005-04-01

    Collagen gel is a natural biomaterial commonly used in tissue engineering because of its close resemblance to nature, negligible immunogenecity and excellent biocompatibility. However, unprocessed collagen gel is mechanically weak, highly water binding and vulnerable to chemical and enzymatic attacks that limits its use in tissue engineering in particular tissues for weight-bearing purposes. The current project aimed to strengthen and stabilize collagen scaffolds using a photochemical crosslinking technique. Photochemical crosslinking is rapid, efficient, non-thermal and does not involve toxic chemicals, comparing with other crosslinking methods such as glutaraldehyde and gamma irradiation. Collagen scaffolds were fabricated using rat-tail tendon collagen. An argon laser was used to process the collagen gel after equilibrating with a photosensitizing reagent. Scanning electronic microscope was used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphology of the membranes. Physico-chemical properties of the collagen scaffolds such as water-binding capacity, mechanical properties and thermostability were studied. Photochemical crosslinking significantly reduced the water-binding capacity, a parameter inversely proportional to the extent of crosslinking, of collagen scaffolds. Photochemical crosslinking also significantly increased the ultimate stress and tangent modulus at 90% of the rupture strain of the collagen scaffolds. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed a significantly higher shrinkage temperature and absence of the denaturation peak during the thermoscan comparing with the controls. This means greater thermostability in the photochemically crosslinked collagen scaffolds. This study demonstrates that the photochemical crosslinking technology is able to enhance the physicochemical propterties of collagen scaffolds by strengthening, stabilizing and controlling the swelling ratio of the collagen scaffolds so as to enable their use for tissue

  18. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  19. Inexpensive diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system for measuring changes in tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennie, Diana L.; Hayward, Joseph E.; McKee, Daniel E.; Farrell, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    The measurement of changes in blood volume in tissue is important for monitoring the effects of a wide range of therapeutic interventions, from radiation therapy to skin-flap transplants. Many systems available for purchase are either expensive or difficult to use, limiting their utility in the clinical setting. A low-cost system, capable of measuring changes in tissue blood volume via diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is presented. The system consists of an integrating sphere coupled via optical fibers to a broadband light source and a spectrometer. Validation data are presented to illustrate the accuracy and reproducibility of the system. The validity and utility of this in vivo system were demonstrated in a skin blanching/reddening experiment using epinephrine and lidocaine, and in a study measuring the severity of radiation-induced erythema during radiation therapy.

  20. Bioactivity, biocompatibility and antimicrobial properties of a chitosan-mineral composite for periodontal tissue regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Paul Hurt; Arun Kumar Kotha; Vivek Trivedi; Nichola Jayne Coleman

    2015-01-01

    AbstractA composite membrane of the polymer, chitosan, and the silver-exchanged mineral phase, tobermorite, was prepared by solvent casting and characterised by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro bioactivity, cytocompatibility and antimicrobial activity of the composite were evaluated with respect to its potential application as a guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membrane. The in vitro bioactivity was verified by the formation of hydroxyapat...

  1. Fabrication method, structure, mechanical, and biological properties of decellularized extracellular matrix for replacement of wide bone tissue defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, N Y; Kiselevsky, M V; Sukhorukova, I V; Shvindina, N V; Shtansky, D V

    2015-09-01

    The present paper was focused on the development of a new method of decellularized extracellular matrix (DECM) fabrication via a chemical treatment of a native bone tissue. Particular attention was paid to the influence of chemical treatment on the mechanical properties of native bones, sterility, and biological performance in vivo using the syngeneic heterotopic and orthotopic implantation models. The obtained data indicated that after a chemical decellularization treatment in 4% aqueous sodium chlorite, no noticeable signs of the erosion of compact cortical bone surface or destruction of trabeculae of spongy bone in spinal channel were observed. The histological studies showed that the chemical treatment resulted in the decellularization of both bone and cartilage tissues. The DECM samples demonstrated no signs of chemical and biological degradation in vivo. Thorough structural characterization revealed that after decellularization, the mineral frame retained its integrity with the organic phase; however clotting and destruction of organic molecules and fibers were observed. FTIR studies revealed several structural changes associated with the destruction of organic molecules, although all organic components typical of intact bone were preserved. The decellularization-induced structural changes in the collagen constituent resulted changed the deformation under compression mechanism: from the major fracture by crack propagation throughout the sample to the predominantly brittle fracture. Although the mechanical properties of radius bones subjected to decellularization were observed to degrade, the mechanical properties of ulna bones in compression and humerus bones in bending remained unchanged. The compressive strength of both the intact and decellularized ulna bones was 125-130 MPa and the flexural strength of humerus bones was 156 and 145 MPa for the intact and decellularized samples, respectively. These results open new avenues for the use of DECM samples as

  2. Supplementation of exogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate enhances mechanical properties of 3D cell-agarose constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Yodmuang, Supansa; Spiller, Kara; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-10-01

    Formation of tissue-engineered cartilage is greatly enhanced by mechanical stimulation. However, direct mechanical stimulation is not always a suitable method, and the utilization of mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction might allow for a highly effective and less aggressive alternate means of stimulation. In particular, the purinergic, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-mediated signaling pathway is strongly implicated in mechanotransduction within the articular cartilage. We investigated the effects of transient and continuous exogenous ATP supplementation on mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs engineered using bovine chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in an agarose hydrogel. For both cell types, we have observed significant increases in equilibrium and dynamic compressive moduli after transient ATP treatment applied in the fourth week of cultivation. Continuous ATP treatment over 4 weeks of culture only slightly improved the mechanical properties of the constructs, without major changes in the total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content. Structure-function analyses showed that transiently ATP-treated constructs, and in particular those based on hMSCs, had the highest level of correlation between compositional and mechanical properties. Transiently treated groups showed intense staining of the territorial matrix for GAGs and collagen type II. These results indicate that transient ATP treatment can improve functional mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs based on chondrogenic cells and agarose hydrogels, possibly by improving the structural organization of the bulk phase and territorial extracellular matrix (ECM), that is, by increasing correlation slopes between the content of the ECM components (GAG, collagen) and mechanical properties of the construct.

  3. Incision properties and thermal effects of CO2 lasers in soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Berns, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal and histological events resulting from soft tissue incision using CO2 lasers at 9.3 (mu) or 10.6 (mu) , fitted with a hollow wave guide or an articulated arm delivery system respectively, were investigated. In 9 fresh pigs' mandibles, standardized incisions 3 cm in length were made in the oral mucosa. Incisions were performed in the cw mode at 1 W, 4 W, and 12 W. Thermal events were measured in adjacent soft tissues using thermocouples. Incisions were dissected out, fixed, embedded in paraffin wax, sectioned and stained with Serius Red. The Students' t-test for paired data was used to compare zones of necrosis, zones of collagen damage and thermal events. No significant temperature rise was measured during irradiation at any timepoints or power settings (p < 0.05). Results were very similar for the two lasers with significantly different results obtained only at the 12 W setting (p < 0.05). Vertical incision depths and horizontal incision widths did not differ significantly (p < 0.0001) at 12 W and 4 W. Horizontal and vertical zones of necrosis did not differ significantly (p < 0.0001) either between the two lasers at 12 W and 4 W. Thus the thermal and histological events occurring during soft tissue incision were similar using these two lasers, despite the difference in wavelength and delivery system.

  4. In Vitro Corrosion and Cytocompatibility Properties of Nano-Whisker Hydroxyapatite Coating on Magnesium Alloy for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here the successful fabrication of nano-whisker hydroxyapatite (nHA coatings on Mg alloy by using a simple one-step hydrothermal process in aqueous solution. The nHA coating shows uniform structure and high crystallinity. Results indicate that nHA coating is promising for improving the in vitro corrosion and cytocompatibility properties of Mg-based implants and devices for bone tissue engineering. In addition, the simple hydrothermal deposition method used in the current study is also applicable to substrates with complex shapes or surface geometries.

  5. Effect of temperature and fixation on the optical properties of atherosclerotic tissue: A validation study of an ex-vivo whole heart cadaveric model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gnanadesigan (Muthukaruppan); G. van Soest (Gijs); S. White (Stephen); S. Scoltock (Simon); G.J. Ughi (Giovanni); A. Baumbach (Andreas); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); E.S. Regar (Eveline); T.W. Johnson (Thomas)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAtherosclerotic plaque composition can be imaged using the optical attenuation coefficient derived from intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) data. The relation between optical properties and tissue type has been established on autopsy tissues. In this study, we validate an ex

  6. Effect of temperature and fixation on the optical properties of atherosclerotic tissue: a validation study of an ex-vivo whole heart cadaveric model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnanadesigan, M.; Van Soest, G.; White, S.; Scoltock, S.; Ughi, G.J.; Baumbach, A.; Van der Steen, A.F.W.; Regar, E.; Johnson, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque composition can be imaged using the optical attenuation coefficient derived from intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) data. The relation between optical properties and tissue type has been established on autopsy tissues. In this study, we validate an ex-vivo model

  7. Preparation of gelatin based porous biocomposite for bone tissue engineering and evaluation of gamma irradiation effect on its properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md. Minhajul [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Khan, Mubarak A. [Institute of Radiation and Polymer Technology (IRPT), Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), P. O. Box No. 3787, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur, E-mail: mizanur.rahman@du.ac.bd [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable porous hybrid polymer composites were prepared by using gelatin as base polymer matrix, β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and calcium sulfate (CS) as cementing materials, chitosan as an antimicrobial agent, and glutaraldehyde and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as crosslinkers at different mass ratios. Thereafter, the composites were subjected to γ-radiation sterilization. The structure and properties of these composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mechanical properties testing (compressive, bending, tensile and impact), thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and physical stability test in simulated body fluid (SBF). We found that TCP rich composites showed enhanced mechanical properties among all the crosslinked composites. γ-Radiation sterilization triggered further cross linking in polymer matrix resulting a decrease in pore size of the composites and an increase in pore wall thickness with improved mechanical and thermal properties. The chemically crosslinked composite with 40% TCP followed by γ-radiation sterilization showed the smallest pore size distribution with a mean pore diameter of 159.22 μm, which falls in the range of 100–350 μm — known to be suitable for osteoconduction. Considering its improved mechanical and thermal properties along with osteoconduction ability without cytotoxicity, we propose this biocomposite as a viable candidate for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Composite scaffolds were prepared from biopolymers (gelatin and chitosan). • β-TCP and CS were used as bioactive cementing materials at different ratios. • γ-Sterilization improved the mechanical properties of the biocomposites. • γ-Sterilization reduced the cytotoxicity and induced high antimicrobial properties. • Composite having 40% TCP has the proper pore size distribution for osteoconduction.

  8. Viscoelastic Properties of a Hierarchical Model of Soft Biological Tissue: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnansky, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The measuring of viscoelastic response is widely used for revealing information about soft matter and biological tissue noninvasively. This information encodes intrinsic dynamic correlations and depends on relations between macroscopic viscoelasticity and structure at the mesoscopic scale. Here we show numerically that the frequency dependent dynamical shear moduli distinguish between the mesoscopic architectural complexities and sensitive to the Euclidean dimensionality. Our approach enables the explanation of two- and three-dimensional viscoelastic experiments by objectively choosing and modeling the most relevant architectural features such as the concentration of compounds and intra-model hierarchical characteristics of physical parameters. Current work provides a link between the macroscopical effective viscoelastic properties to viscoelastic constants and network geometry on the mesoscale. Besides of this we also pay attention to the analytical properties of generalized susceptibility function of considered constitutive model accounting principles of causality.

  9. Tissue formation and tissue engineering through host cell recruitment or a potential injectable cell-based biocomposite with replicative potential: Molecular mechanisms controlling cellular senescence and the involvement of controlled transient telomerase activation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2015-12-01

    . Nuclear export is initiated by ROS-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine 707 within hTERT by the Src kinase family. It might be presumed that protection of mitochondria against oxidative stress is an important telomere length-independent function for telomerase in cell survival. Biotechnology companies are focused on development of therapeutic telomerase vaccines, telomerase inhibitors, and telomerase promoter-driven cell killing in oncology, have a telomerase antagonist in late preclinical studies. Anti-aging medicine-oriented groups have intervened on the market with products working on telomerase activation for a broad range of degenerative diseases in which replicative senescence or telomere dysfunction may play an important role. Since oxidative damage has been shown to shorten telomeres in tissue culture models, the adequate topical, transdermal, or systemic administration of antioxidants (such as, patented ocular administration of 1% N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops in the treatment of cataracts) may be beneficial at preserving telomere lengths and delaying the onset or in treatment of disease in susceptible individuals. Therapeutic strategies toward controlled transient activation of telomerase are targeted to cells and replicative potential in cell-based therapies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  10. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Razavi, Mehdi; E Bahrololoom, Mohammad; Bazargan-Lari, Reza; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Kotturi, Hari; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe3O4) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan.

  11. Human-tissue-related inventions: ownership and intellectual property rights in international collaborative research in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andanda, P A

    2008-03-01

    There are complex unresolved ethical, legal and social issues related to the use of human tissues obtained in the course of research or diagnostic procedures and retained for further use in research. The question of intellectual property rights over commercially viable products or procedures that are derived from these samples and the suitability or otherwise of participants relinquishing their rights to the samples needs urgent attention. The complexity of these matters lies in the fact that the relationship between intellectual property rights and ownership or rights pertaining to the samples on which the intellectual property right is based may either be overlooked or taken for granted. What equally makes the matter complex is that samples may be obtained from participants in developing countries and exported to developed countries for analysis and research. It is important for research ethics committees to tread carefully when reviewing research protocols that raise such issues for purposes of ensuring that appropriate benefit sharing agreements, particularly with developing countries, are in place. This paper attempts to analyse the key questions related to ownership and intellectual property rights in commercially viable products derived from human tissue samples. Patent law is used as a point of reference as opposed to other forms of intellectual property rights such as industrial designs because it is the right that most inventors apply for in respect of human tissue-related inventions. The key questions are formulated following a systematic analysis of peer reviewed journal articles that have reported original investigations into relevant issues in this field. Most of the cases and reported studies that are referred to in this paper do not directly deal with HIV/AIDS research but the underlying principles are helpful in HIV/AIDS research as well. Pertinent questions, which members of ethics review committees should focus on in this regard are discussed and

  12. A multiscale theoretical model for diffusive mass transfer in cellular biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapellos, George E; Alexiou, Terpsichori S; Payatakes, Alkiviades C

    2007-11-01

    An integrated methodology is developed for the theoretical analysis of solute transport and reaction in cellular biological media, such as tissues, microbial flocs, and biofilms. First, the method of local spatial averaging with a weight function is used to establish the equation which describes solute conservation at the cellular biological medium scale, starting with a continuum-based formulation of solute transport at finer spatial scales. Second, an effective-medium model is developed for the self-consistent calculation of the local diffusion coefficient in the cellular biological medium, including the effects of the structural heterogeneity of the extra-cellular space and the reversible adsorption to extra-cellular polymers. The final expression for the local effective diffusion coefficient is: D(Abeta)=lambda(beta)D(Aupsilon), where D(Aupsilon) is the diffusion coefficient in water, and lambda(beta) is a function of the composition and fundamental geometric and physicochemical system properties, including the size of solute molecules, the size of extra-cellular polymer fibers, and the mass permeability of the cell membrane. Furthermore, the analysis sheds some light on the function of the extra-cellular hydrogel as a diffusive barrier to solute molecules approaching the cell membrane, and its implications on the transport of chemotherapeutic agents within a cellular biological medium. Finally, the model predicts the qualitative trend as well as the quantitative variability of a large number of published experimental data on the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in cell-entrapping gels, microbial flocs, biofilms, and mammalian tissues.

  13. An anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterned electrospun scaffold with tailored mechanical property and improved bioactivity for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He; Li, Haiyan; Ke, Qinfei; Chang, Jiang

    2015-04-29

    The development of vascular scaffolds with controlled mechanical properties and stimulatory effects on biological activities of endothelial cells still remains a significant challenge to vascular tissue engineering. In this work, we reported an innovative approach to prepare a new type of vascular scaffolds with anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterns using electrospinning technique with unique wire spring templates, and further investigated the structural effects of the patterned electrospun scaffolds on mechanical properties and angiogenic differentiation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results showed that anisotropically aligned patterned nanofibrous structure was obtained by depositing nanofibers on template in a structurally different manner, one part of nanofibers densely deposited on the embossments of wire spring and formed cylindrical-like structures in the transverse direction, while others loosely suspended and aligned along the longitudinal direction, forming a three-dimensional porous microstructure. We further found that such structures could efficiently control the mechanical properties of electrospun vascular scaffolds in both longitudinal and transverse directions by altering the interval distances between the embossments of patterned scaffolds. When HUVECs were cultured on scaffolds with different microstructures, the patterned scaffolds distinctively promoted adhesion of HUVECs at early stage and proliferation during the culture period. Most importantly, cells experienced a large shape change associated with cell cytoskeleton and nuclei remodeling, leading to a stimulatory effect on angiogenesis differentiation of HUVECs by the patterned microstructures of electrospun scaffolds, and the scaffolds with larger distances of intervals showed a higher stimulatory effect. These results suggest that electrospun scaffolds with the anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterns, which could efficiently control the

  14. Connective tissue fibroblast properties are position-dependent during mouse digit tip regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Karen; Karapetyan, Adrine; Fernando, Warnakulusuriya Akash; Simkin, Jennifer; Han, Manjong; Rugg, Elizabeth L; Muneoka, Ken

    2013-01-01

    A key factor that contributes to the regenerative ability of regeneration-competent animals such as the salamander is their use of innate positional cues that guide the regeneration process. The limbs of mammals has severe regenerative limitations, however the distal most portion of the terminal phalange is regeneration competent. This regenerative ability of the adult mouse digit is level dependent: amputation through the distal half of the terminal phalanx (P3) leads to successful regeneration, whereas amputation through a more proximal location, e.g. the subterminal phalangeal element (P2), fails to regenerate. Do the connective tissue cells of the mammalian digit play a role similar to that of the salamander limb in controlling the regenerative response? To begin to address this question, we isolated and cultured cells of the connective tissue surrounding the phalangeal bones of regeneration competent (P3) and incompetent (P2) levels. Despite their close proximity and localization, these cells show very distinctive profiles when characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies comparing their proliferation and position-specific interactions reveal that cells isolated from the P3 and P2 are both capable of organizing and differentiating epithelial progenitors, but with different outcomes. The difference in interactions are further characterized with three-dimension cultures, in which P3 regenerative cells are shown to lack a contractile response that is seen in other fibroblast cultures, including the P2 cultures. In in vivo engraftment studies, the difference between these two cell lines is made more apparent. While both P2 and P3 cells participated in the regeneration of the terminal phalanx, their survival and proliferative indices were distinct, thus suggesting a key difference in their ability to interact within a regeneration permissive environment. These studies are the first to demonstrate distinct positional characteristics of connective tissue

  15. Connective tissue fibroblast properties are position-dependent during mouse digit tip regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Wu

    Full Text Available A key factor that contributes to the regenerative ability of regeneration-competent animals such as the salamander is their use of innate positional cues that guide the regeneration process. The limbs of mammals has severe regenerative limitations, however the distal most portion of the terminal phalange is regeneration competent. This regenerative ability of the adult mouse digit is level dependent: amputation through the distal half of the terminal phalanx (P3 leads to successful regeneration, whereas amputation through a more proximal location, e.g. the subterminal phalangeal element (P2, fails to regenerate. Do the connective tissue cells of the mammalian digit play a role similar to that of the salamander limb in controlling the regenerative response? To begin to address this question, we isolated and cultured cells of the connective tissue surrounding the phalangeal bones of regeneration competent (P3 and incompetent (P2 levels. Despite their close proximity and localization, these cells show very distinctive profiles when characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies comparing their proliferation and position-specific interactions reveal that cells isolated from the P3 and P2 are both capable of organizing and differentiating epithelial progenitors, but with different outcomes. The difference in interactions are further characterized with three-dimension cultures, in which P3 regenerative cells are shown to lack a contractile response that is seen in other fibroblast cultures, including the P2 cultures. In in vivo engraftment studies, the difference between these two cell lines is made more apparent. While both P2 and P3 cells participated in the regeneration of the terminal phalanx, their survival and proliferative indices were distinct, thus suggesting a key difference in their ability to interact within a regeneration permissive environment. These studies are the first to demonstrate distinct positional characteristics of

  16. Preparation and Properties of Collagen-Chitosan/ Glycosaminoglycans as Candidate Tissue Engineering Biomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIQin-Hua; HUANGYao-xiong; CHENGJian-su

    2004-01-01

    A novel biomaterial scaffold was created from collagen-chitosan/GAG. Its tensile strength was 8.6MPa(wet state)and degree of swelling water was 60%~75% with higer ultimate elongation 300%. Rabbit corneas of collagen-chitosan/GAG implantation samples in vivo for biodegradation showed that the inplantion samples was complets biodegrable and digested afere 120 day. There was enought time to maintain cell growth,immigrating and proliferation. This biomaterials scaffold can be used for cell culture and in various tissue engineering fields.

  17. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound increases the mechanical properties of the healing tissues at bone-tendon junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Huang, Qing-Hua; Lu, Hong-Bin; Qin, Ling

    2009-01-01

    The re-establishment of bone-tendon junction (BTJ) tissues is involved in many trauma and reconstructive surgeries. A direct BTJ repair requires a long period of immobilization which may be associated with a postoperative weak knee. In this study, we investigated if low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment increases the material properties of healing tissues at bone-tendon junction (BTJ) after partial patellectomy using rabbit models. Standard partial patellectomy was conducted on one knee of twenty four rabbits which were randomly divided into an ultrasound group and a control group. The bony changes of BTJ complexes around the BTJ healing interface were measured by anteroposterior x-ray radiographs; then the volumetric bone-mineral density (BMD) of the new bone was assessed using a peripheral computed tomography scanner (pQCT). The stiffness of patellar cartilage, fibrocartilage at the healing interface and the tendon were measured in situ using a novel noncontact ultrasound water jet indentation system. Not only significantly more newly formed bone at the BTJ healing interface but also increased stiffness of the junction tissues were found in the ultrasound group compared with the controls at week 18. In addition, the ultrasound group also showed significantly 44% higher BMD at week 6 than controls.

  18. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidari, Fatemeh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Yasouj University, Yasuj 75918-74934 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Mehdi [BCAST, Institute of Materials and Manufacturing, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, London UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Brunel Institute for Bioengineering, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, London UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Bahrololoom, Mohammad E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazargan-Lari, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Marvdasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Marvdasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vashaee, Daryoosh [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Kotturi, Hari [Department of Biology, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034 (United States); Tayebi, Lobat, E-mail: lobat.tayebi@marquette.edu [Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan. - Highlights: • Chitosan (CS)/magnetite composite presented the maximum bending strength. • Adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the CS enhances its mechanical properties. • Magnetic does not have reverse effect on the cyto-compatibility of samples.

  19. A Multiscale Mechanical Model for Plant Tissue Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Pasini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant petioles and stems are hierarchical cellular structures, displaying structuralfeatures defined at multiple length scales. The current work focuses on the multi-scalemodelling of plant tissue, considering two orders of structural hierarchy, cell wall and tissue.The stiffness of plant tissue is largely governed by the geometry of the tissue cells, thecomposition of the cell wall and the structural properties of its constituents. The cell wallis analogous to a fiber reinforced composite, where the cellulose microfibril (CMF is theload bearing component. For multilayered cell wall, the microfibril angle (MFA in themiddle layer of the secondary cell wall (S2 layer largely affects the longitudinal stiffnessfor values up to 40o. The MFA in turn influences the overall wall stiffness. In this work,the effective stiffness of a model system based on collenchyma cell wall of a dicotyledonousplant, the Rheum rhabarbarum, is computed considering generic MFA and volume fractions.At the cellular level, a 2-D Finite Edge Centroidal Voronoi tessellation (FECVT has beendeveloped and implemented to generate the non-periodic microstructure of the plant tissue.The effective elastic properties of the cellular tissue are obtained through finite elementanalysis (FEA of the Voronoi model coupled with the cell wall properties. The stiffness ofthe hierarchically modeled tissue is critically important in determining the overall structuralproperties of plant petioles and stems.

  20. Fabrication and Properties of Poly(vinylalcohol)-glycosaminoglycantype I Collagen Composite Membrane as Tissue Regeneration Scaffolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qin-hua; LIN Dong-qing

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to design a porous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based on composite membrane with certain mechanical strength and biocompatibilities serving as tissue regenerative scaffolds. PVA-glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-type I collagen (COL) composite membrane was fabricated by PVA with different molecular weight (Mw) and alcoholysis degree (AD) being blended with certain amounts of GAG and COL and dried at 38℃for 24 h. The water content of the composite membranes were from 61.9%to 95.1%and swelling ratio ranged from 123.6%to 621.7%. Scanning electron micro-scope (SEM) analysis proved that PVA-GAG-COL composite membrane has porous and homogenous structure. Biocompatibility test results showed that the composite membrane was nontoxic, which could promote adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts on the com-posite membrane. In conclusion, PVA-GAG-COL composite membrane with high water content and swelling ratio, suitable mechanical strength and good biocompatibility, has potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  1. Fiber-optic probe for noninvasive real-time determination of tissue optical properties at multiple wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, J S; Pedersen, C B; Dalgaard, T; Fabricius, P E; Aruna, P; Andersson-Engels, S

    2001-03-01

    We present a compact, fast, and versatile fiber-optic probe system for real-time determination of tissue optical properties from spatially resolved continuous-wave diffuse reflectance measurements. The system collects one set of reflectance data from six source-detector distances at four arbitrary wavelengths with a maximum overall sampling rate of 100 Hz. Multivariate calibration techniques based on two-dimensional polynomial fitting are employed to extract and display the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in real-time mode. The four wavelengths of the current configuration are 660, 785, 805, and 974 nm, respectively. Cross-validation tests on a 6 x 7 calibration matrix of Intralipid-dye phantoms showed that the mean prediction error at, e.g., 785 nm was 2.8% for the absorption coefficient and 1.3% for the reduced scattering coefficient. The errors are relative to the range of the optical properties of the phantoms at 785 nm, which were 0-0.3/cm for the absorption coefficient and 6-16/cm for the reduced scattering coefficient. Finally, we also present and discuss results from preliminary skin tissue measurements.

  2. The influence of feed phosphates on the structural, mechanical and chemical properties of bone tissue in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodem, A; Dragan, Sz; Kołacz, Sz; Dobrzanski, Z

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the influence of various feed phosphates on the structural and mechanical properties as well as on the chemical composition of femurs in adult pigs (weight approx. 110 kg). Three types of phosphates--monocalcium phosphate (MCP), dicalcium phosphate (n-DCP) and calcium-sodium phosphate (CSP)--were used alternatively in pigs fed with the standard feed mixture. The MCP and CSP phosphates were typical, imported products used traditionally in pig feeding. Dicalcium phosphate (n-DCP) was manufactured in Poland on the basis of phosphoric acid with the new pro-ecological method. The following parameters were determined: the mean physical density of the samples of the compact and spongy bone tissue, values of Young's modulus, strength and the energy of deformation, and Vickers microhardness (HV). Also the content of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, and Si, as well as Ca, P and Sr was determined. Significant differences in mean values of the mentioned parameters occurred between the studied groups. The best mechanical properties were shown by the bones from the n-DCP group, and the compact bone tissue (diaphysis) contained the most Ca, P, and Sr when compared to the MCP and CSP groups.

  3. Prediction of matrix-to-cell stress transfer in heart valve tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Siyao; Huang, Hsiao-Ying Shadow

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear and anisotropic heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics manifest principally from the stratification, orientation, and inhomogeneity of their collagenous microstructures. Disturbance of the native collagen fiber network has clear consequences for valve and leaflet tissue mechanics and presumably, by virtue of their intimate embedment, on the valvular interstitial cell stress-strain state and concomitant phenotype. In the current study, a set of virtual biaxial stretch experiments were conducted on porcine pulmonary valve leaflet tissue photomicrographs via an image-based finite element approach. Stress distribution evolution during diastolic valve closure was predicted at both the tissue and cellular levels. Orthotropic material properties consistent with distinct stages of diastolic loading were applied. Virtual experiments predicted tissue- and cellular-level stress fields, providing insight into how matrix-to-cell stress transfer may be influenced by the inhomogeneous collagen fiber architecture, tissue anisotropic material properties, and the cellular distribution within the leaflet tissue. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study reporting on the evolution of stress fields at both the tissue and cellular levels in valvular tissue and thus contributes toward refining our collective understanding of valvular tissue micromechanics while providing a computational tool enabling the further study of valvular cell-matrix interactions.

  4. The Mechanical and Biological Properties of Chitosan Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Templates Are Significantly Enhanced by Chitosan from Gongronella butleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tamura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan with a molecular weight (MW of 104 Da and 13% degree of acetylation (DA was extracted from the mycelia of the fungus Gongronella butleri USDB 0201 grown in solid substrate fermentation and used to prepare scaffolds by the freeze-drying method. The mechanical and biological properties of the fungal chitosan scaffolds were evaluated and compared with those of scaffolds prepared using chitosans obtained from shrimp and crab shells and squid bone plates (MW 105-106 Da and DA 10-20%. Under scanning electron microscopy, it was observed that all scaffolds had average pore sizes of approximately 60-90 mm in diameter. Elongated pores were observed in shrimp chitosan scaffolds and polygonal pores were found in crab, squid and fungal chitosan scaffolds. The physico-chemical properties of the chitosans had an effect on the formation of pores in the scaffolds, that consequently influenced the mechanical and biological properties of the scaffolds. Fungal chitosan scaffolds showed excellent mechanical, water absorption and lysozyme degradation properties, whereas shrimp chitosan scaffolds (MW 106Da and DA 12% exhibited the lowest water absorption properties and lysozyme degradation rate. In the evaluation of biocompatibility of chitosan scaffolds, the ability of fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells to attach on all chitosan scaffolds was similar, but the proliferation of cells with polygonal morphology was faster on crab, squid and fungal chitosan scaffolds than on shrimp chitosan scaffolds. Therefore fungal chitosan scaffold, which has excellent mechanical and biological properties, is the most suitable scaffold to use as a template for tissue regeneration.

  5. A Novel High Mechanical Property PLGA Composite Matrix Loaded with Nanodiamond-Phospholipid Compound for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Song, Qingxin; Huang, Xuan; Li, Fengning; Wang, Kun; Tang, Yixing; Hou, Canglong; Shen, Hongxing

    2016-01-20

    A potential bone tissue engineering material was produced from a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), loaded with nanodiamond phospholipid compound (NDPC) via physical mixing. On the basis of hydrophobic effects and physical absorption, we modified the original hydrophilic surface of the nanodiamond (NDs) with phospholipids to be amphipathic, forming a typical core-shell structure. The ND-phospholipid weight ratio was optimized to generate sample NDPC50 (i.e., ND-phospholipid weight ratio of 100:50), and NDPC50 was able to be dispersed in a PLGA matrix at up to 20 wt %. Compared to a pure PLGA matrix, the introduction of 10 wt % of NDPC (i.e., sample NDPC50-PF10) resulted in a significant improvement in the material's mechanical and surface properties, including a decrease in the water contact angle from 80 to 55°, an approximately 100% increase in the Young's modulus, and an approximate 550% increase in hardness, thus closely resembling that of human cortical bone. As a novel matrix supporting human osteoblast (hFOB1.19) growth, NDPC50-PFs with different amounts of NDPC50 demonstrated no negative effects on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we focused on the behaviors of NDPC-PFs implanted into mice for 8 weeks and found that NDPC-PFs induced acceptable immune response and can reduce the rapid biodegradation of PLGA matrix. Our results represent the first in vivo research on ND (or NDPC) as nanofillers in a polymer matrix for bone tissue engineering. The high mechanical properties, good in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility, and increased mineralization capability suggest that biodegradable PLGA composite matrices loaded with NDPC may potentially be useful for a variety of biomedical applications, especially bone tissue engineering.

  6. Hard-Soft Tissue Interface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Oliver E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is comprised of three distinct tissue categories: structural mineralized tissues, actuating muscular soft tissues, and connective tissues. Where connective tissues - ligament, tendon and cartilage - meet with bones, a graded interface in mechanical properties occurs that allows the transmission of load without creating stress concentrations that would cause tissue damage. This interface typically occurs over less than 1 mm and contains a three order of magnitude difference in elastic stiffness, in addition to changes in cell type and growth factor concentrations among others. Like all engineered tissues, the replication of these interfaces requires the production of scaffolds that will provide chemical and mechanical cues, resulting in biologically accurate cellular differentiation. For interface tissues however, the scaffold must provide spatially graded chemical and mechanical cues over sub millimetre length scales. Naturally, this complicates the manufacture of the scaffolds and every stage of their subsequent cell seeding and growth, as each region has different optimal conditions. Given the higher degree of difficulty associated with replicating interface tissues compared to surrounding homogeneous tissues, it is likely that the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems will continue to be limited by the engineering of connective tissues interfaces with bone.

  7. Surface Chemistry Manipulation of Gold Nanorods Displays High Cellular Uptake In Vitro While Preserving Optical Properties for Bio-Imaging and Photo-Thermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-28

    two photon luminescence microscopy image intensity and photo-thermal cellular ablation compared to bare MTAB GNRs. These results demonstrate how TA...ROS assay ...........................................................................................................................5 3.8 RT- PCR ...luminescence microscopy image intensity and photo- thermal cellular ablation compared to bare MTAB GNRs. These results demonstrate how TA surface chemistry

  8. Microstructure and properties of nano-fibrous PCL-b-PLLA scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L He

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nano-fibrous scaffolds which could potentially mimic the architecture of extracellular matrix (ECM have been considered a good candidate matrix for cell delivery in tissue engineering applications. In the present study, a semicrystalline diblock copolymer, poly(e-caprolactone-block-poly(L-lactide (PCL-b-PLLA, was synthesized and utilized to fabricate nano-fibrous scaffolds via a thermally induced phase separation process. Uniform nano-fibrous networks were created by quenching a PCL-b-PLLA/THF homogenous solution to -20ºC or below, followed by further gelation for 2 hours due to the presence of PLLA and PCL microcrystals. However, knot-like structures as well as continuously smooth pellicles appeared among the nano-fibrous network with increasing gelation temperature. DSC analysis indicated that the crystallization of PCL segments was interrupted by rigid PLLA segments, resulting in an amorphous phase at high gelation temperatures. Combining TIPS (thermally induced phase separation with salt-leaching methods, nano-fibrous architecture and interconnected pore structures (144±36 mm in diameter with a high porosity were created for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. Specific surface area and protein adsorption on the surface of the nano-fibrous scaffold were three times higher than on the surface of the solid-walled scaffold. Chondrocytes cultured on the nano-fibrous scaffold exhibited a spherical condrocyte-like phenotype and secreted more cartilage-like extracellular matrix (ECM than those cultured on the solid-walled scaffold. Moreover, the protein and DNA contents of cells cultured on the nano-fibrous scaffold were 1.2-1.4 times higher than those on the solid-walled scaffold. Higher expression levels of collagen II and aggrecan mRNA were induced on the nano-fibrous scaffold compared to on the solid-walled scaffold. These findings demonstrated that scaffolds with a nano-fibrous architecture could serve as superior scaffolds for cartilage tissue

  9. The Improvement of The Endogenous Antioxidant Property of Stone Fish (Actinopyga lecanora Tissue Using Enzymatic Proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bordbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stone fish (Actinopyga lecanora ethanolic and methanolic tissue extracts were investigated for total phenolic contents (TPCs as well as antioxidant activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH• radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. Both extracts showed low amount of phenolics (20.33 to 17.03 mg of gallic acid equivalents/100 g dried sample and moderate antioxidant activity (39% to 34%  DPPH• radical scavenging activity and 23.95 to 22.30 mmol/100 mL FeSO4 FRAP value. Enzymatic proteolysis was carried out in order to improve the antioxidant activity using six commercially available proteases under their optimum conditions. The results revealed that the highest increase in antioxidant activity up to 85% was obtained for papain-generated proteolysate, followed by alcalase (77%, trypsin (75%, pepsin (68%, bromelain (68%, and flavourzyme (50% as measured by DPPH• radical scavenging activity, whilst for the FRAP value, the highest increase in the antioxidant activity up to 39.2 mmol/100 mL FeSO4 was obtained for alcalase-generated proteolysate, followed by papain (29.5 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, trypsin (23.2 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, flavourzyme (24.7 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, bromelain (22.9 mmol/100 mL FeSO4, and pepsin (20.8 mmol/100 mL FeSO4. It is obvious that proteolysis of stone fish tissue by proteolytic enzymes can considerably enhance its antioxidant activity.

  10. The ownership that wasn't meant to be: Yearworth and property rights in human tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostill, Luke David

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the English Court of Appeal's decision in Yearworth v North Bristol NHS Trust that six men had, for the purposes of their claims against the trust, ownership of the sperm they had produced. The case has been discussed by many commentators and most, if not all, of those who have discussed the case have claimed or assumed that the court held that the claimants had property rights in the sperm they had produced. In this paper, I advance an interpretation of the case that does not regard the court as deciding that the men had property rights (in the narrow sense of that term) in the sperm they had produced. On this view, the 'ownership' that the Court of Appeal purported to vest in each of the men was not a right in rem, a right 'binding the world'. If this is so, it is perhaps unsurprising that some scholars, evaluating the success of the court's reasoning as a justification for vesting the claimants with property rights, have found it to be unsatisfactory.

  11. Effects of stress shielding and subsequent restressing on mechanical properties of regenerated and residual tissues in rabbit patellar tendon after resection of its central one-third.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Eijiro; Asanuma, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Hitoshi; Tohyama, Harukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    2009-08-07

    Central third of patellar tendon (PT) is used as an autograft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Previous studies investigated temporal changes in material properties of healing tissues in PT after resection of the central third. However, no study has been performed on effects of stress shielding (SS) and restressing (RS) on the properties of healing tissues. The present study hypothesised that SS adversely affects the mechanical integrity of healing tissues, which is recovered by subsequent RS. An entire rectangular defect was created in the central third of rabbit PT. Operated PTs were subjected to either SS or no stress shielding (NSS). A subgroup of stress-shielded PTs was followed by the resumption of normal loading, namely RS. Tensile properties of tissues regenerated in the defect and residual tendons were evaluated. Regenerated tissues of SS for 3 weeks resulted in significantly lower strength than NSS, which was recovered to NSS level by 3 weeks of RS. Strength of residual tissues in RS reversed SS effects, leading to the strength at NSS level after 12 weeks. However, tangent modulus of residual tissues in RS was still significantly lower than that of NSS at 12 weeks. Therefore, SS induces detrimental effects on the mechanical integrity of healing PTs, and the response to RS was different between regenerate and residual tissues, the latter of which took longer period to reach NSS level.

  12. The effect of water, various incorporations and substitutions on physical and chemical properties of bioapatite and mechanical properties of bone tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avrunin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on scientific publications and original research the authors specified the effect of incorporation and adsorption of different ions and water molecules on physical, chemical and mechanical properties of bioapatite and determined new directions for investigations of intercrystallite interactions in nanoscale. Inner structure of the apatite crystallites more adaptable to chemical substitutions in comparison with other minerals controls their important characteristics such as a size, solubility, hardness, fragility, formability and thermal stability. The water molecules incorporated in crystallites and adsorbed on their surfaces stabilize them. In case the distances between crystallites become shorter than 10 nm the water molecules adsorbed on their surface play dominant role in bonding between the crystallites. This bond determines the main mechanical properties of bones. We bring forward a suggestion that theoretical model developed on the basis of near edge X-ray spectroscopic studies of bones using the contemporary high brilliant sources of X-ray radiation (synchrotrons and X-ray free electrons lasers will allow to receive new quantitative data on local electronic and atomic structure (coordination numbers, ionic charges, interatomic distances interatomic and intercrystallite forces of nanoelements in osseous tissue. The investigation results must bring to construction of new morphologically correct model providing deeper understanding of processes occurring in mineral matrix and mechanical properties of bones.

  13. Preparation and Properties of Bamboo Fiber/Nano-hydroxyapatite/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) Composite Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liuyun; Li, Ye; Xiong, Chengdong; Su, Shengpei; Ding, Haojie

    2017-02-08

    In this study, bamboo fiber was first designed to incorporate into nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) to obtain a new composite scaffold of bamboo fiber/nano-hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co- glycolic) (BF/n-HA/PLGA) by freeze-drying method. The effect of their components and some factors consisting of different freeze temperatures, concentrations, and pore-forming agents on the porous morphology, porosity, and compressive properties of the scaffold were investigated by scanning electron microscope, modified liquid displacement method, and electromechanical universal testing machine. The results indicated that the 5% BF/30% n-HA/PLGA composite scaffold, prepared with 5% (w/v) high concentration and frozen at -20 °C without pore-forming agent, had the best ideal porous structure and porosity as well as compressive properties, which far exceed those of n-HA/PLGA composite scaffold. In addition, the in vitro simulated body fluids soaking and cell culture experiment showed the addition of BF into the scaffold accelerated the BF/n-HA/PLGA composite scaffolds degradation and exhibited good cytocompatibility, including attachment and proliferation. All the results of the study show that BF has improved the properties of n-HA/PLGA composite scaffolds and BF/n-HA/PLGA might have a great potential for bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  14. Detection of optical and mechanical property inhomogeneities in tissue mimicking phantoms using an ultrasound assisted optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, C Usha; Chandran, R Sreekumari Bharat; Vasu, R Mohan; Sood, Ajay K

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the issue of separating contributions from mechanical and optical properties of a moderately scattering tissue phantom to the modulation depth (M) of intensity autocorrelation measured in an ultrasound-assisted optical tomography system using axial and transverse illuminations. For axial illumination, M is affected by both the displacement and absorption coefficient, more prominently by displacement. But transverse illumination has very little contribution from displacement of scattering centers. Since displacement is related to the elastic property of the insonified region, we show that there is a possibility of separating the contributions from elastic and optical properties of the insonified region using axial and transverse illuminations. The main conclusions of our study using moderately scattering phantoms are: 1. axial illumination is the best for mapping storage modulus inhomogeneities, but M is also affected by optical absorption; 2. transverse illumination is the best for mapping absorption inhomogeneities; and 3. for the practically relevant case of an inclusion with larger storage modulus and absorption, both illuminations produced large contrast in M. When the scattering coefficient is high, the angle dependence of illumination is lost and the present method is shown to fail to separate these contributions based on direction of illumination.

  15. Assessment of electrochemical properties of a biogalvanic system for tissue characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, J.H.; Culmer, P.R.; Jayne, D.G.; Neville, A.

    2015-01-01

    Biogalvanic characterisation is a promising method for obtaining health-specific tissue information. However, there is a dearth of understanding in the literature regarding the underlying galvanic cell, electrode reactions and their controlling factors which limits the application of the technique. This work presents a parametric electrochemical investigation into a zinc–copper galvanic system using salt (NaCl) solution analogues at physiologically-relevant concentrations (1.71, 17.1 & 154 mM). The potential difference at open cell, closed cell maximum current and the internal resistance (based on published characterisation methods) were measured. Additionally, independent and relative polarisation scans of the electrodes were performed to improve understanding of the system. Our findings suggest that the prominent reaction at the cathode is that of oxygen-reduction, not hydrogen-evolution. Results indicate that cell potentials are influenced by the concentration of dissolved oxygen at low currents and maximum closed cell currents are limited by the rate of oxygen diffusion to the cathode. Characterised internal resistance values for the salt solutions did not correspond to theoretical values at the extremes of concentration (1.71 and 154 mM) due to electrode resistance and current limitation. Existing biogalvanic models do not consider these phenomena and should be improved to advance the technique and its practical application. PMID:25460609

  16. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  17. Assessment of electrochemical properties of a biogalvanic system for tissue characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, J H; Culmer, P R; Jayne, D G; Neville, A

    2015-02-01

    Biogalvanic characterisation is a promising method for obtaining health-specific tissue information. However, there is a dearth of understanding in the literature regarding the underlying galvanic cell, electrode reactions and their controlling factors which limits the application of the technique. This work presents a parametric electrochemical investigation into a zinc–copper galvanic system using salt (NaCl) solution analogues at physiologically-relevant concentrations (1.71, 17.1 & 154 mM). The potential difference at open cell, closed cell maximum current and the internal resistance (based on published characterisation methods) were measured. Additionally, independent and relative polarisation scans of the electrodes were performed to improve understanding of the system. Our findings suggest that the prominent reaction at the cathode is that of oxygen-reduction, not hydrogen-evolution. Results indicate that cell potentials are influenced by the concentration of dissolved oxygen at low currents and maximum closed cell currents are limited by the rate of oxygen diffusion to the cathode. Characterised internal resistance values for the salt solutions did not correspond to theoretical values at the extremes of concentration (1.71 and 154 mM) due to electrode resistance and current limitation. Existing biogalvanic models do not consider these phenomena and should be improved to advance the technique and its practical application.

  18. Bioengineered silk scaffolds in 3D tissue modeling with focus on mammary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghdouri-White, Yas; Bowlin, Gary L; Lemmon, Christopher A; Dréau, Didier

    2016-02-01

    In vitro generation of three-dimensional (3D) biological tissues and organ-like structures is a promising strategy to study and closely model complex aspects of the molecular, cellular, and physiological interactions of tissue. In particular, in vitro 3D tissue modeling holds promises to further our understanding of breast development. Indeed, biologically relevant 3D structures that combine mammary cells and engineered matrices have improved our knowledge of mammary tissue growth, organization, and differentiation. Several polymeric biomaterials have been used as scaffolds to engineer 3D mammary tissues. Among those, silk fibroin-based biomaterials have many biologically relevant properties and have been successfully used in multiple medical applications. Here, we review the recent advances in engineered scaffolds with an emphasis on breast-like tissue generation and the benefits of modified silk-based scaffolds.

  19. Emulsion templated scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robert; Sherborne, Colin; Paterson, Thomas; Green, Nicola H; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2016-02-01

    Polymerised High Internal Phase Emulsions (PolyHIPEs) are manufactured via emulsion templating and exhibit a highly interconnected microporosity. These materials are commonly used as thin membranes for 3D cell culture. This study uses emulsion templating in combination with microstereolithography to fabricate PolyHIPE scaffolds with a tightly controlled and reproducible architecture. This combination of methods produces hierarchical structures, where the microstructural properties can be independently controlled from the scaffold macrostructure. PolyHIPEs were fabricated with varying ratios of two acrylate monomers (2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and isobornyl acrylate (IBOA)) and varying nominal porosity to tune mechanical properties. Young's modulus, ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elongation at failure were determined for twenty EHA/IBOA compositions. Moduli ranged from 63.01±9.13 to 0.36±0.04MPa, UTS from 2.03±0.33 to 0.11±0.01MPa and failure strain from 21.86±2.87% to 2.60±0.61%. Selected compositions were fabricated into macro-porous woodpile structures, plasma treated with air or acrylic acid and seeded with human embryonic stem-cell derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (hES-MPs). Confocal and two-photon microscopy confirmed cell proliferation and penetration into the micro- and macro-porous architecture. The scaffolds supported osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells and interestingly, the stiffest IBOA-based scaffolds that were plasma treated with acrylic acid promoted osteogenesis more strongly than the other scaffolds.

  20. Effects of acute static, ballistic, and PNF stretching exercise on the muscle and tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, A; Stafilidis, S; Tilp, M

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a single static, ballistic, or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching exercise on the various muscle-tendon parameters of the lower leg and to detect possible differences in the effects between the methods. Volunteers (n = 122) were randomly divided into static, ballistic, and PNF stretching groups and a control group. Before and after the 4 × 30 s stretching intervention, we determined the maximum dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM) with the corresponding fascicle length and pennation angle of the gastrocnemius medialis. Passive resistive torque (PRT) and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured with a dynamometer. Observation of muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement with ultrasound allowed us to determine the length changes in the tendon and muscle, respectively, and hence to calculate stiffness. Although RoM increased (static: +4.3%, ballistic: +4.5%, PNF: +3.5%), PRT (static: -11.4%, ballistic: -11.5%, PNF: -13,7%), muscle stiffness (static: -13.1%, ballistic: -20.3%, PNF: -20.2%), and muscle-tendon stiffness (static: -11.3%, ballistic: -10.5%, PNF: -13.7%) decreased significantly in all the stretching groups. Only in the PNF stretching group, the pennation angle in the stretched position (-4.2%) and plantar flexor MVC (-4.6%) decreased significantly. Multivariate analysis showed no clinically relevant difference between the stretching groups. The increase in RoM and the decrease in PRT and muscle-tendon stiffness could be explained by more compliant muscle tissue following a single static, ballistic, or PNF stretching exercise.

  1. Contrast Agent-Enhanced Computed Tomography of Articular Cartilage: Association with Tissue Composition and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, T.S.; Jurvelin, J.S.; Aula, A.S.; Lammi, M.J.; Toeyraes, J. (Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography may enable the noninvasive quantification of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of articular cartilage. It has been reported that penetration of the negatively charged contrast agent ioxaglate (Hexabrix) increases significantly after enzymatic degradation of GAGs. However, it is not known whether spontaneous degradation of articular cartilage can be quantitatively detected with this technique. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic potential of contrast agent-enhanced cartilage tomography (CECT) in quantification of GAG concentration in normal and spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage by means of clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Material and Methods: In this in vitro study, normal and spontaneously degenerated adult bovine cartilage (n=32) was used. Bovine patellar cartilage samples were immersed in 21 mM contrast agent (Hexabrix) solution for 24 hours at room temperature. After immersion, the samples were scanned with a clinical pQCT instrument. From pQCT images, the contrast agent concentration in superficial as well as in full-thickness cartilage was calculated. Histological and functional integrity of the samples was quantified with histochemical and mechanical reference measurements extracted from our earlier study. Results: Full diffusion of contrast agent into the deep cartilage was found to take over 8 hours. As compared to normal cartilage, a significant increase (11%, P<0.05) in contrast agent concentration was seen in the superficial layer of spontaneously degenerated samples. Significant negative correlations were revealed between the contrast agent concentration and the superficial or full-thickness GAG content of tissue (|R|>0.5, P<0.01). Further, pQCT could be used to measure the thickness of patellar cartilage. Conclusion: The present results suggest that CECT can be used to diagnose proteoglycan depletion in spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage with a

  2. Implications of Surface and Bulk Properties of Abutment Implants and Their Degradation in the Health of Periodontal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Dorigatti de Avila

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current review was to investigate the implications of the surface and bulk properties of abutment implants and their degradation in relation to periodontal health. The success of dental implants is no longer a challenge for dentistry. The scientific literature presents several types of implants that are specific for each case. However, in cases of prosthetics components, such as abutments, further research is needed to improve the materials used to avoid bacterial adhesion and enhance contact with epithelial cells. The implanted surfaces of the abutments are composed of chemical elements that may degrade under different temperatures or be damaged by the forces applied onto them. This study showed that the resulting release of such chemical elements could cause inflammation in the periodontal tissue. At the same time, the surface characteristics can be altered, thus favoring biofilm development and further increasing the inflammation. Finally, if not treated, this inflammation can cause the loss of the implant.

  3. Mucoadhesive polymer films for tissue retraction in laparoscopic surgery: Ex-vivo study on their mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang; Tai, Lik-Ren; McLean, Donald; Wright, Emma J; Florence, Gordon J; Brown, Stuart I; Andre, Pascal; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective manipulation of soft tissue during laparoscopic procedures can be achieved by the use of mucoadhesive polymer films. A series of novel adhesive polymer films were formulated in house based on either Carbopol or Chitosan modified systems. The mechanical properties of the polymers and their adherence to bowel were evaluated using ex-vivo pig bowel immersed in 37°C water bath and connected to an Instron tensiometer. Young's modulus was 300 kPa for the Carbopol-polymer and 5 kPa for the Chitosan-polymer. The Chitosan-polymer exhibited much larger shear adhesion than its tensile adhesion: 3.4 N vs. 1.2. Both tensile and shear adhesions contributed to the large retraction force (2.6 N) obtained during l polymer-bowel retraction testing. Work of adhesion at the polymer/serosa interface, defined as the area under the force curve, was 64 mJ, which is appreciably larger than that reported with existing polymers. In conclusion, adhesive polymers can stick to the serosal side of the bowel with an adhesive force, which is sufficient to lift the bowel, providing a lower retraction stress than that caused by laparoscopic grasping which induces high localized pressures on the tissue.

  4. Microindentation for in vivo measurement of bone tissue material properties in atypical femoral fracture patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güerri-Fernández, Roberto C; Nogués, Xavier; Quesada Gómez, José M; Torres Del Pliego, Elisa; Puig, Lluís; García-Giralt, Natalia; Yoskovitz, Guy; Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Hansma, Paul K; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFF) associated with long-term bisphosphonates (LTB) are a growing concern. Their etiology is unknown, but bone material properties might be deteriorated. In an AFF series, we analyzed the bone material properties by microindentation. Four groups of patients were included: 6 AFF, 38 typical osteoporotic fractures, 6 LTB, and 20 controls without fracture. Neither typical osteoporotic fractures nor controls have received any antiosteoporotic medication. A general laboratory workup, bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and microindentation testing at the tibia were done in all patients. Total indentation distance (Total ID), indentation distance increase (IDI), and creep indentation distance (Creep ID) were measured (microns). Age-adjusted analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used for comparisons. Controls were significantly younger than fracture groups. Bisphosphonate exposure was on average 5.5 years (range 5 to 12 years) for the AFF and 5.4 years (range 5 to 8 years) for the LTB groups. Total ID (microns) showed better material properties (lower Total ID) for controls 36 (± 6; mean ± SD) than for AFF 46 (± 4) and for typical femoral fractures 47 (± 13), respectively. Patients on LTB showed values between controls and fractures, 38 (± 4), although not significantly different from any of the other three groups. IDI values showed a similar pattern 13 (± 2), 16 (± 6), 19 (± 3), and 18 (± 5). After adjusting by age, significant differences were seen between controls and typical (p Creep ID between groups. Our data suggest that patients with AFF have a deep deterioration in bone material properties at a tissue level similar to that for the osteoporotic fracture group. The LTB group shows levels that are in between controls and both type of fractures, although not statistically different. These results suggest that bisphosphonate therapy probably does not put the majority of patients at risk

  5. Doppler Tissue Evaluation of Atrial Conduction Properties in Patients With Non-alcoholic Fatty-liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozveren, Olcay; Izgi, Cemil; Eroglu, Elif; Simsek, Mustafa Aytek; Turer, Ayca; Kucukdurmaz, Zekeriya; Cinar, Veysel; Degertekin, Muzaffer

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in clinical practice, and there is an increasing trend in its prevalence in the general population. Recent studies have demonstrated increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) in NAFLD. However, information on the mechanism of increased risk of AF in NAFLD is lacking. Impaired atrial conduction is an important factor in the pathophysiology of AF. We aimed to investigate atrial conduction properties in patients with NAFLD by tissue Doppler echocardiography. Fifty-nine ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD patients without clinical diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or cardiac disease and 22 normal subjects as controls were included in this study. Atrial conduction properties were assessed by electromechanical delay (EMD) derived from Doppler tissue echocardiography examination and P-wave dispersion (PWD) calculated from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Inter-atrial and intra-atrial EMD intervals were significantly longer in NAFLD patients than in controls (inter-atrial EMD, 31.9 ± 8.5 ms vs. 23.4 ± 4.6 ms,p= 0.0001, and intra-atrial EMD, 14.3 ± 5.2 vs. 10.2 ± 4.0 ms,p= 0.001). Similarly, PWD was significantly higher in NAFLD patients compared with controls (49.2 ± 6.3 ms vs. 43.3 ± 4.2 ms,p= 0.0001). Maximum left atrial volume was also significantly higher in the NAFLD group than in controls (51 ± 11 mL vs. 34 ± 9 mL,pNAFLD. Also, in a patient population of NAFLD without any clinical diagnosis of cardiac disease, diabetes, or hypertension, left atrial volume was increased compared with controls. These findings suggest impaired atrial conduction as a factor in increased risk of AF in NAFLD.

  6. Temperature simulations in hyperthermia treatment planning of the head and neck region. Rigorous optimization of tissue properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaart, Rene F.; Rijnen, Zef; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Paulides, Margarethus M. [Erasmus MC - Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyperthermia Unit, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F. [Erasmus MC, Departments of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is used in the head and neck region (H and N) for pretreatment optimization, decision making, and real-time HTP-guided adaptive application of hyperthermia. In current clinical practice, HTP is based on power-absorption predictions, but thermal dose-effect relationships advocate its extension to temperature predictions. Exploitation of temperature simulations requires region- and temperature-specific thermal tissue properties due to the strong thermoregulatory response of H and N tissues. The purpose of our work was to develop a technique for patient group-specific optimization of thermal tissue properties based on invasively measured temperatures, and to evaluate the accuracy achievable. Data from 17 treated patients were used to optimize the perfusion and thermal conductivity values for the Pennes bioheat equation-based thermal model. A leave-one-out approach was applied to accurately assess the difference between measured and simulated temperature (∇T). The improvement in ∇T for optimized thermal property values was assessed by comparison with the ∇T for values from the literature, i.e., baseline and under thermal stress. The optimized perfusion and conductivity values of tumor, muscle, and fat led to an improvement in simulation accuracy (∇T: 2.1 ± 1.2 C) compared with the accuracy for baseline (∇T: 12.7 ± 11.1 C) or thermal stress (∇T: 4.4 ± 3.5 C) property values. The presented technique leads to patient group-specific temperature property values that effectively improve simulation accuracy for the challenging H and N region, thereby making simulations an elegant addition to invasive measurements. The rigorous leave-one-out assessment indicates that improvements in accuracy are required to rely only on temperature-based HTP in the clinic. (orig.) [German] Die Hyperthermiebehandlungsplanung (HTP, ''hyperthermia treatment planning'') wird in der Kopf- und Halsregion zur Optimierung der

  7. Treatment with tibolone partially protects 3-D microarchitecture of lumbar Vertebral Bone Tissues and Prevents Ovariectomy-induced Reduction in Mechanical Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    Treatment with Tibolone partially Protects 3-D Microarchitecture of Lumbar Vertebral Bone Tissues and Prevents Ovariectomy-induced Reduction in Mechanical Properties Tibolone (Org OD14) is a tissue selective steroid with estrogenic effects on the brain, bone and vagina, without stimulating...... the breast and endometrium. A previous study has shown that longterm treatment with tibolone prevents ovariectomy (OVX) induced bone loss in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tibolone on three-dimensional (3-D) microarchitecture and mechanical properties of rat lumbar vertebra. We...... and cortical bones were quantified and the mechanical properties of the lumbar cancellous and cortical bones were determined separately. Our data demonstrated that OVX lead to pronounced reduction in mechanical properties and bone mass. Treatment with tibolone increased mechanical properties and improved 3-D...

  8. The effect of processing variables on morphological and mechanical properties of supercritical CO2 foamed scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lisa J; Hutter, Victoria; Tai, Hongyun; Howdle, Steven M; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    The porous structure of a scaffold determines the ability of bone to regenerate within this environment. In situations where the scaffold is required to provide mechanical function, balance must be achieved between optimizing porosity and maximizing mechanical strength. Supercritical CO(2) foaming can produce open-cell, interconnected structures in a low-temperature, solvent-free process. In this work, we report on foams of varying structural and mechanical properties fabricated from different molecular weights of poly(DL-lactic acid) P(DL)LA (57, 25 and 15 kDa) and by varying the depressurization rate. Rapid depressurization rates produced scaffolds with homogeneous pore distributions and some closed pores. Decreasing the depressurization rate produced scaffolds with wider pore size distributions and larger, more interconnected pores. In compressive testing, scaffolds produced from 57 kDa P(DL)LA exhibited typical stress-strain curves for elastomeric open-cell foams whereas scaffolds fabricated from 25 and 15 kDa P(DL)LA behaved as brittle foams. The structural and mechanical properties of scaffolds produced from 57 kDa P(DL)LA by scCO(2) ensure that these scaffolds are suitable for potential applications in bone tissue engineering.

  9. Understanding the influence of surface properties of nanoparticles and penetration enhancers for improving bioavailability in eye tissues in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaling, Binapani; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2016-03-30

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems, mucoadhesive polymers and penetration enhancers have been used individually to overcome ocular barriers and increase bioavailability to eye tissues. However the combined influence of mucoadhesive polymer coating and penetration enhancers on NP permeability has not been investigated. Hence, in this study, three types of core-shell nanoparticles with same hydrophobic core but different hydrophilic mucoadhesive shells were developed. Initially the influence of a single penetration enhancer (PE) [benzalkonium chloride (BAC)] on ocular permeability of all the three core-shell nanoparticles was studied. Then ocular permeability of a single nanoparticle system [polycaprolactone-pluronicF68 (PCL-PF68)] in presence of different types of PEs namely BAC, capric acid (CA), EDTA, sodium glycocolate (SG) and sodium taurocholate (ST) was studied. The results indicated that BAC differentially enhanced ocular permeability of nanoparticles depending on their surface properties. All the PEs except EDTA enhanced ocular permeability of PCL-PF68 nanoparticles to anterior part of the eye. BAC and CA showed increased bioavailability of PCL-PF68 nanoparticles in conjunctiva, SG in cornea, iris and ciliary body, and ST in cornea. Overall, the combination of PEs and surface properties of nanoparticles can differentially influence ocular permeability and bioavailability and can be advantageously used to develop improved ocular drug delivery systems.

  10. Relationship between meat toughness and properties of connective tissue from cows and young bulls heat treated at low temperatures for prolonged times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line; Ertbjerg, Per; Løje, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    of beef was investigated and the relationship to properties of connective tissue was examined. Measurements of toughness, collagen solubility, cathepsin activity and protein denaturation of beef semitendinosus heated at temperatures between 53. °C and 63. °C for up to 19 1/2. h were conducted. The results...... of the connective tissue, caused partly by denaturation or conformational changes of the proteins and/or by solubilization of collagen. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd....

  11. 嗅鞘细胞生物学特性及其表达的相关分子%Olfactory ensheathing cells: cellular biology and molecular properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晶晶; 袁一旻; 苏志达

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), a unique population of glia in the primary olfactory nervous system, are derived from the olfactory placode in the peripheral nervous system; they can envelop olfactory axons during migration from the olfactory epithelium to the bulb in the central nervous system and are thought critical for growth of olfactory axons in both the developing and adult olfactory nervous system. Importantly, OECs are potential candidates for implantation therapy of damage to the central nervous system. The biological features of OECs are determined by the molecules they express: PDGF, NDY, S-100, Nestin, etc. Although p75NTR is commonly used to label OECs, up to now there have been no specific molecules for identifying OECs from Schwann cells and astrocytes. This paper reviews the cellular and molecular biological properties of OECs.%嗅鞘细胞(olfactory ensheathing cells, OECs)起源于外周神经系统(嗅基板),可穿越外周与中枢之间的屏障进入中枢神经系统,是嗅觉系统内一类特殊的胶质细胞.OECs在整个嗅觉通路中包绕在嗅神经外周,伴随其进入嗅中枢,在嗅神经生长和再生中发挥重要作用.OECs是目前移植治疗中枢神经损伤的重要候选细胞之一.其生物学特点是由特异表达的分子决定的,这些分子包括PDGF、NDY、S-100和Nestin等.目前实验室中常用p75NTR标记OECs的定位与分布,尚缺乏可以特异标记OECs的分子,将其与神经膜细胞和星形胶质细胞区分开.本文就OECs生物学特性及其表达的相关分子作一简要综述.

  12. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400-1100 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao Huilan; Xing Da; Wei Huajiang; Gu Huaimin [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, ina Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Guoyong; Lu Jianjun [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)], E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn

    2008-04-21

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P < 0.01) and smaller reduced scattering coefficients (P < 0.01) for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, and there were smaller optical penetration depths for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, especially in the near-infrared wavelength. Thermal coagulation induced significant increase of the absorption coefficients and reduced scattering coefficients for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues, and significantly reduced decrease of the optical penetration depths for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues. The smaller optical penetration depth for coagulated adenomatous colon tissues is a disadvantage for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy.

  13. Structural, thermal, optical properties and cytotoxicity of PMMA/ZnO fibers and films: Potential application in tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balen, Rodrigo; Vidotto da Costa, Wilian; Lara Andrade, Jéssica de; Piai, Juliana Francis [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Química, Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900, Zona Sete, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Muniz, Edvani Curti [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Química, Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900, Zona Sete, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biotecnologia Aplicada à Agricultura, Universidade Paranaense (UNIPAR), 87502-210, Umuarama, PR (Brazil); Programa de Pós- Graduação em Ciências de Materiais & Engenharia, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR-LD), 86036-370, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Companhoni, Mychelle Vianna; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900, Zona Sete, Maringá, PR (Brazil); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Films and fibers of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposite were prepared. • ZnO NPs incorporated into PMMA fibers reduces their diameter and beads presence. • PMMA films containing ZnO exhibit higher thermal stability than pure polymer. • PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites show improved optical properties compared to pure polymer. • PMMA/ZnO shows potential for applications in tissue engineering. - Abstract: Films and fibers of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites (100/0, 99/01, 97/03, 95/05, 90/10, and 85/15 wt.%) were produced by casting and electrospinning, respectively. Their structural, thermal, and optical properties were investigated by XRD, SEM, TGA, PAS, and PL. The incorporation of ZnO NPs reduced the diameter of PMMA fibers and the presence of beads. The surfaces of the fibers exhibited greater hydrophobicity, compared to the films, with contact angles of around 120° and 94°, respectively. PMMA films containing ZnO exhibited higher thermal stability than the pure polymer, while the corresponding fibers did not show any changes in thermal stability. The dispersion of the ZnO NPs at the surface and in the bulk of the nanocomposites appeared to be relatively homogeneous. ZnO improved the optical properties of the PMMA, with an intense absorption band near 370 nm observed for all the nanocomposites, which also exhibited luminescence with emission in the near-UV region, both attributed to ZnO. Biological tests demonstrated that fibers and films with up to 1% of ZnO exhibited good performance in the proliferation of fibroblast cells, indicating their potential for applications in tissue engineering. The fibers provided higher cell viability than the films, presumably due to their greater surface area and/or more suitable surface morphology. Nanocomposites with 15% ZnO inhibited cell proliferation, due to the cytotoxicity of the ZnO NPs. Although several applications of PMMA have been suggested by biomedical researchers, until now there have been no reports on the specific

  14. Hydroxyapatite-TiO(2)-based nanocomposites synthesized in supercritical CO(2) for bone tissue engineering: physical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salarian, Mehrnaz; Xu, William Z; Wang, Zhiqiang; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Charpentier, Paul A

    2014-10-08

    Calcium phosphate-based nanocomposites offer a unique solution toward producing scaffolds for orthopedic and dental implants. However, despite attractive bioactivity and biocompatibility, hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been limited in heavy load-bearing applications due to its intrinsically low mechanical strength. In this work, to improve the mechanical properties of HAp, we grew HAp nanoplates from the surface of one-dimensional titania nanorod structures by combining a coprecipitation and sol-gel methodology using supercritical fluid processing with carbon dioxide (scCO2). The effects of metal alkoxide concentration (1.1-1.5 mol/L), reaction temperature (60-80 °C), and pressure (6000-8000 psi) on the morphology, crystallinity, and surface area of the resulting nanostructured composites were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method. Chemical composition of the products was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analyses. HAp nanoplates and HAp-TiO2 nanocomposites were homogeneously mixed within poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to develop scaffolds with enhanced physical and mechanical properties for bone regeneration. Mechanical behavior analysis demonstrated that the Young's and flexural moduli of the PCL/HAp-TiO2 composites were substantially higher than the PCL/HAp composites. Therefore, this new synthesis methodology in scCO2 holds promise for bone tissue engineering with improved mechanical properties.

  15. Characterization of mechanical and biological properties of 3-D scaffolds reinforced with zinc oxide for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pei; Wei, Pingpin; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    A scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have highly interconnected porous structure, appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this work, we fabricated well-interconnected porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds via selective laser sintering (SLS). We found that the mechanical and biological properties of the scaffolds were improved by doping of zinc oxide (ZnO). Our data showed that the fracture toughness increased from 1.09 to 1.40 MPam(1/2), and the compressive strength increased from 3.01 to 17.89 MPa when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. It is hypothesized that the increase of ZnO would lead to a reduction in grain size and an increase in density of the strut. However, the fracture toughness and compressive strength decreased with further increasing of ZnO content, which may be due to the sharp increase in grain size. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was investigated by analyzing the adhesion and the morphology of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells cultured on the surfaces of the scaffolds. The scaffolds exhibited better and better ability to support cell attachment and proliferation when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. Moreover, a bone like apatite layer formed on the surfaces of the scaffolds after incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating an ability of osteoinduction and osteoconduction. In summary, interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds doped with ZnO were successfully fabricated and revealed good mechanical and biological properties, which may be used for bone repair and replacement potentially.

  16. Characterization of mechanical and biological properties of 3-D scaffolds reinforced with zinc oxide for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Feng

    Full Text Available A scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have highly interconnected porous structure, appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this work, we fabricated well-interconnected porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffolds via selective laser sintering (SLS. We found that the mechanical and biological properties of the scaffolds were improved by doping of zinc oxide (ZnO. Our data showed that the fracture toughness increased from 1.09 to 1.40 MPam(1/2, and the compressive strength increased from 3.01 to 17.89 MPa when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. It is hypothesized that the increase of ZnO would lead to a reduction in grain size and an increase in density of the strut. However, the fracture toughness and compressive strength decreased with further increasing of ZnO content, which may be due to the sharp increase in grain size. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was investigated by analyzing the adhesion and the morphology of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells cultured on the surfaces of the scaffolds. The scaffolds exhibited better and better ability to support cell attachment and proliferation when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. Moreover, a bone like apatite layer formed on the surfaces of the scaffolds after incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF, indicating an ability of osteoinduction and osteoconduction. In summary, interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds doped with ZnO were successfully fabricated and revealed good mechanical and biological properties, which may be used for bone repair and replacement potentially.

  17. Geometric and mechanical properties evaluation of scaffolds for bone tissue applications designing by a reaction-diffusion models and manufactured with a material jetting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Velasco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds are essential in bone tissue engineering, as they provide support to cells and growth factors necessary to regenerate tissue. In addition, they meet the mechanical function of the bone while it regenerates. Currently, the multiple methods for designing and manufacturing scaffolds are based on regular structures from a unit cell that repeats in a given domain. However, these methods do not resemble the actual structure of the trabecular bone which may work against osseous tissue regeneration. To explore the design of porous structures with similar mechanical properties to native bone, a geometric generation scheme from a reaction-diffusion model and its manufacturing via a material jetting system is proposed. This article presents the methodology used, the geometric characteristics and the modulus of elasticity of the scaffolds designed and manufactured. The method proposed shows its potential to generate structures that allow to control the basic scaffold properties for bone tissue engineering such as the width of the channels and porosity. The mechanical properties of our scaffolds are similar to trabecular tissue present in vertebrae and tibia bones. Tests on the manufactured scaffolds show that it is necessary to consider the orientation of the object relative to the printing system because the channel geometry, mechanical properties and roughness are heavily influenced by the position of the surface analyzed with respect to the printing axis. A possible line for future work may be the establishment of a set of guidelines to consider the effects of manufacturing processes in designing stages.

  18. A human-phantom coupling experiment and a dispersive simulation model for investigating the variation of dielectric properties of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Fukuhara, Yuto; He, Siyu; Saito, Kazuyuki; Ito, Koichi; Yu, Wenwei

    2015-06-01

    Variation of the dielectric properties of tissues could happen due to aging, moisture of the skin, muscle denervation, and variation of blood flow by temperature. Several studies used burst-modulated alternating stimulation to improve activation and comfort by reducing tissue impedance as a possible mechanism to generate muscle activation with less energy. The study of the effect of dielectric properties of biological tissues in nerve activation presents a fundamental problem, which is the difficulty of systematically changing the morphological factors and dielectric properties of the subjects under study. We tackle this problem by using a simulation and an experimental study. The experimental study is a novel method that combines a fat tissue-equivalent phantom, with known and adjustable dielectric properties, with the human thigh. In this way, the dispersion of the tissue under study could be modified to observe its effects systematically in muscle activation. We observed that, to generate a given amount of muscle or nerve activation under conditions of decreased impedance, the magnitude of the current needs to be increased while the magnitude of the voltage needs to be decreased.

  19. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Stimulates Extra-Cellular Matrix Production in Cellular Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Casco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologies have been integrated into drug delivery, and non-invasive imaging applications, into nanostructured scaffolds for the manipulation of cells. The objective of this work was to determine how the physico-chemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs and their spatial distribution into cellular spheroids stimulated cells to produce an extracellular matrix (ECM. The MNP concentration (0.03 mg/mL, 0.1 mg/mL and 0.3 mg/mL, type (magnetoferritin, shape (nanorod—85 nm × 425 nm and incorporation method were studied to determine each of their effects on the specific stimulation of four ECM proteins (collagen I, collagen IV, elastin and fibronectin in primary rat aortic smooth muscle cell. Results demonstrated that as MNP concentration increased there was up to a 6.32-fold increase in collagen production over no MNP samples. Semi-quantitative Immunohistochemistry (IHC results demonstrated that MNP type had the greatest influence on elastin production with a 56.28% positive area stain compared to controls and MNP shape favored elastin stimulation with a 50.19% positive area stain. Finally, there are no adverse effects of MNPs on cellular contractile ability. This study provides insight on the stimulation of ECM production in cells and tissues, which is important because it plays a critical role in regulating cellular functions.

  20. Energy Landscape of Cellular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    Cellular Networks are in general quite robust and perform their biological functions against the environmental perturbations. Progresses have been made from experimental global screenings, topological and engineering studies. However, there are so far few studies of why the network should be robust and perform biological functions from global physical perspectives. In this work, we will explore the global properties of the network from physical perspectives. The aim of this work is to develop a conceptual framework and quantitative physical methods to study the global nature of the cellular network. The main conclusion of this presentation is that we uncovered the underlying energy landscape for several small cellular networks such as MAPK signal transduction network and gene regulatory networks, from the experimentally measured or inferred inherent chemical reaction rates. The underlying dynamics of these networks can show bi-stable as well as oscillatory behavior. The global shapes of the energy landscapes of the underlying cellular networks we have studied are robust against perturbations of the kinetic rates and environmental disturbances through noise. We derived a quantitative criterion for robustness of the network function from the underlying landscape. It provides a natural explanation of the robustness and stability of the network for performing biological functions. We believe the robust landscape is a global universal property for cellular networks. We believe the robust landscape is a quantitative realization of Darwinian principle of natural selection at the cellular network level. It may provide a novel algorithm for optimizing the network connections, which is crucial for the cellular network design and synthetic biology. Our approach is general and can be applied to other cellular networks.

  1. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data.

  2. Structural, thermal, optical properties and cytotoxicity of PMMA/ZnO fibers and films: Potential application in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balen, Rodrigo; da Costa, Wilian Vidotto; de Lara Andrade, Jéssica; Piai, Juliana Francis; Muniz, Edvani Curti; Companhoni, Mychelle Vianna; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Lima, Sandro Marcio; da Cunha Andrade, Luis Humberto; Bittencourt, Paulo Rodrigo Stival; Hechenleitner, Ana Adelina Winkler; Pineda, Edgardo Alfonso Gómez; Fernandes, Daniela Martins

    2016-11-01

    Films and fibers of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites (100/0, 99/01, 97/03, 95/05, 90/10, and 85/15 wt.%) were produced by casting and electrospinning, respectively. Their structural, thermal, and optical properties were investigated by XRD, SEM, TGA, PAS, and PL. The incorporation of ZnO NPs reduced the diameter of PMMA fibers and the presence of beads. The surfaces of the fibers exhibited greater hydrophobicity, compared to the films, with contact angles of around 120° and 94°, respectively. PMMA films containing ZnO exhibited higher thermal stability than the pure polymer, while the corresponding fibers did not show any changes in thermal stability. The dispersion of the ZnO NPs at the surface and in the bulk of the nanocomposites appeared to be relatively homogeneous. ZnO improved the optical properties of the PMMA, with an intense absorption band near 370 nm observed for all the nanocomposites, which also exhibited luminescence with emission in the near-UV region, both attributed to ZnO. Biological tests demonstrated that fibers and films with up to 1% of ZnO exhibited good performance in the proliferation of fibroblast cells, indicating their potential for applications in tissue engineering. The fibers provided higher cell viability than the films, presumably due to their greater surface area and/or more suitable surface morphology. Nanocomposites with 15% ZnO inhibited cell proliferation, due to the cytotoxicity of the ZnO NPs. Although several applications of PMMA have been suggested by biomedical researchers, until now there have been no reports on the specific uses of fibers and films of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites as scaffolds for fibroblast cell proliferation.

  3. Tissue level material composition and mechanical properties in Brtl/+ mouse model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta after sclerostin antibody treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, William R.; Sinder, Benjamin P.; Salemi, Joseph; Ominsky, Michael S.; Marini, Joan C.; Caird, Michelle S.; Morris, Michael D.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2015-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder resulting in defective collagen or collagen-associated proteins and fragile, brittle bones. To date, therapies to improve OI bone mass, such as bisphosphonates, have increased bone mass in the axial skeleton of OI patients, but have shown limited effects at reducing long bone fragility. Sclerostin antibody (Scl- Ab), currently in clinical trials for osteoporosis, stimulates bone formation and may have the potential to reduce long bone fracture rates in OI patients. Scl-Ab has been investigated as an anabolic therapy for OI in the Brtl/+ mouse model of moderately severe Type IV OI. While Scl-Ab increases long bone mass in the Brtl/+ mouse, it is not known whether material properties and composition changes also occur. Here, we report on the effects of Scl-Ab on wild type and Brtl/+ young (3 week) and adult (6 month) male mice. Scl-Ab was administered over 5 weeks (25mg/kg, 2x/week). Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation are used for bone composition and biomechanical bone property measurements in excised bone. Fluorescent labels (calcein and alizarin) at 4 time points over the entire treatment period are used to enable measurements at specific tissue age. Differences between wild type and Brtl/+ groups included variations in the mineral and matrix lattices, particularly the phosphate v1, carbonate v1, and the v(CC) proline and hydroxyproline stretch vibrations. Results of Raman spectroscopy corresponded to nanoindentation findings which indicated that old bone (near midcortex) is stiffer (higher elastic modulus) than new bone. We compare and contrast mineral to matrix and carbonate to phosphate ratios in young and adult mice with and without treatment.

  4. Evaluation of clinical, antiinflammatory and antiinfective properties of amniotic membrane used for guided tissue regeneration: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the antiinflammatory, antiinfective and clinical properties of amniotic membrane (AM when used for guided tissue regeneration (GTR in contained interdental defects. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 subjects participated in this study. Two sites in each subject were randomly assigned into each of the following experimental groups; test group: AM with bone graft and control group: Bone graft only. Clinical parameters included recording site-specific measures of plaque, gingivitis, probing pocket depth (PPD, and clinical attachment loss (CAL. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF from the test and control sites were measured by using commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits. The evaluation of bone fill was performed by using digital subtraction technique and morphometric area analysis. One-way analysis of variance followed by the post-hoc test was used for intragroup and intergroup comparison. A P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Combination therapy using an AM increased bone fill and reduced PPD and CAL when compared to controls. AM also resulted in a significant reduction of GCF IL-1β levels and insignificant increase in the hBD-2 levels. Conclusion: From this trial conducted over a period of 24 weeks, AM demonstrated a marked antiinflammatory effect and its use resulted in an improvement in periodontal parameters. AM has the potential to function as a barrier for GTR and the unique properties associated with this material can augment its potential as a matrix for periodontal regeneration.

  5. Comparison of biocompatibility and adsorption properties of different plastics for advanced microfluidic cell and tissue culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Midwoud, Paul M; Janse, Arnout; Merema, Marjolijn T; Groothuis, Geny M M; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2012-05-01

    Microfluidic technology is providing new routes toward advanced cell and tissue culture models to better understand human biology and disease. Many advanced devices have been made from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) to enable experiments, for example, to study drug metabolism by use of precision-cut liver slices, that are not possible with conventional systems. However, PDMS, a silicone rubber material, is very hydrophobic and tends to exhibit significant adsorption and absorption of hydrophobic drugs and their metabolites. Although glass could be used as an alternative, thermoplastics are better from a cost and fabrication perspective. Thermoplastic polymers (plastics) allow easy surface treatment and are generally transparent and biocompatible. This study focuses on the fabrication of biocompatible microfluidic devices with low adsorption properties from the thermoplastics poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) as alternatives for PDMS devices. Thermoplastic surfaces were oxidized using UV-generated ozone or oxygen plasma to reduce adsorption of hydrophobic compounds. Surface hydrophilicity was assessed over 4 weeks by measuring the contact angle of water on the surface. The adsorption of 7-ethoxycoumarin, testosterone, and their metabolites was also determined after UV-ozone treatment. Biocompatibility was assessed by culturing human hepatoma (HepG2) cells on treated surfaces. Comparison of the adsorption properties and biocompatibility of devices in different plastics revealed that only UV-ozone-treated PC and COC devices satisfied both criteria. This paper lays an important foundation that will help researchers make informed decisions with respect to the materials they select for microfluidic cell-based culture experiments.

  6. Establishing the biomechanical properties of the pelvic soft tissues through an inverse finite element analysis using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M E T; Brandão, S; Parente, M P L; Mascarenhas, T; Natal Jorge, R M

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical characteristics of the female pelvic floor are relevant when explaining pelvic dysfunction. The decreased elasticity of the tissue often causes inability to maintain urethral position, also leading to vaginal and rectal descend when coughing or defecating as a response to an increase in the internal abdominal pressure. These conditions can be associated with changes in the mechanical properties of the supportive structures-namely, the pelvic floor muscles-including impairment. In this work, we used an inverse finite element analysis to calculate the material constants for the passive mechanical behavior of the pelvic floor muscles. The numerical model of the pelvic floor muscles and bones was built from magnetic resonance axial images acquired at rest. Muscle deformation, simulating the Valsalva maneuver with a pressure of 4 KPa, was compared with the muscle displacement obtained through additional dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The difference in displacement was of 0.15 mm in the antero-posterior direction and 3.69 mm in the supero-inferior direction, equating to a percentage error of 7.0% and 16.9%, respectively. We obtained the shortest difference in the displacements using an iterative process that reached the material constants for the Mooney-Rivlin constitutive model (c10=11.8 KPa and c20=5.53 E-02 KPa). For each iteration, the orthogonal distance between each node from the group of nodes which defined the puborectal muscle in the numerical model versus dynamic magnetic resonance imaging was computed. With the methodology used in this work, it was possible to obtain in vivo biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles for a specific subject using input information acquired non-invasively.

  7. Passive mechanical properties of rat abdominal wall muscles suggest an important role of the extracellular connective tissue matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen H M; Carr, John Austin; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal wall muscles have a unique morphology suggesting a complex role in generating and transferring force to the spinal column. Studying passive mechanical properties of these muscles may provide insights into their ability to transfer force among structures. Biopsies from rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) were harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and single muscle fibers and fiber bundles (4-8 fibers ensheathed in their connective tissue matrix) were isolated and mechanically stretched in a passive state. Slack sarcomere lengths were measured and elastic moduli were calculated from stress-strain data. Titin molecular mass was also measured from single muscle fibers. No significant differences were found among the four abdominal wall muscles in terms of slack sarcomere length or elastic modulus. Interestingly, across all four muscles, slack sarcomere lengths were quite long in individual muscle fibers (>2.4 µm), and demonstrated a significantly longer slack length in comparison to fiber bundles (p muscle lengths. Titin molecular mass was significantly less in TrA compared to each of the other three muscles (p < 0.0009), but this difference did not correspond to hypothesized differences in stiffness.

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Calcium Phosphate Cement/Gelatine Composite Scaffold with Oriented Pore Structure for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiaopeng; HE Fupo; YE Jiandong

    2012-01-01

    The macroporous calcium phosphate(CPC) cement with oriented pore structure was prepared by freeze casting.SEM observation showed that the macropores in the porous calcium phosphate cement were interconnected aligned along the ice growth direction.The porosity of the as-prepared porous CPC was measured to be 87.6% by Archimede's principle.XRD patterns of specimens showed that poorly crystallized hydroxyapatite was the main phase present in the hydrated porous calcium phosphate cement.To improve the mechanical properties of the CPC scaffold,the 15% gelatine solution was infiltrated into the pores under vacuum and then the samples were freeze dried to form the CPC/gelatine composite scaffolds.After reinforced with gelatine,the compressive strength of CPC/gelatine composite increased to 5.12 MPa,around fifty times greater than that of the unreinforced macroporous CPC scaffold,which was only 0.1 MPa.And the toughness of the scaffold has been greatly improved via the gelatine reinforcement with a much greater fracture strain.SEM examination of the specimens indicated good bonding between the cement and gelatine.Participating the external load by the deformable gelatine,patching the defects of the CPC pores wall,and crack deflection were supposed to be the reinforcement mechanisms.In conclusion,the calcium phosphate cement/gelatine composite with oriented pore structure prepared in this work might be a potential scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  9. Cellular communication through light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fels

    Full Text Available Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  10. Improving parenchyma segmentation by simultaneous estimation of tissue property T1 map and group-wise registration of inversion recovery MR breast images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ye; Xue, Zhong; Englander, Sarah; Schnall, Mitchell; Shen, Dinggang

    2008-01-01

    The parenchyma tissue in the breast has a strong relation with predictive biomarkers of breast cancer. To better segment parenchyma, we perform segmentation on estimated tissue property T1 map. To improve the estimation of tissue property (T1) which is the basis for parenchyma segmentation, we present an integrated algorithm for simultaneous T1 map estimation, T1 map based parenchyma segmentation and group-wise registration on series of inversion recovery magnetic resonance (MR) breast images. The advantage of using this integrated algorithm is that the simultaneous T1 map estimation (E-step) and group-wise registration (R-step) could benefit each other and jointly improve parenchyma segmentation. In particular, in E-step, T1 map based segmentation could help perform an edge-preserving smoothing on the tentatively estimated noisy T1 map, and could also help provide tissue probability maps to be robustly registered in R-step. Meanwhile, the improved estimation of T1 map could help segment parenchyma in a more accurate way. In R-step, for robust registration, the group-wise registration is performed on the tissue probability maps produced in E-step, rather than the original inversion recovery MR images, since tissue probability maps are the intrinsic tissue property which is invariant to the use of different imaging parameters. The better alignment of images achieved in R-step can help improve T1 map estimation and indirectly the T1 map based parenchyma segmentation. By iteratively performing E-step and R-step, we can simultaneously obtain better results for T1 map estimation, T1 map based segmentation, group-wise registration, and finally parenchyma segmentation.

  11. Introduction to Tissular and Cellular Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JF; STOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    Most human tissues do not regenerate spontaneously, which is why cellular therapies and tissular engineering are promising alternatives. The principle is simple: cells are sampled in a patient and introduced in the damaged tissue or in a tridimentional porous support and cultivated in a bioreactor in which the physico-chemical and mechanical parameters are controlled. Once the tissues (or the cells) are mature they may be implanted. In parallel, the development of biotherapies with stem cells is a field of ...

  12. Optical properties of tumor tissues grown on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken eggs: tumor model to assay of tumor response to photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Norihiro; Kariyama, Yoichiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Ishii, Takuya; Kitajima, Yuya; Inoue, Katsushi; Ishizuka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tohru; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Herein, the optical adequacy of a tumor model prepared with tumor cells grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of a chicken egg is evaluated as an alternative to the mouse tumor model to assess the optimal irradiation conditions in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The optical properties of CAM and mouse tumor tissues were measured with a double integrating sphere and the inverse Monte Carlo technique in the 350- to 1000-nm wavelength range. The hemoglobin and water absorption bands observed in the CAM tumor tissue (10 eggs and 10 tumors) are equal to that of the mouse tumor tissue (8 animals and 8 tumors). The optical intersubject variability of the CAM tumor tissues meets or exceeds that of the mouse tumor tissues, and the reduced scattering coefficient spectra of CAM tumor tissues can be equated with those of mouse tumor tissues. These results confirm that the CAM tumor model is a viable alternative to the mouse tumor model, especially for deriving optimal irradiation conditions in PDT.

  13. Tumor tissue slice cultures as a platform for analyzing tissue-penetration and biological activities of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Lea; Höbel, Sabrina; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Ewe, Alexander; Bechmann, Ingo; Franke, Heike; Merz, Felicitas; Aigner, Achim

    2017-03-01

    The success of therapeutic nanoparticles depends, among others, on their ability to penetrate a tissue for actually reaching the target cells, and their efficient cellular uptake in the context of intact tissue and stroma. Various nanoparticle modifications have been implemented for altering physicochemical and biological properties. Their analysis, however, so far mainly relies on cell culture experiments which only poorly reflect the in vivo situation, or is based on in vivo experiments that are often complicated by whole-body pharmacokinetics and are rather tedious especially when analyzing larger nanoparticle sets. For the more precise analysis of nanoparticle properties at their desired site of action, efficient ex vivo systems closely mimicking in vivo tissue properties are needed. In this paper, we describe the setup of organotypic tumor tissue slice cultures for the analysis of tissue-penetrating properties and biological activities of nanoparticles. As a model system, we employ 350μm thick slice cultures from different tumor xenograft tissues, and analyze modified or non-modified polyethylenimine (PEI) complexes as well as their lipopolyplex derivatives for siRNA delivery. The described conditions for tissue slice preparation and culture ensure excellent tissue preservation for at least 14days, thus allowing for prolonged experimentation and analysis. When using fluorescently labeled siRNA for complex visualization, fluorescence microscopy of cryo-sectioned tissue slices reveals different degrees of nanoparticle tissue penetration, dependent on their surface charge. More importantly, the determination of siRNA-mediated knockdown efficacies of an endogenous target gene, the oncogenic survival factor Survivin, reveals the possibility to accurately assess biological nanoparticle activities in situ, i.e. in living cells in their original environment. Taken together, we establish tumor (xenograft) tissue slices for the accurate and facile ex vivo assessment of

  14. Quantitative assessment of optical properties in healthy cartilage and repair tissue by optical coherence tomography and histology (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van der Pol, Edwin; Savci-Heijink, Cemile D.; Strackee, Simon D.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantification of the OCT signal is an important step toward clinical implementation of a diagnostic tool in cartilage imaging. Discrimination of structural cartilage differences in patients with osteoarthritis is critical, yet challenging. This study assesses the variation in the optical attenuation coefficient (μOCT) between healthy cartilage, repair tissue, bone and layers within repair tissue in a controlled setting. OCT and histology was used to assess goat talus articular surfaces in which central osteochondral defects were created. Exact matches of OCT and histology were selected for research. μOCT measurements were taken from healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Measured μOCT in healthy cartilage was higher compared to both repair tissue and bone tissue. Two possible mechanisms for the difference in attenuation were investigated. We studied morphological parameters in terms of nucleus count, nucleus size and inter-nucleus distance. Collagen content in healthy cartilage and repair tissue was assessed using polarization microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the nuclei did not demonstrate a difference in nucleus size and count between healthy cartilage and repair tissue. In healthy cartilage, cells were spaced farther apart and had a lower variation in local nuclear density compared to repair tissue. Polarization microscopy suggested higher collagen content in healthy cartilage compared to repair tissue. μOCT measurements can distinguish between healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Results suggest that cartilage OCT attenuation measurements could be of great impact in clinical diagnostics of osteoarthritis.

  15. Up-regulation of mitochondrial activity and acquirement of brown adipose tissue-like property in the white adipose tissue of fsp27 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Yon Toh

    Full Text Available Fsp27, a member of the Cide family proteins, was shown to localize to lipid droplet and promote lipid storage in adipocytes. We aimed to understand the biological role of Fsp27 in regulating adipose tissue differentiation, insulin sensitivity and energy balance. Fsp27(-/- mice and Fsp27/lep double deficient mice were generated and we examined the adiposity, whole body metabolism, BAT and WAT morphology, insulin sensitivity, mitochondrial activity, and gene expression changes in these mouse strains. Furthermore, we isolated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs from wildtype and Fsp27(-/- mice, followed by their differentiation into adipocytes in vitro. We found that Fsp27 is expressed in both brown adipose tissue (BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT and its levels were significantly elevated in the WAT and liver of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Fsp27(-/- mice had increased energy expenditure, lower levels of plasma triglycerides and free fatty acids. Furthermore, Fsp27(-/-and Fsp27/lep double-deficient mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity and display increased insulin sensitivity. Moreover, white adipocytes in Fsp27(-/- mice have reduced triglycerides accumulation and smaller lipid droplets, while levels of mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial size and activity are dramatically increased. We further demonstrated that BAT-specific genes and key metabolic controlling factors such as FoxC2, PPAR and PGC1alpha were all markedly upregulated. In contrast, factors inhibiting BAT differentiation such as Rb, p107 and RIP140 were down-regulated in the WAT of Fsp27(-/- mice. Remarkably, Fsp27(-/- MEFs differentiated in vitro show many brown adipocyte characteristics in the presence of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3. Our data thus suggest that Fsp27 acts as a novel regulator in vivo to control WAT identity, mitochondrial activity and insulin sensitivity.

  16. Engineered Polymeric Hydrogels for 3D Tissue Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric biomaterials are widely used in a wide range of biomedical applications due to their unique properties, such as biocompatibility, multi-tunability and easy fabrication. Specifically, polymeric hydrogel materials are extensively utilized as therapeutic implants and therapeutic vehicles for tissue regeneration and drug delivery systems. Recently, hydrogels have been developed as artificial cellular microenvironments because of the structural and physiological similarity to native extracellular matrices. With recent advances in hydrogel materials, many researchers are creating three-dimensional tissue models using engineered hydrogels and various cell sources, which is a promising platform for tissue regeneration, drug discovery, alternatives to animal models and the study of basic cell biology. In this review, we discuss how polymeric hydrogels are used to create engineered tissue constructs. Specifically, we focus on emerging technologies to generate advanced tissue models that precisely recapitulate complex native tissues in vivo.

  17. Wave field characterization for non-destructive assessment of elastic properties using laser-acoustic sources in fluids and eye related tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windisch, T.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Spörl, E.

    2010-03-01

    The age-related changes in the visco-elastic properties of the human lens are discussed with respect to presbyopia for a long time. All known measurement techniques are based on extracted lenses or are damaging the tissue. Hence, in vivo studies of lens hardness are not possible at the moment. To close this gap in lens diagnostics this project deals with an approach for a non-contact laser-acoustic characterization technique. Laser-generated wave fronts are reflected by the tissue interfaces and are also affected by the visco-elastic properties of the lens tissue. After propagating through the eye, these waves are recorded as corneal vibrations by laser vibrometry. A systematic analysis of amplitude and phase of these signals and the wave generation process shall give information about the interface locations and the tissues viscoelastic properties. Our recent studies on extracted porcine eyes proved that laser-acoustic sources can be systematically used for non-contacting generation and recording of ultrasound inside the human eye. Furthermore, a specific numerical model provides important contributions to the understanding of the complex wave propagation process. Measurements of the acoustic sources support this approach. Future investigations are scheduled to answer the question, whether this novel technique can be directly used during a laser surgery for monitoring purposes and if a purely diagnostic approach, e.g. by excitation in the aqueous humor, is also possible. In both cases, this technique offers a promising approach for non-contact ultrasound based eye diagnostics.

  18. Multiaxial mechanical properties and constitutive modeling of human adipose tissue: a basis for preoperative simulations in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gerhard; Eder, Maximilian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pathak, Heramb; Bonitz, Lars; Mueller, Christoph; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-11-01

    A preoperative simulation of soft tissue deformations during plastic and reconstructive surgery is desirable to support the surgeon's planning and to improve surgical outcomes. The current development of constitutive adipose tissue models, for the implementation in multilayer computational frameworks for the simulation of human soft tissue deformations, has proved difficult because knowledge of the required mechanical parameters of fat tissue is limited. Therefore, for the first time, human abdominal adipose tissues were mechanically investigated by biaxial tensile and triaxial shear tests. The results of this study suggest that human abdominal adipose tissues under quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial loadings can be characterized as a nonlinear, anisotropic and viscoelastic soft biological material. The nonlinear and anisotropic features are consequences of the material's collagenous microstructure. The aligned collagenous septa observed in histological investigations causes the anisotropy of the tissue. A hyperelastic model used in this study was appropriate to represent the quasi-static multiaxial mechanical behavior of fat tissue. The constitutive parameters are intended to serve as a basis for soft tissue simulations using the finite element method, which is an apparent method for obtaining promising results in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  19. β-Tricalcium phosphate/poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds with robust mechanical property for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiaoyu; Ma, Yifan; Kan, Chao; Ma, Haiyan; Li, Yulin; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-11-01

    Despite good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, porous β-TCP scaffolds still lack the structural stability and mechanical robustness, which greatly limit their application in the field of bone regeneration. The hybridization of β-TCP with conventional synthetic biodegradable PLA and PCL only produced a limited toughening effect due to the plasticity of the polymers in nature. In this study, a β-TCP/poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffold (β-TCP/PGS) with well interconnected porous structure and robust mechanical property was prepared. Porous β-TCP scaffold was first prepared with polyurethane sponge as template and then impregnated into PGS pre-polymer solution with moderate viscosity, followed by in situ heat crosslinking and freezing-drying process. The results indicated that the freezing-drying under vacuum process could further facilitate crosslinking of PGS and formation of Ca(2+)-COO(-) ionic complexing and thus synergistically improved the mechanical strength of the β-TCP/PGS with in situ heat crosslinking. Particularly, the β-TCP/PGS with 15% PGS content after heat crosslinking at 130°C and freezing-drying at -50°C under vacuum exhibited an elongation at break of 375±25% and a compressive strength of 1.73MPa, 3.7-fold and 200-fold enhancement compared to the β-TCP, respectively. After the abrupt drop of compressive load, the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds exhibited a full recovery of their original shape. More importantly, the PGS polymer in the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds could direct the biomineralization of Ca/P from particulate shape into a nanofiber-interweaved structure. Furthermore, the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds allowed for cell penetration and proliferation, indicating a good cytobiocompatibility. It is believed that β-TCP/PGS scaffolds have great potential application in rigid tissue regeneration.

  20. Acellularization-Induced Changes in Tensile Properties Are Organ Specific - An In-Vitro Mechanical and Structural Analysis of Porcine Soft Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schleifenbaum

    Full Text Available Though xenogeneic acellular scaffolds are frequently used for surgical reconstruction, knowledge of their mechanical properties is lacking. This study compared the mechanical, histological and ultrastructural properties of various native and acellular specimens.Porcine esophagi, ureters and skin were tested mechanically in a native or acellular condition, focusing on the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile stress and maximum strain. The testing protocol for soft tissues was standardized, including the adaption of the tissue's water content and partial plastination to minimize material slippage as well as templates for normed sample dimensions and precise cross-section measurements. The native and acellular tissues were compared at the microscopic and ultrastructural level with a focus on type I collagens.Increased elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress values were quantified in acellular esophagi and ureters compared to the native condition. In contrast, these values were strongly decreased in the skin after acellularization. Acellularization-related decreases in maximum strain were found in all tissues. Type I collagens were well-preserved in these samples; however, clotting and a loss of cross-linking type I collagens was observed ultrastructurally. Elastins and fibronectins were preserved in the esophagi and ureters. A loss of the epidermal layer and decreased fibronectin content was present in the skin.Acellularization induces changes in the tensile properties of soft tissues. Some of these changes appear to be organ specific. Loss of cross-linking type I collagen may indicate increased mechanical strength due to decreasing transverse forces acting upon the scaffolds, whereas fibronectin loss may be related to decreased load-bearing capacity. Potentially, the alterations in tissue mechanics are linked to organ function and to the interplay of cells and the extracellular matrix, which is different in hollow organs when compared to skin.

  1. Cellular morphological parameters of the human urinary bladder (malignant and normal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Ahmad; Keshtkar, Asghar; Lawford, Pat

    2007-06-01

    The normal and malignant cellular morphological parameters (intra- and extracellular spaces of the human urinary bladder) were obtained from analysis of digital images of bladder histology sections. Then these cellular morphological parameters were compared with the same parameters obtained from the literature for the bladder tissue. However, the limited quantitative data about these parameters available in the literature for bladder cell sizes and other geometrical parameters such as extra-cellular space does not provide a scientific basis to construct accurate structural models of normal and malignant bladder tissue. Therefore, there is usually no quantitative discussion of cell sizes in literature but the measured data in this work can provide a reasonable estimation of expected morphological parameter changes of bladder tissue with pathology. To produce this quantitative information, and also, to build a suitable models in another study using electrical properties of the tissue, 10 digital images of histological sections of normal, and six sections from malignant areas of the human urinary bladder, were chosen randomly (ex vivo). Finally, the measured data showed that there is a significant difference between the cell dimensions (in basal and intermediate layers) of normal and malignant bladder tissues.

  2. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L

    2012-01-01

    tissue modulus (P collagen III and insulin-like growth factor I...... was increased, while collagen I was unchanged, and decreases were seen in noncollagen matrix components (fibromodulin and biglycan), matrix degrading enzymes, transforming growth factor-ß1, and connective tissue growth factor. In conclusion, the tested model could not be validated as a model for Achilles...

  3. Biomaterials in tooth tissue engineering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration.

  4. Flat Cellular (UMTS) Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Samuel, L.G.; Mullender, S.J.; Polakos, P.; Rittenhouse, G.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, cellular systems have been built in a hierarchical manner: many specialized cellular access network elements that collectively form a hierarchical cellular system. When 2G and later 3G systems were designed there was a good reason to make system hierarchical: from a cost-perspective i

  5. Imaging of soft-tissue tumors using L-3-[iodine-123]iodo-alpha-methyl-tyrosine single photon emission computed tomography: comparison with proliferative and mitotic activity, cellularity, and vascularity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, P L; Plaat, B E; Vries, E G de; Molenaar, W M; Vaalburg, W; Piers, D A; Hoekstra, H J

    2000-01-01

    The radiolabeled amino acid L-3-[123I]-iodo-alpha-methyltyrosine (IMT) is a new tumor tracer that accumulates in many tumors and is suitable for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Using IMT SPECT, we studied 32 patients with a soft-tissue tumor suspected to be a soft-tissue

  6. Study on preparation and dielectric properties of cellular polyimide films%聚酰亚胺多孔膜的制备与介电性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楚晖娟; 魏宏亮; 朱宝库; 徐又一

    2011-01-01

    To explore low dielectric polyimide,cellular polyimide films were prepared from pyromellitic dianhydride and 4,4′-diaminodiphenyl ether via a combined technique of solution induced phase separation and thermal imidization.These polyimide films displayed good thermal stability.SEM analyses showed that the obtained polyimide films had various cellular structures with the different conditions,such as the composition and temperature of coagulation bath,staying time,etc.The films with sponge-like cellular structures exhibited lower dielectric constants than those with finger-like structures.When the film was prepared in the conditions the coagulation bath of DMAc/H2O of 20/80,the temperature of 25℃ and the staying time of 20min,the film was full of sponge-like structure and its dielectric constant was low to 1.45.%以均苯四甲酸二酐和4,4′-二氨基二苯醚为原料合成聚酰亚胺前体聚酰胺酸溶液,通过溶液诱导相分离和热酰亚胺化法制备聚酰亚胺多孔膜。结果表明,用该方法得到的聚酰亚胺多孔膜具有较好的热稳定性。SEM分析显示,在不同的凝胶浴组成、凝胶浴温度和挥发时间等制膜条件下,可得到不同孔结构的多孔膜。与指状孔膜相比,海绵状孔多孔膜具有较低的介电常数。当凝胶浴组成DMAc/H2O为20/80、凝固浴温度为25℃、挥发时间为20min时,多孔膜断面几乎完全由海绵状孔组成,介电常数为1.45。

  7. Immunogold Labelling to Localize Polyphenol Oxidase (PPO) During Wilting of Red Clover Leaf Tissue and the Effect of Removing Cellular Matrices on PPO Protection of Glycerol-Based Lipid in the Rumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) reduces the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis within red clover fed to ruminants. PPO catalyses the conversion of phenols to quinones which can react with nucleophilic cellular constituents (e.g. proteins), forming protein-phenol complexes that may reduce protei...

  8. The Facial Adipose Tissue: A Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglikov, Ilja; Trujillo, Oscar; Kristen, Quick; Isac, Kerelos; Zorko, Julia; Fam, Maria; Okonkwo, Kasie; Mian, Asima; Thanh, Hyunh; Koban, Konstantin; Sclafani, Anthony P; Steinke, Hanno; Cotofana, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Recent advantages in the anatomical understanding of the face have turned the focus toward the subcutaneous and deep facial fat compartments. During facial aging, these fat-filled compartments undergo substantial changes along with other structures in the face. Soft tissue filler and fat grafting are valid methods to fight the signs of facial aging, but little is known about their precise effect on the facial fat. This narrative review summarizes the current knowledge about the facial fat compartments in terms of anatomical location, histologic appearance, immune-histochemical characteristics, cellular interactions, and therapeutic options. Three different types of facial adipose tissue can be identified, which are located either superficially (dermal white adipose tissue) or deep (subcutaneous white adipose tissue): fibrous (perioral locations), structural (major parts of the midface), and deposit (buccal fat pad and deep temporal fat pad). These various fat types differ in the size of the adipocytes and the collagenous composition of their extracellular matrix and thus in their mechanical properties. Minimal invasive (e.g., soft tissue fillers or fat grafting) and surgical interventions aiming to restore the youthful face have to account for the different fat properties in various facial areas. However, little is known about the macro- and microscopic characteristics of the facial fat tissue in different compartments and future studies are needed to reveal new insights to better understand the process of aging and how to fight its signs best.

  9. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche wh