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Sample records for cellular stress molecular

  1. Cellular and Molecular Basis for Stress-Induced Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Wei, Jing; Qin, Luye; Kim, Yong; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress plays a crucial role in the development of psychiatric diseases, such as anxiety and depression. Dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been linked to the cognitive and emotional deficits induced by stress. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular determinants in mPFC for stress-associated mental disorders. Here we show that chronic restraint stress induces the selective loss of p11 (also known as annexin II light chain, S100A10), a multifunctional protein binding to 5-HT receptors, in layer II/III neurons of the prelimbic cortex (PrL), as well as depression-like behaviors, both of which are reversed by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the tricyclic class of antidepressant (TCA) agents. In layer II/III of the PrL, p11 is highly concentrated in dopamine D2 receptor-expressing (D2+) glutamatergic neurons. Viral expression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons alleviates the depression-like behaviors exhibited by genetically manipulated mice with D2+ neuron-specific or global deletion of p11. In stressed animals, overexpression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons rescues depression-like behaviors by restoring glutamatergic transmission. Our results have identified p11 as a key molecule in a specific cell type that regulates stress-induced depression, which provides a framework for the development of new strategies to treat stress-associated mental illnesses. PMID:27457815

  2. Stress testing at the cellular and molecular level to unravel cellular dysfunction and growth factor signal transduction defects: what Molecular Cell Biology can learn from Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenberger, Johannes

    2007-11-01

    Clinical medicine has been revolutionized by the impact of cellular and molecular biology in the past 30 years. This article focuses on a novel approach, whereby the clinically proven and important concept of patient or organ stress testing is being applied to cellular models, thereby developing and validating novel quantitative molecular and cellular stress tests. One example is monocyte chemotaxis analysis, whereby circulating monocytes freshly isolated from peripheral blood are being tested for their migratory responsiveness towards relevant biological stimuli such as growth factors or chemokines. These stimuli are relevant for recruiting monocytes to sites of local inflammation such as during wound healing or arteriogenesis, i.e. growth of collateral arteries. Initial clinical studies to validate "ligand-induced monocyte chemotaxis" indicate that this parameter is impaired in the presence of various cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia or smoking. In addition, there is proof of concept that impaired monocyte chemotaxis is reversible as shown for anti-oxidants in smokers. Moreover, the parameter "ligand-induced monocyte chemotaxis" is of great relevance for basic science (including Molecular Cell Biology) as unravelling the underlying molecular mechanisms of cellular dysfunction will certainly stimulate our understanding of the molecular basis of cellular function. This article highlights the concept of stress testing in modern medicine. Cellular stress testing is introduced as a novel and intriguing approach, which was developed as bedside-to-bench. Future prospective clinical trials will have to validate the predictive value of cellular stress testing.

  3. Early-life Stress Impacts the Developing Hippocampus and Primes Seizure Occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tung eHuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures and an increase in epileptogenesis. This article reviews the cellular and molecular changes encountered during prenatal and postnatal stress, and assesses the possible link between these changes and increases in seizure occurrence and epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus. In addititon, the priming effect of prenatal and postnatal stress for seizures and epileptogenesis is discussed. Finally, the roles of epigenetic modifications in hippocampus and HPA axis programming, early-life stress, and epilepsy are discussed.

  4. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  5. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  6. Molecular kinesis in cellular function and plasticity.

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    Tiedge, H; Bloom, F E; Richter, D

    2001-06-19

    Intracellular transport and localization of cellular components are essential for the functional organization and plasticity of eukaryotic cells. Although the elucidation of protein transport mechanisms has made impressive progress in recent years, intracellular transport of RNA remains less well understood. The National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Molecular Kinesis in Cellular Function and Plasticity therefore was devised as an interdisciplinary platform for participants to discuss intracellular molecular transport from a variety of different perspectives. Topics covered at the meeting included RNA metabolism and transport, mechanisms of protein synthesis and localization, the formation of complex interactive protein ensembles, and the relevance of such mechanisms for activity-dependent regulation and synaptic plasticity in neurons. It was the overall objective of the colloquium to generate momentum and cohesion for the emerging research field of molecular kinesis.

  7. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

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    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  8. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  9. [Cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, Serge

    2010-01-01

    A defining characteristic of the brain is its remarkable capacity to undergo activity-dependent functional and morphological remodelling via mechanisms of plasticity that form the basis of our capacity to encode and retain memories. Today, it is generally accepted that one key neurobiological mechanism underlying the formation of memories reside in activity-driven modifications of synaptic strength and structural remodelling of neural networks activated during learning. The discovery and detailed report of the phenomenon generally known as long-term potentiation, a long-lasting activity-dependent form of synaptic strengthening, opened a new chapter in the study of the neurobiological substrate of memory in the vertebrate brain, and this form of synaptic plasticity has now become the dominant model in the search for the cellular bases of learning and memory. To date, the key events in the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation are starting to be identified. They require the activation of specific receptors and of several molecular cascades to convert extracellular signals into persistent functional changes in neuronal connectivity. Accumulating evidence suggests that the rapid activation of neuronal gene programs is a key mechanism underlying the enduring modification of neural networks required for the laying down of memory. The recent developments in the search for the cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory storage are reviewed.

  10. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the factors such as cellular oxidative damage, its consequences and the main protective measures taken to prevent or delay this process. Tests with antioxidants: vitamins A, E and C, flavonoids, carotenoids and minerals, the practice of caloric restriction and physical exercise, seeking the beneficial effects on human health, increasing longevity, reducing the level of oxidative stress, slowing the cellular senescence and origin of certain diseases, are discussed.Diferentes teorias tentam explicar o envelhecimento biológico através da alteração das funções e estrutura dos sistemas orgânicos e células. Ao longo da vida, os radicais livres presentes no estresse oxidativo conduzem à peroxidação dos lipídios das membranas celulares, desequilíbrio da homeostase, formação de resíduos químicos, mutações gênicas no DNA, disfunção de certas organelas, bem como ao surgimento de doenças devido à lesão e/ou morte celular. Nesta revisão descreve-se a ação do estresse oxidativo no processo de envelhecimento das células, enfatizando fatores como os danos oxidativos celulares, suas conseqüências e as principais medidas protetoras adotadas para se prevenir ou retardar este processo. Testes com antioxidantes: vitaminas A, E e C, flavonóides, carotenóides e minerais; a prática de restrição calórica e exercícios físicos, que buscam efeitos benéficos sobre a saúde humana, aumentando a longevidade, reduzindo o nível de estresse oxidativo

  11. A comparative cellular and molecular biology of longevity database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jeffrey A; Liang, Ping; Luo, Xuemei; Page, Melissa M; Gallagher, Emily J; Christoff, Casey A; Robb, Ellen L

    2013-10-01

    Discovering key cellular and molecular traits that promote longevity is a major goal of aging and longevity research. One experimental strategy is to determine which traits have been selected during the evolution of longevity in naturally long-lived animal species. This comparative approach has been applied to lifespan research for nearly four decades, yielding hundreds of datasets describing aspects of cell and molecular biology hypothesized to relate to animal longevity. Here, we introduce a Comparative Cellular and Molecular Biology of Longevity Database, available at ( http://genomics.brocku.ca/ccmbl/ ), as a compendium of comparative cell and molecular data presented in the context of longevity. This open access database will facilitate the meta-analysis of amalgamated datasets using standardized maximum lifespan (MLSP) data (from AnAge). The first edition contains over 800 data records describing experimental measurements of cellular stress resistance, reactive oxygen species metabolism, membrane composition, protein homeostasis, and genome homeostasis as they relate to vertebrate species MLSP. The purpose of this review is to introduce the database and briefly demonstrate its use in the meta-analysis of combined datasets.

  12. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Advances in Molecular and Cellular Biology

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    Xin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue malignancy in childhood and adolescence. The two major histological subtypes of RMS are alveolar RMS, driven by the fusion protein PAX3-FKHR or PAX7-FKHR, and embryonic RMS, which is usually genetically heterogeneous. The prognosis of RMS has improved in the past several decades due to multidisciplinary care. However, in recent years, the treatment of patients with metastatic or refractory RMS has reached a plateau. Thus, to improve the survival rate of RMS patients and their overall well-being, further understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of RMS and identification of novel therapeutic targets are imperative. In this review, we describe the most recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of RMS, including alterations in oncogenic pathways, miRNA (miR, in vivo models, stem cells, and important signal transduction cascades implicated in the development and progression of RMS. Furthermore, we discuss novel potential targeted therapies that may improve the current treatment of RMS.

  13. Cellular and Molecular Biological Approaches to Interpreting Ancient Biomarkers

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    Newman, Dianne K.; Neubauer, Cajetan; Ricci, Jessica N.; Wu, Chia-Hung; Pearson, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Our ability to read the molecular fossil record has advanced significantly in the past decade. Improvements in biomarker sampling and quantification methods, expansion of molecular sequence databases, and the application of genetic and cellular biological tools to problems in biomarker research have enabled much of this progress. By way of example, we review how attempts to understand the biological function of 2-methylhopanoids in modern bacteria have changed our interpretation of what their molecular fossils tell us about the early history of life. They were once thought to be biomarkers of cyanobacteria and hence the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, but we now believe that 2-methylhopanoid biosynthetic capacity originated in the Alphaproteobacteria, that 2-methylhopanoids are regulated in response to stress, and that hopanoid 2-methylation enhances membrane rigidity. We present a new interpretation of 2-methylhopanes that bridges the gap between studies of the functions of 2-methylhopanoids and their patterns of occurrence in the rock record.

  14. Bioceramics for osteogenesis, molecular and cellular advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkiran, Hande

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable need for bone tissue replacement in clinical situations, its limited availability and some major drawbacks of autologous (from the patient) and allogeneic (from a donor) bone grafts are driving researchers to search for alternative approaches for bone repair. In order to develop an appropriate bone substitute, one should understand bone structure and properties and its growth, which will guide researchers to select the optimal conditions for tissue culture and implantation. It's well accepted that bioceramics are excellent candidates as bone replacement with osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction capacity. Therefore, the molecular and cellular interactions that take place at the surface of bioceramics and their relevance in osteogenesis excites many researchers to delve deeper into this line of research.

  15. Cellular and molecular approaches to memory storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, S

    2000-01-01

    There has been nearly a century of interest in the idea that information is stored in the brain as changes in the efficacy of synaptic connections on neurons that are activated during learning. The discovery and detailed report of the phenomenon generally known as long-term potentiation opened a new chapter in the study of synaptic plasticity in the vertebrate brain, and this form of synaptic plasticity has now become the dominant model in the search for the cellular bases of learning and memory. To date, considerable progress has been made in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and in identifying the neural systems which express it. In parallel, the hypothesis that the mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity are activated during learning and serve learning and memory has gained much empirical support. Accumulating evidence suggests that the rapid activation of the genetic machinery is a key mechanism underlying the enduring modification of neural networks required for the laying down of memory. These advances are reviewed below.

  16. Molecular chaperones: The modular evolution of cellular networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tamás Korcsmáros; István A Kovács; Máté S Szalay; Péter Csermely

    2007-04-01

    Molecular chaperones play a prominent role in signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks of the cell. Recent advances uncovered that chaperones act as genetic buffers stabilizing the phenotype of various cells and organisms and may serve as potential regulators of evolvability. Chaperones have weak links, connect hubs, are in the overlaps of network modules and may uncouple these modules during stress, which gives an additional protection for the cell at the network-level. Moreover, after stress chaperones are essential to re-build inter-modular contacts by their low affinity sampling of the potential interaction partners in different modules. This opens the way to the chaperone-regulated modular evolution of cellular networks, and helps us to design novel therapeutic and anti-aging strategies.

  17. Cellular and molecular biology of aging endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Anthony J; Morgan, R Garrett; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage has been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway and result in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current state

  18. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L.R.

    1990-10-01

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of the small aquarium fish, Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes), as a predictor of potential genotoxicity following exposure to carcinogens. This will be accomplished by quantitatively investigating the early molecular events associated with genotoxicity of various tissues of Medaka subsequent to exposure of the organism to several known carcinogens, such as diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Because of the often long latent period between initial contact with certain chemical and physical agents in our environment and subsequent expression of deleterious health or ecological impact, the development of sensitive methods for detecting and estimating early exposure is needed so that necessary interventions can ensue. A promising biological endpoint for detecting early exposure to damaging chemicals is the interaction of these compounds with cellular macromolecules such as Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). This biological endpoint assumes significance because it can be one of the critical early events leading eventually to adverse effects (neoplasia) in the exposed organism.

  19. Cellular and molecular aspects of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm G Smith; Georgina L Hold; Eiichi Tahara; Emad M El-Omar

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global killer with a shifting burden from the developed to the developing world.The cancer develops along a multistage process that is defined by distinct histological and pathophysiological phases. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations mediate the transition from one stage to another and these include mutations in oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cell cycle and mismatch repair genes. The most significant advance in the fight against gastric caner came with the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as the most important acquired aetiological agent for this cancer. Recent work has focussed on elucidating the complex host/microbial interactions that underlie the neoplastic process. There is now considerable insight into the pathogenesis of this cancer and the prospect of preventing and eradicating the disease has become a reality. Perhaps more importantly, the study of H pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis offers a paradigm for understanding more complex human cancers. In this review, we examine the molecular and cellular events that underlie H pyloriinduced gastric cancer.

  20. Molecular and cellular limits to somatosensory specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viana Félix

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animals detect environmental changes through sensory neural mechanisms that enable them to differentiate the quality, intensity and temporal characteristics of stimuli. The 'doctrine of specific nervous energies' postulates that the different sensory modalities experienced by humans result of the activation of specific nervous pathways. Identification of functional classes of sensory receptors provided scientific support to the concept that somatosensory modalities (touch, pain, temperature, kinesthesis are subserved by separate populations of sensory receptor neurons specialized in detecting innocuous and injurious stimuli of different quality (mechanical forces, temperature, chemical compounds. The identification of receptor proteins activated by different physicochemical stimuli, in particular ion channels of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP superfamily, has put forward the concept that specificity of peripheral sensory receptor neurons is determined by their expression of a particular "molecular sensor" that confers to each functional type its selectivity to respond with a discharge of nerve impulses to stimuli of a given quality. Nonetheless, recent experimental data suggest that the various molecular sensors proposed as specific transducer molecules for stimuli of different quality are not as neatly associated with the distinct functional types of sensory receptors as originally proposed. First, many ion channel molecules initially associated to the transduction of only one particular form of energy are also activated by stimuli of different quality, implying a limited degree of specificity in their transducing capacities. Second, molecular sensors associated with a stimulus quality and hence to a sensory receptor type and ultimately to a sensory modality may be concomitantly expressed in sensory receptor neurons functionally defined as specific for another stimulus quality. Finally, activation of voltage gated channels

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yu Jin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Park, Seorim; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Follo, Matilde Yung; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy.

  2. Past, present and future of molecular and cellular oncology

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    Lorenzo eGalluzzi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years, the field of cellular and molecular oncology has been born and has moved its first steps, with an increasingly rapid pace. Hundreds of oncogenic and oncosuppressive signaling cascades have been characterized, facilitating the development of an ever more refined and variegated arsenal of diagnostic and therapeutic weapons. Furthermore, several cancer-specific features and processes have been identified that constitute promising therapeutic targets. For instance, it has been demonstrated that microRNAs can play a critical role in oncogenesis and tumor suppression. Moreover, it turned out that tumor cells frequently exhibit an extensive metabolic rewiring, can behave in a stem cell-like fashion (and hence sustain tumor growth, often constitutively activate stress response pathways that allow them to survive, can react to therapy by engaging in non-apoptotic cell death programs, and sometimes die while eliciting a tumor-specific immune response. In this Perspective article, we discuss the main issues generated by these discoveries that will be in the limelight of molecular and cellular oncology research for the next, hopefully few years.

  3. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress.

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    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases.

  4. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases. PMID:26233704

  5. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  6. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  7. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  8. The molecular and cellular neurobiology of nicotine abuse in schizophrenia.

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    Mobascher, A; Winterer, G

    2008-09-01

    People with schizophrenia suffer from a variety of symptoms that can be categorized as positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Cognitive symptoms are not properly treated with antipsychotic medication and are the major cause of disability associated with the disorder. People with schizophrenia smoke more frequently and heavily than the general population. This observation in view of the well established role of nicotinic, cholinergic neurotransmission in cognition led to the hypothesis that people with schizophrenia may use nicotine as a self-medication to ameliorate cognitive symptoms associated with their disease. Furthermore genetic and post-mortem studies point to additional links between nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission and schizophrenia. This article provides an insight in the possible relationship between schizophrenia and smoking behavior. We focus on the effects of nicotine on individual neurons as well as on neuronal networks. With respect to single neurons the immediate electrophysiological consequences of nicotinic stimulation and the more "metabotropic" effects related to intracellular signal transduction cascades that may lead to plastic changes in the neuron are discussed. With respect to the network level, three systems are discussed: cognition, reward and stress response. The effects of nicotine on cognition may be most pertinent to the problem of schizophrenia, but schizophrenics may also smoke to regulate mood and reduce stress. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular effects of nicotine and how they are related to the pathophysiology and symptomatology of schizophrenia may help to identify new targets for the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia and of nicotine addiction in schizophrenia.

  9. ATM Couples Replication Stress and Metabolic Reprogramming during Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Aird

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress induced by nucleotide deficiency plays an important role in cancer initiation. Replication stress in primary cells typically activates the cellular senescence tumor-suppression mechanism. Senescence bypass correlates with development of cancer, a disease characterized by metabolic reprogramming. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular response to replication stress has been little explored. Here, we report that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM plays a central role in regulating the cellular response to replication stress by shifting cellular metabolism. ATM inactivation bypasses senescence induced by replication stress triggered by nucleotide deficiency. This was due to restoration of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP levels through both upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway via increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity and enhanced glucose and glutamine consumption. These phenotypes were mediated by a coordinated suppression of p53 and upregulation of c-MYC downstream of ATM inactivation. Our data indicate that ATM status couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during senescence.

  10. Chronic pain, perceived stress, and cellular aging: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibille Kimberly T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pain conditions are characterized by significant individual variability complicating the identification of pathophysiological markers. Leukocyte telomere length (TL, a measure of cellular aging, is associated with age-related disease onset, psychosocial stress, and health-related functional decline. Psychosocial stress has been associated with the onset of chronic pain and chronic pain is experienced as a physical and psychosocial stressor. However, the utility of TL as a biological marker reflecting the burden of chronic pain and psychosocial stress has not yet been explored. Findings The relationship between chronic pain, stress, and TL was analyzed in 36 ethnically diverse, older adults, half of whom reported no chronic pain and the other half had chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA pain. Subjects completed a physical exam, radiographs, health history, and psychosocial questionnaires. Blood samples were collected and TL was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Four groups were identified characterized by pain status and the Perceived Stress Scale scores: 1 no pain/low stress, 2 no pain/high stress, chronic pain/low stress, and 4 chronic pain/high stress. TL differed between the pain/stress groups (p = 0.01, controlling for relevant covariates. Specifically, the chronic pain/high stress group had significantly shorter TL compared to the no pain/low stress group. Age was negatively correlated with TL, particularly in the chronic pain/high stress group (p = 0.03. Conclusions Although preliminary in nature and based on a modest sample size, these findings indicate that cellular aging may be more pronounced in older adults experiencing high levels of perceived stress and chronic pain.

  11. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolodny, G. M.

    1979-09-01

    The initiation and control of the division process in normal cells is studied to gain insight into changes in these regards caused by x-irradiation and neoplasia. The Primer Hypothesis for eukaryotic gene regulation proposes that small molecular weight RNA acts as primer for new RNA synthesis by hybridizing with DNA and there initiating the transcription of a new RNA chain. The experiments reported here indicate that small molecular weight RNA will induce the production of new proteins. These results are consistent with the Primer Hypothesis, and demonstrate that RNA can be taken up from the media by cells in culture and can induce in vitro the production of differentiated cell products. (ACR)

  12. Oxidative Stress and Anxiety: Relationship and Cellular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaouad Bouayed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress.

  13. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    KEY FACTS • Signs of biological aging appear progressively and exponentially during the period of survival beyond the ELS of a species. • There are no gerontogenes evolved with a specific function of causing aging and eventual death. • The role of genes in aging and longevity is mainly at the level...... of longevity-assurance in evolutionary terms. • The phenotype of aging is highly differential and heterogeneous at all levels of biological organization. • Aging is characterized by a stochastic occurrence, accumulation, and heterogeneity of damage in macromolecules. • Mild stress-induced activation of defense...

  14. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Nevins W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM and remodeling of the lung architecture. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is considered the most common and severe form of the disease, with a median survival of approximately three years and no proven effective therapy. Despite the fact that effective treatments are absent and the precise mechanisms that drive fibrosis in most patients remain incompletely understood, an extensive body of scientific literature regarding pulmonary fibrosis has accumulated over the past 35 years. In this review, we discuss three broad areas which have been explored that may be responsible for the combination of altered lung fibroblasts, loss of alveolar epithelial cells, and excessive accumulation of ECM: inflammation and immune mechanisms, oxidative stress and oxidative signaling, and procoagulant mechanisms. We discuss each of these processes separately to facilitate clarity, but certainly significant interplay will occur amongst these pathways in patients with this disease.

  15. Interplay between inflammation and cellular stress triggered by Flaviviridae viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Chaves Valadão

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses, from Flaviviridae virus family, comprises several human pathogens, including Dengue, Zika, Yellow Fever, West Nile and Japanese Encephalitis viruses. Those are enveloped, single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses, and replicate mostly in intracellular compartments associated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi complex. Virus replication results in abundant viral RNAs and proteins, which are recognized by cellular mechanisms evolved to prevent virus infection, resulting in inflammation and stress responses. Virus RNA molecules are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, RIG-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA5 and RNA-dependent protein kinases (PKR, inducing the production of inflammatory mediators and interferons. Simultaneously, the synthesis of virus RNA and proteins are distinguished in different compartments such as mitochondria, ER and cytoplasmic granules, triggering intracellular stress pathways, including oxidative stress, UPR pathway, and stress granules assembly. Here, we review the new findings that connect the inflammatory pathways to cellular stress sensors and the strategies of Flaviviridae members to counteract these cellular mechanisms and escape immune response.

  16. Interplay between Inflammation and Cellular Stress Triggered by Flaviviridae Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, Ana L. C.; Aguiar, Renato S.; de Arruda, Luciana B.

    2016-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family comprises several human pathogens, including Dengue, Zika, Yellow Fever, West Nile, Japanese Encephalitis viruses, and Hepatitis C Virus. Those are enveloped, single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses, which replicate mostly in intracellular compartments associated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi complex. Virus replication results in abundant viral RNAs and proteins, which are recognized by cellular mechanisms evolved to prevent virus infection, resulting in inflammation and stress responses. Virus RNA molecules are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA5) and RNA-dependent protein kinases (PKR), inducing the production of inflammatory mediators and interferons. Simultaneously, the synthesis of virus RNA and proteins are distinguished in different compartments such as mitochondria, ER and cytoplasmic granules, triggering intracellular stress pathways, including oxidative stress, unfolded protein response pathway, and stress granules assembly. Here, we review the new findings that connect the inflammatory pathways to cellular stress sensors and the strategies of Flaviviridae members to counteract these cellular mechanisms and escape immune response. PMID:27610098

  17. Cellular and molecular neurobiology of brain preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Krasnova, Irina N

    2009-02-01

    The tolerant brain which is a consequence of adaptation to repeated nonlethal insults is accompanied by the upregulation of protective mechanisms and the downregulation of prodegenerative pathways. During the past 20 years, evidence has accumulated to suggest that protective mechanisms include increased production of chaperones, trophic factors, and other antiapoptotic proteins. In contrast, preconditioning can cause substantial dampening of the organism's metabolic state and decreased expression of proapoptotic proteins. Recent microarray analyses have also helped to document a role of several molecular pathways in the induction of the brain refractory state. The present review highlights some of these findings and suggests that a better understanding of these mechanisms will inform treatment of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  20. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Batista de Souza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops.

  1. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of ROS production and oxidative stress in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Keane, Kevin Noel; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem

    2016-12-15

    Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are known to be associated with the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidative and antioxidative systems of cells and tissues, is a result of over production of oxidative-free radicals and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS). One outcome of excessive levels of ROS is the modification of the structure and function of cellular proteins and lipids, leading to cellular dysfunction including impaired energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, impaired cell transport mechanisms and overall dysfunctional biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. Nutritional stress, such as that caused by excess high-fat and/or carbohydrate diets, promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation and decreased antioxidant status. In obesity, chronic oxidative stress and associated inflammation are the underlying factors that lead to the development of pathologies such as insulin resistance, dysregulated pathways of metabolism, diabetes and cardiovascular disease through impaired signalling and metabolism resulting in dysfunction to insulin secretion, insulin action and immune responses. However, exercise may counter excessive levels of oxidative stress and thus improve metabolic and inflammatory outcomes. In the present article, we review the cellular and molecular origins and significance of ROS production, the molecular targets and responses describing how oxidative stress affects cell function including mechanisms of insulin secretion and action, from the point of view of possible application of novel diabetic therapies based on redox regulation.

  3. Cellular Memory of Acquired Stress Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Qiaoning; Haroon, Suraiya; Bravo, Diego González; Will, Jessica L.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular memory of past experiences has been observed in several organisms and across a variety of experiences, including bacteria “remembering” prior nutritional status and amoeba “learning” to anticipate future environmental conditions. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a multifaceted memory of prior stress exposure. We previously demonstrated that yeast cells exposed to a mild dose of salt acquire subsequent tolerance to severe doses of H2O2. We set out to characterize ...

  4. Cellular effects of swim stress in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Lynn G; Pan, Yu-Zhen; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Rani, Shobha; Nunan, John D; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2007-07-01

    Swim stress regulates forebrain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in a complex manner and its effects are initiated in the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of swim stress on the physiology of DRN neurons in conjunction with 5-HT immunohistochemistry. Basic membrane properties, 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptor-mediated responses and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were measured using whole-cell patch clamp techniques. Rats were forced to swim for 15min and 24h later DRN brain slices were prepared for electrophysiology. Swim stress altered the resting membrane potential, input resistance and action potential duration of DRN neurons in a neurochemical-specific manner. Swim stress selectively elevated glutamate EPSC frequency in 5-HT DRN neurons. Swim stress non-selectively reduced EPSC amplitude in all DRN cells. Swim stress elevated the 5-HT(1B) receptor-mediated inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic activity that selectively targeted 5-HT cells. Non-5-HT DRN neurons appeared to be particularly responsive to the effects of a milder handling stress. Handling elevated EPSC frequency, reduced EPSC decay time and enhanced a 5-HT(1B) receptor-mediated inhibition of mEPSC frequency selectively in non-5-HT DRN cells. These results indicate that swim stress has both direct, i.e., changes in membrane characteristics, and indirect effects, i.e., via glutamatergic afferents, on DRN neurons. These results also indicate that there are distinct local glutamatergic afferents to neurochemically specific populations of DRN neurons, and furthermore that these distinct afferents are differentially regulated by swim stress. These cellular changes may contribute to the complex effects of swim stress on 5-HT neurotransmission and/or the behavioral changes underlying the forced swimming test model of depression.

  5. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  6. Cellular and molecular connections between sleep and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benington, Joel H; Frank, Marcos G

    2003-02-01

    The hypothesis that sleep promotes learning and memory has long been a subject of active investigation. This hypothesis implies that sleep must facilitate synaptic plasticity in some way, and recent studies have provided evidence for such a function. Our knowledge of both the cellular neurophysiology of sleep states and of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity has expanded considerably in recent years. In this article, we review findings in these areas and discuss possible mechanisms whereby the neurophysiological processes characteristic of sleep states may serve to facilitate synaptic plasticity. We address this issue first on the cellular level, considering how activation of T-type Ca(2+) channels in nonREM sleep may promote either long-term depression or long-term potentiation, as well as how cellular events of REM sleep may influence these processes. We then consider how synchronization of neuronal activity in thalamocortical and hippocampal-neocortical networks in nonREM sleep and REM sleep could promote differential strengthening of synapses according to the degree to which activity in one neuron is synchronized with activity in other neurons in the network. Rather than advocating one specific cellular hypothesis, we have intentionally taken a broad approach, describing a range of possible mechanisms whereby sleep may facilitate synaptic plasticity on the cellular and/or network levels. We have also provided a general review of evidence for and against the hypothesis that sleep does indeed facilitate learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity.

  7. Genetically-encoded biosensors for monitoring cellular stress in bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2015-02-01

    With the current wealth of transcriptomic data, it is possible to design genetically-encoded biosensors for the detection of stress responses and apply these to high-throughput bioprocess development and monitoring of cellular health. Such biosensors can sense extrinsic factors such as nutrient or oxygen deprivation and shear stress, as well as intrinsic stress factors like oxidative damage and unfolded protein accumulation. Alongside, there have been developments in biosensing hardware and software applicable to the field of genetically-encoded biosensors in the near future. This review discusses the current state-of-the-art in biosensors for monitoring cultures during biological manufacturing and the future challenges for the field. Connecting the individual achievements into a coherent whole will enable the application of genetically-encoded biosensors in industry.

  8. Neural tube closure: cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Galea, Gabriel L; Rolo, Ana; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2017-02-15

    Neural tube closure has been studied for many decades, across a range of vertebrates, as a paradigm of embryonic morphogenesis. Neurulation is of particular interest in view of the severe congenital malformations - 'neural tube defects' - that result when closure fails. The process of neural tube closure is complex and involves cellular events such as convergent extension, apical constriction and interkinetic nuclear migration, as well as precise molecular control via the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, Shh/BMP signalling, and the transcription factors Grhl2/3, Pax3, Cdx2 and Zic2. More recently, biomechanical inputs into neural tube morphogenesis have also been identified. Here, we review these cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms involved in neural tube closure, based on studies of various vertebrate species, focusing on the most recent advances in the field.

  9. Cellular memory of acquired stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qiaoning; Haroon, Suraiya; Bravo, Diego González; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2012-10-01

    Cellular memory of past experiences has been observed in several organisms and across a variety of experiences, including bacteria "remembering" prior nutritional status and amoeba "learning" to anticipate future environmental conditions. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a multifaceted memory of prior stress exposure. We previously demonstrated that yeast cells exposed to a mild dose of salt acquire subsequent tolerance to severe doses of H(2)O(2). We set out to characterize the retention of acquired tolerance and in the process uncovered two distinct aspects of cellular memory. First, we found that H(2)O(2) resistance persisted for four to five generations after cells were removed from the prior salt treatment and was transmitted to daughter cells that never directly experienced the pretreatment. Maintenance of this memory did not require nascent protein synthesis after the initial salt pretreatment, but rather required long-lived cytosolic catalase Ctt1p that was synthesized during salt exposure and then distributed to daughter cells during subsequent cell divisions. In addition to and separable from the memory of H(2)O(2) resistance, these cells also displayed a faster gene-expression response to subsequent stress at >1000 genes, representing transcriptional memory. The faster gene-expression response requires the nuclear pore component Nup42p and serves an important function by facilitating faster reacquisition of H(2)O(2) tolerance after a second cycle of salt exposure. Memory of prior stress exposure likely provides a significant advantage to microbial populations living in ever-changing environments.

  10. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@jcbose.ac.in

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  11. Molecular and Cellular Therapies: New challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiangdong; Peer, Dan; Petersen, Bryon,

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is suggested to be one of the most specific and efficient modulations for gene deficient diseases and extended to other diseases like cancer and inflammation, even though there are still challenges to be faced, such as specific and selective delivery, minimal to no toxicity, efficient metabolism, simplicity, and measurable efficiency. It is important to identify and validate drug-able disease-specific targets for molecular and cellular therapies, while it is equally important to ...

  12. Advances in the cellular and molecular biology of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, Stuart; Bicknell, Roy

    2011-12-01

    Capillaries have been recognized for over a century as one of the most important components in regulating tissue oxygen transport, and their formation or angiogenesis a pivotal element of tissue remodelling during development and adaptation. Clinical interest stems from observations that both excessive and inadequate vascular growth plays a major role in human diseases, and novel developments in treatments for cancer and eye disease increasingly rely on anti-angiogenic therapies. Although the discovery of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) provided the first clue for specificity of signalling in endothelial cell activation, understanding the integrative response that drives angiogenesis requires a much broader perspective. The Advances in the Cellular and Molecular Biology of Angiogenesis meeting brought together researchers at the forefront of this rapidly moving field to provide an update on current understanding, and the most recent insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of vascular growth. The plenary lecture highlighted the integrative nature of the angiogenic process, whereas invited contributions from basic and clinician scientists described fundamental mechanisms and disease-associated issues of blood vessel formation, grouped under a number of themes to aid discussion. These articles will appeal to academic, clinical and pharmaceutical scientists interested in the molecular and cellular basis of angiogenesis, their modulation or dysfunction in human diseases, and application of these findings towards translational medicine.

  13. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jereme G. Spiers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure.

  14. Fluorosis Caused Cellular Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress of Rat Kidneys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yang; WANG Jin-cheng; XU Hui; DU Zhen-wu; ZHANG Gui-zhen; SELIM Hamid Abdu; LI Guang-sheng

    2013-01-01

    As the strongest electronegative element,fluorine can stimulate the production of superoxide radicals in cells.In view of the important roles of kidneys in bone metabolism,the authors analyzed the quantitative pathomorphological characteristics of renal damage and the potential cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress mechanisms in rats treated with excessive fluoride.Wistar rats were exposed to 50 mg F-(110.5 mg NaF)/L,100 mg F-(221.0 mg NaF)/Land 150 mg F (331.5 mg NaF)/L in drinking water for 70 and 140 d,respectively.Microscope with image analysis was used to quantitate pathomorphological changes in renal tissues of the rats.Reactive oxygen species(ROS),the cell cycle and apoptosis of renal cells were measured by flow cytometry and TUNEL technique(terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling),respectively.The ion concentrations in serum and renal functional parameters were detected by automatic biochemical analyzer.Quantitative analysis results demonstrate the expanded Bowman's space of glomerulus and obvious dilatation of renal tubule.TUNEL technique revealed that NBT/BCIP (nitro blue tetrazoliurn/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate,p-toluidine salt)-staining positive apoptotic cells selectively located in medullocortical junction areas.The data suggest that renal damage in chronic fluorostic rats is associated with the cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  15. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  16. Using RNA as Molecular Code for Programming Cellular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Manish; Rostain, William; Prakash, Satya; Duncan, John N; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-08-19

    RNA is involved in a wide-range of important molecular processes in the cell, serving diverse functions: regulatory, enzymatic, and structural. Together with its ease and predictability of design, these properties can lead RNA to become a useful handle for biological engineers with which to control the cellular machinery. By modifying the many RNA links in cellular processes, it is possible to reprogram cells toward specific design goals. We propose that RNA can be viewed as a molecular programming language that, together with protein-based execution platforms, can be used to rewrite wide ranging aspects of cellular function. In this review, we catalogue developments in the use of RNA parts, methods, and associated computational models that have contributed to the programmability of biology. We discuss how RNA part repertoires have been combined to build complex genetic circuits, and review recent applications of RNA-based parts and circuitry. We explore the future potential of RNA engineering and posit that RNA programmability is an important resource for firmly establishing an era of rationally designed synthetic biology.

  17. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes.

  18. Placental ABC transporters, cellular toxicity and stress in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Keelan, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-25

    The human placenta, in addition to its roles as a nutrient transfer and endocrine organ, functions as a selective barrier to protect the fetus against the harmful effects of exogenous and endogenous toxins. Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins limit the entry of xenobiotics into the fetal circulation via vectorial efflux from the placenta to the maternal circulation. Several members of the ABC family, including proteins from the ABCA, ABCB, ABCC and ABCG subfamilies, have been shown to be functional in the placenta with clinically significant roles in xenobiotic efflux. However, recent findings suggest that these transporters also protect placental tissue by preventing the cellular accumulation of cytotoxic compounds such as lipids, sterols and their derivatives. Such protective functions are likely to be particularly important in pregnancies complicated by inflammatory or oxidative stress, where the generation of toxic metabolites is enhanced. For example, ABC transporters have been shown to protect against the harmful effects of hypoxia and oxidative stress through increased expression and efflux of oxysterols and glutathione conjugated xenobiotics. However, this protective capacity may be diminished in response to the same stressors. Several studies in primary human trophoblast cells and animal models have demonstrated decreased expression and activity of placental ABC transporters with inflammatory, oxidative or metabolic stress. Several clinical studies in pregnancies complicated by inflammatory conditions such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes support these findings, although further studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of the relationships between placental ABC transporter expression and activity, and placental function in stressed pregnancies. Such studies are necessary to fully understand the consequences of pregnancy disorders on placental function and viability in order to optimise pregnancy

  19. Representing and analysing molecular and cellular function using the computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, J; Naim, A; Mancuso, R; Eldridge, M; Wernisch, L; Gilbert, D; Wodak, S J

    2000-01-01

    Determining the biological function of a myriad of genes, and understanding how they interact to yield a living cell, is the major challenge of the post genome-sequencing era. The complexity of biological systems is such that this cannot be envisaged without the help of powerful computer systems capable of representing and analysing the intricate networks of physical and functional interactions between the different cellular components. In this review we try to provide the reader with an appreciation of where we stand in this regard. We discuss some of the inherent problems in describing the different facets of biological function, give an overview of how information on function is currently represented in the major biological databases, and describe different systems for organising and categorising the functions of gene products. In a second part, we present a new general data model, currently under development, which describes information on molecular function and cellular processes in a rigorous manner. The model is capable of representing a large variety of biochemical processes, including metabolic pathways, regulation of gene expression and signal transduction. It also incorporates taxonomies for categorising molecular entities, interactions and processes, and it offers means of viewing the information at different levels of resolution, and dealing with incomplete knowledge. The data model has been implemented in the database on protein function and cellular processes 'aMAZE' (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/research/pfbp/), which presently covers metabolic pathways and their regulation. Several tools for querying, displaying, and performing analyses on such pathways are briefly described in order to illustrate the practical applications enabled by the model.

  20. [Regulatory role of mechanical stress response in cellular function: development of new drugs and tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Kazutaka; Matsuda, Takehisa; Oike, Masahiro; Obara, Kazuo; Laher, Ismail; Sugiura, Seiryo; Ohata, Hisayuki; Nakayama, Koichi

    2003-02-01

    The investigation of mechanotransduction in the cardiovascular system is essentially important for elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in not only the maintenance of hemodynamic homeostasis but also etiology of cardiovascular diseases including arteriosclerosis. The present review summarizes the latest research performed by six academic groups, and presented at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Pharmacological Society. Technology of cellular biomechanics is also required for research and clinical application of a vascular hybrid tissue responding to pulsatile stress. 1) Vascular tissue engineering: Design of pulsatile stress-responsive scaffold and in vivo vascular wall reconstruction (T. Matsuda); 2) Cellular mechanisms of mechanosensitive calcium transients in vascular endothelium (M. Oike et al.); 3) Cross-talk of stimulation with fluid flow and lysophosphatidic acid in vascular endothelial cells (K. Momose et al.); 4) Mechanotransduction of vascular smooth muscles: Rate-dependent stretch-induced protein phosphorylations and contractile activation (K. Obara et al.); 5) Lipid mediators in vascular myogenic tone (I. Laher et al.); and 6) Caldiomyocyte regulates its mechanical output in response to mechanical load (S. Sugiura et al.).

  1. Pancreatic islets under attack: cellular and molecular effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yolcu, Esma S; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2007-01-01

    Abundant information is available on the involvement of various cellular and molecular mechanisms in beta cell apoptosis. The experimental evidence is controversial and difficult to reconcile, and the mechanisms of evasion of the autoreactive clones from immune surveillance are poorly understood. Multiple apoptotic pathways play a role in destructive insulitis, including perforin/granzyme, Fas/Fas-ligand (FasL), and other members of the necrosis factor superfamily. These pathways present redundant behaviors in both the initial and late stages of beta cell injury, and at the same time, each molecular mechanism is dispensable in the evolution of autoimmune diabetes. There may be a preferential use of perforin/granzyme in CD8(+) T cell-mediated lysis, which participates in onset of autoimmunity, and a predominance of FasL in CD4(+) T cell-mediated insulitis. Several cytokines released in the inflammatory infiltrate induce Fas expression in beta cells, priming them to FasL-mediated apoptosis. In this review, we focus on the possible participation of multiple cell subsets and molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of diabetes to the point where inflammation incites an irreversible vicious cycle that perpetuates beta cell death.

  2. Marine molluscs in environmental monitoring. I. Cellular and molecular responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Vladimir; Abelson, Avigdor; Fishelson, Lev; Feldstein, Tamar; Rosenfeld, Michael; Mokady, Ofer

    2003-10-01

    levels of biological organization—the molecular and cellular level—the parameters measured may have the capacity not only for biomonitoring environmental quality, but also for early warning.

  3. Cellular & Molecular Immunology receives its first Impact Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Tian

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 2009 edition of the JCR, in which Cellular (c) Molecular Immunology (CMI) is listed for the first time, reveals an Impact Factor of 2.765, placing CMI 63rd out of 128 in the Immunology subject category. According to ISI's ranking this also places the journal 5th out of 114 journals published in China and 23rd out of 587 journals published in the Asia-Pacific region. This is an excellent first Impact Factor for a young journal like CMI and,together with our publishing partner Nature Publishing Group and the continued support of our readers and authors, we hope to further build on this into the future. We are delighted that CMI can be internationally recognized as important in the field of immunology.

  4. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of antiretroviral effects of HPA23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, D; Yeramian, P; Lambert, P; Spire, B; Daveloose, D; Barre-Sinoussi, F C; Chermann, J C

    1988-01-01

    HPA23 is an antimonio-tungstate that exhibits numerous antiviral activities both in vivo and in vitro. It has been described as a competitive inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT). Patients treated with daily injections of HPA23 show an inhibition of HIV RT activity in cell culture in 60% of the cases. Using biophysical (electronic spin resonance [ESR]), ultrastructural (microspectroscopic analysis), chemical (spectroscopy), and biological (cell culture) assays, HPA23 cellular and molecular mechanisms may be summarized as follows: 1) competitive inhibition of HIV-RT, 2) no or slight effect on cells infected with HIV in culture, 3) interactions with the cell membranes when long incubations are performed, and 4) antiviral activity possibly mediated by immune modulator effect of the drug.

  5. Traffic jams and shocks of molecular motors inside cellular protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2014-05-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes inside actin-based cellular protrusions. The motors carry cargo proteins to the protrusion tip which participate in regulating the actin polymerization and play a key role in facilitating the growth and formation of such protrusions. It is observed that the motors accumulate at the tips of cellular protrusions and form aggregates that are found to drift towards the protrusion base at the rate of actin treadmilling. We present a one-dimensional driven lattice model, where motors become inactive after delivering their cargo at the tip, or by loosing their cargo to a cargoless neighbor. The results suggest that the experimental observations may be explained by the formation of traffic jams that form at the tip. The model is solved using a novel application of mean-field and shock analysis. We find a new class of shocks that undergo intermittent collapses. Extensions with attachment and detachment events and relevance to experiments are briefly described.

  6. Traffic Jams and Shocks of Molecular Motors inside Cellular Protrusions

    CERN Document Server

    Pinkoviezky, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes inside actin-based cellular protrusions. The motors carry cargo proteins to the protrusion tip which participate in regulating the actin polymerization, and play a key role in facilitating the growth and formation of such protrusions. It is observed that the motors accumulate at the tips of cellular protrusions, and in addition form aggregates that are found to drift towards the protrusion base at the rate of actin treadmilling. We present a one-dimensional driven lattice model, where motors become inactive after delivering their cargo at the tip, or by loosing their cargo to a cargo-less neighbor. The results suggest that the experimental observations may be explained by the formation of traffic jams that form at the tip. The model is solved using a novel application of mean-field and shock analysis. We find a new class of shocks that undergo intermittent collapses, and on average do not obey the Rankine-Hugoniot relation.

  7. Cellular adaptation to biomechanical stress across length scales in tissue homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Penney M; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-09-15

    Human tissues are remarkably adaptable and robust, harboring the collective ability to detect and respond to external stresses while maintaining tissue integrity. Following injury, many tissues have the capacity to repair the damage - and restore form and function - by deploying cellular and molecular mechanisms reminiscent of developmental programs. Indeed, it is increasingly clear that cancer and chronic conditions that develop with age arise as a result of cells and tissues re-implementing and deregulating a selection of developmental programs. Therefore, understanding the fundamental molecular mechanisms that drive cell and tissue responses is a necessity when designing therapies to treat human conditions. Extracellular matrix stiffness synergizes with chemical cues to drive single cell and collective cell behavior in culture and acts to establish and maintain tissue homeostasis in the body. This review will highlight recent advances that elucidate the impact of matrix mechanics on cell behavior and fate across these length scales during times of homeostasis and in disease states.

  8. [Molecular-cellular and hormonal mechanisms of induced brain tolerance of extreme factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoĭlov, M O; Rybnikova, E A

    2012-01-01

    This review includes results of own studies and literature data on the topical problem of neurobiology and medicine: discovery of the mechanisms of increased brain resistance to extreme exposures. The emphasis is made on the molecular-cellular and hormonal mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning-induced brain tolerance to injurious hypoxia, psychoemotional and traumatic stress. A role of basic hormonal and intracellular cascade pro-adaptive processes mediating the neuroprotective action of hypoxic preconditioning is reviewed. A dynamics of the mechanisms of development of induced susceptible brain areas (hippocampus, neocortex) tolerance which includes phases of induction, transformation and expression, is presented. New data on preconditioning-induced cross-tolerance providing increased brain resistance not only to hypoxia but also to other stresses are reported. For the first time neuroprotective effects of hypoxic postconditioning are described.

  9. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  10. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, Detmar [University of Bremen (Germany). Biochemistry, Department of Biology and Chemistry; Hartwig, Andrea [Technical University of Berlin (Germany). Institute of Food Technology and Food Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases. (orig.)

  11. Folic acid supplementation during early hepatocarcinogenesis: cellular and molecular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Carlos Eduardo Andrade; Bassoli, Bruna Kempfer; de Souza, Camila Alexandre Soares; Deminice, Rafael; Jordão Júnior, Alceu Afonso; Paiva, Sérgio Alberto Rupp; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Ong, Thomas Prates; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2011-11-01

    Folic acid (FA) supplementation during carcinogenesis is controversial. Considering the impact of liver cancer as a public health problem and mandatory FA fortification in several countries, the role of FA supplementation in hepatocarcinogenesis should be elucidated. We evaluated FA supplementation during early hepatocarcinogenesis. Rats received daily 0.08 mg (FA8 group) or 0.16 mg (FA16 group) of FA/100 g body weight or water (CO group, controls). After a 2-week treatment, animals were subjected to the "resistant hepatocyte" model of hepatocarcinogenesis (initiation with diethylnitrosamine, selection/promotion with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial hepatectomy) and euthanized after 8 weeks of treatment. Compared to the CO group, the FA16 group presented: reduced (p PNL); reduced (p PNL; decreased (p PNL. Regarding all these parameters, no differences (p > 0.05) were observed between CO and FA8 groups. FA-treated groups presented increased hepatic levels of S-adenosylmethionine but only FA16 group presented increased S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio. No differences (p > 0.05) were observed between experimental groups regarding apoptosis in persistent and remodeling GST-P positive PNL, and global DNA methylation pattern in microdissected PNL. Altogether, the FA16 group, but not the FA8 group, presented chemopreventive activity. Reversion of PNL phenotype and inhibition of DNA damage and of c-myc expression represent relevant FA cellular and molecular effects.

  12. Cellular and molecular effects of yeast probiotics on cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Amir; Alipour, Beitollah; Faghfoori, Zeinab; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    The cancer is one of the main causes of human deaths worldwide. The exact mechanisms of initiation and progression of malignancies are not clear yet, but there is a common agreement about the role of colonic microbiota in the etiology of different cancers. Probiotics have been examined for their anti-cancer effects, and different mechanisms have been suggested about their antitumor functions. Nonpathogenic yeasts, as members of probiotics family, can be effective on gut microbiota dysbiosis. Generally safe yeasts have shown so many beneficial effects on human health. Probiotic yeasts influence physiology, metabolism, and immune homeostasis in the colon and contribute to cancer treatment due to possessing anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-cancer properties. This study reviews some of the health-beneficial effects of probiotic yeasts and their biological substances like folic acid and β-glucan on cancer and focuses on the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of probiotic yeasts such as influencing pathogenic bacteria, inactivation of carcinogenic compounds, especially those derived from food, improvement of intestinal barrier function, modulation of immune responses, antitoxic function, apoptosis, and anti-proliferative effects.

  13. Lipoprotein(a: Cellular Effects and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Riches

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a (Lp(a is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Indeed, individuals with plasma concentrations >20 mg/dL carry a 2-fold increased risk of developing CVD, accounting for ~25% of the population. Circulating levels of Lp(a are remarkably resistant to common lipid lowering therapies, and there are currently no robust treatments available for reduction of Lp(a apart from plasma apheresis, which is costly and labour intensive. The Lp(a molecule is composed of two parts, an LDL/apoB-100 core and a unique glycoprotein, apolipoprotein(a (apo(a, both of which can interact with components of the coagulation cascade, inflammatory pathways, and cells of the blood vessel wall (smooth muscle cells (SMC and endothelial cells (EC. Therefore, it is of key importance to determine the molecular pathways by which Lp(a exerts its influence on the vascular system in order to design therapeutics to target its cellular effects. This paper will summarise the role of Lp(a in modulating cell behaviour in all aspects of the vascular system including platelets, monocytes, SMC, and EC.

  14. Unraveling the cellular and molecular mechanisms of repetitive magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eMüller-Dahlhaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous clinical studies, which have investigated the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in various brain diseases, our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying rTMS-based therapies remains limited. Thus, a deeper understanding of rTMS-induced neural plasticity is required to optimize current treatment protocols. Studies in small animals or appropriate in vitro preparations (including models of brain diseases provide highly useful experimental approaches in this context. State-of-the-art electrophysiological and live-cell imaging techniques that are well established in basic neuroscience can help answering some of the major questions in the field, such as (i which neural structures are activated during TMS, (ii how does rTMS induce Hebbian plasticity, and (iii are other forms of plasticity (e.g., metaplasticity, structural plasticity induced by rTMS? We argue that data gained from these studies will support the development of more effective and specific applications of rTMS in clinical practice.

  15. Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin is a novel structural component of human erythrocytes and a biomarker of cellular stress and senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna H Antonelou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secretory Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin (sCLU is a ubiquitously expressed chaperone that has been functionally implicated in several pathological conditions of increased oxidative injury, including aging. Nevertheless, the biological role of sCLU in red blood cells (RBCs remained largely unknown. In the current study we identified sCLU as a component of human RBCs and we undertook a detailed analysis of its cellular topology. Moreover, we studied the erythrocytic membrane sCLU content during organismal aging, in conditions of increased organismal stress and accelerated RBCs senescence, as well as during physiological in vivo cellular senescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a combination of molecular, biochemical and high resolution microscopical methods we found that sCLU is a novel structural component of RBCs extra- and intracellular plasma membrane and cytosol. We observed that the RBCs membrane-associated sCLU decreases during organismal aging or exposure to acute stress (e.g. smoking, in patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, as well as during RBCs in vivo senescence. In all cases, sCLU reduction paralleled the expression of typical cellular senescence, redox imbalance and erythrophagocytosis markers which are also indicative of the senescence- and oxidative stress-mediated RBCs membrane vesiculation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that sCLU at the mature RBCs is not a silent remnant of the erythroid precursors, but an active component being functionally implicated in the signalling mechanisms of cellular senescence and oxidative stress-responses in both healthy and diseased organism. The reduced sCLU protein levels in the RBCs membrane following cell exposure to various endogenous or exogenous stressors closely correlates to the levels of cellular senescence and redox imbalance markers, suggesting the usefulness of sCLU as a sensitive biomarker of senescence and cellular stress.

  16. Unraveling the cellular response to oxidative stress in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram

    , disulfide bonds are predominantly generated by the two isoforms of the ER oxidoreductin-1 (Ero1) family: Ero1α and Ero1β. Both enzymes oxidize the active-site cysteines in protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs), which in turn introduce disulfide bonds into newly synthesized proteins. Ero1 is re......-oxidized by molecular oxygen and this step generates hydrogen peroxide: a reactive oxygen species. Intramolecular disulfide bonds tightly regulate the oxidase activity of Ero1α. Whereas the regulatory mechanisms that regulate Ero1α activity are well understood, the overall cellular response to oxidative stress...... generated by Ero1α in the lumen of the mammalian ER is poorly characterized. The work presented here shows that overexpression of a hyperactive mutant (C104A/C131A) of Ero1α leads to hyperoxidation of the ER oxidoreductase ERp57 and induces the unfolded protein response (UPR). These effects are likely...

  17. A Model of How Different Biology Experts Explain Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do…

  18. Dynamic modeling of cellular response to DNA damage based on p53 stress response networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinpeng Qi; Yongsheng Ding; Shihuang Shao

    2009-01-01

    Under acute perturbations from the outside, cells can trigger self-defensive mechanisms to fight against genome stress. To investigate the cellular response to continuous ion radiation (IR), a dynamic model for p53 stress response networks at the cellular level is proposed. The model can successfully be used to simulate the dynamic processes of double-strand breaks (DSBs) generation and their repair, switch-like ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop, as well as toxins elimination triggered by p53 stress response networks. Especially, the model can predict the plausible outcomes of cellular response under different IR dose regimes.

  19. Cellular and molecular aspects of plant adaptation to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the range and mechanisms of the biological effects of microgravity is one of the urgent fundamental tasks of space and gravitational biology. The absence of forbidding on plant growth and development in orbital flight allows studying different aspects of plant adaptation to this factor that is directly connected with development of the technologies of bioregenerative life-support systems. Microgravity belongs to the environmental factors which cause adaptive reactions at the cellular and molecular levels in the range of physiological responses in the framework of genetically determined program of ontogenesis. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part in reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and molecular levels in real and simulated microgravity is considered. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in the cell organelle functional load. The maintenance of the plasmalemma fluidity at the certain level, an activation of both the antioxidant system and expression of HSP genes, especially HSP70, under increasing reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation intensity and alteration in protein homeostasis, are a strategic paradigm of rapid (primary) cell adaptation to microgravity. In this sense, biological membranes, especially plasmalemma, and their properties and functions may be considered as the most sensitive indicators of the influence of gravity or altered gravity on a cell. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is a border between the cell internal content and environment, so it is a mediator

  20. The cellular and molecular basis of cnidarian neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentzsch, Fabian; Layden, Michael; Manuel, Michaël

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenesis initiates during early development and it continues through later developmental stages and in adult animals to enable expansion, remodeling, and homeostasis of the nervous system. The generation of nerve cells has been analyzed in detail in few bilaterian model organisms, leaving open many questions about the evolution of this process. As the sister group to bilaterians, cnidarians occupy an informative phylogenetic position to address the early evolution of cellular and molecular aspects of neurogenesis and to understand common principles of neural development. Here we review studies in several cnidarian model systems that have revealed significant similarities and interesting differences compared to neurogenesis in bilaterian species, and between different cnidarian taxa. Cnidarian neurogenesis is currently best understood in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, where it includes epithelial neural progenitor cells that express transcription factors of the soxB and atonal families. Notch signaling regulates the number of these neural progenitor cells, achaete-scute and dmrt genes are required for their further development and Wnt and BMP signaling appear to be involved in the patterning of the nervous system. In contrast to many vertebrates and Drosophila, cnidarians have a high capacity to generate neurons throughout their lifetime and during regeneration. Utilizing this feature of cnidarian biology will likely allow gaining new insights into the similarities and differences of embryonic and regenerative neurogenesis. The use of different cnidarian model systems and their expanding experimental toolkits will thus continue to provide a better understanding of evolutionary and developmental aspects of nervous system formation. WIREs Dev Biol 2017, 6:e257. doi: 10.1002/wdev.257 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of aldosterone producing adenoma development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheerazed eBoulkroun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary aldosteronism (PA is the most common form of secondary hypertension with an estimated prevalence of ~10% in referred patients. PA occurs as a result of a dysregulation of the normal mechanisms controlling adrenal aldosterone production. It is characterized by hypertension with low plasma renin and elevated aldosterone and often associated with hypokalemia. The two major causes of PA are unilateral aldosterone producing adenoma (APA and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, accounting together for ~95% of cases. In addition to the well-characterized effect of excess mineralocorticoids on blood pressure, high levels of aldosterone also have cardiovascular, renal and metabolic consequences. Hence, long-term consequences of PA include increased risk of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Despite recent progress in the management of patients with PA, critical issues related to diagnosis, subtype differentiation and treatment of non-surgically correctable forms still persist. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease should lead to the identification of more reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for a more sensitive and specific screening and new therapeutic options. In this review we will summarize our current knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of APA development. On one hand, we will discuss how various animal models have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of excess aldosterone production. On the other hand, we will summarize the major advances made during the last few years in the genetics of APA due to transcriptomic studies and whole exome sequencing. The identification of recurrent and somatic mutations in genes coding for ion channels (KCNJ5 and CACNA1D and ATPases (ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 allowed highlighting the central role of calcium signaling in autonomous aldosterone production by the adrenal.

  2. Active Control of Cellular Orientation through In-Situ Stress in the Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Heng-An; WANG Xiu-Xi; YAN Shun-Ping

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the orientation of cells on substrates to find possible methods for controlling the cellular orientation.The force dipole model is employed in our modelling and simulation.The elastic interaction between cells as well as the elastic interaction between the cell and in-situ stress field in the substrate are found to be the two main physical mechanisms to control the cellular orientation,The former interaction dominates the cellular orientation when the in-situ stress is small.while the later dominates when the in-situ stress is large enough.Two cells tend to align perpendicularly on a free substrate,but the cellular orientation varies with the increasing in-situ stress.Two cells tend to align in parallel when the normal stress is large enough.Their direction is perpendicular to the extension stress direction or parallel to the compression stress direction.When the positive in-situ shear stress is large enough,the two cells tend to align at-45°.Based on this theoretical simulation,it is believed that the cellular orientation on substrates can be controlled by the in-situ stresses.

  3. A new cellular stress response that triggers centriolar satellite reorganization and ciliogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Bine H; Danielsen, Jannie R; Povlsen, Lou;

    2013-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, granular structures that cluster around centrosomes, but whose biological function and regulation are poorly understood. We show that centriolar satellites undergo striking reorganization in response to cellular stresses such as UV radiation, heat shock...

  4. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, S J; Caputo, M; Tulloh, R M

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed.

  5. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of 3,3′-Diindolylmethane in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Mi Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies in humans have shown that 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM, which is found in cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage and broccoli, is effective in the attenuation of gastrointestinal cancers. This review presents the latest findings on the use, targets, and modes of action of DIM for the treatment of human gastrointestinal cancers. DIM acts upon several cellular and molecular processes in gastrointestinal cancer cells, including apoptosis, autophagy, invasion, cell cycle regulation, metastasis, angiogenesis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. In addition, DIM increases the efficacy of other drugs or therapeutic chemicals when used in combinatorial treatment for gastrointestinal cancer. The studies to date offer strong evidence to support the use of DIM as an anticancer and therapeutic agent for gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, this review provides a comprehensive understanding of the preventive and therapeutic properties of DIM in addition to its different perspective on the safety of DIM in clinical applications for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

  6. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection.

  7. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Al-Griw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market.

  8. Study of the impact of radionuclides discharges from nuclear industry in the northern Cotentin area on the oyster Crassostrea gigas: expression of cellular stress molecular markers; Etude de l'impact des radionucleides rejetes par les installations nucleaires du Nord Cotentin sur l'huitre creuse Crassostrea gigas: analyse de l'expression de marqueurs moleculaires de stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcy, E

    2006-11-15

    This thesis explores the potential radiological impact of radionuclide discharges from the nuclear industry on the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. One of the major goals of this research was to identify markers that could be used to monitor the effects of low-level chronic irradiation. We decided to focalize on the expression of stress-induced genes involved in the regulation of cellular stress, focusing on transcription. First, homology cloning was used to identify four new cDNAs encoding stress markers. Then data collected at various sites enabled to evidence that mRNA levels for each of the genes of interest naturally vary to a significant degree, based on individual differences and seasonal factors. Comparing oysters from exposed sites with those from a reference site located on the Atlantic coast did not suggest any relationship between mRNA levels changes and the oysters exposure to liquid radioactive waste from the A.R.E.V.A. reprocessing plant. In the environment, we found that those radionuclide releases resulted in a very small increase in radioactivity in oysters, especially compared with their natural radioactivity. In the laboratory, by exposing the oysters to higher radionuclide concentrations than those found in the environment, we were able to identify two genes as potential candidates for studying the effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations in the oyster: genes encoding MT and MXR. We confirmed that transcriptional induction of these two genes occurs in response to high doses of acute irradiation. Finally, the comparison between environmental results and the laboratory results underlined the complementarity of these two approaches. In particular, it revealed that seasonal variations in mRNA levels probably have a significant effect on the stress response. (author)

  9. Stress appraisals and cellular aging: a key role for anticipatory threat in the relationship between psychological stress and telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Aoife; Tomiyama, A Janet; Lin, Jue; Puterman, Eli; Adler, Nancy E; Kemeny, Margaret; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Epel, Elissa S

    2012-05-01

    Chronic psychological stress is a risk factor for multiple diseases of aging. Accelerated cellular aging as indexed by short telomere length has emerged as a potential common biological mechanism linking various forms of psychological stress and diseases of aging. Stress appraisals determine the degree and type of biological stress responses and altered stress appraisals may be a common psychological mechanism linking psychological stress and diseases of aging. However, no previous studies have examined the relationship between stress appraisals and telomere length. We exposed chronically stressed female caregivers and non-caregiving controls (N=50; M age=62.14±6.10) to a standardized acute laboratory stressor and measured their anticipatory and retrospective threat and challenge appraisals of the stressor. We hypothesized that threat and challenge appraisals would be associated with shorter and longer telomere length respectively, and that chronic caregiving stress would influence telomere length through altered stress appraisals. Higher anticipatory threat appraisals were associated with shorter age-adjusted telomere length (β=-.32, p=.03), but challenge appraisals and retrospective threat appraisals showed no independent association with telomere length. Caregivers reported significantly higher anticipatory (β=-.36, p=.006) and retrospective (β=-.29, p=.03) threat appraisals than controls, but similar challenge appraisals. Although there was no significant main effect of caregiver status on telomere length, caregiving had a significant indirect effect on telomere length through anticipatory threat appraisals. Exaggerated anticipatory threat appraisals may be a common and modifiable psychological mechanism of psychological stress effects on cellular aging.

  10. The cellular response to curvature-induced stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Y. Y.; Safran, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to explain recent observations of the orientational response of cells to unidirectional curvature. Experiments show that some cell types when plated on a rigid cylindrical surface tend to reorient their shape and stress fibers along the axis of the cylinder, while others align their stress fibers perpendicular to that axis. Our model focuses on the competition of the shear stress—that results from cell adhesion and active contractility—and the anisotropic bending stiffness of the stress fibers. We predict the cell orientation angle that results from the balance of these two forces in a mechanical equilibrium. The conditions under which the different experimental observations can be obtained are discussed in terms of the theory.

  11. Discovery of biomarkers for oxidative stress based on cellular metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningli; Wei, Jianteng; Liu, Yewei; Pei, Dong; Hu, Qingping; Wang, Yu; Di, Duolong

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress has a close relationship with various pathologic physiology phenomena and the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress may provide evidence for clinical diagnosis or disease prevention. Metabolomics was employed to identify the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector, mass spectrometry and partial least squares discriminate analysis were used in this study. The 10, 15 and 13 metabolites were considered to discriminate the model group, vitamin E-treated group and l-glutathione-treated group, respectively. Some of them have been identified, namely, malic acid, vitamin C, reduced glutathione and tryptophan. Identification of other potential biomarkers should be conducted and their physiological significance also needs to be elaborated.

  12. Molecular and cellular functions of the FANCJ DNA helicase defective in cancer and in Fanconi Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Brosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The FANCJ DNA helicase is mutated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer as well as the progressive bone marrow failure disorder Fanconi anemia (FA. FANCJ is linked to cancer suppression and DNA double strand break (DSB repair through its direct interaction with the hereditary breast cancer associated gene product, BRCA1. FANCJ also operates in the FA pathway of interstrand cross-link (ICL repair and contributes to homologous recombination (HR. FANCJ collaborates with a number of DNA metabolizing proteins implicated in DNA damage detection and repair, and plays an important role in cell cycle checkpoint control. In addition to its role in the classical FA pathway, FANCJ is believed to have other functions that are centered on alleviating replication stress. FANCJ resolves G-quadruplex (G4 DNA structures that are known to affect cellular replication and transcription, and potentially plays a role in the preservation and functionality of chromosomal structures such as telomeres. Recent studies suggest that FANCJ helps to maintain chromatin structure and preserve epigenetic stability by facilitating smooth progression of the replication fork when it encounters DNA damage or an alternate DNA structure such as a G4. Ongoing studies suggest a prominent but still not well-understood role of FANCJ in transcriptional regulation, chromosomal structure and function, and DNA damage repair to maintain genomic stability. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the molecular and cellular functions of FANCJ that are critical for chromosomal integrity.

  13. The effect of strength training on muscle cellular stress in prostate cancer patients on ADT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Nilsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate cancer (PCa is associated with several side effects, including loss of muscle mass. Muscle atrophy is associated with reduced mitochondrial function and increased muscle cellular stress that may be counteracted by strength training. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of strength training on mitochondrial proteins and indicators of muscle cellular stress in PCa patients on ADT. Methods Men diagnosed with locally advanced PCa receiving ADT were randomised to a strength training group (STG (n=16 or a control group (CG (n=15 for 16 weeks. Muscle biopsies were collected pre- and post-intervention from the vastus lateralis muscle, and analysed for mitochondrial proteins (citrate synthase, cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COXIV, HSP60 and indicators of muscle cellular stress (heat shock protein (HSP 70, alpha B-crystallin, HSP27, free ubiquitin, and total ubiquitinated proteins using Western blot and ELISA. Results No significant intervention effects were observed in any of the mitochondrial proteins or indicators of muscle cellular stress. However, within-group analysis revealed that the level of HSP70 was reduced in the STG and a tendency towards a reduction in citrate synthase levels was observed in the CG. Levels of total ubiquitinated proteins were unchanged in both groups. Conclusion Although reduced HSP70 levels indicated reduced muscle cellular stress in the STG, the lack of an intervention effect precluded any clear conclusions.

  14. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of HGF/Met in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Simona; Sala, Valentina; Gatti, Stefano; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2015-12-01

    Met tyrosine kinase receptor, also known as c-Met, is the HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) receptor. The HGF/Met pathway has a prominent role in cardiovascular remodelling after tissue injury. The present review provides a synopsis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of HGF/Met in the heart and blood vessels. In vivo, HGF/Met function is particularly important for the protection of the heart in response to both acute and chronic insults, including ischaemic injury and doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Accordingly, conditional deletion of Met in cardiomyocytes results in impaired organ defence against oxidative stress. After ischaemic injury, activation of Met provides strong anti-apoptotic stimuli for cardiomyocytes through PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. Recently, we found that HGF/Met is also important for autophagy regulation in cardiomyocytes via the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. HGF/Met induces proliferation and migration of endothelial cells through Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) activation. In fibroblasts, HGF/Met antagonizes the actions of TGFβ1 (transforming growth factor β1) and AngII (angiotensin II), thus preventing fibrosis. Moreover, HGF/Met influences the inflammatory response of macrophages and the immune response of dendritic cells, indicating its protective function against atherosclerotic and autoimmune diseases. The HGF/Met axis also plays an important role in regulating self-renewal and myocardial regeneration through the enhancement of cardiac progenitor cells. HGF/Met has beneficial effects against myocardial infarction and endothelial dysfunction: the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying repair function in the heart and blood vessels are common and include pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic actions. Thus administration of HGF or HGF mimetics may represent a promising therapeutic agent for the

  15. Cellular and molecular responses of E. fetida coelomocytes exposed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigorgne, Emilie, E-mail: emilie.bigorgne@univ-lorraine.fr; Foucaud, Laurent [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France); Caillet, Celine [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire Environnement et Mineralurgie (LEM) CNRS UMR7569 (France); Giamberini, Laure; Nahmani, Johanne [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France); Thomas, Fabien [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire Environnement et Mineralurgie (LEM) CNRS UMR7569 (France); Rodius, Francois [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France)

    2012-07-15

    An in vitro approach using coelomocytes of Eisenia fetida was investigated to evaluate toxicity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Coelomocytes were exposed to well-dispersed suspension of small aggregates (130 nm) of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (1-25 {mu}g/ml) during 4, 12 and 24 h. Intracellular localisation suggested that the main route of uptake was endocytosis. Cellular responses showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were not cytotoxic and had no effect on phagocytosis at any of the four concentrations for each time tested. Concerning molecular responses, an increase of fetidin and metallothionein mRNA expression was observed starting from 4 h of exposure. In contrast, expression of coelomic cytolytic factor mRNA decreased for 10 and 25 {mu}g/ml after 4 h. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase expression were not modified suggesting that oxidative stress was not induced by TiO{sub 2} in our experimental conditions. This in vitro approach showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were taken up by coelomocytes and they could modify the molecular response of immune and detoxification system.

  16. Cellular stress responses for monitoring and modulating ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirovic, Dino; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Nizard, Carine

    2013-01-01

    the removal of the stressors; and (iii) down-stream effectors for counteracting the effects of disturbance and for re-establishing homeodynamics. At the present it is not known how these three steps are maintained interactively in terms of kinetics and intensity, and how these may alter during growth...... healing in vitro by fibroblasts, and induction of differentiation of telomerase-immortalised stem cells. Furthermore, immediate and delayed stress profiles need to be established at several age points during the replicative senescence of cells in culture, which can then be the basis for testing potential...

  17. Enhanced foaming of cellular metals by internal stress superplasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazono, K.; Sato, E.; Kuribayashi, K. [The Inst. of Space and Astronautical Science, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Effects of internal stress superplasticity on solid-state foaming process were examined using Al-8.69Si alloy and pure zinc compacts produced by the powder metallurgical (P/M) route. Isothermal and thermal cycling compression creep behaviors revealed that composite CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion)-mismatch superplasticity was induced in P/M Al-Si alloy, however, no difference was shown in the solid-state foaming. On the other hand, the foaming rate of P/M zinc was enhanced by anisotropic CTE-mismatch superplasticity. The cell morphology of the foamed zinc has anisotropy due to the original powder compact produced by hot-extrusion. (orig.)

  18. Molecular and Cellular Effects Induced in Mytilus galloprovincialis Treated with Oxytetracycline at Different Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banni, Mohamed; Sforzini, Susanna; Franzellitti, Silvia; Oliveri, Caterina; Viarengo, Aldo; Fabbri, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the interactive effects of temperature (16°C and 24°C) and a 4-day treatment with the antibiotic oxytetracycline (OTC) at 1 and 100 μg/L on cellular and molecular parameters in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), a sensitive biomarker of impaired health status in this organism, was assessed in the digestive glands. In addition, oxidative stress markers and the expression of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in antioxidant defense (catalase (cat) and glutathione-S-transferase (gst)) and the heat shock response (hsp90, hsp70, and hsp27) were evaluated in the gills, the target tissue of soluble chemicals. Finally, cAMP levels, which represent an important cell signaling pathway related to oxidative stress and the response to temperature challenges, were also determined in the gills. Exposure to heat stress as well as to OTC rendered a decrease in LMS and an increase in malonedialdehyde accumulation (MDA). CAT activity was not significantly modified, whereas GST activity decreased at 24°C. Cat and gst expression levels were reduced in animals kept at 24°C compared to 16°C in the presence or absence of OTC. At 16°C, treatment with OTC caused a significant increase in cat and gst transcript levels. Hsp27 mRNA was significantly up-regulated at all conditions compared to controls at 16°C. cAMP levels were increased at 24°C independent of the presence of OTC. PCA analysis showed that 37.21% and 25.89% of the total variance was explained by temperature and OTC treatment, respectively. Interestingly, a clear interaction was observed in animals exposed to both stressors increasing LMS and MDA accumulation and reducing hsp27 gene expression regulation. These interactions may suggest a risk for the organisms due to temperature increases in contaminated seawaters.

  19. Pavlovian Conditioning of "Hermissenda": Current Cellular, Molecular, and Circuit Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Terry

    2004-01-01

    The less-complex central nervous system of many invertebrates make them attractive for not only the molecular analysis of the associative learning and memory, but also in determining how neural circuits are modified by learning to generate changes in behavior. The nudibranch mollusk "Hermissenda crassicornis" is a preparation that has contributed…

  20. Cellular dysfunction in diabetes as maladaptive response to mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudi, Alba; Jove, Mariona; Ayala, Victoria; Cassanye, Anna; Serrano, Jose; Gonzalo, Hugo; Boada, Jordi; Prat, Joan; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in diabetes long-term complications. In this paper, we summarize the growing evidence suggesting that hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of superoxide by mitochondrial electron transport chain triggers a maladaptive response by affecting several metabolic and signaling pathways involved in the pathophysiology of cellular dysfunction and diabetic complications. In particular, it is our goal to describe physiological mechanisms underlying the mitochondrial free radical production and regulation to explain the oxidative stress derived from a high intracellular glucose concentration and the resulting maladaptive response that leads to a cellular dysfunction and pathological state. Finally, we outline potential therapies for diabetes focused to the prevention of mitochondrial oxidative damage.

  1. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Michael; Gao, Guo-Jie; Thomas, Jeffrey; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity.

  2. Networking with noise at the molecular, cellular, and population level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Jose

    2002-03-01

    The intrinsic stochastic nature of biochemical reactions affects enzymatic and transcriptional networks at different levels. Yet, cells are able to function effectively and consistently amidst such random fluctuations. I will discuss some molecular mechanisms that are able to reduce the intrinsic noise of chemical reactions, how suitable designs can make networks resistant to noise, and what strategies can be used by populations to achieve precise functions.

  3. Cellular Viscosity in Prokaryotes and Thermal Stability of Low Molecular Weight Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuecas, Alba; Cruces, Jorge; Galisteo-López, Juan F; Peng, Xiaojun; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2016-08-23

    Some low molecular weight biomolecules, i.e., NAD(P)H, are unstable at high temperatures. The use of these biomolecules by thermophilic microorganisms has been scarcely analyzed. Herein, NADH stability has been studied at different temperatures and viscosities. NADH decay increased at increasing temperatures. At increasing viscosities, NADH decay rates decreased. Thus, maintaining relatively high cellular viscosity in cells could result in increased stability of low molecular weight biomolecules (i.e., NADH) at high temperatures, unlike what was previously deduced from studies in diluted water solutions. Cellular viscosity was determined using a fluorescent molecular rotor in various prokaryotes covering the range from 10 to 100°C. Some mesophiles showed the capability of changing cellular viscosity depending on growth temperature. Thermophiles and extreme thermophiles presented a relatively high cellular viscosity, suggesting this strategy as a reasonable mechanism to thrive under these high temperatures. Results substantiate the capability of thermophiles and extreme thermophiles (growth range 50-80°C) to stabilize and use generally considered unstable, universal low molecular weight biomolecules. In addition, this study represents a first report, to our knowledge, on cellular viscosity measurements in prokaryotes and it shows the dependency of prokaryotic cellular viscosity on species and growth temperature.

  4. Molecular mechanism of cellular reception of ionizing radiation and of activation of signal transduction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    The author reviewed what in cells receives ionizing radiation as a stress and which signal transduction pathway is activated to induce the stress reaction in the following order: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway by radiation, activation of MAP kinase superfamily by radiation, induction of p53 function by radiation, and radiation exposure and stress reaction pathway. Conclusion was as follows: Cellular receptors to radiation can be cell membrane and DNA. Membrane reception of radiation induces activation of tyrosine kinase and sphingomyelinase, which resulting in activation of PKC- and MAP kinase-mediated signal transduction. The signal generated in the nucleus participates in regulation of cell cycle and in DNA repair. Therefore, it seems that irradiation of ionizing radiation gives energy to various cellular receptor sites as well as DNA, which generate various independent signals to be transduced and accumulated in the nucleus, and leading to cellular response. (K.H.). 63 refs.

  5. The Molecular and Cellular Choreography of Appendage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Elly M

    2016-06-16

    Recent advances in limb regeneration are revealing the molecular events that integrate growth control, cell fate programming, and positional information to yield the exquisite replacement of the amputated limb. Parallel progress in several invertebrate and vertebrate models has provided a broader context for understanding the mechanisms and the evolution of regeneration. Together, these discoveries provide a foundation for describing the principles underlying regeneration of complex, multi-tissue structures. As such these findings should provide a wealth of ideas for engineers seeking to reconstitute regeneration from constituent parts or to elicit full regeneration from partial regeneration events.

  6. Cellular and molecular bases of memory: synaptic and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J H; Ko, G Y; Kelly, P T

    1997-07-01

    Discoveries made during the past decade have greatly improved our understanding of how the nervous system functions. This review article examines the relation between memory and the cellular mechanisms of neuronal and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. Evidence indicating that activity-dependent short- and long-term changes in strength of synaptic transmission are important for memory processes is examined. Focus is placed on one model of synaptic plasticity called long-term potentiation, and its similarities with memory processes are illustrated. Recent studies show that the regulation of synaptic strength is bidirectional (e.g., synaptic potentiation or depression). Mechanisms involving intracellular signaling pathways that regulate synaptic strength are described, and the specific roles of calcium, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, and retrograde messengers are emphasized. Evidence suggests that changes in synaptic ultrastructure, dendritic ultrastructure, and neuronal gene expression may also contribute to mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Also discussed are recent findings about postsynaptic mechanisms that regulate short-term synaptic facilitation and neuronal burst-pattern activity, as well as evidence about the subcellular location (presynaptic or postsynaptic) of mechanisms involved in long-term synaptic plasticity.

  7. Calcium-mediated oxidative stress: a common mechanism in tight junction disruption by different types of cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Shukla, Pradeep K; Nagaraja, Archana S; Dorniak, Piotr L; Pallikuth, Sandeep; Waters, Christopher M; Sood, Anil; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2017-02-20

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osmotic stress, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and cyclic stretch-induced tight junction (TJ) disruption was investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and restraint stress-induced barrier dysfunction in mouse colon in vivo Live cell imaging showed that osmotic stress, cyclic stretch and DSS triggered rapid production of ROS in Caco-2 cell monolayers, which was blocked by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. Knockdown of CaV1.3 or TRPV6 channels blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production and attenuated TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. N-Acetyl l-cysteine (NAC) and l-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) blocked stress-induced TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. NAC and l-NAME also blocked stress-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Src. ROS was colocalized with the mitochondrial marker in stressed cells. Cyclosporin A blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production, barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption and JNK activation. Mitochondria-targeted Mito-TEMPO blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced barrier dysfunction and TJ disruption. Chronic restraint stress in mice resulted in the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), activation of JNK and c-Src, and disruption of TJ in the colonic epithelium. Furthermore, corticosterone administration induced JNK and c-Src activation, TJ disruption and protein thiol oxidation in colonic mucosa. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress is a common signal in the mechanism of TJ disruption in the intestinal epithelium by different types of cellular stress in vitro and bio behavioral stress in vivo.

  8. The role of neutron scattering in molecular and cellular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, D. L.

    1982-09-01

    Neutron scattering measurements of biological macromolecules and materials have provided answers to numerous questions about molecular assemblies and arrangements. Studies of ribosomes, viruses, membranes, and other biological structures are reviewed, with emphasis on the importance of both deuterium labelling and contrast variation with H2O/D2O exchange. Although many studies of biological molecules have been made using contrast variation alone, it is the deuterium labelling experiments that have provided the most precise information and answers to major biological questions. This is largely the result of the low resolution of scattering data and the consequent rapid increase of information content that specific deuterium labelling provides. Procedures for specific deuterium labelling `in vivo' are described for recent work on myelin membranes together with basic aspects of such labelling useful for future research.

  9. Molecular and Cellular Quantitative Microscopy: theoretical investigations, technological developments and applications to neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Alessandro

    2006-05-01

    This PhD project aims at the development and evaluation of microscopy techniques for the quantitative detection of molecular interactions and cellular features. The primarily investigated techniques are Fαrster Resonance Energy Transfer imaging and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy. These techniques have the capability to quantitatively probe the biochemical environment of fluorophores. An automated microscope capable of unsupervised operation has been developed that enables the investigation of molecular and cellular properties at high throughput levels and the analysis of cellular heterogeneity. State-of-the-art Förster Resonance Energy Transfer imaging, Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and the newly developed tools have been combined with cellular and molecular biology techniques for the investigation of protein-protein interactions, oligomerization and post-translational modifications of α-Synuclein and Tau, two proteins involved in Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, respectively. The high inter-disciplinarity of this project required the merging of the expertise of both the Molecular Biophysics Group at the Debye Institute - Utrecht University and the Cell Biophysics Group at the European Neuroscience Institute - Gαttingen University. This project was conducted also with the support and the collaboration of the Center for the Molecular Physiology of the Brain (Göttingen), particularly with the groups associated with the Molecular Quantitative Microscopy and Parkinson’s Disease and Aggregopathies areas. This work demonstrates that molecular and cellular quantitative microscopy can be used in combination with high-throughput screening as a powerful tool for the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of complex biological phenomena like those occurring in neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen.

  11. The Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Apoptosis in Hippocampus: Cellular and Molecular Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Akram; Hami, Javad; Razavi, Shahnaz; Esfandiary, Ebrahim; Hejazi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive deficits in humans and animals. These deficits are paralleled by neurophysiological and structural changes in brain. In diabetic animals, impairments of spatial learning, memory, and cognition occur in association with distinct changes in hippocampus, a key brain area for many forms of learning and memory and are particularly sensitive to changes in glucose homeostasis. However, the multifactorial pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy is not yet completely understood. Apoptosis plays a crucial role in diabetes-induce neuronal loss in hippocampus. Methods: The effects of diabetes on hippocampus and cognitive/behavioral dysfunctions in experimental models of diabetes are reviewed, with a focus on the negative impact on increased neuronal apoptosis and related cellular and molecular mechanisms. Results: Of all articles that were assessed, most of the experimental studies clearly showed that diabetes causes neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus through multiple mechanisms, including oxidative stress, inhibition of caspases, disturbance in expression of apoptosis regulator genes, as well as deficits in mitochondrial function. The balance between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling may determine the neuronal apoptotic outcome in vitro and in vivo models of experimental diabetes. Conclusions: Dissecting out the mechanisms responsible for diabetes-related changes in the hippocampal cell apoptosis helps improve treatment of impaired cognitive and memory functions in diabetic individuals. PMID:27076895

  12. Biologic plausibility, cellular effects, and molecular mechanisms of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borow, Kenneth M; Nelson, John R; Mason, R Preston

    2015-09-01

    Residual cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in dyslipidemic patients despite intensive statin therapy, underscoring the need for additional intervention. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is incorporated into membrane phospholipids and atherosclerotic plaques and exerts beneficial effects on the pathophysiologic cascade from onset of plaque formation through rupture. Specific salutary actions have been reported relating to endothelial function, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, inflammation, plaque formation/progression, platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and plaque rupture. EPA also improves atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by reduction of triglycerides without raising low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Other beneficial effects of EPA include vasodilation, resulting in blood pressure reductions, as well as improved membrane fluidity. EPA's effects are at least additive to those of statins when given as adjunctive therapy. In this review, we present data supporting the biologic plausibility of EPA as an anti-atherosclerotic agent with potential clinical benefit for prevention of CV events, as well as its cellular effects and molecular mechanisms of action. REDUCE-IT is an ongoing, randomized, controlled study evaluating whether the high-purity ethyl ester of EPA (icosapent ethyl) at 4 g/day combined with statin therapy is superior to statin therapy alone for reducing CV events in high-risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia. The results from this study are expected to clarify the role of EPA as adjunctive therapy to a statin for reduction of residual CV risk.

  13. Neuroimmune pharmacology: an elective course for molecular and cellular bioscience graduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sulie L; Mao, Xin

    2011-03-01

    Neuroimmune pharmacology is an interdisciplinary field which integrates neuroscience, immunology, and pharmacology. This new discipline has developed over the last two decades in order to study the etiology and treatment of disorders involving both the immune and nervous systems. The proposed Neuroimmune Pharmacology course is a semester-long elective course for students in molecular and cellular biology graduate programs. It is designed to introduce these students to basic principles and practices of neuroimmune pharmacology as well as to the application of molecular and cellular biological techniques in the study of neuroimmune disorders. The goal of this elective course is to help prepare future molecular and cellular biologists to undertake research initiatives in the field of neuroimmunity in health and disease.

  14. 2012 CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17 - 22, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judith Berman

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on CELLULAR & MOLECULAR FUNGAL BIOLOGY was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  15. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology, Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Judith [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  16. The virtual cell animation collection: tools for teaching molecular and cellular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, Katie M; White, Alan R; Johnson, Christina; Vender, Bradley; Slator, Brian M; McClean, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    A cell is a minifactory in which structures and molecules are assembled, rearranged, disassembled, packaged, sorted, and transported. Because cellular structures and molecules are invisible to the human eye, students often have difficulty conceptualizing the dynamic nature of cells that function at multiple scales across time and space. To represent these dynamic cellular processes, the Virtual Cell Productions team at North Dakota State University develops freely available multimedia materials to support molecular and cellular biology learning inside and outside the high school and university classroom.

  17. The Virtual Cell Animation Collection: Tools for Teaching Molecular and Cellular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, Katie M.; White, Alan R.; Johnson, Christina; Vender, Bradley; Slator, Brian M.; McClean, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    A cell is a minifactory in which structures and molecules are assembled, rearranged, disassembled, packaged, sorted, and transported. Because cellular structures and molecules are invisible to the human eye, students often have difficulty conceptualizing the dynamic nature of cells that function at multiple scales across time and space. To represent these dynamic cellular processes, the Virtual Cell Productions team at North Dakota State University develops freely available multimedia materials to support molecular and cellular biology learning inside and outside the high school and university classroom. PMID:25856580

  18. The Molecular Genetics and Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv D. Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is an incurable disorder clinically characterised by a sustained elevation of mean arterial pressure in the absence of systemic involvement. As the adult circulation is a low pressure, low resistance system, PAH represents a reversal to a foetal state. The small pulmonary arteries of patients exhibit luminal occlusion resultant from the uncontrolled growth of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This vascular remodelling is comprised of hallmark defects, most notably the plexiform lesion. PAH may be familial in nature but the majority of patients present with spontaneous disease or PAH associated with other complications. In this paper, the molecular genetic basis of the disorder is discussed in detail ranging from the original identification of the major genetic contributant to PAH and moving on to current next-generation technologies that have led to the rapid identification of additional genetic risk factors. The impact of identified mutations on the cell is examined, particularly, the determination of pathways disrupted in disease and critical to pulmonary vascular maintenance. Finally, the application of research in this area to the design and development of novel treatment options for patients is addressed along with the future directions PAH research is progressing towards.

  19. Redox Sensitivities of Global Cellular Cysteine Residues under Reductive and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kazutaka; Kusano, Hidewo; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Riko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The protein cysteine residue is one of the amino acids most susceptible to oxidative modifications, frequently caused by oxidative stress. Several applications have enabled cysteine-targeted proteomics analysis with simultaneous detection and quantitation. In this study, we employed a quantitative approach using a set of iodoacetyl-based cysteine reactive isobaric tags (iodoTMT) and evaluated the transient cellular oxidation ratio of free and reversibly modified cysteine thiols under DTT and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. DTT treatment (1 mM for 5 min) reduced most cysteine thiols, irrespective of their cellular localizations. It also caused some unique oxidative shifts, including for peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and thioredoxin (TXN), proteins reportedly affected by cellular reactive oxygen species production. Modest H2O2 treatment (50 μM for 5 min) did not cause global oxidations but instead had apparently reductive effects. Moreover, with H2O2, significant oxidative shifts were observed only in redox active proteins, like PRDX2, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), TXN, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Overall, our quantitative data illustrated both H2O2- and reduction-mediated cellular responses, whereby while redox homeostasis is maintained, highly reactive thiols can potentiate the specific, rapid cellular signaling to counteract acute redox stress.

  20. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan, E-mail: falawi@upenn.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening.

  1. Molecular approaches to improve rice abiotic stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoi, Junya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major factor limiting productivity of rice crops in large areas of the world. Because plants cannot avoid abiotic stress by moving, they have acquired various mechanisms for stress tolerance in the course of their evolution. Enhancing or introducing such mechanisms in rice is one effective way to develop stress-tolerant cultivars. Based on physiological studies on stress responses, recent progress in plant molecular biology has enabled discovery of many genes involved in stress tolerance. These genes include regulatory genes, which regulate stress response (e.g., transcription factors and protein kinases), and functional genes, which protect the cell (e.g., enzymes for generating protective metabolites and proteins). Both kinds of genes are used to increase stress tolerance in rice. In addition, several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with higher stress tolerance have been cloned, contributing to the discovery of significantly important genes for stress tolerance.

  2. Tuning Cellular Uptake of Molecular Probes by Rational Design of Their Assembly into Supramolecular Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Lye Lin; Reyes, Claudia D; Zhang, Pengcheng; Cui, Honggang

    2016-03-16

    Intracellular sensing of pathologically relevant biomolecules could provide essential information for accurate evaluation of disease staging and progression, yet the poor cellular uptake of water-soluble molecular probes limits their use as protease sensors. In other cases such as extracellular sensing, cellular uptake should be effectively inhibited. Self-assembly of molecular probes into supramolecular nanoprobes presents a potential strategy to alter their interaction mechanisms with cells to promote or reduce their cellular uptake. Here, we report on the design, synthesis, and assembly of peptide-based molecular beacons into supramolecular protease sensors of either spherical or filamentous shapes. We found that positively charged spherical nanobeacons demonstrate much higher cellular uptake efficiency than its monomeric form, thus making them most suitable for intracellular sensing of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Our results also suggest that assembly into filamentous nanobeacons significantly reduces their internalization by cancer cells, an important property that can be utilized for probing extracellular protease activities. These studies provide important guiding principles for rational design of supramolecular nanoprobes with tunable cellular uptake characteristics.

  3. Kinetic theory approach to modeling of cellular repair mechanisms under genome stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Qi

    Full Text Available Under acute perturbations from outer environment, a normal cell can trigger cellular self-defense mechanism in response to genome stress. To investigate the kinetics of cellular self-repair process at single cell level further, a model of DNA damage generating and repair is proposed under acute Ion Radiation (IR by using mathematical framework of kinetic theory of active particles (KTAP. Firstly, we focus on illustrating the profile of Cellular Repair System (CRS instituted by two sub-populations, each of which is made up of the active particles with different discrete states. Then, we implement the mathematical framework of cellular self-repair mechanism, and illustrate the dynamic processes of Double Strand Breaks (DSBs and Repair Protein (RP generating, DSB-protein complexes (DSBCs synthesizing, and toxins accumulating. Finally, we roughly analyze the capability of cellular self-repair mechanism, cellular activity of transferring DNA damage, and genome stability, especially the different fates of a certain cell before and after the time thresholds of IR perturbations that a cell can tolerate maximally under different IR perturbation circumstances.

  4. Molecular and Cellular Quantitative Microscopy: theoretical investigations, technological developments and applications to neurobiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    This PhD project aims at the development and evaluation of microscopy techniques for the quantitative detection of molecular interactions and cellular features. The primarily investigated techniques are Fαrster Resonance Energy Transfer imaging and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy. These tec

  5. Platinum nanozymes recover cellular ROS homeostasis in an oxidative stress-mediated disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglianetti, Mauro; de Luca, Elisa; Pedone, Deborah; Marotta, Roberto; Catelani, Tiziano; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase enzymes, with similar or even superior performance than natural enzymes, along with higher adaptability to the changes in environmental conditions. We then exploited their potent activity as radical scavenging materials in a cellular model of an oxidative stress-related disorder, namely human Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) disease, which is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Noteworthily, we found that Pt nanozymes can efficiently reduce ROS levels, completely restoring the cellular physiological homeostasis.In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide

  6. The CK1 family: contribution to cellular stress response and its role in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe eKnippschild

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed pleiotropic CK1 family play major regulatory roles in many cellular processes including DNA-processing and repair, proliferation, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicular trafficking, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. As a consequence of cellular stress conditions, interaction of CK1 with the mitotic spindle is manifold increased pointing to regulatory functions at the mitotic checkpoint. Furthermore, CK1 is able to alter the activity of key regulatory proteins and signal integration molecules and is tightly connected to the regulation of β-catenin, p53- and MDM2-specific functions and degradation. Considering the importance of CK1 for accurate cell division and regulation of tumor suppressor functions it is not surprising that mutations and alterations in the expression and/or activity of CK1 isoforms are often detected in various tumor entities including cancer of the kidney, choriocarcinomas, breast carcinomas, oral cancer, adenocarcinomas of the pancreas, and ovarian cancer. Therefore, effort has enormously increased (i to understand the regulation of CK1 and its involvement in tumorigenesis- and tumor progression-related signal transduction pathways and (ii to develop CK1-specific inhibitors for the use in personalized therapy concepts. In this review we summarize the current knowledge regarding the regulation, functions, and interactions of CK1 family members with cellular proteins playing central roles in cellular stress-responses and carcinogenesis.

  7. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Requena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis.

  8. Molecular Chaperones of Leishmania: Central Players in Many Stress-Related and -Unrelated Physiological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Jose M.; Montalvo, Ana M.; Fraga, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are key components in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and survival, not only during stress but also under optimal growth conditions. Folding of nascent polypeptides is supported by molecular chaperones, which avoid the formation of aggregates by preventing nonspecific interactions and aid, when necessary, the translocation of proteins to their correct intracellular localization. Furthermore, when proteins are damaged, molecular chaperones may also facilitate their refolding or, in the case of irreparable proteins, their removal by the protein degradation machinery of the cell. During their digenetic lifestyle, Leishmania parasites encounter and adapt to harsh environmental conditions, such as nutrient deficiency, hypoxia, oxidative stress, changing pH, and shifts in temperature; all these factors are potential triggers of cellular stress. We summarize here our current knowledge on the main types of molecular chaperones in Leishmania and their functions. Among them, heat shock proteins play important roles in adaptation and survival of this parasite against temperature changes associated with its passage from the poikilothermic insect vector to the warm-blooded vertebrate host. The study of structural features and the function of chaperones in Leishmania biology is providing opportunities (and challenges) for drug discovery and improving of current treatments against leishmaniasis. PMID:26167482

  9. Mechanism resulting in chemical imbalance due to cellular damage associated with mechanoporation: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliozberg, Yelena R.; Chantawansri, Tanya L.

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of ion transport through a transmembrane pore, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were employed. A model membrane where a pore connects the intra- and extra-cellular compartment was considered. Pores with radii of 1.5 nm or less exhibited resealing over the course of 135 ns simulations, and ionic disturbance is minimal. Ion transport through a larger pore (2 nm radius) leads to a substantial change in the intra- and extra-cellular ionic concentrations. The influx of Na+ and Cl- ions down their concentration gradients is greater than the efflux of K+ leading to an osmotic influx of water.

  10. Hormesis, cellular stress response and neuroinflammation in schizophrenia: Early onset versus late onset state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Giordano, James; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Ruggieri, Martino; Bianchini, Rio; Ontario, Maria Laura; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Calabrese, Edward J

    2017-05-01

    Abnormal redox homeostasis and oxidative stress have been proposed to play a role in the etiology of several neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders. Emerging interest has recently focused on markers of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in schizophrenic spectrum disorders, at least in particular subgroups of patients. Altered expression of genes related to oxidative stress, oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, as well as reduced glutathione levels in central and peripheral tissues could act synergistically, and contribute to the course of the disease.  Herein, we discuss cellular mechanisms that may be operative in neuroinflammation and contributory to schizophrenia. We address modulation of endogenous cellular defense mechanisms as a potentially innovative approach to therapeutics for schizophrenia, and other neuropsychiatric conditions that are associated with neuroinflammation. Specifically, we discuss the emerging role of heme oxygenase as prominent member of neuroprotective network in redox stress responsive mechanisms, as well as the importance of glutathione relevant in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Finally we introduce the hormetic dose response concept as relevant and important to neuroprotection, and review hormetic mechanisms as possible approaches to manipulation of neuroinflammatory targets that may be viable for treating schizophrenia spectrum disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The role of nanosecond electric pulse-induced mechanical stress in cellular nanoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.

    Background: Exposures of cells to very short (less than 1 microsecond) electric pulses in the megavolt/meter range have been shown to cause a multitude of effects, both physical and molecular in nature. Physically, nanosecond electrical pulse exposure can disrupt the plasma membrane, leading to a phenomenon known as nanoporation. Nanoporation is the production of nanometer sized holes (less than 2 nanometers in diameter) that can persist for up to fifteen minutes, allowing the flow of ions into and out of the cell. Nanoporation can lead to secondary physical effects, such as cellular swelling, shrinking and blebbing. Molecularly, nanosecond electrical pulses have been shown to activate signaling pathways, produce oxidative stress, stimulate hormone secretion and induce both apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause molecular changes is unknown; however, it is thought the flow of ions, such as calcium, into the cell via nanopores, could be a major cause. The ability of nanosecond electrical pulses to cause membranes to become permeable and to induce apoptosis makes the technology a desirable modality for cancer research; however, the lack of understanding regarding the mechanisms by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause nanoporation impedes further development of this technology. This dissertation documents the genomic and proteomic responses of cells exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses and describes in detail the biophysical effects of these electrical pulses, including the demonstration for the first time of the generation of acoustic pressure transients capable of disrupting plasma membranes and possibly contributing to nanoporation. Methods: Jurkat, clone E6-1 (human lymphocytic cell line), U937 (human lymphocytic cell line), Chinese hamster ovarian cells and adult primary human dermal fibroblasts exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses were subjected to a variety of molecular assays, including flow cytometry

  12. IRE1 Sulfenylation by Reactive Oxygen Species Coordinates Cellular Stress Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dennis H

    2016-08-18

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Hourihan et al. (2016) show that sulfenylation of IRE1 by reactive oxygen species inhibits the role of IRE1 in the Unfolded Protein Response and activates a SKN-1/Nrf2-dependent response to oxidative stress.

  13. The link between injury-induced stress and regenerative phenomena: A cellular and genetic synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Piril; Monaghan, James R

    2015-04-01

    Injury is an inescapable phenomenon of life that affects animals at every physiological level. Yet, some animals respond to injury by rebuilding the damaged tissues whereas others are limited to scarring. Elucidating how a tissue insult from wounding leads to a regenerative response at the genetic level is essential to make regenerative advantages translational. It has become clear that animals with regenerative abilities recycle developmental programs after injury, reactivating genes that have lied dormant throughout adulthood. The question that is critical to our understanding of regeneration is how a specific set of developmentally important genes can be reactivated only after an acute tissue insult. Here, we review how injury-induced cellular stresses such as hypoxic, oxidative, and mechanical stress may contribute to the genomic and epigenetic changes that promote regeneration in animals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity.

  14. Nitrosative stress, cellular stress response, and thiol homeostasis in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Sultana, Rukhsana; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Guagliano, Eleonora; Sapienza, Maria; Bella, Rita; Kanski, Jaroslaw; Pennisi, Giovanni; Mancuso, Cesare; Stella, Anna Maria Giuffrida; Butterfield, D A

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with cognitive and memory decline, personality changes, and synapse loss. Increasing evidence indicates that factors such as oxidative and nitrosative stress, glutathione depletion, and impaired protein metabolism can interact in a vicious cycle, which is central to AD pathogenesis. In the present study, we demonstrate that brains of AD patients undergo oxidative changes classically associated with a strong induction of the so-called vitagenes, including the heat shock proteins (HSPs) heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), HSP60, and HSP72, as well as thioredoxin reductase (TRXr). In inferior parietal brain of AD patients, a significant increase in the expression of HO-1 and TRXr was observed, whereas HO-2 expression was decreased, compared with controls. TRHr was not increased in AD cerebellum. Plasma GSH was decreased in AD patients, compared with the control group, and was associated with a significant increase in oxidative stress markers (i.e., GSSG, hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyl content, and nitrotyrosine). In AD lymphocytes, we observed an increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, HO-1, Hsp72, HSP60, and TRXr. Our data support a role for nitrative stress in the pathogenesis of AD and indicate that the stress-responsive genes, such as HO-1 and TRXr, may represent important targets for novel cytoprotective strategies.

  15. Cellular, biochemical, and molecular changes during encystment of free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouque, Emilie; Trouilhé, Marie-Cécile; Thomas, Vincent; Hartemann, Philippe; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Héchard, Yann

    2012-04-01

    Free-living amoebae are protozoa found in soil and water. Among them, some are pathogenic and many have been described as potential reservoirs of pathogenic bacteria. Their cell cycle is divided into at least two forms, the trophozoite and the cyst, and the differentiation process is named encystment. As cysts are more resistant to disinfection treatments than trophozoites, many studies focused on encystment, but until recently, little was known about cellular, biochemical, and molecular modifications operating during this process. Important signals and signaling pathways at play during encystment, as well as cell responses at the molecular level, have been described. This review summarizes our knowledge and focuses on new findings.

  16. Cellular and molecular drivers of differential organ growth: insights from the limbs of Monodelphis domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Anna; Doroba, Carolyn; Maier, Jennifer A; Cohen, Lorna; VandeBerg, John; Sears, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental question in biology is "how is growth differentially regulated during development to produce organs of particular sizes?" We used a new model system for the study of differential organ growth, the limbs of the opossum (Monodelphis domestica), to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of differential organ growth in mammals. Opossum forelimbs grow much faster than hindlimbs, making opossum limbs an exceptional system with which to study differential growth. We first used the great differences in opossum forelimb and hindlimb growth to identify cellular processes and molecular signals that underlie differential limb growth. We then used organ culture and pharmacological addition of FGF ligands and inhibitors to test the role of the Fgf/Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway in driving these cellular processes. We found that molecular signals from within the limb drive differences in cell proliferation that contribute to the differential growth of the forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums. We also found that alterations in the Fgf/MAPK pathway can generate differences in cell proliferation that mirror those observed between wild-type forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums and that manipulation of Fgf/MAPK signaling affects downstream focal adhesion-extracellular matrix (FA-ECM) and Wnt signaling in opossum limbs. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionary changes in the Fgf/MAPK pathway could help drive the observed differences in cell behaviors and growth in opossum forelimb and hindlimbs.

  17. Discrimination of Dysplastic Nevi from Common Melanocytic Nevi by Cellular and Molecular Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Hiroshi; Kiecker, Felix; Shemer, Avner; Cannizzaro, Maria Vittoria; Wang, Claire Q F; Gulati, Nicholas; Ohmatsu, Hanako; Shah, Kejal R; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary; Cueto, Inna; McNutt, Neil Scott; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Krueger, James G

    2016-10-01

    Dysplastic nevi (DNs), also known as Clark's nevi or atypical moles, are distinguished from common melanocytic nevi by variegation in pigmentation and clinical appearance, as well as differences in tissue patterning. However, cellular and molecular differences between DNs and common melanocytic nevi are not completely understood. Using cDNA microarray, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we molecularly characterized DNs and analyzed the difference between DNs and common melanocytic nevi. A total of 111 probesets (91 annotated genes, fold change > 2.0 and false discovery rate DNs was altered differentiation and activation of epidermal keratinocytes with increased expression of hair follicle-related molecules (keratin 25, trichohyalin, ribonuclease, RNase A family, 7) and inflammation-related molecules (S100A7, S100A8) at both genomic and protein levels. The immune microenvironment of DNs was characterized by an increase of T helper type 1 (IFNγ) and T helper type 2 (IL13) cytokines as well as an upregulation of oncostatin M and CXCL1. DUSP3, which regulates cellular senescence, was identified as one of the disease discriminative genes between DNs and common melanocytic nevi by three independent statistical approaches and its altered expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The molecular and cellular changes in which the epidermal-melanin unit undergoes follicular differentiation as well as upregulation of defined cytokines could drive complex immune, epidermal, and pigmentary alterations.

  18. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne CM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Claire M Payne, Cheray Crowley-Skillicorn, Carol Bernstein, Hana Holubec, Harris BernsteinDepartment of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss.Keywords: chromosome 1p, colon carcinogenesis, molecular pathways, cellular pathways

  19. Cellular and subcellular oxidative stress parameters following severe spinal cord injury

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    Nishant P. Visavadiya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study undertook a comprehensive assessment of the acute biochemical oxidative stress parameters in both cellular and, notably, mitochondrial isolates following severe upper lumbar contusion spinal cord injury (SCI in adult female Sprague Dawley rats. At 24 h post-injury, spinal cord tissue homogenate and mitochondrial fractions were isolated concurrently and assessed for glutathione (GSH content and production of nitric oxide (NO•, in addition to the presence of oxidative stress markers 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, protein carbonyl (PC, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE and lipid peroxidation (LPO. Moreover, we assessed production of superoxide (O2•- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in mitochondrial fractions. Quantitative biochemical analyses showed that compared to sham, SCI significantly lowered GSH content accompanied by increased NO• production in both cellular and mitochondrial fractions. SCI also resulted in increased O2•- and H2O2 levels in mitochondrial fractions. Western blot analysis further showed that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS mediated PC and 3-NT production were significantly higher in both fractions after SCI. Conversely, neither 4-HNE levels nor LPO formation were increased at 24 h after injury in either tissue homogenate or mitochondrial fractions. These results indicate that by 24 h post-injury ROS-induced protein oxidation is more prominent compared to lipid oxidation, indicating a critical temporal distinction in secondary pathophysiology that is critical in designing therapeutic approaches to mitigate consequences of oxidative stress.

  20. TFEB and TFE3: Linking Lysosomes to Cellular Adaptation to Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2016-10-06

    In recent years, our vision of lysosomes has drastically changed. Formerly considered to be mere degradative compartments, they are now recognized as key players in many cellular processes. The ability of lysosomes to respond to different stimuli revealed a complex and coordinated regulation of lysosomal gene expression. This review discusses the participation of the transcription factors TFEB and TFE3 in the regulation of lysosomal function and biogenesis, as well as the role of the lysosomal pathway in cellular adaptation to a variety of stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation, mitochondrial dysfunction, protein misfolding, and pathogen infection. We also describe how cancer cells make use of TFEB and TFE3 to promote their own survival and highlight the potential of these transcription factors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurological and lysosomal diseases.

  1. Enhanced susceptibility of T lymphocytes to oxidative stress in the absence of the cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Villiers, Christian; Candéias, Serge M; Garrel, Catherine; Bertrand, Caroline; Collin, Véronique; Marche, Patrice N; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne

    2011-02-01

    The cellular prion glycoprotein (PrP(C)) is ubiquitously expressed but its physiologic functions remain enigmatic, particularly in the immune system. Here, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that PrP(C) is involved in T lymphocytes response to oxidative stress. By monitoring the intracellular level of reduced glutathione, we show that PrP(-/-) thymocytes display a higher susceptibility to H(2)O(2) exposure than PrP(+/+) cells. Furthermore, we find that in mice fed with a restricted diet, a regimen known to increase the intracellular level of ROS, PrP(-/-) thymocytes are more sensitive to oxidative stress. PrP(C) function appears to be specific for oxidative stress, since no significant differences are observed between PrP(-/-) and PrP(+/+) mice exposed to other kinds of stress. We also show a marked evolution of the redox status of T cells throughout differentiation in the thymus. Taken together, our results clearly ascribe to PrP(C) a protective function in thymocytes against oxidative stress.

  2. Molecular Signatures of Psychosocial Stress and Cognition Are Modulated by Chronic Lithium Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzózka, Magdalena M; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula; Wichert, Sven P; Falkai, Peter; Rossner, Moritz J

    2016-07-01

    Chronic psychosocial stress is an important environmental risk factor of psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. Social defeat in rodents has been shown to be associated with maladaptive cellular and behavioral consequences including cognitive impairments. Although gene expression changes upon psychosocial stress have been described, a comprehensive transcriptome profiling study at the global level in precisely defined hippocampal subregions which are associated with learning has been lacking. In this study, we exposed adult C57Bl/6N mice for 3 weeks to "resident-intruder" paradigm and combined laser capture microdissection with microarray analyses to identify transcriptomic signatures of chronic psychosocial stress in dentate gyrus and CA3 subregion of the dorsal hippocampus. At the individual transcript level, we detected subregion specific stress responses whereas gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) identified several common pathways upregulated upon chronic psychosocial stress related to proteasomal function and energy supply. Behavioral profiling revealed stress-associated impairments most prominent in fear memory formation which was prevented by chronic lithium treatment. Thus, we again microdissected the CA3 region and performed global transcriptome analysis to search for molecular signatures altered by lithium treatment in stressed animals. By combining GSEA with unsupervised clustering, we detected pathways that are regulated by stress and lithium in the CA3 region of the hippocampus including proteasomal components, oxidative phosphorylation, and anti-oxidative mechanisms. Our study thus provides insight into hidden molecular phenotypes of chronic psychosocial stress and lithium treatment and proves a beneficial role for lithium treatment as an agent attenuating negative effects of psychosocial stress on cognition.

  3. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  4. MECANISMOS CELULARES EN RESPUESTA AL ESTRÉS:: SIRTUINAS Cellular mechanisms in response to stress: sirtuin

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    Nancy Paola Echeverri-Ruíz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace algún tiempo se conoce el papel de la restricción calórica sobre la longevidad y la prevención de enfermedades crónicas, pero hasta hace poco los mecanismos celulares involucrados comienzan a ser elucidados. El estrés celular se podría definir como el estado en el que la célula no presenta las condiciones óptimas de supervivencia, siendo el oxidativo un tipo de estrés en el que se generan radicales libres nocivos para las estructuras celulares. La restricción calórica podría incrementar la resistencia celular a diferentes formas de estrés. Las sirtuinas, proteínas deacetilasas de histonas tipo III, están involucradas en la relación entre balance energético y transcripción génica, permitiendo que la célula responda a la restricción calórica y sobreviva a situaciones de estrés oxidativo. En esta relación las sirtuinas regulan genes de la familia FOXO, cMYC, hTERT, p53, entre otros. La activación o silenciamiento de estos genes es importante en los procesos de apoptosis, reparación y muerte celular.The role of caloric restriction on longevity and prevention of chronic diseases has been known for some time; recently, cellular mechanisms involved are beginning to be elucidated. Cellular stress could be defined as the state in which the cell does not present optimal survival conditions; oxidative stress is a type of stress in which free radicals harmful cell structures. Caloric restriction might increase cellular resistance to various forms of stress. Sirtuins, histone deacetylases type III proteins are involved in the relationship between energy balance and gene transcription, allowing cell to respond to caloric restriction and to survive to oxidative stress. In this relationship, sirtuins regulate FOXO family genes, cMYC, hTERT, p53, among others. Activation or silencing of those genes is important in the process of apoptosis, repair and cell death

  5. Hormesis, cellular stress response and vitagenes as critical determinants in aging and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Iavicoli, Ivo; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Calabrese, Edward J

    2011-08-01

    Understanding mechanisms of aging and determinants of life span will help to reduce age-related morbidity and facilitate healthy aging. Average lifespan has increased over the last centuries, as a consequence of medical and environmental factors, but maximal life span remains unchanged. Extension of maximal life span is currently possible in animal models with measures such as genetic manipulations and caloric restriction (CR). CR appears to prolong life by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage. But ROS formation, which is positively implicated in cellular stress response mechanisms, is a highly regulated process controlled by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways. By sensing the intracellular nutrient and energy status, the functional state of mitochondria, and the concentration of ROS produced in mitochondria, the longevity network regulates life span across species by co-ordinating information flow along its convergent, divergent and multiply branched signaling pathways, including vitagenes which are genes involved in preserving cellular homeostasis during stressful conditions. Vitagenes encode for heat shock proteins (Hsp) Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin and the sirtuin protein systems. Dietary antioxidants, such as carnosine, carnitines or polyphenols, have recently been demonstrated to be neuroprotective through the activation of hormetic pathways, including vitagenes. The hormetic dose-response, challenges long-standing beliefs about the nature of the dose-response in a lowdose zone, having the potential to affect significantly the design of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials as well as strategies for optimal patient dosing in the treatment of numerous diseases. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing stress responses. In this review we discuss the most current and up to date

  6. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cigarette smoke-induced myocardial injury: prevention by vitamin C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archita Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains one of the major killers in modern society. One strong risk factor of CVD is cigarette smoking that causes myocardial injury and leads to the genesis of pathological cardiovascular events. However, the exact toxic component(s of cigarette smoke (CS and its molecular and cellular mechanisms for causing myocardial injury leading to heart damage and its prevention are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a guinea pig model, here we show that chronic exposure to CS produces myocardial injury that is prevented by vitamin C. Male guinea pigs were fed either vitamin C-deficient (0.5 mg/day or vitamin C-sufficient (15 mg/day diet and subjected to CS exposure from 5 Kentucky Research cigarettes (3R4F/day (6 days/week in a smoke chamber up to 8 weeks. Pair-fed sham controls were subjected to air exposure instead of CS exposure under similar conditions. Myocardial injury was produced in CS-exposed marginal vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs as evidenced by release of cardiac Troponin-T and I in the serum, oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, thrombosis and collagen deposition in the myocardium. Treatment of rat cardiomyocyte cells (H9c2 in vitro and guinea pigs in vivo with p-benzoquinone (p-BQ in amounts derived from CS revealed that p-BQ was a major factor responsible for CS-induced myocardial damage. A moderately large dose of vitamin C (15 mg/day prevented CS/p-BQ-induced myocardial injury. Population based studies indicated that plasma vitamin C levels of smokers without disease were significantly lower (p = 0,0000 than that of non-smokers. Vitamin C levels of CS-related cardiovascular patients were further lower (p = 0.0000 than that of smokers without disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that dietary supplementation of vitamin C may be a novel and simple therapy for the prevention of pathological cardiovascular events in habitual smokers.

  7. Cellular and Axonal Diversity in Molecular Layer Heterotopia of the Rat Cerebellar Vermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Van Dine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular layer heterotopia of the cerebellar primary fissure are a characteristic of many rat strains and are hypothesized to result from defect of granule cells exiting the external granule cell layer during cerebellar development. However, the cellular and axonal constituents of these malformations remain poorly understood. In the present report, we use histochemistry and immunocytochemistry to identify neuronal, glial, and axonal classes in molecular layer heterotopia. In particular, we identify parvalbumin-expressing molecular layer interneurons in heterotopia as well as three glial cell types including Bergmann glia, Olig2-expressing oligodendrocytes, and Iba1-expressing microglia. In addition, we document the presence of myelinated, serotonergic, catecholaminergic, and cholinergic axons in heterotopia indicating possible spinal and brainstem afferent projections to heterotopic cells. These findings are relevant toward understanding the mechanisms of normal and abnormal cerebellar development.

  8. Neurological and cellular regulation of visceral hypersensitivity induced by chronic stress and colonic inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Winston, J H; Sarna, S K

    2013-09-17

    The role of inflammation in inducing visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) in ulcerative colitis patients remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that acute ulcerative colitis-like inflammation does not induce VHS. However, it sets up molecular conditions such that chronic stress following inflammation exaggerates single-unit afferent discharges to colorectal distension. We used dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce ulcerative colitis-like inflammation and a 9-day heterotypic chronic stress protocol in rats. DSS upregulated Nav1.8 mRNA in colon-responsive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, TRPV1 in colonic muscularis externae (ME) and BDNF in spinal cord without affecting the spike frequency in spinal afferents or VMR to CRD. By contrast, chronic stress did not induce inflammation but it downregulated Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 mRNA in DRG neurons, and upregulated TRPA1 and nerve growth factor in ME, which mediated the increase of spike frequency and VMR to CRD. Chronic stress following inflammation exacerbated spike frequency in spinal afferent neurons. TRPA1 antagonist suppressed the sensitization of afferent neurons. DSS-inflammation did not affect the composition or excitation thresholds of low-threshold and high-threshold fibers. Chronic stress following inflammation increased the percent composition of high-threshold fibers and lowered the excitation threshold of both types of fibers. We conclude that not all types of inflammation induce VHS, whereas chronic stress induces VHS in the absence of inflammation.

  9. Involvement of Noxa in mediating cellular ER stress responses to lytic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebeck, Shaun; Sudini, Kuladeep; Chen, Tiannan; Leaman, Douglas W

    2011-09-01

    Noxa is a Bcl-2 homology domain-containing pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein. Noxa mRNA and protein expression are upregulated by dsRNA or virus, and ectopic Noxa expression enhances cellular sensitivity to virus or dsRNA-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that Noxa null baby mouse kidney (BMK) cells are deficient in normal cytopathic response to lytic viruses, and that reconstitution of the knockout cells with wild-type Noxa restored normal cytopathic responses. Noxa regulation by virus mirrored its regulation by proteasome inhibitors or ER stress inducers and the ER stress response inhibitor salubrinal protected cells against viral cytopathic effects. Noxa mRNA and protein were synergistically upregulated by IFN or dsRNA when combined with ER stress inducers, leading to Noxa/Mcl-1 interaction, activation of Bax and pro-apoptotic caspases, degradation of Mcl-1, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and initiation of apoptosis. These data highlight the importance of ER stress in augmenting the expression of Noxa following viral infection.

  10. Adaptive cellular stress pathways as therapeutic targets of dietary phytochemicals: focus on the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Daeui; Chung, Hae Young; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-07-01

    During the past 5 decades, it has been widely promulgated that the chemicals in plants that are good for health act as direct scavengers of free radicals. Here we review evidence that favors a different hypothesis for the health benefits of plant consumption, namely, that some phytochemicals exert disease-preventive and therapeutic actions by engaging one or more adaptive cellular response pathways in cells. The evolutionary basis for the latter mechanism is grounded in the fact that plants produce natural antifeedant/noxious chemicals that discourage insects and other organisms from eating them. However, in the amounts typically consumed by humans, the phytochemicals activate one or more conserved adaptive cellular stress response pathways and thereby enhance the ability of cells to resist injury and disease. Examplesof such pathways include those involving the transcription factors nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and forkhead box subgroup O, as well as the production and action of trophic factors and hormones. Translational research to develop interventions that target these pathways may lead to new classes of therapeutic agents that act by stimulating adaptive stress response pathways to bolster endogenous defenses against tissue injury and disease. Because neurons are particularly sensitive to potentially noxious phytochemicals, we focus on the nervous system but also include findings from other cell types in which actions of phytochemicals on specific signal transduction pathways have been more thoroughly studied.

  11. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  12. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance has been noticed in both clinical observation and laboratory studies. Evidence shows that many molecular and cellular events that play essential roles in opioid analgesia and tolerance are actually age-dependent. For example, the expression and functions of endogenous opioid peptides, multiple types of opioid receptors, G protein subunits that couple to opioid receptors, and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins change with development and age. Other signaling systems that are critical to opioid tolerance development, such as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors, also undergo age-related changes. It is plausible that the age-dependent expression and functions of molecules within and related to the opioid signaling pathways, as well as age-dependent cellular activity such as agonist-induced opioid receptor internalization and desensitization, eventually lead to significant age-dependent changes in opioid analgesia and tolerance development.

  13. The impact of environmental stress on male reproductive development in plants: biological processes and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    In plants, male reproductive development is extremely sensitive to adverse climatic environments and (a)biotic stress. Upon exposure to stress, male gametophytic organs often show morphological, structural and metabolic alterations that typically lead to meiotic defects or premature spore abortion and male reproductive sterility. Depending on the type of stress involved (e.g. heat, cold, drought) and the duration of stress exposure, the underlying cellular defect is highly variable and either involves cytoskeletal alterations, tapetal irregularities, altered sugar utilization, aberrations in auxin metabolism, accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS; oxidative stress) or the ectopic induction of programmed cell death (PCD). In this review, we present the critically stress-sensitive stages of male sporogenesis (meiosis) and male gametogenesis (microspore development), and discuss the corresponding biological processes involved and the resulting alterations in male reproduction. In addition, this review also provides insights into the molecular and/or hormonal regulation of the environmental stress sensitivity of male reproduction and outlines putative interaction(s) between the different processes involved.

  14. Idiopathic Autism: Cellular and Molecular Phenotypes in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhuo; Campanac, Emilie; Cheung, Hoi-Hung; Ziats, Mark N; Canterel-Thouennon, Lucile; Raygada, Margarita; Baxendale, Vanessa; Pang, Alan Lap-Yin; Yang, Lu; Swedo, Susan; Thurm, Audrey; Lee, Tin-Lap; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Chan, Wai-Yee; Hoffman, Dax A; Rennert, Owen M

    2016-06-29

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder whose pathophysiology remains elusive as a consequence of the unavailability for study of patient brain neurons; this deficit may potentially be circumvented by neural differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Rare syndromes with single gene mutations and autistic symptoms have significantly advanced the molecular and cellular understanding of autism spectrum disorders; however, in aggregate, they only represent a fraction of all cases of autism. In an effort to define the cellular and molecular phenotypes in human neurons of non-syndromic autism, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three male autism spectrum disorder patients who had no identifiable clinical syndromes, and their unaffected male siblings and subsequently differentiated these patient-specific stem cells into electrophysiologically active neurons. iPSC-derived neurons from these autistic patients displayed decreases in the frequency and kinetics of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents relative to controls, as well as significant decreases in Na(+) and inactivating K(+) voltage-gated currents. Moreover, whole-genome microarray analysis of gene expression identified 161 unique genes that were significantly differentially expressed in autistic patient iPSC-derived neurons (>twofold, FDR autism spectrum disorder. Our data demonstrate aberrant voltage-gated currents and underlying molecular changes related to synaptic function in iPSC-derived neurons from individuals with idiopathic autism as compared to unaffected siblings controls.

  15. A model of how different biology experts explain molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M; Anderson, Trevor R; Pelaez, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do explanations made by experts from different biology subdisciplines at a university support the validity of this model? Guided by the modeling framework of R. S. Justi and J. K. Gilbert, the validity of an initial model was tested by asking seven biologists to explain a molecular mechanism of their choice. Data were collected from interviews, artifacts, and drawings, and then subjected to thematic analysis. We found that biologists explained the specific activities and organization of entities of the mechanism. In addition, they contextualized explanations according to their biological and social significance; integrated explanations with methods, instruments, and measurements; and used analogies and narrated stories. The derived methods, analogies, context, and how themes informed the development of our final MACH model of mechanistic explanations. Future research will test the potential of the MACH model as a guiding framework for instruction to enhance the quality of student explanations.

  16. Cellular phones for reducing battlefield stress: rationale and a preliminary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Grassi, Alessandra; Villani, Daniela; Preziosa, Alessandra

    2007-01-01

    Battlefield stress is the consequence of man being exposed to the hostile environment of combat. Combat stress is specifically caused by man's feat of the dangers of combat, and is fueled and tempered by other variables such as morale, cohesion, fatigue, confidence, training and intensity of the combat. Treatment is often as simple as giving soldiers time to rest for a few hours or days, to get a shower and some sleep, to talk about the feelings they have in the presence of a counselor. Only in rare cases soldiers undergo more serious psychological treatment. One of the best strategies for dealing with stress is learning how to relax. However, relaxing is difficult to achieve in a battlefield. In this chapter we suggest the use of mobile multimedia technology--PDA/cellular phones--for the provision of advanced coping techniques suitable to the battlefield context. Specifically, we developed a protocol based on mobile narratives, to be experienced on mobile multimedia technology--3G cellular phones or PDAs--like the one now under development by the US Army within the "Soldier as a System--SaaS" and "Future Combat Systems--FCS" projects. Mobile narratives are audio-visual experiences, implemented on mobile devices, in which the narrative component is a critical aspect to induce a feeling of presence and engagement. Through the link between the feeling of presence and the emotional state, mobile narratives may be used to improve the mood state in their users. The rationale of the approach and a preliminary test of the proposed method are presented and discussed.

  17. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs.

  18. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-), which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  19. Molecular and cellular bases of adaptation to a changing environment in microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuven, Clara; Landry, Christian R

    2016-10-26

    Environmental heterogeneity constitutes an evolutionary challenge for organisms. While evolutionary dynamics under variable conditions has been explored for decades, we still know relatively little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. It is of paramount importance to examine these molecular bases because they may play an important role in shaping the course of evolution. In this review, we examine the diversity of adaptive mechanisms in the face of environmental changes. We exploit the recent literature on microbial systems because those have benefited the most from the recent emergence of genetic engineering and experimental evolution followed by genome sequencing. We identify four emerging trends: (i) an adaptive molecular change in a pathway often results in fitness trade-off in alternative environments but the effects are dependent on a mutation's genetic background; (ii) adaptive changes often modify transcriptional and signalling pathways; (iii) several adaptive changes may occur within the same molecular pathway but be associated with pleiotropy of different signs across environments; (iv) because of their large associated costs, macromolecular changes such as gene amplification and aneuploidy may be a rapid mechanism of adaptation in the short-term only. The course of adaptation in a variable environment, therefore, depends on the complexity of the environment but also on the molecular relationships among the genes involved and between the genes and the phenotypes under selection.

  20. Cellular and molecular immune responses of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) experimentally infected with betanodavirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scapigliati, G.; Buonocore, F.; Randelli, E.;

    2010-01-01

    Naïve sea bass juveniles (38.4 ± 4.5 g) were intramuscularly infected with a sublethal dose of betanodavirus isolate 378/I03, followed after 43 days by a similar boosting. This infection resulted in an overall mortality of 7.6%. At various intervals, sampling of fish tissues was performed to inve...... was also observed, while the other tested genes did not show any significant variations with respect to mock-treated fish. Overall, our work represents a first comprehensive analysis of cellular and molecular immune parameters in a fish species exposed to a pathogenic virus....

  1. Uterine leiomyomas: effects on architectural, cellular, and molecular determinants of endometrial receptivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Annu; Goel, Madhu Mati

    2013-06-01

    Impaired endometrial receptivity is an important contributing factor to implantation failure. Uterine leiomyomas are widely prevalent steroid hormone-dependent benign tumors that act as a restraint to conception and successful outcome of pregnancies. Reports are available, which suggest that leiomyomas have negative influence on endometrial receptivity to blastocyst implantation. The aim of the present review is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current knowledge of the effect of uterine leiomyomas on the architectural, cellular, and molecular determinants of endometrial receptivity. Understanding the potential role of these factors will provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of leiomyoma-associated infertility and provide new areas for basic and translational research.

  2. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles increase macrophage atherogenicity: Stimulation of cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and triglycerides accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Lauren; Rosenblat, Mira; Paland, Nicole; Aviram, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle research has focused on their toxicity in general, while increasing evidence points to additional specific adverse effects on atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophage cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmark of early atherogenesis, leading to cardiovascular events. To investigate the in vitro atherogenic effects of silicon dioxide (SiO2 ), J774.1 cultured macrophages (murine cell line) were incubated with SiO2 nanoparticle (SP, d = 12 nm, 0-20 µg/mL), followed by cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, TG and cholesterol metabolism analyses. A significant dose-dependent increase in oxidative stress (up to 164%), in cytotoxicity (up to 390% measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release), and in TG content (up to 63%) was observed in SiO2 exposed macrophages compared with control cells. A smaller increase in macrophage cholesterol mass (up to 22%) was noted. TG accumulation in macrophages was not due to a decrease in TG cell secretion or to an increased TG biosynthesis rate, but was the result of attenuated TG hydrolysis secondary to decreased lipase activity and both adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein expression (by 42 and 25%, respectively). Overall, SPs showed pro-atherogenic effects on macrophages as observed by cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and TG accumulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 713-723, 2016.

  3. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

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    Bross Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress.

  4. Integrating the cell stress response: a new view of molecular chaperones as immunological and physiological homeostatic regulators.

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    Henderson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The response of cells to stress was first documented in the 1960s and 1970s and the molecular nature of the families of proteins that subserve this vital response, the molecular chaperones, were identified and subjected to critical study in the period from the late 1980s. This resulted in the rapidly advancing new field of protein folding and its role in cellular function. Emerging at the same time, but initially largely ignored, were reports that molecular chaperones could be released by cells and exist on the outer plasma membrane or in the body fluids. These secreted molecular chaperones were found to have intercellular signalling functions. There is now a growing body of evidence to support the hypothesis that molecular chaperones have properties ascribed to the Roman god Janus, the god of gates, doors, beginnings and endings, whose two faces point in different directions. Molecular chaperones appear to have one set of key functions within the cell and, potentially, a separate set of functions when they exist on the cell surface or in the various fluid phases of the body. Thus, it is a likely hypothesis that secreted molecular chaperones act as an additional level of homeostatic control possibly linking cellular stress to physiological systems such as the immune system. This review concentrates on three key molecular chaperones: Hsp10, Hsp60 and the Hsp70 family for which most information is available. An important consideration is the role that these proteins may play in human disease and in the treatment of human disease.

  5. Lengthening our perspective: morphological, cellular, and molecular responses to eccentric exercise.

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    Hyldahl, Robert D; Hubal, Monica J

    2014-02-01

    The response of skeletal muscle to unaccustomed eccentric exercise has been studied widely, yet it is incompletely understood. This review is intended to provide an up-to-date overview of our understanding of how skeletal muscle responds to eccentric actions, with particular emphasis on the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of damage and recovery. This review begins by addressing the question of whether eccentric actions result in physical damage to muscle fibers and/or connective tissue. We next review the symptomatic manifestations of eccentric exercise (i.e., indirect damage markers, such as delayed onset muscle soreness), with emphasis on their relatively poorly understood molecular underpinnings. We then highlight factors that potentially modify the muscle damage response following eccentric exercise. Finally, we explore the utility of using eccentric training to improve muscle function in populations of healthy and aging individuals, as well as those living with neuromuscular disorders.

  6. Cellular Automata Modelling of Photo-Induced Oxidation Processes in Molecularly Doped Polymers

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    David M. Goldie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of employing cellular automata (CA to model photo-induced oxidation processes in molecularly doped polymers is explored. It is demonstrated that the oxidation dynamics generated using CA models exhibit stretched-exponential behavior. This dynamical characteristic is in general agreement with an alternative analysis conducted using standard rate equations provided the molecular doping levels are sufficiently low to prohibit the presence of safe-sites which are impenetrable to dissolved oxygen. The CA models therefore offer the advantage of exploring the effect of dopant agglomeration which is difficult to assess from standard rate equation solutions. The influence of UV-induced bleaching or darkening upon the resulting oxidation dynamics may also be easily incorporated into the CA models and these optical effects are investigated for various photo-oxidation product scenarios. Output from the CA models is evaluated for experimental photo-oxidation data obtained from a series of hydrazone-doped polymers.

  7. Mood disorders in Huntington's disease: from behavior to cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Patrick; Orvoen, Sophie; Saudou, Frédéric; David, Denis J; Humbert, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is best known for its effect on motor control. Mood disturbances such as depression, anxiety, and irritability also have a high prevalence in patients with HD, and often start before the onset of motor symptoms. Various rodent models of HD recapitulate the anxiety/depressive behavior seen in patients. HD is caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the N-terminal part of a 350 kDa protein called huntingtin (HTT). HTT is ubiquitously expressed and is implicated in several cellular functions including control of transcription, vesicular trafficking, ciliogenesis, and mitosis. This review summarizes progress in efforts to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral disorders in patients with HD. Dysfunctional HTT affects cellular pathways that are involved in mood disorders or in the response to antidepressants, including BDNF/TrkB and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, HTT affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a physiological phenomenon that is implicated in some of the behavioral effects of antidepressants and is linked to the control of anxiety. These findings are consistent with the emerging role of wild-type HTT as a crucial component of neuronal development and physiology. Thus, the pathogenic polyQ expansion in HTT could lead to mood disorders not only by the gain of a new toxic function but also by the perturbation of its normal function.

  8. Mood disorders in Huntington’s disease: from behavior to cellular and molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick ePla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder that is best known for its effect on motor control. Mood disturbances such as depression, anxiety, and irritability also have a high prevalence in patients with HD, and often start before the onset of motor symptoms. Various rodent models of HD recapitulate the anxiety/depressive behavior seen in patients. HD is caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the N-terminal part of a 350 kDa protein called huntingtin (HTT. HTT is ubiquitously expressed and is implicated in several cellular functions including control of transcription, vesicular trafficking, ciliogenesis, and mitosis. This review summarizes progress in efforts to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral disorders in patients with HD. Dysfunctional HTT affects cellular pathways that are involved in mood disorders or in the response to antidepressants, including BDNF/TrkB and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, HTT affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a physiological phenomenon that is implicated in some of the behavioral effects of antidepressants and is linked to the control of anxiety. These findings are consistent with the emerging role of wild-type HTT as a crucial component of neuronal development and physiology. Thus, the pathogenic polyQ expansion in HTT could lead to mood disorders not only by the gain of a new toxic function but also by the perturbation of its normal function.

  9. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  10. Physiological, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms of heat stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Nahar, Kamrun; Alam, Md Mahabub; Roychowdhury, Rajib; Fujita, Masayuki

    2013-05-03

    High temperature (HT) stress is a major environmental stress that limits plant growth, metabolism, and productivity worldwide. Plant growth and development involve numerous biochemical reactions that are sensitive to temperature. Plant responses to HT vary with the degree and duration of HT and the plant type. HT is now a major concern for crop production and approaches for sustaining high yields of crop plants under HT stress are important agricultural goals. Plants possess a number of adaptive, avoidance, or acclimation mechanisms to cope with HT situations. In addition, major tolerance mechanisms that employ ion transporters, proteins, osmoprotectants, antioxidants, and other factors involved in signaling cascades and transcriptional control are activated to offset stress-induced biochemical and physiological alterations. Plant survival under HT stress depends on the ability to perceive the HT stimulus, generate and transmit the signal, and initiate appropriate physiological and biochemical changes. HT-induced gene expression and metabolite synthesis also substantially improve tolerance. The physiological and biochemical responses to heat stress are active research areas, and the molecular approaches are being adopted for developing HT tolerance in plants. This article reviews the recent findings on responses, adaptation, and tolerance to HT at the cellular, organellar, and whole plant levels and describes various approaches being taken to enhance thermotolerance in plants.

  11. Activation of the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase in keratinocytes exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

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    Rodrigo A Silva

    Full Text Available Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death.

  12. Iron and its complexation by phenolic cellular metabolites: from oxidative stress to chemical weapons.

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    Chobot, Vladimir; Hadacek, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Iron is a transition metal that forms chelates and complexes with various organic compounds, also with phenolic plant secondary metabolites. The ligands of iron affect the redox potential of iron. Electrons may be transferred either to hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen. In the first case, oxidative stress is decreased, in the latter two cases, oxidative stress is increased. This milieu-dependent mode of action may explain the non-linear mode of action of juglone and other secondary metabolites. Attention to this phenomenon may help to explain idiosyncratic and often nonlinear effects that result in biological assays. Current chemical assays are discussed that help to explore these aspects of redox chemistry.

  13. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Thin Film Growth Stress Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haifeng

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing demand for thin films across a wide range of technology, especially in electronic and magnetic applications, controlling the stresses in deposited thin films has become one of the more important challenges in modern engineering. It is well known that large intrinsic stress---in the magnitude of several gigapascals---can result during the thin film preparation. The magnitude of stress depends on the deposition technique, film thickness, types and structures of materials used as films and substrates, as well as other factors. Such large intrinsic stress may lead to film cracking and peeling in case of tensile stress, and delamination and blistering in case of compression. However it may also have beneficial effects on optoelectronics and its applications. For example, intrinsic stresses can be used to change the electronic band gap of semiconducting materials. The far-reaching fields of microelectronics and optoelectronics depend critically on the properties, behavior, and reliable performance of deposited thin films. Thus, understanding and controlling the origins and behavior of such intrinsic stresses in deposited thin films is a highly active field of research. In this study, on-going tensile stress evolution during Volmer-Weber growth mode was analyzed through numerical methods. A realistic model with semi-cylinder shape free surfaces was used and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted. Simulations were at room temperature (300 K), and 10 nanometer diameter of islands were used. A deposition rate that every 3 picoseconds deposit one atom was chosen for simulations. The deposition energy was and lattice orientation is [0 0 1]. Five different random seeds were used to ensure average behaviors. In the first part of this study, initial coalescence stress was first calculated by comparing two similar models, which only differed in the distance between two neighboring islands. Three different substrate thickness systems were analyzed to

  14. Helicobacter pylori eradication to prevent gastric cancer:underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shingo Tsuji; Norio Hayashi; Masahiko Tsujii; Hiroaki Murata; Tsutomu Nishida; Masato Komori; Masakazu Yasumaru; Shuji Ishii; Yoshiaki Sasayama; Sunao Kawano

    2006-01-01

    Numerous cellular and molecular events have been described in development of gastric cancer. In this article,we overviewed roles of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection on some of the important events in gastric carcinogenesis and discussed whether these cellular and molecular events are reversible after cure of the infection. There are several bacterial components affecting gastric epithelial kinetics and promotion of gastric carcinogenesis. The bacterium also increases risks of genetic instability and mutations due to NO and other reactive oxygen species. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes such as RUNX3 may alter the frequency of phenotype change of gastric glands to those with intestinal metaplasia. Host factors such as increased expression of growth factors, cytokines and COX-2 have been also reported in non-cancerous tissue in H pylori-positive subjects. It is noteworthy that most of the above phenomena are reversed after the cure of the infection. However,some of them including overexpression of COX-2 continue to exist and may increase risks for carcinogenesis in metaplastic or dysplastic mucosa even after successful H pylori eradication. Thus, H pylori eradication may not completely abolish the risk for gastric carcinogenesis. Efficiency of the cure of the infection in suppressing gastric cancer depends on the timing and the target population,and warrant further investigation.

  15. Molecular and cellular organization of the taste system in the Drosophila larva.

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    Kwon, Jae Young; Dahanukar, Anupama; Weiss, Linnea A; Carlson, John R

    2011-10-26

    We examine the molecular and cellular basis of taste perception in the Drosophila larva through a comprehensive analysis of the expression patterns of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs). Gr-GAL4 lines representing each Gr are examined, and 39 show expression in taste organs of the larval head, including the terminal organ (TO), the dorsal organ (DO), and the pharyngeal organs. A receptor-to-neuron map is constructed. The map defines 10 neurons of the TO and DO, and it identifies 28 receptors that map to them. Each of these neurons expresses a unique subset of Gr-GAL4 drivers, except for two neurons that express the same complement. All of these neurons express at least two drivers, and one neuron expresses 17. Many of the receptors map to only one of these cells, but some map to as many as six. Conspicuously absent from the roster of Gr-GAL4 drivers expressed in larvae are those of the sugar receptor subfamily. Coexpression analysis suggests that most larval Grs act in bitter response and that there are distinct bitter-sensing neurons. A comprehensive analysis of central projections confirms that sensory information collected from different regions (e.g., the tip of the head vs the pharynx) is processed in different regions of the suboesophageal ganglion, the primary taste center of the CNS. Together, the results provide an extensive view of the molecular and cellular organization of the larval taste system.

  16. The Role of Mechanical Force in Molecular and Cellular during Orthodontic Tooth Movement

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    Ida Bagus Narmada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Application of mechanical force on abnormally positioned tooth, cause changes in tooth location and transmitted to the bone ia the periodontal ligament (PDL produce orthodontic tooth movement. This force application is further way that remodeling in the area occurs. In order to develop biological strategies for enhancing this movement of teeth in bone, the underlying mechanisms of bone resorption and apposition should be understood in detail. Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF may be a good means of examining the on going molecular and cellular process associated with gingival and bone turnover during orthodontic tooth movement. If it could be possible to biologically monitor and predict the outcome of orthodontic force, then the appliance management could be based on dividual tissue response and the effectiveness of the treatment could be improved and understanding their biology is critical to finding ways to modify bone biology to move teeth faster. The present article reviewed a short introduction to some mayors advanced mechanical force in molecular and cellular biology during orthodontic tooth movement.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i3.30

  17. Molecular and cellular causes of abnormal uterine bleeding of endometrial origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Hilary O D; Maybin, Jacqueline A

    2011-09-01

    Women today may reasonably anticipate in the order of some 400 menstrual cycles over their reproductive lifespan. The endometrium is thus subject to repeat cycles of shedding and repair and notably healing of the endometrium post menses is "scarless". The local molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in post menstrual resolution of the inflammatory events associated with menstruation and endometrial repair remain to be fully determined. Menstrual complaints are common. It is highly likely that unrestrained local inflammatory events and/ or deficient repair processes within the endometrium contribute to the women's experience of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). The management of women with HMB may need to utilize therapeutic approaches that optimize endometrial repair processes, post menses. These approaches may be necessary in addition to current therapies that hitherto have focused on limiting the local inflammation associated with menstruation. Research endeavors thus need to focus upon the molecular and cellular causes of problematic uterine bleeding. Herein the events associated with pre-menstrual progesterone withdrawal, limitation of blood loss, the expression of vasoactive mediators and factors that may modulate vascular morphology are described. Such lines of enquiry and knowledge will be essential if novel targets for treatment of menstrual bleeding complaints, such as HMB, are to be identified.

  18. Chronobiology at the cellular and molecular levels: models and mechanisms for circadian timekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, L N

    1983-12-01

    This review considers cellular chronobiology and examines, at least in a superficial way, several classes of models and mechanisms that have been proposed for circadian rhythmicity and some of the experimental approaches that have appeared to be most productive. After a brief discussion of temporal organization and the metabolic, epigenetic, and circadian time domains, the general properties of circadian rhythms are enumerated. A survey of independent oscillations in isolated organs, tissues, and cells is followed by a review of selected circadian rhythms in eukaryotic microorganisms, with particular emphasis placed on the rhythm of cell division in the algal flagellate Euglena as a model system illustrating temporal differentiation. In the ensuing section, experimental approaches to circadian clock mechanisms are considered. The dissection of the clock by the use of chemical inhibitors is illustrated for the rhythm of bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax and for the rhythm of photosynthetic capacity in the unicellular green alga Acetabularia. Alternatively, genetic analysis of circadian oscillators is considered in the green alga Chlamydomonas and in the bread mold Neurospora, both of which have yielded clock mutants and mutants having biochemical lesions that exhibit altered clock properties. On the basis of the evidence generated by these experimental approaches, several classes of biochemical and molecular models for circadian clocks have been proposed. These include strictly molecular models, feedback loop (network) models, transcriptional (tape-reading) models, and membrane models; some of their key elements and predictions are discussed. Finally, a number of general unsolved problems at the cellular level are briefly mentioned: cell cycle interfaces, the evolution of circadian rhythmicity, the possibility of multiple cellular oscillators, chronopharmacology and chronotherapy, and cell-cycle clocks in development and aging.

  19. Сalculation theory for shrinkage stresses in cellular concrete wall panels in carbonation processes with account of creep

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    Chepurnenko Anton Sergeevich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The task of comprehensive analysis presented in this article is a development of theory of calculation of shrinkage stresses in cellular concrete wall panels; such stresses occur due to carbonation of concrete because of the creep of material. Analytical dependences characterizing the influence of carbonation on the modulus of elasticity, shrinkage and creep of autoclaved cellular concrete, as well as the regularity of variation of carbonation degree as per thickness of the wall panels depending on time, were obtained. The proposed theory of calculation of shrinkage stresses in cellular concrete wall panels, with account of concrete creep, makes it possible to predict the influence of carbonation processes on crack resistance thereof, and thus to develop measures of technological and structural nature, in order to improve their operational reliability and durability.

  20. Cyclophilin 20-3 relays a 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid signal during stress responsive regulation of cellular redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Wook; Li, Wei; Viehhauser, Andrea; He, Bin; Kim, Soonok; Nilsson, Anders K; Andersson, Mats X; Kittle, Joshua D; Ambavaram, Madana M R; Luan, Sheng; Esker, Alan R; Tholl, Dorothea; Cimini, Daniela; Ellerström, Mats; Coaker, Gitta; Mitchell, Thomas K; Pereira, Andy; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Lawrence, Christopher B

    2013-06-04

    The jasmonate family of phytohormones plays central roles in plant development and stress acclimation. However, the architecture of their signaling circuits remains largely unknown. Here we describe a jasmonate family binding protein, cyclophilin 20-3 (CYP20-3), which regulates stress-responsive cellular redox homeostasis. (+)-12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) binding promotes CYP20-3 to form a complex with serine acetyltransferase 1, which triggers the formation of a hetero-oligomeric cysteine synthase complex with O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase B in chloroplasts. The cysteine synthase complex formation then activates sulfur assimilation that leads to increased levels of thiol metabolites and the buildup of cellular reduction potential. The enhanced redox capacity in turn coordinates the expression of a subset of OPDA-responsive genes. Thus, we conclude that CYP20-3 is a key effector protein that links OPDA signaling to amino acid biosynthesis and cellular redox homeostasis in stress responses.

  1. N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevents stress-induced desmin aggregation in cellular models of desminopathy.

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    Bertrand-David Segard

    Full Text Available Mutations within the human desmin gene are responsible for a subcategory of myofibrillar myopathies called desminopathies. However, a single inherited mutation can produce different phenotypes within a family, suggesting that environmental factors influence disease states. Although several mouse models have been used to investigate organ-specific desminopathies, a more general mechanistic perspective is required to advance our knowledge toward patient treatment. To improve our understanding of disease pathology, we have developed cellular models to observe desmin behaviour in early stages of disease pathology, e.g., upon formation of cytoplasmic desmin aggregates, within an isogenic background. We cloned the wildtype and three mutant desmin cDNAs using a Tet-On Advanced® expression system in C2C12 cells. Mutations were selected based on positioning within desmin and capacity to form aggregates in transient experiments, as follows: DesS46Y (head domain; low aggregation, DesD399Y (central rod domain; high aggregation, and DesS460I (tail domain; moderate aggregation. Introduction of these proteins into a C2C12 background permitted us to compare between desmin variants as well as to determine the role of external stress on aggregation. Three different types of stress, likely encountered during muscle activity, were introduced to the cell models-thermal (heat shock, redox-associated (H2O2 and cadmium chloride, and mechanical (stretching stresses-after which aggregation was measured. Cells containing variant DesD399Y were more sensitive to stress, leading to marked cytoplasmic perinuclear aggregations. We then evaluated the capacity of biochemical compounds to prevent this aggregation, applying dexamethasone (an inducer of heat shock proteins, fisetin or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (antioxidants before stress induction. Interestingly, N-acetyl-L-cysteine pre-treatment prevented DesD399Y aggregation during most stress. N-acetyl-L-cysteine has recently been

  2. CURRENT APPROACHES TO THE LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES: ROLE OF MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOMARKERS

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    E. N. Aleksandrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory medicine in the early 21st century has achieved advances due to the development and prompt practical introduction of innovative molecular cell technologies, which have assisted in increasing the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of laboratory tests and in substantially expanding the spectrum of study biomarkers in rheumatology. High-technology automated analytical systems using both classical uniplex methods for immunochemical analysis (indirect immunofluorescence test, enzyme immunoassay, immunoblotting, immunodot assay, immunonephelometry, chemiluminescence immunoassay, and radioimmunoassay and multiplex diagnostic platforms based on DNA, RNA, protein and cellular microchips, polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and mass spectrometry have been used in the past decade to determine biomarkers of rheumatic diseases (RD in blood, synovial fluid, urine, biopsy specimens of the synovial membrane, kidney, and other affected tissues.Present-day generation of molecular and cellular biomarkers (autoantibodies, acute-phase inflammatory proteins, cytokines, chemokines, vascular endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, complement components, lymphocyte subpopulations, osseous and cartilaginous tissue metabolic products, intracellular signaling molecules, proteases, and genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic markers is an important tool for prevention, early diagnosis, assessment of disease activity, progression rate, clinical laboratory subtypes of RD, prediction of the efficiency of therapy and the risk of adverse events during treatment. Deciphering of the key pathogenetic mechanisms of RD could identify the molecular and cellular biomarkers that might be used as therapeutic targets. Biologicals (monoclonal antibodies and hybrid protein molecules that selectively inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and membrane molecules mediating the pathological activation of immunocompetent cells are successfully used to treat RD today

  3. Investigation of biomimetic shear stress on cellular uptake and mechanism of polystyrene nanoparticles in various cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taehee; Park, Chulhun; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment are affected by fluid shear stress generated by blood flow in the vascular microenvironment and interstitial flows in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, we investigated how fluidic shear stress affects cellular uptake as well as the endocytosis mechanism of nanoparticles using a biomimetic microfluidic system that mimics the human dynamic environment. Positively charged amino-modified polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNs) at 100 μg/mL were delivered to cancer cells under static and biomimetic dynamic conditions (0.5 dyne/cm(2)). Additionally, the experiment was done in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors specific for one of the endocytosis pathways. To evaluate cellular uptake of cationic PSNs, the fluorescence intensity of cationic PSNs in cancer cells was measured by flow cytometer and fluorescence images were taken using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cancer cells in dynamic conditions exhibited higher cellular uptake of PSNs and showed different cellular uptake mechanisms compared with those in static conditions. From these results, it suggested that biomimetic dynamic conditions stimulated specific endocytosis and prompted cellular uptake. It was also important to consider fluidic shear stress as one of the critical factors because cellular uptake and drug delivery could play a key role in cancer cells and metastasis.

  4. Reverting p53 activation after recovery of cellular stress to resume with cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Pedro A

    2017-05-01

    The activation of p53 in response to different types of cellular stress induces several protective reactions including cell cycle arrest, senescence or cell death. These protective effects are a consequence of the activation of p53 by specific phosphorylation performed by several kinases. The reversion of the cell cycle arrest, induced by p53, is a consequence of the phosphorylated and activated p53, which triggers its own downregulation and that of its positive regulators. The different down-regulatory processes have a sequential and temporal order of events. The mechanisms implicated in p53 down-regulation include phosphatases, deacetylases, and protein degradation by the proteasome or autophagy, which also affect different p53 protein targets and functions. The necessary first step is the dephosphorylation of p53 to make it available for interaction with mdm2 ubiquitin-ligase, which requires the activation of phosphatases targeting both p53 and p53-activating kinases. In addition, deacetylation of p53 is required to make lysine residues accessible to ubiquitin ligases. The combined action of these downregulatory mechanisms brings p53 protein back to its basal levels, and cell cycle progression can resume if cells have overcome the stress or damage situation. The specific targeting of these down-regulatory mechanisms can be exploited for therapeutic purposes in cancers harbouring wild-type p53.

  5. Molecular Responses of Groundnut (Arachis hypogea L. to Zinc Stress

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    A. John De Britto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are important environmental pollutants and their toxicity is a problem of increasing significance for ecological, evolutionary and environmental reasons. The interference of germination related proteins by heavy metals has not been well documented at the proteomic and genomic level. In the current study, molecular responses of germinating groundnut seeds were investigated under Zinc stress. The SDS-PAGE showed the preliminary changes in the polypeptides patterns under Zinc stress. Restriction digestion banding pattern of EcoRI and Hind III enzymes showed distinct banding pattern in the treated plants.

  6. Endogenous progesterone and its cellular binding sites in wheat exposed to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeczko, Anna; Oklešťková, Jana; Siwek, Agata; Dziurka, Michał; Pociecha, Ewa; Kocurek, Maciej; Novák, Ondřej

    2013-11-01

    Progesterone is a basic hormone that regulates the metabolism in mammals. The presence of this compound has also been found in certain plants. It is believed that progesterone can regulate growth processes and resistance to stress, however, its precise role in plants remains unknown. The research conducted in this study was aimed at analyzing the content of endogenous progesterone and its cellular binding sites in the leaves of spring wheat exposed to drought. Changes were studied in two cultivars of wheat - a cultivar sensitive to drought (Katoda) and tolerant cultivar (Monsun). Plants had undergone periodic droughts during the seedling stage or in the phase of heading. The occurrence of free progesterone as well as its conjugated forms was observed in wheat studied. The amount of progesterone ranged from 0.2 to 5.8pmolgFW(-1) and was dependent on the cultivar, age of the plants, stage of development and fluctuated as a result of the exposure to drought. Cv. Katoda responded to a water deficit by lowering the amount of progesterone and cv. Monsun by increasing its level. Progesterone in plants grown in limited water conditions occurred primarily in a free form. While in the optimal watering conditions, some of its pool was found in the form of conjugates. In the spring wheat the occurrence of binding sites for progesterone was detected in cell membranes, cytoplasm and nuclei in the range of 10-36fmol/mg of protein. The wheat cultivars tested, Monsun and Katoda, differ in their concentration of cellular binding sites for progesterone. This number varied in the individual fractions during different stages of plant development and due to the effect of drought stress. The number of binding sites for progesterone located in the membrane fraction of seedlings and flag leaves increased significantly under drought in the cv. Katoda (35-46%), but did not change in the cv. Monsun. Whereas the number of cytoplasmic progesterone binding sites increased during the drought in

  7. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Reale

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD, have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-, which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a

  8. COPPER STRESS ON CELLULAR CONTENTS AND FATTY ACID PROFILES IN CHLORELLA SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sibi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher photosynthetic efficiency and biomass production with rapid growth makes microalgae as potential candidates over other energy crops in many applications. Heavy metals influence the production of secondary metabolites and lipd content of microalgae in particular. A study was conducted using six Chlorella species under heavy metal exposure to evaluate the copper stress on biomass, cellular and lipid contents. Preliminary growth studies indicated the growth tolerance levels of Chlorella in the presence of copper at 4.0 mg L-1 concentration. The total chlorophyll, protein and lipid content of the isolates were 1.7-3.45%, 0.43-0.70 mg g-1 and 0.02-0.11 mg g-1 respectively. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the percent composition of fatty acids varied among the species studied and the major group of fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1 and C18:2. Highest percent of fatty acids were found in C. vulgaris, C. protothecoides and C. pyrenoidosa. Copper have an impact on Chlorella species where biomass content was directly proportional to the lipid productivity. The results reflects the fact that copper stress on Chlorella species as the evidence of lipid production in both qualitative and quantitative manner. In conclusion, Chlorella species can be used for the sustainable producion of renewable energy through copper stress and removal of copper from aqueous solutions.

  9. Establishing cellular stress response profiles as biomarkers of homeodynamics, health and hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirovic, Dino; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2013-01-01

    Aging is the progressive shrinkage of the homeodynamic space. A crucial component of the homeodynamic space is the stress response (SR), by virtue of which a living system senses disturbance and initiates a series of events for maintenance, repair, adaptation, remodeling and survival. Here we discuss the main intracellular SR pathways in human cells, and argue for the need to define and establish the immediate and delayed stress response profiles (SRP) during aging. Such SRP are required to be established at several age-points, which can be the molecular biomarkers of homeodynamic space and the health status of cells and organisms. SRP can also be useful for testing potential protectors and stimulators of homeodynamics, and can be a standard for monitoring the efficacy of potential pro-survival, health-promoting and aging-modulating conditions, food components and other compounds. An effective strategy, which makes use of SRP for achieving healthy aging and extending the healthspan, is that of strengthening the homeodynamics through repeated mild stress-induced hormesis by physical, biological and nutritional hormetins. Furthermore, SRP can also be the basis for defining health as a state of having adequate physical and mental independence of activities of daily living, by identifying a set of measurable parameters at the most fundamental level of biological organization.

  10. Cellular and molecular processes of regeneration, with special emphasis on fish fins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Yuki; Kawakami, Atsushi; Kudo, Akira

    2007-02-01

    The phenomenon of 'epimorphic regeneration', a complete reformation of lost tissues and organs from adult differentiated cells, has been fascinating many biologists for many years. While most vertebrate species including humans do not have a remarkable ability for regeneration, the lower vertebrates such as urodeles and fish have exceptionally high regeneration abilities. In particular, the teleost fish has a high ability to regenerate a variety of tissues and organs including scales, muscles, spinal cord and heart among vertebrate species. Hence, an understanding of the regeneration mechanism in teleosts will provide an essential knowledge base for rational approaches to tissue and organ regeneration in mammals. In the last decade, small teleost fish such as the zebrafish and medaka have emerged as powerful animal models in which a variety of developmental, genetic and molecular approaches are applicable. In addition, rapid progress in the development of genome resources such as expressed sequence tags and genome sequences has accelerated the speed of the molecular analysis of regeneration. This review summarizes the current status of our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of regeneration, particularly that regarding fish fins.

  11. Quasi-classical modeling of molecular quantum-dot cellular automata multidriver gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ehsan; Nejad, Shahram Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (mQCA) has received considerable attention in nanoscience. Unlike the current-based molecular switches, where the digital data is represented by the on/off states of the switches, in mQCA devices, binary information is encoded in charge configuration within molecular redox centers. The mQCA paradigm allows high device density and ultra-low power consumption. Digital mQCA gates are the building blocks of circuits in this paradigm. Design and analysis of these gates require quantum chemical calculations, which are demanding in computer time and memory. Therefore, developing simple models to probe mQCA gates is of paramount importance. We derive a semi-classical model to study the steady-state output polarization of mQCA multidriver gates, directly from the two-state approximation in electron transfer theory. The accuracy and validity of this model are analyzed using full quantum chemistry calculations. A complete set of logic gates, including inverters and minority voters, are implemented to provide an appropriate test bench in the two-dot mQCA regime. We also briefly discuss how the QCADesigner tool could find its application in simulation of mQCA devices.

  12. Modulation of early stress-related biomarkers in cytoplasm by the antioxidants silymarin and quercetin using a cellular model of acute arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Elio A; Eynard, Aldo R; Bongiovanni, Guillermina A

    2010-12-01

    Several pathologies (e.g. cancer and diabetes) are increased in arsenic-exposed populations, with oxidative stress being a major toxicological mechanism. Since the flavonoids silymarin (S) and quercetin (Q) are antioxidants and may protect cells, it would be valuable to develop a model which allows assessing the potential of xenobiotic against arsenic cytotoxicity in an efficient and rapid way. Thus, the oxidant production [e.g. reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (RNS)], the molecular parameters of biological response [e.g. plasma membrane composition, actin microfilaments and activated diphosphorilated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)] and cellular viability were determined in CHO-K1 cells treated with arsenite (As), S and Q. Arsenic caused loss of the cellular viability in a time-dependent manner. This effect was accompanied by a lipid hydroperoxide (LHP) formation, with no RNS induction or ganglioside content changes being found. Both flavonoids counteracted oxidative damage. Despite all treatments had unspecific responses on nitrite cellular release along the time, there was no relation between them and the cellular viability. Arsenic induced cytoplasmic microfilament rearrangement (tight perinuclear distribution with projections, stress fibres and pseudopodia) which was reversed by S. Also, activated JNK showed a similar distribution to actin. Contrarily, Q caused a dysmorphic granular pattern, thus behaving as a toxic agent. Summing up, toxic levels of arsenic disturb the redox homeostasis with LHP induction and early triggering of stress responses in cytoskeleton and cell signalling. Using the proposed model, only S showed to protect cells from arsenical cytotoxicity without own toxic properties. Thus, S might be considered for modulation of the human arsenic susceptibility.

  13. [Molecular basis of stress-evoked psychiatric disturbances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beszczyńska, Beata

    2007-11-20

    Stress, defined as coping with environmental challenges, involves the activation of the neuronal and neurohormonal systems. Central monoaminergic (noradrenergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic) neural networks, limbic structures, the sympathoadrenal system, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the immune system are considered the most important stress pathways. Their activation determines stress reactivity and pathological consequences on exposure to situations of distress. Both trauma and long-term stress can cause alterations in the activities of neuroanatomical structures and neural networks within the central nervous system. These neurohormonal changes are associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a disturbance thought to be one of the most serious psychiatric illnesses. PTSD may develop in individuals after exposure to a traumatic event (war, violence, accident) and is manifested by various symptoms, such as re-experiencing, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, impaired memory of the event, sleep disorders, nightmares, panic attacks, and depression. In this review the neurohormonal changes associated with experiencing stress are presented to highlight the molecular and hormonal basis of PTSD.

  14. In situ sensing and modeling of molecular events at the cellular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruiguo

    We developed the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nanorobot in combination with other nanomechanical sensors for the investigation of cell signaling pathways. The AFM nanorobotics hinge on the superior spatial resolution of AFM in imaging and extends it into the measurement of biological processes and manipulation of biological matters. A multiple input single output control system was designed and implemented to solve the issues of nanomanipulation of biological materials, feedback, response frequency and nonlinearity. The AFM nanorobotic system therefore provide the human-directed position, velocity and force control with high frequency feedback, and more importantly it can feed the operator with the real-time imaging of manipulation result from the fast-imaging based local scanning. The use of the system has taken the study of cellular process at the molecular scale into a new level. The cellular response to the physiological conditions can be significantly manifested in cellular mechanics. Dynamic mechanical property has been regarded as biomarkers, sometimes even regulators of the signaling and physiological processes, thus the name mechanobiology. We sought to characterize the relationship between the structural dynamics and the molecular dynamics and the role of them in the regulation of cell behavior. We used the AFM nanorobotics to investigate the mechanical properties in real-time of cells that are stimulated by different chemical species. These reagents could result in similar ion channel responses but distinctive mechanical behaviors. We applied these measurement results to establish a model that describes the cellular stimulation and the mechanical property change, a "two-hit" model that comprises the loss of cell adhesion and the initiation of cell apoptosis. The first hit was verified by functional experiments: depletion of Calcium and nanosurgery to disrupt the cellular adhesion. The second hit was tested by a labeling of apoptotic markers that

  15. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  16. The cellular and molecular carcinogenic effects of radon exposure: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Aaron; Allen, James; Laney, Robin; Curnow, Alison

    2013-07-05

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is responsible for approximately half of the human annual background radiation exposure globally. Chronic exposure to radon and its decay products is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer behind smoking, and links to other forms of neoplasms have been postulated. Ionizing radiation emitted during the radioactive decay of radon and its progeny can induce a variety of cytogenetic effects that can be biologically damaging and result in an increased risk of carcinogenesis. Suggested effects produced as a result of alpha particle exposure from radon include mutations, chromosome aberrations, generation of reactive oxygen species, modification of the cell cycle, up or down regulation of cytokines and the increased production of proteins associated with cell-cycle regulation and carcinogenesis. A number of potential biomarkers of exposure, including translocations at codon 249 of TP53 in addition to HPRT mutations, have been suggested although, in conclusion, the evidence for such hotspots is insufficient. There is also substantial evidence of bystander effects, which may provide complications when calculating risk estimates as a result of exposure, particularly at low doses where cellular responses often appear to deviate from the linear, no-threshold hypothesis. At low doses, effects may also be dependent on cellular conditions as opposed to dose. The cellular and molecular carcinogenic effects of radon exposure have been observed to be both numerous and complex and the elevated chronic exposure of man may therefore pose a significant public health risk that may extend beyond the association with lung carcinogenesis.

  17. The Cellular and Molecular Carcinogenic Effects of Radon Exposure: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Curnow

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is responsible for approximately half of the human annual background radiation exposure globally. Chronic exposure to radon and its decay products is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer behind smoking, and links to other forms of neoplasms have been postulated. Ionizing radiation emitted during the radioactive decay of radon and its progeny can induce a variety of cytogenetic effects that can be biologically damaging and result in an increased risk of carcinogenesis. Suggested effects produced as a result of alpha particle exposure from radon include mutations, chromosome aberrations, generation of reactive oxygen species, modification of the cell cycle, up or down regulation of cytokines and the increased production of proteins associated with cell-cycle regulation and carcinogenesis. A number of potential biomarkers of exposure, including translocations at codon 249 of TP53 in addition to HPRT mutations, have been suggested although, in conclusion, the evidence for such hotspots is insufficient. There is also substantial evidence of bystander effects, which may provide complications when calculating risk estimates as a result of exposure, particularly at low doses where cellular responses often appear to deviate from the linear, no-threshold hypothesis. At low doses, effects may also be dependent on cellular conditions as opposed to dose. The cellular and molecular carcinogenic effects of radon exposure have been observed to be both numerous and complex and the elevated chronic exposure of man may therefore pose a significant public health risk that may extend beyond the association with lung carcinogenesis.

  18. Stochastic narrow escape in molecular and cellular biology analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    This book covers recent developments in the non-standard asymptotics of the mathematical narrow escape problem in stochastic theory, as well as applications of the narrow escape problem in cell biology. The first part of the book concentrates on mathematical methods, including advanced asymptotic methods in partial equations, and is aimed primarily at applied mathematicians and theoretical physicists who are interested in biological applications. The second part of the book is intended for computational biologists, theoretical chemists, biochemists, biophysicists, and physiologists. It includes a summary of output formulas from the mathematical portion of the book and concentrates on their applications in modeling specific problems in theoretical molecular and cellular biology. Critical biological processes, such as synaptic plasticity and transmission, activation of genes by transcription factors, or double-strained DNA break repair, are controlled by diffusion in structures that have both large and small sp...

  19. Biological (molecular and cellular) markers of toxicity. Final report, September 15, 1988 - September 14, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L. R.; D' Surney, S. J.; Gettys-Hull, C.; Greeley, Jr, M. S.

    1991-12-15

    Several molecular and cellular markers of genotoxicity were adapted for measurement in the Medaka (Oryzias latipes), and were used to describe the effects of treatment of the organism with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). NO{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts were detected, and a slight statistically significant, increase in DNA strand breaks was observed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high levels of DEN induced alkyltransferase activity which enzymatically removes any O{sup 6}-ethyl guanine adducts but does not result in strand breaks or hypomethylation of the DNA such as might be expected from excision repair of chemically modified DNA. Following a five week continuous DEN exposure with 100 percent renewal of DEN-water every third day, the F values (DNA double strandedness) increased considerably and to similar extent in fish exposed to 25, 50, and 100 ppM DEN. This has been observed also in medaka exposed to BaP.

  20. Experimental genomics: The application of DNA microarrays in cellular and molecular biology studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The genome sequence information in combination with DNA microarrays promises to revolutionize the way of cellular and molecular biological research by allowing complex mixtures of RNA and DNA to interrogated in a parallel and quant itative fashion. DNA microarrays can be used to measure levels of gene expressio n for tens of thousands of gene simultaneously and take advantage of all availab le sequence information for experimental design and data interpretation in pursu it of biological understanding. Recent progress in experimental genomics allows DNA microarrays not simply to provide a catalogue of all the genes and informati on about their function, but to understand how the components work together to comprise functioning cells and organisms. This brief review gives a survey of DNA microarrays technology and its applications in genome and gene function analysis, gene expression studies, biological signal and defense system, cell cyclereg ulation, mechanism of transcriptional regulation, proteomics, and the functional ity of food component.

  1. The neurobiology of depression--revisiting the serotonin hypothesis. I. Cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Paul R; Benkelfat, Chawki; Descarries, Laurent

    2012-09-05

    The serotonin (5-HT) hypothesis of depression dates from the 1960s. It originally postulated that a deficit in brain serotonin, corrected by antidepressant drugs, was the origin of the illness. Nowadays, it is generally accepted that recurring mood disorders are brain diseases resulting from the combination, to various degrees, of genetic and other biological as well as environmental factors, evolving through the lifespan. All areas of neuroscience, from genes to behaviour, molecules to mind, and experimental to clinical, are actively engaged in attempts at elucidating the pathophysiology of depression and the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of antidepressant treatments. This first of two special issues of Philosophical Transactions B seeks to provide an overview of current developments in the field, with an emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms, and how their unravelling opens new perspectives for future research.

  2. [Cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury: can peripheral markers be detected?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, A K; Nikitin, K V; Potapov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury is a relevant fundamental objective of radiobiology and neuroradiology. Damage to the healthy brain tissue is the key factor limiting the application of radiation therapy in patients with nervous systems neoplasms. Furthermore, postradiation brain injury can be clinically indiscernible from continued tumor growth and requires differential diagnosis. Thus, there exists high demand for biomarkers of radiation effects on the brain in neurosurgery and radiobiology. These markers could be used for better understanding and quantifying the effects of ionizing radiation on brain tissues, as well as for elaborating personalized therapy. Despite the high demand, biomarkers of radiation-induced brain injury have not been identified thus far. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of the effect of ionizing radiation on the brain were analyzed in this review in order to identify potential biomarkers of radiation-induced injury to nervous tissue.

  3. Exclusion and Hierarchy of Time Scales Lead to Spatial Segregation of Molecular Motors in Cellular Protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkoviezky, I.; Gov, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular motors that carry cargo along biopolymer filaments within cells play a crucial role in the functioning of the cell. In particular, these motors are essential for the formation and maintenance of the cellular protrusions that play key roles in motility and specific functionalities, such as the stereocilia in hair cells. Typically, there are several species of motors, carrying different cargos, that share the same track. Furthermore, it was observed that in the mature stereocilia, the different motors occupy well-segregated bands as a function of distance from the tip. We use a totally asymmetric exclusion process model with two- and three-motor species, to study the conditions that give rise to such spatial patterns. We find that the well-segregated bands appear for motors with a strong hierarchy of attachment or detachment rates. This is a striking example of pattern formation in nonequilibrium, low-dimensional systems.

  4. Structural, cellular and molecular aspects of immune privilege in the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan eLi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The testis presents a special immunological environment, considering its property of immune privilege that tolerates allo- and auto-antigens. Testicular immune privilege was once believed to be mainly based on the sequestration of antigens from the immune system by the blood-testis barrier in the seminiferous epithelium. Substantial evidence supports the view that the combination of physical structure, testicular cells, and cytokines controls immune responses in the testis to preserve the structural and functional integrity of testicular immune privilege. Both systemic immune tolerance and local immunosuppression help maintain the immune privilege status. Constitutive expression of anti-inflammatory factors in testicular cells is critical for local immunosuppression. However, the testis locally generates an efficient innate immune system against pathogens. Disruption of these mechanisms may lead to orchitis and impair fertility. This review article highlights the current understanding of structural, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the unique immune environment of the testis, particularly its immune privilege status.

  5. Signal processing for molecular and cellular biological physics: an emerging field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Max A.; Jones, Nick S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in our ability to watch the molecular and cellular processes of life in action—such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers and Forster fluorescence resonance energy transfer—raise challenges for digital signal processing (DSP) of the resulting experimental data. This article explores the unique properties of such biophysical time series that set them apart from other signals, such as the prevalence of abrupt jumps and steps, multi-modal distributions and autocorrelated noise. It exposes the problems with classical linear DSP algorithms applied to this kind of data, and describes new nonlinear and non-Gaussian algorithms that are able to extract information that is of direct relevance to biological physicists. It is argued that these new methods applied in this context typify the nascent field of biophysical DSP. Practical experimental examples are supplied. PMID:23277603

  6. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration as revealed by studies in Xenopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Survival of any living organism critically depends on its ability to repair and regenerate damaged tissues and/or organs during its lifetime following injury, disease, or aging. Various animal models from invertebrates to vertebrates have been used to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of wound healing and tissue regeneration. It is hoped that such studies will form the framework for identifying novel clinical treatments that will improve the healing and regenerative capacity of humans. Amongst these models, Xenopus stands out as a particularly versatile and powerful system. This review summarizes recent findings using this model, which have provided fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for efficient and perfect tissue repair and regeneration.

  7. Molecular modeling of the conformational dynamics of the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles; Colling, Ian; Bartz, Jason; Soto, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Prions are infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a type of fatal neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Prions propagate biological information by conversion of the non-pathological version of the prion protein to the infectious conformation, PrPSc. A wealth of knowledge has shed light on the nature and mechanism of prion protein conversion. In spite of the significance of this problem, we are far from fully understanding the conformational dynamics of the cellular isoform. To remedy this situation we employ multiple biomolecular modeling techniques such as docking and molecular dynamics simulations to map the free energy landscape and determine what specific regions of the prion protein are most conductive to binding. The overall goal is to characterize the conformational dynamics of the cell form of the prion protein, PrPc, to gain insight into inhibition pathways against misfolding. NE EPSCoR FIRST Award to Patricia Soto.

  8. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P; Nunan, R

    2015-08-01

    A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to heal and leave behind a noticeable scar. At the extreme end, chronic wounds - defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months - have become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world and will only increase as our populations advance in age, and with the increasing incidence of diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Here we describe the clinical problems and how, through better dialogue between basic researchers and clinicians, we may extend our current knowledge to enable the development of novel potential therapeutic treatments.

  9. Avian hepatitis B viruses: Molecular and cellular biology, phylogenesis, and host tropism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) share several fundamental features.Both viruses have a partially double-stranded DNA genome that is replicated via a RNA intermediate and the coding open reading frames (ORFs) overlap extensively.In addition, the genomic and structural organization,as well as replication and biological characteristics, are very similar in both viruses. Most of the key features of hepadnaviral infection were first discovered in the DHBV model system and subsequently confirmed for HBV.There are, however, several differences between human HBV and DHBV. This review will focus on the molecular and cellular biology, evolution, and host adaptation of the avian hepatitis B viruses with particular emphasis on DHBV as a model system.

  10. Molecular and cellular response of earthworm Eisenia andrei (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) to PCDD/Fs exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusair, Shreen Deeb; Abu Zarour, Yousef Sa'id

    2017-01-01

    The acute toxicity of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) was investigated in the earthworm Eisenia andrei using filter paper toxicity test. Protein content, catalase (CAT) activity, and histology of intestinal wall (chloragogen cells and intestinal epithelium) were investigated in earthworms exposed for 48 h to 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ng/cm(2) PCDD/Fs. The results showed an increase in the total protein content 1.56- (p = 0.104), 1.66- (p = 0.042), and 2.26-fold (p biomarkers of E. andrei within 48 h, the cellular and molecular alterations resulted from the filter paper contact test could be utilized as a rapid toxicity assessment tool of environmental contamination with dioxins/furans and to assess consequent potential adverse effects on soil biota and other organisms in the ecosystem.

  11. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes ;in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  12. Maintenance of radiation-induced intestinal fibrosis: Cellular and molecular features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valérie Haydont; Marie-Catherine Vozenin-Brotons

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in cell and molecular radiobiology clearly showed that tissue response to radiation injury cannot be restricted to a simple cell-killing process, but depends upon continuous and integrated pathogenic processes, involving cell differentiation and crosstalk between the various cellular components of the tissue within the extracellular matrix. Thus, the prior concept of primary cell target in which a single-cell type (whatever it's epithelial or endothelial cells) dictates the whole tissue response to radiation injury has to be replaced by the occurrence of coordinated multicellular response that may either lead to tissue recovery or to sequel development. In this context, the present review will focus on the maintenance of the radiation-induced wound healing and fibrogenic signals triggered by and through the microenvironment toward the mesencnymal cell compartment, and will highlight how sequential and sustained modifications in cell phenotypes will in cascade modify cell-to-cell interactions and tissue composition.

  13. Cellular changes, molecular pathways and the immune system following photodynamic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupin-Mrugalska, P; Sobotta, L; Kucinska, M; Murias, M; Mielcarek, J; Düzgüneş, N

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel medical technique involving three key components: light, a photosensitizer molecule and molecular oxygen, which are essential to achieve the therapeutic effect. There has been great interest in the use of PDT in the treatment of many cancers and skin disorders. Upon irradiation with light of a specific wavelength, the photosensitizer undergoes several reactions resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS may react with different biomolecules, causing defects in many cellular structures and biochemical pathways. PDT-mediated tumor destruction in vivo involves cellular mechanisms with photodamage of mitochondria, lysosomes, nuclei, and cell membranes that activate apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic signals, leading to cell death. PDT is capable of changing the tumor microenvironment, thereby diminishing the supply of oxygen, which explains the antiangiogenic effect of PDT. Finally, inflammatory and immune responses play a crucial role in the long-lasting consequences of PDT treatment. This review is focused on the biochemical effects exerted by photodynamic treatment on cell death signaling pathways, destruction of the vasculature, and the activation of the immune system.

  14. Proteomic characterization of cellular and molecular processes that enable the Nanoarchaeum equitans--Ignicoccus hospitalis relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Giannone

    Full Text Available Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only cultured representative of the Nanoarchaeota, is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. The molecular mechanisms that enable this relationship are unknown. Using whole-cell proteomics, differences in the relative abundance of >75% of predicted protein-coding genes from both Archaea were measured to identify the specific response of I. hospitalis to the presence of N. equitans on its surface. A purified N. equitans sample was also analyzed for evidence of interspecies protein transfer. The depth of cellular proteome coverage achieved here is amongst the highest reported for any organism. Based on changes in the proteome under the specific conditions of this study, I. hospitalis reacts to N. equitans by curtailing genetic information processing (replication, transcription in lieu of intensifying its energetic, protein processing and cellular membrane functions. We found no evidence of significant Ignicoccus biosynthetic enzymes being transported to N. equitans. These results suggest that, under laboratory conditions, N. equitans diverts some of its host's metabolism and cell cycle control to compensate for its own metabolic shortcomings, thus appearing to be entirely dependent on small, transferable metabolites and energetic precursors from I. hospitalis.

  15. Proteomic characterization of cellular and molecular processes that enable the Nanoarchaeum equitans--Ignicoccus hospitalis relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Richard J; Huber, Harald; Karpinets, Tatiana; Heimerl, Thomas; Küper, Ulf; Rachel, Reinhard; Keller, Martin; Hettich, Robert L; Podar, Mircea

    2011-01-01

    Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only cultured representative of the Nanoarchaeota, is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. The molecular mechanisms that enable this relationship are unknown. Using whole-cell proteomics, differences in the relative abundance of >75% of predicted protein-coding genes from both Archaea were measured to identify the specific response of I. hospitalis to the presence of N. equitans on its surface. A purified N. equitans sample was also analyzed for evidence of interspecies protein transfer. The depth of cellular proteome coverage achieved here is amongst the highest reported for any organism. Based on changes in the proteome under the specific conditions of this study, I. hospitalis reacts to N. equitans by curtailing genetic information processing (replication, transcription) in lieu of intensifying its energetic, protein processing and cellular membrane functions. We found no evidence of significant Ignicoccus biosynthetic enzymes being transported to N. equitans. These results suggest that, under laboratory conditions, N. equitans diverts some of its host's metabolism and cell cycle control to compensate for its own metabolic shortcomings, thus appearing to be entirely dependent on small, transferable metabolites and energetic precursors from I. hospitalis.

  16. A Current View of Functional Biomaterials for Wound Care, Molecular and Cellular Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Piraino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intricate process of wound healing involves activation of biological pathways that work in concert to regenerate a tissue microenvironment consisting of cells and external cellular matrix (ECM with enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors. Distinct stages characterize the mammalian response to tissue injury: hemostasis, inflammation, new tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Hemostasis and inflammation start right after the injury, while the formation of new tissue, along with migration and proliferation of cells within the wound site, occurs during the first week to ten days after the injury. In this review paper, we discuss approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to address each of these processes through the application of biomaterials, either as support to the native microenvironment or as delivery vehicles for functional hemostatic, antibacterial, or anti-inflammatory agents. Molecular therapies are also discussed with particular attention to drug delivery methods and gene therapies. Finally, cellular treatments are reviewed, and an outlook on the future of drug delivery and wound care biomaterials is provided.

  17. Genomic instability and cellular stress in organ biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with colorectal cancer and predisposing pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara; Fuoco, Ilenia; di Fluri, Giorgia; Costa, Francesco; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Biondi, Graziano; Nardini, Vincenzo; Scarpato, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and polyps, are common colorectal pathologies in western society and are risk factors for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genomic instability is a cancer hallmark and is connected to changes in chromosomal structure, often caused by double strand break formation (DSB), and aneuploidy. Cellular stress, may contribute to genomic instability. In colorectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with IBD, polyps and CRC, we evaluated 1) genomic instability using the γH2AX assay as marker of DSB and micronuclei in mononuclear lymphocytes kept under cytodieresis inhibition, and 2) cellular stress through expression and cellular localization of glutathione-S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1). Colon biopsies showed γH2AX increase starting from polyps, while lymphocytes already from IBD. Micronuclei frequency began to rise in lymphocytes of subjects with polyps, suggesting a systemic genomic instability condition. Colorectal tissues lost GSTO1 expression but increased nuclear localization with pathology progression. Lymphocytes did not change GSTO1 expression and localization until CRC formation, where enzyme expression was increased. We propose that the growing genomic instability found in our patients is connected with the alteration of cellular environment. Evaluation of genomic damage and cellular stress in colorectal pathologies may facilitate prevention and management of CRC. PMID:26046795

  18. Attenuation of replication stress-induced premature cellular senescence to assess anti-aging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Described is an in vitro model of premature senescence in pulmonary adenocarcinoma A549 cells induced by persistent DNA replication stress in response to treatment with the DNA damaging drug mitoxantrone (Mxt). The degree of cellular senescence, based on characteristic changes in cell morphology, is measured by laser scanning cytometry. Specifically, the flattening of cells grown on slides (considered the hallmark of cellular senescence) is measured as the decline in local intensity of DNA-associated DAPI fluorescence (represented by maximal pixels). This change is paralleled by an increase in nuclear area. Thus, the ratio of mean intensity of maximal pixels to nuclear area provides a very sensitive morphometric biomarker for the degree of senescence. This analysis is combined with immunocytochemical detection of senescence markers, such as overexpression of cyclin kinase inhibitors (e.g., p21(WAF1) ) and phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), a key marker associated with aging/senescence that is detected using a phospho-specific antibody. These biomarker indices are presented in quantitative terms defined as a senescence index (SI), which is the fraction of the marker in test cultures relative to the same marker in exponentially growing control cultures. This system can be used to evaluate the anti-aging potential of test agents by assessing attenuation of maximal senescence. As an example, the inclusion of berberine, a natural alkaloid with reported anti-aging properties and a long history of use in traditional Chinese medicine, is shown to markedly attenuate the Mxt-induced SI and phosphorylation of rpS6. The multivariate analysis of senescence markers by laser scanning cytometry offers a promising tool to explore the potential anti-aging properties of a variety agents.

  19. Cellular stress response in Eca-109 cells inhibits apoptosis during early exposure to isorhamnetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, C; Fan, L Y; Cai, Z; Liu, Y Y; Yang, C L

    2012-01-01

    The flavonol aglycone isorhamnetin shows anti-proliferative activity in a variety of cancer cells. Previous work, from our laboratory showed that isorhamnetin inhibits the proliferation of human esophageal squamous carcinoma Eca-109 cells in vitro, but only after 72 h of exposure. This led us to propose that isorhamnetin exposure induces a cellular stress response that inhibits the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of the compound during early exposure. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the effects of isorhamnetin on Eca-109 cells during the first 72 h of exposure. Cell growth was assessed using the trypan blue exclusion assay, and expression of IκBα, NF-κB/p65, NF-κB/p50, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, COX-2, Mcl-1, Bax, p53 and Id-1 were analyzed by Western blot. During the first 72 h of exposure, NF-κB/p65 and NF-κB/p50 accumulated in nuclei and expression of COX-2, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 increased. In contrast, expression of IκBα and Bax fell initially but later increased. Expression of phospho-Akt and p53 showed no detectable change during the first 48 h. Pretreatment with the NF-κB inhibitor MG132 before exposure to isorhamnetin blocked the nuclear accumulation of p50 and p65, thereby inhibiting cell proliferation. These results show that during early exposure of Eca-109 cells to isorhamnetin, the NF-κB signaling pathway is activated and COX-2 expression increases, and this increase in expression partially inhibits isorhamnetin-induced apoptosis. Beyond 72 h of exposure, however, the apoptotic effect of isorhamnetin dominates, leading to inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and of cellular proliferation. These results will need to be taken into account when exploring the use of isorhamnetin against cancer in vivo.

  20. Monitoring cellular stress responses to nanoparticles using a lab-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lukas; Charwat, Verena; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Bellutti, Florian; Brueckl, Hubert; Ertl, Peter

    2011-08-07

    As nanotechnology moves towards widespread commercialization, new technologies are needed to adequately address the potential health impact of nanoparticles (NPs). Assessing the safety of over 30,000 NPs through animal testing would not only be expensive, but it would also raise a number of ethical considerations. Furthermore, existing in vitro cell-based assays are not sufficient in scope to adequately address the complexity of cell-nanoparticle interactions including NP translocation, accumulation and co-transport of e.g. allergens. In particular, classical optical/fluorescent endpoint detection methods are known to provide irreproducible, inaccurate and unreliable results since these labels can directly react with the highly catalytic surfaces of NP. To bridge this technological gap we have developed a lab-on-a-chip capable of continuously and non-invasively monitoring the collagen production of primary human fibroblast cells (NHDF) using contactless dielectric microsensors. Human dermal fibroblast cells are responsible for the maintenance of soft tissue integrity, are found throughout the human body and their primary function is collagen expression. We show that cellular collagen production can be readily detected and used to assess cellular stress responses to a variety of external stimuli, including exposure to nanoparticles. Results of the study showed a 20% and 95% reduction of collagen production following 4 hour exposure to 10 μg mL(-1) gold and silver nanoparticles (dia.10 nm), respectively. Furthermore a prolonged perfusion of sub-toxic concentrations (0.1 μg mL(-1)) of silver NP reduced NHDF collagen production by 40% after 10 h indicating increased NP take up and accumulation. We demonstrate that the application of microfluidics for the tailored administration of different NP treatments constitutes a powerful new tool to study cell-nanoparticle interactions and nanoparticle accumulation effects in small cell populations.

  1. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to quantify the adherence and mechanical properties of an array of L. monocytogenes strains and their surface biopolymers. First, eight L. monocytogenes strains that represented the two major lineages of the species were compared for their adherence and mechanics at cellular and molecular levels. Our results indicated that strains of lineage' II were characterized by higher adhesion and Young's moduli, longer and more rigid surface biopolymers and lower specific and nonspecific forces when compared to lineage' I strains. Additionally, adherence and mechanical properties of eight L. monocytogenes epidemic and environmental strains were probed. Our results pointed to that environmental and epidemic strains representative of a given lineage were similar in their adherence and mechanical properties when investigated at a cellular level. However, when the molecular properties of the strains were considered, epidemic strains were characterized by higher specific and nonspecific forces, shorter, denser and more flexible biopolymers compared to environmental strains. Second, the role of environmental pH conditions of growth on the adhesion and mechanics of a pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe was investigated. Our results pointed to a transition in the adhesion energies for cells cultured at pH 7. In addition, when the types of molecular forces that govern the adhesion were quantified using Poisson statistical approach and using a new proposed method, specific hydrogen-bond energies dominated the bacterial adhesion process. Such a finding is instrumental to researchers designing methods to control bacterial adhesion. Similarly, bacterial cells underwent a transition in their mechanical properties. We have shown that cells cultured at pH 7 were the most rigid compared to those cultured in lower or higher pH conditions of growth. Due to transitions observed in adherence and mechanics when cells were cultured at pH 7, we hypothesized that

  2. Molecular and cellular mechanism of the effect of La(III) on horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-09-01

    Horseradish is an important economic crop. It contains horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and lots of nutrients, and has specific pungency. Lanthanum is one of the heavy metals in the environment. It can transfer through the food chain to humans. In this paper, the molecular and cellular mechanism of the toxic effects of La(III) on HRP in vivo was investigated with an optimized combination of biophysical, biochemical, and cytobiological methods. It was found that La(III) could interact with O and/or N atoms in the backbone/side chains of the HRP molecule in the cell membrane of horseradish treated with 80 microM La(III), leading to the formation of a new complex of La and HRP (La-HRP). The formation of the La-HRP complex causes the redistribution of the electron densities of atoms in the HRP molecule, especially the decrease in the electron density of the active center, Fe(III), in the heme group of the La-HRP molecule compared with the native HRP molecule in vivo. Therefore, the electron transfer and the activity of HRP in horseradish treated with 80 microM La(III) are obviously decreased compared with those of the native HRP in vivo. This is a possible molecular and cellular mechanism for the toxic effect of La(III) on HRP in vivo. It is suggested that the accumulation of La in the environment, especially the formation of the La-HRP complex in vivo, is harmful to organisms.

  3. Poliovirus infection induces the co-localization of cellular protein SRp20 with TIA-1, a cytoplasmic stress granule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerry D; Semler, Bert L

    2013-09-01

    Different types of environmental stress cause mammalian cells to form cytoplasmic foci, termed stress granules, which contain mRNPs that are translationally silenced. These foci are transient and dynamic, and contain components of the cellular translation machinery as well as certain mRNAs and RNA binding proteins. Stress granules are known to be induced by conditions such as hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and oxidative stress, and a number of cellular factors have been identified that are commonly associated with these foci. More recently it was discovered that poliovirus infection also induces the formation of stress granules, although these cytoplasmic foci appear to be somewhat compositionally unique. Work described here examined the punctate pattern of SRp20 (a host cell mRNA splicing protein) localization in the cytoplasm of poliovirus-infected cells, demonstrating the partial co-localization of SRp20 with the stress granule marker protein TIA-1. We determined that SRp20 does not co-localize with TIA-1, however, under conditions of oxidative stress, indicating that the close association of these two proteins during poliovirus infection is not representative of a general response to cellular stress. We confirmed that the expression of a dominant negative version of TIA-1 (TIA-1-PRD) results in the dissociation of stress granules. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of wild type TIA-1 or dominant negative TIA-1-PRD in cells during poliovirus infection does not dramatically affect viral translation. Taken together, these studies provide a new example of the unique cytoplasmic foci that form during poliovirus infection.

  4. Carbon dioxide enrichment alleviates heat stress by improving cellular redox homeostasis through an ABA-independent process in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Ahammed, G J; Zhang, Y Q; Zhang, G Q; Sun, Z H; Zhou, J; Zhou, Y H; Xia, X J; Yu, J Q; Shi, K

    2015-01-01

    Plant responses to elevated CO₂ and high temperature are critically regulated through a complex network of phytohormones and redox homeostasis. However, the involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) in plant adaptation to heat stress under elevated CO₂ conditions has not been thoroughly studied. This study investigated the interactive effects of elevated CO₂ (800 μmol·mol(-1) ) and heat stress (42 °C for 24 h) on the endogenous level of ABA and the cellular redox state of two genotypes of tomato with different ABA biosynthesis capacities. Heat stress significantly decreased maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and leaf water potential, but also increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) in both genotypes. Heat-induced damage was more severe in the ABA-deficient mutant notabilis (not) than in its parental cultivar Ailsa Craig (Ailsa), suggesting that a certain level of endogenous ABA is required to minimise the heat-induced oxidative damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. Irrespective of genotype, the enrichment of CO₂ remarkably stimulated Fv/Fm, MDA and EL in heat-stressed plants towards enhanced tolerance. In addition, elevated CO₂ significantly strengthened the antioxidant capacity of heat-stressed tomato seedlings towards a reduced cellular redox state for a prolonged period, thereby mitigating oxidative stress. However, elevated CO₂ and heat stress did not alter the endogenous level of ABA or the expression of its biosynthetic gene NCED2 in either genotype, indicating that ABA is not involved in elevated CO₂ -induced heat stress alleviation. The results of this study suggest that elevated CO₂ alleviated heat stress through efficient regulation of the cellular redox poise in an ABA-independent manner in tomato plants.

  5. Propofol ameliorates doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and cellular apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, H.C. [Cardiovascular Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Center, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Y.C. [Graduate Institute of Natural Healing Sciences, Nanhua University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Wang, L.C. [Cardiovascular Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ting, C.T.; Lee, W.L. [Cardiovascular Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Center, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, H.W. [Cardiovascular Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, K.Y. [Cardiovascular Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, A. [College of Biological Science, University of California, Davis (United States); Su, C.S. [Cardiovascular Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Center, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, T.J., E-mail: trliu@vghtc.gov.tw [Cardiovascular Center and Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Center, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Background: Propofol is an anesthetic with pluripotent cytoprotective properties against various extrinsic insults. This study was designed to examine whether this agent could also ameliorate the infamous toxicity of doxorubicin, a widely-used chemotherapeutic agent against a variety of cancer diseases, on myocardial cells. Methods: Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were administrated with vehicle, doxorubicin (1 {mu}M), propofol (1 {mu}M), or propofol plus doxorubicin (given 1 h post propofol). After 24 h, cells were harvested and specific analyses regarding oxidative/nitrative stress and cellular apoptosis were conducted. Results: Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays disclosed that viability of cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced by doxorubicin. Contents of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were increased and antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, and GPx were decreased in these doxorubicin-treated cells. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and membrane potential were also depressed, along with activation of key effectors downstream of mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic signaling. Besides, abundance of p53 was elevated and cleavage of PKC-{delta} was induced in these myocardial cells. In contrast, all of the above oxidative, nitrative and pro-apoptotic events could be suppressed by propofol pretreatment. Conclusions: Propofol could extensively counteract oxidative/nitrative and multiple apoptotic effects of doxorubicin in the heart; hence, this anesthetic may serve as an adjuvant agent to assuage the untoward cardiac effects of doxorubicin in clinical application. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluate how propofol prevents doxorubicin-induced toxicity in cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propofol reduces doxorubicin-imposed nitrative and oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propofol suppresses mitochondrion-, p53- and PKC-related apoptotic signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propofol ameliorates apoptosis and

  6. Binge Ethanol and MDMA Combination Exacerbates Toxic Cardiac Effects by Inducing Cellular Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Ros-Simó, Clara; Milanés, María-Victoria; Valverde, Olga; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Binge drinking is a common pattern of ethanol consumption among young people. Binge drinkers are especially susceptible to brain damage when other substances are co-administered, in particular 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The aim of the present work was to study the mechanisms implicated in the adaptive changes observed after administration of these drugs of abuse. So, we have evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity and the expression and activation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), after voluntary binge ethanol consumption, alone and in combination with MDMA. Both parameters are markers of stressful situations and they could be modified inducing several alterations in different systems. Adolescent mice received MDMA, ethanol or both (ethanol plus MDMA). Drinking in the dark (DID) procedure was used as a model of binge. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), TH phosphorylated at serine 31 and HSP27 expression and its phosphorylation at serine 82 were evaluated in adolescent mice 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days after treatments in the left ventricle. NA and normetanephrine (NMN) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); TH and HSP27 expression and phosphorylation were measured by quantitative blot immunollabeling using specific antibodies. Ethanol and MDMA co-administration increased NA turnover and TH expression and phosphorylation versus the consumption of each one of these drugs. In parallel with the described modifications in the cardiac sympathetic activity, our results showed that binge ethanol+MDMA exposure is associated with an increase in HSP27 expression and phosphorylation in the left ventricle, supporting the idea that the combination of both drugs exacerbates the cellular stress induced by ethanol or MDMA alone. PMID:26509576

  7. Molecular and cellular effects of in vitro shockwave treatment on lymphatic endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Rohringer

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shockwave treatment was shown to improve orthopaedic diseases and wound healing and to stimulate lymphangiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT effects on lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC behavior and lymphangiogenesis. We analyzed migration, proliferation, vascular tube forming capability and marker expression changes of LECs after IVSWT compared with HUVECs. Finally, transcriptome- and miRNA analyses were conducted to gain deeper insight into the IVSWT-induced molecular mechanisms in LECs. The results indicate that IVSWT-mediated proliferation changes of LECs are highly energy flux density-dependent and LEC 2D as well as 3D migration was enhanced through IVSWT. IVSWT suppressed HUVEC 3D migration but enhanced vasculogenesis. Furthermore, we identified podoplaninhigh and podoplaninlow cell subpopulations, whose ratios changed upon IVSWT treatment. Transcriptome- and miRNA analyses on these populations showed differences in genes specific for signaling and vascular tissue. Our findings help to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying shockwave-induced lymphangiogenesis in vivo.

  8. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yochelis, A; Ebrahim, S; Millis, B; Cui, R; Kachar, B; Naoz, M; Gov, N S

    2015-09-03

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general.

  9. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  10. Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses About the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Conolly, Rory B; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2006-11-21

    This report describes the development of a computational systems biology approach to evaluate the hypotheses of molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptive response to low dose ionizing radiation. Our concept is that computational models of signaling pathways can be developed and linked to biologically based dose response models to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms which lead to adaptive response. For development of quantitatively accurate, predictive models, it will be necessary to describe tissues consisting of multiple cell types where the different types each contribute in their own way to the overall function of the tissue. Such a model will probably need to incorporate not only cell type-specific data but also spatial information on the architecture of the tissue and on intercellular signaling. The scope of the current model was more limited. Data obtained in a number of different biological systems were synthesized to describe a chimeric, “average” population cell. Biochemical signaling pathways involved in sensing of DNA damage and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoint controls and the apoptotic path were also included. As with any computational modeling effort, it was necessary to develop these simplified initial descriptions (models) that can be iteratively refined. This preliminary model is a starting point which, with time, can evolve to a level of refinement where large amounts of detailed biological information are synthesized and a capability for robust predictions of dose- and time-response behaviors is obtained.

  11. Multiple molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of lycopene in cancer inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Solís, Cristina; Pedraza-Chaverrí, Jose; Torres-Ramos, Mónica; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Cruz Salgado, Arturo; Serrano-García, Norma; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Sotelo, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  12. Cellular and molecular choreography of neutrophil recruitment to sites of sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Braedon; Kubes, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Liberation of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) following tissue injury and necrotic cell death leads to the induction of sterile inflammation. A hallmark of acute inflammation is the recruitment of neutrophils to injured tissues. This review focuses on the journey of neutrophils to sites of sterile inflammation and the cellular and molecular mechanisms that choreograph this complex voyage. We review the pathway of leukocyte recruitment, with emphasis on recent additions to our understanding of intravascular neutrophil migration. The contributions of various tissue-resident sentinel cell populations to the detection of danger signals (DAMPs) and coordination of neutrophil recruitment and migration are discussed. In addition, we highlight recent data on the control of neutrophil chemotaxis towards sites of sterile inflammation, including new insight into the temporal and spatial regulation of chemoattractant guidance signals that direct cell migration. Given that inappropriate neutrophilic inflammation is a cornerstone in the pathogenesis of many diseases, a complete understanding of the choreography of neutrophil recruitment to sites of sterile inflammation may uncover new avenues for therapeutic interventions to treat inflammatory pathologies.

  13. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation.

  14. Cellular Stress Response Gene Expression During Upper and Lower Body High Intensity Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowicz, Andrzej; Sawczyn, Stanisław; Niespodziński, Bartłomiej; Mieszkowski, Jan; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to compare the effect of upper and lower body high-intensity exercise on chosen genes expression in athletes and non-athletes. Method Fourteen elite male artistic gymnasts (EAG) aged 20.6 ± 3.3 years and 14 physically active men (PAM) aged 19.9 ± 1.0 years performed lower and upper body 30 s Wingate Tests. Blood samples were collected before, 5 and 30 minutes after each effort to assess gene expression via PCR. Results Significantly higher mechanical parameters after lower body exercise was observed in both groups, for relative power (8.7 ± 1.2 W/kg in gymnasts, 7.2 ± 1.2 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01) and mean power (6.7 ± 0.7 W/kg in gymnasts, 5.4 ± 0.8 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01). No differences in lower versus upper body gene expression were detected for all tested genes as well as between gymnasts and physical active man. For IL-6 m-RNA time-dependent effect was observed. Conclusions Because of no significant differences in expression of genes associated with cellular stress response the similar adaptive effect to exercise may be obtained so by lower and upper body exercise. PMID:28141870

  15. Temporally distinct roles of ATM and ROS in genotoxic-stress-dependent induction and maintenance of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Raji R; Bagheri, Meisam; Saini, Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-15

    Cells exposed to genotoxic stress induce cellular senescence through a DNA damage response (DDR) pathway regulated by ATM kinase and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that the regulatory roles for ATM kinase and ROS differ during induction and maintenance of cellular senescence. Cells treated with different genotoxic agents were analyzed using specific pathway markers and inhibitors to determine that ATM kinase activation is directly proportional to the dose of the genotoxic stress and that senescence initiation is not dependent on ROS or the p53 status of cells. Cells in which ROS was quenched still activated ATM and initiated the DDR when insulted, and progressed normally to senescence. By contrast, maintenance of a viable senescent state required the presence of ROS as well as activated ATM. Inhibition or removal of either of the components caused cell death in senescent cells, through a deregulated ATM-ROS axis. Overall, our work demonstrates existence of an intricate temporal hierarchy between genotoxic stress, DDR and ROS in cellular senescence. Our model reports the existence of different stages of cellular senescence with distinct regulatory networks.

  16. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  17. Investigation of cellular and molecular responses to pulsed focused ultrasound in a mouse model.

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    Scott R Burks

    Full Text Available Continuous focused ultrasound (cFUS has been widely used for thermal ablation of tissues, relying on continuous exposures to generate temperatures necessary to induce coagulative necrosis. Pulsed FUS (pFUS employs non-continuous exposures that lower the rate of energy deposition and allow cooling to occur between pulses, thereby minimizing thermal effects and emphasizing effects created by non-thermal mechanisms of FUS (i.e., acoustic radiation forces and acoustic cavitation. pFUS has shown promise for a variety of applications including drug and nanoparticle delivery; however, little is understood about the effects these exposures have on tissue, especially with regard to cellular pro-homing factors (growth factors, cytokines, and cell adhesion molecules. We examined changes in murine hamstring muscle following pFUS or cFUS and demonstrate that pFUS, unlike cFUS, has little effect on the histological integrity of muscle and does not induce cell death. Infiltration of macrophages was observed 3 and 8 days following pFUS or cFUS exposures. pFUS increased expression of several cytokines (e.g., IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, INFγ, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and GMCSF creating a local cytokine gradient on days 0 and 1 post-pFUS that returns to baseline levels by day 3 post-pFUS. pFUS exposures induced upregulation of other signaling molecules (e.g., VEGF, FGF, PlGF, HGF, and SDF-1α and cell adhesion molecules (e.g., ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on muscle vasculature. The observed molecular changes in muscle following pFUS may be utilized to target cellular therapies by increasing homing to areas of pathology.

  18. Amyloid-β–Induced Changes in Molecular Clock Properties and Cellular Bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Grimm, Amandine; Eckert, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Ageing is an inevitable biological process that results in a progressive structural and functional decline, as well as biochemical alterations that altogether lead to reduced ability to adapt to environmental changes. As clock oscillations and clock-controlled rhythms are not resilient to the aging process, aging of the circadian system may also increase susceptibility to age-related pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Besides the amyloid-beta protein (Aβ)-induced metabolic decline and neuronal toxicity in AD, numerous studies have demonstrated that the disruption of sleep and circadian rhythms is one of the common and earliest signs of the disease. In this study, we addressed the questions of whether Aβ contributes to an abnormal molecular circadian clock leading to a bioenergetic imbalance. For this purpose, we used different oscillator cellular models: human skin fibroblasts, human glioma cells, as well as mouse primary cortical and hippocampal neurons. We first evaluated the circadian period length, a molecular clock property, in the presence of different Aβ species. We report here that physiologically relevant Aβ1–42 concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 nM induced an increase of the period length in human skin fibroblasts, human A172 glioma cells as well as in mouse primary neurons whereas the reverse control peptide Aβ42-1, which is devoid of toxic action, did not influence the circadian period length within the same concentration range. To better understand the underlying mechanisms that are involved in the Aβ-related alterations of the circadian clock, we examined the cellular metabolic state in the human primary skin fibroblast model. Notably, under normal conditions, ATP levels displayed circadian oscillations, which correspond to the respective circadian pattern of mitochondrial respiration. In contrast, Aβ1–42 treatment provoked a strong dampening in the metabolic oscillations of ATP levels as well as mitochondrial respiration and

  19. Impact of photocatalysis on fungal cells: depiction of cellular and molecular effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Sana; Simonet, France; Lemaire, Marc; Guillard, Chantal; Cotton, Pascale

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the antimicrobial effects of photocatalysis on the yeast model Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To accurately study the antimicrobial mechanisms of the photocatalytic process, we focused our investigations on two questions: the entry of the nanoparticles in treated cells and the fate of the intracellular environment. Transmission electronic microscopy did not reveal any entry of nanoparticles within the cells, even for long exposure times, despite degradation of the cell wall space and deconstruction of cellular compartments. In contrast to proteins located at the periphery of the cells, intracellular proteins did not disappear uniformly. Disappearance or persistence of proteins from the pool of oxidized intracellular isoforms was not correlated to their functions. Altogether, our data suggested that photocatalysis induces the establishment of an intracellular oxidative environment. This hypothesis was sustained by the detection of an increased level of superoxide ions (O2°(-)) in treated cells and by greater cell cultivability for cells expressing oxidant stress response genes during photocatalytic exposure. The increase in intracellular ROS, which was not connected to the entry of nanoparticles within the cells or to a direct contact with the plasma membrane, could be the result of an imbalance in redox status amplified by chain reactions. Moreover, we expanded our study to other yeast and filamentous fungi and pointed out that, in contrast to the laboratory model S. cerevisiae, some environmental strains are very resistant to photocatalysis. This could be related to the cell wall composition and structure.

  20. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Robertson

    Full Text Available Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and

  1. The Molecular and Cellular Effect of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Škovierová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid derived in methionine metabolism. The increased level of Hcy in plasma, hyperhomocysteinemia, is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it is still not clear if Hcy is a marker or a causative agent of diseases. More and more research data suggest that Hcy is an important indicator for overall health status. This review represents the current understanding of molecular mechanism of Hcy metabolism and its link to hyperhomocysteinemia-related pathologies in humans. The aberrant Hcy metabolism could lead to the redox imbalance and oxidative stress resulting in elevated protein, nucleic acid and carbohydrate oxidation and lipoperoxidation, products known to be involved in cytotoxicity. Additionally, we examine the role of Hcy in thiolation of proteins, which results in their molecular and functional modifications. We also highlight the relationship between the imbalance in Hcy metabolism and pathogenesis of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological and psychiatric disorders, chronic kidney disease, bone tissue damages, gastrointestinal disorders, cancer, and congenital defects.

  2. Axial level-dependent molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the genesis of the embryonic neural plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Hisato; Takada, Shinji; Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor gene Sox2, centrally involved in neural primordial regulation, is activated by many enhancers. During the early stages of embryonic development, Sox2 is regulated by the enhancers N2 and N1 in the anterior neural plate (ANP) and posterior neural plate (PNP), respectively. This differential use of the enhancers reflects distinct regulatory mechanisms underlying the genesis of ANP and PNP. The ANP develops directly from the epiblast, triggered by nodal signal inhibition, and via the combined action of TFs SOX2, OTX2, POU3F1, and ZIC2, which promotes the the ANP development and inhibits other cell lineages. In contrast, the PNP is derived from neuromesodermal bipotential axial stem cells that develop into the neural plate when Sox2 is activated by the N1 enhancer, whereas they develop into the paraxial mesoderm when the N1 enhancer is repressed by the action of TBX6. The axial stem cells are maintained by the activity of WNT3a and T (Brachyury). However, at axial levels more anterior to the 8th somites (cervical levels), the development of both the neural plate and somite proceeds in the absence of WNT3a, T, or TBX6. These observations indicate that distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms determine neural plate genesis based on the axial level, and contradict the classical concept of the term "neural induction," which assumes a pan-neural plate mechanism.

  3. Historical review: Molecular and cellular mechanisms of opiate and cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2004-04-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse was founded in 1974, and since that time there have been significant advances in understanding the processes by which drugs of abuse cause addiction. The initial protein targets for almost all drugs of abuse are now known. Animal models that replicate key features of addiction are available, and these models have made it possible to characterize the brain regions that are important for addiction and other drug effects, such as physical dependence. A large number of drug-induced changes at the molecular and cellular levels have been identified in these brain areas and rapid progress is being made in relating individual changes to specific behavioral abnormalities in animal models of addiction. The current challenges are to translate this increasingly impressive knowledge of the basic neurobiology of addiction to human addicts, and to identify the specific genes that make some individuals either particularly vulnerable or resistant to addiction. In this article, I present a historical review of basic research on opiate and cocaine addiction.

  4. Molecular and cellular changes associated with the evolution of novel jaw muscles in parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Masayoshi; Nakayama, Tomoki; Schneider, Richard A; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2013-02-01

    Vertebrates have achieved great evolutionary success due in large part to the anatomical diversification of their jaw complex, which allows them to inhabit almost every ecological niche. While many studies have focused on mechanisms that pattern the jaw skeleton, much remains to be understood about the origins of novelty and diversity in the closely associated musculature. To address this issue, we focused on parrots, which have acquired two anatomically unique jaw muscles: the ethmomandibular and the pseudomasseter. In parrot embryos, we observe distinct and highly derived expression patterns for Scx, Bmp4, Tgfβ2 and Six2 in neural crest-derived mesenchyme destined to form jaw muscle connective tissues. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis reveals that cell proliferation is more active in the cells within the jaw muscle than in surrounding connective tissue cells. This biased and differentially regulated mode of cell proliferation in cranial musculoskeletal tissues may allow these unusual jaw muscles to extend towards their new attachment sites. We conclude that the alteration of neural crest-derived connective tissue distribution during development may underlie the spatial changes in jaw musculoskeletal architecture found only in parrots. Thus, parrots provide valuable insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms that may generate evolutionary novelties with functionally adaptive significance.

  5. Cellular and molecular portrait of eleven human glioblastoma cell lines under photon and carbon ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, S; Magné, N; Battiston-Montagne, P; Hau-Desbat, N-H; Diaz, O; Beuve, M; Constanzo, J; Chargari, C; Poncet, D; Chautard, E; Ardail, D; Alphonse, G; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2015-04-28

    This study aimed to examine the cellular and molecular long-term responses of glioblastomas to radiotherapy and hadrontherapy in order to better understand the biological effects of carbon beams in cancer treatment. Eleven human glioblastoma cell lines, displaying gradual radiosensitivity, were irradiated with photons or carbon ions. Independently of p53 or O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase(1) status, all cell lines responded to irradiation by a G2/M phase arrest followed by the appearance of mitotic catastrophe, which was concluded by a ceramide-dependent-apoptotic cell death. Statistical analysis demonstrated that: (i) the SF2(2) and the D10(3) values for photon are correlated with that obtained in response to carbon ions; (ii) regardless of the p53, MGMT status, and radiosensitivity, the release of ceramide is associated with the induction of late apoptosis; and (iii) the appearance of polyploid cells after photon irradiation could predict the Relative Biological Efficiency(4) to carbon ions. This large collection of data should increase our knowledge in glioblastoma radiobiology in order to better understand, and to later individualize, appropriate radiotherapy treatment for patients who are good candidates.

  6. Cellular and molecular changes associated with somatic embryogenesis induction in Agave tequilana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, L; Olmedilla, A; Santacruz-Ruvalcaba, F

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the importance of somatic embryogenesis for basic research in plant embryology as well as for crop improvement and plant propagation, it is still unclear which mechanisms and cell signals are involved in acquiring embryogenic competence by a somatic cell. The aim of this work was to study cellular and molecular changes involved in the induction stage in calli of Agave tequilana Weber cultivar azul in order to gain more information on the initial stages of somatic embryogenesis in this species. Cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques were used to identify differences between embryogenic and non-embryogenic cells from several genotypes. Presence of granular structures was detected after somatic embryogenesis induction in embryogenic cells; composition of these structures as well as changes in protein and polysaccharide distribution was studied using Coomassie brilliant blue and Periodic Acid-Schiff stains. Distribution of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and pectins was investigated in embryogenic and non-embryogenic cells by immunolabelling using anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies (JIM4, JIM8 and JIM13) as well as an anti-methyl-esterified pectin-antibody (JIM7), in order to evaluate major modifications in cell wall composition in the initial stages of somatic embryogenesis. Our observations pointed out that induction of somatic embryogenesis produced accumulation of proteins and polysaccharides in embryogenic cells. Presence of JIM8, JIM13 and JIM7 epitopes were detected exclusively in embryogenic cells, which supports the idea that specific changes in cell wall are involved in the acquisition of embryogenic competence of A. tequilana.

  7. Cocaine and MDMA Induce Cellular and Molecular Changes in Adult Neurogenic Systems: Functional Implications

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    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the brain to generate new adult neurons is a recent discovery that challenges the old theory of an immutable adult brain. A new and fascinating field of research now focuses on this regenerative process. The two brain systems that constantly produce new adult neurons, known as the adult neurogenic systems, are the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the lateral ventricules/olfactory bulb system. Both systems are involved in memory and learning processes. Different drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and MDMA, have been shown to produce cellular and molecular changes that affect adult neurogenesis. This review summarizes the effects that these drugs have on the adult neurogenic systems. The functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is obscured by the functions of the systems that integrate adult neurons. Therefore, we explore the effects that cocaine and MDMA produce not only on adult neurogenesis, but also on the DG and olfactory bulbs. Finally, we discuss the possible role of new adult neurons in cocaine- and MDMA-induced impairments. We conclude that, although harmful drug effects are produced at multiple physiological and anatomical levels, the specific consequences of reduced hippocampus neurogenesis are unclear and require further exploration.

  8. Prolactin and teleost ionocytes: new insights into cellular and molecular targets of prolactin in vertebrate epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone prolactin is a functionally versatile hormone produced by the vertebrate pituitary. Comparative studies over the last six decades have revealed that a conserved function for prolactin across vertebrates is the regulation of ion and water transport in a variety of tissues including those responsible for whole-organism ion homeostasis. In teleost fishes, prolactin was identified as the “freshwater-adapting hormone”, promoting ion-conserving and water-secreting processes by acting on the gill, kidney, gut and urinary bladder. In mammals, prolactin is known to regulate renal, intestinal, mammary and amniotic epithelia, with dysfunction linked to hypogonadism, infertility, and metabolic disorders. Until recently, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of prolactin action in fishes has been hampered by a paucity of molecular tools to define and study ionocytes, specialized cells that control active ion transport across branchial and epidermal epithelia. Here we review work in teleost models indicating that prolactin regulates ion balance through action on ion transporters, tight-junction proteins, and water channels in ionocytes, and discuss recent advances in our understanding of ionocyte function in the genetically and embryonically accessible zebrafish (Danio rerio). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in endocrine and osmoregulatory systems, these studies in teleost models are contributing novel mechanistic insight into how prolactin participates in the development, function, and dysfunction of osmoregulatory systems across the vertebrate lineage.

  9. Cellular and molecular alterations in human epithelial cells transformed by high let radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Sutter, T.; Willey, J. C.; Suzuki, K.

    An understanding of the radiobiological effects of high LET radiation is essential for human risk estimation and radiation protection. In the present study, we show that a single, 30 cGy dose of 150 keV/mum ^4He ions can malignantly transform human papillomavirus immortalized human bronchial epithelial [BEP2D] cells. Transformed cells produce progressively growing tumors in nude mice. The transformation frequency by the single dose of alpha particles is estimated to be approximately 4 x 10^-7. Based on the average cross-sectional area of BEP2D cells, it can be calculated that a mean traversal of 1.4 particles per cell is sufficient to induce tumorigenic conversion of these cells 3 to 4 months post-irradiation. Tumorigenic BEP2D cells overexpress mutated p53 tumor suppressor oncoproteins in addition to the cell cycle control gene cyclin D1 and D2. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular changes at the various stages in radiation carcinogenesis involving human cells.

  10. β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate as a countermeasure for cancer cachexia: a cellular and molecular rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Su; Khamoui, Andy V; Jo, Edward; Park, Bong-Sup; Lee, Won Jun

    2013-10-01

    Cancer cachexia is a life-threatening condition characterized by involuntary body weight loss and skeletal muscle wasting. In addition to being associated with poor prognosis and reduced survival, patients with cachexia exhibit a critical loss of physical function that impinges upon their ability to perform basic activities of daily living. Consequently, there is a loss of independence and a drastically reduced quality of life. Despite being a major unmet medical need of patients, very few treatment options exist. Maintaining muscle mass represents an important objective in the cancer patient trajectory not only because it relates to one's capacity to perform activities of daily living, but also because muscle preservation may be a critical determinant of survival while in a tumor-bearing state. In this regard, research has been directed towards identifying countermeasures effective in preserving muscle. With respect to nutritional approaches, administration of the leucine metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) could be a viable component in multi-modal therapies targeting cancer cachexia. Evidence suggests that HMB treatment promotes regenerative events (i.e. myogenic program), suppresses protein degradation, and activates signaling pathways preceding protein synthesis and skeletal muscle growth. HMB therefore, could conceivably act on key regulatory events driving cancer cachexia, thereby favoring muscle growth/preservation. In this review, we take a mechanistic approach in making a case for the use of HMB provision as a possible therapeutic strategy for cancer cachexia by highlighting the cellular and molecular aspects of HMB function.

  11. [Lipid mobilization and energy metabolism: impact of molecular and cellular approaches on the treatment of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontan, M; Berlan, M; Galitzky, J

    2000-12-01

    There is strong evidence that reduced sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is involved in the etiology of obesity in several animal models of obesity. In humans the situation is more complex but humans with low SNS activity, reduced beta-adrenergic sensitivity, reduced lipid mobilizing efficacy of catecholamines have lowered energy expenditure and are at greater risk of obesity. The SNS with its effect on food intake, lipid mobilization and energy expenditure has a major potential as a target for novel pharmacotherapies in weight reducing strategies. Extended cellular and molecular knowledge about the nature, the distribution and the role of the adrenergic receptors (beta(1)-, beta(2)-, beta(3)-, alpha(2)- and alpha(1)-) existing in tissue effectors involved in the control of lipid mobilization (adipose tissue) and energy expenditure (brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle) has opened new pathways for pharmacological strategies. In this manuscript, after a summary of current knowledge on the regulation of lipid mobilization and energy expenditure in humans, we briefly review the putative targets and the most recent attempts to develop agents acting at various adrenergic receptor types in SNS effectors or on SNS activity. These include major questions about putative utilization of beta(3)-agonists, alpha(2)-antagonists and beta-antagonists in pharmacotherapy and/or prevention of obesity in humans.

  12. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle aging and sarcopenia and effects of electrical stimulation in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Barberi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers, alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors.

  13. Cellular and molecular aspects of diabetic nephropathy; the role of VEGF-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Katherine; Veron, Dolores; Cercado, Alicia; Bautista, Noemi; Pozo, Wilson; Tufro, Alda; Veron, Delma

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus increased during the last century and it is estimated that 45% of the patients are not diagnosed. In South America the prevalence of diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) increased, with a great disparity among the countries with respect to access to dialysis. In Ecuador it is one of the main causes of mortality, principally in the provinces located on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. The greatest single cause of beginning dialysis is diabetic nephropathy (DN). Even using the best therapeutic options for DN, the residual risk of proteinuria and of terminal CKD remains high. In this review we indicate the importance of the problem globally and in our region. We analyse relevant cellular and molecular studies that illustrate the crucial significance of glomerular events in DN development and evolution and in insulin resistance. We include basic anatomical, pathophysiological and clinical concepts, with special attention to the role of angiogenic factors such as the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) and their relationship to the insulin receptor, endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and angiopoietins. We also propose various pathways that have therapeutic potential in our opinion. Greater in-depth study of VEGF-A and angiopoietins, the state of glomerular VEGF resistance, the relationship of VEGF receptor 2/nephrin, VEGF/insulin receptors/nephrin and the relationship of VEGF/eNOS-NO at glomerular level could provide solutions to the pressing world problem of DN and generate new treatment alternatives.

  14. Molecular and Cellular Profiling of Scalp Psoriasis Reveals Differences and Similarities Compared to Skin Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Juan; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Shemer, Avner; Oliva, Margeaux; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Krueger, James G

    2016-01-01

    Scalp psoriasis shows a variable clinical spectrum and in many cases poses a great therapeutic challenge. However, it remains unknown whether the immune response of scalp psoriasis differs from understood pathomechanisms of psoriasis in other skin areas. We sought to determine the cellular and molecular phenotype of scalp psoriasis by performing a comparative analysis of scalp and skin using lesional and nonlesional samples from 20 Caucasian subjects with untreated moderate to severe psoriasis and significant scalp involvement and 10 control subjects without psoriasis. Our results suggest that even in the scalp, psoriasis is a disease of the inter-follicular skin. The immune mechanisms that mediate scalp psoriasis were found to be similar to those involved in skin psoriasis. However, the magnitude of dysregulation, number of differentially expressed genes, and enrichment of the psoriatic genomic fingerprint were more prominent in skin lesions. Furthermore, the scalp transcriptome showed increased modulation of several gene-sets, particularly those induced by interferon-gamma, compared with that of skin psoriasis, which was mainly associated with activation of TNFα/L-17/IL-22-induced keratinocyte response genes. We also detected differences in expression of gene-sets involving negative regulation, epigenetic regulation, epidermal differentiation, and dendritic cell or Th1/Th17/Th22-related T-cell processes.

  15. DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

  16. The Molecular and Cellular Events That Take Place during Craniofacial Distraction Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Rachmiel, DMD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Gradual bone lengthening using distraction osteogenesis principles is the gold standard for the treatment of hypoplastic facial bones. However, the long treatment time is a major disadvantage of the lengthening procedures. The aim of this study is to review the current literature and summarize the cellular and molecular events occurring during membranous craniofacial distraction osteogenesis. Mechanical stimulation by distraction induces biological responses of skeletal regeneration that is accomplished by a cascade of biological processes that may include differentiation of pluripotential tissue, angiogenesis, osteogenesis, mineralization, and remodeling. There are complex interactions between bone-forming osteoblasts and other cells present within the bone microenvironment, particularly vascular endothelial cells that may be pivotal members of a complex interactive communication network in bone. Studies have implicated number of cytokines that are intimately involved in the regulation of bone synthesis and turnover. The gene regulation of numerous cytokines (transforming growth factor-β, bone morphogenetic proteins, insulin-like growth factor-1, and fibroblast growth factor-2 and extracellular matrix proteins (osteonectin, osteopontin during distraction osteogenesis has been best characterized and discussed. Understanding the biomolecular mechanisms that mediate membranous distraction osteogenesis may guide the development of targeted strategies designed to improve distraction osteogenesis and accelerate bone regeneration that may lead to shorten the treatment duration.

  17. Novel metastasis-related gene CIM functions in the regulation of multiple cellular stress-response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Arima, Chinatsu; Tomida, Shuta; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Yukako; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Osada, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Various stresses of the tumor microenvironment produced by insufficient nutrients, pH, and oxygen can contribute to the generation of altered metabolic and proliferative states that promote the survival of metastatic cells. Among many cellular stress-response pathways activated under such conditions are the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is elicited as a response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this study, we report the identification of a novel cancer invasion and metastasis-related gene (hereafter referred to as CIM, also called ERLEC1), which influences both of these stress-response pathways to promote metastasis. CIM was identified by comparing the gene expression profile of a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line with its weakly metastatic parental clone. We showed that CIM is critical for metastatic properties in this system. Proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed that CIM has multifaceted roles in controlling the response to hypoxia and ER stress. Specifically, CIM sequestered OS-9 from the HIF-1α complex and PHD2, permitting HIF-1α accumulation by preventing its degradation. Ectopic expression of CIM in lung cancer cells increased their tolerance to hypoxia. CIM also modulated UPR through interaction with the key ER stress protein BiP, influencing cell proliferation under ER stress conditions. Our findings shed light on how tolerance to multiple cellular stresses at a metastatic site can be evoked by an integrated mechanism involving CIM, which can function to coordinate those responses in a manner that promotes metastatic cell survival.

  18. Molecular and physiological responses of trees to waterlogging stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-10-01

    One major effect of global climate change will be altered precipitation patterns in many regions of the world. This will cause a higher probability of long-term waterlogging in winter/spring and flash floods in summer because of extreme rainfall events. Particularly, trees not adapted at their natural site to such waterlogging stress can be impaired. Despite the enormous economic, ecological and social importance of forest ecosystems, the effect of waterlogging on trees is far less understood than the effect on many crops or the model plant Arabidopsis. There is only a handful of studies available investigating the transcriptome and metabolome of waterlogged trees. Main physiological responses of trees to waterlogging include the stimulation of fermentative pathways and an accelerated glycolytic flux. Many energy-consuming, anabolic processes are slowed down to overcome the energy crisis mediated by waterlogging. A crucial feature of waterlogging tolerance is the steady supply of glycolysis with carbohydrates, particularly in the roots; stress-sensitive trees fail to maintain sufficient carbohydrate availability resulting in the dieback of the stressed tissues. The present review summarizes physiological and molecular features of waterlogging tolerance of trees; the focus is on carbon metabolism in both, leaves and roots of trees.

  19. Regulation of calnexin sub-cellular localization modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delom, Frédéric; Fessart, Delphine; Chevet, Eric

    2007-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the cellular compartment where proteins enter the secretory pathway, undergo post-translational modifications and acquire a correct conformation. If these functions are chronically altered, specific ER stress signals are triggered to promote cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Here, we show that tunicamycin causes significant alteration of calnexin sub-cellular distribution in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, this correlates with the absence of both tunicamycin-induced calnexin phosphorylation as well as tunicamycin-induced cell death. Under these conditions, calnexin-associated Bap31, an ER integral membrane protein, is subjected to a caspase-8 cleavage pattern within a specific sub-compartment of the ER. These results suggest that MCF-7 resistance to ER stress-induced apoptosis is partially mediated by the expression level of calnexin which in turn controls its sub-cellular localization, and its association with Bap31. These data may delineate a resistance mechanism to the ER stress-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  20. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 mg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by focus pattern and focus number counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (γg-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average focus counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profiles of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in γg-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not

  1. Polyphenol Stilbenes: Molecular Mechanisms of Defence against Oxidative Stress and Aging-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Reinisalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have highlighted the key roles of oxidative stress and inflammation in aging-related diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In aging cells, the natural antioxidant capacity decreases and the overall efficiency of reparative systems against cell damage becomes impaired. There is convincing data that stilbene compounds, a diverse group of natural defence phenolics, abundant in grapes, berries, and conifer bark waste, may confer a protective effect against aging-related diseases. This review highlights recent data helping to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the stilbene-mediated protection against oxidative stress. The impact of stilbenes on the nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 mediated cellular defence against oxidative stress as well as the potential roles of SQSTM1/p62 protein in Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and autophagy will be summarized. The therapeutic potential of stilbene compounds against the most common aging-related diseases is discussed.

  2. Oxidative stress: molecular perception and transduction of signals triggering antioxidant gene defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Scandalios

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen (O2 is the premier biological electron acceptor that serves vital roles in fundamental cellular functions. However, with the beneficial properties of O2 comes the inadvertent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS such as superoxide (O2·-, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical (OH·. If unabated, ROS pose a serious threat to or cause the death of aerobic cells. To minimize the damaging effects of ROS, aerobic organisms evolved non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defenses. The latter include catalases, peroxidases, superoxide dismutases, and glutathione S-transferases (GST. Cellular ROS-sensing mechanisms are not well understood, but a number of transcription factors that regulate the expression of antioxidant genes are well characterized in prokaryotes and in yeast. In higher eukaryotes, oxidative stress responses are more complex and modulated by several regulators. In mammalian systems, two classes of transcription factors, nuclear factor kB and activator protein-1, are involved in the oxidative stress response. Antioxidant-specific gene induction, involved in xenobiotic metabolism, is mediated by the "antioxidant responsive element" (ARE commonly found in the promoter region of such genes. ARE is present in mammalian GST, metallothioneine-I and MnSod genes, but has not been found in plant Gst genes. However, ARE is present in the promoter region of the three maize catalase (Cat genes. In plants, ROS have been implicated in the damaging effects of various environmental stress conditions. Many plant defense genes are activated in response to these conditions, including the three maize Cat and some of the superoxide dismutase (Sod genes.

  3. Impact of Heat Stress on Cellular and Transcriptional Adaptation of Mammary Epithelial Cells in Riverine Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapila, Neha; Sharma, Ankita; Kishore, Amit; Sodhi, Monika; Tripathi, Pawan K; Mohanty, Ashok K; Mukesh, Manishi

    The present study aims to identify the heat responsive genes and biological pathways in heat stressed buffalo mammary epithelial cells (MECs). The primary mammary epithelial cells of riverine buffalo were exposed to thermal stress at 42°C for one hour. The cells were subsequently allowed to recover at 37°C and harvested at different time intervals (30 min to 48 h) along with control samples (un-stressed). In order to assess the impact of heat stress in buffalo MECs, several in-vitro cellular parameters (lactate dehydrogenase activity, cell proliferation assay, cellular viability, cell death and apoptosis) and transcriptional studies were conducted. The heat stress resulted in overall decrease in cell viability and cell proliferation of MECs while induction of cellular apoptosis and necrosis. The transcriptomic profile of heat stressed MECs was generated using Agilent 44 K bovine oligonucleotide array and at cutoff criteria of ≥3-or ≤3 fold change, a total of 153 genes were observed to be upregulated while 8 genes were down regulated across all time points post heat stress. The genes that were specifically up-regulated or down-regulated were identified as heat responsive genes. The upregulated genes in heat stressed MECs belonged to heat shock family viz., HSPA6, HSPB8, DNAJB2, HSPA1A. Along with HSPs, genes like BOLA, MRPL55, PFKFB3, PSMC2, ENDODD1, ARID5A, and SENP3 were also upregulated. Microarray data revealed that the heat responsive genes belonged to different functional classes viz., chaperons; immune responsive; cell proliferation and metabolism related. Gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment of several biological processes like; cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, biological regulation, immune system processes and signaling. The transcriptome analysis data was further validated by RT-qPCR studies. Several HSP (HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, and HSPB1), apoptotic (Bax and Bcl2), immune (IL6, TNFα and NF-kβ) and oxidative

  4. Multi-scale continuum modeling of biological processes: from molecular electro-diffusion to sub-cellular signaling transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Kekenes-Huskey, P.; Hake, J. E.; Holst, M. J.; McCammon, J. A.; Michailova, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of multi-scale modeling at the molecular to cellular scale, with new results for heart muscle cells. A finite element-based simulation package (SMOL) was used to investigate the signaling transduction at molecular and sub-cellular scales (http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/smol/, http://FETK.org) by numerical solution of the time-dependent Smoluchowski equations and a reaction-diffusion system. At the molecular scale, SMOL has yielded experimentally validated estimates of the diffusion-limited association rates for the binding of acetylcholine to mouse acetylcholinesterase using crystallographic structural data. The predicted rate constants exhibit increasingly delayed steady-state times, with increasing ionic strength, and demonstrate the role of an enzyme's electrostatic potential in influencing ligand binding. At the sub-cellular scale, an extension of SMOL solves a nonlinear, reaction-diffusion system describing Ca2+ ligand buffering and diffusion in experimentally derived rodent ventricular myocyte geometries. Results reveal the important role of mobile and stationary Ca2+ buffers, including Ca2+ indicator dye. We found that alterations in Ca2+-binding and dissociation rates of troponin C (TnC) and total TnC concentration modulate sub-cellular Ca2+ signals. The model predicts that reduced off-rate in the whole troponin complex (TnC, TnI, TnT) versus reconstructed thin filaments (Tn, Tm, actin) alters cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics under control conditions or in disease-linked TnC mutations. The ultimate goal of these studies is to develop scalable methods and theories for the integration of molecular-scale information into simulations of cellular-scale systems.

  5. Investigating the Effects of Stress Interaction Using a Cellular-automaton Based Model in Fault Networks of Varying Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, A. P.; Steacy, S.; McCloskey, J.

    2007-12-01

    Seismicity spatial and temporal patterns are strongly influenced by stress interaction between faults. However the effects of such interaction on earthquake statistics is not yet well understood. Computer models provide accurate, large and complete datasets to investigate this issue and also have the benefit of allowing direct comparison of seismicity behavior in time and space in networks, with and without fault interaction. We investigate the effect of such interaction on modeled real-world fault networks of varying complexity using a cellular-automata based model. Each 3-D fault within the fault network is modeled by a discrete cellular automaton. The cell size is 1 km square which allows for a minimum earthquake size of approximately Mw=4. The cell strength is distributed fractally across each fault and all cells are loaded by a remote tectonic stressing rate. When the stress on a cell exceeds its strength, the cell fails and stress is transferred to its nearest neighbors which may in turn cause them to break allowing the earthquake to grow. These stress transfer rules allow realistic stress concentrations to develop at the boundary of the rupture. If the extent of the rupture exceeds a user defined minimum length, and if interaction between faults is allowed, a boundary element method is used to calculate stress transfer to neighboring faults. Here we present results from four simulated fault networks based on active faults in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, the Northern Anatolian Fault, Turkey, Southern California, and the Marlborough Fault System, South Island, New Zealand. These are chosen for their varying level of fault complexity and we examine both interacting and non-interacting models in terms of their b-value and recurrence intervals for each region. Results will be compared and discussed.

  6. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Darvishi, Behrad [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmoradi, Elnaz [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Ali [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Drug and Food Control, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javanbakht, Mehran [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dinarvand, Rassoul [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh, E-mail: atyabifa@tums.ac.ir [Nanotechnology Research Center,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells. - Highlights: • MIP-PEG-FA was synthesized as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery to cancerous cells. • Nanoparticles

  7. Cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of YAC transgenic mouse models of Friedreich ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Anjomani Virmouni

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene. We have previously established and performed preliminary characterisation of several human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models containing GAA repeat expansions, Y47R (9 GAA repeats, YG8R (90 and 190 GAA repeats and YG22R (190 GAA repeats.We now report extended cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of these FXN YAC transgenic mouse models. FXN transgene copy number analysis of the FRDA mice demonstrated that the YG22R and Y47R lines each have a single copy of the FXN transgene while the YG8R line has two copies. Single integration sites of all transgenes were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We identified significant functional deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8R and YG22R FRDA mice compared to Y47R and wild-type control mice. We also confirmed increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the cerebellum and brain of YG22R and YG8R mice, together with significantly reduced levels of FXN mRNA and protein in the brain and liver of YG8R and YG22R compared to Y47R.Together these studies provide a detailed characterisation of our GAA repeat expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models that will help investigations of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy.

  8. Cellular and molecular function of mucolipins (TRPML) and polycystin 2 (TRPP2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Noben-Trauth, Konrad

    2005-10-01

    Mucolipins (transient receptor potential mucolipin, TRPML) and polycystin-2 proteins (transient receptor potential polycystin, TRPP) constitute two small families of cation channels with motif and sequence similarities to the transient receptor potential (TRP) class of non-selective cation channels. Genetic defects in TRPML1 and TRPML3 in humans and in animal models cause the accumulation of large vacuoles, leading to a variety of cellular phenotypes including neurological and neurosensory deficiencies. TRPML1 is a Ca(2+)-, K(+)-, and Na(+)-permeable cation channel sensitive to pH changes, and regulates a critical step in the maturation of late endosomes to lysosomes. Mutations of TRPP2 in humans result in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Molecular studies have demonstrated that TRPP2 and TRPP3 proteins function as Ca(2+)-regulated, non-selective cation channels. During embryogenesis TRPP2 is active in node monocilia and plays a role in the establishment of left-right asymmetry. Recent results have indicated that TRPP2 interacts with polycystin-1 and that their interaction is important for their function as mechanosensitive channels at the primary cilium of renal epithelial cells. The interaction of polycystin family members appears to be conserved and is critical for fertilization and mating behavior. An emerging concept from the studies of the polycystin family is that they function as cation-influx based devices for sensing extracellular signals on ciliated structures. Here we review the function of TRPML1 and TRPP2 as representative members of these families, focusing on the genetics, physiology, and biochemistry.

  9. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; Fauth, John E.; Richmond, Robert H.; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W.; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m−2 s−1 PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching. PMID:24324575

  10. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  11. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Downs

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex, usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2 s(-1 PAR at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  12. C/EBPγ Is a Critical Regulator of Cellular Stress Response Networks through Heterodimerization with ATF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Christopher J; Mayekar, Manasi K; Martin, Nancy; Saylor, Karen L; Gonit, Mesfin; Jailwala, Parthav; Kasoji, Manjula; Haines, Diana C; Quiñones, Octavio A; Johnson, Peter F

    2015-12-14

    The integrated stress response (ISR) controls cellular adaptations to nutrient deprivation, redox imbalances, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ISR genes are upregulated in stressed cells, primarily by the bZIP transcription factor ATF4 through its recruitment to cis-regulatory C/EBP:ATF response elements (CAREs) together with a dimeric partner of uncertain identity. Here, we show that C/EBPγ:ATF4 heterodimers, but not C/EBPβ:ATF4 dimers, are the predominant CARE-binding species in stressed cells. C/EBPγ and ATF4 associate with genomic CAREs in a mutually dependent manner and coregulate many ISR genes. In contrast, the C/EBP family members C/EBPβ and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were largely dispensable for induction of stress genes. Cebpg(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) proliferate poorly and exhibit oxidative stress due to reduced glutathione levels and impaired expression of several glutathione biosynthesis pathway genes. Cebpg(-/-) mice (C57BL/6 background) display reduced body size and microphthalmia, similar to ATF4-null animals. In addition, C/EBPγ-deficient newborns die from atelectasis and respiratory failure, which can be mitigated by in utero exposure to the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Cebpg(-/-) mice on a mixed strain background showed improved viability but, upon aging, developed significantly fewer malignant solid tumors than WT animals. Our findings identify C/EBPγ as a novel antioxidant regulator and an obligatory ATF4 partner that controls redox homeostasis in normal and cancerous cells.

  13. β-carotene treatment alters the cellular death process in oxidative stress-induced K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakaya, Handan; Tok, Sabiha; Dal, Fulya; Cinar, Suzan Adin; Nurten, Rustem

    2017-03-01

    Oxidizing agents (e.g., H2 O2 ) cause structural and functional disruptions of molecules by affecting lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. As a result, cellular mechanisms related to disrupted macro molecules are affected and cell death is induced. Oxidative damage can be prevented at a certain point by antioxidants or the damage can be reversed. In this work, we studied the cellular response against oxidative stress induced by H2 O2 and antioxidant-oxidant (β-carotene-H2 O2 ) interactions in terms of time, concentration, and treatment method (pre-, co-, and post) in K562 cells. We showed that co- or post-treatment with β-carotene did not protect cells from the damage of oxidative stress furthermore co- and post-β-carotene-treated oxidative stress induced cells showed similar results with only H2 O2 treated cells. However, β-carotene pre-treatment prevented oxidative damage induced by H2 O2 at concentrations lower than 1,000 μM compared with only H2 O2 -treated and co- and post-β-carotene-treated oxidative stress-induced cells in terms of studied cellular parameters (mitochondrial membrane potential [Δψm ], cell cycle and apoptosis). Prevention effect of β-carotene pre-treatment was lost at concentrations higher than 1,000 μM H2 O2 (2-10 mM). These findings suggest that β-carotene pre-treatment alters the effects of oxidative damage induced by H2 O2 and cell death processes in K562 cells.

  14. Cell mechanics and stress: from molecular details to the 'universal cell reaction' and hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, Paul S

    2007-04-01

    The 'universal cell reaction' (UCR), a coordinated biphasic response to external (noxious and other) stimuli observed in all living cells, was described by Nasonov and his colleagues in the mid-20th century. This work has received no attention from cell biologists in the West, but the UCR merits serious consideration. Although it is non-specific, it is likely to be underpinned by precise mechanisms and, if these mechanisms were characterized and their relationship to the UCR elucidated, then our understanding of the integration of cellular function could be improved. As a step towards identifying such mechanisms, I review some recent advances in understanding cell mechanics and the stress response and I suggest potentially testable hypotheses. There is a particular need for time-course studies of cellular responses to different stimulus doses or intensities. I also suggest a correspondence with hormesis; re-investigation of the UCR using modern biophysical and molecular-biological techniques might throw light on this much-discussed phenomenon.

  15. Stresses and elastic constants of crystalline sodium, from molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiferl, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    The stresses and the elastic constants of bcc sodium are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) for temperatures to T = 340K. The total adiabatic potential of a system of sodium atoms is represented by pseudopotential model. The resulting expression has two terms: a large, strictly volume-dependent potential, plus a sum over ion pairs of a small, volume-dependent two-body potential. The stresses and the elastic constants are given as strain derivatives of the Helmholtz free energy. The resulting expressions involve canonical ensemble averages (and fluctuation averages) of the position and volume derivatives of the potential. An ensemble correction relates the results to MD equilibrium averages. Evaluation of the potential and its derivatives requires the calculation of integrals with infinite upper limits of integration, and integrand singularities. Methods for calculating these integrals and estimating the effects of integration errors are developed. A method is given for choosing initial conditions that relax quickly to a desired equilibrium state. Statistical methods developed earlier for MD data are extended to evaluate uncertainties in fluctuation averages, and to test for symmetry. 45 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Molecular and structural antioxidant defenses against oxidative stress in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Costantini, David

    2011-10-01

    In this review, it is our aim 1) to describe the high diversity in molecular and structural antioxidant defenses against oxidative stress in animals, 2) to extend the traditional concept of antioxidant to other structural and functional factors affecting the "whole" organism, 3) to incorporate, when supportable by evidence, mechanisms into models of life-history trade-offs and maternal/epigenetic inheritance, 4) to highlight the importance of studying the biochemical integration of redox systems, and 5) to discuss the link between maximum life span and antioxidant defenses. The traditional concept of antioxidant defenses emphasizes the importance of the chemical nature of molecules with antioxidant properties. Research in the past 20 years shows that animals have also evolved a high diversity in structural defenses that should be incorporated in research on antioxidant responses to reactive species. Although there is a high diversity in antioxidant defenses, many of them are evolutionary conserved across animal taxa. In particular, enzymatic defenses and heat shock response mediated by proteins show a low degree of variation. Importantly, activation of an antioxidant response may be also energetically and nutrient demanding. So knowledge of antioxidant mechanisms could allow us to identify and to quantify any underlying costs, which can help explain life-history trade-offs. Moreover, the study of inheritance mechanisms of antioxidant mechanisms has clear potential to evaluate the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to stress response phenotype variation.

  17. Promoting Neuronal Tolerance of Diabetic Stress: Modulating Molecular Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, S M; Dobrowsky, R T

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) involves an interrelated series of metabolic and vascular insults that ultimately contribute to sensory neuron degeneration. In the quest to pharmacologically manage DPN, small-molecule inhibitors have targeted proteins and pathways regarded as "diabetes specific" as well as others whose activity are altered in numerous disease states. These efforts have not yielded any significant therapies, due in part to the complicating issue that the biochemical contribution of these targets/pathways to the progression of DPN does not occur with temporal and/or biochemical uniformity between individuals. In a complex, chronic neurodegenerative disease such as DPN, it is increasingly appreciated that effective disease management may not necessarily require targeting a pathway or protein considered to contribute to disease progression. Alternatively, it may prove sufficiently beneficial to pharmacologically enhance the activity of endogenous cytoprotective pathways to aid neuronal tolerance to and recovery from glucotoxic stress. In pursuing this paradigm shift, we have shown that modulating the activity and expression of molecular chaperones such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) may provide translational potential for the effective medical management of insensate DPN. Considerable evidence supports that modulating Hsp70 has beneficial effects in improving inflammation, oxidative stress, and glucose sensitivity. Given the emerging potential of modulating Hsp70 to manage DPN, the current review discusses efforts to characterize the cytoprotective effects of this protein and the benefits and limitations that may arise in drug development efforts that exploit its cytoprotective activity.

  18. Large-scale cellular-resolution gene profiling in human neocortex reveals species-specific molecular signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongkui; Shen, Elaine H.; Hohmann, John G.; Oh, Wook Seung; Bernard, Amy; Royall, Joshua J.; Glattfelder, Katie J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Morris, John A.; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Ebbert, Amanda J.; Swanson, Beryl; Kuan, Leonard; Page, Damon T.; Overly, Caroline C.; Lein, Ed S.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Jones, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although there have been major advances in elucidating the functional biology of the human brain, relatively little is known of its cellular and molecular organization. Here we report a large-scale characterization of the expression of ~1,000 genes important for neural functions, by in situ hybridization with cellular resolution in visual and temporal cortices of adult human brains. These data reveal diverse gene expression patterns and remarkable conservation of each individual gene’s expression among individuals (95%), cortical areas (84%), and between human and mouse (79%). A small but substantial number of genes (21%) exhibited species-differential expression. Distinct molecular signatures, comprised of genes both common between species and unique to each, were identified for each major cortical cell type. The data suggest that gene expression profile changes may contribute to differential cortical function across species, in particular, a shift from corticosubcortical to more predominant corticocortical communications in the human brain. PMID:22500809

  19. Overexpression of factor VIII after AAV delivery is transiently associated with cellular stress in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Amy M; Altynova, Ekaterina S; Nguyen, Giang N; Sabatino, Denise E

    2016-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a large glycoprotein that is challenging to express both in vitro and in vivo. Several studies suggest that high levels of FVIII expression can lead to cellular stress. After gene transfer, transgene expression is restricted to a subset of cells and the increased FVIII load per cell may impact activation of the unfolded protein response. We sought to determine whether increased FVIII expression in mice after adeno-associated viral liver gene transfer would affect the unfolded protein response and/or immune response to the transgene. The FVIII gene was delivered as B-domain deleted single chain or two chain (light and heavy chains) at a range of doses in hemophilia A mice. A correlation between FVIII expression and anti-FVIII antibody titers was observed. Analysis of key components of the unfolded protein response, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), showed transient unfolded protein response activation in the single chain treated group expressing >200% of FVIII but not after two chain delivery. These studies suggest that supraphysiological single chain FVIII expression may increase the likelihood of a cellular stress response but does not alter liver function. These data are in agreement with the observed long-term expression of FVIII at therapeutic levels after adeno-associated viral delivery in hemophilia A dogs without evidence of cellular toxicity. PMID:27738645

  20. The effects of aging on the molecular and cellular composition of the prostate microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Bianchi-Frias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advancing age is associated with substantial increases in the incidence rates of common diseases affecting the prostate gland including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma. The prostate is comprised of a functional secretory epithelium, a basal epithelium, and a supporting stroma comprised of structural elements, and a spectrum of cell types that includes smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and inflammatory cells. As reciprocal interactions between epithelium and stromal constituents are essential for normal organogenesis and serve to maintain normal functions, discordance within the stroma could permit or promote disease processes. In this study we sought to identify aging-associated alterations in the mouse prostate microenvironment that could influence pathology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We quantitated transcript levels in microdissected glandular-adjacent stroma from young (age 4 months and old (age 20-24 months C57BL/6 mice, and identified a significant change in the expression of 1259 genes (p<0.05. These included increases in transcripts encoding proteins associated with inflammation (e.g., Ccl8, Ccl12, genotoxic/oxidative stress (e.g., Apod, Serpinb5 and other paracrine-acting effects (e.g., Cyr61. The expression of several collagen genes (e.g., Col1a1 and Col3a1 exhibited age-associated declines. By histology, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy we determined that the collagen matrix is abundant and disorganized, smooth muscle cell orientation is disordered, and inflammatory infiltrates are significantly increased, and are comprised of macrophages, T cells and, to a lesser extent, B cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate that during normal aging the prostate stroma exhibits phenotypic and molecular characteristics plausibly contributing to the striking age associated pathologies affecting the prostate.

  1. Heat shock protein 90 in plants: molecular mechanisms and roles in stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao-Shi; Li, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Yang; Chen, Ming; Li, Lian-Cheng; Ma, You-Zhi

    2012-11-23

    The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) family mediates stress signal transduction, and plays important roles in the control of normal growth of human cells and in promoting development of tumor cells. Hsp90s have become a currently important subject in cellular immunity, signal transduction, and anti-cancer research. Studies on the physiological functions of Hsp90s began much later in plants than in animals and fungi. Significant progress has been made in understanding complex mechanisms of HSP90s in plants, including ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins. A wide range of signaling proteins interact with HSP90s. Recent studies revealed that plant Hsp90s are important in plant development, environmental stress response, and disease and pest resistance. In this study, the plant HSP90 family was classified into three clusters on the basis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structure, and biological functions. We discuss the molecular functions of Hsp90s, and systematically review recent progress of Hsp90 research in plants.

  2. Heat Shock Protein 90 in Plants: Molecular Mechanisms and Roles in Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Zhi Ma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 family mediates stress signal transduction, and plays important roles in the control of normal growth of human cells and in promoting development of tumor cells. Hsp90s have become a currently important subject in cellular immunity, signal transduction, and anti-cancer research. Studies on the physiological functions of Hsp90s began much later in plants than in animals and fungi. Significant progress has been made in understanding complex mechanisms of HSP90s in plants, including ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins. A wide range of signaling proteins interact with HSP90s. Recent studies revealed that plant Hsp90s are important in plant development, environmental stress response, and disease and pest resistance. In this study, the plant HSP90 family was classified into three clusters on the basis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structure, and biological functions. We discuss the molecular functions of Hsp90s, and systematically review recent progress of Hsp90 research in plants.

  3. Cytological, molecular mechanisms and temperature stress regulating production of diploid male gametes in Dianthus caryophyllus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuhong; Mo, Xijun; Gui, Min; Wu, Xuewei; Jiang, Yalian; Ma, Lulin; Shi, Ziming; Luo, Ying; Tang, Wenru

    2015-12-01

    In plant evolution, because of its key role in sexual polyploidization or whole genome duplication events, diploid gamete formation is considered as an important component in diversification and speciation. Environmental stress often triggers unreduced gamete production. However, the molecular, cellular mechanisms and adverse temperature regulating diplogamete production in carnation remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the cytological basis for 2n male gamete formation and describe the isolation and characterization of the first gene, DcPS1 (Dianthus Caryophyllus Parallel Spindle 1). In addition, we analyze influence of temperature stress on diploid gamete formation and transcript levels of DcPS1. Cytological evidence indicated that 2n male gamete formation is attributable to abnormal spindle orientation at male meiosis II. DcPS1 protein is conserved throughout the plant kingdom and carries domains suggestive of a regulatory function. DcPS1 expression analysis show DcPS1 gene probably have a role in 2n pollen formation. Unreduced pollen formation in various cultivation was sensitive to high or low temperature which was probably regulated by the level of DcPS1 transcripts. In a broader perspective, these findings can have potential applications in fundamental polyploidization research and plant breeding programs.

  4. Selective Regulation of FGF19 and FGF21 Expression by Cellular and Nutritional Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Makoto; Morimoto, Hitomi; Maruyama, Ryuto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and FGF21 are members of a subfamily of the FGFs called endocrine FGFs. FGF19 regulates the bile acid synthetic pathway. FGF19 expression is induced by farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear hormone receptor activated by bile acids in the small intestine. FGF21 plays an important role in lipolysis that occurs in white adipose tissue. FGF21 expression is stimulated by the nuclear fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in the liver. FGF19 and FGF21 were recently identified as targets of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), which is activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ATF4 is also activated by oxidative stress and amino acid deprivation. In this study, we investigated FGF19 and FGF21 expression in response to oxidative stress and amino acid deprivation. We found that FGF19 mRNA is induced by oxidative stress inducers in Caco-2 cells, which are derived from the human intestinal epithelium, and rat intestinal epithelial IEC6 cells. In contrast, ileal FGF15 expression, the rodent ortholog of human FGF19, is not increased by oxidative stress. No notable changes in expression of FGF15/19 took place under amino acid deprivation either in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, FGF21 expression is induced by oxidative stress and amino acid deprivation both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate distinctive patterns of regulation of FGF19 expression by ER stress, and FGF21 expression by ER stress, oxidative stress, and amino acid deprivation through ATF4 activation.

  5. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Department of Research, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi 110070 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  6. Alternative oxidase pathway optimizes photosynthesis during osmotic and temperature stress by regulating cellular ROS, malate valve and antioxidative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINAKAR eCHALLABATHULA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 µmoles m-2 s-1 at 25 oC under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 M to 1.0M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 oC to 10 oC to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25 OC, the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10 OC, while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Nevertheless, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, the observed changes in NaHCO3 dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(PH/NAD(P and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the

  7. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Landeras-Bueno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection.

  8. Oxidative stress-induced proteome alterations target different cellular pathways in human myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina;

    2011-01-01

    , and α-enolase were shifted to a more acidic isoelectric point upon oxidative stress, indicating posttranslational modifications. Oxidized proteins were evidenced by immunodetection of derivatized carbonyl groups followed by identification by mass spectrometry. The carbonylated proteins identified...

  9. Modelling molecular mechanisms: a framework of scientific reasoning to construct molecular-level explanations for cellular behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mil, M.H.W.; Boerwinkel, D.J.; Waarlo, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular-level details are part of the upper-secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the level of cells, organs and organisms. Recent studies suggest that students lack a framework to reason about

  10. Establishing cellular stress response profiles as biomarkers of homeodynamics, health, and hormesis

    OpenAIRE

    Demirovic, Dino; Rattan, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Aging is the progressive shrinkage of the homeodynamic space. A crucial component of the homeodynamic space is the stress response (SR), by virtue of which a living system senses disturbance and initiates a series of events for maintenance, repair, adaptation, remodeling and survival. Here we discuss the main intracellular SR pathways in human cells, and argue for the need to define and establish the immediate and delayed stress response profiles (SRP) during aging. Such SRP are required to b...

  11. OSTEOPOROSIS AND ALZHEIMER PATHOLOGY: ROLE OF CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE AND HORMETIC REDOX SIGNALING IN AGING AND BONE REMODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio eCalabrese

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD as well as osteoporosis are multifactorial progressive degenerative disorders characterized by low parenchymal density and microarchitectural deterioration of tissue. Though not referred to as one of the major complications of AD, osteoporosis and hip fracture are commonly observed in patients with AD, however, the mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generally recognized as intracellular redox signaling molecules involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include peroxidation of lipids and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. ROS formation, which is positively implicated in cellular stress response mechanisms, is a highly regulated process controlled by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways which regulate life span across species including vitagenes which are genes involved in preserving cellular homeostasis during stressful conditions. Vitagenes encode for heat shock proteins (Hsp Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin and the sirtuin protein systems. Dietary antioxidants, have recently been demonstrated to be neuroprotective through the activation of hormetic pathways, including vitagenes. The hormetic dose–response, has the potential to affect significantly the design of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials as well as strategies for optimal patient dosing in the treatment of numerous diseases. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing stress responses. Here we focus on possible signaling mechanisms involved in bone remodeling and activation of vitagenes resulting in enhanced defense against energy and stress resistance homeostasis dysruption with consequent impact on

  12. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins involved in the oxidative stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio A Cino

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1, are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5-1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response.

  13. Confocal imaging of whole vertebrate embryos reveals novel insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadel, Diana M.; Keller, Bradley B.; Sandell, Lisa L.

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has been an invaluable tool for studying cellular or sub-cellular biological processes. The study of vertebrate embryology is based largely on examination of whole embryos and organs. The application of confocal microscopy to immunostained whole mount embryos, combined with three dimensional (3D) image reconstruction technologies, opens new avenues for synthesizing molecular, cellular and anatomical analysis of vertebrate development. Optical cropping of the region of interest enables visualization of structures that are morphologically complex or obscured, and solid surface rendering of fluorescent signal facilitates understanding of 3D structures. We have applied these technologies to whole mount immunostained mouse embryos to visualize developmental morphogenesis of the mammalian inner ear and heart. Using molecular markers of neuron development and transgenic reporters of neural crest cell lineage we have examined development of inner ear neurons that originate from the otic vesicle, along with the supporting glial cells that derive from the neural crest. The image analysis reveals a previously unrecognized coordinated spatial organization between migratory neural crest cells and neurons of the cochleovestibular nerve. The images also enable visualization of early cochlear spiral nerve morphogenesis relative to the developing cochlea, demonstrating a heretofore unknown association of neural crest cells with extending peripheral neurite projections. We performed similar analysis of embryonic hearts in mouse and chick, documenting the distribution of adhesion molecules during septation of the outflow tract and remodeling of aortic arches. Surface rendering of lumen space defines the morphology in a manner similar to resin injection casting and micro-CT.

  14. Involvement of Noxa in mediating cellular ER stress responses to lytic virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Noxa is a Bcl-2 homology domain-containing pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein. Noxa mRNA and protein expression are upregulated by dsRNA or virus, and ectopic Noxa expression enhances cellular sensitivity to virus or dsRNA-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that Noxa null baby mouse kidney (BMK) cells are deficient in normal cytopathic response to lytic viruses, and that reconstitution of the knockout cells with wild type Noxa restored normal cytopathic responses. Noxa regulation by viru...

  15. Reaction of small heat-shock proteins to different kinds of cellular stress in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Golenhofen, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) in response to cellular stress is one mechanism to increase cell viability.We previously described that cultured rat hippocampal neurons express five of the 11 family members but only upregulate two of them (HspB1 and HspB5) at the protein level after heat stress. Since neurons have to cope with many other pathological conditions, we investigated in this study the expression of all five expressed sHsps on mRNA and protein level after sublethal sodium arsenite and oxidative and hyperosmotic stress. Under all three conditions, HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, and HspB8 but not HspB11 were consistently upregulated but showed differences in the time course of upregulation. The increase of sHsps always occurred earlier on mRNA level compared with protein levels. We conclude from our data that these four upregulated sHsps (HspB1, HspB5, HspB6, HspB8) act together in different proportions in the protection of neurons from various stress conditions.

  16. Assessing coral stress responses using molecular biomarkers of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M B; Vogelien, D L; Snell, T W

    2001-03-01

    We present a method for detecting rapid changes in coral gene expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level. The staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis was exposed to 1 and 10 microg/L permethrin and 25 and 50 microg/L copper for 4 h. Using differential display polymerase chain reaction (PCR), mRNA associated with each toxicant exposure were reverse transcribed into complementary DNA (cDNA) fragments that were subsequently amplified and isolated. Six differentially expressed cDNA fragments were further developed into molecular probes that were used in Northern dot blots to determine the change in transcription levels of target transcripts. Changes in mRNA abundance were quantified by densitometry of chemiluminescence of digoxigenin-labeled probes hybridizing to target mRNA transcripts. The six gene probes showed varying degrees of sensitivity to the toxicants as well as specificity between toxicants. These probes were hybridized in Southern blots to genomic DNA from A. formosa sperm, which lacks zooxanthellae, to demonstrate that the genes coding for the mRNA transcripts produced are found within the coral genome. The gene probes developed in this study provide coral biologists with a new tool for coral assessment. Gene probes are sensitive, toxicant-specific biomarkers of coral stress responses with which gene sequence information can be obtained, providing a mechanism for identifying the stressor altering the gene expression.

  17. Pummelo Protects Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiac Cell Death by Reducing Oxidative Stress, Modifying Glutathione Transferase Expression, and Preventing Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chularojmontri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus flavonoids have been shown to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD risks prominently due to their antioxidant effects. Here we investigated the protective effect of pummelo (Citrus maxima, CM fruit juice in rat cardiac H9c2 cells against doxorubicin (DOX- induced cytotoxicity. Four antioxidant compositions (ascorbic acid, hesperidin, naringin, and gallic acid were determined by HPLC. CM significantly increased cardiac cell survival from DOX toxicity as evaluated by MTT assay. Reduction of cellular oxidative stress was monitored by the formation of DCF fluorescent product and total glutathione (GSH levels. The changes in glutathione-S-transferase (GST activity and expression were determined by enzyme activity assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. Influence of CM on senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity (SA-β-gal was also determined. The mechanisms of cytoprotection involved reduction of intracellular oxidative stress, maintaining GSH availability, and enhanced GST enzyme activity and expression. DOX-induced cellular senescence was also attenuated by long-term CM treatment. Thus, CM fruit juice can be promoted as functional fruit to protect cells from oxidative cell death, enhance the phase II GSTP enzyme activity, and decrease senescence phenotype population induced by cardiotoxic agent such as DOX.

  18. Hodgkin Lymphoma in a patient with mycosis fungoides: molecular evidence for separate cellular origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidwell, R U; McLaughlin, J E; Jones, A; Whittaker, S J

    2003-04-01

    We report the case of a man with mycosis fungoides (MF), who, 11 years after diagnosis, developed Hodgkin's disease. Although MF is associated with a higher than expected prevalence of other malignancies, including Hodgkin lymphoma, analysis of cells from the skin and lymph nodes showed findings that suggest a separate cellular origin for the two diseases.

  19. Adult neurogenesis and the unfolded protein response; new cellular and molecular avenues in sleep research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Scheper, W.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Two recent publications in this journal highlight the impact of new developments for our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the consequences of sleep disturbance and sleep loss. Meerlo et al. discuss effects of sleep disturbance at the cellular level, focusing mainly on adult neurogenesis an

  20. Polyhydroxylated fullerene attenuates oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via a fortifying Nrf2-regulated cellular antioxidant defence system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye SF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Shefang Ye,1 Min Chen,1 Yuanqin Jiang,1,2 Mingliang Chen,3 Tong Zhou,1 Yange Wang,1 Zhenqing Hou,1 Lei Ren11Department of Biomaterials, Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China; 2First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China; 3Key Laboratory of Marine Biogenetic Resources, Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Polyhydroxylated derivatives of fullerene C60, named fullerenols (C60[OH]n, have stimulated great interest because of their potent antioxidant properties in various chemical and biological systems, which enable them to be used as a new promising pharmaceutical for the future treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases, but the details remain unknown. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a principal transcription factor that regulates expression of several antioxidant genes via binding to the antioxidant response element and plays a crucial role in cellular defence against oxidative stress. In this study we investigated whether activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant response element pathway contributes to the cytoprotective effects of C60(OH24. Our results showed that C60(OH24 enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and upregulated expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, NAD(PH: quinine oxidoreductase 1, and γ-glutamate cysteine ligase in A549 cells. Treatment with C60(OH24 resulted in phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinases. By using inhibitors of cellular kinases, we showed that pretreatment of A549 cells with SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, abolished nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and induction of HO-1 protein induced by C60(OH24, indicating an involvement of p38 MAPK in Nrf2/HO-1 activation by C60

  1. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mughal, Nadeem A. [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan, E-mail: s.ponnambalam@leeds.ac.uk [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  2. Just Working with the Cellular Machine: A High School Game for Teaching Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernanda Serpa; Dumpel, Renata; Gomes da Silva, Luisa B.; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; Santos, Dilvani O.; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Castro, Helena C.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology is a difficult comprehension subject due to its high complexity, thus requiring new teaching approaches. Herein, we developed an interdisciplinary board game involving the human immune system response against a bacterial infection for teaching molecular biology at high school. Initially, we created a database with several…

  3. The influence of cellular structures on flow stress of high strength components manufactured using SLM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, Rasoul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Loft Højbjerre, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing has shown significant improvement in material and machines for high-quality solid freeform fabrication processes such as selective laser melting (SLM). In particular, manufacturing lattice structures using the SLM procedure is of interest. This research examines the effect...... of cellular materials on compression strength. The specimens are manufactured additively using industrial 3D printing systems from high-strength alloy. The material has the right mechanical properties for manufacturing tool components. This includes samples with solid and lattice structures. The Compression...

  4. Negative Regulation of IRF7 Activation by ATF4 Suggests a Cross Regulation Between the Interferon Responses and the Cellular Integrated Stress Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Qiming; Deng, Hongying; Sun, Chiao-Wang; Tim M. Townes; Zhu, Fanxiu

    2010-01-01

    Cells react to viral infection by exhibiting interferon (IFN)-based innate immune responses and integrated stress responses, but little is known about the interrelationships between the two. We here report a linkage between these two host protective cellular mechanisms. We found that IRF7, the master regulator of type I IFN gene expression, interacts with ATF4, a key component of the integrated stress responses whose translation is induced by viral infection and various stresses. We have demo...

  5. Physiological, cellular and biochemical thermal stress response of intertidal shrimps with different vertical distributions: Palaemon elegans and Palaemon serratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joana; Costa, Pedro M; Larguinho, Miguel; Vinagre, Catarina; Diniz, Mário S

    2015-05-01

    The ability to cope with high temperature variations is a critical factor in intertidal communities. Two species of intertidal rocky shore shrimps (Palaemon sp.) with different vertical distributions were collected from the Portuguese coast in order to test if they were differentially sensitive to thermal stress. Three distinct levels of biological organization (organismal, biochemical, and cellular) were surveyed. The shrimp were exposed to a constant rate of temperature increase of 1°C x h(-1), starting at 20°C until reaching the CTMax (critical thermal maximum). During heat stress, two biomarkers of protein damage were quantified in the muscle via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays: heat shock proteins HSP70 (hsp70/hsc70) and total ubiquitin. Muscle histopathological alterations caused by temperature were also evaluated. CTMax values were not significantly different between the congeners (P. elegans 33.4 ± 0.5 °C; P. serratus 33.0 ± 0.5 °C). Biomarker levels did not increase along the temperature trial, but P. elegans (higher intertidal) showed higher amounts of HSP70 and total ubiquitin than P. serratus (lower intertidal). HSP70 and total ubiquitin levels showed a positive significant correlation in both species, suggesting that their association is important in thermal tolerance. Histopathological observations of muscle tissue in P. serratus showed no gross alterations due to temperature but did show localized atrophy of muscle fibers at CTMax. In P. elegans, alterations occurred at a larger scale, showing multiple foci of atrophic muscular fascicles caused by necrotic or autolytic processes. In conclusion, Palaemon congeners displayed different responses to stress at a cellular level, with P. elegans having greater biomarker levels and histopathological alterations.

  6. Task Group 7B: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging: The Roles of Nature, Nurture and Chance in the Maintenance of Human Healthspan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Arya, Suresh; Grant, Christine; Miller, Linda; Ono, Santa Jeremy; Patil, Chris; Shay, Jerry; Topol, Eric; Torry, Michael; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tse, Iris; Lin, Su-Ju; Miller, Richard

    2007-11-14

    The degree to which an individual organism maintains healthspan and lifespan is a function of complex interactions between genetic inheritance ('nature'), environment, including cultural inheritance (nurture) and stochastic events ('luck' or 'chance'). This task group will focus upon the role of chance because it is so poorly understood and because it appears to be of major importance in the determination of individual variations in healthspan and lifespan within species. The major factor determining variations in healthspan and lifespan between species is genetic inheritance. Broader aspects of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological aging will also be considered, given their importance for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of successful aging. The task force will consider the cellular and molecular basis for nature, nurture and chance in healthspan and life span determination. On the basis of comparisons between identical and non-identical twins, geneticists have estimated that genes control no more than about a quarter of the inter-individual differences in lifespan (Herskind 1996). Twin studies of very old individuals, however, show substantially greater genetic contributions to Healthspan (McClearn 2004; Reed 2003). The environment clearly plays an important role in the length and the quality of life. Tobacco smoke, for example has the potential to impact upon multiple body systems in ways that appear to accelerate the rates at which those systems age (Bernhard 2007). To document the role of chance events on aging, one must rigorously control both the genetic composition of an organism and its environment. This has been done to a remarkable degree in a species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans (Vanfleteren 1998). The results confirm hundreds of previous studies with a wide range of species, especially those with inbred rodents housed under apparently identical but less well controlled environments. One

  7. Taurine Boosts Cellular Uptake of Small d-Peptides for Enzyme-Instructed Intracellular Molecular Self-Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Li, Jie; Yamagata, Natsuko; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Due to their biostability, d-peptides are emerging as an important molecular platform for biomedical applications. Being proteolytically resistant, d-peptides lack interactions with endogenous transporters and hardly enter cells. Here we show that taurine, a natural amino acid, drastically boosts the cellular uptake of small d-peptides in mammalian cells by >10-fold, from 118 μM (without conjugating taurine) to >1.6 mM (after conjugating taurine). The uptake of a large amount of the ester con...

  8. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-01-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-bindin...

  9. A study on the cellular structure during stress solicitation induced by BioMEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fior, Raffaella; Maggiolino, Stefano; Codan, Barbara; Lazzarino, Marco; Sbaizero, Orfeo

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of single cells is a topic in continuous evolution. The complexity of the cellular matrix, the huge variety of cells, the interaction of one cell with the other are all factors that must be taken into consideration in the study of the cellular structure and mechanics. In this project, we developed different types of bioMEMS for cell's stretching, both transparent devices based on silicon nitride and non-transparent silicon based. While the use of silicon devices is limited to reflection microscopes, transparent bioMEMS can be used with transmission and reflection microscopes but can also be easily coupled with other tools such as patch clamp analyzers or atomic force microscope. This improvement will open brand new possibilities in the biological investigation field. We used these two BioMEMS to stretch a single cell in a controlled way and, as a first investigation, we focused on its morphology. We noticed that during a controlled stretch, cells react to the applied deformation. A hysteretic behavior on the ratio between area and perimeter has been highlighted.

  10. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Washington, Mary K; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zaika, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    p53, p63, and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family rather than p53 alone.

  11. Organizing the Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer by Mass Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank Drs Scott Tanner, Olga Ornatsky, Dmitry Bandura , Mitch Winnik and Mark Nitz for their critical reading of this...Quality assurance for polychromatic flow cytometry using a suite of calibration beads. Nat Protoc 2012, 7:2067-2079. 23. Baranov VI, Quinn Z, Bandura ... Bandura DR, Tanner SD, Dick J: Multiple cellular antigen detection by ICP-MS. J Immunol Methods 2006, 308:68-76. 25. Ornatsky OI, Kinach R, Bandura DR

  12. Mechanisms and Regulation of Intestinal Absorption of Water-soluble Vitamins: Cellular and Molecular Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Said, Hamid M

    2012-01-01

    The water-soluble vitamins represent a group of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds that share the common feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth, and development. With the exception of some endogenous production of niacin, human cells cannot synthesize...... or deficiency. An impaired absorptive function occurs in a variety of conditions including congenital defects in the digestive or absorptive processes, intestinal diseases, drug interaction, and chronic alcohol use....

  13. Establishing cellular stress response profiles as biomarkers of homeodynamics, health, and hormesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirovic, Dino; Rattan, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Aging is the progressive shrinkage of the homeodynamic space. A crucial component of the homeodynamic space is the stress response (SR), by virtue of which a living system senses disturbance and initiates a series of events for maintenance, repair, adaptation, remodeling and survival. Here we...... and the health status of cells and organisms. SRP can also be useful for testing potential protectors and stimulators of homeodynamics, and can be a standard for monitoring the efficacy of potential pro-survival, health-promoting and aging-modulating conditions, food components and other compounds. An effective...... strategy, which makes use of SRP for achieving healthy aging and extending the healthspan, is that of strengthening the homeodynamics through repeated mild stress-induced hormesis by physical, biological and nutritional hormetins. Furthermore, SRP can also be the basis for defining health as a state...

  14. Oma1 Links Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control and TOR Signaling To Modulate Physiological Plasticity and Cellular Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohovych, Iryna; Kastora, Stavroula; Christianson, Sara; Topil, Danelle; Kim, Heejeong; Fangman, Teresa; Zhou, You J; Barrientos, Antoni; Lee, Jaekwon; Brown, Alistair J P; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2016-09-01

    A network of conserved proteases known as the intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) system is central to mitochondrial protein homeostasis and cellular health. IMQC proteases also appear to participate in establishment of signaling cues for mitochondrion-to-nucleus communication. However, little is known about this process. Here, we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of the membrane-bound IMQC protease Oma1 interferes with oxidative-stress responses through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during logarithmic growth and reduced stress signaling via the TORC1-Rim15-Msn2/Msn4 axis. Pharmacological or genetic prevention of ROS accumulation in Oma1-deficient cells restores this defective TOR signaling. Additionally, inactivation of the Oma1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans also alters TOR signaling and, unexpectedly, leads to increased resistance to neutrophil killing and virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella Our findings reveal a novel and evolutionarily conserved link between IMQC and TOR-mediated signaling that regulates physiological plasticity and pancellular oxidative-stress responses.

  15. Cellular stress reactions assessed by gender and species in spiders from areas variously polluted with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, Grazyna; Babczyńska, Agnieszka; Wilczek, Piotr; Dolezych, Bogdan; Migula, Paweł; Młyńska, Hanna

    2008-05-01

    In the funnel web spider Agelena labyrinthica (Agelenidae; A. l.), sheet web spider Linyphia triangularis (Linyphiidae; L. t.) and wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae; X. n.) from two differently polluted meadow sites in southern Poland, we studied the relations between antioxidant parameters (glutathione, GSH; glutathione peroxidases, GPOX, GSTPx; catalase, CAT; stress proteins-Hsp70, metallothioneins Mts), the intensity of apoptosis and necrosis, and heavy metal burdens of the midgut gland. Cellular reactions against stress caused by pollutants seemed to be sex-dependent. The concentrations of Zn and Cu in the midgut glands of male A. l. and X. n. were more than double that of the females, from both study sites. In male spiders from the heavily polluted site, both negative correlations (activity of caspase-3-like proteins vs Cu, Zn concentration; number of depolarized mitochondria vs Cu concentration) and positive correlations (number of necrotic cells vs Cu concentrations; activity of CAT vs Zn ) were noted. The defense of males against high metal content and its prooxidative effects is based mainly on GSH and CAT. In females the antioxidative reactions are species-specific and depend mainly on high peroxidase activity and on stress protein level. The increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the midgut gland of female spiders from the heavily polluted site suggests the defensive role of this process in maintaining the proper functioning of this organ.

  16. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Barik, Sailen [Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, College of Science, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shevde, Lalita A. [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Samant, Rajeev S., E-mail: rsamant@usouthal.edu [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States)

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  17. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik-Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-01-01

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington’s, Parkinson’s diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S). PMID:22504047

  18. Molecular Mechanistic Reasoning: Toward Bridging the Gap between the Molecular and Cellular Levels in Life Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mil, Marc H. W.; Postma, Paulien A.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Klaassen, Kees; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2016-01-01

    Although learning about DNA, RNA, and proteins is part of the upper secondary biology curriculum in most countries, many studies report that students fail to connect molecular knowledge to phenomena at the higher level of cells, organs, and organisms. As a result, many students use memorization and rote learning as a coping strategy when presented…

  19. The OsCYP19-4 Gene Is Expressed as Multiple Alternatively Spliced Transcripts Encoding Isoforms with Distinct Cellular Localizations and PPIase Activities under Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areum Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is an important molecular mechanism by which single genes can generate multiple mRNA isoforms. We reported previously that, in Oryza sativa, the cyclophilin 19-4 (OsCYP19-4.1 transcript was significantly upregulated in response to cold stress, and that transgenic plants were cold tolerant. Here we show that, under cold stress, OsCYP19-4 produces eight transcript variants by intron retention and exon skipping, resulting in production of four distinct protein isoforms. The OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms exhibited different cellular localizations in the epidermal cells: in contrast to OsCYP19-4.1, the OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3 proteins were primarily targeted to guard and subsidiary cells, whereas OsCYP19-4.5, which consists largely of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER targeting signal, was co-localized with the RFP-BiP marker in the ER. In OsCYP19-4.2, the key residues of the PPIase domain are altered; consistent with this, recombinant OsCYP19-4.2 had significantly lower PPIase activity than OsCYP19-4.1 in vitro. Specific protein-protein interactions between OsCYP19-4.2/3 and AtRCN1 were verified in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H and bimolecular fluoresence complementation (BiFC assays, although the OsCYP19-4 isoforms could not bind each other. Based on these results, we propose that two OsCYP19-4 AS isoforms, OsCYP19-4.2 and OsCYP19-4.3, play roles linking auxin transport and cold stress via interactions with RCN1.

  20. Oxidative stress suppresses the cellular bioenergetic effect of the 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase/hydrogen sulfide pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Módis, Katalin [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Asimakopoulou, Antonia [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Coletta, Ciro [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Papapetropoulos, Andreas [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States); Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Szabo, Csaba, E-mail: szabocsaba@aol.com [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch and Shriners Burns Hospital for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Oxidative stress impairs 3-MST-derived H{sub 2}S production in isolated enzyme and in isolated mitochondria. •This impairs the stimulatory bioenergetic effects of H{sub 2}S in hepatocytes. •This has implications for the pathophysiology of diseases with oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Recent data show that lower concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), as well as endogenous, intramitochondrial production of H{sub 2}S by the 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP)/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) pathway serves as an electron donor and inorganic source of energy to support mitochondrial electron transport and ATP generation in mammalian cells by donating electrons to Complex II. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress on the activity of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, 100–500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of recombinant mouse 3-MST enzyme. In mitochondria isolated from murine hepatoma cells, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50–500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in production of H{sub 2}S from 3-MP. In cultured murine hepatoma cells H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (3–100 μM), did not result in overall cytotoxicity, but caused a partial decrease in basal oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve rapacity. The positive bioenergetic effect of 3-MP (100–300 nM) was completely abolished by pre-treatment of the cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 μM). The current findings demonstrate that oxidative stress inhibits 3-MST activity and interferes with the positive bioenergetic role of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of various conditions associated with increased oxidative stress, such as various forms of critical illness, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or physiological aging.

  1. Identification of microRNAs dysregulated in cellular senescence driven by endogenous genotoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidadavolu, Lolita S.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2013-01-01

    XFE progeroid syndrome, a disease of accelerated aging caused by deficiency in the DNA repair endonuclease XPF-ERCC1, is modeled by Ercc1 knockout and hypomorphic mice. Tissues and primary cells from these mice senesce prematurely, offering a unique opportunity to identify factors that regulate senescence and aging. We compared microRNA (miRNA) expression in Ercc1−/− primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and wild-type (WT) MEFs in different growth conditions to identify miRNAs that drive cellular senescence. Microarray analysis showed three differentially expressed miRNAs in passage 7 (P7) Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 20% O2 compared to Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 3% O2. Thirty-six differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in Ercc1−/− MEFs at P7 compared to early passage (P3) in 3% O2. Eight of these miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455*, miR-128, miR-497, miR-543, miR-450b-3p, miR-872 and miR-10b) were similarly downregulated in the liver of progeroid Ercc1−/Δ and old WT mice compared to adult WT mice, a tissue that senesces with aging. Three miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455* and miR-128) were also downregulated in Ercc1−/Δ and WT old mice kidneys compared to young WT mice. We also discovered that the miRNA expression regulator Dicer is significantly downregulated in tissues of old mice and late passage cells compared to young controls. Collectively these results support the conclusion that the miRNAs identified may play an important role in staving off cellular senescence and their altered expression could be indicative of aging. PMID:23852002

  2. Redox regulation of human OGG1 activity in response to cellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravard, Anne; Vacher, Monique; Gouget, Barbara; Coutant, Alexandre; de Boisferon, Florence Hillairet; Marsin, Stéphanie; Chevillard, Sylvie; Radicella, J Pablo

    2006-10-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common and mutagenic form of oxidized guanine in DNA, is eliminated mainly through base excision repair. In human cells its repair is initiated by human OGG1 (hOGG1), an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase. We investigated the effects of an acute cadmium exposure of human lymphoblastoid cells on the activity of hOGG1. We show that coinciding with alteration of the redox cellular status, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of hOGG1 was nearly completely inhibited. However, the hOGG1 activity returned to normal levels once the redox cellular status was normalized. In vitro, the activity of purified hOGG1 was abolished by cadmium and could not be recovered by EDTA. In cells, however, the reversible inactivation of OGG1 activity by cadmium was strictly associated with reversible oxidation of the protein. Moreover, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of purified OGG1 and that from crude extracts were modulated by cysteine-modifying agents. Oxidation of OGG1 by the thiol oxidant diamide led to inhibition of the activity and a protein migration pattern similar to that seen in cadmium-treated cells. These results suggest that cadmium inhibits hOGG1 activity mainly by indirect oxidation of critical cysteine residues and that excretion of the metal from the cells leads to normalization of the redox cell status and restoration of an active hOGG1. The results presented here unveil a novel redox-dependent mechanism for the regulation of OGG1 activity.

  3. Futile attempts to differentiate provide molecular evidence for individual differences within a population of cells during cellular reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Tesmer, Jens; Souquet, Manfred; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2012-04-01

    The heterogeneity of cell populations and the influence of stochastic noise might be important issues for the molecular analysis of cellular reprogramming at the system level. Here, we show that in Physarum polycephalum, the expression patterns of marker genes correlate with the fate decision of individual multinucleate plasmodial cells that had been exposed to a differentiation-inducing photostimulus. For several hours after stimulation, the expression kinetics of PI-3-kinase, piwi, and pumilio orthologs and other marker genes were qualitatively similar in all stimulated cells but quantitatively different in those cells that subsequently maintained their proliferative potential and failed to differentiate accordingly. The results suggest that the population of nuclei in an individual plasmodium behaves synchronously in terms of gene regulation to an extent that the plasmodium provides a source for macroscopic amounts of homogeneous single-cell material for analysing the dynamic processes of cellular reprogramming. Based on the experimental findings, we predict that circuits with switch-like behaviour that control the cell fate decision of a multinucleate plasmodium operate through continuous changes in the concentration of cellular regulators because the nuclear population suspended in a large cytoplasmic volume damps stochastic noise.

  4. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-08-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-binding activity. No hybridization was detected in RNA extracted from ovary, spleen, kidney, or liver, which contain relatively low levels of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein activity. Analysis of genomic clones isolated from an EcoRI bovine genomic library demonstrated that the bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein gene is composed of four exons and three introns. Two putative promoter sequences were identified in the cloned 5' sequence of the gene.

  5. Taurine Boosts Cellular Uptake of Small D-Peptides for Enzyme-Instructed Intracellular Molecular Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Li, Jie; Yamagata, Natsuko; Xu, Bing

    2015-08-19

    Due to their biostability, D-peptides are emerging as an important molecular platform for biomedical applications. Being proteolytically resistant, D-peptides lack interactions with endogenous transporters and hardly enter cells. Here we show that taurine, a natural amino acid, drastically boosts the cellular uptake of small D-peptides in mammalian cells by >10-fold, from 118 μM (without conjugating taurine) to >1.6 mM (after conjugating taurine). The uptake of a large amount of the ester conjugate of taurine and D-peptide allows intracellular esterase to trigger intracellular self-assembly of the D-peptide derivative, further enhancing their cellular accumulation. The study on the mechanism of the uptake reveals that the conjugates enter cells via both dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis, but likely not relying on taurine transporters. Differing fundamentally from the positively charged cell-penetrating peptides, the biocompatibility, stability, and simplicity of the enzyme-cleavable taurine motif promise new ways to promote the uptake of bioactive molecules for countering the action of efflux pump and contributing to intracellular molecular self-assembly.

  6. Annexin A2: Its Molecular Regulation and Cellular Expression in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Annexin A2 (ANXA2 orchestrates multiple biologic processes and clinical associations, especially in cancer progression. The structure of ANXA2 affects its cellular localization and function. However, posttranslational modification and protease-mediated N-terminal cleavage also play critical roles in regulating ANXA2. ANXA2 expression levels vary among different types of cancers. With some cancers, ANXA2 can be used for the detection and diagnosis of cancer and for monitoring cancer progression. ANXA2 is also required for drug-resistance. This review discusses the feasibility of ANXA2 which is active in cancer development and can be a therapeutic target in cancer management.

  7. Molecular targets of omega 3 and conjugated linoleic fatty acids – micromanaging cellular response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eVisioli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized de novo by mammals and need to be ingested either with the diet or through the use of supplements/functional foods to ameliorate cardiovascular prognosis. This review focus on the molecular targets of omega 3 fatty acids and CLA, as paradigmatic molecules that can be explored both as nutrients and as pharmacological agents, especially as related to cardioprotection. In addition, we indicate novel molecular targets, namely microRNAs that might contribute to the observed biological activities of such essential fatty acids.

  8. Changing cellular location of CheZ predicted by molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Lipkow

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In the chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Escherichia coli, signals are carried from a cluster of receptors to the flagellar motors by the diffusion of the protein CheY-phosphate (CheYp through the cytoplasm. A second protein, CheZ, which promotes dephosphorylation of CheYp, partially colocalizes with receptors in the plasma membrane. CheZ is normally dimeric in solution but has been suggested to associate into highly active oligomers in the presence of CheYp. A model is presented here and supported by Brownian dynamics simulations, which accounts for these and other experimental data: A minority component of the receptor cluster (dimers of CheA(short nucleates CheZ oligomerization and CheZ molecules move from the cytoplasm to a bound state at the receptor cluster depending on the current level of cellular stimulation. The corresponding simulations suggest that dynamic CheZ localization will sharpen cellular responses to chemoeffectors, increase the range of detectable ligand concentrations, and make adaptation more precise and robust. The localization and activation of CheZ constitute a negative feedback loop that provides a second tier of adaptation to the system. Subtle adjustments of this kind are likely to be found in many other signaling pathways.

  9. Molecular targets in cellular response to ionizing radiation and implications in space radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M.; Tabocchini, M.A. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy). Physics Lab.; Sapora, O. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy). Comparative Toxicology Lab.

    2002-12-01

    DNA repair systems and cell cycle checkpoints closely co-operate in the attempt of maintaining the genomic integrity of cells damaged by ionizing radiation. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered as the most biologically important radiation-induced damage. Their spatial distribution and association with other types of damage depend on radiation quality. It is believed these features affect damage reparability, thus explaining the higher efficiency for cellular effects of densely ionizing radiation with respect to {gamma}-rays. DSB repair systems identified in mammalian cells are homologous recombination (HR), single-strand annealing (SSA) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Some enzymes may participate in more than one of these repair systems. DNA damage also triggers biochemical signals activating checkpoints responsible for delay in cell cycle progression that allows more time for repair. Those at G1/S and S phases prevent replication of damaged DNA and those at G2/M phase prevent segregation of changed chromosomes. Individuals with lack or alterations of genes involved in DNA DSB repair and cell cycle checkpoints exhibit syndromes characterized by genome instability and predisposition to cancer. Information reviewed in this paper on the basic mechanisms of cellular response to ionizing radiation indicates their importance for a number of issues relevant to protection of astronauts from space radiation. (author)

  10. Differential Cellular and Molecular Effects of Butyrate and Trichostatin A on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasturi Ranganna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, butyrate and trichostatin A (TSA, are epigenetic histone modifiers and proliferation inhibitors by downregulating cyclin D1, a positive cell cycle regulator, and upregulating p21Cip1 and INK family of proteins, negative cell cycle regulators. Our recent study indicated cyclin D1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC that are proliferation-arrested by butyrate. Here we investigate whether cyclin D1 upregulation is a unique response of VSMC to butyrate or a general response to HDAC inhibitors (HDACi by evaluating the effects of butyrate and TSA on VSMC. While butyrate and TSA inhibit VSMC proliferation via cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, respectively, they downregulate cdk4, cdk6, and cdk2, and upregulate cyclin D3, p21Cip1 and p15INK4B, and cause similar effects on key histone H3 posttranslational modifications. Conversely, cyclin D1 is upregulated by butyrate and inhibited by TSA. Assessment of glycogen synthase 3-dependent phosphorylation, subcellular localization and transcription of cyclin D1 indicates that differential effects of butyrate and TSA on cyclin D1 levels are linked to disparity in cyclin D1 gene expression. Disparity in butyrate- and TSA-induced cyclin D1 may influence transcriptional regulation of genes that are associated with changes in cellular morphology/cellular effects that these HDACi confer on VSMC, as a transcriptional modulator.

  11. Differential Modulation of Cellular Bioenergetics by Poly(L-lysine)s of Different Molecular Weights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Wu, Lin-Ping; Parhamifar, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Poly(L-lysine)s (PLLs), and related derivatives, have received considerable attention as nonviral vectors. High molecular weight PLLs (H-PLLs) are superior transfectants compared with low Mw PLLs (L-PLLs), but suggested to be more cytotoxic. Through a pan-integrated metabolomic approach using Sea...

  12. Characterization of Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad;

    2016-01-01

    and osteoblast differentiation genes which included several homeobox genes: TBX15, HOXA2 and HOXA10, and IGF1, FGFR3, BMP6, MCAM, ITGA10, IGFBP5, and ALP. siRNA-based downregulation of the ALP gene in CL1 impaired osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. Our studies demonstrate the existence of molecular...

  13. Mst1-FoxO signaling protects Naive T lymphocytes from cellular oxidative stress in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ste-20 family kinase Hippo restricts cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis for proper organ development in Drosophila. In C. elegans, Hippo homolog also regulates longevity. The mammalian Ste20-like protein kinase, Mst1, plays a role in apoptosis induced by various types of apoptotic stress. Mst1 also regulates peripheral naïve T cell trafficking and proliferation in mice. However, its functions in mammals are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that the Mst1-FoxO signaling pathway plays a crucial role in survival, but not apoptosis, of naïve T cells. In Mst1(-/- mice, peripheral T cells showed impaired FoxO1/3 activation and decreased FoxO protein levels. Consistently, the FoxO targets, Sod2 and catalase, were significantly down-regulated in Mst1(-/- T cells, thereby resulting in elevated levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and induction of apoptosis. Expression of constitutively active FoxO3a restored Mst1(-/- T cell survival. Crossing Mst1 transgenic mice (Mst1 Tg with Mst1(-/- mice reduced ROS levels and restored normal numbers of peripheral naïve T cells in Mst1 Tg;Mst1(-/- progeny. Interestingly, peripheral T cells from Mst1(-/- mice were hypersensitive to gamma-irradiation and paraquat-induced oxidative stresses, whereas those from Mst1 Tg mice were resistant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data support the hypothesis that tolerance to increased levels of intracellular ROS provided by the Mst1-FoxOs signaling pathway is crucial for the maintenance of naïve T cell homeostasis in the periphery.

  14. Effects of lead exposure on placental cellular apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yunying; Hu Haiyan; Li Hong; Ma Haiyan; Xu Fengsen; Qu Baoming

    2014-01-01

    Background Lead exposure during pregnancy contributes to fetal abortion and/or teratogenesis.Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) apoptosis can be induced by various pathological conditions when ER function is disturbed.However,it is unclear whether ER stress and apoptosis play a role in the etiology of lead-exposed disease status.We aimed to investigate whether lead induced placental apoptosis and subsequent toxicity is initiated by ER apoptosis via caspase-12.Methods Sixty-three female Wistar rats were exposed to lead in drinking water during various gestational periods.Blood lead level was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.Placental cytoplasmic organelles were examined by electronic microscopy.Placental caspase-12 mRNA expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR.TUNEL assay was used to determine the placental apoptosis.Results Lead exposure significant induced ER apoptosis compared to that of the controls (P <0.05),accompanied with increased caspase-12 mRNA expression.Significant differences of caspase-12 mRNA expression levels were observed among the four groups (F=13.78,P <0.05).Apoptotic index (AI) was significantly increased in experimental groups compared to that of the controls (F=96.15,P <0.05).In lead-exposed groups,trophoblast cells underwent degeneration and fibrin deposition; Mitochondria were swollen and decreased in number; ER swelling,expansion,and vacuolization were observed.Conclusion Lead exposure contributes to placental apoptosis,as well as increased caspase-12 mRNA expression,which in turn promoted ER stress.

  15. Glutamate Dehydrogenase Is Required by Mycobacterium bovis BCG for Resistance to Cellular Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Gallant

    Full Text Available We recently reported on our success to generate deletion mutants of the genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT in M. bovis BCG, despite their in vitro essentiality in M. tuberculosis. We could use these mutants to delineate the roles of GDH and GOGAT in mycobacterial nitrogen metabolism by using M. bovis BCG as a model for M. tuberculosis specifically. Here, we extended our investigation towards the involvement of GDH and GOGAT in other aspects of M. bovis BCG physiology, including the use of glutamate as a carbon source and resistance to known phagosomal stresses, as well as in survival inside macrophages. We find that gdh is indispensable for the utilization of glutamate as a major carbon source, in low pH environments and when challenged with nitric oxide. On the other hand, the gltBD mutant had increased viability under low pH conditions and was unaffected by a challenge with nitric oxide. Strikingly, GDH was required to sustain M. bovis BCG during infection of both murine RAW 264.7 and bone-marrow derived and macrophages, while GOGAT was not. We conclude that the catabolism of glutamate in slow growing mycobacteria may be a crucial function during infection of macrophage cells and demonstrate a novel requirement for M. bovis BCG GDH in the protection against acidic and nitrosative stress. These results provide strong clues on the role of GDH in intracellular survival of M. tuberculosis, in which the essentiality of the gdh gene complicates knock out studies making the study of the role of this enzyme in pathogenesis difficult.

  16. Neocortex and allocortex respond differentially to cellular stress in vitro and aging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posimo, Jessica M; Titler, Amanda M; Choi, Hailey J H; Unnithan, Ajay S; Leak, Rehana K

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, the allocortex accumulates aggregated proteins such as synuclein and tau well before neocortex. We present a new high-throughput model of this topographic difference by microdissecting neocortex and allocortex from the postnatal rat and treating them in parallel fashion with toxins. Allocortical cultures were more vulnerable to low concentrations of the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and PSI but not the oxidative poison H2O2. The proteasome appeared to be more impaired in allocortex because MG132 raised ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and lowered proteasome activity in allocortex more than neocortex. Allocortex cultures were more vulnerable to MG132 despite greater MG132-induced rises in heat shock protein 70, heme oxygenase 1, and catalase. Proteasome subunits PA700 and PA28 were also higher in allocortex cultures, suggesting compensatory adaptations to greater proteasome impairment. Glutathione and ceruloplasmin were not robustly MG132-responsive and were basally higher in neocortical cultures. Notably, neocortex cultures became as vulnerable to MG132 as allocortex when glutathione synthesis or autophagic defenses were inhibited. Conversely, the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine rendered allocortex resilient to MG132. Glutathione and ceruloplasmin levels were then examined in vivo as a function of age because aging is a natural model of proteasome inhibition and oxidative stress. Allocortical glutathione levels rose linearly with age but were similar to neocortex in whole tissue lysates. In contrast, ceruloplasmin levels were strikingly higher in neocortex at all ages and rose linearly until middle age. PA28 levels rose with age and were higher in allocortex in vivo, also paralleling in vitro data. These neo- and allocortical differences have implications for the many studies that treat the telencephalic mantle as a single unit. Our observations suggest that the topographic progression of protein aggregations through the

  17. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  18. Pathogens penetrating the central nervous system: infection pathways and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Norton, Robert; Currie, Bart J; St John, James A; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Batzloff, Michael; Ulett, Glen C; Beacham, Ifor R

    2014-10-01

    The brain is well protected against microbial invasion by cellular barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). In addition, cells within the central nervous system (CNS) are capable of producing an immune response against invading pathogens. Nonetheless, a range of pathogenic microbes make their way to the CNS, and the resulting infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Bacteria, amoebae, fungi, and viruses are capable of CNS invasion, with the latter using axonal transport as a common route of infection. In this review, we compare the mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens reach the CNS and infect the brain. In particular, we focus on recent data regarding mechanisms of bacterial translocation from the nasal mucosa to the brain, which represents a little explored pathway of bacterial invasion but has been proposed as being particularly important in explaining how infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in melioidosis encephalomyelitis.

  19. Androgens and skeletal muscle: cellular and molecular action mechanisms underlying the anabolic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2012-05-01

    Androgens increase both the size and strength of skeletal muscle via diverse mechanisms. The aim of this review is to discuss the different cellular targets of androgens in skeletal muscle as well as the respective androgen actions in these cells leading to changes in proliferation, myogenic differentiation, and protein metabolism. Androgens bind and activate a specific nuclear receptor which will directly affect the transcription of target genes. These genes encode muscle-specific transcription factors, enzymes, structural proteins, as well as microRNAs. In addition, anabolic action of androgens is partly established through crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as Akt, myostatin, IGF-I, and Notch. Finally, androgens may also exert non-genomic effects in muscle by increasing Ca(2+) uptake and modulating kinase activities. In conclusion, the anabolic effect of androgens on skeletal muscle is not only explained by activation of the myocyte androgen receptor but is also the combined result of many genomic and non-genomic actions.

  20. Functional Proteomics Defines the Molecular Switch Underlying FGF Receptor Trafficking and Cellular Outputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francavilla, Chiara; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T.G.; Emdal, Kristina B

    2013-01-01

    The stimulation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with distinct FGF ligands generates specific cellular responses. However, the mechanisms underlying this paradigm have remained elusive. Here, we show that FGF-7 stimulation leads to FGFR2b degradation and, ultimately, cell proliferation......, whereas FGF-10 promotes receptor recycling and cell migration. By combining mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics with fluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods, we find that FGF-10 specifically induces the rapid phosphorylation of tyrosine (Y) 734 on FGFR2b, which leads to PI3K and SH3BP4...... recruitment. This complex is crucial for FGFR2b recycling and responses, given that FGF-10 stimulation of either FGFR2b_Y734F mutant- or SH3BP4-depleted cells switches the receptor endocytic route to degradation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell migration and the inhibition of epithelial branching...

  1. Molecular, Cellular and Clinical Aspects of Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Are the Enemies Within?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righy, Cássia; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Bozza, Fernando A.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a disease with high incidence and mortality rates. In addition to the mass lesions that result from hemorrhagic stroke, substances such as the blood-derived products (BDP) (hemoglobin (Hb), heme and iron) induce a potent inflammatory response and exert direct toxic effects on neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms of brain injury secondary to hemorrhagic stroke, focusing on the involvement of BDP as major players of cellular redox imbalance, inflammation, and glutamate excitotoxicity. Potential natural mechanisms of protection against free Hb and heme such as haptoglobin and hemopexin, respectively, are highlighted. We finally discuss the experimental and clinical trials targeting free iron and heme scavenging as well as inflammation, as potential new therapies to minimize the devastating effects of hemorrhagic stroke on brain structure and function. PMID:26714583

  2. Molecular and cellular insights into a distinct myopathy of Great Dane dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kin-Chow; McCulloch, Maj-Lis C; Anderson, Thomas James

    2010-03-01

    A myopathy in the Great Dane dog with characteristic pathological and molecular features is reported. Young adults present with progressive weakness and generalised muscle atrophy. To better define this condition, an investigation using histopathology, confocal microscopy, biochemistry and microarray analysis was undertaken. The skeletal muscles of affected dogs exhibited increased oxidative fibre phenotype and core fibre lesions characterised by the disruption of the sarcomeric architecture and the accumulation of mitochondrial organelles. Affected muscles displayed co-ordinated expression of genes consistent with a slow-oxidative phenotype, which was possibly a compensatory response to chronic muscle damage. There was disruption of Z-lines in affected muscles which, at the molecular level, manifested as transcriptional dysregulation of several Z-line associated genes, including alpha-actinin, myotilin, desmin, vimentin and telethonin. The pathology of this canine myopathy is distinct from that of human central core myopathies that are characterised by cores devoid of mitochondria and by the presence of myofibrillar breakdown products.

  3. Collective effects in intra-cellular molecular motor transport: coordination, cooperation and competetion

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, D

    2006-01-01

    Molecular motors do not work in isolation {\\it in-vivo}. We highlight some of the coordinations, cooperations and competitions that determine the collective properties of molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. In the context of traffic-like movement of motors on a track, we emphasize the importance of single-motor bio-chemical cycle and enzymatic activity on their collective spatio-temporal organisation. Our modelling strategy is based on a synthesis- the same model describes the single-motor mechano-chemistry at sufficiently low densities whereas at higher densities it accounts for the collective flow properties and the density profiles of the motors. We consider two specific examples, namely, traffic of single-headed kinesin motors KIF1A on a microtubule track and ribosome traffic on a messenger RNA track.

  4. Cellular and molecular aspects of the anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Large, Martin

    2015-01-01

    For decades an anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of low-dose X-irradiation (LD-RT) has clinically been well established in the treatment of a plethora of benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders with empirically identified single doses < 1 Gy to be most effective. Although considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of immune modulatory effects of ionising radiation, especially in the low-dose range, the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently not fully r...

  5. Awakened by cellular stress: isolation and characterization of a novel population of pluripotent stem cells derived from human adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Heneidi

    Full Text Available Advances in stem cell therapy face major clinical limitations, particularly challenged by low rates of post-transplant cell survival. Hostile host factors of the engraftment microenvironment such as hypoxia, nutrition deprivation, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and reactive oxygen species can each contribute to unwanted differentiation or apoptosis. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new population of adipose tissue (AT derived pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress-Enduring (Muse Cells, which are isolated using severe cellular stress conditions, including long-term exposure to the proteolytic enzyme collagenase, serum deprivation, low temperatures and hypoxia. Under these conditions, a highly purified population of Muse-AT cells is isolated without the utilization of cell sorting methods. Muse-AT cells grow in suspension as cell spheres reminiscent of embryonic stem cell clusters. Muse-AT cells are positive for the pluripotency markers SSEA3, TR-1-60, Oct3/4, Nanog and Sox2, and can spontaneously differentiate into mesenchymal, endodermal and ectodermal cell lineages with an efficiency of 23%, 20% and 22%, respectively. When using specific differentiation media, differentiation efficiency is greatly enhanced in Muse-AT cells (82% for mesenchymal, 75% for endodermal and 78% for ectodermal. When compared to adipose stem cells (ASCs, microarray data indicate a substantial up-regulation of Sox2, Oct3/4, and Rex1. Muse-ATs also exhibit gene expression patterns associated with the down-regulation of genes involved in cell death and survival, embryonic development, DNA replication and repair, cell cycle and potential factors related to oncogenecity. Gene expression analysis indicates that Muse-ATs and ASCs are mesenchymal in origin; however, Muse-ATs also express numerous lymphocytic and hematopoietic genes, such as CCR1 and CXCL2, encoding chemokine receptors and ligands involved in stem cell

  6. Awakened by cellular stress: isolation and characterization of a novel population of pluripotent stem cells derived from human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneidi, Saleh; Simerman, Ariel A; Keller, Erica; Singh, Prapti; Li, Xinmin; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Advances in stem cell therapy face major clinical limitations, particularly challenged by low rates of post-transplant cell survival. Hostile host factors of the engraftment microenvironment such as hypoxia, nutrition deprivation, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and reactive oxygen species can each contribute to unwanted differentiation or apoptosis. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new population of adipose tissue (AT) derived pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress-Enduring (Muse) Cells, which are isolated using severe cellular stress conditions, including long-term exposure to the proteolytic enzyme collagenase, serum deprivation, low temperatures and hypoxia. Under these conditions, a highly purified population of Muse-AT cells is isolated without the utilization of cell sorting methods. Muse-AT cells grow in suspension as cell spheres reminiscent of embryonic stem cell clusters. Muse-AT cells are positive for the pluripotency markers SSEA3, TR-1-60, Oct3/4, Nanog and Sox2, and can spontaneously differentiate into mesenchymal, endodermal and ectodermal cell lineages with an efficiency of 23%, 20% and 22%, respectively. When using specific differentiation media, differentiation efficiency is greatly enhanced in Muse-AT cells (82% for mesenchymal, 75% for endodermal and 78% for ectodermal). When compared to adipose stem cells (ASCs), microarray data indicate a substantial up-regulation of Sox2, Oct3/4, and Rex1. Muse-ATs also exhibit gene expression patterns associated with the down-regulation of genes involved in cell death and survival, embryonic development, DNA replication and repair, cell cycle and potential factors related to oncogenecity. Gene expression analysis indicates that Muse-ATs and ASCs are mesenchymal in origin; however, Muse-ATs also express numerous lymphocytic and hematopoietic genes, such as CCR1 and CXCL2, encoding chemokine receptors and ligands involved in stem cell homing. Being

  7. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Palaschak, Brett; Hoffman, Brad E; Srikanthan, Meera A; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII) and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity. PMID:27738644

  8. Cold priming drives the sub-cellular antioxidant systems to protect photosynthetic electron transport against subsequent low temperature stress in winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiangnan; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature seriously depresses the growth of wheat through inhibition of photosynthesis, while earlier cold priming may enhance the tolerance of plants to subsequent low temperature stress. Here, winter wheat plants were firstly cold primed (5.2°C lower temperature than the ambient temperature......-cellular antioxidant systems, depressing the oxidative burst in photosynthetic apparatus, hereby enhanced the tolerance to subsequent low temperature stress in winter wheat plants. © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS....

  9. Nonuniqueness of local stress of three-body potentials in molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Koh M.; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic stress fields are widely used in molecular simulations to understand mechanical behavior. Recently, decomposition methods of multibody forces to central force pairs between the interacting particles have been proposed. Here, we introduce a force center of a three-body potential and propose different force decompositions that also satisfy the conservation of translational and angular momentum. We compare the force decompositions by stress-distribution magnitude and discuss their difference in the stress profile of a bilayer membrane by using coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Biological Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular and Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Glüer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles (SPIO are used in different ways as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: Particles with high nonspecific uptake are required for unspecific labeling of phagocytic cells whereas those that target specific molecules need to have very low unspecific cellular uptake. We compared iron-oxide particles with different core materials (magnetite, maghemite, different coatings (none, dextran, carboxydextran, polystyrene and different hydrodynamic diameters (20–850 nm for internalization kinetics, release of internalized particles, toxicity, localization of particles and ability to generate contrast in MRI. Particle uptake was investigated with U118 glioma cells und human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, which exhibit different phagocytic properties. In both cell types, the contrast agents Resovist, B102, non-coated Fe3O4 particles and microspheres were better internalized than dextran-coated Nanomag particles. SPIO uptake into the cells increased with particle/iron concentrations. Maximum intracellular accumulation of iron particles was observed between 24 h to 36 h of exposure. Most particles were retained in the cells for at least two weeks, were deeply internalized, and only few remained adsorbed at the cell surface. Internalized particles clustered in the cytosol of the cells. Furthermore, all particles showed a low toxicity. By MRI, monolayers consisting of 5000 Resovist-labeled cells could easily be visualized. Thus, for unspecific cell labeling, Resovist and microspheres show the highest potential, whereas Nanomag particles are promising contrast agents for target-specific labeling.

  11. Focused Metabolite Profiling for Dissecting Cellular and Molecular Processes of Living Organisms in Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory control in biological systems is exerted at all levels within the central dogma of biology. Metabolites are the end products of all cellular regulatory processes and reflect the ultimate outcome of potential changes suggested by genomics and proteomics caused by an environmental stimulus or genetic modification. Following on the heels of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, metabolomics has become an inevitable part of complete-system biology because none of the lower "-omics" alone provide direct information about how changes in mRNA or protein are coupled to changes in biological function. The challenges are much greater than those encountered in genomics because of the greater number of metabolites and the greater diversity of their chemical structures and properties. To meet these challenges, much developmental work is needed, including (1) methodologies for unbiased extraction of metabolites and subsequent quantification, (2) algorithms for systematic identification of metabolites, (3) expertise and competency in handling a large amount of information (data set), and (4) integration of metabolomics with other "omics" and data mining (implication of the information). This article reviews the project accomplishments.

  12. Vision preservation during retinal inflammation by anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract: cellular and molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Seiji; Takahashi, Noriko; Sasaki, Mariko; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract, a plant-derived antioxidant, has been utilized as a popular supplement for ocular health worldwide. However, it is unclear whether this extract has any biological effect on visual function, and the mechanism for such an effect is completely unknown. In this study, we generated a mouse model of endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) that shows retinal inflammation, as well as uveitis, by injecting lipopolysaccharide. We pretreated the mice with anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract and analyzed the effect on the retina. Anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract prevented the impairment of photoreceptor cell function, as measured by electroretinogram. At the cellular level, we found that the EIU-associated rhodopsin decreased and the shortening of outer segments in photoreceptor cells were suppressed in the bilberry-extract-treated animals. Moreover, the extract prevented both STAT3 activation, which induces inflammation-related rhodopsin decrease, and the increase in interleukin-6 expression, which activates STAT3. In addition to its anti-inflammatory effect, the anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract ameliorated the intracellular elevation of reactive oxygen species and activated NF-κB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor, in the inflamed retina. Our findings indicate that anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract has a protective effect on visual function during retinal inflammation.

  13. Development of in vitro models for cellular and molecular studies in toxicology and chemoprevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, K.; Offord, E.A.; Harris, C.C.; Pfeifer, A.M.A. [Nestle Research Center, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1998-12-31

    Many natural dietary phytochemicals found compounds found in fruits, vegetables, spices and tea have been shown in recent years to be protective against cancer in various animal models. In the light of the potential impact of these compounds on human health it is important to elucidate the mechanisms involved. We therefore developed and characterized relevant in vitro models using immortalized human epithelial cell lines derived from target tissues in carcinogenesis, such as lung, liver and colon. Assays were established, allowing the evaluation of the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of various procarcinogens, including nitrosamines, mycotoxins and heterocyclic amines on these metabolically-competent human epithelial cell lines. These cellular models appeared to be a useful tool to study the capacity of certain food components to block the initiation stage of carcinogenesis. The ability of carnosol and carnosic acid from rosemary as well as the synthetic dithiolethione, oltipraz, to block the formation of DNA adducts, and their effects on the expression of phase I and phase II enzymes was investigated. We have observed that both rosemary extracts and oltiprax inhibited benzo(a)pyrene- or aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced DNA adduct formation by strongly inhibiting CYP{sub 450} activities and inducing the expression of glutathione S-transferase. These results in human cell models give some insight into the different mechanisms involved in the chemopreventive action of both natural and synthetic compounds in relation to phase I and phase II enzymes. (orig.)

  14. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swy, Eric R.; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S.; Shuboni, Dorela D.; Latourette, Matthew T.; Mallet, Christiane L.; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2014-10-01

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ~70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using

  15. A Critical Analysis of Rejection in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation: Clinical, cellular and molecular aspects, Current Challenges, and Novel Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim A Sarhane

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in microsurgical techniques and immunomodulatory protocols have contributed to the expansion of Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA with very encouraging immunological, functional, and cosmetic results. Rejection remains however a major hurdle that portends serious threats to recipients. Rejection features in VCA have been described in a number of studies, and an international consensus on the classification of rejection was established. Unfortunately, current available diagnostic methods carry many shortcomings that, in certain cases, pose a great diagnostic challenge to physicians especially in borderline rejection cases. In this review, we revisit the features of acute skin rejection in hand and face transplantation at the clinical, cellular and molecular levels. The multiple challenges in diagnosing rejection and in defining chronic and antibody-mediated rejection in VCA are then presented, and we finish by analyzing current research directions and novel concepts aiming at improving available diagnostic measures.

  16. Cellular and molecular markers in monitoring the fate of lymphoid cell culture from Penaeus monodon Fabricius (1798).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Jose, Seena; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-12-01

    Lymphoid cell culture from penaeid shrimps has gained much acceptance as an in vitro platform to facilitate research on the development of prophylaxis, and therapeutic strategies against viruses and for cell line development. However, lymphoid cells can be used as platform for in vitro research, only if they are in metabolically and mitotically active state in vitro with unaltered cell surface receptors. Through this study, we addressed the response of lymphoid cells to a new microenvironment at cellular and molecular levels; including the study of mitotic events, DNA synthesis, expression profile of cell cycle genes, cytoskeleton organization, metabolic activity and viral susceptibility. The S-phase entry and synthesis of new DNA was recorded by immunoflourescent technique. Cdc2, CycA, CycB, EF-1α and BUB3 genes involved in cell cycle were studied in both the cells and tissue, of which EF-1α showed an elevated expression in cells in vitro (∼ 19.7%). Cytoskeleton network of the cell was examined by studying the organization of actin filaments. As the markers for metabolic status, mitochondrial dehydrogenase, protein synthesis and glucose assimilation by the cells were also assessed. Viral susceptibility of the cell was determined using WSSV to confirm the preservation of cellular receptors. This study envisages to strengthen the shrimp cell line research and to bring forth lymphoid cell culture system as a 'model' in vitro system for shrimp and crustaceans altogether.

  17. Broad-spectrum anti-biofilm peptide that targets a cellular stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César de la Fuente-Núñez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form multicellular communities known as biofilms that cause two thirds of all infections and demonstrate a 10 to 1000 fold increase in adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotics. Currently, there are no approved drugs that specifically target bacterial biofilms. Here we identified a potent anti-biofilm peptide 1018 that worked by blocking (pppGpp, an important signal in biofilm development. At concentrations that did not affect planktonic growth, peptide treatment completely prevented biofilm formation and led to the eradication of mature biofilms in representative strains of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium and Burkholderia cenocepacia. Low levels of the peptide led to biofilm dispersal, while higher doses triggered biofilm cell death. We hypothesized that the peptide acted to inhibit a common stress response in target species, and that the stringent response, mediating (pppGpp synthesis through the enzymes RelA and SpoT, was targeted. Consistent with this, increasing (pppGpp synthesis by addition of serine hydroxamate or over-expression of relA led to reduced susceptibility to the peptide. Furthermore, relA and spoT mutations blocking production of (pppGpp replicated the effects of the peptide, leading to a reduction of biofilm formation in the four tested target species. Also, eliminating (pppGpp expression after two days of biofilm growth by removal of arabinose from a strain expressing relA behind an arabinose-inducible promoter, reciprocated the effect of peptide added at the same time, leading to loss of biofilm. NMR and chromatography studies showed that the peptide acted on cells to cause degradation of (pppGpp within 30 minutes, and in vitro directly interacted with ppGpp. We thus propose that 1018 targets (pppGpp and marks it for

  18. Immune and cellular impacts in the autogenous Aedes caspius larvae after experimentally-induced stress: Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects possess effective defense mechanisms against pathogens via induction of antimicrobial immune and oxidative stress responses. In this study, immune impact and histological damages in the gastric caeca have been investigated in the 3rd instar larvae of the autogenous Aedes caspius upon infection with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt. Data showed a significant increase in phenoloxidase (PO activity by 1.23 folds at 4 h post-infection which then reduced to the normal level at 8 h post-infection and until larval death. Besides, the nitric oxide (NO titer was significantly increased by 1.4 folds at 4 h post-infection, then, reduced down to its normal level at 8 h post-infection, after which, it was significantly decreasing by time until being hardly detected at 44 h post-infection compared to that of control mosquitoes. Moreover, percentages of cellular apoptosis were significantly elevating from 6 to 48 h post-infection. Consequently, cytological damages in the epithelium and the microvilli of the gastric caeca were observed at 48 h post-infection. Finally, larval body sizes were significantly smaller prior to death (at 48 h post-infection. Taken together, these data suggest further modes of action of Bt as inhibiting the antibacterial immune responses, inducing cellular apoptosis prior to damaging the epithelium of gastric caeca. This may explain – partially at least – the irresistibility and high pathogenicity of Bt against mosquito vector, which may help in understanding, and hence, overcoming the developing resistance by some mosquito vectors to some mosquitocidal bacteria. This may help in improving the biocontrol measures against mosquito vectors.

  19. Correlation between electron-irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, Shogo; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawata, Hiroaki; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Yasuda, Masaaki, E-mail: yasuda@pe.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tada, Kazuhiro [Department of Electrical and Control Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, Toyama 939-8630 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the correlation between electron irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene. The electron irradiation effect is introduced by the binary collision model in the MD simulation. By applying a tensile stress to graphene, the number of adatom-vacancy (AV) and Stone–Wales (SW) defects increase under electron irradiation, while the number of single-vacancy defects is not noticeably affected by the applied stress. Both the activation and formation energies of an AV defect and the activation energy of an SW defect decrease when a tensile stress is applied to graphene. Applying tensile stress also relaxes the compression stress associated with SW defect formation. These effects induced by the applied stress cause the increase in AV and SW defect formation under electron irradiation.

  20. Systemic molecular and cellular changes induced in rats upon inhalation of JP-8 petroleum fuel vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanas, Jay S; Bruce Briggs, G; Lerner, Megan R; Lightfoot, Stan A; Larabee, Jason L; Karsies, Todd J; Epstein, Robert B; Hanas, Rushie J; Brackett, Daniel J; Hocker, James R

    2010-05-01

    Limited information is available regarding systemic changes in mammals associated with exposures to petroleum/hydrocarbon fuels. In this study, systemic toxicity of JP-8 jet fuel was observed in a rat inhalation model at different JP-8 fuel vapor concentrations (250, 500, or 1000 mg/m(3), for 91 days). Gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry sequencing identified the alpha-2 microglobulin protein to be elevated in rat kidney in a JP-8 dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis of kidney and lung tissue extracts revealed JP-8 dependent elevation of inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Tissue changes were observed histologically (hematoxylin and eosin staining) in liver, kidney, lung, bone marrow, and heart, and more prevalently at medium or high JP-8 vapor phase exposures (500-1000 mg/m(3)) than at low vapor phase exposure (250 mg/m(3)) or non-JP-8 controls. JP-8 fuel-induced liver alterations included dilated sinusoids, cytoplasmic clumping, and fat cell deposition. Changes to the kidneys included reduced numbers of nuclei, and cytoplasmic dumping in the lumen of proximal convoluted tubules. JP-8 dependent lung alterations were edema and dilated alveolar capillaries, which allowed clumping of red blood cells (RBCs). Changes in the bone marrow in response to JP-8 included reduction of fat cells and fat globules, and cellular proliferation (RBCs, white blood cells-WBCs, and megakaryocytes). Heart tissue from JP-8 exposed animals contained increased numbers of inflammatory and fibroblast cells, as well as myofibril scarring. cDNA array analysis of heart tissue revealed a JP-8 dependent increase in atrial natriuretic peptide precursor mRNA and a decrease in voltage-gated potassium (K+) ion channel mRNA.

  1. Cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates underlying the impact of nicotine on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Thomas J; Leach, Prescott T

    2014-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder marked by long-lasting maladaptive changes in behavior and in reward system function. However, the factors that contribute to the behavioral and biological changes that occur with addiction are complex and go beyond reward. Addiction involves changes in cognitive control and the development of disruptive drug-stimuli associations that can drive behavior. A reason for the strong influence drugs of abuse can exert on cognition may be the striking overlap between the neurobiological substrates of addiction and of learning and memory, especially areas involved in declarative memory. Declarative memories are critically involved in the formation of autobiographical memories, and the ability of drugs of abuse to alter these memories could be particularly detrimental. A key structure in this memory system is the hippocampus, which is critically involved in binding multimodal stimuli together to form complex long-term memories. While all drugs of abuse can alter hippocampal function, this review focuses on nicotine. Addiction to tobacco products is insidious, with the majority of smokers wanting to quit; yet the majority of those that attempt to quit fail. Nicotine addiction is associated with the presence of drug-context and drug-cue associations that trigger drug seeking behavior and altered cognition during periods of abstinence, which contributes to relapse. This suggests that understanding the effects of nicotine on learning and memory will advance understanding and potentially facilitate treating nicotine addiction. The following sections examine: (1) how the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning change as nicotine administration transitions from acute to chronic and then to withdrawal from chronic treatment and the potential impact of these changes on addiction, (2) how nicotine usurps the cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, (3) the physiological changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to nicotine

  2. Molecular and cellular basis of microvascular perfusion deficits induced by Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium septicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Hickey

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reduced tissue perfusion leading to tissue ischemia is a central component of the pathogenesis of myonecrosis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The C. perfringens alpha-toxin has been shown capable of inducing these changes, but its potential synergy with perfringolysin O (theta-toxin is less well understood. Similarly, Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent causative agent of spontaneous gas gangrene, but its effect on the microcirculation has not been examined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use intravital microscopy to examine the effects of C. perfringens and C. septicum on the functional microcirculation, coupled with the use of isogenic toxin mutants to elucidate the role of particular toxins in the resultant microvascular perfusion deficits. This study represents the first time this integrated approach has been used in the analysis of the pathological response to clostridial toxins. Culture supernatants from wild-type C. perfringens induced extensive cell death within 30 min, as assessed by in vivo uptake of propidium iodide. Furthermore, significant reductions in capillary perfusion were observed within 60 min. Depletion of either platelets or neutrophils reduced the alteration in perfusion, consistent with a role for these blood-borne cells in obstructing perfusion. In addition, mutation of either the alpha-toxin or perfringolysin O structural genes attenuated the reduction in perfusion, a process that was reversed by genetic complementation. C. septicum also induced a marked reduction in perfusion, with the degree of microvascular compromise correlating with the level of the C. septicum alpha-toxin. Together, these data indicate that as a result of its ability to produce alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O, C. perfringens rapidly induces irreversible cellular injury and a marked reduction in microvascular perfusion. Since C. septicum induces a similar reduction in microvascular perfusion, it is postulated that this function

  3. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunomodulation in the brain through environmental enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eSinghal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on environmental enrichment (EE have shown cytokines, cellular immune components (e.g. T lymphocytes, NK cells and glial cells in causal relationship to EE in bringing out changes to neurobiology and behavior. The purpose of this review is to evaluate these neuroimmune mechanisms associated with neurobiological and behavioral changes in response to different EE methods. We systematically reviewed common research databases. After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 328 articles remained for this review. Physical exercise, a form of EE, elicits anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory effects through interaction with several immune pathways including IL-6 secretion from muscle fibers, reduced expression of TLR’s on monocytes and macrophages, reduced secretion of adipokines, modulation of hippocampal T cells, priming of microglia and upregulation of MKP-1 in CNS. In contrast, immunomodulatory roles of other enrichment methods are not studied extensively. Nonetheless, studies showing reduction in the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α in response to enrichment with novel objects and accessories suggest anti-inflammatory effects of novel environment. Likewise, social enrichment, though considered a necessity for healthy behavior, results in immunosuppression in socially defeated animals. This has been attributed to reduction in T lymphocytes, NK cells and IL-10 in subordinate animals. EE through sensory stimuli has been investigated to a lesser extent and the effect on immune factors has not been evaluated yet. Discovery of this multidimensional relationship between immune system, brain functioning and EE has paved a way towards formulating environ-immuno therapies for treating psychiatric illnesses with minimal use of pharmacotherapy. While the immuno-modulatory role of physical exercise has been evaluated extensively, more research is required to investigate neuroimmune changes associated with other enrichment methods.

  4. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunomodulation in the brain through environmental enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Gaurav; Jaehne, Emily J; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on environmental enrichment (EE) have shown cytokines, cellular immune components [e.g., T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells], and glial cells in causal relationship to EE in bringing out changes to neurobiology and behavior. The purpose of this review is to evaluate these neuroimmune mechanisms associated with neurobiological and behavioral changes in response to different EE methods. We systematically reviewed common research databases. After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 328 articles remained for this review. Physical exercise (PE), a form of EE, elicits anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory effects through interaction with several immune pathways including interleukin (IL)-6 secretion from muscle fibers, reduced expression of Toll-like receptors on monocytes and macrophages, reduced secretion of adipokines, modulation of hippocampal T cells, priming of microglia, and upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in central nervous system. In contrast, immunomodulatory roles of other enrichment methods are not studied extensively. Nonetheless, studies showing reduction in the expression of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in response to enrichment with novel objects and accessories suggest anti-inflammatory effects of novel environment. Likewise, social enrichment, though considered a necessity for healthy behavior, results in immunosuppression in socially defeated animals. This has been attributed to reduction in T lymphocytes, NK cells and IL-10 in subordinate animals. EE through sensory stimuli has been investigated to a lesser extent and the effect on immune factors has not been evaluated yet. Discovery of this multidimensional relationship between immune system, brain functioning, and EE has paved a way toward formulating environ-immuno therapies for treating psychiatric illnesses with minimal use of pharmacotherapy. While the immunomodulatory role of PE has been evaluated extensively, more research

  5. Paclitaxel molecularly imprinted polymer-PEG-folate nanoparticles for targeting anticancer delivery: Characterization and cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Darvishi, Behrad; Ishkuh, Fatemeh Azizi; Shahmoradi, Elnaz; Mohammadi, Ali; Javanbakht, Mehran; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize molecularly imprinted polymer-poly ethylene glycol-folic acid (MIP-PEG-FA) nanoparticles for use as a controlled release carrier for targeting delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. MIP nanoparticles were synthesized by a mini-emulsion polymerization technique and then PEG-FA was conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles showed high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, 15.6 ± 0.8 and 100%, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was evaluated by binding experiments in human serum. Good selective binding and recognition were found in MIP nanoparticles. In vitro drug release studies showed that MIP-PEG-FA have a controlled release of PTX, because of the presence of imprinted sites in the polymeric structure, which makes it is suitable for sustained drug delivery. The drug release from polymeric nanoparticles was indeed higher at acidic pH. The molecular structure of MIP-PEG-FA was confirmed by Hydrogen-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR), and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and their thermal behaviors by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) results showed that nanoparticles have a smooth surface and spherical shape with an average size of 181 nm. MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles showed a greater amount of intracellular uptake in folate receptor-positive cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells) in comparison with the non-folate nanoparticles and free PTX, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 4.9 ± 0.9, 7.4 ± 0.5 and 32.8 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. These results suggest that MIP-PEG-FA nanoparticles could be a potentially useful drug carrier for targeting drug delivery to cancer cells.

  6. Molecular Mechanism of Salinity Stress and Biotechnological Strategies for Engineering Salt Tolerance in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Latoya Harris; Ronald J. Newton

    2003-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of plant responses to salinity stress and the physiological consequences of altered gene expression are reviewed. Extensive use of comparisons with halophytic plants and glycophytos provide a paradigm for many responses to salinity exhibited by stress sensitive plants. Osmolyte biosynthesis, water flux control, and membrane transport of ions are important for maintenance and re-establishment of homeostasis. Transgenic plant and mutant analyses in Arabidopsis improve the understanding of stress responses and elements of stress signal transduction pathways. The genomic DNA sequences and cell-specific transcript expression data, combined with determinant identification based on molecular genetics, will provide the infrastructure for functional physiological dissection of salt tolerance determinants in plants. Protein interaction analysis, genetic activation and suppression screens will lead inevitably to an understanding of the interrelationships of the multiple signaling systems that control stress-adaptive responses and provide more opportunity to engineer salt tolerance in plants.

  7. Response differences between Ectocarpus siliculosus populations to copper stress involve cellular exclusion and induction of the phytochelatin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncarati, Francesca; Sáez, Claudio A; Greco, Maria; Gledhill, Martha; Bitonti, Maria B; Brown, Murray T

    2015-02-01

    Some populations of brown seaweed species inhabit metal-polluted environments and can develop tolerance to metal stress, but the mechanisms by which this is accomplished are still to be elucidated. To address this, the responses of two strains of the model brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus isolated from sites with different histories of metal contamination exposed to total copper (CuT) concentrations ranging between 0 and 2.4 μM for 10 days were investigated. The synthesis of the metal-chelator phytochelatin (PCs) and relative levels of transcripts encoding the enzymes γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), glutathione synthase (GS) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS) that participate in the PC biosynthetic pathway were measured, along with the effects on growth, and adsorption and uptake of Cu. Growth of strain LIA, from a pristine site in Scotland, was inhibited to a greater extent, and at lower concentrations, than that of Es524, isolated from a Cu-contaminated site in Chile. Concentrations of intra-cellular Cu were higher and the exchangeable fraction was lower in LIA than Es524, especially at the highest exposure levels. Total glutathione concentrations increased in both strains with Cu exposure, whereas total PCs levels were higher in Es524 than LIA; PC2 and PC3 were detected in Es524 but PC2 only was found in LIA. The greater production and levels of polymerisation of PCs in Es524 can be explained by the up-regulation of genes encoding for key enzymes involved in the synthesis of PCs. In Es524 there was an increase in the transcripts of γ-GCS, GS and PCS, particularly under high Cu exposure, whereas in LIA4 transcripts of γ-GCS1 increased only slightly, γ-GCS2 and GS decreased and PCS did not change. The consequences of higher intra-cellular concentrations of Cu, lower production of PCs, and lower expression of enzymes involved in GSH-PCs synthesis may be contributing to an induced oxidative stress condition in LIA, which explains, at least in part, the

  8. Molecular profiling reveals diversity of stress signal transduction cascades in highly penetrant Alzheimer's disease human skin fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella Mendonsa

    Full Text Available The serious and growing impact of the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD as an individual and societal burden raises a number of key questions: Can a blanket test for Alzheimer's disease be devised forecasting long-term risk for acquiring this disorder? Can a unified therapy be devised to forestall the development of AD as well as improve the lot of present sufferers? Inflammatory and oxidative stresses are associated with enhanced risk for AD. Can an AD molecular signature be identified in signaling pathways for communication within and among cells during inflammatory and oxidative stress, suggesting possible biomarkers and therapeutic avenues? We postulated a unique molecular signature of dysfunctional activity profiles in AD-relevant signaling pathways in peripheral tissues, based on a gain of function in G-protein-coupled bradykinin B2 receptor (BKB2R inflammatory stress signaling in skin fibroblasts from AD patients that results in tau protein Ser hyperphosphorylation. Such a signaling profile, routed through both phosphorylation and proteolytic cascades activated by inflammatory and oxidative stresses in highly penetrant familial monogenic forms of AD, could be informative for pathogenesis of the complex multigenic sporadic form of AD. Comparing stimulus-specific cascades of signal transduction revealed a striking diversity of molecular signaling profiles in AD human skin fibroblasts that express endogenous levels of mutant presenilins PS-1 or PS-2 or the Trisomy 21 proteome. AD fibroblasts bearing the PS-1 M146L mutation associated with highly aggressive AD displayed persistent BKB2R signaling plus decreased ERK activation by BK, correctible by gamma-secretase inhibitor Compound E. Lack of these effects in the homologous PS-2 mutant cells indicates specificity of presenilin gamma-secretase catalytic components in BK signaling biology directed toward MAPK activation. Oxidative stress revealed a JNK-dependent survival

  9. Anchoring Distortions Coupled with Plane Couette & Poiseuille Flows of Nematic Polymers in Viscous Solvents: Morphology in Molecular Orientation, Stress & Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    COUETTE & POISEUILLE FLOWS OF NEMATIC POLYMERS IN VISCOUS SOLVENTS: MORPHOLOGY IN MOLECULAR ORIENTATION, STRESS & FLOW Hong Zhou...viscoelastic stresses, and flow feedback. Pre- vious studies in plane Couette & Poiseuille flow (with the exception of [7]) have focused on the coupling between...with Plane Couette & Poiseuille Flows of Nematic Polymers in Viscous Solvents: Morphology in Molecular Orientation, Stress & Flow 5a. CONTRACT

  10. Dispersion fraction enhances cellular growth of carbon nanotube and aluminum oxide reinforced ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene biocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Anup Kumar; Balani, Kantesh, E-mail: kbalani@iitk.ac.in

    2015-01-01

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is widely used as bone-replacement material for articulating surfaces due to its excellent wear resistance and low coefficient of friction. But, the wear debris, generated during abrasion between mating surfaces, leads to aseptic loosening of implants. Thus, various reinforcing agents are generally utilized, which may alter the surface and biological properties of UHMWPE. In the current work, the cellular response of compression molded UHMWPE upon reinforcement of bioactive multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and bioinert aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is investigated. The phase retention and stability were observed using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The reinforcement of MWCNTs and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has shown to alter the wettability (from contact angle of ∼ 88° ± 2° to ∼ 118° ± 4°) and surface energy (from ∼ 23.20 to ∼ 17.75 mN/m) of composites with respect to UHMWPE, without eliciting any adverse effect on cytocompatibility for the L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. Interestingly, the cellular growth of the L929 mouse fibroblast cell line is observed to be dominated by the dispersion fraction of surface free energy (SFE). After 48 h of incubation period, a decrease in metabolic activity of MWCNT–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforced composites is attributed to apatite formation that reduces the dispersion fraction of surface energy. The mineralized apatite during incubation was confirmed and quantified by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. Thus, the dispersion fraction of surface free energy can be engineered to play an important role in achieving enhanced metabolic activity of the MWCNT–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforced UHMWPE biopolymer composites. - Highlights: • The cellular response of UHMWPE upon MWCNT and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforcement is highlighted. • Wettability decreases with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and

  11. Cellular and molecular phenotypes depending upon the RNA repair system RtcAB of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Christoph; Schaefer, Jorrit; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    RNA ligases function pervasively across the three kingdoms of life for RNA repair, splicing and can be stress induced. The RtcB protein (also HSPC117, C22orf28, FAAP and D10Wsu52e) is one such conserved ligase, involved in tRNA and mRNA splicing. However, its physiological role is poorly described, especially in bacteria. We now show in Escherichia coli bacteria that the RtcR activated rtcAB genes function for ribosome homeostasis involving rRNA stability. Expression of rtcAB is activated by agents and genetic lesions which impair the translation apparatus or may cause oxidative damage in the cell. Rtc helps the cell to survive challenges to the translation apparatus, including ribosome targeting antibiotics. Further, loss of Rtc causes profound changes in chemotaxis and motility. Together, our data suggest that the Rtc system is part of a previously unrecognized adaptive response linking ribosome homeostasis with basic cell physiology and behaviour. PMID:27402162

  12. Toward a biaxial model of "bipolar" affective disorders: further exploration of genetic, molecular and cellular substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askland, Kathleen

    2006-08-01

    functioning--neuroelectrical and neurochemical. The class(es) of primary genetic alteration (i.e., neuroelectrical, neurochemical or both) determines the type, while the locus and specific allelic variant determines the direction, of pathologic trait alteration(s). In addition to the class, locus and allelic variant of the primary genetic alteration, the cellular--and system-level expressions-including functional trait interaction therein--determine the nature and degree of clinical expression of each trait. Finally, the type, direction and presence of functional interaction between pathologic alterations would indicate the most appropriate pharmacology.

  13. Plant molecular stress responses face climate change. Trends in Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahuja, I.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Bones, A.M.; Hall, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental stress factors such as drought, elevated temperature, salinity and rising CO2 affect plant growth and pose a growing threat to sustainable agriculture. This has become a hot issue due to concerns about the effects of climate change on plant resources, biodiversity and global food secur

  14. Molecular stress response pathways as the basis of hormesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirovic, Dino; de Toda, Irene Martinez; Rattan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    There is now a large amount of data available for human beings showing positive hormetic effects of mild stresses from physical, chemical, nutritional and mental sources. However, these data are dispersed in the literature and not always interpreted as hormetic effects, thus restricting their ful...

  15. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Topham, David J.; Thakar, Juilee

    2016-01-01

    Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets) have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV) infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC) infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection. PMID:26981147

  16. Molecular and cellular dynamics of the Toll-like receptor 4 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick eGay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As well as being the primary signaling receptor for bacterial endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide Toll-like receptor 4 function is modulated by numerous factors not only in the context of microbial pathogenesis but also autoimmune and allergic diseases. TLR4 is subject to multiple levels of endogenous control and regulation from biosynthesis and trafficking to signal transduction and degradation. On the other hand regulation of TLR4 activity breaks down during Gram –ve sepsis leading to systemic damage, multi organ failure and death. In this article we review how TLR4 traffics from the early secretory pathway, the cis/trans Golgi to the cell surface and endolysosomal compartments. We will present evidence about how these processes influence signaling and can potentially lead to ligand independent constitutive activation that may contribute to pathogenesis in sepsis. We will also discuss how sustained signaling may be coupled to endocytosis and consider the potential molecular mechanisms of immuno-modulators that modify TLR4 signalling function including the cat allergen FelD1 and endogenous protein ligands such as the extracellular matrix protein tenascin C and calprotectin (MRP8/14.

  17. Cellular and molecular toxicology of lead. I. Effect of lead on cultured cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusell, M.; O' Cheskey, S.; Gerschenson, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    Growth studies were done on a cultured rat liver cell line (RLC-GAI) grown in a chemically defined medium in the presence of lead nitrate. Lead reversibly inhibited the growth of these cells even after 6 d of exposure to the heavy metal. To compare lead sensitivity in various cell lines, GI50 and LD50 values were determined in the RLC-GAI cells as well as two glioma cell lines (B82 and C/sub 6/) and a neuroblastoma cell line (N18). The LD50 values paralleled but were consistently lower than the GI50 values. Since lead is known to affect heme synthesis, hemin was added to test the possibility of preventing the growth-inhibitory effect of the lead. The growth capacity of lead-treated cells did not change with the addition of hemin. It is thought that differentiated cultured cell lines such as these could be useful in examining the molecular mechanism of lead toxicity.

  18. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Anderson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection.

  19. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S; DeDiego, Marta L; Topham, David J; Thakar, Juilee

    2016-01-01

    Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets) have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV) infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC) infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection.

  20. Molecular and physiological responses to abiotic stress in forest trees and their relevance to tree improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfouche, Antoine; Meilan, Richard; Altman, Arie

    2014-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and cold, are the major environmental stresses that adversely affect tree growth and, thus, forest productivity, and play a major role in determining the geographic distribution of tree species. Tree responses and tolerance to abiotic stress are complex biological processes that are best analyzed at a systems level using genetic, genomic, metabolomic and phenomic approaches. This will expedite the dissection of stress-sensing and signaling networks to further support efficient genetic improvement programs. Enormous genetic diversity for stress tolerance exists within some forest-tree species, and due to advances in sequencing technologies the molecular genetic basis for this diversity has been rapidly unfolding in recent years. In addition, the use of emerging phenotyping technologies extends the suite of traits that can be measured and will provide us with a better understanding of stress tolerance. The elucidation of abiotic stress-tolerance mechanisms will allow for effective pyramiding of multiple tolerances in a single tree through genetic engineering. Here we review recent progress in the dissection of the molecular basis of abiotic stress tolerance in forest trees, with special emphasis on Populus, Pinus, Picea, Eucalyptus and Quercus spp. We also outline practices that will enable the deployment of trees engineered for abiotic stress tolerance to land owners. Finally, recommendations for future work are discussed.

  1. Activation of autophagy via Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK/mTOR pathway in rat notochordal cells is a cellular adaptation under hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Bo; Cao, Lu; Yin, Xiao-Fan; Yasen, Miersalijiang; Yishake, Mumingjiang; Dong, Jian; Li, Xi-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells experience hyperosmotic stress in spinal discs; however, how these cells can survive in the hostile microenvironment remains unclear. Autophagy has been suggested to maintain cellular homeostasis under different stresses by degrading the cytoplasmic proteins and organelles. Here, we explored whether autophagy is a cellular adaptation in rat notochordal cells under hyperosmotic stress. Hyperosmotic stress was found to activate autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner. SQSTM1/P62 expression was decreased as the autophagy level increased. Transient Ca(2+) influx from intracellular stores and extracellular space was stimulated by hyperosmotic stress. Activation of AMPK and inhibition of p70S6K were observed under hyperosmotic conditions. However, intercellular Ca(2+) chelation inhibited the increase of LC3-II and partly reversed the decrease of p70S6K. Hyperosmotic stress decreased cell viability and promoted apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy led to SQSTM1/P62 accumulation, reduced cell viability, and accelerated apoptosis in notochordal cells under this condition. These evidences suggest that autophagy induction via the Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK/mTOR pathway might occur as an adaptation mechanism for notochordal cells under hyperosmotic stress. Thus, activating autophagy might be a promising approach to improve viability of notochordal cells in intervertebral discs.

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms affecting tumour radiosensitivity : An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Olive Mary

    The response of tumour cells in vitro to ionising radiation can, to a certain extent, predict the response of tumours to various radiotherapy treatment modalities. This thesis considers some of the factors known to be involved in the radiation response of human tumour cells in vitro. These parameters include radiation-induced cell-cycle perturbations, apoptosis and DNA damage repair. A panel of eight human tumour cell lines with markedly differing radiosensitivities were assessed in order to determine the key factors governing their radiation response. A wide range of doses spanning both the low dose region (0-2 Gy and 0-5 Gy) and the clinically relevant region (1-4 Gy) were used to determine whether differences in responses could distinguish cells which were radiosensitive or resistant. Ionising radiation produced a cell cycle delay in all cell lines in one or both of the cellular checkpoints. A Gl/S delay was detected in those cell lines that expressed wild-type p53, and the duration of this delay appeared to be directly related to the level of constitutive protein. p53 protein stabilisation was observed after 4 h, even at doses of 0-2 Gy, although a Gl/S delay was only detectable at higher doses. There was no direct relationship between p53 status and survival although wild-type p53 expression was more prevalent in the radiosensitive cell lines (3/4 sensitives are wild-type versus 2/4 resistants). A G2/M delay could only be detected at doses of > 1 Gy. This delay appeared to be dose independent in the resistant cell lines, suggesting a threshold dose of IGy, above which no further effect is observed. A radiation-induced reduction of cyclin B1 protein was observed in all cell lines implicating this protein in the induction of a G2/M delay. The duration of G2/M delay was significantly longer in the radiosensitive cell lines at 4 Gy (7-20 h versus 4-6 h at 4 Gy). The proportion of cells that exited the G2/M block and re-entered GO/G1 phase was also significantly

  3. Molecular biology of the stress response in the early embryo and its stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puscheck, Elizabeth E; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Yang, Yu; Jiang, Zhongliang; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    tendency to prioritize differentiation by increasing the first essential lineage and decreasing later lineages. These mechanisms include stress enzymes that regulate TFs and provide stress-specific, shared homeostatic cellular and organismal responses of prioritized differentiation.

  4. HAMLET kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism--cellular, molecular, and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanborg, Catharina; Agerstam, Helena; Aronson, Annika; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Düringer, Caroline; Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Leijonhuvud, Irene; Linse, Sara; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Nilsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Jenny; Svensson, Malin

    2003-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex that induces apoptosis-like death in tumor cells, but leaves fully differentiated cells unaffected. This review summarizes the information on the in vivo effects of HAMLET in patients and tumor models on the tumor cell biology, and on the molecular characteristics of the complex. HAMLET limits the progression of human glioblastomas in a xenograft model and removes skin papillomas in patients. This broad anti-tumor activity includes >40 different lymphomas and carcinomas and apoptosis is independent of p53 or bcl-2. In tumor cells HAMLET enters the cytoplasm, translocates to the perinuclear area, and enters the nuclei where it accumulates. HAMLET binds strongly to histones and disrupts the chromatin organization. In the cytoplasm, HAMLET targets ribosomes and activates caspases. The formation of HAMLET relies on the propensity of alpha-lactalbumin to alter its conformation when the strongly bound Ca2+ ion is released and the protein adopts the apo-conformation that exposes a new fatty acid binding site. Oleic acid (C18:1,9 cis) fits this site with high specificity, and stabilizes the altered protein conformation. The results illustrate how protein folding variants may be beneficial, and how their formation in peripheral tissues may depend on the folding change and the availability of the lipid cofactor. One example is the acid pH in the stomach of the breast-fed child that promotes the formation of HAMLET. This mechanism may contribute to the protective effect of breastfeeding against childhood tumors. We propose that HAMLET should be explored as a novel approach to tumor therapy.

  5. Genetic dissection of sexual orientation: behavioral, cellular, and molecular approaches in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, D; Ito, H; Fujitani, K

    1996-10-01

    Insertional mutagenesis using P-element vectors yielded several independent mutations that cause male homosexuality in Drosophila melanogaster. Subsequent analyses revealed that all of these insertions were located at the same chromosomal division, 91B, where one of the inversion breakpoints responsible for the bisexual phenotype of the fruitless (fru) mutant has been mapped. In addition to the altered sexual orientation, the fru mutants displayed a range of defects in the formation of a male-specific muscle, the muscle of Lawrence. Since the male-specific formation of this muscle was dependent solely on the sex of the innervating nerve and not on the sex of the muscle itself, the primary site of action of the fru gene should be in the neural cells. satori, one of the P-insertion alleles of fru which we isolated, carried the lacZ gene of E. coli as a reporter, and beta-galactosidase expression was found in a subset of brain cells including those in the antennal lobe in the satori mutant. Targeted expression of a sex determination gene, transformer (tra), was used to produce chromosomally male flies with certain feminized glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Such sexually mosaic flies courted not only females but also males when the DM2, DA3 and DA4 glomeruli were feminized, indicating that these substructures in the antennal lobe may be involved in the determination of the sexual orientation of flies. Molecular cloning and analyses of the genomic and complementary DNAs indicated that transcription of the fru locus yields several different transcripts, one of which encodes a putative transcription regulator with a BTB domain and two zinc finger motifs. In the 5' non-coding region, three putative Transformer binding sites were identified. It appears plausible therefore that the fru gene is one of the elements in the sex determination cascade that controls sexual fates of certain neuronal cells. Improper sex determination in these neural cells may lead to altered sexual

  6. Study on the Cellular Molecular Mechanism of Intrauterine Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健; 孙琳

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study intrauterine transmission of HBV and its celbular molecular mechanism and influence on the fetus. Methods: A total of 46 cases of Fegnant uxnnen who suffered from HBV were divided into HBeAg (+) and HBeAg (-) groups. HBV-DNA in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells ( PBMC ) of 46 cases of pregnant women before delivery urns detected by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR). After placenta being delivery, HBV-DNA in serum and cord blood mononuclear cells ( CBMC) was also detected by PCR. Results: The total of positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum and PBMC of pregnant women with hepatitis B were 69.57% (32/46) and 41.30% (19/46). The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of cord blood and CBMC were 56.52%(26/46) and 21.74% (10/46) respectively. Among them, the positive rates of HBV-DNA inserum and PBMC of pregnant women with HBeAg (+) were 100. 00% (25/25) and 60.00% (15/25) respectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of cord blood and CBMC were 88.00% (22/25) and 32. 00% (8/25) respectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum and PBMC of pregnant women with HBeAg (-) were 33.33%(7/21) and 19.05%(4/21) respectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of card blood and CBMC were 19.05%(4/21) and 9.52%(2/21) resspectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of card blood and CBMC of newborns were higher in the group of pregnant women with HBeAg (+) than those in the group of pregnant women with HBeAg (--) (P<0. O1 and P<0. 05). There was no HBV-DNA in serum, PBMC and CBMC of normal pregnant women and normal neorwles. Conclusion : The intrauterine transmission of HBV can be existent and its transmission way not only can be induced by serum but also can be induced by PBMC. The way of intrauterine transmission of HBV in-duced by PBMC was concealed. The dangerous possibility of intrauterine transmission is higher in thepregnant women with HBeAg (+) than that in the group of pregnant women with HBeAg (-).

  7. Task Group 7B: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging: The Roles of Nature, Nurture and Chance in the Maintenance of Human Healthspan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Arya, Suresh; Grant, Christine; Miller, Linda; Ono, Santa Jeremy; Patil, Chris; Shay, Jerry; Topol, Eric; Torry, Michael; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tse, Iris; Lin, Su-Ju; Miller, Richard

    2007-11-14

    The degree to which an individual organism maintains healthspan and lifespan is a function of complex interactions between genetic inheritance ('nature'), environment, including cultural inheritance (nurture) and stochastic events ('luck' or 'chance'). This task group will focus upon the role of chance because it is so poorly understood and because it appears to be of major importance in the determination of individual variations in healthspan and lifespan within species. The major factor determining variations in healthspan and lifespan between species is genetic inheritance. Broader aspects of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological aging will also be considered, given their importance for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of successful aging. The task force will consider the cellular and molecular basis for nature, nurture and chance in healthspan and life span determination. On the basis of comparisons between identical and non-identical twins, geneticists have estimated that genes control no more than about a quarter of the inter-individual differences in lifespan (Herskind 1996). Twin studies of very old individuals, however, show substantially greater genetic contributions to Healthspan (McClearn 2004; Reed 2003). The environment clearly plays an important role in the length and the quality of life. Tobacco smoke, for example has the potential to impact upon multiple body systems in ways that appear to accelerate the rates at which those systems age (Bernhard 2007). To document the role of chance events on aging, one must rigorously control both the genetic composition of an organism and its environment. This has been done to a remarkable degree in a species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans (Vanfleteren 1998). The results confirm hundreds of previous studies with a wide range of species, especially those with inbred rodents housed under apparently identical but less well controlled environments. One

  8. Cellular and molecular players in adipose tissue inflammation in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Lee, Jongsoon

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that inflammation is an important pathogenic mediator of the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. It is now generally accepted that tissue-resident immune cells play a major role in the regulation of this obesity-induced inflammation. The roles that adipose tissue (AT)-resident immune cells play have been particularly extensively studied. AT contains most types of immune cells and obesity increases their numbers and activation levels, particularly in AT macrophages (ATMs). Other pro-inflammatory cells found in AT include neutrophils, Th1 CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, DCs, and mast cells. However, AT also contains anti-inflammatory cells that counter the pro-inflammatory immune cells that are responsible for the obesity-induced inflammation in this tissue. These anti-inflammatory cells include regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs), Th2 CD4 T cells, and eosinophils. Hence, AT inflammation is shaped by the regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory immune cell homeostasis, and obesity skews this balance towards a more pro-inflammatory status. Recent genetic studies revealed several molecules that participate in the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. In this review, the cellular and molecular players that participate in the regulation of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance are discussed, with particular attention being placed on the roles of the cellular players in these pathogeneses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  9. Conserved Molecular and Epigenetic Determinants of Aromatase Gene Induction by the Herbicide Atrazine in Human and Rat Cellular Models Relevant to Breast Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    AbstractConserved Molecular and Epigenetic Determinants of Aromatase Gene Induction by the Herbicide Atrazine in Human and Rat Cellular Models Relevant to Breast Cancer Risk ByTheresa Ryan StueveDoctor of Philosophy in Molecular ToxicologyUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Gary Firestone, Co-ChairProfessor Dale Leitman, Co-ChairFall 2011The widely-applied herbicide atrazine (ATR) is a potent endocrine disruptor that elicits anti-androgenic and estrogenic effects, often at concentrat...

  10. A genome-wide screen in yeast identifies specific oxidative stress genes required for the maintenance of sub-cellular redox homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ayer

    Full Text Available Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/organellar level are poorly understood. The genetic bases of cellular redox homeostasis were investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP based redox probe, roGFP2 and a pH sensitive GFP-based probe, pHluorin. The use of roGFP2, in conjunction with pHluorin, enabled determination of pH-adjusted sub-cellular redox potential in a non-invasive and real-time manner. A genome-wide screen using both the non-essential and essential gene collections was carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using cytosolic-roGFP2 to identify factors essential for maintenance of cytosolic redox state under steady-state conditions. 102 genes of diverse function were identified that are required for maintenance of cytosolic redox state. Mutations in these genes led to shifts in the half-cell glutathione redox potential by 75-10 mV. Interestingly, some specific oxidative stress-response processes were identified as over-represented in the data set. Further investigation of the role of oxidative stress-responsive systems in sub-cellular redox homeostasis was conducted using roGFP2 constructs targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome and E(GSH was measured in cells in exponential and stationary phase. Analyses allowed for the identification of key redox systems on a sub-cellular level and the identification of novel genes involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis.

  11. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Jun Fan; Wei-Xing Zong

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis,respectively.While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells,autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules.Yet in some conditions,autophagy can lead to cell death.Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses.Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways,which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy.This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  12. Opto-Electronically Efficient Conjugated Polymers by Stress-Induced Molecular Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-11-1-4055 Opto-Electronically Efficient Conjugated Polymers by Stress-Induced Molecular Constraints... polymers . The effects of molecular flows triggered in thin film dewetting were further studied to reveal the mechanisms of chain stretching...to increase. Finally, the efficiency enhancement can be produced in solid films of conjugated polymers using simple imprints under good control

  13. Sex-dependent diversity in ventral tegmental dopaminergic neurons and developmental programing: A molecular, cellular and behavioral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, G E; Virdee, K; McArthur, S; Dalley, J W

    2014-12-12

    The knowledge that diverse populations of dopaminergic neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) can be distinguished in terms of their molecular, electrophysiological and functional properties, as well as their differential projections to cortical and subcortical regions has significance for key brain functions, such as the regulation of motivation, working memory and sensorimotor control. Almost without exception, this understanding has evolved from landmark studies performed in the male sex. However, converging evidence from both clinical and pre-clinical studies illustrates that the structure and functioning of the VTA dopaminergic systems are intrinsically different in males and females. This may be driven by sex differences in the hormonal environment during adulthood ('activational' effects) and development (perinatal and/or pubertal 'organizational' effects), as well as genetic factors, especially the SRY gene on the Y chromosome in males, which is expressed in a sub-population of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Stress and stress hormones, especially glucocorticoids, are important factors which interact with the VTA dopaminergic systems in order to achieve behavioral adaptation and enable the individual to cope with environmental change. Here, also, there is male/female diversity not only during adulthood, but also in early life when neurobiological programing by stress or glucocorticoid exposure differentially impacts dopaminergic developmental trajectories in male and female brains. This may have enduring consequences for individual resilience or susceptibility to pathophysiological change induced by stressors in later life, with potential translational significance for sex bias commonly found in disorders involving dysfunction of the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic systems. These findings highlight the urgent need for a better understanding of the sexual dimorphism in the VTA if we are to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of

  14. Stress proteins in CNS inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, J.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Stress proteins or heat shock proteins (HSPs) are ubiquitous cellular components that have long been known to act as molecular chaperones. By assisting proper folding and transport of proteins, and by assisting in the degradation of aberrant proteins, they play key roles in cellular metabolism. The

  15. The 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with heat shock protein Hsp60 and cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Arima, Kunimasa; Yamamura, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family consists of acidic 30-kDa proteins composed of 7 isoforms expressed abundantly in neurons and glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The 14-3-3 protein identified in the cerebrospinal fluid provides a surrogate marker for premortem diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although an active involvement of 14-3-3 in the pathogenesis of prion diseases remains unknown. By protein overlay and mass spectrometric analysis of protein extract of NTera2-derived differentiated neurons, we identified heat shock protein Hsp60 as a 14-3-3-interacting protein. The 14-3-3zeta and gamma isoforms interacted with Hsp60, suggesting that the interaction is not isoform-specific. Furthermore, the interaction was identified in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma, U-373MG astrocytoma, and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells. The cellular prion protein (PrPC) along with Hsp60 was coimmunoprecipitated with 14-3-3 in the human brain protein extract. By protein overlay, 14-3-3 interacted with both recombinant human Hsp60 and PrPC produced by Escherichia coli, indicating that the molecular interaction is phosphorylation-independent. The 14-3-3-binding domain was located in the N-terminal half (NTF) of Hsp60 spanning amino acid residues 27-287 and the NTF of PrPC spanning amino acid residues 23-137. By immunostaining, the 14-3-3 protein Hsp60 and PrPC were colocalized chiefly in the mitochondria of human neuronal progenitor cells in culture, and were coexpressed most prominently in neurons and reactive astrocytes in the human brain. These observations indicate that the 14-3-3 protein forms a molecular complex with Hsp60 and PrPC in the human CNS under physiological conditions and suggest that this complex might become disintegrated in the pathologic process of prion diseases.

  16. Molecular and cellular characterization of a zebrafish optic pathway tumor line implicates glia-derived progenitors in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staci L Solin

    Full Text Available In this study we describe the molecular and cellular characterization of a zebrafish mutant that develops tumors in the optic pathway. Heterozygous Tg(flk1:RFPis18 transgenic adults develop tumors of the retina, optic nerve and optic tract. Molecular and genetic mapping demonstrate the tumor phenotype is linked to a high copy number transgene array integrated in the lincRNA gene lincRNAis18/Zv9_00007276 on chromosome 3. TALENs were used to isolate a 147 kb deletion allele that removes exons 2-5 of the lincRNAis18 gene. Deletion allele homozygotes are viable and do not develop tumors, indicating loss of function of the lincRNAis18 locus is not the trigger for tumor onset. Optic pathway tumors in the Tg(flk1:RFPis18 mutant occur with a penetrance of 80-100% by 1 year of age. The retinal tumors are highly vascularized and composed of rosettes of various sizes embedded in a fibrous matrix. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased expression of the glial markers GFAP and BLBP throughout retinal tumors and in dysplastic optic nerve. We performed transcriptome analysis of pre-tumorous retina and retinal tumor tissue and found changes in gene expression signatures of radial glia and astrocytes (slc1a3, activated glia (atf3, blbp, apoeb, proliferating neural progenitors (foxd3, nestin, cdh2, her9/hes1, and glioma markers (S100β, vim. The transcriptome also revealed activation of cAMP, Stat3 and Wnt signal transduction pathways. qRT-PCR confirmed >10-fold overexpression of the Wnt pathway components hbegfa, ascl1a, and insm1a. Together the data indicate Müller glia and/or astrocyte-derived progenitors could contribute to the zebrafish Tg(flk1:RFPis18 optic pathway tumors.

  17. Cell-based assay for the detection of chemically induced cellular stress by immortalized untransformed transgenic hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vezzoni Paolo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary hepatocytes, one of the most widely used cell types for toxicological studies, have a very limited life span and must be freshly derived from mice or even humans. Attempts to use stable cell lines maintaining the enzymatic pattern of liver cells have been so far unsatisfactory. Stress proteins (heat shock proteins, HSPs have been proposed as general markers of cellular injury and their use for environmental monitoring has been suggested. The aim of this work is to develop a bi-transgenic hepatocyte cell line in order to evaluate the ability of various organic and inorganic chemicals to induce the expression of the HSP70 driven reporter gene. We previously described transgenic mice (Hsp70/hGH secreting high levels of human Growth Hormone (hGH following exposure to toxic compounds in vivo and in vitro in primary cultures derived from different organs. In addition, we also reported another transgenic model (AT/cytoMet allowing the reproducible immortalization of untransformed hepatocytes retaining in vitro complex liver functions. Results The transgenic mouse line Hsp70/hGH was crossed with the AT/cytoMet transgenic strain permitting the reproducible immortalization of untransformed hepatocytes. From double transgenic animals we derived several stable hepatic cell lines (MMH-GH which showed a highly-differentiated phenotype as judged from the retention of epithelial cell polarity and the profile of gene expression, including hepatocyte-enriched transcription factors and detoxifying enzymes. In these cell lines, stresses induced by exposure to inorganic [Sodium Arsenite (NaAsO2 and Cadmium Chloride (CdCl2], and organic [Benzo(aPyrene (BaP, PentaChloroPhenol (PCP, TetraChloroHydroQuinone (TCHQ, 1-Chloro-2,4-DiNitro-Benzene (CDNB] compounds, specifically induced hGH release in the culture medium. Conclusions MMH-GH, an innovative model to evaluate the toxic potential of chemical and physical xenobiotics, provides a simple

  18. Wiring olfaction: the cellular and molecular mechanisms that guide the development of synaptic connections from the nose to the cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando De Castro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the central nervous system, the olfactory system fascinates by its developmental and physiological particularities, and is one of the most studied models to understand the mechanisms underlying the guidance of growing axons to their appropriate targets. A constellation of contact-mediated (laminins, CAMs, ephrins, etc. and secreted mechanisms (semaphorins, slits, growth factors, etc. are known to play different roles in the establishment of synaptic interactions between the olfactory epithelium, olfactory bulb (OB and olfactory cortex. Specific mechanisms of this system (including the amazing family of about 1000 different olfactory receptors have been also proposed. In the last years, different reviews have focused in partial sights, specially in the mechanisms involved in the formation of the olfactory nerve, but a detailed review of the mechanisms implicated in the development of the connections among the different olfactory structures (olfactory epithelium, OB, olfactory cortex remains to be written. In the present work, we afford this systematic review: the different cellular and molecular mechanisms which rule the formation of the olfactory nerve, the lateral olfactory tract and the intracortical connections, as well as the few data available regarding the accessory olfactory system. These mechanisms are compared, and the implications of the differences and similarities discussed in this fundamental scenario of ontogeny.

  19. Biocompatible and pH Sensitive PLGA Encapsulated MnO Nanocrystals for Molecular and Cellular MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Lobo, Tricia L.; Nkansah, Michael K.; Ulas, Gözde; Brudvig, Gary W.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic manganese based particles are becoming attractive for molecular and cellular imaging, due to their ability to provide bright contrast on MRI, as opposed to the dark contrast generated from iron based particles. Using a single emulsion technique, we have successfully fabricated pH sensitive, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) encapsulated manganese oxide (MnO) nanocrystals. Two classes of particles were fabricated at ~ 140 nm and 1.7 μm, and incorporated 15 to 20 nm MnO nanocrystals with high encapsulation efficiencies. Intact particles at physiological pH cause little contrast in MRI, but following endocytosis into low pH compartments within the cells, the particles erode, and MnO dissolves to release Mn2+. This causes the cells to appear bright on MR images. The magnitude of the change in MRI properties is as high as 35-fold, making it the most dynamic ‘smart’ MRI contrast agent yet reported. Possible applications of these MnO particles include slow release Mn2+, tumor targeting, and confirmation of cell uptake. PMID:21495676

  20. Biocompatible and pH-sensitive PLGA encapsulated MnO nanocrystals for molecular and cellular MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewitz, Margaret F; Lobo, Tricia L; Nkansah, Michael K; Ulas, Gözde; Brudvig, Gary W; Shapiro, Erik M

    2011-05-24

    Inorganic manganese-based particles are becoming attractive for molecular and cellular imaging, due to their ability to provide bright contrast on MRI, as opposed to the dark contrast generated from iron-based particles. Using a single emulsion technique, we have successfully fabricated pH-sensitive poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-encapsulated manganese oxide (MnO) nanocrystals. Two classes of particles were fabricated at ∼140 nm and 1.7 μm and incorporated 15 to 20 nm MnO nanocrystals with high encapsulation efficiencies. Intact particles at physiological pH cause little contrast in MRI, but following endocytosis into low pH compartments within the cells, the particles erode and MnO dissolves to release Mn(2+). This causes the cells to appear bright on MR images. The magnitude of the change in MRI properties is as high as 35-fold, making it the most dynamic "smart" MRI contrast agent yet reported. Possible applications of these MnO particles include slow release Mn(2+), tumor targeting, and confirmation of cell uptake.

  1. Identification and molecular characterization of cellular factors required for glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mRNA decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ok Hyun; Park, Joori; Yu, Mira; An, Hyoung-Tae; Ko, Jesang; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) has been shown recently to bind a subset of mRNAs and elicit rapid mRNA degradation. However, the molecular details of GR-mediated mRNA decay (GMD) remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that GMD triggers rapid degradation of target mRNAs in a translation-independent and exon junction complex-independent manner, confirming that GMD is mechanistically distinct from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Efficient GMD requires PNRC2 (proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein 2) binding, helicase ability, and ATM-mediated phosphorylation of UPF1 (upstream frameshift 1). We also identify two GMD-specific factors: an RNA-binding protein, YBX1 (Y-box-binding protein 1), and an endoribonuclease, HRSP12 (heat-responsive protein 12). In particular, using HRSP12 variants, which are known to disrupt trimerization of HRSP12, we show that HRSP12 plays an essential role in the formation of a functionally active GMD complex. Moreover, we determine the hierarchical recruitment of GMD factors to target mRNAs. Finally, our genome-wide analysis shows that GMD targets a variety of transcripts, implicating roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including immune responses.

  2. Molecular and cellular aspects of mental retardation in the Fragile X syndrome: from gene mutation/s to spine dysmorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; Fernández, Esperanza; Buzzi, Andrea; Di Marino, Daniele; Bagni, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most frequent form of inherited mental retardation and also considered a monogenic cause of Autism Spectrum Disorder. FXS symptoms include neurodevelopmental delay, anxiety, hyperactivity, and autistic-like behavior. The disease is due to mutations or loss of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein abundant in the brain and gonads, the two organs mainly affected in FXS patients. FMRP has multiple functions in RNA metabolism, including mRNA decay, dendritic targeting of mRNAs, and protein synthesis. In neurons lacking FMRP, a wide array of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in synaptic structure and function are altered. As a result of this complex dysregulation, in the absence of FMRP, spine morphology and functioning is impaired. Consistently, model organisms for the study of the syndrome recapitulate the phenotype observed in FXS patients, such as dendritic spine anomalies and defects in learning. Here, we review the fundamentals of genetic and clinical aspects of FXS, devoting a specific attention to ASD comorbidity and FXS-related diseases. We also review the current knowledge on FMRP functions through structural, molecular, and cellular findings. Finally, we discuss the neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral defects caused by FMRP loss, as well as the current treatments able to partially revert some of the FXS abnormalities.

  3. Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by which Total Saponin Extracted from Tribulus Terrestris Protects Against Artherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengquan Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Total saponin extracted from Tribulus terrestris (TSETT has been reported to protect against atherosclerosis. We here investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TSETT underlying protection against atherosclerosis. Methods: Cell proliferation was measured with Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT; Intracellular H2O2 was measured with DCFH-DA, a fluorescent dye; Intracellular free Ca2+ was measured with a confocal laser scanning microscopy; Genes expression was measured with gene array and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2 was measured with cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and western blotting. Results: TSETT significantly suppressed the increase in cells proliferation induced by angiotensin II, significantly suppressed the increase in the intracellular production of H2O2 induced by angiotensin II, significantly inhibited the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ induced by H2O2, significantly inhibited the increase in phospho-ERK1/2 induced by angiotensin II; significantly inhibited the increase in mRNA expression of c-fos, c-jun and pkc-α induced by angiotensin II. Conclusion: These findings provide a new insight into the antiatherosclerotic properties of TSETT and provide a pharmacological basis for the clinical application of TSETT in anti-atherosclerosis.

  5. CD34(-) cells at the apex of the human hematopoietic stem cell hierarchy have distinctive cellular and molecular signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Currie, Erin; Palmer, Hector G; Foster, Katie E; Taussig, David C; Bonnet, Dominique

    2013-08-01

    In addition to well-characterized CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), the human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) hierarchy contains a rare CD34(-) population with severe combined immunodeficiency-repopulating capacity. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of these CD34(-) cells or their relationship to the CD34(+) populations. Here, we show that the self-renewing Lin(-)CD34(-)CD38(-)CD93(hi) population contains cells that not only function as HSCs, but can also be placed above the CD34(+) populations in the hematopoietic hierarchy. These cells have an active Notch pathway, in which signaling through Delta4 is crucial for maintenance of the primitive state, and combined signals from Jagged1 and TGF-β are important in controlling its quiescence. They are also refractory to proliferative signals and show a repressed canonical Wnt pathway, in part regulated by Notch. Overall, therefore, CD34(-) cells represent an immature and quiescent human HSC population maintained through a distinctive network of cellular signaling interactions.

  6. Is the microscopic stress computed from molecular simulations in mechanical equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    The microscopic stress field connects atomistic simulations with the mechanics of materials at the nano-scale through statistical mechanics. However, its definition remains ambiguous. In a recent work we showed that this is not only a theoretical problem, but rather that it greatly affects local stress calculations from molecular simulations. We find that popular definitions of the local stress, which are continuously being employed to understand the mechanics of various systems at the nanoscale, violate the continuum statements of mechanical equilibrium. We exemplify these facts in local stress calculations of defective graphene, lipid bilayers, and fibrous proteins. Furthermore, we propose a new physical and sound definition of the microscopic stress that satisfies the continuum equations of balance, irrespective of the many-body nature of the inter-atomic potential. Thus, our proposal provides an unambiguous link between discrete-particle models and continuum mechanics at the nanoscale.

  7. Physiological and Molecular Features of Puccinellia tenuiflora Tolerating Salt and Alkaline-Salt Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Zhang; Liqin Wei; Zizhang Wang; Tai Wang

    2013-01-01

    Saline-alkali soil seriously threatens agriculture productivity; therefore,understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to alkaline-salt stress has become a major challenge.Halophytic Puccinellia tenuiflora can tolerate salt and alkaline-salt stress,and is thus an ideal plant for studying this tolerance mechanism.In this study,we examined the salt and alkaline-salt stress tolerance of P.tenuiflora,and analyzed gene expression profiles under these stresses.Physiological experiments revealed that P.tenuiflora can grow normally with maximum stress under 600 mmol/L NaCl and 150 mmol/L Na2CO3 (pH 11.0)for 6 d.We identified 4,982 unigenes closely homologous to rice and barley.Furthermore,1,105 genes showed differentially expressed profiles under salt and alkaline-salt treatments.Differentially expressed genes were overrepresented in functions of photosynthesis,oxidation reduction,signal transduction,and transcription regulation.Almost all genes downregulated under salt and alkaline-salt stress were related to cell structure,photosynthesis,and protein synthesis.Comparing with salt stress,alkaline-salt stress triggered more differentially expressed genes and significantly upregulated genes related to H+ transport and citric acid synthesis.These data indicate common and diverse features of salt and alkalinesalt stress tolerance,and give novel insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms of plant salt and alkaline-salt tolerance.

  8. Lagrangian viscoelastic flow computations using a generalized molecular stress function model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2002-01-01

    –Sawyers fluid to a fluid described by a generalized molecular stress function (MSF) model allowing the use of dissipative convective constraint release in the constitutive equation. The convergence of the method is demonstrated on the axis-symmetric problem of the inflation of a polymeric membrane only...

  9. Calculation of Cauchy stress tensor in molecular dynamics system with a generalized Irving-Kirkwood formulism

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jerry Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Irving and Kirkwood formulism (IK formulism) provides a way to compute continuum mechanics quantities at certain location in terms of molecular variables. To make the approach more practical in computer simulation, Hardy proposed to use a spacial kernel function that couples continuum quantities with atomistic information. To reduce irrational fluctuations, Murdoch proposed to use a temporal kernel function to smooth the physical quantities obtained in Hardy's approach. In this paper, we generalize the original IK formulism to systematically incorporate both spacial and temporal average. The Cauchy stress tensor is derived in this generalized IK formulism (g-IK formulism). Analysis is given to illuminate the connection and difference between g-IK formulism and traditional temporal post-process approach. The relationship between Cauchy stress and first Piola-Kirchhoff stress is restudied in the framework of g-IK formulism. Numerical experiments using molecular dynamics are conducted to examine the analysis res...

  10. Influence of arsenic stress on synthesis and localization of low-molecular-weight thiols in Pteris vittata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yuki [Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita 9, Nishi 9, Kitaku, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshihiro, E-mail: nabe@chem.agr.hokudai.ac.j [Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita 9, Nishi 9, Kitaku, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan); Wasaki, Jun [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-7-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Senoura, Takeshi [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, 1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Shinano, Takuro [National Agricultural Research Center for Hokkaido Region, Sapporo 062-8555 (Japan); Osaki, Mitsuru [Research Faculty of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita 9, Nishi 9, Kitaku, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The roles of low-molecular-weight thiols (LMWTs), such as glutathione and phytochelatins, in arsenic (As) tolerance and hyperaccumulation in Pteris vittata an As-hyperaccumulator fern remain to be better understood. This study aimed to thoroughly characterize LMWT synthesis in P. vittata to understand the roles played by LMWTs in As tolerance and hyperaccumulation. LMWT synthesis in P. vittata was induced directly by As, and not by As-mediated oxidative stress. Expression of PvECS2, one of the putative genes of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}ECS), increases in P. vittata shoots at 48 h after the onset of As exposure, almost corresponding to the increase in the concentrations of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine and glutathione. Furthermore, localization of As showed similar trends to those of LMWTs in fronds at both whole-frond and cellular levels. This study thus indicates the specific contribution of LMWTs to As tolerance in P. vittata. {gamma}ECS may be responsible for the As-induced enhancement of LMWT synthesis. - Pteris vittata specifically enhances low-molecular-weight thiol synthesis against arsenic toxicities

  11. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a "priming" dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a "challenge" dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results: Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions: This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions.

  12. Stress, stress hormones, and the behavioral neurobiology of brain plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM; Beldhuis, HJA; vanderZee, EA; Roozendaal, B; Douma, B; Ishikawa, K; McGaugh, JL; Sakata, H

    1996-01-01

    Efforts have long been directed toward studying stress-induced alterations via stress hormones on brain excitability and synaptic plasticity as inferred from combined behavioral, electrophysiological, and immunohistochemical cellular/molecular observations. Kindling of the brain in the rat serves as

  13. Heat Stress Related Gene Expression in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEMIREL; Ufuk; GR; M; Atilla; KARAKU; Mehmet; MEMON; Abdul; Rezaque

    2008-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major limiting factor to crop productivity,and heat stress is one of the important elements for reduced crop production.Plants respond to heat stress at molecular and cellular levels as well as physiological level.Heat stress alters expression patterns of numerous genes in plants.

  14. Reduced evolvability of Escherichia coli MDS42, an IS-less cellular chassis for molecular and synthetic biology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blattner Frederick R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolvability is an intrinsic feature of all living cells. However, newly emerging, evolved features can be undesirable when genetic circuits, designed and fabricated by rational, synthetic biological approaches, are installed in the cell. Streamlined-genome E. coli MDS42 is free of mutation-generating IS elements, and can serve as a host with reduced evolutionary potential. Results We analyze an extreme case of toxic plasmid clone instability, and show that random host IS element hopping, causing inactivation of the toxic cloned sequences, followed by automatic selection of the fast-growing mutants, can prevent the maintenance of a clone developed for vaccine production. Analyzing the molecular details, we identify a hydrophobic protein as the toxic byproduct of the clone, and show that IS elements spontaneously landing in the cloned fragment relieve the cell from the stress by blocking transcription of the toxic gene. Bioinformatics analysis of sequence reads from early shotgun genome sequencing projects, where clone libraries were constructed and maintained in E. coli, suggests that such IS-mediated inactivation of ectopic genes inhibiting the growth of the E. coli cloning host might happen more frequently than generally anticipated, leading to genomic instability and selection of altered clones. Conclusions Delayed genetic adaptation of clean-genome, IS-free MDS42 host improves maintenance of unstable genetic constructs, and is suggested to be beneficial in both laboratory and industrial settings.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Study for Channel Size Dependence of Shear Stress Between Droplet and Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Akinori; Mima, Toshiki; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the channel size dependence of the shear stress between water droplets and solid walls in nm-order channel was analyzed. We considered a several different-sized and highly hydrophobic channel whose macroscopic contact angle was about 150 degrees. We have evaluated the shear stress and the normal pressure by molecular dynamics simulation. Analyzing shear stress and normal pressure based on the macroscopic model, we have discussed the difference between the macroscopic model based on hydrodynamics and the microscopic model. As a result, in the high hydrophobic case, it became clear that the shear stress depends on the channel size due to the large Laplace pressure. Furthermore, in the case that the channel size was less than 50 A, the normal pressure by the molecular simulation didn't agree with the expected value from the Young-Laplace equation. From this study it was clear that molecular simulation is needed when the channel size is less than 40 A.

  16. Molecular basis for vulnerability to mitochondrial and oxidative stress in a neuroendocrine CRI-G1 cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Chandiramani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many age-associated disorders (including diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, which leads to impaired cellular bioenergetics and increased oxidative stress. However, it is not known what genetic and molecular pathways underlie differential vulnerability to mitochondrial dysfunction observed among different cell types. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Starting with an insulinoma cell line as a model for a neuronal/endocrine cell type, we isolated a novel subclonal line (named CRI-G1-RS that was more susceptible to cell death induced by mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors than the parental CRI-G1 line (renamed CRI-G1-RR for clarity. Compared to parental RR cells, RS cells were also more vulnerable to direct oxidative stress, but equally vulnerable to mitochondrial uncoupling and less vulnerable to protein kinase inhibition-induced apoptosis. Thus, differential vulnerability to mitochondrial toxins between these two cell types likely reflects differences in their ability to handle metabolically generated reactive oxygen species rather than differences in ATP production/utilization or in downstream apoptotic machinery. Genome-wide gene expression analysis and follow-up biochemical studies revealed that, in this experimental system, increased vulnerability to mitochondrial and oxidative stress was associated with (1 inhibition of ARE/Nrf2/Keap1 antioxidant pathway; (2 decreased expression of antioxidant and phase I/II conjugation enzymes, most of which are Nrf2 transcriptional targets; (3 increased expression of molecular chaperones, many of which are also considered Nrf2 transcriptional targets; (4 increased expression of β cell-specific genes and transcription factors that specify/maintain β cell fate; and (5 reconstitution of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The molecular profile presented here will enable identification of individual genes or

  17. Molecular mechanisms of anti-aging hormetic effects of mild heat stress on human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh I S; Eskildsen-Helmond, Yvonne E G; Beedholm, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    at the levels of maintenance of stress protein profile; reduction in the accumulation of oxidatively and glycoxidatively damaged proteins; stimulation of the proteasomal activities for the degradation of abnormal proteins; improved cellular resistance to ethanol, hydrogenperoxide, and ultraviolet-B rays......; and enhanced levels of various antioxidant enzymes. We are now undertaking a detailed analysis of the signal transduction pathways to determine alterations in the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation states of extracellular signal-related kinase, c-Jun terminal kinase and p38 MAP-kinases as a measure...

  18. Molecular Origins of Higher Harmonics in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow: Shear Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey; Schmalzer, Andrew; Bird, R. B.

    Recent work has focused on understanding the molecular origins of higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. These higher harmonics have been explained using only the orientation distribution of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian fluid, which neglects molecular interactions and is the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity [R.B. Bird et al., J Chem Phys, 140, 074904 (2014)]. We explore these molecular interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory that accounts for restricted polymer motions arising when chains are concentrated [Fan and Bird, JNNFM, 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ =0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1 1 8 8 to rod-climbing, 1 1 2 2 >= ɛ >= 3 3 4 4 to reasonable shear-thinning predictions in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ =1 to a dilute solution of chains. We examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases, ɛ = 0 , 1 0 , 1 8 , 3 3 8 8 8 , 3 3 8 8 , 1 , of the Curtiss-Bird model, and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  19. Effects of 900-MHz electromagnetic field emitted from cellular phone on brain oxidative stress and some vitamin levels of guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, Ismail; Mert, Handan; Mert, Nihat; Deger, Yeter; Yoruk, Ibrahim; Yetkin, Ayşen; Keskin, Siddik

    2007-09-12

    This study was designed to demonstrate the effects of 900-MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted from cellular phone on brain tissue and also blood malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), retinol (vitamin A), vitamin D(3) and tocopherol (vitamin E) levels, and catalase (CAT) enzyme activity of guinea pigs. Fourteen male guinea pigs, weighing 500-800 g were randomly divided into one of two experimental groups: control and treatment (EMF-exposed), each containing seven animals. Animals in treatment group were exposed to 890- to 915-MHz EMF (217-Hz pulse rate, 2-W maximum peak power, SAR 0.95 w/kg) of a cellular phone for 12 h/day (11-h 45-min stand-by and 15-min spiking mode) for 30 days. Control guinea pigs were housed in a separate room without exposing EMF of a cellular phone. Blood samples were collected through a cardiac puncture and brains were removed after decapitation for the biochemical analysis at the end of the 30 days of experimental period. It was found that the MDA level increased (P0.05) in the brain tissues of EMF-exposed guinea pigs. In addition, MDA, vitamins A, D(3) and E levels, and CAT enzyme activity increased (Pelectromagnetic field emitted from cellular phone might produce oxidative stress in brain tissue of guinea pigs. However, more studies are needed to demonstrate whether these effects are harmful or/and affect the neural functions.

  20. Cellular and Molecular Dynamics of Th17 Differentiation and its Developmental Plasticity in the Intestinal Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Suniti; Basu, Rajatava

    2017-01-01

    developmental axes with related cellular subsets such as Th22, Th1, and iTreg in the context of intestinal inflammation and also examine the molecular and epigenetic features of Th17 cells that mediate these overlapping developmental programs.

  1. Structure and stress in Cu/Au and Fe/Au systems: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zientarski, Tomasz, E-mail: martom@dyzio.umcs.lublin.pl [Department for the Modelling of Physico-Chemical Processes, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, ul. Gliniana 33, 20-614 Lublin (Poland); Chocyk, Dariusz [Department of Applied Physics, Lublin University of Technology, ul. Nadbystrzycka 38, 20-618 Lublin (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Growth of Fe and Cu thin films on Au substrate and stress evolution were modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The interactions in the system are described by embedded atom method. The kinematical theory of scattering is performed to identify the structure obtained from simulations. The gold layers undergo reconstruction before deposition. The deposited copper atoms do not disturb the atoms in the reconstructed gold layer, but the deposited iron atoms cause the disappearance of the reconstructed gold surfaces. In both systems Cu/Au and Fe/Au, in the early stage of growth one observes compressive stress. Next, Cu/Au systems have the compressive stress, while in the case of Fe/Au the tensile stress is observed. In the Fe/Au system, the body-centered cubic lattice of Fe changes its orientation relative to the Au layer. In the Fe/Au system we observed a larger diffusion of Au atoms than in Cu/Au systems. - Highlights: • The kinematical theory of scattering is performed to identify the structure. • The correlation between the stress and the deformation is observed. • The relaxation of the stress depends on the orientation of layers. • The lattice of Fe changes its orientation relative to the Au layer in the Fe/Au system. • The Cu layer continues the lattice of Au in the Cu/Au system.

  2. Deranged Bioenergetics and Defective Redox Capacity in T Lymphocytes and Neutrophils Are Related to Cellular Dysfunction and Increased Oxidative Stress in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Jen Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyllysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT, was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients.

  3. The MAP kinase-activated protein kinase Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xichuan; Du, Wei; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Lilin; Zhu, Zhiyan; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-06-01

    Rck2p is the Hog1p-MAP kinase-activated protein kinase required for the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to an osmotic challenge in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rck2p also regulates rapamycin sensitivity in both S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that the deletion of CaRCK2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to, and CaRck2p translocates from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to, cell wall stresses caused by Congo red, Calcoflor White, elevated heat and zymolyase. However, the kinase activity of CaRck2p is not required for the cellular response to these cell wall stresses. Furthermore, transcripts of cell wall protein-encoding genes CaBGL2, CaHWP1 and CaXOG1 are reduced in C. albicans cells lacking CaRCK2. The deletion of CaRCK2 also reduces the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans and its virulence in a mouse model of systemic candidasis. The kinase activity of CaRck2p is required for the virulence, but not for the in vitro filamentation, in C. albicans. Therefore, Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen C. albicans.

  4. Reducing residual stresses and deformations in selective laser melting through multi-level multi-scale optimization of cellular scanning strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and deformations continue to remain one of the primary challenges towards expanding the scope of selective laser melting as an industrial scale manufacturing process. While process monitoring and feedback-based process control of the process has shown significant potential, there is still dearth of techniques to tackle the issue. Numerical modelling of selective laser melting process has thus been an active area of research in the last few years. However, large computational resource requirements have slowed the usage of these models for optimizing the process. In this paper, a calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model coupled with a 3D finite element mechanical model is used to simulate residual stress formation and deformations during selective laser melting. The resulting reduction in thermal model computation time allows evolutionary algorithm-based optimization of the process. A multilevel optimization strategy is adopted using a customized genetic algorithm developed for optimizing cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting, with an objective of reducing residual stresses and deformations. The resulting thermo-mechanically optimized cellular scanning strategies are compared with standard scanning strategies and have been used to manufacture standard samples.

  5. Molecular biomarkers and adaptation to environmental stress in moon jelly (Aurelia spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Werner; Ender, Andrea; Schierwater, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    We describe a strategy that identifies molecular biomarkers and links the study of abiotic stress to evolutionary history. By utilizing the moon jellyfish Aurelia spp. as a model, we identified genes differentially regulated in response to the chemical stressor tributyltin by means of complementary DNA subtraction analyses. Expression of 3 out of 25 identified candidate genes, one oxidative stress gene, one heat shock (hsp70) gene, and one GTP-binding gene, was quantified under laboratory conditions and in field tests using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Differential expression patterns were found following exposure to tributyltin and temperature treatments. The findings suggest that the identified genes are involved in response to chemical as well as heat- induced stress and may serve as biomarkers for monitoring marine habitats. Gene regulatory patterns combined with phylogenetic inferences of the hsp70 gene support a possible role of ecologically driven divergence within the genus Aurelia. We show that added information on genetic variability can raise the predictive power of molecular biomarkers in studies of individual stress response.

  6. Exploring the molecular mechanism of acute heat stress exposure in broiler chickens using gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Q B; Song, X Y; Ji, C L; Zhang, X Q; Zhang, D X

    2014-08-10

    The process of heat regulation is complex and its exact molecular mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, to investigate the global gene regulation response to acute heat exposure, gene microarrays were exploited to analyze the effects of heat stress on three tissues (brain, liver, leg muscle) of the yellow broiler chicken (Gallus gallus). We detected 166 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the brain, 219 in the leg muscle and 317 in the liver. Six of these genes were differentially expressed in all three tissues and were validated by qRT-PCR, and included heat shock protein genes (HSPH1, HSP25), apoptosis-related genes (RB1CC1, BAG3), a cell proliferation and differentiation-related gene (ID1) and the hunger and energy metabolism related gene (PDK). All these genes might be important factors in chickens suffering from heat stress. We constructed gene co-expression networks using the DEGs of the brain, leg muscle and liver and two, four and two gene co-expression modules were identified in these tissues, respectively. Functional enrichment of these gene modules revealed that various functional clusters were related to the effects of heat stress, including those for cytoskeleton, extracellular space, ion binding and energy metabolism. We concluded that these genes and functional clusters might be important factors in chickens under acute heat stress. Further in-depth research on the newly discovered heat-related genes and functional clusters is required to fully understand their molecular functions in thermoregulation.

  7. Quantifying the global cellular thiol-disulfide status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa E; Roth, Doris; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the redox status of protein thiols is of central importance to protein structure and folding and that glutathione is an important low-molecular-mass redox regulator. However, the total cellular pools of thiols and disulfides and their relative abundance have never been...... redox pool than glutathione. Accordingly, protein thiols are likely to be directly involved in the cellular defense against oxidative stress....

  8. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response.

  9. Time-course profiling of molecular stress responses to silver nanoparticles in the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Simonsen, Vibeke;

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity, particularly its temporal aspect, is currently limited in the literature. This study seeks to identify and profile changes in molecular response patterns over time during soil exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to AgNPs (82±27 nm......) with reference to dissolved silver salt (AgNO3). Principal component analysis of selected gene and enzyme response profiles revealed dissimilar patterns between AgNO3 and AgNP treatments and also over time. Despite the observed difference in molecular profiles, the body burdens of total Ag were within the same...... range (10–40 mg/kg dry weight worm) for both treatments with apparent correlation to the induction pattern of metallothionein. AgNO3 induced the genes and enzymes related to oxidative stress at day 1, after which markers of energy metabolism were all suppressed at day 2. Exposure to AgNPs likewise led...

  10. Influence of arsenic stress on synthesis and localization of low-molecular-weight thiols in Pteris vittata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuki; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Wasaki, Jun; Senoura, Takeshi; Shinano, Takuro; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2010-12-01

    The roles of low-molecular-weight thiols (LMWTs), such as glutathione and phytochelatins, in arsenic (As) tolerance and hyperaccumulation in Pteris vittata an As-hyperaccumulator fern remain to be better understood. This study aimed to thoroughly characterize LMWT synthesis in P. vittata to understand the roles played by LMWTs in As tolerance and hyperaccumulation. LMWT synthesis in P. vittata was induced directly by As, and not by As-mediated oxidative stress. Expression of PvECS2, one of the putative genes of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γECS), increases in P. vittata shoots at 48h after the onset of As exposure, almost corresponding to the increase in the concentrations of γ-glutamylcysteine and glutathione. Furthermore, localization of As showed similar trends to those of LMWTs in fronds at both whole-frond and cellular levels. This study thus indicates the specific contribution of LMWTs to As tolerance in P. vittata. γECS may be responsible for the As-induced enhancement of LMWT synthesis.

  11. Pre-analytical and post-analytical evaluation in the era of molecular diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases: cellularity control and internal control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loria Bianchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increase of molecular tests performed on DNA extracted from various biological materials should not be carried out without an adequate standardization of the pre-analytical and post-analytical phase. Materials and Methods. Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of internal control (IC to standardize pre-analytical phase and the role of cellularity control (CC in the suitability evaluation of biological matrices, and their influence on false negative results. 120 cervical swabs (CS were pre-treated and extracted following 3 different protocols. Extraction performance was evaluated by amplification of: IC, added in each mix extraction; human gene HPRT1 (CC with RT-PCR to quantify sample cellularity; L1 region of HPV with SPF10 primers. 135 urine, 135 urethral swabs, 553 CS and 332 ThinPrep swabs (TP were tested for C. trachomatis (CT and U. parvum (UP with RT-PCR and for HPV by endpoint-PCR. Samples were also tested for cellularity. Results. Extraction protocol with highest average cellularity (Ac/sample showed lowest number of samples with inhibitors; highest HPV positivity was achieved by protocol with greatest Ac/PCR. CS and TP under 300.000 cells/sample showed a significant decrease of UP (P<0.01 and HPV (P<0.005 positivity. Female urine under 40.000 cells/mL were inadequate to detect UP (P<0.05. Conclusions. Our data show that IC and CC allow optimization of pre-analytical phase, with an increase of analytical quality. Cellularity/sample allows better sample adequacy evaluation, crucial to avoid false negative results, while cellularity/PCR allows better optimization of PCR amplification. Further data are required to define the optimal cut-off for result normalization.

  12. Comparison of the molecular topologies of stress-activated transcription factors HSF1, AP-1, NRF2, and NF-κB in their induction kinetics of HMOX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Tessa E; van der Veen, Jochem W; Vandebriel, Rob J; van Loveren, Henk; de Vink, Erik P; Pennings, Jeroen L A

    2014-10-01

    For cells, reacting aptly to changes in their environment is of critical importance. The protein Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) plays a critical role as a guard of cellular homeostasis and is considered as a reliable indicator of cellular oxidative stress. A better insight in the regulation of HMOX1 would assist in understanding the physiological role of HMOX1 as well as improving functional interpretation of the gene as a biomarker in toxicogenomics. Remarkably, as many as four transcription factors are known to regulate the HMOX1 gene: HSF1, AP-1, NRF2, and NF-κB. To investigate induction kinetics of these transcription factors, we constructed mathematical simulation models for each of them. We included the topology of the known interactions of molecules involved in the activation of the transcription factors, and the feedback loops resulting in their down-regulation. We evaluate how the molecular circuitries associated with the different transcription factors differ in their kinetics regarding HMOX1 induction, under different scenarios of acute and less acute stress. We also evaluate the combined effect of the four transcription factors on HMOX1 expression and the resulting alleviation of stress. Overall, the results support the assumption of different biological roles for the four transcription factors, with AP-1 being a fast acting general stress response protein at the expense of efficiency, and NRF2 being important for cellular homeostasis in maintaining low levels of oxidative stress.

  13. Enhancing crop resilience to combined abiotic and biotic stress through the dissection of physiological and molecular crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoudis, Christos; van de Wiel, Clemens; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Plants growing in their natural habitats are often challenged simultaneously by multiple stress factors, both abiotic and biotic. Research has so far been limited to responses to individual stresses, and understanding of adaptation to combinatorial stress is limited, but indicative of non-additive interactions. Omics data analysis and functional characterization of individual genes has revealed a convergence of signaling pathways for abiotic and biotic stress adaptation. Taking into account that most data originate from imposition of individual stress factors, this review summarizes these findings in a physiological context, following the pathogenesis timeline and highlighting potential differential interactions occurring between abiotic and biotic stress signaling across the different cellular compartments and at the whole plant level. Potential effects of abiotic stress on resistance components such as extracellular receptor proteins, R-genes and systemic acquired resistance will be elaborated, as well as crosstalk at the levels of hormone, reactive oxygen species, and redox signaling. Breeding targets and strategies are proposed focusing on either manipulation and deployment of individual common regulators such as transcription factors or pyramiding of non- (negatively) interacting components such as R-genes with abiotic stress resistance genes. We propose that dissection of broad spectrum stress tolerance conferred by priming chemicals may provide an insight on stress cross regulation and additional candidate genes for improving crop performance under combined stress. Validation of the proposed strategies in lab and field experiments is a first step toward the goal of achieving tolerance to combinatorial stress in crops.

  14. Enhancing crop resilience to combined abiotic and biotic stress through the dissection of physiological and molecular crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos eKissoudis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants growing in their natural habitats are often challenged simultaneously by multiple stress factors, both abiotic and biotic. Research has so far been limited to responses to individual stresses, and understanding of adaptation to combinatorial stress is limited, but indicative of non-additive interactions. Omics data analysis and functional characterization of individual genes has revealed a convergence of signalling pathways for abiotic and biotic stress adaptation. Taking into account that most data originate from imposition of individual stress factors, this review summarizes these findings in a physiological context, following the pathogenesis timeline and highlighting potential differential interactions occurring between abiotic and biotic stress signalling across the different cellular compartments and at the whole plant level. Potential effects of abiotic stress on resistance components such as extracellular receptor proteins, R-genes and systemic acquired resistance will be elaborated, as well as crosstalk at the levels of hormone, ROS and redox signalling. Breeding targets and strategies are proposed focusing on either manipulation and deployment of individual common regulators such as transcription factors or pyramiding of non- (negatively interacting components such as R-genes with abiotic stress resistance genes. We propose that dissection of broad spectrum stress tolerance conferred by priming chemicals may provide an insight on stress cross regulation and additional candidate genes for improving crop performance under combined stress. Validation of the proposed strategies in lab and field experiments is a first step towards the goal of achieving tolerance to combinatorial stress in crops.

  15. Identification of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) as a molecular gate for cellular export of cobalamin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm-Ebsen, Rasmus; van de Wetering, Koen; Hardlei, Tore;

    2010-01-01

    transporters by cellular gene silencing showed a role in cellular Cbl efflux of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-drug transporter, ABCC1, alias multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), which is present in the basolateral membrane of intestinal epithelium and in other cells. The ability of MRP1 to mediate ATP...... and kidney. In contrast, Cbl accumulates in the terminal part of the intestine of these mice, suggesting a functional malabsorption because of a lower epithelial basolateral Cbl efflux. The identification of this Cbl export mechanism now allows the delineation of a coherent pathway for Cbl trafficking from...

  16. Multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulation of atomic level stresses in Si(111)/Si3N4(0001) nanopixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Nakano, Aiichiro; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Vashishta, Priya; Ebbsjö, Ingvar; Madhukar, Anupam; Messina, Paul

    1998-04-01

    Ten million atom multiresolution molecular-dynamics simulations are performed on parallel computers to determine atomic-level stress distributions in a 54 nm nanopixel on a 0.1 μm silicon substrate. Effects of surfaces, edges, and lattice mismatch at the Si(111)/Si3N4(0001) interface on the stress distributions are investigated. Stresses are found to be highly inhomogeneous in the nanopixel. The top surface of silicon nitride has a compressive stress of +3 GPa and the stress is tensile, -1 GPa, in silicon below the interface.

  17. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  18. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambros, Maria Polikandritou, E-mail: mlambros@westernu.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Parsa, Cyrus [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Mulamalla, HariChandana [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Orlando, Robert [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Lau, Bernard [Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Huang, Ying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Pon, Doreen [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Chow, Moses [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We irradiated a 3-D human oral cell culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts with 12 and 2 Gy. {yields} 6 h after irradiation the histopathology and apoptosis of the 3-D culture were evaluated. Microarrays were used to assess the gene expression in the irradiated 3-D tissue. {yields} 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic changes and cellular apoptosis. {yields} 12 Gy significantly affected genes of the NF-kB pathway, inflammatory cytokines and DAMPs. -- Abstract: Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this

  19. Heat Stress Related Gene Expression in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEMIREL Ufuk; G(U)R M Atilla; KARAKU Mehmet; MEMON Abdul Rezaque

    2008-01-01

    @@ Abiotic stress is a major limiting factor to crop productivity,and heat stress is one of the important elements for reduced crop production.Plants respond to heat stress at molecular and cellular levels as well as physiological level.Heat stress alters expression patterns of numerous genes in plants.At the molecular level,most of the information for heat stress response was obtained from model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana,Medicago trancatula,and ,Oryza sativa,but little molecular research has focused on heat stress respones in cotton.

  20. The Physiological and Molecular Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to the Stress of Oxalic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-ting; LIN Jie; SHAO Xue-feng; OU Xiao-ming; WANG Zong-hua; LU Guo-dong

    2009-01-01

    Many fungal phytopathogens can secrete oxalic acid (OA), which is the crucial pathogenic determinant and plays important roles in pathogenicity and virulence of pathogen during infection process. However, how plants respond to OA stress still needs further characterization. In this study, we observed the physiological and molecular responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to OA stress. The leaves of 6-wk-old A. thaliana were sprayed with OA and distilled water respectively, and 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h later, the leaves were collected and the contents of MDA, H2O2, and GSH, and the activities of CAT, SOD, and POD were determined and the expressions of PR1 and PDF1.2 were also studied. Under the stress of 30 mmol L-1 OA, SOD activity was first enhanced to reduce the accumulation of O2-. But immediately, POD, CAT, and GSH all decreased extremely resulting in the accumulation of H2O2, and the MDA content increased 24 h later. GSH activity was enhanced significantly at 24 h after OA used. However, H2O2 wasn't eliminated at the same time, suggesting that the activity inhibitions of POD and CAT might be the reasons that caused Arabidopsis cells' impairment under OA stress. RT-PCR results indicated that PDF1.2, a marker gene of the JA/ET signaling was significantly induced; PR1, an indicator gene in SA signaling, was slighlty induced from 8 to 12 h after OA stress. In conclusion, Arabidopsis may recruit metabolism of reactive oxygen, both JA/ET and SA signaling pathways to respond to OA stress. These results will facilitate our further understanding the mechanisms of plant response to OA and OA-dependent fungal infection.

  1. Chronic mild stress alters circadian expressions of molecular clock genes in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kei; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tsukita, Sohei; Kaneko, Keizo; Shirai, Yuta; Munakata, Yuichiro; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Chronic stress is well known to affect metabolic regulation. However, molecular mechanisms interconnecting stress response systems and metabolic regulations have yet to be elucidated. Various physiological processes, including glucose/lipid metabolism, are regulated by the circadian clock, and core clock gene dysregulation reportedly leads to metabolic disorders. Glucocorticoids, acting as end-effectors of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, entrain the circadian rhythms of peripheral organs, including the liver, by phase-shifting core clock gene expressions. Therefore, we examined whether chronic stress affects circadian expressions of core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver using the chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure. In BALB/c mice, CMS elevated and phase-shifted serum corticosterone levels, indicating overactivation of the HPA axis. The rhythmic expressions of core clock genes, e.g., Clock, Npas2, Bmal1, Per1, and Cry1, were altered in the liver while being completely preserved in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuculeus (SCN), suggesting that the SCN is not involved in alterations in hepatic core clock gene expressions. In addition, circadian patterns of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes, e.g., peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (Ppar) α, Pparγ-1, Pparγ-coactivator-1α, and phosphoenolepyruvate carboxykinase, were also disturbed by CMS. In contrast, in C57BL/6 mice, the same CMS procedure altered neither serum corticosterone levels nor rhythmic expressions of hepatic core clock genes and metabolism-related genes. Thus, chronic stress can interfere with the circadian expressions of both core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver possibly involving HPA axis overactivation. This mechanism might contribute to metabolic disorders in stressful modern societies.

  2. Regulation of the hypertonic stress response and other cellular functions by the Rel-like transcription factor NFAT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramburu, José; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Estrada-Gelonch, Anaïs; Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Santiago, Verónica; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2006-11-30

    Stress, be it from environmental factors or intrinsic to the cell as result of growth and metabolism, can be harmful to cells. Mammalian cells have developed numerous mechanisms to respond to diverse forms of stress. These mechanisms combine signaling cascades and activation of gene expression programs to orchestrate an adaptive response that will allow the cell to survive and resume its normal functioning. In this review we will focus on the transcription factor NFAT5, a fundamental regulator of the response to osmotic stress in mammalian cells. Identified in 1999, NFAT5 is the latest addition to the Rel family, which comprises the NF-kappaB and NFATc proteins. Though in some of its structural and functional features NFAT5 is a hybrid between these two major groups of Rel proteins, it has unique characteristics that make it stand on its own as a third type of Rel transcription factor. Since its discovery, NFAT5 has been studied mostly in the context of the hypertonicity stress response. The advent of mouse models deficient in NFAT5 and other recent advances have confirmed a fundamental osmoprotective role for this factor in mammals, but also revealed features that suggest it may have a wider range of functions.

  3. Molecular mechanism of dehydrin in response to environmental stress in plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuxiu; WANG Zi; XU Jin

    2007-01-01

    Dehydrins, known as the D-11 subgroup of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, are an immunologically distinct family of proteins, which typically accumulate in desiccation-tolerant seed embryo or in vegetative tissues in response to various environmental stresses such as drought, salinity and freezing. The existence of conservative sequences designated as K, S, and Y segments is a structural feature of dehydrins, and the K segment found in all dehydrins represents a highly conserved 15 amino acid motif (EKKGIMDKIKEKLPG) and forms an amphiphilic a-helix. According to the arrangement of these domains and clustering analysis, dehydrins are subdivided into 5 subtypes: YnSK, Kn, KnS, SKn and YnK. Different types of dehydrins are induced by different environmental stress in plants. Study results showed that dehydrins might play important protective roles under abiotic stress via a number of different mechanisms, including improving or protecting enzyme activities by the cryoprotective activity in responding to freeze/thaw or dehydration; stabilizing vesicles or other endomembrane structures by function as the membrane stabilizer during freeze induced dehydration,and preventing the membrane system from the oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen radicals as the radical scavenger. Here, the gene expression and molecular mechanisms of dehydrin in response to stress in plants are discussed.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  5. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly.

  6. Decreased hepatic contents of coenzyme A molecular species in mice after subchronic mild social defeat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshifumi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Hagiya, Yuki; Chohnan, Shigeru; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Social stress may precipitate psychiatric disorders such as depression, which is related to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the effects of social stress on central and peripheral metabolism using a model of depression in mice. In the present study, we focused on coenzyme A (CoA) molecular species [i.e. non-esterified CoA (CoASH), acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA] which play important roles in numerous metabolic pathways, and we analyzed changes in expression of these molecules in the hypothalamus and liver of adult male mice (C57BL/6J) subjected to 10 days of subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) with ICR mice as aggressors. Mice (n = 12) exposed to showed hyperphagia- and polydipsia-like symptoms and increased body weight gain compared with control mice which were not affected by exposure to ICR mice (n = 12). To elucidate the underlying metabolic features in the sCSDS model, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and CoASH tissue levels were analyzed using the acyl-CoA cycling method. The levels of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, which decreases feeding behavior, were not influenced by sCSDS. However, sCSDS reduced levels of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and total CoA (sum of the three CoA molecular species) in the liver. Hence, hyperphagia-like symptoms in sCSDS mice evidently occurred independently of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, but might consequently lead to down-regulation of hepatic CoA via altered expression of nudix hydrolase 7. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the down-regulation of liver CoA pools in sCSDS mice.

  7. Molecular origins of higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, P. H.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent work has focused on deepening our understanding of the molecular origins of the higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. For instance, these higher harmonics have been explained by just considering the orientation distribution of rigid dumbbells suspended in a Newtonian solvent. These dumbbells, when in dilute suspension, form the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity, and this model specifically neglects interactions between the polymer molecules [R. B. Bird et al., "Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074904 (2014)]. In this paper, we explore these interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory designed specifically to account for the restricted motions that arise when polymer chains are concentrated, thus interacting and specifically, entangled. We begin our comparison using a heretofore ignored explicit analytical solution [X.-J. Fan and R. B. Bird, "A kinetic theory for polymer melts. VI. Calculation of additional material functions," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ = 0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1/8 to rod-climbing, 1/5 ≤ ɛ ≤ 3/4 to reasonable predictions for shear-thinning in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ = 1 to the dilute solution without hydrodynamic interaction. In this paper, we examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases ɛ = (" separators=" 0 , 1 / 8 , 3 / 8 , 1 ) , and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  8. Report on the Gordon Research Conference on Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Neural Plasticity (5th) Held at Wolfeboro, New Hampshire on 21-26 Jul 85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-12

    Neuroscience, University of Oregon) Monitoring the outgrowth of motor neurons with long-lived fluorescent dyes in Zebra fish . Jeff Lichtman (Dept Physiology and...coordinate action in stress. A remarkable consensus on the specific protein changes that occur in neural growth and regeneration was achieved in the...Neurobiology, Washington University, St. Louis) Changes in the molecular state of neurons during development and regeneration . Pate Skene (Dept

  9. The cytotoxicity and cellular stress by temperature-fabricated polyshaped gold nanoparticles using marine macroalgae, Padina gymnospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manoj; Saurav, Kumar; Majouga, Alexander; Kumari, Mamta; Kumar, Manish; Manikandan, S; Kumaraguru, A K

    2015-01-01

    Bioreduction of metal ions for the synthesis of stable nanoparticles (NPs) in physiological environment has been a great challenge in the field of nanotechnology and its application. In the present study, well-defined biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were developed following a biomimetic approach for an enhanced anticancer activity. The fucoxanthins-capped crystalline AuNPs showed a particle size of 14 nm. The temperature-mediated biosynthesized NPs were characterized by UV-vis, dynamic light scattering, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of the NPs was analyzed on liver (HepG2) and lung (A549) cancerous cells. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay infers that the biofunctionalized polyshaped AuNPs synthesized with an aqueous macroalgae extract showed a satisfactory anticancer effect on the cell lines, as evaluated by changes in cell morphology, cell viability, and metabolic activity. An altered cellular function and the morphology of cancer cell lines suggest a potential for in vivo application of AuNPs and the need to understand the interactions between nanomaterials, biomolecules, and cellular components. With continued improvements, these NPs may prove to be potential drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy.

  10. Altering endoplasmic reticulum stress in a model of blast-induced traumatic brain injury controls cellular fate and ameliorates neuropsychiatric symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric Flint Logsdon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal injury following blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI increases the risk for neuropsychiatric disorders, yet the pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB disruption, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and apoptosis have all been implicated in bTBI. Microvessel compromise is a primary effect of bTBI and is postulated to cause subcellular secondary effects such as ER stress. What remains unclear is how these secondary effects progress to personality disorders in humans exposed to head trauma. To investigate this we exposed male rats to a clinically relevant bTBI model we have recently developed. The study examined initial BBB disruption using Evan’s blue, ER stress mechanisms, apoptosis and impulsive-like behavior measured with elevated plus maze (EPM. Large BBB openings were observed immediately following bTBI, and persisted for at least 6 h. Data showed increased mRNA abundance of stress response genes at 3 h, with subsequent increases in the ER stress markers C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34 at 24 h. Caspase-12 and Caspase-3 were both cleaved at 24 h following bTBI. The ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal (SAL, was administered (1mg/kg i.p. to investigate its’ effects on neuronal injury and impulsive-like behavior associated with bTBI. SAL reduced CHOP protein expression, and diminished Caspase-3 cleavage, suggesting apoptosis attenuation. Interestingly, SAL also ameliorated impulsive-like behavior indicative of head trauma. These results suggest SAL plays a role in apoptosis regulation and the pathology of chronic disease. These observations provide evidence that bTBI involves ER stress and that the UPR is a promising molecular target for the attenuation of neuronal injury.

  11. Molecular basis for catalysis and substrate-mediated cellular stabilization of human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Forouhar, Farhad; Kim, Sung-Mi; Lew, Scott; Wang, YongQiang; Karkashon, Shay; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Hussain, Munif; Correia, Maria Almira; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) play a central role in tryptophan metabolism and are involved in many cellular and disease processes. Here we report the crystal structure of human TDO (hTDO) in a ternary complex with the substrates L-Trp and O2 and in a binary complex with the product N-formylkynurenine (NFK), defining for the first time the binding modes of both substrates and the product of this enzyme. The structure indicates that the dioxygenation reaction is initiated by a direct attack of O2 on the C2 atom of the L-Trp indole ring. The structure also reveals an exo binding site for L-Trp, located ~42 Å from the active site and formed by residues conserved among tryptophan-auxotrophic TDOs. Biochemical and cellular studies indicate that Trp binding at this exo site does not affect enzyme catalysis but instead it retards the degradation of hTDO through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. This exo site may therefore provide a novel L-Trp-mediated regulation mechanism for cellular degradation of hTDO, which may have important implications in human diseases. PMID:27762317

  12. Hormonal and molecular effects of restraint stress on formalin-induced pain-like behavior in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Caela C; Sadler, Katelyn E; Kolber, Benedict J

    2016-10-15

    The evolutionary advantages to the suppression of pain during a stressful event (stress-induced analgesia (SIA)) are obvious, yet the reasoning behind sex-differences in the expression of this pain reduction are not. The different ways in which males and females integrate physiological stress responses and descending pain inhibition are unclear. A potential supraspinal modulator of stress-induced analgesia is the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). This limbic brain region is involved in both the processing of stress and pain; the CeA is anatomically and molecularly linked to regions of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and descending pain network. The CeA exhibits sex-based differences in response to stress and pain that may differentially induce SIA in males and females. Here, sex-based differences in behavioral and molecular indices of SIA were examined following noxious stimulation. Acute restraint stress in male and female mice was performed prior to intraplantar injections of formalin, a noxious inflammatory agent. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors were measured for 60min following formalin injection and mechanical hypersensitivity was evaluated 120 and 180min post-injection. Restraint stress altered formalin-induced spontaneous behaviors in male and female mice and formalin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in male mice. To assess molecular indices of SIA, tissue samples from the CeA and blood samples were collected at the 180min time point. Restraint stress prevented formalin-induced increases in extracellular signal regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation in the male CeA, but no changes associated with pERK2 were seen with formalin or restraint in females. Sex differences were also seen in plasma corticosterone concentrations 180min post injection. These results demonstrate sex-based differences in behavioral, molecular, and hormonal indices of acute stress in mice that extend for 180min after stress and noxious stimulation.

  13. Proteasome-Mediated Processing of Def1, a Critical Step in the Cellular Response to Transcription Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Marcus D.; Harreman, Michelle; Taschner, Michael; Reid, James; Walker, Jane; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA damage triggers polyubiquitylation and degradation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), a “mechanism of last resort” employed during transcription stress. In yeast, this process is dependent on Def1 through a previously unresolved mechanism. Here, we report that Def1 becomes activated through ubiquitylation- and proteasome-dependent processing. Def1 processing results in the removal of a domain promoting cytoplasmic localization, resulting in nuclear accumulation ...

  14. A role for cytosolic hsp70 in yeast [PSI(+)] prion propagation and [PSI(+)] as a cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, G; Jones, G; Wegrzyn, R D; Masison, D C

    2000-10-01

    [PSI(+)] is a prion (infectious protein) of Sup35p, a subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae translation termination factor. We isolated a dominant allele, SSA1-21, of a gene encoding an Hsp70 chaperone that impairs [PSI(+)] mitotic stability and weakens allosuppression caused by [PSI(+)]. While [PSI(+)] stability is normal in strains lacking SSA1, SSA2, or both, SSA1-21 strains with a deletion of SSA2 cannot propagate [PSI(+)]. SSA1-21 [PSI(+)] strains are hypersensitive to curing of [PSI(+)] by guanidine-hydrochloride and partially cured of [PSI(+)] by rapid induction of the heat-shock response but not by growth at 37 degrees. The number of inheritable [PSI(+)] particles is significantly reduced in SSA1-21 cells. SSA1-21 effects on [PSI(+)] appear to be independent of Hsp104, another stress-inducible protein chaperone known to be involved in [PSI(+)] propagation. We propose that cytosolic Hsp70 is important for the formation of Sup35p polymers characteristic of [PSI(+)] from preexisting material and that Ssa1-21p both lacks and interferes with this activity. We further demonstrate that the negative effect of heat stress on [PSI(+)] phenotype directly correlates with solubility of Sup35p and find that in wild-type strains the presence of [PSI(+)] causes a stress that elevates basal expression of Hsp104 and SSA1.

  15. Physiological, biochemical and molecular responses in four Prunus rootstocks submitted to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Sergio; Dridi, Jihène; Gutiérrez, Diego; Moret, David; Irigoyen, Juan J; Moreno, María A; Gogorcena, Yolanda

    2013-10-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms that determine plant response to reduced water availability is essential to improve water-use efficiency (WUE) of stone fruit crops. The physiological, biochemical and molecular drought responses of four Prunus rootstocks (GF 677, Cadaman, ROOTPAC 20 and ROOTPAC(®) R) budded with 'Catherina' peach cultivar were studied. Trees were grown in 15-l containers and subjected to a progressive water stress for 26 days, monitoring soil moisture content by time domain reflectometry. Photosynthetic and gas exchange parameters were determined. Root and leaf soluble sugars and proline content were also measured. At the end of the experiment, stressed plants showed lower net photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, and higher intrinsic leaf WUE (AN/gs). Soluble sugars and proline concentration changes were observed, in both root and leaf tissues, especially in an advanced state of stress. The accumulation of proline in roots and leaves with drought stress was related to the decrease in osmotic potential and increase in WUE, whereas the accumulation of sorbitol in leaves, raffinose in roots and proline in both tissues was related only to the increase in the WUE. Owing to the putative role of raffinose and proline as antioxidants and their low concentration, they could be ameliorating deleterious effects of drought-induced oxidative stress by protecting membranes and enzymes rather than acting as active osmolytes. Higher expression of P5SC gene in roots was also consistent with proline accumulation in the tolerant genotype GF 677. These results indicate that accumulation of sorbitol, raffinose and proline in different tissues and/or the increase in P5SC expression could be used as markers of drought tolerance in peach cultivars grafted on Prunus rootstocks.

  16. Classical Galactosemia: Insight into Molecular Pathomechanisms by Differential Membrane Proteomics of Fibroblasts under Galactose Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubach, Simon; Müller, Stefan; Pekmez, Murat; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2017-02-03

    Classical galactosemia, a hereditary metabolic disease caused by the deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.712), results in an impaired galactose metabolism and serious long-term developmental affection of the CNS and ovaries, potentially related in part to endogenous galactose-induced protein dysglycosylation. In search for galactose-induced changes in membrane raft proteomes of GALT-deficient cells, we performed differential analyses of lipid rafts from patient-derived (Q) and sex- and age-matched control fibroblasts (H) in the presence or absence of the stressor. Label-based proteomics revealed of the total 454 (female) or 678 (male) proteins a proportion of ∼12% in at least one of four relevant ratios as fold-changed. GALT(-) cell-specific effects in the absence of stressor revealed cell-model-dependent affection of biological processes related to protein targeting to the plasma membrane (female) or to cellular migration (male). However, a series of common galactose-induced effects were observed, among them the strongly increased ER-stress marker GRP78 and calreticulin involved in N-glycoprotein quality control. The membrane-anchored N-glycoprotein receptor CD109 was concertedly decreased under galactose-stress together with cadherin-13, GLIPR1, glypican-1, and semaphorin-7A. A series of proteins showed opposite fold-changes in the two cell models, whereas others fluctuated in only one of the two models.

  17. Thermal vibration of a single-layered graphene with initial stress predicted by semiquantum molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng; Jiang, Jingnong

    2016-09-01

    Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet (RSLGS) with initial stress is investigated by a semiquantum molecular dynamics (SQMD) method on the basis of modified Langevin dynamics. The quantum effect in the thermal vibration of RSLGS is accounted by introducing a quantum thermal bath. The spectrum of the thermal vibration of RSLGSs is obtained both by SQMD and classical molecular dynamics (CMD). The RSLGS vibrates with the same frequencies via both the SQMD simulation and the CMD simulation. The root of mean squared (rms) amplitude obtained via the CMD is greater than that obtained via the SQMD. The energy in high order mode is frozen at very low temperature if quantum effect is taken into consideration. An elastic plate model with initial stress considering quantum effects is established to describe the thermal vibration of the RSLGS. The rms amplitude of RSLGS calculated by plate model with the law of energy equipartition and that obtained from the CMD coincide very well. The plate model considering the quantum effects provides accurate prediction of the rms amplitude of the RSLGS obtained from the SQMD. These results indicate that quantum effects cannot be neglected in the thermal vibration of the RSLGS at low temperature case.

  18. Plasma membranes as heat stress sensors: from lipid-controlled molecular switches to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Zsolt; Crul, Tim; Maresca, Bruno; Schütz, Gerhard J; Viana, Felix; Dindia, Laura; Piotto, Stefano; Brameshuber, Mario; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Porta, Amalia; Trapani, Alfonso; Gombos, Imre; Glatz, Attila; Gungor, Burcin; Peksel, Begüm; Vigh, László; Csoboz, Bálint; Horváth, Ibolya; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Hooper, Phillip L; Harwood, John L; Vigh, László

    2014-06-01

    The classic heat shock (stress) response (HSR) was originally attributed to protein denaturation. However, heat shock protein (Hsp) induction occurs in many circumstances where no protein denaturation is observed. Recently considerable evidence has been accumulated to the favor of the "Membrane Sensor Hypothesis" which predicts that the level of Hsps can be changed as a result of alterations to the plasma membrane. This is especially pertinent to mild heat shock, such as occurs in fever. In this condition the sensitivity of many transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is particularly notable. Small temperature stresses can modulate TRP gating significantly and this is influenced by lipids. In addition, stress hormones often modify plasma membrane structure and function and thus initiate a cascade of events, which may affect HSR. The major transactivator heat shock factor-1 integrates the signals originating from the plasma membrane and orchestrates the expression of individual heat shock genes. We describe how these observations can be tested at the molecular level, for example, with the use of membrane perturbers and through computational calculations. An important fact which now starts to be addressed is that membranes are not homogeneous nor do all cells react identically. Lipidomics and cell profiling are beginning to address the above two points. Finally, we observe that a deregulated HSR is found in a large number of important diseases where more detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved may offer timely opportunities for clinical interventions and new, innovative drug treatments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  19. Mechanisms underlying autoimmune synaptic encephalitis leading to disorders of memory, behavior and cognition: insights from molecular, cellular and synaptic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Emilia H; Jain, Ankit; Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan G; Dalmau, Josep; Balice-Gordon, Rita J

    2010-07-01

    Recently, several novel, potentially lethal and treatment-responsive syndromes that affect hippocampal and cortical function have been shown to be associated with auto-antibodies against synaptic antigens, notably glutamate or GABA-B receptors. Patients with these auto-antibodies, sometimes associated with teratomas and other neoplasms, present with psychiatric symptoms, seizures, memory deficits and decreased levels of consciousness. These symptoms often improve dramatically after immunotherapy or tumor resection. Here we review studies of the cellular and synaptic effects of these antibodies in hippocampal neurons in vitro and preliminary work in rodent models. Our work suggests that patient antibodies lead to rapid and reversible removal of neurotransmitter receptors from synaptic sites, leading to changes in synaptic and circuit function that in turn are likely to lead to behavioral deficits. We also discuss several of the many questions raised by these and related disorders. Determining the mechanisms underlying these novel anti-neurotransmitter receptor encephalopathies will provide insights into the cellular and synaptic bases of the memory and cognitive deficits that are hallmarks of these disorders, and potentially suggest avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Effects of a silver nanomaterial on cellular organelles and time course of oxidative stress in a fish cell line (PLHC-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Nogales, A; Fernández, M; Fernández-Cruz, M L; Navas, J M

    2016-12-01

    Among the nanomaterials currently in commercial products, those based on silver are the most used, and so there is a high probability that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) will be released into aquatic environments where they could adversely affect aquatic organisms, including fish. Taking this into account, the aim of the present work was to characterize in depth the mechanisms underlying the toxic action of AgNPs using fish cell lines, determining specifically the contribution of alterations in cellular structures and oxidative stress time course to the cytotoxicity of AgNPs. Since liver plays a key role in detoxification, the hepatoma cell line PLHC-1 was used. Exposure to AgNPs (NM-300K, obtained from the Joint Research Centre Repository) caused alterations at the lysosomal and mitochondrial levels at lower concentrations than those that disrupted plasma membrane (evaluated by means of neutral red, alamarBlue, and 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate, acetoxymethyl ester assays respectively). AgNO3, used as a control Ag(+) ion source, produced similar cytotoxic effects but at lower concentrations than AgNPs. Both silver forms caused oxidative disruption but the initial response was delayed in AgNPs until 6h of exposure. Transmission electron microscopy analysis also evidenced the disruption of mitochondrial structures in cells exposed to cytotoxic concentrations of both forms of silver. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, AgNPs were detected inside the nucleoli and mitochondria, thereby pointing to long-term effects. The present work evidences the mutual interaction between the induction of oxidative stress and the alterations of cellular structures, particularly mitochondria, as cytotoxicity mechanisms not exclusively associated to NPs.

  1. Effect of electromagnetic fields at 2.45 GHz on the levels of cellular stress proteins HSP-90 and 70 in the rat thyroid; Efecto de los campos electromagneticos a 2,45 GHz sobre los niveles de proteinas de estres celular HSP-90 y 70 en el toroides de rata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misa Agustino, M. J.; Alvarez-Folgueras, M.; Jorge-Mora, M. T.; Jorge Barreiro, F. J.; Ares Pena, F. J.; Lleiro, J.; Lopez Martin, M. E.

    2011-07-01

    In this study we analyzed the cellular stress levels achieved by heat shock proteins (HSP) 90 and 70 in rat thyroid tissue after exposure to radio waves in TWG experimental system. Parallel measurements of body stress in animals by rectal temperature probes allow us to determine whether there is any interaction between temperature increases and cellular stress.

  2. Cellular metabolic, stress, and histological response on exposure to acute toxicity of endosulfan in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Rupam; Tripathi, Gayatri; Kumar, Kundan; Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Krishna, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Endosulfan is one of the most hazardous organochlorines pesticides responsible for environmental pollution, as it is very persistent and shows bio-magnification. This study evaluated the impact of acute endosulfan toxicity on metabolic enzymes, lysozyme activities, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 expression, and histopathology in Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Among the indicators that were induced in dose dependent manner were the enzymes of amino acid metabolism (serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), carbohydrate metabolism (serum lactate dehydrogenase), pentose phosphate pathway (Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) as well as lysozyme and Hsp70 in liver and gill, while liver and gill Isocitrate dehydrogenase (TCA cycle enzyme) and marker of general energetics (Total adenosine triphosphatase) were inhibited. Histopathological alterations in gill were clubbing of secondary gill lamellae, marked hyperplasia, complete loss of secondary lamellae and atrophy of primary gill filaments. Whereas in liver, swollen hepatocyte, and degeneration with loss of cellular boundaries were distinctly noticed. Overall results clearly demonstrated the unbalanced metabolism and damage of the vital organs like liver and gill in Tilapia due to acute endosulfan exposure.

  3. Influence of immunomodulators of natural origin on cellular immunity indices in blood of broiler chicken under stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Grabovskyi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with researching of T- and B-lymphocytes relative quantity and functional activity in broiler chicken blood after using of animal origin immunomodulators in conditions of pre-slaughter stress. The authors determined the relative amount of T- and B-lymphocytes and their individual populations in the reaction of spontaneous rоsetting with the sheep erythrocytes in blood. Besides, the differentiated count of rоsetting lymphocytes with the various degree of functional activity was conducted. The spleen extract (70% alcohol solution in volume of 1.4 ml per chicken was added to the diet of broiler chicken of experimental groups by aerosol method. This extract was obtained with/ without ultrasound application. 70% alcohol solution in the same volume and using the same method was added to the diet of broiler chicken of the control group five days before slaughter. The authors have not established probable increase of T-lymphocytes general quantity in broiler chicken blood in both experimental groups. It is shown that pre-slaughter stress in broiler chicken caused by weaning has immuno-suppressive effect on T- and B-lymphocytes in blood, which is accompanied by their quantity and functional activity decrease. T- and B-lymphocytes amount and functional activity of T- and B-cell immunity was stimulated after adding immunomodulators of natural origin to broiler chicken diet. Spleen extract polyamines as immunomodulators and antistressors most effectively influenced on some of cell immunity indices before slaughter – it is necessary to note the increase in T-helper lymphocytes in the broiler chickens blood caused by lymphocytes with medium (6–10 – by 18% (Р < 0.05 and high density receptors (М – by 35% (Р < 0.05 compared to the control. It is shown that decrease of T-lymphocytes quantity in broiler chicken blood is caused by lymphocytes with law (3–5 – by 22% (Р < 0.01 and high (M – by 11% (Р < 0.05 density receptors with

  4. Peak stress intensity factor governs crack propagation velocity in crosslinked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirimamilla, Abhiram; Furmanski, Jevan; Rimnac, Clare

    2013-04-01

    Ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been successfully used as a bearing material in total joint replacement components. However, these bearing materials can fail as a result of in vivo static and cyclic loads. Crack propagation behavior in this material has been considered using the Paris relationship which relates fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN (mm/cycle) versus the stress intensity factor range, ΔK (Kmax - Kmin , MPa√m). However, recent work suggests that the crack propagation velocity of conventional UHMWPE is driven by the peak stress intensity (Kmax ), not ΔK. The hypothesis of this study is that the crack propagation velocity of highly crosslinked and remelted UHMWPE is also driven by the peak stress intensity, Kmax , during cyclic loading. To test this hypothesis, two highly crosslinked (65 kGy and 100 kGy) and remelted UHMWPE materials were examined. Frequency, waveform, and R-ratio were varied between test conditions to determine the governing factor for fatigue crack propagation. It was found that the crack propagation velocity in crosslinked UHMWPE is also driven by Kmax and not ΔK, and is dependent on loading waveform and frequency in a predictable quasistatic manner. This study supports that crack growth in crosslinked UHMWPE materials, even under cyclic loading conditions, can be described by a relationship between the velocity of crack growth, da/dt and the peak stress intensity, Kmax . The findings suggest that stable crack propagation can occur as a result of static loading only and this should be taken into consideration in design of UHMWPE total joint replacement components.

  5. Individual vs. combinatorial effect of elevated CO2 conditions and salinity stress on Arabidopsis thaliana liquid cultures: Comparing the early molecular response using time-series transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta Bhaskar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we investigated the individual and combinatorial effect of elevated CO2 conditions and salinity stress on the dynamics of both the transcriptional and metabolic physiology of Arabidopsis thaliana liquid hydroponic cultures over the first 30 hours of continuous treatment. Both perturbations are of particular interest in plant and agro-biotechnological applications. Moreover, within the timeframe of this experiment, they are expected to affect plant growth to opposite directions. Thus, a major objective was to investigate whether this expected "divergence" was valid for the individual perturbations and to study how it is manifested under the combined stress at two molecular levels of cellular function, using high-throughput analyses. Results We observed that a high salinity has stronger effect than elevated CO2 at both the transcriptional and metabolic levels, b the transcriptional responses to the salinity and combined stresses exhibit strong similarity, implying a robust transcriptional machinery acting to the salinity stress independent of the co-occurrence of elevated CO2, c the combinatorial effect of the two perturbations on the metabolic physiology is milder than of the salinity stress alone. Metabolomic analysis suggested that the beneficial role of elevated CO2 on salt-stressed plants within the timeframe of this study should be attributed to the provided additional resources; these allow the plants to respond to high salinity without having to forfeit other major metabolic functions, and d 9 h-12 h and 24 h of treatment coincide with significant changes in the metabolic physiology under any of the investigated stresses. Significant differences between the acute and longer term responses were observed at both molecular levels. Conclusions This study contributes large-scale dynamic omic data from two levels of cellular function for a plant system under various stresses. It provides an additional example

  6. Dual fluorescent molecular substrates selectively report the activation, sustainability and reversibility of cellular PKB/Akt activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Duanwen; Bai, Mingfeng; Tang, Rui; Xu, Baogang; Ju, Xiaoming; Pestell, Richard G.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Using a newly developed near-infrared (NIR) dye that fluoresces at two different wavelengths (dichromic fluorescence, DCF), we discovered a new fluorescent substrate for Akt, also known as protein kinase B, and a method to quantitatively report this enzyme's activity in real time. Upon insulin activation of cellular Akt, the enzyme multi-phosphorylated a single serine residue of a diserine DCF substrate in a time-dependent manner, culminating in monophospho- to triphospho-serine products. The NIR DCF probe was highly selective for the Akt1 isoform, which was demonstrated using Akt1 knockout cells derived from MMTV-ErbB2 transgenic mice. The DCF mechanism provides unparalleled potential to assess the stimulation, sustainability, and reversibility of Akt activation longitudinally. Importantly, NIR fluorescence provides a pathway to translate findings from cells to living organisms, a condition that could eventually facilitate the use of these probes in humans.

  7. A chemical biology approach to interrogate quorum-sensing regulated behaviors at the molecular and cellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Colin A; Matamouros, Susana; Niessen, Sherry; Zhu, Jie; Scolnick, Jonathan; Lively, Jenny M; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Miller, Samuel I; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2013-07-25

    Small molecule probes have been used extensively to explore biologic systems and elucidate cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we use an inhibitor of bacterial communication to monitor changes in the proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with the aim of discovering unrecognized processes regulated by AI-2-based quorum-sensing (QS), a mechanism of bacterial intercellular communication that allows for the coordination of gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. In S. typhimurium, this system regulates the uptake and catabolism of intercellular signals and has been implicated in pathogenesis, includin