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Sample records for cellular scf complex

  1. Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen's Association with the CUL7 SCF Complex Contributes to Cellular Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Arai, Takehiro; Ali, Syed Hamid; DeCaprio, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (T Ag) is capable of immortalizing and transforming rodent cells. The transforming activity of T Ag is due in large part to perturbation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and the retinoblastoma (pRB) family members. Inactivation of these tumor suppressors may not be sufficient for T Ag-mediated cellular transformation. It has been shown that T Ag associates with an SCF-like complex that contains a member of the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, CUL7, as...

  2. Simian virus 40 large T antigen's association with the CUL7 SCF complex contributes to cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Arai, Takehiro; Ali, Syed Hamid; DeCaprio, James A

    2005-09-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (T Ag) is capable of immortalizing and transforming rodent cells. The transforming activity of T Ag is due in large part to perturbation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and the retinoblastoma (pRB) family members. Inactivation of these tumor suppressors may not be sufficient for T Ag-mediated cellular transformation. It has been shown that T Ag associates with an SCF-like complex that contains a member of the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, CUL7, as well as SKP1, RBX1, and an F-box protein, FBXW8. We identified T Ag residues 69 to 83 as required for T Ag binding to the CUL7 complex. We demonstrate that delta69-83 T Ag, while it lost its ability to associate with CUL7, retained binding to p53 and pRB family members. In the presence of CUL7, wild-type (WT) T Ag but not delta69-83 T Ag was able to induce proliferation of mouse embryo fibroblasts, an indication of cellular transformation. In contrast, WT and delta69-83 T Ag enabled mouse embryo fibroblasts to proliferate to similarly high densities in the absence of CUL7. Our data suggest that, in addition to p53 and the pRB family members, T Ag serves to bind to and inactivate the growth-suppressing properties of CUL7. In addition, these results imply that, at least in the presence of T Ag, CUL7 may function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:16140746

  3. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfi Jacqueline

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myxoma virus (MYXV, a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus. Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1 were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  4. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  5. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gelfi Jacqueline; Blanié Sophie; Bertagnoli Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville Christelle

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has ...

  6. Regulation of flower development in Arabidopsis by SCF complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weimin; Xie, Daoxin; Hobbie, Lawrence; Feng, Baomin; Zhao, Dazhong; Akkara, Joseph; Ma, Hong

    2004-04-01

    SCF complexes are the largest and best studied family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases that facilitate the ubiquitylation of proteins targeted for degradation. The SCF core components Skp1, Cul1, and Rbx1 serve in multiple SCF complexes involving different substrate-specific F-box proteins that are involved in diverse processes including cell cycle and development. In Arabidopsis, mutations in the F-box gene UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) result in a number of defects in flower development. However, functions of the core components Cul1 and Rbx1 in flower development are poorly understood. In this study we analyzed floral phenotypes caused by altering function of Cul1 or Rbx1, as well as the effects of mutations in ASK1 and ASK2. Plants homozygous for a point mutation in the AtCUL1 gene showed reduced floral organ number and several defects in each of the four whorls. Similarly, plants with reduced AtRbx1 expression due to RNA interference also exhibited floral morphological defects. In addition, compared to the ask1 mutant, plants homozygous for ask1 and heterozygous for ask2 displayed enhanced reduction of B function, as well as other novel defects of flower development, including carpelloid sepals and an inhibition of petal development. Genetic analyses demonstrate that AGAMOUS (AG) is required for the novel phenotypes observed in the first and second whorls. Furthermore, the genetic interaction between UFO and AtCUL1 supports the idea that UFO regulates multiple aspects of flower development as a part of SCF complexes. These results suggest that SCF complexes regulate several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis.

  7. Identification of SFBB-containing canonical and noncanonical SCF complexes in pollen of apple (Malus × domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Mai F; Koyano, Ruriko; Kikuchi, Shinji; Koba, Takato; Sassa, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) of Rosaceae, Solanaceae and Plantaginaceae is controlled by a single polymorphic S locus. The S locus contains at least two genes, S-RNase and F-box protein encoding gene SLF/SFB/SFBB that control pistil and pollen specificity, respectively. Generally, the F-box protein forms an E3 ligase complex, SCF complex with Skp1, Cullin1 (CUL1) and Rbx1, however, in Petunia inflata, SBP1 (S-RNase binding protein1) was reported to play the role of Skp1 and Rbx1, and form an SCFSLF-like complex for ubiquitination of non-self S-RNases. On the other hand, in Petunia hybrida and Petunia inflata of Solanaceae, Prunus avium and Pyrus bretschneideri of Rosaceae, SSK1 (SLF-interacting Skp1-like protein1) is considered to form the SCFSLF/SFB complex. Here, we isolated pollen-expressed apple homologs of SSK1 and CUL1, and named MdSSK1, MdCUL1A and MdCUL1B. MdSSK1 was preferentially expressed in pollen, but weakly in other organs analyzed, while, MdCUL1A and MdCUL1B were almost equally expressed in all the organs analyzed. MdSSK1 transcript abundance was significantly (>100 times) higher than that of MdSBP1. In vitro binding assays showed that MdSSK1 and MdSBP1 interacted with MdSFBB1-S9 and MdCUL1, and MdSFBB1-S9 interacted more strongly with MdSSK1 than with MdSBP1. The results suggest that both MdSSK1-containing SCFSFBB1 and MdSBP1-containing SCFSFBB1-like complexes function in pollen of apple, and the former plays a major role. PMID:24847858

  8. Identification of SFBB-containing canonical and noncanonical SCF complexes in pollen of apple (Malus × domestica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai F Minamikawa

    Full Text Available Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI of Rosaceae, Solanaceae and Plantaginaceae is controlled by a single polymorphic S locus. The S locus contains at least two genes, S-RNase and F-box protein encoding gene SLF/SFB/SFBB that control pistil and pollen specificity, respectively. Generally, the F-box protein forms an E3 ligase complex, SCF complex with Skp1, Cullin1 (CUL1 and Rbx1, however, in Petunia inflata, SBP1 (S-RNase binding protein1 was reported to play the role of Skp1 and Rbx1, and form an SCFSLF-like complex for ubiquitination of non-self S-RNases. On the other hand, in Petunia hybrida and Petunia inflata of Solanaceae, Prunus avium and Pyrus bretschneideri of Rosaceae, SSK1 (SLF-interacting Skp1-like protein1 is considered to form the SCFSLF/SFB complex. Here, we isolated pollen-expressed apple homologs of SSK1 and CUL1, and named MdSSK1, MdCUL1A and MdCUL1B. MdSSK1 was preferentially expressed in pollen, but weakly in other organs analyzed, while, MdCUL1A and MdCUL1B were almost equally expressed in all the organs analyzed. MdSSK1 transcript abundance was significantly (>100 times higher than that of MdSBP1. In vitro binding assays showed that MdSSK1 and MdSBP1 interacted with MdSFBB1-S9 and MdCUL1, and MdSFBB1-S9 interacted more strongly with MdSSK1 than with MdSBP1. The results suggest that both MdSSK1-containing SCFSFBB1 and MdSBP1-containing SCFSFBB1-like complexes function in pollen of apple, and the former plays a major role.

  9. Identification of SFBB-containing canonical and noncanonical SCF complexes in pollen of apple (Malus × domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Mai F; Koyano, Ruriko; Kikuchi, Shinji; Koba, Takato; Sassa, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) of Rosaceae, Solanaceae and Plantaginaceae is controlled by a single polymorphic S locus. The S locus contains at least two genes, S-RNase and F-box protein encoding gene SLF/SFB/SFBB that control pistil and pollen specificity, respectively. Generally, the F-box protein forms an E3 ligase complex, SCF complex with Skp1, Cullin1 (CUL1) and Rbx1, however, in Petunia inflata, SBP1 (S-RNase binding protein1) was reported to play the role of Skp1 and Rbx1, and form an SCFSLF-like complex for ubiquitination of non-self S-RNases. On the other hand, in Petunia hybrida and Petunia inflata of Solanaceae, Prunus avium and Pyrus bretschneideri of Rosaceae, SSK1 (SLF-interacting Skp1-like protein1) is considered to form the SCFSLF/SFB complex. Here, we isolated pollen-expressed apple homologs of SSK1 and CUL1, and named MdSSK1, MdCUL1A and MdCUL1B. MdSSK1 was preferentially expressed in pollen, but weakly in other organs analyzed, while, MdCUL1A and MdCUL1B were almost equally expressed in all the organs analyzed. MdSSK1 transcript abundance was significantly (>100 times) higher than that of MdSBP1. In vitro binding assays showed that MdSSK1 and MdSBP1 interacted with MdSFBB1-S9 and MdCUL1, and MdSFBB1-S9 interacted more strongly with MdSSK1 than with MdSBP1. The results suggest that both MdSSK1-containing SCFSFBB1 and MdSBP1-containing SCFSFBB1-like complexes function in pollen of apple, and the former plays a major role.

  10. JFK, a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, links the SCF complex to p53 regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenqian; Yu, Wenhua; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Xiaohan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifang; Yao, Xingrong; Yi, Xia; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-06-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Currently, several ubiquitin ligases, including the single-subunit RING-finger types--MDM2, Pirh2, and COP1--and the HECT-domain type--ARF-BP1--have been reported to target p53 for degradation. Here, we report the identification of a human Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, JFK. We showed that JFK promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53. But unlike MDM2, Pirh2, COP1, and ARF-BP1, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assembly of a Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex. Significantly, JFK inhibits p53-dependent transcription, and depletion of JFK stabilizes p53, promotes cell apoptosis, arrests cells in the G(1) phase, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation-induced cell death. These data indicate that JFK is a critical negative regulator of p53 and represents a pathway for the maintenance of p53 levels in unstressed cells. Our experiments link the Skp1-Cul1-F-box system to p53 regulation.

  11. SCF ensures meiotic chromosome segregation through a resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ya Okamoto

    Full Text Available The SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex contributes to a variety of cellular events including meiotic cell cycle control, but its function during meiosis is not understood well. Here we describe a novel function of SCF/Skp1 in meiotic recombination and subsequent chromosome segregation. The skp1 temperature-sensitive mutant exhibited abnormal distribution of spindle microtubules in meiosis II, which turned out to originate from abnormal bending of the spindle in meiosis I. Bent spindles were reported in mitosis of this mutant, but it remained unknown how SCF could affect spindle morphology. We found that the meiotic bent spindle in skp1 cells was due to a hypertension generated by chromosome entanglement. The spindle bending was suppressed by inhibiting double strand break (DSB formation, indicating that the entanglement was generated by the meiotic recombination machinery. Consistently, Rhp51/Rad51-Rad22/Rad52 foci persisted until meiosis I in skp1 cells, proving accumulation of recombination intermediates. Intriguingly bent spindles were also observed in the mutant of Fbh1, an F-box protein containing the DNA helicase domain, which is involved in meiotic recombination. Genetic evidence suggested its cooperation with SCF/Skp1. Thus, SCF/Skp1 together with Fbh1 is likely to function in the resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates, thereby ensuring proper chromosome segregation.

  12. JFK, a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, links the SCF complex to p53 regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Luyang; SHI, LEI; Li, Wenqian; Yu, Wenhua; LIANG, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Xiaohan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifang; Yao, Xingrong; Yi, Xia; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Currently, several ubiquitin ligases, including the single-subunit RING-finger types—MDM2, Pirh2, and COP1—and the HECT-domain type—ARF-BP1—have been reported to target p53 for degradation. Here, we report the identification of a human Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, JFK. We ...

  13. Astrobiological Complexity with Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotić, B

    2012-01-01

    Search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence constitutes one of the major endeavors in science, but has yet been quantitatively modeled only rarely and in a cursory and superficial fashion. We argue that probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) represent the best quantitative framework for modeling astrobiological history of the Milky Way and its Galactic Habitable Zone. The relevant astrobiological parameters are to be modeled as the elements of the input probability matrix for the PCA kernel. With the underlying simplicity of the cellular automata constructs, this approach enables a quick analysis of large and ambiguous input parameters' space. We perform a simple clustering analysis of typical astrobiological histories and discuss the relevant boundary conditions of practical importance for planning and guiding actual empirical astrobiological and SETI projects. In addition to showing how the present framework is adaptable to more complex situations and updated observational databases from current and ne...

  14. Simulating Complex Systems by Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Jiri; Hoekstra, Alfons G

    2010-01-01

    Deeply rooted in fundamental research in Mathematics and Computer Science, Cellular Automata (CA) are recognized as an intuitive modeling paradigm for Complex Systems. Already very basic CA, with extremely simple micro dynamics such as the Game of Life, show an almost endless display of complex emergent behavior. Conversely, CA can also be designed to produce a desired emergent behavior, using either theoretical methodologies or evolutionary techniques. Meanwhile, beyond the original realm of applications - Physics, Computer Science, and Mathematics – CA have also become work horses in very different disciplines such as epidemiology, immunology, sociology, and finance. In this context of fast and impressive progress, spurred further by the enormous attraction these topics have on students, this book emerges as a welcome overview of the field for its practitioners, as well as a good starting point for detailed study on the graduate and post-graduate level. The book contains three parts, two major parts on th...

  15. Mathematical analysis of complex cellular activity

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Richard; Teka, Wondimu; Vo, Theodore; Wechselberger, Martin; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on mathematical physiology that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. The first article reviews the basic theory of calcium oscillations (common to almost all cell types), including spatio-temporal behaviors such as waves. The second article uses, and expands on, much of this basic theory to show how the interaction of cytosolic calcium oscillators with membrane ion channels can result in highly complex patterns of electrical spiking. Through these examples one can see clearly how multiple oscillatory processes interact within a cell, and how mathematical methods can be used to understand such interactions better. The two reviews provide excellent examples of how mathematics and physiology can learn from each other, and work jointly towards a better understanding of complex cellular processes. Review 1: Richard Bertram, Joel Tabak, Wondimu Teka, Theodore Vo, Martin Wechselberger: Geometric Singular Perturbation Analysis of Burst...

  16. Astrobiological complexity with probabilistic cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukotić, Branislav; Ćirković, Milan M

    2012-08-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence constitutes one of the major endeavors in science, but has yet been quantitatively modeled only rarely and in a cursory and superficial fashion. We argue that probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) represent the best quantitative framework for modeling the astrobiological history of the Milky Way and its Galactic Habitable Zone. The relevant astrobiological parameters are to be modeled as the elements of the input probability matrix for the PCA kernel. With the underlying simplicity of the cellular automata constructs, this approach enables a quick analysis of large and ambiguous space of the input parameters. We perform a simple clustering analysis of typical astrobiological histories with "Copernican" choice of input parameters and discuss the relevant boundary conditions of practical importance for planning and guiding empirical astrobiological and SETI projects. In addition to showing how the present framework is adaptable to more complex situations and updated observational databases from current and near-future space missions, we demonstrate how numerical results could offer a cautious rationale for continuation of practical SETI searches. PMID:22832998

  17. The anaphase-promoting complex works together with the SCF complex for proteolysis of the S-phase cyclin Clb6 during the transition from G1 to S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shiao-Yii; Kuan, Vivian Jen-Wei; Tzeng, Yao-Wei; Schuyler, Scott C; Juang, Yue-Li

    2016-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the S-phase cyclin Clb6 is expressed shortly before the G1/S transition. It has been shown that in S phase the SCF(Cdc4) ubiquitin ligase controls Clb6 proteolysis, which requires cyclin-dependent kinases activity. A Clb6-3A mutant, bearing non-phosphorylatable mutations at S6A, T39A, and S147A, was observed to be hyperstabilized in S-phase but was unstable in mitosis. In this study, we found that the APC(Cdh1) form of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) was required for Clb6 proteolysis in both early and late G1. An in vitro ubiquitination assay confirmed that Clb6 is a substrate for APC(Cdh1). A KEN box and a destruction box in the Clb6N-terminus were identified. Mutations in the KEN box (mkb) and/or the destruction box (mdb) enhanced Clb6 stability in G1. Expression of Clb6mkd, bearing both mutations in the mkb and mdb, allowed cells to bypass the late G1 arrest caused by cdc4-1. This bypass phenotype was observed to depend upon CDK phosphorylation at residues S6, T39 and S147. Compared to Clb6, overexpression of Clb6ST, bearing all five mutations of S6A, T39A, S147A, mkb and mdb in combination, had a greater effect on promoting expression of Clb2 and S-phase entry, caused a greater G2 delay and a greater defect in cell division. Swe1 was also required for bud emergence when Clb6ST was overexpressed. Our observations suggest that both APC(Cdh1) and SCF(Cdc4)-dependent proteolysis of Clb6 at the G1/S border are crucial for multiple cell cycle regulated events including proper expression of Clb2, the G1/S and G2/M cell cycle transitions and for proper completion of cell division at mitotic exit.

  18. All 17 S-locus F-box proteins of the S2 - and S3 -haplotypes of Petunia inflata are assembled into similar SCF complexes with a specific function in self-incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Williams, Justin S; Sun, Penglin; Kao, Teh-Hui

    2016-09-01

    The collaborative non-self-recognition model for S-RNase-based self-incompatibility predicts that multiple S-locus F-box proteins (SLFs) produced by pollen of a given S-haplotype collectively mediate ubiquitination and degradation of all non-self S-RNases, but not self S-RNases, in the pollen tube, thereby resulting in cross-compatible pollination but self-incompatible pollination. We had previously used pollen extracts containing GFP-fused S2 -SLF1 (SLF1 with an S2 -haplotype) of Petunia inflata for co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and mass spectrometry (MS), and identified PiCUL1-P (a pollen-specific Cullin1), PiSSK1 (a pollen-specific Skp1-like protein) and PiRBX1 (a conventional Rbx1) as components of the SCF(S) (2-) (SLF) (1) complex. Using pollen extracts containing PiSSK1:FLAG:GFP for Co-IP/MS, we identified two additional SLFs (SLF4 and SLF13) that were assembled into SCF(SLF) complexes. As 17 SLF genes (SLF1 to SLF17) have been identified in S2 and S3 pollen, here we examined whether all 17 SLFs are assembled into similar complexes and, if so, whether these complexes are unique to SLFs. We modified the previous Co-IP/MS procedure, including the addition of style extracts from four different S-genotypes to pollen extracts containing PiSSK1:FLAG:GFP, to perform four separate experiments. The results taken together show that all 17 SLFs and an SLF-like protein, SLFLike1 (encoded by an S-locus-linked gene), co-immunoprecipitated with PiSSK1:FLAG:GFP. Moreover, of the 179 other F-box proteins predicted by S2 and S3 pollen transcriptomes, only a pair with 94.9% identity and another pair with 99.7% identity co-immunoprecipitated with PiSSK1:FLAG:GFP. These results suggest that SCF(SLF) complexes have evolved specifically to function in self-incompatibility.

  19. The brittleness model of complex system based on cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN De-ming; JIN Hong-zhang; LI Qi; WU Hong-mei

    2004-01-01

    Now the research on the complex system is a hot spot. Brittleness is one of the basic characteristics of a complex system. In a complex system, after one of subsystems is struck to be collapsed, the whole system will collapse. Meanwhile, cellular automata is a discrete dynamic system. When the rule is given, the cellular automata could be defined. Then it can imitate the complex action. Cellular automata is used to simulate the brittleness action in this study. Entropy was used to analyze the action and get the rule. Then,three normal brittleness models were given. The result shows that the brittleness of complex system is existent and in addition some important behavior mode of complex system brittleness has been achieved.

  20. Minimal model for complex dynamics in cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suguna, C; Chowdhury, K K; Sinha, S

    1999-11-01

    Cellular functions are controlled and coordinated by the complex circuitry of biochemical pathways regulated by genetic and metabolic feedback processes. This paper aims to show, with the help of a minimal model of a regulated biochemical pathway, that the common nonlinearities and control structures present in biomolecular interactions are capable of eliciting a variety of functional dynamics, such as homeostasis, periodic, complex, and chaotic oscillations, including transients, that are observed in various cellular processes.

  1. Complex systems modeling by cellular automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kroc; P.M.A. Sloot

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the notion of complex systems proved to be a very useful concept to define, describe, and study various natural phenomena observed in a vast number of scientific disciplines. Examples of scientific disciplines that highly benefit from this concept range from physics, mathematics, an

  2. EVOLUTION COMPLEXITY OF THEELEMENTARY CELLULAR AUTOMATON OF RULE 22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangYi; JiangZhisong

    2002-01-01

    Cellular automata are the discrete dynamical systems of simple construction but with complex and varied behaviors. In this paper, the elementary cellular automaton of rule 22 is studied by the tools of formal language theory and symbolic dynamics. Its temporal evolution orbits are coarse-grained into evolution sequences and the evolution languages are defined. It is proved that for every n≥2 its width n evolution language is not regular.

  3. Caractérisation biochimique et moléculaire du complexe SCF (SKP1-CULLIN-FBOX) chez le blé tendre

    OpenAIRE

    El Beji, Imen

    2011-01-01

    The selective degradation of proteins is an important means of regulating gene expression and plays crucial roles in the control of various cellular processes. The Ubiquitin (Ub)-Proteasome System (UPS) is the principal non-lysosomal proteolytic pathway in eukaryotic cells and is required for the degradation of key regulatory proteins. Ubiquitin is a 76-residue protein that can be attached covalently to target proteins through an enzymatic conjugation cascade involving three enzymes denoted, ...

  4. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora;

    2015-01-01

    (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation...... the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2....

  5. Studying Nuclear Receptor Complexes in the Cellular Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The ligand-regulated structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes are commonly determined by in vitro studies of isolated receptors, cofactors, and their fragments. However, in the living cell, the complexes that form are governed not just by the relative affinities of isolated cofactors for the receptor but also by the cell-specific sequestration or concentration of subsets of competing or cooperating cofactors, receptors, and other effectors into distinct subcellular domains and/or their temporary diversion into other cellular activities. Most methods developed to understand nuclear receptor function in the cellular environment involve the direct tagging of the nuclear receptor or its cofactors with fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the tracking of those FP-tagged factors by fluorescence microscopy. One of those approaches, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, quantifies the transfer of energy from a higher energy "donor" FP to a lower energy "acceptor" FP attached to a single protein or to interacting proteins. The amount of FRET is influenced by the ligand-induced changes in the proximities and orientations of the FPs within the tagged nuclear receptor complexes, which is an indicator of the structure of the complexes, and by the kinetics of the interaction between FP-tagged factors. Here, we provide a guide for parsing information about the structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes from FRET measurements in living cells.

  6. Schema Redescription in Cellular Automata: Revisiting Emergence in Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Marques-Pita, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to eliminate redundancy in the transition tables of Boolean automata: schema redescription with two symbols. One symbol is used to capture redundancy of individual input variables, and another to capture permutability in sets of input variables: fully characterizing the canalization present in Boolean functions. Two-symbol schemata explain aspects of the behaviour of automata networks that the characterization of their emergent patterns does not capture. We use our method to compare two well-known cellular automata for the density classification task: the human engineered CA GKL, and another obtained via genetic programming. We show that despite having very different collective behaviour, these rules are very similar. Indeed, GKL is a special case of GP. Therefore, we demonstrate that it is more feasible to compare cellular automata via schema redescriptions of their rules, than by looking at their emergent behaviour, leading us to question the tendency in complexity research to pay much m...

  7. TOR Complexes and the Maintenance of Cellular Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltschinger, Sandra; Loewith, Robbie

    2016-02-01

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a conserved serine/threonine (ser/thr) kinase that functions in two, distinct, multiprotein complexes called TORC1 and TORC2. Each complex regulates different aspects of eukaryote growth: TORC1 regulates cell volume and/or mass by influencing protein synthesis and turnover, while TORC2, as detailed in this review, regulates cell surface area by influencing lipid production and intracellular turgor. TOR complexes function in feedback loops, implying that downstream effectors are also likely to be involved in upstream regulation. In this regard, the notion that TORCs function primarily as mediators of cellular and organismal homeostasis is fundamentally different from the current, predominate view of TOR as a direct transducer of extracellular biotic and abiotic signals.

  8. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  9. SCF increases in utero-labeled stem cells migration and improves wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, Carlos; Xu, Junwang; Mallette, Andrew C; Caskey, Robert C; Zhang, Liping; Hu, Junyi; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic skin wounds lack the ability to heal properly and constitute a major and significant complication of diabetes. Nontraumatic lower extremity amputations are the number one complication of diabetic skin wounds. The complexity of their pathophysiology requires an intervention at many levels to enhance healing and wound closure. Stem cells are a promising treatment for diabetic skin wounds as they have the ability to correct abnormal healing. Stem cell factor (SCF), a chemokine expressed in the skin, can induce stem cells migration, however the role of SCF in diabetic skin wound healing is still unknown. We hypothesize that SCF would correct the impairment and promote the healing of diabetic skin wounds. Our results show that SCF improved wound closure in diabetic mice and increased HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression levels in these wounds. SCF treatment also enhanced the migration of red fluorescent protein (RFP)-labeled skin stem cells via in utero intra-amniotic injection of lenti-RFP at E8. Interestingly these RFP+ cells are present in the epidermis, stain negative for K15, and appear to be distinct from the already known hair follicle stem cells. These results demonstrate that SCF improves diabetic wound healing in part by increasing the recruitment of a unique stem cell population present in the skin.

  10. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora; Christiano, Romain; Hannibal-Bach, Hans-Kristian; Graham, Morven; Liu, Xinran; Ejsing, Christer S; Farese, Robert V; Walther, Tobias C

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are abundant membrane components and important signaling molecules in eukaryotic cells. Their levels and localization are tightly regulated. However, the mechanisms underlying this regulation remain largely unknown. In this study, we identify the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation analogous to a VPS53 allele causing progressive cerebello-cerebral atrophy type 2 (PCCA2) in humans exhibits similar, albeit weaker, phenotypes in yeast, providing mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of the first step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis is sufficient to mitigate many of the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08712.001 PMID:26357016

  11. On nonadiabatic SCF calculations of molecular properties

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Francisco M.

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the dynamic extended molecular orbital (DEMO) method may be less accurate than expected because the motion of the center of mass was not properly removed prior to the SCF calculation. Under such conditions the virial theorem is a misleading indication of the accuracy of the wavefunction.

  12. Cul7/p185/p193 Binding to Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen Has a Role in Cellular Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Syed Hamid; Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A.

    2004-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg) is a viral oncoprotein that can promote cellular transformation. TAg's transforming activity results in part by binding and inactivating key tumor suppressors, including p53 and the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). We have identified a TAg-associated 185-kDa protein that has significant homology to the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. TAg binds to an SCF-like complex that contains p185/Cul7, Rbx1, and the F box protein Fbw6. This SCF-like complex binds...

  13. Challenges in Characterizing and Controlling Complex Cellular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikswo, John

    2011-03-01

    Multicellular dynamic biological processes such as developmental differentiation, wound repair, disease, aging, and even homeostasis can be represented by trajectories through a phase space whose extent reflects the genetic, post-translational, and metabolic complexity of the process - easily extending to tens of thousands of dimensions. Intra- and inter-cellular sensing and regulatory systems and their nested, redundant, and non-linear feed-forward and feed-back controls create high-dimensioned attractors in this phase space. Metabolism provides free energy to drive non-equilibrium processes and dynamically reconfigure attractors. Studies of single molecules and cells provide only minimalist projections onto a small number of axes. It may be difficult to infer larger-scale emergent behavior from linearized experiments that perform only small amplitude perturbations on a limited number of the dimensions. Complete characterization may succeed for bounded component problems, such as an individual cell cycle or signaling cascade, but larger systems problems will require a coarse-grained approach. Hence a new experimental and analytical framework is needed. Possibly one could utilize high-amplitude, multi-variable driving of the system to infer coarse-grained, effective models, which in turn can be tested by their ability to control systems behavior. Navigation at will between attractors in a high-dimensioned dynamical system will provide not only detailed knowledge of the shape of attractor basins, but also measures of underlying stochastic events such as noise in gene expression or receptor binding and how both affect system stability and robustness. Needed for this are wide-bandwidth methods to sense and actuate large numbers of intracellular and extracellular variables and automatically and rapidly infer dynamic control models. The success of this approach may be determined by how broadly the sensors and actuators can span the full dimensionality of the phase space

  14. The novel ubiquitin ligase complex, SCF(Fbxw4, interacts with the COP9 signalosome in an F-box dependent manner, is mutated, lost and under-expressed in human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W Lockwood

    Full Text Available Identification of novel proteins that can potentially contribute to carcinogenesis is a requisite venture. Herein, we report the first biochemical characterization of the novel F-box and WD40 containing protein, FBXW4. We have identified interacting protein partners and demonstrated that FBXW4 is part of a ubiquitin ligase complex. Furthermore, the Fbxw4 locus is a common site of proviral insertion in a variety of retroviral insertional mutagenesis murine cancer models and Fbxw4 mRNA is highly expressed in the involuting murine mammary gland. To begin to characterize the biochemical function of Fbxw4, we used proteomic analysis to demonstrate that Fbxw4 interacts with Skp1 (SKP1, Cullin1 (CUL1, Ring-box1 (RBX1 and all components of the COP9 signalosome. All of these interactions are dependent on an intact F-box domain of Fbxw4. Furthermore, Fbxw4 is capable of interacting with ubiquitinated proteins within cells in an F-box dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that FBXW4 is mutated, lost and under-expressed in a variety of human cancer cell lines and clinical patient samples. Importantly, expression of FBXW4 correlates with survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Taken together, we suggest that FBXW4 may be a novel tumor suppressor that regulates important cellular processes.

  15. Cellular uptake of a dexamethasone palmitate-low density lipoprotein complex by macrophages and foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of a dexamethasone palmitate (DP)-low density lipoprotein (LDL) complex to transport drug into foam cells, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by macrophages and foam cells was examined. The DP-LDL complex was prepared by incubation with DP and LDL, and the DP-LDL complex and murine macrophages were incubated. No cellular uptake of the DP-LDL complex by macrophages was found until 6 h after the start of incubation, but this gradually increased from 12 to 48 h. On the other hand, the cellular uptake of the oxidized DP-LDL complex was already apparent at 3 h after the start incubation, and then markedly increased until 48 h incubation along with that of the lipid emulsion (LE) containing DP (DP-LE). The cellular uptake of DP-LE by foam cells was significantly lower than that by macrophages. However, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by foam cells was similar to that by macrophages. These findings suggest that the DP-LDL complex is oxidatively modified, and then incorporated into macrophages and foam cells through the scavenger receptor pathway. Since selective delivery of drugs into foam cells in the early stage of atherosclerosis is a useful protocol for antiatherosclerosis treatment, the DP-LDL complex appears to be a potentially useful drug-carrier complex for future antiatherosclerotic therapy.

  16. Location Management Technique to Reduce Complexity in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Selvan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An important issue in the design of mobile computing is how to manage the location information of mobile nodes in wireless cellular networks. The existing system has two approaches. First approach is spatial quantization technique in which location update takes place only when the mobile terminal move from one location area to other and second approach is temporal quantization in which location update takes place only after a specific time threshold. In this paper, we introduce Intelligent Agent Quantization(IAQ which is based on prediction of movements and distance between node and Base Station Controller(BSC to locate the mobile nodes. The main idea of using IAQ is reduce the update cost considerably with slight increase in paging cost.

  17. Starting SCF Calculations by Superposition of Atomic Densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lenthe, J.H.; Zwaans, R.; van Dam, H.J.J.; Guest, M.F.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the procedure to start an SCF calculation of the general type from a sum of atomic electron densities, as implemented in GAMESS-UK. Although the procedure is well-known for closed-shell calculations and was already suggested when the Direct SCF procedure was proposed, the general procedu

  18. Inhibition of SCF ubiquitin ligases by engineered ubiquitin variants that target the Cul1 binding site on the Skp1–F-box interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelik, Maryna; Orlicky, Stephen; Sartori, Maria A.; Tang, Xiaojing; Marcon, Edyta; Kurinov, Igor; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Tyers, Mike; Moffat, Jason; Sicheri, Frank; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-03-14

    The ubiquitin proteasome components are often misregulated in numerous diseases, encouraging the search for drug targets and inhibitors. E3 ligases that specify ubiquitination targets are of particular interest. Multimeric Skp1–Cul1–F-box (SCF) E3 ligases constitute one of the largest E3 families connected to every cellular process and multiple diseases; however, their characterization as therapeutic targets is impeded by functional diversity and poor characterization of its members. Herein we describe a strategy to inhibit SCF E3 ligases using engineered ubiquitin-based binders. We identify a previously uncharacterized inhibitory site and design ubiquitin-based libraries targeting this site. Our strategy to target SCF E3 ligases with small-molecule–like agents will have broad applications for basic research and drug development relating to SCF E3 ligase function.

  19. SCF{sup TM}, Single Column Floater - a deepwater solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Jayanto K.; Denman, Jeremy [ABB Lummus Global Inc., Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Deepwater Technology and Engineering

    2004-07-01

    As commercially attractive oil and gas discoveries are found in ever increasing water depths, the associated technical, operational and economic challenges become formidable. Appropriate selection of development architecture is essential for the overall success of a project. To properly address this wide range of development options, ABB has developed a portfolio of various hull forms. The SCF{sup TM} concept is one such hull form for a deep water solution. This paper presents the development of the SCF platform by addressing design issues, model test, product storage, fabrication, quay side integration, transportation, installation, schedule and cost estimate. The SCF concept brings tangible benefits to many of the deep water developments around the globe. The attributes of the SCF concept can commercially benefit deep water developments in Brazil as well as potentially generate in-country fabrication and service opportunities. (author)

  20. Analysis of information gain and Kolmogorov complexity for structural evaluation of cellular automata configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri Javid, Mohammad Ali; Blackwell, Tim; Zimmer, Robert; Majid al-Rifaie, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Shannon entropy fails to discriminate structurally different patterns in two-dimensional images. We have adapted information gain measure and Kolmogorov complexity to overcome the shortcomings of entropy as a measure of image structure. The measures are customised to robustly quantify the complexity of images resulting from multi-state cellular automata (CA). Experiments with a two-dimensional multi-state cellular automaton demonstrate that these measures are able to predict some of the structural characteristics, symmetry and orientation of CA generated patterns.

  1. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi, E-mail: tajima@nirs.go.jp

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  2. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation

  3. Dinuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as single and two-photon luminescence cellular imaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenchao; Zuo, Jiarui; Wang, Lili; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2014-02-28

    A new series of dinuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes, which possess larger π-conjugated systems, good water solubility and pH resistance, and high photostability, were developed to act as single and two-photon luminescence cellular imaging probes. PMID:24418839

  4. Genetically engineered mouse models for functional studies of SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Zhou; Wenyi Wei; Yi Sun

    2013-01-01

    The SCF (SKP1 (S-phase-kinase-associated protein 1),Cullin-1,F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligases,the founding member of Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs),are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in mammals.Each individual SCF E3 ligase consists of one adaptor protein SKP1,one scaffold protein cullin-1 (the first family member of the eight cullins),one F-box protein out of 69 family members,and one out of two RING (Really Interesting New Gene) family proteins RBX1/ROC1 or RBX2/ROC2/SAG/RNF7.Various combinations of these four components construct a large number of SCF E3s that promote the degradation of many key regulatory proteins in cell-context,temporally,and spatially dependent manners,thus controlling precisely numerous important cellular processes,including cell cycle progression,apoptosis,gene transcription,signal transduction,DNA replication,maintenance of genome integrity,and tumorigenesis.To understand how the SCF E3 ligases regulate these cellular processes and embryonic development under in vivo physiological conditions,a number of mouse models with transgenic (Tg) expression or targeted deletion of components of SCF have been established and characterized.In this review,we will provide a brief introduction to the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases,followed by a comprehensive overview on the existing Tg and knockout (KO) mouse models of the SCF E3s,and discuss the role of each component in mouse embryogenesis,cell proliferation,apoptosis,carcinogenesis,as well as other pathogenic processes associated with human diseases.We will end with a brief discussion on the future directions of this research area and the potential applications of the knowledge gained to more effective therapeutic interventions of human diseases.

  5. The COP9 signalosome interacts with SCF UFO and participates in Arabidopsis flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiping; Feng, Suhua; Nakayama, Naomi; Crosby, W L; Irish, Vivian; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2003-05-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is involved in multiple developmental processes. It interacts with SCF ubiquitin ligases and deconjugates Nedd8/Rub1 from cullins (deneddylation). CSN is highly expressed in Arabidopsis floral tissues. To investigate the role of CSN in flower development, we examined the expression pattern of CSN in developing flowers. We report here that two csn1 partially deficient Arabidopsis strains exhibit aberrant development of floral organs, decline of APETALA3 (AP3) expression, and low fertility in addition to defects in shoot and inflorescence meristems. We show that UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) forms a SCF(UFO) complex, which is associated with CSN in vivo. Genetic interaction analysis indicates that CSN is necessary for the gain-of-function activity of the F-box protein UFO in AP3 activation and in floral organ transformation. Compared with the previously reported csn5 antisense and csn1 null mutants, partial deficiency of CSN1 causes a reduction in the level of CUL1 in the mutant flowers without an obvious defect in CUL1 deneddylation. We conclude that CSN is an essential regulator of Arabidopsis flower development and suggest that CSN regulates Arabidopsis flower development in part by modulating SCF(UFO)-mediated AP3 activation. PMID:12724534

  6. The COP9 signalosome interacts with SCF UFO and participates in Arabidopsis flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiping; Feng, Suhua; Nakayama, Naomi; Crosby, W L; Irish, Vivian; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2003-05-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is involved in multiple developmental processes. It interacts with SCF ubiquitin ligases and deconjugates Nedd8/Rub1 from cullins (deneddylation). CSN is highly expressed in Arabidopsis floral tissues. To investigate the role of CSN in flower development, we examined the expression pattern of CSN in developing flowers. We report here that two csn1 partially deficient Arabidopsis strains exhibit aberrant development of floral organs, decline of APETALA3 (AP3) expression, and low fertility in addition to defects in shoot and inflorescence meristems. We show that UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) forms a SCF(UFO) complex, which is associated with CSN in vivo. Genetic interaction analysis indicates that CSN is necessary for the gain-of-function activity of the F-box protein UFO in AP3 activation and in floral organ transformation. Compared with the previously reported csn5 antisense and csn1 null mutants, partial deficiency of CSN1 causes a reduction in the level of CUL1 in the mutant flowers without an obvious defect in CUL1 deneddylation. We conclude that CSN is an essential regulator of Arabidopsis flower development and suggest that CSN regulates Arabidopsis flower development in part by modulating SCF(UFO)-mediated AP3 activation.

  7. Effect of iron poly (sorbitolgluconic acid) complex on urinary cellular excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H L; Lawrence, J R; Campbell, B C; Goldberg, A; Smart, L E

    1981-01-01

    The intramuscular injection of 250 mg iron poly (sorbitol-gluconic acid) complex caused no increase in urinary cellular or bacterial excretion in 8 patients with chronic pyelonephritis, 4 patients with non-infective renal disease, and 4 controls. However, in 4 patients with chronic infective disease of the renal tract given 500 g there was a significant increase in cellular excretion. This response was not seen in 2 control patients, nor in 2 patients with non-infective renal disease. Using a differential staining technique, this increase in urinary cellular excretion was found to be due, not to leucocytes, but to renal tubular cells. The precise significance of this is unclear, but there would be concern that the high concentration of excreted iron was providing a 'toxic' insult to susceptible, infection-damaged cells. PMID:7226874

  8. SCF, regulated by HIF-1α, promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuntao Gao

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α both have important functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. This study aims to analyze the expression and clinicopathological significance of SCF and HIF-1α in PDAC specimens and explore the molecular mechanism at PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo. We showed that the expression of SCF was significantly correlated with HIF-1α expression via Western blot, PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay, and luciferase assay analysis. The SCF level was also correlated with lymph node metastasis and the pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM stage in PDAC samples. The SCF higher-expression group had significantly lower survival rates than the SCF lower-expression group (p<0.05. Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of SCF through the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α in PDAC cells at the protein and RNA levels. When HIF-1α was knocked down by RNA interference, the SCF level decreased significantly. Additionally, ChIP and luciferase results demonstrated that HIF-1α can directly bind to the hypoxia response element (HRE region of the SCF promoter and activate the SCF transcription under hypoxia. The results of colony formation, cell scratch, and transwell migration assay showed that SCF promoted the proliferation and invasion of PANC-1 cells under hypoxia. Furthermore, the down-regulated ability of cell proliferation and invasion following HIF-1α knockdown was rescued by adding exogenous SCF under hypoxia in vitro. Finally, when the HIF-1α expression was inhibited by digoxin, the tumor volume and the SCF level decreased, thereby proving the relationship between HIF-1α and SCF in vivo. In conclusion, SCF is an important factor for the growth of PDAC. In our experiments, we proved that SCF, a downstream gene of HIF-1α, can promote the development of PDAC under hypoxia. Thus, SCF might be a potential therapeutic target for PDAC.

  9. SCF, Regulated by HIF-1α, Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Ren, He; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiuchao; Lang, Mingxiao; Liu, Jingcheng; Gao, Song; Zhao, Xiao; Sheng, Jun; Yuan, Zhanna; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) both have important functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This study aims to analyze the expression and clinicopathological significance of SCF and HIF-1α in PDAC specimens and explore the molecular mechanism at PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo. We showed that the expression of SCF was significantly correlated with HIF-1α expression via Western blot, PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and luciferase assay analysis. The SCF level was also correlated with lymph node metastasis and the pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM) stage in PDAC samples. The SCF higher-expression group had significantly lower survival rates than the SCF lower-expression group (p<0.05). Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of SCF through the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in PDAC cells at the protein and RNA levels. When HIF-1α was knocked down by RNA interference, the SCF level decreased significantly. Additionally, ChIP and luciferase results demonstrated that HIF-1α can directly bind to the hypoxia response element (HRE) region of the SCF promoter and activate the SCF transcription under hypoxia. The results of colony formation, cell scratch, and transwell migration assay showed that SCF promoted the proliferation and invasion of PANC-1 cells under hypoxia. Furthermore, the down-regulated ability of cell proliferation and invasion following HIF-1α knockdown was rescued by adding exogenous SCF under hypoxia in vitro. Finally, when the HIF-1α expression was inhibited by digoxin, the tumor volume and the SCF level decreased, thereby proving the relationship between HIF-1α and SCF in vivo. In conclusion, SCF is an important factor for the growth of PDAC. In our experiments, we proved that SCF, a downstream gene of HIF-1α, can promote the development of PDAC under hypoxia. Thus, SCF might be a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:25799412

  10. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  11. CDK-mediated activation of the SCF(FBXO) (28) ubiquitin ligase promotes MYC-driven transcription and tumourigenesis and predicts poor survival in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cepeda, Diana; Ng, Hwee-Fang; Sharifi, Hamid Reza;

    2013-01-01

    results in an impairment of MYC-driven transcription, transformation and tumourigenesis. Finally, in human breast cancer, high FBXO28 expression and phosphorylation are strong and independent predictors of poor outcome. In conclusion, our data suggest that SCF(FBXO28) plays an important role...... in transmitting CDK activity to MYC function during the cell cycle, emphasizing the CDK-FBXO28-MYC axis as a potential molecular drug target in MYC-driven cancers, including breast cancer.......SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box) ubiquitin ligases act as master regulators of cellular homeostasis by targeting key proteins for ubiquitylation. Here, we identified a hitherto uncharacterized F-box protein, FBXO28 that controls MYC-dependent transcription by non-proteolytic ubiquitylation. SCF(FBXO28...

  12. Cyanogen Azide. Ionization Potentials and Ab Initio SCF MO Calculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Börge; Jansen, Peter; Stafast, Herbert

    1975-01-01

    The Ne(I) and He(I) photoelectron(PE) spectra of cyanogen azide, NCN3, have been recorded at high resolution. Their interpretation is achieved by comparison with the PE spectrum of HN3 and an ab initio LCGO SCF MO calculation. Deviations from Koopmans' theorem of quite different magnitudes are fo...

  13. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  14. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xurui Zhang

    Full Text Available Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research.

  15. Gradient and mc scf calculations of the conformers and the formation of primary ethylene ozonide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Peter; Sæbø, Svein; Almlöf, Jan

    1981-11-01

    The confonners of primary ethylene ozonide have been studied by ab initio gradient and MC SCF calculations. At the MC SCF level they are more spread in energy than in SCF calculations. The planar conformer, carbon-carbon half chair and the oxygen envelope are much higher m energy than the other conformers. The MC SCF activation energy for cyclo-addition of ozone and ethylene is 91-99 kJ/mole.

  16. Synchronization, TIGoRS, and Information Flow in Complex Systems: Dispositional Cellular Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulis, William H

    2016-04-01

    Synchronization has a long history in physics where it refers to the phase matching of two identical oscillators. This notion has been extensively studied in physics as well as in biology, where it has been applied to such widely varying phenomena as the flashing of fireflies and firing of neurons in the brain. Human behavior, however, may be recurrent but it is not oscillatory even though many physiological systems do exhibit oscillatory tendencies. Moreover, much of human behaviour is collaborative and cooperative, where the individual behaviours may be distinct yet contemporaneous (if not simultaneous) and taken collectively express some functionality. In the context of behaviour, the important aspect is the repeated co-occurrence in time of behaviours that facilitate the propagation of information or of functionality, regardless of whether or not these behaviours are similar or identical. An example of this weaker notion of synchronization is transient induced global response synchronization (TIGoRS). Previous work has shown that TIGoRS is a ubiquitous phenomenon among complex systems, enabling them to stably parse environmental transients into salient units to which they stably respond. This leads to the notion of Sulis machines, which emergently generate a primitive linguistic structure through their dynamics. This article reviews the notion of TIGoRS and its expression in several complex systems models including tempered neural networks, driven cellular automata and cocktail party automata. The emergent linguistics of Sulis machines are discussed. A new class of complex systems model, the dispositional cellular automaton is introduced. A new metric for TIGoRS, the excess synchronization, is introduced and applied to the study of TIGoRS in dispositional cellular automata. It is shown that these automata exhibit a nonlinear synchronization response to certain perturbing transients.

  17. Synchronization, TIGoRS, and Information Flow in Complex Systems: Dispositional Cellular Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulis, William H

    2016-04-01

    Synchronization has a long history in physics where it refers to the phase matching of two identical oscillators. This notion has been extensively studied in physics as well as in biology, where it has been applied to such widely varying phenomena as the flashing of fireflies and firing of neurons in the brain. Human behavior, however, may be recurrent but it is not oscillatory even though many physiological systems do exhibit oscillatory tendencies. Moreover, much of human behaviour is collaborative and cooperative, where the individual behaviours may be distinct yet contemporaneous (if not simultaneous) and taken collectively express some functionality. In the context of behaviour, the important aspect is the repeated co-occurrence in time of behaviours that facilitate the propagation of information or of functionality, regardless of whether or not these behaviours are similar or identical. An example of this weaker notion of synchronization is transient induced global response synchronization (TIGoRS). Previous work has shown that TIGoRS is a ubiquitous phenomenon among complex systems, enabling them to stably parse environmental transients into salient units to which they stably respond. This leads to the notion of Sulis machines, which emergently generate a primitive linguistic structure through their dynamics. This article reviews the notion of TIGoRS and its expression in several complex systems models including tempered neural networks, driven cellular automata and cocktail party automata. The emergent linguistics of Sulis machines are discussed. A new class of complex systems model, the dispositional cellular automaton is introduced. A new metric for TIGoRS, the excess synchronization, is introduced and applied to the study of TIGoRS in dispositional cellular automata. It is shown that these automata exhibit a nonlinear synchronization response to certain perturbing transients. PMID:27033136

  18. Cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides after complexing or conjugation with cell-penetrating model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, J; Birth, P; Klauschenz, E; Wiesner, B; Beyermann, M; Oksche, A; Bienert, M

    2002-08-01

    The uptake by mammalian cells of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was compared with that of their respective complexes or conjugates with cationic, cell-penetrating model peptides of varying helix-forming propensity and amphipathicity. An HPLC-based protocol for the synthesis and purification of disulfide bridged conjugates in the 10-100 nmol range was developed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with gel-capillary electrophoresis and laser induced fluorescence detection (GCE-LIF) revealed cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulationin all cases. The uptake differences between naked oligonucleotides and their respective peptide complexes or conjugates were generally confined to one order of magnitude. No significant influence of the structural properties of the peptide components upon cellular uptake was found. Our results question the common belief that the increased biological activity of oligonucleotides after derivatization with membrane permeable peptides may be primarily due to improved membrane translocation.

  19. SELF-ADAPTIVE CONTROLS OF A COMPLEX CELLULAR SIGNALING TRANSDUCTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; ZHOU Zhiyuan; DAI Rongyang; LUO Bo; ZHENG Xiaoli; YANG Wenli; HE Tao; WU Minglu

    2004-01-01

    In cells, the interactions of distinct signaling transduction pathways originating from cross-talkings between signaling molecules give rise to the formation of signaling transduction networks, which contributes to the changes (emergency) of kinetic behaviors of signaling system compared with single molecule or pathway. Depending on the known experimental data, we have constructed a model for complex cellular signaling transduction system, which is derived from signaling transduction of epidermal growth factor receptor in neuron. By the computational simulating methods, the self-adaptive controls of this system have been investigated. We find that this model exhibits a relatively stable selfadaptive system, especially to over-stimulation of agonist, and the amplitude and duration of signaling intermediates in it could be controlled by multiple self-adaptive effects, such as "signal scattering", "positive feedback", "negative feedback" and "B-Raf shunt". Our results provide an approach to understanding the dynamic behaviors of complex biological systems.

  20. Electron binding energies using perturbative delta-SCF method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhusal, Shusil; Baruah, Tunna; Zope, Rajendra

    The knowledge of fundamental and optical gaps is of significant importance for organic photovoltaics. The electron binding energies estimated from the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues are significantly underestimated. Here, we use our recently outlined perturbative delta-SCF approach to compute the electron binding energies of a number of aromatic organic molecules commonly used in organic photovoltaics. Further, the electron affinities are also computed for the C60, C70 and PCBM. The results show that the perturbative delta-SCF provide adequate description of valence electron binding energies. We also applied the method to compute the core binding energies and the core-valence excited states. While the method can successfully predict the core-valence excited states the results on the core-binding energies are mixed. The strategies for improvement of the core binding energies will be discussed.

  1. Structural Basis of the Cks1-Dependent Recognition of P27Kip1 by the SCF skp2 Ubiquitin Ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao,B.; Zheng, N.; Schulman, B.; Wu, G.; Miller, J.; Pagano, M.; Pavletich, N.

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of the Cdk2 inhibitor p27(Kip1) plays a central role in cell cycle progression, and enhanced degradation of p27(Kip1) is associated with many common cancers. Proteolysis of p27(Kip1) is triggered by Thr187 phosphorylation, which leads to the binding of the SCF(Skp2) (Skp1-Cul1-Rbx1-Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Unlike other known SCF substrates, p27(Kip1) ubiquitination also requires the accessory protein Cks1. The crystal structure of the Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complex bound to a p27(Kip1) phosphopeptide shows that Cks1 binds to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain and C-terminal tail of Skp2, whereas p27(Kip1) binds to both Cks1 and Skp2. The phosphorylated Thr187 side chain of p27(Kip1) is recognized by a Cks1 phosphate binding site, whereas the side chain of an invariant Glu185 inserts into the interface between Skp2 and Cks1, interacting with both. The structure and biochemical data support the proposed model that Cdk2-cyclin A contributes to the recruitment of p27(Kip1) to the SCF(Skp2)-Cks1 complex.

  2. Decomposing Complex, Macroscopic Phenomena Through A Set of Local Nonlinear Rules In A Cellular Automata Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, M. V.; Crisci, G. M.; D'Ambrosio, D.; di Gregorio, S.; Iovine, G.; Rongo, R.; Spataro, W.

    Cellular Automata (CA) are able to capture the peculiar characteristics of systems, whose global evolution can be exclusively described on the basis of local interactions among their constituent parts ("a-centrism"). Such systems match the paradigm of parallelism with the a-centrism one. In modelling complex phenomena by means of classical CA, elementary automata characterised by few states and simple transition function have usually been involved. On the other hand, many complex macroscopic phenomena (even though characterised by properties of parallelism and a-centrism) can be very difficult to be modelled through classical CA, because of their hetero- geneous characteristics, which require a very large number of states. For such cases, which perfectly fit the general definition of CA, more complex transition rules (differ- ing from typical transition functions) would be, in fact, needed. Aiming at modelling these latter phenomena, an empirical method has been developed, based on the decom- position of the phenomenon into "elementary" components, whose behaviour can be described through local rules. Furthermore, criteria and conditions have been defined, in order to translate the local rules into a transition function, as needed for perform- ing cellular automata simulations. Applications of CA models to real cases of study have recently been attempted: landslides (earth flows, rock avalanches, debris flows), lava flows, soil erosion, soil contamination and bioremediation, forest fires have all been analysed through CA simulations, and encouraging results have been obtained. In the present paper, examples of application of the method for hazard evaluation are described, with particular reference to the Sarno 1998 debris flows and the Etna 2001 lava flows.

  3. Silencio/CG9754 connects the Piwi–piRNA complex to the cellular heterochromatin machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienski, Grzegorz; Batki, Julia; Senti, Kirsten-André; Dönertas, Derya; Tirian, Laszlo; Meixner, Katharina; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-01-01

    The repression of transposable elements in eukaryotes often involves their transcriptional silencing via targeted chromatin modifications. In animal gonads, nuclear Argonaute proteins of the PIWI clade complexed with small guide RNAs (piRNAs) serve as sequence specificity determinants in this process. How binding of nuclear PIWI–piRNA complexes to nascent transcripts orchestrates heterochromatin formation and transcriptional silencing is unknown. Here, we characterize CG9754/Silencio as an essential piRNA pathway factor that is required for Piwi-mediated transcriptional silencing in Drosophila. Ectopic targeting of Silencio to RNA or DNA is sufficient to elicit silencing independently of Piwi and known piRNA pathway factors. Instead, Silencio requires the H3K9 methyltransferase Eggless/SetDB1 for its silencing ability. In agreement with this, SetDB1, but not Su(var)3-9, is required for Piwi-mediated transcriptional silencing genome-wide. Due to its interaction with the target-engaged Piwi–piRNA complex, we suggest that Silencio acts as linker between the sequence specificity factor Piwi and the cellular heterochromatin machinery. PMID:26494711

  4. Silencio/CG9754 connects the Piwi-piRNA complex to the cellular heterochromatin machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienski, Grzegorz; Batki, Julia; Senti, Kirsten-André; Dönertas, Derya; Tirian, Laszlo; Meixner, Katharina; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-11-01

    The repression of transposable elements in eukaryotes often involves their transcriptional silencing via targeted chromatin modifications. In animal gonads, nuclear Argonaute proteins of the PIWI clade complexed with small guide RNAs (piRNAs) serve as sequence specificity determinants in this process. How binding of nuclear PIWI-piRNA complexes to nascent transcripts orchestrates heterochromatin formation and transcriptional silencing is unknown. Here, we characterize CG9754/Silencio as an essential piRNA pathway factor that is required for Piwi-mediated transcriptional silencing in Drosophila. Ectopic targeting of Silencio to RNA or DNA is sufficient to elicit silencing independently of Piwi and known piRNA pathway factors. Instead, Silencio requires the H3K9 methyltransferase Eggless/SetDB1 for its silencing ability. In agreement with this, SetDB1, but not Su(var)3-9, is required for Piwi-mediated transcriptional silencing genome-wide. Due to its interaction with the target-engaged Piwi-piRNA complex, we suggest that Silencio acts as linker between the sequence specificity factor Piwi and the cellular heterochromatin machinery.

  5. Monitoring cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of copper(II) complex using a fluorescent anthracene thiosemicarbazone ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Anup N; Kumbhar, Anupa A; Khan, Ayesha A; Joshi, Pranaya V; Puranik, Vedavati G

    2014-01-15

    The thiosemicarbazone derivative of anthracene (ATSC, anthracene thiosemicarbazone 1) and its copper(II) complex (CuATSC, 2) were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic, electrochemical, and crystallographic techniques. Interaction of 1 and 2 with calf thymus (CT) DNA was explored using absorption and emission spectral methods, and viscosity measurements reveal a partial-intercalation binding mode. Their protein binding ability was monitored by the quenching of tryptophan emission using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. Furthermore, their cellular uptake, in vitro cytotoxicity testing on the HeLa cell line, and flow cytometric analysis were carried out to ascertain the mode of cell death. Cell cycle analysis indicated that 1 and 2 cause cell cycle arrest in sub-G1 phase. PMID:24328322

  6. Modeling of the competition life cycle using the software complex of cellular automata PyCAlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, D. B.; Beklemishev, K. A.; Medvedev, A. N.; Medvedeva, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work is to develop a numerical model of the life cycle of competition on the basis of software complex cellular automata PyCAlab. The model is based on the general patterns of growth of various systems in resource-limited settings. At examples it is shown that the period of transition from an unlimited growth of the market agents to the stage of competitive growth takes quite a long time and may be characterized as monotonic. During this period two main strategies of competitive selection coexist: 1) capture of maximum market space with any reasonable costs; 2) saving by reducing costs. The obtained results allow concluding that the competitive strategies of companies must combine two mentioned types of behavior, and this issue needs to be given adequate attention in the academic literature on management. The created numerical model may be used for market research when developing of the strategies for promotion of new goods and services.

  7. Identification of She3 as an SCF(Grr1 substrate in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiwen Wang

    Full Text Available The highly orchestrated progression of the cell cycle depends on the degradation of many regulatory proteins at different cell cycle stages. One of the key cell cycle ubiquitin ligases is the Skp1-cullin-F-box (SCF complex. Acting in concert with the substrate-binding F-box protein Grr1, SCF(Grr1 promotes the degradation of cell cycle regulators as well as various metabolic enzymes. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay with a Grr1 derivative as the bait, we identified She3, which is an adaptor protein in the asymmetric mRNA transport system, as a novel Grr1 substrate. We generated stabilized She3 mutants, which no longer bound to Grr1, and found that the degradation of She3 is not required for regulating asymmetric mRNA transport. However, She3 stabilization leads to slower growth compared to wild-type cells in a co-culture assay, demonstrating that the degradation of She3 by Grr1 is required for optimal cell growth.

  8. New water-soluble ruthenium(II) cytotoxic complex: biological activity and cellular distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Tânia S; Santos, Filipa C; Jorge, Tiago F; Côrte-Real, Leonor; Madeira, Paulo J Amorim; Marques, Fernanda; Robalo, M Paula; Matos, António; Santos, Isabel; Garcia, M Helena

    2014-01-01

    A novel water soluble organometallic compound, [RuCp(mTPPMSNa)(2,2'-bipy)][CF3SO3] (TM85, where Cp=η(5)-cyclopentadienyl, mTPPMS=diphenylphosphane-benzene-3-sulfonate and 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine) is presented herein. Studies of interactions with relevant proteins were performed to understand the behavior and mode of action of this complex in the biological environment. Electrochemical and fluorescence studies showed that TM85 strongly binds to albumin. Studies carried out to study the formation of TM85 which adducts with ubiquitin and cytochrome c were performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Antitumor activity was evaluated against a variety of human cancer cell lines, namely A2780, A2780cisR, MCF7, MDAMB231, HT29, PC3 and V79 non-tumorigenic cells and compared with the reference drug cisplatin. TM85 cytotoxic effect was reduced in the presence of endocytosis modulators at low temperatures, suggesting an energy-dependent mechanism consistent with endocytosis. Ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that TM85 targets the endomembranar system disrupting the Golgi and also affects the mitochondria. Disruption of plasma membrane observed by flow cytometry could lead to cellular damage and cell death. On the whole, the biological activity evaluated herein combined with the water solubility property suggests that complex TM85 could be a promising anticancer agent. PMID:24145065

  9. APC/C and SCF(cyclin F) Constitute a Reciprocal Feedback Circuit Controlling S-Phase Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Bonacci, Thomas; Arceci, Anthony; Lahiri, Debojyoti; Mills, Christine A; Kernan, Jennifer L; Branigan, Timothy B; DeCaprio, James A; Burke, Daniel J; Emanuele, Michael J

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin ligase and core component of the cell-cycle oscillator. During G1 phase, APC/C binds to its substrate receptor Cdh1 and APC/C(Cdh1) plays an important role in restricting S-phase entry and maintaining genome integrity. We describe a reciprocal feedback circuit between APC/C and a second ubiquitin ligase, the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box). We show that cyclin F, a cell-cycle-regulated substrate receptor (F-box protein) for the SCF, is targeted for degradation by APC/C. Furthermore, we establish that Cdh1 is itself a substrate of SCF(cyclin F). Cyclin F loss impairs Cdh1 degradation and delays S-phase entry, and this delay is reversed by simultaneous removal of Cdh1. These data indicate that the coordinated, temporal ordering of cyclin F and Cdh1 degradation, organized in a double-negative feedback loop, represents a fundamental aspect of cell-cycle control. This mutual antagonism could be a feature of other oscillating systems.

  10. Stem cell factor (SCF) protects osteoblasts from oxidative stress through activating c-Kit-Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lei [Department of Orthopedics, Changzhou Wujin People’s Hospital-South Division, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Changzhou (China); Wu, Zhong [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Gang; Liu, Haifeng; Guan, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiaoqiang [Department of Orthopedics, Changzhou Wujin People’s Hospital-South Division, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Changzhou (China); Wang, Jianguang, E-mail: jianguangwang@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Jianguo, E-mail: gehujianguo68@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, Changzhou Wujin People’s Hospital-South Division, Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Changzhou (China)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SCF receptor c-Kit is functionally expressed in primary and transformed osteoblasts. • SCF protects primary and transformed osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • SCF activation of c-Kit in osteoblasts, required for its cyto-protective effects. • c-Kit mediates SCF-induced Akt activation in cultured osteoblasts. • Akt activation is required for SCF-regulated cyto-protective effects in osteoblasts. - Abstract: Osteoblasts regulate bone formation and remodeling, and are main target cells of oxidative stress in the progression of osteonecrosis. The stem cell factor (SCF)-c-Kit pathway plays important roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of cell types, but little is known about its functions in osteoblasts. In this study, we found that c-Kit is functionally expressed in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Its ligand SCF exerted significant cyto-protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). SCF activated its receptor c-Kit in osteoblasts, which was required for its cyto-protective effects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Pharmacological inhibition (by Imatinib and Dasatinib) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Kit thus inhibited SCF-mediated osteoblast protection. Further investigations showed that protection by SCF against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was mediated via activation of c-Kit-dependent Akt pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation, through pharmacological or genetic means, suppressed SCF-mediated anti-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activity in osteoblasts. In summary, we have identified a new SCF-c-Kit-Akt physiologic pathway that protects osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced damages, and might minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by oxidative stress.

  11. Conformational analysis of primary ethylene ozonide by gradient and multiconfigurational scf calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Peter; Almlöf, Jan; Sæbø, Svem

    1980-06-01

    Four conformers of ethylene primary ozonide have been studied by ab initio gradient and MC SCF calculations, using gaussian-type basis functions. The MC SCF results indicate that the conformers are not as close in energy as suggested from single-determinant SCF calculations. The oxygen-oxygen and carbon-oxygen half-chair structures are much lower in energy than the carbon-carbon half-chair.

  12. SCF, Regulated by HIF-1α, Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chuntao; Li, Shasha; Zhao, Tiansuo; Chen, Jing; Ren, He; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiuchao; Lang, Mingxiao; Liu, Jingcheng; Gao, Song; Zhao, Xiao; Sheng, Jun; Yuan, Zhanna; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) both have important functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This study aims to analyze the expression and clinicopathological significance of SCF and HIF-1α in PDAC specimens and explore the molecular mechanism at PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo. We showed that the expression of SCF was significantly correlated with HIF-1α expression via Western blot, PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and luciferase a...

  13. Low-complexity co-tier interference reduction scheme in open-access overlaid cellular networks

    KAUST Repository

    Radaydeh, Redha Mahmoud Mesleh

    2011-12-01

    This paper addresses the effect of co-tier interference on the performance of multiuser overlaid cellular networks that share the same available resources. It assumed that each macrocell contains a number of self-configurable and randomly located femtocells that employ the open-access control strategy to reduce the effect of cross-tier interference. It is also assumed that the desired user equipment (UE) can access only one of the available channels, maintains simple decoding circuitry with single receive antenna, and has limited knowledge of the instantaneous channel state information (CSI) due to resource limitation. To mitigate the effect of co-tier interference in the absence of the CSI of the desired UE, a low-complexity switched-based scheme for single channel selection based on the predicted interference levels associated with available channels is proposed for the case of over-loaded channels. Through the analysis, new general formulation for the statistics of the resulting instantaneous interference power and some performance measures are presented. The effect of the switching threshold on the efficiency and performance of the proposed scheme is studied. Numerical and simulation results to clarify the usefulness of the proposed scheme in reducing the impact of co-tier interference are also provided. © 2011 IEEE.

  14. Does constructive neutral evolution play an important role in the origin of cellular complexity? Making sense of the origins and uses of biological complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Speijer

    2011-01-01

    Recently, constructive neutral evolution has been touted as an important concept for the understanding of the emergence of cellular complexity. It has been invoked to help explain the development and retention of, amongst others, RNA splicing, RNA editing and ribosomal and mitochondrial respiratory

  15. Depletion of Cellular Pre-Replication Complex Factors Results in Increased Human Cytomegalovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Evans Braun; Emma Poole; John Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Although HCMV encodes many genes required for the replication of its DNA genome, no HCMV-encoded orthologue of the origin binding protein, which has been identified in other herpesviruses, has been identified. This has led to speculation that HCMV may use other viral proteins or possibly cellular factors for the initiation of DNA synthesis. It is also unclear whether cellular replication factors are required for efficient replication of viral DNA during or after viral replication origin recog...

  16. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Xurui Zhang; Caiyong Ye; Fang Sun; Wenjun Wei; Burong Hu; Jufang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. ...

  17. Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Kumar, Chanchal; Gnad, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylation's cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600 ly...

  18. Particle acceleration in a complex solar active region modelled by a Cellular automata model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2004-12-01

    The models of cellular automat allowed to reproduce successfully several statistical properties of the solar flares. We use a cellular automat model based on the concept of self-organised critical system to model the evolution of the magnetic energy released in an eruptive active area. Each burst of magnetic energy released is assimilated to a process of magnetic reconnection. We will thus generate several current layers (RCS) where the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. We calculate the energy gain of the particles (ions and electrons) for various types of magnetic configuration. We calculate the distribution function of the kinetic energy of the particles after their interactions with a given number of RCS for each type of configurations. We show that the relative efficiency of the acceleration of the electrons and the ions depends on the selected configuration.

  19. Structural basis of the Cks1-dependent recognition of p27(Kip1) by the SCF(Skp2) ubiquitin ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, B.; Zheng, N.; Schulman, B.A.; Wu, G.; Miller, J.J.; Pagano, M.; Pavletich, N.P. (MSKCC); (HHMI)

    2010-07-19

    The ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of the Cdk2 inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} plays a central role in cell cycle progression, and enhanced degradation of p27{sup Kip1} is associated with many common cancers. Proteolysis of p27{sup Kip1} is triggered by Thr187 phosphorylation, which leads to the binding of the SCF{sup Skp2} (Skp1-Cul1-Rbx1-Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Unlike other known SCF substrates, p27{sup Kip1} ubiquitination also requires the accessory protein Cks1. The crystal structure of the Skp1-Skp2-Cks1 complex bound to a p27{sup Kip1} phosphopeptide shows that Cks1 binds to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain and C-terminal tail of Skp2, whereas p27{sup Kip1} binds to both Cks1 and Skp2. The phosphorylated Thr187 side chain of p27{sup Kip1} is recognized by a Cks1 phosphate binding site, whereas the side chain of an invariant Glu185 inserts into the interface between Skp2 and Cks1, interacting with both. The structure and biochemical data support the proposed model that Cdk2-cyclin A contributes to the recruitment of p27{sup Kip1} to the SCF{sup Skp2}-Cks1 complex.

  20. Structural Basis of Selective Ubiquitination of TRF1 by SCF[superscript Fbx4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhixiong; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Yong; Yang, Xiaomei; Diehl, J. Alan; Liu, Xuedong; Lei, Ming (UPENN); (Michigan-Med); (Colorado)

    2010-09-03

    TRF1 is a critical regulator of telomere length. As such, TRF1 levels are regulated by ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis via an SCF E3 ligase where Fbx4 contributes to substrate specification. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Fbx4-TRF1 complex at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Fbx4 contains an unusual substrate-binding domain that adopts a small GTPase fold. Strikingly, this atypical GTPase domain of Fbx4 binds to a globular domain of TRF1 through an intermolecular {beta} sheet, instead of recognizing short peptides/degrons as often seen in other F-box protein-substrate complexes. Importantly, mutations in this interface abrogate Fbx4-dependent TRF1 binding and ubiquitination. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that recognition of TRF1 by SCFFbx4 is regulated by another telomere protein, TIN2. Our results reveal an atypical small GTPase domain within Fbx4 as a substrate-binding motif for SCFFbx4 and uncover a mechanism for selective ubiquitination and degradation of TRF1 in telomere homeostasis control.

  1. Plin2 inhibits cellular glucose uptake through interactions with SNAP23, a SNARE complex protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Senthivinayagam

    Full Text Available Although a link between excess lipid storage and aberrant glucose metabolism has been recognized for many years, little is known what role lipid storage droplets and associated proteins such as Plin2 play in managing cellular glucose levels. To address this issue, the influence of Plin2 on glucose uptake was examined using 2-NBD-Glucose and [(3H]-2-deoxyglucose to show that insulin-mediated glucose uptake was decreased 1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively in L cell fibroblasts overexpressing Plin2. Conversely, suppression of Plin2 levels by RNAi-mediated knockdown increased 2-NBD-Glucose uptake several fold in transfected L cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The effect of Plin2 expression on proteins involved in glucose uptake and transport was also examined. Expression of the SNARE protein SNAP23 was increased 1.6-fold while levels of syntaxin-5 were decreased 1.7-fold in Plin2 overexpression cells with no significant changes observed in lipid droplet associated proteins Plin1 or FSP27 or with the insulin receptor, GLUT1, or VAMP4. FRET experiments revealed a close proximity of Plin2 to SNAP23 on lipid droplets to within an intramolecular distance of 51 Å. The extent of targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets was determined by co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to show increased partitioning of SNAP23 to lipid droplets when Plin2 was overexpressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Plin2 inhibits glucose uptake by interacting with, and regulating cellular targeting of SNAP23 to lipid droplets. In summary, the current study for the first time provides direct evidence for the role of Plin2 in mediating cellular glucose uptake.

  2. Novel roles of Skp2 E3 ligase in cellular senescence, cancer progression, and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guocan Wang; Chia-Hsin Chan; Yuan Gao; Hui-Kuan Lin

    2012-01-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) belongs to the F-box protein family.It is a component of the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex.Skp2 has been shown to regulate cellular proliferation by targeting several cell cycle-regulated proteins for ubiquitination and degradation,including cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27.Skp2 has also been demonstrated to display an oncogenic function since its overexpression has been observed in many human cancers.This review discusses the recent discoveries on the novel roles of Skp2 in regulating cellular senescence,cancer progression,and metastasis,as well as the therapeutic potential of targeting Skp2 for human cancer treatment.

  3. Coordinated destruction of cellular messages in translation complexes by the gammaherpesvirus host shutoff factor and the mammalian exonuclease Xrn1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Sergio; Gaglia, Marta M; Kumar, G Renuka; Wong, Wesley; Jackson, Andrew O; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2011-10-01

    Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells.

  4. Coordinated destruction of cellular messages in translation complexes by the gammaherpesvirus host shutoff factor and the mammalian exonuclease Xrn1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Covarrubias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells.

  5. DMRG-SCF study of the singlet, triplet, and quintet states of oxo-Mn(Salen)

    CERN Document Server

    Wouters, Sebastian; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    We use CheMPS2, our free open-source spin-adapted implementation of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) [Wouters et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 185, 1501 (2014)], to study the lowest singlet, triplet, and quintet states of the oxo-Mn(Salen) complex. We describe how an initial approximate DMRG calculation in a large active space around the Fermi level can be used to obtain a good set of starting orbitals for subsequent complete-active-space or DMRG self-consistent field (CASSCF or DMRG-SCF) calculations. This procedure mitigates the need for a localization procedure, followed by a manual selection of the active space. Per multiplicity, the same active space of 28 electrons in 22 orbitals (28e, 22o) is obtained with the 6-31G*, cc-pVDZ, and ANO-RCC-VDZP basis sets (the latter with DKH2 scalar relativistic corrections). Our calculations provide new insight into the electronic structure of the quintet.

  6. Cellular Nutrition in Complex Three-Dimensional Scaffolds: A Comparison between Experiments and Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Claudia; Elter, Patrick; Lange, Regina; Weißmann, Volker; Hansmann, Harald; Klinkenberg, Ernst-Dieter; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Studies on bone cell ingrowth into synthetic, porous three-dimensional (3D) implants showed difficulties arising from impaired cellular proliferation and differentiation in the core region of these scaffolds with increasing scaffold volume in vitro. Therefore, we developed an in vitro perfusion cell culture module, which allows the analysis of cells in the interior of scaffolds under different medium flow rates. For each flow rate the cell viability was measured and compared with results from computer simulations that predict the local oxygen supply and shear stress inside the scaffold based on the finite element method. We found that the local cell viability correlates with the local oxygen concentration and the local shear stress. On the one hand the oxygen supply of the cells in the core becomes optimal with a higher perfusion flow. On the other hand shear stress caused by high flow rates impedes cell vitality, especially at the surface of the scaffold. Our results demonstrate that both parameters must be considered to derive an optimal nutrient flow rate. PMID:26539216

  7. Cellular Nutrition in Complex Three-Dimensional Scaffolds: A Comparison between Experiments and Computer Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bergemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on bone cell ingrowth into synthetic, porous three-dimensional (3D implants showed difficulties arising from impaired cellular proliferation and differentiation in the core region of these scaffolds with increasing scaffold volume in vitro. Therefore, we developed an in vitro perfusion cell culture module, which allows the analysis of cells in the interior of scaffolds under different medium flow rates. For each flow rate the cell viability was measured and compared with results from computer simulations that predict the local oxygen supply and shear stress inside the scaffold based on the finite element method. We found that the local cell viability correlates with the local oxygen concentration and the local shear stress. On the one hand the oxygen supply of the cells in the core becomes optimal with a higher perfusion flow. On the other hand shear stress caused by high flow rates impedes cell vitality, especially at the surface of the scaffold. Our results demonstrate that both parameters must be considered to derive an optimal nutrient flow rate.

  8. Particle acceleration and radiation in flaring complex solar active regions modeled by cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2007-06-01

    Context: We study the acceleration and radiation of electrons and ions interacting with multiple small-scale dissipation regions resulting from the magnetic energy release process. Aims: We aim to calculate the distribution functions of the kinetic energy of the particles and the X-ray spectra and γ-ray fluxes produced by the accelerated particles. Methods: The evolution of the magnetic energy released in an active region is mimicked by a cellular automaton model based on the concept of self-organized criticality. Each burst of magnetic energy release is associated with a reconnecting current sheet (RCS) in which the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. Results: We calculate the energy gain of the particles (ions and electrons) for three different magnetic configurations of the RCS after their interactions with a given number of RCS. We finally compare our results with existing observations. Conclusions: The results of our simulation can reproduce several properties of the observations such as variable electron and ion energy contents and γ-ray line ratio. Even if very flat X-ray spectra have been reported in a few events, the X-ray spectra produced in this model are too flat when compared to most X-ray observations.

  9. Biology of cancer and aging: a complex association with cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falandry, Claire; Bonnefoy, Marc; Freyer, Gilles; Gilson, Eric

    2014-08-20

    Over the last 50 years, major improvements have been made in our understanding of the driving forces, both parallel and opposing, that lead to aging and cancer. Many theories on aging first proposed in the 1950s, including those associated with telomere biology, senescence, and adult stem-cell regulation, have since gained support from cumulative experimental evidence. These views suggest that the accumulation of mutations might be a common driver of both aging and cancer. Moreover, some tumor suppressor pathways lead to aging in line with the theory of antagonist pleiotropy. According to the evolutionary-selected disposable soma theory, aging should affect primarily somatic cells. At the cellular level, both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways regulate aging and senescence. However, increasing lines of evidence support the hypothesis that these driving forces might be regulated by evolutionary-conserved pathways that modulate energy balance. According to the hyperfunction theory, aging is a quasi-program favoring both age-related diseases and cancer that could be inhibited by the regulation of longevity pathways. This review summarizes these hypotheses, as well as the experimental data that have accumulated over the last 60 years linking aging and cancer.

  10. Complex dynamics of selection and cellular memory in adaptation to a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussell, Edo; Lin, Wei-Hsiang

    We study a synthetic evolutionary system in bacteria in which an antibiotic resistance gene is controlled by a stochastic on/off switching promoter. At the population level, this system displays all the basic ingredients for evolutionary selection, including diversity, fitness differences, and heritability. At the single cell level, physiological processes can modulate the ability of selection to act. We expose the stochastic switching strains to pulses of antibiotics of different durations in periodically changing environments using microfluidics. Small populations are tracked over a large number of periods at single cell resolution, allowing the visualization and quantification of selective sweeps and counter-sweeps at the population level, as well as detailed single cell analysis. A simple model is introduced to predict long-term population growth rates from single cell measurements, and reveals unexpected aspects of population dynamics, including cellular memory that acts on a fast timescale to modulate growth rates. This work is supported by NIH Grant No. R01-GM097356.

  11. Sevoflurane-Sulfobutylether-β-Cyclodextrin Complex: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Toxicity, Molecular Modeling and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Shityakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to study the ability of sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD to form an inclusion complex with sevoflurane (SEV, a volatile anesthetic with poor water solubility. The inclusion complex was prepared, characterized and its cellular toxicity and blood-brain barrier (BBB permeation potential of the formulated SEV have also been examined for the purpose of controlled drug delivery. The SEV-SBEβCD complex was nontoxic to the primary brain microvascular endothelial (pEND cells at a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane. The inclusion complex exhibited significantly higher BBB permeation profiles as compared with the reference substance (propranolol concerning calculated apparent permeability values (Papp. In addition, SEV binding affinity to SBEβCD was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔGbind value of −1.727 ± 0.042 kcal·mol−1 and an average binding constant (Kb of 53.66 ± 9.24 mM indicating rapid drug liberation from the cyclodextrin amphiphilic cavity.

  12. Sevoflurane-Sulfobutylether-β-Cyclodextrin Complex: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Toxicity, Molecular Modeling and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Puskás, István; Pápai, Katalin; Salvador, Ellaine; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the ability of sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD) to form an inclusion complex with sevoflurane (SEV), a volatile anesthetic with poor water solubility. The inclusion complex was prepared, characterized and its cellular toxicity and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation potential of the formulated SEV have also been examined for the purpose of controlled drug delivery. The SEV-SBEβCD complex was nontoxic to the primary brain microvascular endothelial (pEND) cells at a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane. The inclusion complex exhibited significantly higher BBB permeation profiles as compared with the reference substance (propranolol) concerning calculated apparent permeability values (Papp). In addition, SEV binding affinity to SBEβCD was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔGbind) value of -1.727 ± 0.042 kcal·mol-1 and an average binding constant (Kb) of 53.66 ± 9.24 mM indicating rapid drug liberation from the cyclodextrin amphiphilic cavity. PMID:26046323

  13. Role of Cellular Lipids in Positive-Sense RNA Virus Replication Complex Assembly and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Stapleford, Kenneth A.; Miller, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Positive-sense RNA viruses are responsible for frequent and often devastating diseases in humans, animals, and plants. However, the development of effective vaccines and anti-viral therapies targeted towards these pathogens has been hindered by an incomplete understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in viral replication. One common feature of all positive-sense RNA viruses is the manipulation of host intracellular membranes for the assembly of functional viral RNA replication complex...

  14. The Complex Economic System of Supply Chain Financing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Yan, Guangle

    Supply Chain Financing (SCF) refers to a series of innovative and complicated financial services based on supply chain. The SCF set-up is a complex system, where the supply chain management and Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) financing services interpenetrate systematically. This paper establishes the organization structure of SCF System, and presents two financing models respectively, with or without the participation of the third-party logistic provider (3PL). Using Information Economics and Game Theory, the interrelationship among diverse economic sectors is analyzed, and the economic mechanism of development and existent for SCF system is demonstrated. New thoughts and approaches to solve SMEs financing problem are given.

  15. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kristen Hall

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9 technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties.

  16. Cellular responses induced by Cu(II quinolinonato complexes in human tumor and hepatic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trávníček Zdeněk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspired by the unprecedented historical success of cisplatin, one of the most important research directions in bioinorganic and medicinal chemistry is dedicated to the development of new anticancer compounds with the potential to surpass it in antitumor activity, while having lower unwanted side-effects. Therefore, a series of copper(II mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Cu(qui(L]Y · xH2O (1–6, where Hqui = 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolinone, Y = NO3 (1, 3, 5 or BF4 (2, 4, 6, and L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen (1, 2, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen (3, 4 and bathophenanthroline (bphen (5, 6, was studied for their in vitro cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines (A549 lung carcinoma, HeLa cervix epitheloid carcinoma, G361 melanoma cells, A2780 ovarian carcinoma, A2780cis cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma, LNCaP androgen-sensitive prostate adenocarcinoma and THP-1 monocytic leukemia. Results The tested complexes displayed a stronger cytotoxic effect against all the cancer cells as compared to cisplatin. The highest cytotoxicity was found for the complexes 4 (IC50 = 0.36 ± 0.05 μM and 0.56 ± 0.15 μM, 5 (IC50 = 0.66 ± 0.07 μM and 0.73 ± 0.08 μM and 6 (IC50 = 0.57 ± 0.11 μM and 0.70 ± 0.20 μM against A2780, and A2780cis respectively, as compared with the values of 12.0 ± 0.8 μM and 27.0 ± 4.6 μM determined for cisplatin. Moreover, the tested complexes were much less cytotoxic to primary human hepatocytes than to the cancer cells. The complexes 5 and 6 exhibited significantly high ability to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (2873 ± 238 pg/mL and 3284 ± 139 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively and IL-1β (1177 ± 128 pg/mL and 1087 ± 101 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively tested on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells as compared with the values of 1173

  17. Complex Systems in APL: Fractals, Evolving Cellular Automata and Artificial Life

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonseca, Manuel; Ortega, Alfonso; Cruz Echeandía, Marina de la

    2002-01-01

    This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in APL Quote Quad 32.4 (2002): 17 – 26, http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/604444.602233 We have been working for several years on the representation, study and simulation of complex systems by means of formal methods. APL2 and other programming languages have been used to develop our tools and experiments. This paper summarizes our APL2 works on ...

  18. A differential genome-wide transcriptome analysis: impact of cellular copper on complex biological processes like aging and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Servos

    Full Text Available The regulation of cellular copper homeostasis is crucial in biology. Impairments lead to severe dysfunctions and are known to affect aging and development. Previously, a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the copper-sensing and copper-regulated transcription factor GRISEA of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina was reported to lead to cellular copper depletion and a pleiotropic phenotype with hypopigmentation of the mycelium and the ascospores, affected fertility and increased lifespan by approximately 60% when compared to the wild type. This phenotype is linked to a switch from a copper-dependent standard to an alternative respiration leading to both a reduced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. We performed a genome-wide comparative transcriptome analysis of a wild-type strain and the copper-depleted grisea mutant. We unambiguously assigned 9,700 sequences of the transcriptome in both strains to the more than 10,600 predicted and annotated open reading frames of the P. anserina genome indicating 90% coverage of the transcriptome. 4,752 of the transcripts differed significantly in abundance with 1,156 transcripts differing at least 3-fold. Selected genes were investigated by qRT-PCR analyses. Apart from this general characterization we analyzed the data with special emphasis on molecular pathways related to the grisea mutation taking advantage of the available complete genomic sequence of P. anserina. This analysis verified but also corrected conclusions from earlier data obtained by single gene analysis, identified new candidates of factors as part of the cellular copper homeostasis system including target genes of transcription factor GRISEA, and provides a rich reference source of quantitative data for further in detail investigations. Overall, the present study demonstrates the importance of systems biology approaches also in cases were mutations in single genes are analyzed to

  19. BioJazz: in silico evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity using rule-based modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Song; Ollivier, Julien F; Swain, Peter S; Soyer, Orkun S

    2015-10-30

    Systems biologists aim to decipher the structure and dynamics of signaling and regulatory networks underpinning cellular responses; synthetic biologists can use this insight to alter existing networks or engineer de novo ones. Both tasks will benefit from an understanding of which structural and dynamic features of networks can emerge from evolutionary processes, through which intermediary steps these arise, and whether they embody general design principles. As natural evolution at the level of network dynamics is difficult to study, in silico evolution of network models can provide important insights. However, current tools used for in silico evolution of network dynamics are limited to ad hoc computer simulations and models. Here we introduce BioJazz, an extendable, user-friendly tool for simulating the evolution of dynamic biochemical networks. Unlike previous tools for in silico evolution, BioJazz allows for the evolution of cellular networks with unbounded complexity by combining rule-based modeling with an encoding of networks that is akin to a genome. We show that BioJazz can be used to implement biologically realistic selective pressures and allows exploration of the space of network architectures and dynamics that implement prescribed physiological functions. BioJazz is provided as an open-source tool to facilitate its further development and use. Source code and user manuals are available at: http://oss-lab.github.io/biojazz and http://osslab.lifesci.warwick.ac.uk/BioJazz.aspx.

  20. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  1. Ionization States, Cellular Toxicity and Molecular Modeling Studies of Midazolam Complexed with Trimethyl-β-Cyclodextrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Shityakov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ionization profiles for open-ring (OR and closed-ring (CR forms of midazolam and drug-binding modes with heptakis-(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin; TRIMEB using molecular modeling techniques and quantum mechanics methods. The results indicated that the total net charges for different molecular forms of midazolam tend to be cationic for OR and neutral for CR at physiological pH levels. The thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that CR is less water-soluble than OR, mainly due to the maximal solvation energy (\\(\\Delta G_{solv}^{CR}\\ = −9.98 kcal·mol\\(^{−1}\\, which has a minimal \\(\\Delta G_{solv}^{OR}\\ of −67.01 kcal·mol\\(^{−1}\\. A cell viability assay did not detect any signs of TRIMEB and OR/CR-TRIMEB complex toxicity on the cEND cells after 24 h of incubation in either Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium or in heat-inactivated human serum. The molecular docking studies identified the more flexible OR form of midazolam as being a better binder to TRIMEB with the fluorophenyl ring introduced inside the amphiphilic cavity of the host molecule. The OR binding affinity was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (\\(\\Delta G_{bind}\\ value of −5.57 ± 0.02 kcal·mol\\(^{−1}\\, an equilibrium binding constant (\\(K_{b}\\ of 79.89 ± 2.706 μM, and a ligand efficiency index (\\(LE_{lig}\\ of −0.21 ± 0.001. Our current data suggest that in order to improve the clinical applications of midazolam via its complexation with trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin to increase drug's overall aqueous solubility, it is important to concern the different forms and ionization states of this anesthetic. All mean values are indicated with their standard deviations.

  2. Ionization states, cellular toxicity and molecular modeling studies of midazolam complexed with trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Sohajda, Tamás; Puskás, István; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the ionization profiles for open-ring (OR) and closed-ring (CR) forms of midazolam and drug-binding modes with heptakis-(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin (trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin; TRIMEB) using molecular modeling techniques and quantum mechanics methods. The results indicated that the total net charges for different molecular forms of midazolam tend to be cationic for OR and neutral for CR at physiological pH levels. The thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that CR is less water-soluble than OR, mainly due to the maximal solvation energy (ΔG(CR)(solv = -9.98 kcal·mol ⁻¹), which has a minimal ΔG(OR)(solv) of -67.01 kcal·mol⁻¹. A cell viability assay did not detect any signs of TRIMEB and OR/CR-TRIMEB complex toxicity on the cEND cells after 24 h of incubation in either Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium or in heat-inactivated human serum. The molecular docking studies identified the more flexible OR form of midazolam as being a better binder to TRIMEB with the fluorophenyl ring introduced inside the amphiphilic cavity of the host molecule. The OR binding affinity was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔG(bind)) value of -5.57 ± 0.02 kcal·mol⁻¹, an equilibrium binding constant (K(b)) of 79.89 ± 2.706 μM, and a ligand efficiency index (LE(lig)) of -0.21 ± 0.001. Our current data suggest that in order to improve the clinical applications of midazolam via its complexation with trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin to increase drug's overall aqueous solubility, it is important to concern the different forms and ionization states of this anesthetic. All mean values are indicated with their standard deviations. PMID:25338177

  3. An SCF-CI method for determining the potential energy surface of a triatomic molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢代前; 鄢国森

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent-field (SCF)-configuration interaction (CI) (SCF-CI) method for determining the potential energy surface of a triatomic molecule from the observed vibrational band origins has been suggested. By this method, the SCF-CI procedure in the internal coordinates is used to calculate the vibrational bond origins and their first derivatives with respect to parameters in the potential energy function using the exact vibrational Hamiltonian, and the optimizer LMF in the nonlinear-squares problem is employed to optimize parameters in the potential energy function. This approach is used to optimize the potential energy function of the water molecule. The standard deviation of this fitting to the 70 observed band origins is 1.154cm-1.

  4. Stem Cell Factor (SCF) is a putative biomarker of antidepressant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Francesco; Poletti, Sara; Hoogenboezem, Thomas A; Locatelli, Clara; Ambrée, Oliver; de Wit, Harm; Wijkhuijs, Annemarie J M; Mazza, Elena; Bulgarelli, Chiara; Vai, Benedetta; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico; Arolt, Volker; Drexhage, Hemmo A

    2016-06-01

    Growth factors involved in neurogenesis and neuroplasticity could play a role in biological processes that drive depression recovery. Combined total sleep deprivation and morning light therapy (TSD + LT) can acutely reverse depressive symptoms, thus allowing to investigate the neurobiological correlates of antidepressant response. We tested if changes on plasma levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), S100 calcium binding protein B (S100-B), Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB), and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) are associated with response to TSD + LT in 26 inpatients affected by a major depressive episode in the course of bipolar disorder. Regional grey matter (GM) volumes were assessed at baseline, and BOLD fMRI neural responses to a moral valence decision task were recorded before and after treatment. 61.5 % of patients responded to treatment. SCF plasma levels increased significantly more in responders, and correlated with GM volumes in frontal and parietal cortical areas. The pattern of change of SCF also associated with both GM volumes and changes of BOLD fMRI neural responses in the anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex. SCF is both a hematopoietic growth factor and a neurotrophic factor, involved in neuron-neuron and neuron-(micro) glia interactions, fostering neuronal growth and an anti-inflammatory milieu. We correlated SCF levels with antidepressant response and with functional and structural MRI measures in cortical areas that are involved in the cognitive generation and control of affect. SCF may be a candidate growth factor that contributes to neurotrophic and immune effects that are involved in the process of remission/recovery from depression. PMID:27108110

  5. Stem Cell Factor (SCF) is a putative biomarker of antidepressant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Francesco; Poletti, Sara; Hoogenboezem, Thomas A; Locatelli, Clara; Ambrée, Oliver; de Wit, Harm; Wijkhuijs, Annemarie J M; Mazza, Elena; Bulgarelli, Chiara; Vai, Benedetta; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico; Arolt, Volker; Drexhage, Hemmo A

    2016-06-01

    Growth factors involved in neurogenesis and neuroplasticity could play a role in biological processes that drive depression recovery. Combined total sleep deprivation and morning light therapy (TSD + LT) can acutely reverse depressive symptoms, thus allowing to investigate the neurobiological correlates of antidepressant response. We tested if changes on plasma levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), S100 calcium binding protein B (S100-B), Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB), and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) are associated with response to TSD + LT in 26 inpatients affected by a major depressive episode in the course of bipolar disorder. Regional grey matter (GM) volumes were assessed at baseline, and BOLD fMRI neural responses to a moral valence decision task were recorded before and after treatment. 61.5 % of patients responded to treatment. SCF plasma levels increased significantly more in responders, and correlated with GM volumes in frontal and parietal cortical areas. The pattern of change of SCF also associated with both GM volumes and changes of BOLD fMRI neural responses in the anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex. SCF is both a hematopoietic growth factor and a neurotrophic factor, involved in neuron-neuron and neuron-(micro) glia interactions, fostering neuronal growth and an anti-inflammatory milieu. We correlated SCF levels with antidepressant response and with functional and structural MRI measures in cortical areas that are involved in the cognitive generation and control of affect. SCF may be a candidate growth factor that contributes to neurotrophic and immune effects that are involved in the process of remission/recovery from depression.

  6. Cytotoxicity and cellular accumulation of palladium(II) complexes of tetracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Flávia C S; Guerra, Wendell; Silva, Iara R; Silveira, Josianne N; Botelho, Françoise Vasconcelos; Vieira, Leda Q; Pereira-Maia, Elene C

    2008-10-01

    We studied the cytotoxic effect and the uptake of Pd(II) complexes of doxycycline (Dox), [Pd(Dox)Cl2], and tetracycline (Tc), [Pd(Tc)Cl2], in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. The effect of the compounds on macrophage viability was also investigated. Compound 1 is more effective than compound 2 in inhibiting the growth of K562 cells with the IC(50) values of 14.44 and 34.54 microM, respectively. There is a good correlation between cell-growth inhibition and intracellular metal concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Incubation of the cells with equitoxic concentrations of both compounds yields approximately the same intracellular Pd concentration. At the IC(50) doses, intracellular concentration is ca. 33 x 10(-16) mol/cell for both compounds 1 and 2. This suggests that more [Pd(Tc)Cl2] is needed to produce a cytotoxic effect, because it enters cells more slowly. Both compounds up to 16 microM did not affect the viability of mouse peritoneal macrophages after a 48-h incubation. After 72 h of incubation, the IC(50) values are 22 for [Pd(Dox)Cl2] and 40 microM for [Pd(Tc)Cl(2)]. Therefore, the cytotoxic effect in cancer cells exhibited by both compounds is higher than their effect in macrophages. PMID:18972502

  7. 22号初等元胞自动机的演化复杂性%EVOLUTION COMPLEXITY OF THE ELEMENTARY CELLULAR AUTOMATON OF RULE 22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王益; 江志松

    2002-01-01

    Cellular automata are the discrete dynamical systems of simple construction but with complex and varied behaviors.In this paper,the elementary cellular automaton of rule 22 is studied by the tools of formal language theory and symbolic dynamics.Its temporal evolution orbits are coarse-grained into evolution sequences and the evolution languages are defined.It is proved that for every n≥2 its width n-evolution language is not regular.

  8. Knockdown of SCF(Skp2 function causes double-parked accumulation in the nucleus and DNA re-replication in Drosophila plasmatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Kroeger

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, circulating hemocytes are derived from the cephalic mesoderm during the embryonic wave of hematopoiesis. These cells are contributed to the larva and persist through metamorphosis into the adult. To analyze this population of hemocytes, we considered data from a previously published RNAi screen in the hematopoietic niche, which suggested several members of the SCF complex play a role in lymph gland development. eater-Gal4;UAS-GFP flies were crossed to UAS-RNAi lines to knockdown the function of all known SCF complex members in a plasmatocyte-specific fashion, in order to identify which members are novel regulators of plasmatocytes. This specific SCF complex contains five core members: Lin-19-like, SkpA, Skp2, Roc1a and complex activator Nedd8. The complex was identified by its very distinctive large cell phenotype. Furthermore, these large cells stained for anti-P1, a plasmatocyte-specific antibody. It was also noted that the DNA in these cells appeared to be over-replicated. Gamma-tubulin and DAPI staining suggest the cells are undergoing re-replication as they had multiple centrioles and excessive DNA content. Further experimentation determined enlarged cells were BrdU-positive indicating they have progressed through S-phase. To determine how these cells become enlarged and undergo re-replication, cell cycle proteins were analyzed by immunofluorescence. This analysis identified three proteins that had altered subcellular localization in these enlarged cells: Cyclin E, Geminin and Double-parked. Previous research has shown that Double-parked must be degraded to exit S-phase, otherwise the DNA will undergo re-replication. When Double-parked was titrated from the nucleus by an excess of its inhibitor, geminin, the enlarged cells and aberrant protein localization phenotypes were partially rescued. The data in this report suggests that the SCF(Skp2 complex is necessary to ubiquitinate Double-parked during plasmatocyte cell division

  9. Unique Role for the UbL-UbA Protein Ddi1 in Turnover of SCFUfo1 Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Ivantsiv, Yelena; Kaplun, Ludmila; Tzirkin-Goldin, Regina; Shabek, Nitzan; Raveh, Dina

    2006-01-01

    SCF complexes are E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases that mediate degradation of regulatory and signaling proteins and control G1/S cell cycle progression by degradation of G1 cyclins and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, Sic1. Interchangeable F-box proteins bind the core SCF components; each recruits a specific subset of substrates for ubiquitylation. The F-box proteins themselves are rapidly turned over by autoubiquitylation, allowing rapid recycling of SCF complexes. Here we report a role f...

  10. Pseudosubstrate regulation of the SCF(beta-TrCP) ubiquitin ligase by hnRNP-U

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Matti; Hatzubai, Ada; Andersen, Jens S;

    2002-01-01

    by competition with a pIkappaB(alpha) peptide, or by a specific point mutation in the E3RS WD region, indicating an E3-substrate-type interaction. However, unlike pI(kappa)Balpha, which is targeted by SCF(beta-TrCP) for degradation, the E3-bound hnRNP-U is stable and is, therefore, a pseudosubstrate...

  11. Cellular delivery of pyrenyl-arene ruthenium complexes by a water-soluble arene ruthenium metalla-cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Mona Anca; Schmitt, Frédéric; Wiederkehr, Michaël; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Therrien, Bruno

    2012-06-28

    Three pyrenyl-arene ruthenium complexes (M(1)-M(3)) of the general formula [Ru(η(6)-arene-pyrenyl)Cl(2)(pta)] (pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) have been synthesised and characterised. Prior to the coordination to ruthenium, pyrene was connected to the arene ligand via an alkane chain containing different functional groups: ester (L(1)), ether (L(2)) and amide (L(3)), respectively. Furthermore, the pyrenyl moieties of the M(n) complexes were encapsulated within the hydrophobic cavity of the water soluble metalla-cage, [Ru(6)(η(6)-p-cymene)(6)(tpt)(2)(donq)(3)](6+) (tpt = 2,4,6-tri-(pyridin-4-yl)-1,3,5-triazine; donq = 5,8-dioxydo-1,4-naphthoquinonato), while the arene ruthenium end was pointing out of the cage, thus giving rise to the corresponding host-guest systems [M(n)⊂Ru(6)(η(6)-p-cymene)(6)(tpt)(2)(donq)(3)](6+) ([M(n)⊂cage](6+)). The antitumor activity of the pyrenyl-arene ruthenium complexes (M(n)) and the corresponding host-guest systems [M(n)⊂cage][CF(3)SO(3)](6) were evaluated in vitro in different types of human cancer cell lines (A549, A2780, A2780cisR, Me300 and HeLa). Complex M(2), which contains an ether group within the alkane chain, demonstrated at least a 10 times higher cytotoxicity than the reference compound [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(2)(pta)] (RAPTA-C). All host-guest systems [M(n)⊂cage](6+) showed good anticancer activity with IC(50) values ranging from 2 to 8 μM after 72 h exposure. The fluorescence of the pyrenyl moiety allowed the monitoring of the cellular uptake and revealed an increase of uptake by a factor two of the M(2) complex when encapsulated in the metalla-cage [Ru(6)(η(6)-p-cymene)(6)(tpt)(2)(donq)(3)](6+). PMID:22506276

  12. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India); Goyal, Neena, E-mail: neenacdri@yahoo.com [Division of Biochemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace, PO Box 173, Lucknow (India)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  13. Cul7/p185/p193 binding to simian virus 40 large T antigen has a role in cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Hamid; Kasper, Jocelyn S; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A

    2004-03-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg) is a viral oncoprotein that can promote cellular transformation. TAg's transforming activity results in part by binding and inactivating key tumor suppressors, including p53 and the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). We have identified a TAg-associated 185-kDa protein that has significant homology to the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. TAg binds to an SCF-like complex that contains p185/Cul7, Rbx1, and the F box protein Fbw6. This SCF-like complex binds to an N-terminal region of TAg. Several p185/Cul7-binding-deficient mutants of TAg were generated that retained binding to pRb and p53 and were capable of overcoming Rb-mediated repression of E2F transcription. Despite binding to pRb and p53, these p185/Cul7-binding-defective mutants of TAg were unable to transform primary mouse embryo fibroblasts. Cells expressing p185/Cul7-binding-defective mutants of TAg were unable to grow to high density or grow in an anchorage-independent manner as determined by growth in soft agar. Considering the significance of other TAg-interacting proteins in regulation of the cell cycle, p185/Cul7 may also regulate an important growth control pathway. PMID:14990695

  14. Priming with r-metHuSCF and filgrastim or chemotherapy and filgrastim in patients with malignant lymphomas: a randomized phase II pilot study of mobilization and engraftment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, H E; Geisler, C; Juvonen, E;

    2011-01-01

    SCF has been shown to synergize with G-CSF to mobilize CD34(+) PBPCs. In this study we report results from this combination after a phase II trial of 32 patients with malignant lymphoma randomized to receive recombinant methionyl human SCF (ancestim, r-metHuSCF) in combination with recombinant me...

  15. SCF Ubiquitin Ligase F-box Protein Fbx15 Controls Nuclear Co-repressor Localization, Stress Response and Virulence of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöhnk, Bastian; Bayram, Özgür; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Mattern, Derek J.; Brakhage, Axel A.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins share the F-box domain to connect substrates of E3 SCF ubiquitin RING ligases through the adaptor Skp1/A to Cul1/A scaffolds. F-box protein Fbx15 is part of the general stress response of the human pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Oxidative stress induces a transient peak of fbx15 expression, resulting in 3x elevated Fbx15 protein levels. During non-stress conditions Fbx15 is phosphorylated and F-box mediated interaction with SkpA preferentially happens in smaller subpopulations in the cytoplasm. The F-box of Fbx15 is required for an appropriate oxidative stress response, which results in rapid dephosphorylation of Fbx15 and a shift of the cellular interaction with SkpA to the nucleus. Fbx15 binds SsnF/Ssn6 as part of the RcoA/Tup1-SsnF/Ssn6 co-repressor and is required for its correct nuclear localization. Dephosphorylated Fbx15 prevents SsnF/Ssn6 nuclear localization and results in the derepression of gliotoxin gene expression. fbx15 deletion mutants are unable to infect immunocompromised mice in a model for invasive aspergillosis. Fbx15 has a novel dual molecular function by controlling transcriptional repression and being part of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, which is essential for stress response, gliotoxin production and virulence in the opportunistic human pathogen A. fumigatus. PMID:27649508

  16. Effects of Banxiaxiexin Decoction on the SCF Gene Expression in the Stomach Wall of Rat Model of Electrogastric Dysrhythmias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuhang; Wang Qingguo; Chen meng; Wang Dan; Li Lina; Zhang Dongmei

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effects of Banxiaxiexin Decoction (BD) on rats with electrogastric dysrhythmias by divided design and discuss the mechanism of BD. Methods:To establish the rat model of electrogastric dysrhythmias and examine effects of BD on the SCF mRNA by reverse transcriptive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results:BD and all the divided groups can reduce the mRNA expression of SCF, and show significant difference with model group (P0.05).Conclusion:The BD treatment of epigastric fullness (to regulate the movement of stomach and intestine) is in connection with adjustment of the mRNA expression of SCF.

  17. $\\sigma$-SCF: A Direct Energy-targeting Method To Mean-field Excited States

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Hong-Zhou; Ricke, Nathan D; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The mean-field solutions of electronic excited states are much less accessible than ground state (e.g.\\ Hartree-Fock) solutions. Energy-based optimization methods for excited states, like $\\Delta$-scf, tend to fall into the lowest solution consistent with a given symmetry -- a problem known as "variational collapse". In this work, we combine the ideas of direct energy-targeting and variance-based optimization in order to describe excited states at the mean-field level. The resulting method, $\\sigma$-scf, has several advantages. First, it allows one to target any desired excited state by specifying a single parameter: a guess of the energy of that state. It can therefore, in principle, find \\emph{all} excited states. Second, it avoids variational collapse by using a variance-based, unconstrained local minimization. As a consequence, all states -- ground or excited -- are treated on an equal footing. Third, it provides an alternate approach to locate $\\Delta$-scf solutions that are otherwise inaccessible by the...

  18. Localized SCF and IGF-1 secretion enhances erythropoiesis in the spleen of murine embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keai Sinn Tan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fetal spleen is a major hematopoietic site prior to initiation of bone marrow hematopoiesis. Morphologic analysis suggested erythropoietic activity in fetal spleen, but it remained unclear how erythropoiesis was regulated. To address this question, we performed flow cytometric analysis and observed that the number of spleen erythroid cells increased 18.6-fold from 16.5 to 19.5 days post-coitum (dpc. Among erythropoietic cytokines, SCF and IGF-1 were primarily expressed in hematopoietic, endothelial and mesenchymal-like fetal spleen cells. Cultures treated with SCF and/or IGF-1R inhibitors showed significantly decreased CD45−c-Kit−CD71+/−Ter119+ erythroid cells and downregulated Gata1, Klf1 and β-major globin expression. Administration of these inhibitors to pregnant mice significantly decreased the number of CD45−c-Kit−CD71+/−Ter119+ cells and downregulated β-major globin gene expression in embryos derived from these mice. We conclude that fetal spleen is a major erythropoietic site where endothelial and mesenchymal-like cells primarily accelerate erythropoietic activity through SCF and IGF-1 secretion.

  19. Datasets from an interaction proteomics screen for substrates of the SCF(βTrCP) ubiquitin ligase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magliozzi, Roberto; Peng, Mao; Mohammed, Shabaz; Guardavaccaro, Daniele; Heck, Albert J R; Low, Teck Yew

    2015-01-01

    An affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) method was employed to identify novel substrates of the SCF(βTrCP) ubiquitin ligase. A FLAG-HA tagged version of the F-box protein βTrCP2, the substrate recognition subunit of SCF(βTrCP), was used as bait. βTrCP2 wild type and the two mutants βTrCP2

  20. SCF(JFK) is a bona fide E3 ligase for ING4 and a potent promoter of the angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ruorong; He, Lin; Li, Zhongwu; Han, Xiao; Liang, Jing; Si, Wenzhe; Chen, Zhe; Li, Lei; Xie, Guojia; Li, Wanjin; Wang, Peiyan; Lei, Liandi; Zhang, Hongquan; Pei, Fei; Cao, Dengfeng; Sun, Luyang; Shang, Yongfeng

    2015-03-15

    Loss of function/dysregulation of inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and hyperactivation of NF-κB are frequent events in many types of human malignancies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these remarkable aberrations are not understood. Here, we report that ING4 is physically associated with JFK. We demonstrated that JFK targets ING4 for ubiquitination and degradation through assembly of an Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) complex. We showed that JFK-mediated ING4 destabilization leads to the hyperactivation of the canonical NF-κB pathway and promotes angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer. Significantly, the expression of JFK is markedly up-regulated in breast cancer, and the level of JFK is negatively correlated with that of ING4 and positively correlated with an aggressive clinical behavior of breast carcinomas. Our study identified SCF(JFK) as a bona fide E3 ligase for ING4 and unraveled the JFK-ING4-NF-κB axis as an important player in the development and progression of breast cancer, supporting the pursuit of JFK as a potential target for breast cancer intervention. PMID:25792601

  1. SCF(JFK) is a bona fide E3 ligase for ING4 and a potent promoter of the angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ruorong; He, Lin; Li, Zhongwu; Han, Xiao; Liang, Jing; Si, Wenzhe; Chen, Zhe; Li, Lei; Xie, Guojia; Li, Wanjin; Wang, Peiyan; Lei, Liandi; Zhang, Hongquan; Pei, Fei; Cao, Dengfeng; Sun, Luyang; Shang, Yongfeng

    2015-03-15

    Loss of function/dysregulation of inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and hyperactivation of NF-κB are frequent events in many types of human malignancies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these remarkable aberrations are not understood. Here, we report that ING4 is physically associated with JFK. We demonstrated that JFK targets ING4 for ubiquitination and degradation through assembly of an Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) complex. We showed that JFK-mediated ING4 destabilization leads to the hyperactivation of the canonical NF-κB pathway and promotes angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer. Significantly, the expression of JFK is markedly up-regulated in breast cancer, and the level of JFK is negatively correlated with that of ING4 and positively correlated with an aggressive clinical behavior of breast carcinomas. Our study identified SCF(JFK) as a bona fide E3 ligase for ING4 and unraveled the JFK-ING4-NF-κB axis as an important player in the development and progression of breast cancer, supporting the pursuit of JFK as a potential target for breast cancer intervention.

  2. Molecular Characterization of PDGFR-α/PDGF-A and c-KIT/SCF in Gliosarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui M. Reis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcomas are rare and poorly characterized malignant brain tumors that exhibit a biphasic tissue pattern with areas of gliomatous and sarcomatous differentiation. These tumors are histological variants of glioblastoma, displaying a similar genetic profile and dismal prognosis. Up-regulation of PDGFR subfamily of tyrosine kinase members, PDGFR-α and c-Kit, and their intracellular effectors RAS/RAF/MAPK has a crucial role in the cancer development. In addition, signal transduction mediated by activating mutations of c-Kit and PDGFR can be effectively blocked by specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as Imatinib mesylate. The aim of this study was to characterize the molecular alterations of PDGFR signaling in gliosarcomas. Six cases were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of PDGFR-α, c-Kit and their ligands PDGF-A and SCF, respectively. The cases were further evaluated for the presence of activating mutations of PDGFR-α (exons 12 and 18 and c-kit (exons 9, 11, 13, and 17, as well as B-RAF (exons 11 and 15. Expression of PDGF-A was found in all cases and co-expression of PDGFR-α was observed in three cases. Four cases showed expression of SCF, and c-Kit was observed only in one case that also expressed SCF. Generally, immunoreaction predominates in the glial component. The mutational analysis of PDGFR-α showed the presence of an IVS17-50insT intronic insertion in two cases, one of them also with a 2472C > T silent mutation; this silent mutation was also found in another case. Glioma cell line analysis of IVS17-50insT insertion showed no influence on PDGFR-α gene splicing. No mutations were detected in c-kit and B-RAF oncogenes. Our Results indicate that activating mutations of PDGFR-α, c-kit and B-RAF are absent in gliosarcomas. Nevertheless, the presence of a PDGFR-a/PDGFA and c-Kit/SCF autocrine/paracrine stimulation loop in a proportion of cases, supports the potential role of specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors in

  3. Covalent modifier NEDD8 is essential for SCF ubiquitin-ligase in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Osaka, Fumio; Saeki, Mihoro; Katayama, Satoshi; Aida, Noriko; Toh-e, Akio; Kominami, Kin-ichiro; Toda, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Kato, Seishi

    2000-01-01

    A ubiquitin-like modifier, NEDD8, is covalently attached to cullin-family proteins, but its physiological role is poorly understood. Here we report that the NEDD8-modifying pathway is essential for cell viability and function of Pcu1 (cullin-1 orthologue) in fission yeast. Pcu1 assembled on SCF ubiquitin-ligase was completely modified by NEDD8. Pcu1K713R defective for NEDD8 conjugation lost the ability to complement lethality due to pcu1 deletion. Forced expression of Pcu1K713R or depletion o...

  4. A new entropy based method for computing software structural complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Roca, J L

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the evaluation of software structural complexity is described. It is based on the entropy evaluation of the random uniform response function associated with the so called software characteristic function SCF. The behavior of the SCF with the different software structures and their relationship with the number of inherent errors is investigated. It is also investigated how the entropy concept can be used to evaluate the complexity of a software structure considering the SCF as a canonical representation of the graph associated with the control flow diagram. The functions, parameters and algorithms that allow to carry out this evaluation are also introduced. After this analytic phase follows the experimental phase, verifying the consistency of the proposed metric and their boundary conditions. The conclusion is that the degree of software structural complexity can be measured as the entropy of the random uniform response function of the SCF. That entropy is in direct relation...

  5. Metal Dependence of Signal Transmission through MolecularQuantum-Dot Cellular Automata (QCA: A Theoretical Studyon Fe, Ru, and Os Mixed-Valence Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Tokunaga

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behavior of signal transmission through metal complexes [L5M-BL-ML5]5+ (M=Fe, Ru, Os, BL=pyrazine (py, 4,4’-bipyridine (bpy, L=NH3, which are simplified models of the molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (molecular QCA, is discussed from the viewpoint of one-electron theory, density functional theory. It is found that for py complexes, the signal transmission time (tst is Fe(0.6 fs < Os(0.7 fs < Ru(1.1 fs and the signal amplitude (A is Fe(0.05 e < Os(0.06 e < Ru(0.10 e. For bpy complexes, tst and A are Fe(1.4 fs < Os(1.7 fs < Ru(2.5 fs and Os(0.11 e < Ru(0.12 e complexes generally have stronger signal amplitude, but waste longer time for signal transmission than py complexes. Among all complexes, Fe complex with bpy BL shows the best result. These results are discussed from overlap integral and energy gap of molecular orbitals.

  6. Role of SKP1-CUL1-F-Box-Protein (SCF) E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in Skin Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Ming Xie; Wenyi Wei; Yi Sun

    2013-01-01

    Many biological processes such as cell proliferation,differentiation,and cell death depend precisely on the timely synthesis and degradation of key regulatory proteins.While protein synthesis can be regulated at multiple levels,protein degradation is mainly controlled by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS),which consists of two distinct steps:(1) ubiquitylation of targeted protein by E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme,E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and E3 ubiquitin ligase,and (2) subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.Among all E3 ubiquitin ligases,the SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein) E3 ligases are the largest family and are responsible for the turnover of many key regulatory proteins.Aberrant regulation of SCF E3 ligases is associated with various human diseases,such as cancers,including skin cancer.In this review,we provide a comprehensive overview of all currently published data to define a promoting role of SCF E3 ligases in the development of skin cancer.The future directions in this area of research are also discussed with an ultimate goal to develop small molecule inhibitors of SCF E3 ligases as a novel approach for the treatment of human skin cancer.Furthermore,altered components or substrates of SCF E3 ligases may also be developed as the biomarkers for early diagnosis or predicting prognosis.

  7. Interpretation of unexpected behavior of infrared absorption spectra of ScF3 beyond the quasiharmonic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Sergei; Žguns, Pjotrs A.; Bocharov, Dmitry; Kuzmin, Alexei; Purans, Juris; Kalinko, Aleksandr; Evarestov, Robert A.; Ali, Shehab E.; Rocca, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Scandium fluoride (ScF3), having cubic ReO3-type structure, has attracted much scientific attention due to its rather strong negative thermal expansion (NTE) in the broad temperature range from 10 to 1100 K. Here we use the results of diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to interpret the influence of NTE on the temperature dependence of infrared absorption spectra of ScF3. Original infrared absorption and EXAFS experiments in a large temperature range are presented and interpreted using ab initio lattice dynamics simulations within and beyond quasiharmonic approximations. We demonstrate that ab initio electronic structure calculations, based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals method with hybrid functionals, are able to reproduce well the experimental values of lattice parameter a0, band gap Eg, and lattice dynamics in ScF3. However, the simulations performed within quasiharmonic approximation fail to reproduce the temperature dependence of two infrared active bands due to the F-Sc-F bending (at 220 cm-1) and Sc-F stretching (at 520 cm-1) modes present in the infrared absorption spectra. To overcome this problem, an approach beyond the quasiharmonic approximation is proposed: It accounts for the negative thermal expansion of the lattice and for fluorine atom displacements due to strong F vibrational motion perpendicular to the cubic axes and allows us to explain qualitatively the temperature behavior of infrared spectra of ScF3.

  8. Comparative analysis of Salmonella susceptibility and tolerance to the biocide chlorhexidine identifies a complex cellular defence network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla eCondell

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chlorhexidine is one of the most widely used biocides in health and agricultural settings as well as in the modern food industry. It is a cationic biocide of the biguanide class. Details of its mechanism of action are largely unknown. The frequent use of chlorhexidine has been questioned recently, amidst concerns that an overuse of this compound may select for bacteria displaying an altered susceptibility to antimicrobials, including clinically important anti-bacterial agents.We generated a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate (ST24CHX that exhibited a high-level tolerant phenotype to chlorhexidine, following several rounds of in vitro selection, using sub-lethal concentrations of the biocide. This mutant showed altered suceptibility to a panel of clinically important antimicrobial compounds. Here we describe a genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and phenotypic analysis of the chlorhexidine tolerant S. Typhimurium compared with its isogenic sensitive progenitor. Results from this study describe a chlorhexidine defence network that functions in both the reference chlorhexidine sensitive isolate and the tolerant mutant. The defence network involved multiple cell targets including those associated with the synthesis and modification of the cell wall, the SOS response, virulence, and a shift in cellular metabolism towards anoxic pathways, some of which were regulated by CreB and Fur. In addition, results indicated that chlorhexidine tolerance was associated with more extensive modifications of the same cellular processes involved in this proposed network, as well as a divergent defence response involving the up-regulation of additional targets such as the flagellar apparatus and an altered cellular phosphate metabolism.These data show that sub-lethal concentrations of chlorhexidine induce distinct changes in exposed Salmonella, and our findings provide insights into the mechanisms of action and tolerance to this biocidal agent.

  9. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Sharma, Deepak; Varney, Rebecca; Simmons, Blake A.; Isern, Nancy G.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Robinson, Errol W.

    2013-08-29

    The anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolated bacteria was from tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, making it likely that bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes play an important role in decomposition. We have examined differential expression of the anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth on lignin. After 48 hours of growth, we used transcriptomics and proteomics to define the enzymes and other regulatory machinery that these organisms use to degrade lignin, as well as metabolomics to measure lignin degradation and monitor the use of lignin and iron as terminal electron acceptors that facilitate more efficient use of carbon. Proteomics revealed accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, and lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Our data shows the advantages of a multi-omics approach, where incomplete pathways identified by genomics were completed, and new observations made on coping with poor carbon availability. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in bacterial anaerobic litter deconstruction makes these soils useful templates for improving biofuel production.

  10. Design and process aspects of laboratory scale SCF particle formation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemavarapu, Chandra; Mollan, Matthew J; Lodaya, Mayur; Needham, Thomas E

    2005-03-23

    Consistent production of solid drug materials of desired particle and crystallographic morphologies under cGMP conditions is a frequent challenge to pharmaceutical researchers. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technology gained significant attention in pharmaceutical research by not only showing a promise in this regard but also accommodating the principles of green chemistry. Given that this technology attained commercialization in coffee decaffeination and in the extraction of hops and other essential oils, a majority of the off-the-shelf SCF instrumentation is designed for extraction purposes. Only a selective few vendors appear to be in the early stages of manufacturing equipment designed for particle formation. The scarcity of information on the design and process engineering of laboratory scale equipment is recognized as a significant shortcoming to the technological progress. The purpose of this article is therefore to provide the information and resources necessary for startup research involving particle formation using supercritical fluids. The various stages of particle formation by supercritical fluid processing can be broadly classified into delivery, reaction, pre-expansion, expansion and collection. The importance of each of these processes in tailoring the particle morphology is discussed in this article along with presenting various alternatives to perform these operations.

  11. Col2a1 lineage tracing reveals that the meniscus of the knee joint has a complex cellular origin

    OpenAIRE

    Hyde, Gareth; Boot-Handford, Raymond P.; Wallis, Gillian A

    2008-01-01

    The knee joint consists of multiple interacting tissues that are prone to injury- and disease-related degeneration. Although much is known about the structure and function of the knee’s constituent tissues, relatively little is known about their cellular origin and the mechanisms governing their segregation. To investigate the origin and segregation of knee tissues in vivo we performed lineage tracing using a Col2a1-Cre/R26R mouse model system and compared the data obtained with actual Col2a1...

  12. DNA Binding and Photocleavage Properties, Cellular Uptake and Localization, and in-Vitro Cytotoxicity of Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Varying Lengths in Bridging Alkyl Linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Wu, Bao-Yan; Liu, Jin; Dai, Yong-Cheng; Wang, You-Jun; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    Two new dinuclear Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes containing three and ten methylene chains in their bridging linkers are synthesized and characterized. Their calf thymus DNA-binding and plasmid DNA photocleavage behaviors are comparatively studied with a previously reported, six-methylene-containing analog by absorption and luminescence spectroscopy, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA viscosity measurements, DNA thermal denaturation, and agarose gel electrophoresis analyses. Theoretical calculations applying the density functional theory (DFT) method for the three complexes are also performed to understand experimentally observed DNA binding properties. The results show that the two complexes partially intercalate between the base pairs of DNA. Cellular uptake and colocalization studies have demonstrated that the complexes could enter HeLa cells efficiently and localize within lysosomes. The in-vitro antitumor activity against HeLa and MCF-7 tumor cells of the complexes are studied by MTT cytotoxic analysis. A new method, high-content analysis (HCA), is also used to assess cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of the three complexes. The results show that the lengths of the alkyl linkers could effectively tune their biological properties and that HCA is suitable for rapidly identifying cytotoxicity and can be substituted for MTT assays to evaluate the cell cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. Proteomic analysis of HIV-1 Nef cellular binding partners reveals a role for exocyst complex proteins in mediating enhancement of intercellular nanotube formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerji Joya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef protein contributes to pathogenesis via multiple functions that include enhancement of viral replication and infectivity, alteration of intracellular trafficking, and modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Nef stimulates formation of tunneling nanotubes and virological synapses, and is transferred to bystander cells via these intercellular contacts and secreted microvesicles. Nef associates with and activates Pak2, a kinase that regulates T-cell signaling and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, but how Nef promotes nanotube formation is unknown. Results To identify Nef binding partners involved in Pak2-association dependent Nef functions, we employed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Nef immunocomplexes from Jurkat cells expressing wild-type Nef or Nef mutants defective for the ability to associate with Pak2 (F85L, F89H, H191F and A72P, A75P in NL4-3. We report that wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was associated with 5 components of the exocyst complex (EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, EXOC4, and EXOC6, an octameric complex that tethers vesicles at the plasma membrane, regulates polarized exocytosis, and recruits membranes and proteins required for nanotube formation. Additionally, Pak2 kinase was associated exclusively with wild-type Nef. Association of EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, and EXOC4 with wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays in Jurkat cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of EXOC2 in Jurkat cells abrogated Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation. Using bioinformatic tools, we visualized protein interaction networks that reveal functional linkages between Nef, the exocyst complex, and the cellular endocytic and exocytic trafficking machinery. Conclusions Exocyst complex proteins are likely a key effector of Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation, and possibly microvesicle secretion. Linkages revealed between Nef and the exocyst complex suggest a new paradigm of

  14. Toward a 3D cellular model for studying in vitro the outcome of photodynamic treatments: accounting for the effects of tissue complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany-Ribes, Mireia; García-Díaz, María; Busom, Marta; Nonell, Santi; Semino, Carlos E

    2013-08-01

    Clinical therapies have traditionally been developed using two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems, which fail to accurately capture tissue complexity. Therefore, three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures are more attractive platforms to integrate multiple cues that arise from the extracellular matrix and cells, closer to an in vivo scenario. Here we report the development of a 3D cellular model for the in vitro assessment of the outcome of oxygen- and drug-dependent therapies, exemplified by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Using a synthetic self-assembling peptide as a cellular scaffold (RAD16-I), we were able to recreate the in vivo limitation of oxygen and drug diffusion and its biological effect, which is the development of cellular resistance to therapy. For the first time, the production and decay of the cytotoxic species singlet oxygen could be observed in a 3D cell culture. Results revealed that the intrinsic mechanism of action is maintained in both systems and, hence, the dynamic mass transfer effects accounted for the major differences in efficacy between the 2D and 3D models. We propose that this methodological approach will help to improve the efficacy of future oxygen- and drug-dependent therapies such as PDT.

  15. Detailed Study of the Interaction between Human Herpesvirus 6B Glycoprotein Complex and Its Cellular Receptor, Human CD134

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Huamin; Wang, Junjie; Mahmoud, Nora F.; Mori, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel receptor, CD134, which interacts with the human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) glycoprotein (g)H/gL/gQ1/gQ2 complex and plays a key role in the entry of HHV-6B into target cells. However, details of the interaction between the HHV-6B gH/gL/gQ1/gQ2 complex and CD134 were unknown. In this study, we identified a cysteine-rich domain (CRD), CDR2, of CD134 that is critical for binding to the HHV-6B glycoprotein complex and HHV-6B infection. Furthermore, we found that the e...

  16. Microwave gallium-68 radiochemistry for kinetically stable bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: structural investigations and cellular uptake under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Israt S; Arrowsmith, Rory L; Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Twyman, Frazer; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Botchway, Stanley W; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Carroll, Laurence; Aboagye, Eric O; Pascu, Sofia I

    2016-01-01

    We report the microwave synthesis of several bis(thiosemicarbazones) and the rapid gallium-68 incorporation to give the corresponding metal complexes. These proved kinetically stable under 'cold' and 'hot' biological assays and were investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and radioactive cell retention studies under normoxia and hypoxia. (68)Ga complex retention was found to be 34% higher in hypoxic cells than in normoxic cells over 30 min, further increasing to 53% at 120 min. Our data suggests that this class of gallium complexes show hypoxia selectivity suitable for imaging in living cells and in vivo tests by microPET in nude athymic mice showed that they are excreted within 1 h of their administration. PMID:26583314

  17. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  18. An improved toolbox to unravel the plant cellular machinery by tandem affinity purification of Arabidopsis protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leene, Jelle; Eeckhout, Dominique; Cannoot, Bernard; De Winne, Nancy; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vercruysse, Leen; Dedecker, Maarten; Verkest, Aurine; Vandepoele, Klaas; Martens, Lennart; Witters, Erwin; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is one of the most advanced methods to characterize protein complexes in plants, giving a comprehensive view on the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of a certain protein of interest (bait). The bait protein is fused to a double affinity tag, which consists of a protein G tag and a streptavidin-binding peptide separated by a very specific protease cleavage site, allowing highly specific protein complex isolation under near-physiological conditions. Implementation of this optimized TAP tag, combined with ultrasensitive MS, means that these experiments can be performed on small amounts (25 mg of total protein) of protein extracts from Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures. It is also possible to use this approach to isolate low abundant protein complexes from Arabidopsis seedlings, thus opening perspectives for the exploration of protein complexes in a plant developmental context. Next to protocols for efficient biomass generation of seedlings (∼7.5 months), we provide detailed protocols for TAP (1 d), and for sample preparation and liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS; ∼5 d), either from Arabidopsis seedlings or from cell cultures. For the identification of specific co-purifying proteins, we use an extended protein database and filter against a list of nonspecific proteins on the basis of the occurrence of a co-purified protein among 543 TAP experiments. The value of the provided protocols is illustrated through numerous applications described in recent literature.

  19. Nuclear pore complex contains a family of glycoproteins that includes p62: glycosylation through a previously unidentified cellular pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a monoclonal antibody (mAb 414), the authors previously identified a protein of 62 kDa (p62) that was localized to the nuclear pore complex by immunoelectron microscopy. They also showed that p62 binds specifically to wheat germ agglutinin. Therefore, they proposed that this nuclear pore complex protein might be a member of a recently characterized family of glycoproteins that are labeled by in vitro galactosylation of rat liver nuclei and contain O-linked monosaccharidic GlcNAc residues. In support of this, they now show that incubation with N-acetylglucosaminidase reduces the molecular mass of p62 by ≅ 3 kDa because of the removal of terminal GlcNAc residues. Moreover, p62 can be galactosylated in vitro by using UDP-[3H]galactose and galactosyltransferase. They also show that most of the GlcNAc residues are added within 5 min of synthesis, when p62 is soluble and cytosolic. Thus, the addition of GlcNAc is carried out in the cytoplasm and is clearly distinct from the N- and O-linked glycosylation pathways of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Using another mAb with a broad specificity for nuclear GlcNAc-containing proteins, they show by immunofluorescence and protein blotting of subnuclear fractions that some of these proteins are in the interior of the nucleus, and others are most likely located in the pore complex

  20. Unraveling the cellular uptake of bioreducible poly(amido amine) — Gene complexes in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercauteren, D.; Piest, M.; Soraj, M. Al; Jones, A.T.; Engbersen, J.F.J.; Smedt, de S.C.; Braeckmans, K.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro endocytosis of gene complexes composed of a bioreducible polyamidoamine CBA ABOL and plasmid DNA, in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was studied, the latter being an interesting target for ocular gene therapy. We found that cationic CBA ABOL DNA polyplexes attach to cell surfa

  1. Mitochondrial DNA background modulates the assembly kinetics of OXPHOS complexes in a cellular model of mitochondrial disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pello, R.; Martin, M.A.; Carelli, V.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Achilli, A.; Pala, M.; Torroni, A.; Gomez-Duran, A.; Ruiz-Pesini, E.; Martinuzzi, A.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Arenas, J.; Ugalde, C.

    2008-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disorder, is mostly due to three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in respiratory chain complex I subunit genes: 3460/ND1, 11778/ND4 and 14484/ND6. Despite considerable clinical evidences, a genetic modifying role of the m

  2. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technologies: Assessment of applicability to installation restoration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    USAEC has conducted an evaluation of supercritical fluid (SCF) technologies for their applicability to treatment of explosives, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and metals in soils, water, and/or waste sludge media. Off-specification explosives and propellants that have traditionally been open burned or openly detonated were also examined. Supercritical fluids are substances which have been heated and compressed to above their critical temperatures and pressures and which possess unique transport and mass transfer properties. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) uses the solvating properties of supercritical fluids to extract one or more organic components from a mixture into a supercritical solvent (commonly CO2). The concentrated extract stream may then be recycled, reclaimed, or destroyed by other methods.

  3. Mapping enteroendocrine cell populations in transgenic mice reveals an unexpected degree of complexity in cellular differentiation within the gastrointestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined with a monolayer of cells that undergo perpetual and rapid renewal. Four principal, terminally differentiated cell types populate the monolayer, enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, and enteroendocrine cells. This epithelium exhibits complex patterns of regional differentiation, both from crypt- to-villus and from duodenum-to-colon. The "liver" fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene represents a useful model for analyzing the molecular basis for intes...

  4. SCF promotes dental pulp progenitor migration, neovascularization, and collagen remodeling – potential applications as a homing factor in dental pulp regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuang; Dangaria, Smit; Gopinathan, Gokul; Yan, Xiulin; Lu, Xuanyu; Kolokythas, Antonia; Niu, Yumei; Luan, Xianghong

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is a powerful chemokine that binds to the c-Kit receptor CD117 and has shown promise as a homing agent capable of progenitor cell recruitment. In the present study we have documented high levels of both SCF and its receptor c-Kit in differentiating dental pulp (DP) cells and in the sub-odontoblastic layer of Höhl. In vitro studies using human DP progenitors revealed a significant increase in cell proliferation after100nM SCF application, explained by a 2-fold upregulation in cyclin D3 and FGF2 cell cycle regulators, and a 7-fold increase in CDK4 expression. DP cell migration in the presence of SCF was up-regulated 2.7-fold after a 24 hour culture period, and this effect was accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangement, a 1.5-fold increase in polymeric F-actin over G-actin, and a 1.8-fold increase in RhoA expression. Explaining the signaling effect of SCF on DP migration, PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathway inhibitors were demonstrated to significantly reduce DP cell migration, while SCF alone doubled the number of migrated cells. ERK and AKT phosphorylation were dramatically upregulated already 3-5 minutes after SCF addition to the culture medium and declined thereafter, classifying SCF as a fast acting chemokine. When applied as an agent to promote tissue regeneration in subcutaneously implanted collagen sponges, SCF resulted in a 7-fold increase in the cell number in the implanted tissue construct, a more than 9-fold increase in capillaries, as well as collagen sponge remodeling and collagen fiber neogenesis. Together, these studies demonstrate the suitability of SCF as a potent aid in the regeneration of dental pulp and other mesenchymal tissues, capable of inducing cell homing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. PMID:23703692

  5. Expression and cellular distribution of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in cortical tubers of the tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Meihua; Sun, Feiji; Liang, Chao; Wei, Yujia; Wang, Lukang; Yue, Jiong; Chen, Bing; Li, Song; Liu, Shiyong; Yang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are highly associated with intractable epilepsy. Recent evidence has shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has direct effects on both neurons and glial cells. To understand the role of TRPV4 in pathogenesis of cortical tubers, we investigated the expression patterns of TRPV4 in cortical tubers of TSC compared with normal control cortex (CTX). We found that TRPV4 was clearly up-regulated in cortical tubers at the protein levels. Immunostaining indicated that TRPV4 was specially distributed in abnormal cells, including dysplastic neurons (DNs) and giant cells (GCs). In addition, double immunofluorescent staining revealed that TRPV4 was localized on neurofilament proteins (NF200) positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic portein (GFAP) positive reactive astrocytes. Moreover, TRPV4 co-localized with both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Furthermore, protein levels of protein kinase C (PKC), but not protein kinase A (PKA), the important upstream factors of the TRPV4, were significantly increased in cortical tubers. Taken together, the overexpression and distribution patterns of TRPV4 may be linked with the intractable epilepsy caused by TSC. PMID:26874068

  6. Skipping of exons by premature termination of transcription and alternative splicing within intron-5 of the sheep SCF gene: a novel splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Arumugam Saravanaperumal

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a growth factor, essential for haemopoiesis, mast cell development and melanogenesis. In the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM, SCF is produced either as a membrane-bound (- or soluble (+ forms. Skin expression of SCF stimulates melanocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. We report for the first time, a novel mRNA splice variant of SCF from the skin of white merino sheep via cloning and sequencing. Reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR and molecular prediction revealed two different cDNA products of SCF. Full-length cDNA libraries were enriched by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR. Nucleotide sequencing and molecular prediction revealed that the primary 1519 base pair (bp cDNA encodes a precursor protein of 274 amino acids (aa, commonly known as 'soluble' isoform. In contrast, the shorter (835 and/or 725 bp cDNA was found to be a 'novel' mRNA splice variant. It contains an open reading frame (ORF corresponding to a truncated protein of 181 aa (vs 245 aa with an unique C-terminus lacking the primary proteolytic segment (28 aa right after the D(175G site which is necessary to produce 'soluble' form of SCF. This alternative splice (AS variant was explained by the complete nucleotide sequencing of splice junction covering exon 5-intron (5-exon 6 (948 bp with a premature termination codon (PTC whereby exons 6 to 9/10 are skipped (Cassette Exon, CE 6-9/10. We also demonstrated that the Northern blot analysis at transcript level is mediated via an intron-5 splicing event. Our data refine the structure of SCF gene; clarify the presence (+ and/or absence (- of primary proteolytic-cleavage site specific SCF splice variants. This work provides a basis for understanding the functional role and regulation of SCF in hair follicle melanogenesis in sheep beyond what was known in mice, humans and other mammals.

  7. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  8. 146号初等元胞自动机的演化语言的复杂性%COMPLEXITY OF EVOLUTION LANGUAGES OF THE ELEMENTARY CELLULAR AUTOMATON OF RULE 146

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王益; Morita Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    Symbolic dynamics of cellular automata is introduced by coarse-graining the temporal evolution orbits. Evolution languages are defined. By using the theory of formal languages and automata, the complexity of evolution languages of the elementary cellular automaton of rule 146 is studied and it is proved that its width 1-evolution language is regular, but for every n ≥ 2 its width n-evolution language is not context-free but context-sensitive. Also, the same results hold for the equivalent (under conjugation) elementary cellular automaton of rule 182.

  9. Dancing on damaged chromatin. Functions of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in cellular responses to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to preserve and protect genetic information, eukaryotic cells have developed a signaling or communications network to help the cell respond to DNA damage, and ATM and NBS1 are key players in this network. ATM is a protein kinase which is activated immediately after a DNA double strand break (DSB) is formed, and the resulting signal cascade generated in response to cellular DSBs is regulated by post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In addition, to ensure the efficient functioning of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, the highly ordered structure of eukaryotic chromatin must be appropriately altered to permit access of repair-related factors to DNA. These alterations are termed chromatin remodeling, and are executed by a specific remodeling complex in conjunction with histone modifications. Current advances in the molecular analysis of DNA damage responses have shown that the auto-phosphorylation of ATM and the interaction between ATM and NBS1 are key steps for ATM activation, and that the association of ATM and NBS1 is involved in chromatin remodeling. Identification of novel factors which function in ubiquitination (RNF8, Ubc13, Rap80, etc.) has also enabled us to understand more details of the early stages in DNA repair pathways which respond to DSBs. In this review, the focus is on the role of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in DSB response pathways, and their role in DSB repair and in the regulation of chromatin remodeling. (author)

  10. Efficient Cellular Entry of (r-x-r)-Type Carbamate-Plasmid DNA Complexes and Its Implication for Noninvasive Topical DNA Delivery to Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Manika; Natarajan, Poornemaa; Yadav, Amit K; Patil, Kiran M; Pandey, Tanuja; Gupta, Nidhi; Santhiya, Deenan; Kumar, Vaijayanti A; Fernandes, Moneesha; Ganguli, Munia

    2016-06-01

    Arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides are powerful tools for in vitro as well as in vivo delivery of a wide plethora of biomolecules. However, presence of consecutive arginine residues leads to enhanced amenability for proteolytic degradation as well as steric hindrances for membrane interactions which compromise its bioavailability. In order to overcome these limitations we previously reported a safe and stable octaarginine based oligomer, i.e., (r-x-r)4-carbamate, where the backbone amide linkages were replaced by carbamate linkages and 6-aminohexanoic acid based spacer moieties were incorporated for better flexibility, hydrophobicity, optimal spacing of guanidinium groups, and protection against proteolytic cleavage; resulting in improved transfection efficiency over its amide counterpart. In the present work we have investigated the mechanism behind this enhanced transfection efficiency and, based on our observations, demonstrate how the synergistic effect of rationalized oligomer designing, complex characteristics, and cell type contributes to overall effective intracellular delivery. Our results indicate that the (r-x-r)4-carbamate-plasmid DNA complexes primarily utilize lipid raft dependent pathway of cellular entry more than other pathways, and this possibly facilitates their increased entry in the lipid raft rich milieu of skin cells. We also emphasize the utility of oligomer (r-x-r)4-carbamate as an efficient carrier for topical delivery of nucleic acids in skin tissue. This carrier can be utilized for safe, efficient, and noninvasive delivery of therapeutically relevant macromolecular hydrophilic cargo like nucleic acids to skin. PMID:27175623

  11. SCF (Fbxl17) ubiquitylation of Sufu regulates Hedgehog signaling and medulloblastoma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducu, Madalina; Fung, Ella; Serres, Sébastien; Infante, Paola; Barberis, Alessandro; Fischer, Roman; Bristow, Claire; Thézénas, Marie-Laëtitia; Finta, Csaba; Christianson, John C; Buffa, Francesca M; Kessler, Benedikt M; Sibson, Nicola R; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Toftgård, Rune; D'Angiolella, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligases direct cell survival decisions by controlling protein ubiquitylation and degradation. Sufu (Suppressor of fused) is a central regulator of Hh (Hedgehog) signaling and acts as a tumor suppressor by maintaining the Gli (Glioma-associated oncogene homolog) transcription factors inactive. Although Sufu has a pivotal role in Hh signaling, the players involved in controlling Sufu levels and their role in tumor growth are unknown. Here, we show that Fbxl17 (F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 17) targets Sufu for proteolysis in the nucleus. The ubiquitylation of Sufu, mediated by Fbxl17, allows the release of Gli1 from Sufu for proper Hh signal transduction. Depletion of Fbxl17 leads to defective Hh signaling associated with an impaired cancer cell proliferation and medulloblastoma tumor growth. Furthermore, we identify a mutation in Sufu, occurring in medulloblastoma of patients with Gorlin syndrome, which increases Sufu turnover through Fbxl17-mediated polyubiquitylation and leads to a sustained Hh signaling activation. In summary, our findings reveal Fbxl17 as a novel regulator of Hh pathway and highlight the perturbation of the Fbxl17-Sufu axis in the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma. PMID:27234298

  12. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  13. Hsk1- and SCF(Pof3)-dependent proteolysis of S. pombe Ams2 ensures histone homeostasis and centromere function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yuko; Mamnun, Yasmine M; Trickey, Michelle; Dhut, Susheela; Masuda, Fumie; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Toda, Takashi; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2010-03-16

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe GATA factor Ams2 is responsible for cell cycle-dependent transcriptional activation of all the core histone genes peaking at G1/S phase. Intriguingly, its own protein level also fluctuates concurrently. Here, we show that Ams2 is ubiquitylated and degraded through the SCF (Skp1-Cdc53/Cullin-1-F-box) ubiquitin ligase, in which F box protein Pof3 binds this protein. Ams2 is phosphorylated at multiple sites, which is required for SCF(Pof3)-dependent proteolysis. Hsk1/Cdc7 kinase physically associates with and phosphorylates Ams2. Even mild overexpression of Ams2 induces constitutive histone expression and chromosome instability, and its toxicity is exaggerated when Hsk1 function is compromised. This is partly attributable to abnormal incorporation of canonical H3 into the central CENP-A/Cnp1-rich centromere, thereby reversing specific chromatin structures to apparently normal nucleosomes. We propose that Hsk1 plays a vital role during post S phase in genome stability via SCF(Pof3)-mediated degradation of Ams2, thereby maintaining centromere integrity. PMID:20230746

  14. Assessing computationally efficient isomerization dynamics: Delta-SCF density-functional theory study of azobenzene molecular switching

    CERN Document Server

    Maurer, Reinhard J; 10.1063/1.3664305

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of the S0, S1 (n -> \\pi*) and S2 (\\pi -> \\pi*) potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the prototypical molecular switch azobenzene as obtained by Delta-self-consistent-field (Delta-SCF) Density-Functional Theory (DFT), time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) and approximate Coupled Cluster Singles and Doubles (RI-CC2). All three methods unanimously agree in terms of the PES topologies, which are furthermore fully consistent with existing experimental data concerning the photo-isomerization mechanism. In particular, sum-method corrected Delta-SCF and TD-DFT yield very similar results for S1 and S2, when based on the same ground-state exchange-correlation (xc) functional. While these techniques yield the correct PES topology already on the level of semi-local xc functionals, reliable absolute excitation energies as compared to RI-CC2 or experiment require an xc treatment on the level of long-range corrected hybrids. Nevertheless, particularly the robustness of Delta-SCF with respect to state c...

  15. Applying genetic algorithms in a parallel computing environment for optimising parameters of complex cellular automata models: the case of SCIDDICA S3hex

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, D.; Iovine, G.

    2003-04-01

    Cellular Automata (CA) offer a valid alternative to the classic approach, based on partial differential equation, in order to simulate complex phenomena, when these latter can be described in terms of local interactions among their constituent parts. SCIDDICA S3hex is a two-dimensional hexagonal CA model developed for simulating debris flows: it has recently been applied to several real cases of landslides occurred in Campania (Southern Italy). The release S3hex has been derived by progressively improving an initial simplified CA model, originally derived for simulating simple cases of flow-type landslides. The model requires information related to topography, thickness of erodable regolith overlying the bedrock, and location and extension of landslide sources. Performances depend on a set of global parameters which are utilised in the transition function of the model: their value affect the elementary processes of the transition function and thus the overall results. A fine calibration is therefore an essential phase, in order to evaluate the reliability of the model for successive applications to debris-flow susceptibility zonation. The complexity of both the model and the phenomena to be simulated suggested to employ an automated technique of evaluation, for the determination of the best set of global parameters. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are a powerful optimization tool inspired to natural selection. In the last decades, in spite of their intrinsic simplicity, they have largely been successfully applied on a wide number of highly complex problems. The calibration of the model could therefore be performed through such technique of optimisation, by considering several real cases of study. Owing to the large number of simulations generally needed for performing GA experiments on complex phenomena, which imply long lasting tests on sequential computational architectures, the adoption of a parallel computational environment seemed appropriate: the original source code

  16. Members of the NODE (Nanog and Oct4-associated deacetylase) complex and SOX-2 promote the initiation of a natural cellular reprogramming event in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Ahier, Arnaud; Fischer, Nadine; Jarriault, Sophie

    2012-04-24

    Differentiated cells can be forced to change identity, either to directly adopt another differentiated identity or to revert to a pluripotent state. Direct reprogramming events can also occur naturally. We recently characterized such an event in Caenorhabditis elegans, in which a rectal cell switches to a neuronal cell. Here we have used this single-cell paradigm to investigate the molecular requirements of direct cell-type conversion, with a focus on the early steps. Our genetic analyses revealed the requirement of sem-4/Sall, egl-27/Mta, and ceh-6/Oct, members of the NODE complex recently identified in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and of the OCT4 partner sox-2, for the initiation of this natural direct reprogramming event. These four factors have been shown to individually impact on ES cell pluripotency; however, whether they act together to control cellular potential during development remained an open question. We further found that, in addition to acting at the same time, these factors physically associate, suggesting that they could act together as a NODE-like complex during this in vivo process. Finally, we have elucidated the functional domains in EGL-27/MTA that mediate its reprogramming activity in this system and have found that modulation of the posterior HOX protein EGL-5 is a downstream event to allow the initiation of Y identity change. Our data reveal unique in vivo functions in a natural direct reprogramming event for these genes that impact on ES cells pluripotency and suggest that conserved nuclear events could be shared between different cell plasticity phenomena across phyla. PMID:22493276

  17. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid complex as a carrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Geng

    Full Text Available A quantum dot (QD-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS/poly(γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics.

  18. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid) complex as a carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yao; Lin, Dajie; Shao, Lijia; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-01-01

    A quantum dot (QD)-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS)/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP) via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23762388

  19. New Insights into the Negative Thermal Expansion: Direct Experimental Evidence for the "Guitar-String" Effect in Cubic ScF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Chen, Jun; Sanson, Andrea; Wu, Hui; Guglieri Rodriguez, Clara; Olivi, Luca; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-07-13

    The understanding of the negative thermal expansion (NTE) mechanism remains challenging but critical for the development of NTE materials. This study sheds light on NTE of ScF3, one of the most outstanding materials with NTE. The local dynamics of ScF3 has been investigated by a combined analysis of synchrotron-based X-ray total scattering, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and neutron powder diffraction. Very interestingly, we observe that (i) the Sc-F nearest-neighbor distance strongly expands with increasing temperature, while the Sc-Sc next-nearest-neighbor distance contracts, (ii) the thermal ellipsoids of relative vibrations between Sc-F nearest-neighbors are highly elongated in the direction perpendicular to the Sc-F bond, indicating that the Sc-F bond is much softer to bend than to stretch, and (iii) there is mainly dynamically transverse motion of fluorine atoms, rather than static shifts. These results are direct experimental evidence for the NTE mechanism, in which the rigid unit is not necessary for the occurrence of NTE, and the key role is played by the transverse thermal vibrations of fluorine atoms through the "guitar-string" effect. PMID:27336200

  20. Evidence for faster etching at the mask-substrate interface: atomistic simulation of complex cavities at the micron-/submicron-scale by the continuous cellular automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosálvez, M. A.; Ferrando, N.; Fedoryshyn, Y.; Leuthold, J.; McPeak, K. M.

    2016-04-01

    We combine experiments and simulations to study the acceleration of anisotropic etching of crystalline silicon at the mask-substrate interface, as a function of the coordination number of the substrate atoms located at the junction between obtuse-angled {1 1 1} facets and the mask layer. Atomistic simulations based on the use of the continuous cellular automaton (CCA) conclude that the interface atoms react faster with the etchant, thus initiating a step flow process that results in increased etch rates for the obtuse facets. By generating a wide range of complex cavities on high-index silicon wafers with a single-side, single-step etching, the comparison of the experimental and simulated results strongly indicates that the CCA method is suitable for accurately describing not only the development of micron-scaled structures but also, for the first time, the formation of submicron shapes. The study also describes the acceleration of obtuse facets formed through double-side etching, obtaining results in good agreement with previous experiments.

  1. Complex coacervates formed across liquid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteillet, H.; Kleijn, J.M.; Sprakel, J.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The Scheutjens-Fleer self-consistent field (SF-SCF) theory is used to study complexation between two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes across an interface formed by two solvents, here called oil and water. The focus is on the composition and the lateral stability of such interfacial coacervate.

  2. Stability of plant immune-receptor resistance proteins is controlled by SKP1-CULLIN1-F-box (SCF)-mediated protein degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu Ti; Li, Yingzhong; Huang, Shuai; Huang, Yan; Dong, Xinnian; Zhang, Yuelin; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeats containing proteins (NLRs) serve as immune receptors in both plants and animals. Overaccumulation of NLRs often leads to autoimmune responses, suggesting that the levels of these immune receptors must be tightly controlled. However, the mechanism by which NLR protein levels are regulated is unknown. Here we report that the F-box protein CPR1 controls the stability of plant NLR resistance proteins. Loss-of-function mutations in CPR1 lead to higher accumulation of the NLR proteins SNC1 and RPS2, as well as autoactivation of immune responses. The autoimmune responses in cpr1 mutant plants can be largely suppressed by knocking out SNC1. Furthermore, CPR1 interacts with SNC1 and RPS2 in vivo, and overexpressing CPR1 results in reduced accumulation of SNC1 and RPS2, as well as suppression of immunity mediated by these two NLR proteins. Our data suggest that SKP1-CULLIN1-F-box (SCF) complex-mediated stability control of plant NLR proteins plays an important role in regulating their protein levels and preventing autoimmunity. PMID:21873230

  3. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  4. Never-ageing cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrunc, Müge; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence was historically discovered as a form of cellular ageing of in vitro cultured cells. It has been under the spotlight following the evidence of oncogene-induced senescence in vivo and its role as a potent tumour suppressor mechanism. Presently, a PubMed search using keywords ‘cellular senescence and cancer’ reveals 8398 number of references (by April 2011) showing that while our knowledge of senescence keeps expanding, the complexity of the phenomenon keeps us – researchers...

  5. Phase transition from cubic to monoclinic phase in cryolite (NH sub 4) sub 3 ScF sub 6 - investigation by Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vtyurin, A N; Afanasev, M L; Belyu, A; Shebanin, A P

    2001-01-01

    The studies on the transition from the cubic to monoclinic phase in the (NH sub 4) sub 3 ScF sub 6 cryolite crystal are accomplished through the Raman spectroscopy method. The sharp anomalies of frequencies and half-widths of the RS lines, corresponding to the internal oscillations of the ScF sub 6 sup 3 sup + ions, and also the lattice oscillations were observed; the condensation of the soft lattice node was not identified. The conclusion is made that the studied phase transition is connected mainly with the orientation ordering of these ions

  6. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  7. From a Global View to Focused Examination:Understanding Cellular Function of Lipid Kinase VPS34-Beclin 1 Complex in Autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenyu Yue; Yun Zhong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Autophagy is a cell'self-digestion'process via lysosomal degradation.The bestknown type of autophagy is macroauto phagy(hereafter referred to as auto phagy).Which involves the formation,delivery and degradation of autophago somes.The physiological function of autophagy is the controI of cellular nutrient and organelle homeostasis and can be regulated by various extracellular and intracellular cues(Klionsky and Emr,2000;Levine and Klionsky.2004).

  8. Exploration of cellular DNA lesion, DNA-binding and biocidal ordeal of novel curcumin based Knoevenagel Schiff base complexes incorporating tryptophan: Synthesis and structural validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Thiravidamani; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    A few novel Schiff base transition metal complexes of general formula [MLCl] (where, L = Schiff base, obtained by the condensation reaction of Knoevenagel condensate of curcumin, L-tryptophan and M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II)), were prepared by stencil synthesis. They were typified using UV-vis, IR, EPR spectral techniques, micro analytical techniques, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity. Geometry of the metal complexes was examined and recognized as square planar. DNA binding and viscosity studies revealed that the metal(II) complexes powerfully bound via an intercalation mechanism with the calf thymus DNA. Gel-electrophoresis technique was used to investigate the DNA cleavage competence of the complexes and they establish to approve the cleavage of pBR322 DNA in presence of oxidant H2O2. This outcome inferred that the synthesized complexes showed better nuclease activity. Moreover, the complexes were monitored for antimicrobial activities. The results exposed that the synthesized compounds were forceful against all the microbes under exploration.

  9. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity

  10. Synthesis, DNA binding, cellular DNA lesion and cytotoxicity of a series of new benzimidazole-based Schiff base copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Koch, Biplob; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-12-14

    A series of new benzimidazole containing compounds 2-((1-R-1-H-benzimidazol-2-yl)phenyl-imino)naphthol HL(1-3) (R = methyl, ethyl or propyl, respectively) have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of 2-(1-R-1-H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)aniline and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde. The reactions of HL(1-3) with Cu(NO3)2·2.5H2O led to the corresponding copper(II) complexes [Cu(L)(NO3)] 1-3. All the compounds were characterized by conventional analytical techniques and, for 1 and 3, also by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The interactions of complexes 1-3 with calf thymus DNA were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and the calculated binding constants (K(b)) are in the range of 3.5 × 10(5) M(-1)-3.2 × 10(5) M(-1). Complexes 1-3 effectively bind DNA through an intercalative mode, as proved by molecular docking studies. The binding affinity of the complexes decreases with the size increase of the N-alkyl substituent, in the order of 1 > 2 > 3, which is also in accord with the calculated LUMO(complex) energies. They show substantial in vitro cytotoxic effect against human lung (A-549), breast (MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. Complex 1 exhibits a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the A-549 cancer cells. The antiproliferative efficacy of 1 has also been analysed by a DNA fragmentation assay, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and nuclear morphology using a fluorescence microscope. The possible mode for the apoptosis pathway of 1 has also been evaluated by a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study.

  11. Comparing the effects of nano-sized sugarcane fiber with cellulose and psyllium on hepatic cellular signaling in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhong Q Wang,1,2 Yongmei Yu,1,2 Xian H Zhang,1,2 Z Elizabeth Floyd,3 Anik Boudreau,2 Kun Lian,4 William T Cefalu1,21Nutrition and Diabetes Research Laboratory, 2Botanical Research Center, 3Ubiquitin Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA, USA; 4The Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAim: To compare the effects of dietary fibers on hepatic cellular signaling in mice.Methods: Mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 9/group: high-fat diet (HFD control, cellulose, psyllium, and sugarcane fiber (SCF groups. All mice were fed a HFD with or without 10% dietary fiber (w/w for 12 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting glucose, and fasting insulin levels were measured. At the end of the study, hepatic fibroblast growth factor (FGF 21, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and insulin signaling protein content were determined.Results: Hepatic FGF21 content was significantly lowered, but βKlotho, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha proteins were significantly increased in the SCF group compared with those in the HFD group (P < 0.01. SCF supplementation also significantly enhanced insulin and AMPK signaling, as well as decreased hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol in comparison with the HFD mice. The study has shown that dietary fiber, especially SCF, significantly attenuates lipid accumulation in the liver by enhancing hepatic FGF21, insulin, and AMPK signaling in mice fed a HFD.Conclusion: This study suggests that the modulation of gastrointestinal factors by dietary fibers may play a key role in both enhancing hepatic multiple cellular signaling and reducing lipid accumulation.Keywords: dietary fiber, FGF21, insulin signaling, AMPK, GLP-1, PI 3K

  12. Complexity of the Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathies: Clinical and Cellular Characterization of the MPZ p.D90E Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Sancho, Paula; Calpena, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Molina, Manuel; Mateo-Martínez, Gonzalo; Espinós, Carmen; Arriola-Pereda, Gema

    2015-10-01

    Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies are rare diseases representing a broad clinical and genetic spectrum. Without a notable familial history, the clinical diagnosis is complicated because acquired causes of peripheral neuropathy, such as inflammatory neuropathies, neuropathies with toxic causes, and nutritional deficiencies, must be considered. We examined the clinical, electrophysiological, and pathologic manifestations of a boy with an initial diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. The progression of the disease despite treatment led to a suspicion of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Genetic testing revealed the presence of the MPZ p.D90E mutation in heterozygosis. To clarify the pathogenicity of this mutation and achieve a conclusive diagnosis, we investigated the MPZ p.D90E mutation through in silico and cellular approaches. This study broadens the clinical phenotype of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy due to MPZ mutation and emphasises the difficulty of achieving an accurate genetic diagnosis in a sporadic patient to provide an appropriate pharmacologic treatment.

  13. Improved electronic properties from third-order SCC-DFTB with cost efficient post-SCF extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Steve; Gaus, Michael; Elstner, Marcus

    2012-12-01

    The present work outlines the implementation and performance of two cost efficient post-SCF extensions into the third-order SCC-DFTB code. The first one, the charge model 3 (CM3), corrects for errors in bond dipoles for an improved description of molecular charge distribution as compared to the standard Mulliken partitioning scheme. The second one focuses on the response of the charge density, that is, the electronic molecular polarizability, described inaccurately from SCC-DFTB due to the usage of a minimal atomic orbital basis. Here, a variational approach, based on scaled dipole integrals, was implemented, which clearly outperforms standard finite electric field approaches for polarizability calculations by approximately 1 order of magnitude. Both extensions in the present work rely on a set of empirical parameters, which were fitted against 112 organic molecules to match a reference data set from full density functional calculations with a large basis. As an achievement, notably improved electronic properties, that is, molecular dipole moments and polarizabilities, result from SCC-DFTB calculations at negligible additional computational cost. Furthermore, the accuracy of infrared and Raman intensities was tested as first-order derivatives of the new dipoles and polarizabilities as a function of normal mode vibrations. As a result, the current implementations cannot contribute to an improved prediction of relative intensity pattern from SCC-DFTB as compared to ab initio reference data. PMID:23167841

  14. Tracing the Origin of the HSC Hierarchy Reveals an SCF-Dependent, IL-3-Independent CD43− Embryonic Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Rybtsov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs develop in the aorta gonad mesonephros (AGM region in a stepwise manner. Type I pre-HSCs express CD41 but lack CD45 expression, which is subsequently upregulated in type II pre-HSCs prior to their maturation into definitive HSCs. Here, using ex vivo modeling of HSC development, we identify precursors of definitive HSCs in the trunk of the embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5 mouse embryo. These precursors, termed here pro-HSCs, are less mature than type I and II pre-HSCs. Although pro-HSCs are CD41+, they lack the CD43 marker, which is gradually upregulated in the developing HSC lineage. We show that stem cell factor (SCF, but not interleukin-3 (IL-3, is a major effector of HSC maturation during E9–E10. This study extends further the previously established hierarchical organization of the developing HSC lineage and presents it as a differentially regulated four-step process and identifies additional targets that could facilitate the generation of transplantable HSCs from pluripotent cells for clinical needs.

  15. Ndd1 turnover by SCF(Grr1 is inhibited by the DNA damage checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R Edenberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ndd1 is the dedicated transcriptional activator of the mitotic gene cluster, which includes thirty-three genes that encode key mitotic regulators, making Ndd1 a hub for the control of mitosis. Previous work has shown that multiple kinases, including cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1, phosphorylate Ndd1 to regulate its activity during the cell cycle. Previously, we showed that Ndd1 was inhibited by phosphorylation in response to DNA damage. Here, we show that Ndd1 is also subject to regulation by protein turnover during the mitotic cell cycle: Ndd1 is unstable during an unperturbed cell cycle, but is strongly stabilized in response to DNA damage. We find that Ndd1 turnover in metaphase requires Cdk1 activity and the ubiquitin ligase SCF(Grr1. In response to DNA damage, Ndd1 stabilization requires the checkpoint kinases Mec1/Tel1 and Swe1, the S. cerevisiae homolog of the Wee1 kinase. In both humans and yeast, the checkpoint promotes Wee1-dependent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk1 following exposure to DNA damage. While this is critical for checkpoint-induced arrest in most organisms, this is not true in budding yeast, where the function of damage-induced inhibitory phosphorylation is less well understood. We propose that the DNA damage checkpoint stabilizes Ndd1 by inhibiting Cdk1, which we show is required for targeting Ndd1 for destruction.

  16. A program system for ab initio MO calculations on vector and parallel processing machines II. SCF closed-shell and open-shell iterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Marie-Madeleine; Demuynck, Jean; Bénard, Marc; Wiest, Roland; Bachmann, Christian; Henriet, Charles; Ernenwein, René

    1990-08-01

    This series of three papers presents a program system for ab initio molecular orbital calculations on vector and parallel computers. Part II is devoted to SCF iterations on closed-shell and open-shell configurations starting from a file of two-electron integrals on the basis of contracted Gaussians (CGTOs). In a preliminary step, the two-electron integrals ( pq‖ rs) are reordered according to increasing values of index pq = p( p-1)/2+ q. Then, in the first SCF iteration step, a file of semi-ordered P supermatrix elements (or P and Q supermatrix elements in the open-shell case) is generated from the file of semi-ordered integrals. This file is processed at each iteration step in an efficient vector loop to generate the electron repulsion matrix. Convergence is automatically controlled through level-shifting techniques. The most time-consuming parts are the integral sorting and the generation of the P supermatrix, which are carried out only once. Subsequent SCF iteration steps respectively require 0.9 s and 1.7 s for the process of 10 7 supermatrix elements by the closed-shell and the open-shell programs on a CRAY-2 processor.

  17. Cellular Delivery of Quantum Dot-Bound Hybridization Probe for Detection of Intracellular Pre-MicroRNA Using Chitosan/Poly(γ-Glutamic Acid) Complex as a Carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Geng; Dajie Lin; Lijia Shao; Feng Yan; Huangxian Ju

    2013-01-01

    A quantum dot (QD)-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS)/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP) via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene deliv...

  18. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  19. 抗苗勒氏管激素(AMH)对离体人卵巢黄素化颗粒细胞干细胞因子(SCF)表达负调控的研究%Impact of Anti Miillerian Hormone(AMH) on the Expression of Stem Cell Factor (SCF) in Human Granulosa Cells Cultured in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡蓉; 王飞苗; 罗艳; 马会明; 吴昕

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of anti Mullerian hormone (AMH) on the expression of SCF in human granulosa cells cultured in vitro. Methods: Fifteen patients were recruited who received in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) at age 0.05). Conclusion: AMH can effectively down-regulate the expressions of SCF mRNA and protein in human granulosa cells.%目的:研究人卵巢黄素化颗粒细胞中抗苗勒氏管激素(AMH)对干细胞因子(SCF)表达的影响.方法:收集15例年龄<35岁因男方因素行体外受精-胚胎移植(IVF-ET)患者的卵巢颗粒细胞,经原代培养,加入不同浓度基因重组人抗苗勒氏管激素(rhAMH),分别于培养的第4日与第6日采用实时定量PCR(RT-PCR)和免疫组织化学检测空白对照组与各实验组SCF mRNA及蛋白的表达.结果:RT-PCR和免疫组织化学均证实人卵巢黄素化颗粒细胞在不同浓度rhAMH干预后,SCFmRNA及蛋白的表达显著减少(P<0.05),其中15 ng/ml rhAMH抑制作用最明显;实验组第4日与第6日颗粒细胞表达SCFmRNA及蛋白无明显差异(P>0.05).结论:AMH可有效抑制人卵巢黄素化颗粒细胞SCF mRNA及蛋白的表达.

  20. New Markov-Shannon Entropy models to assess connectivity quality in complex networks: from molecular to cellular pathway, Parasite-Host, Neural, Industry, and Legal-Social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera-Fernández, Pablo; Munteanu, Cristian R; Escobar, Manuel; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Martín-Romalde, Raquel; Pereira, David; Villalba, Karen; Duardo-Sánchez, Aliuska; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2012-01-21

    Graph and Complex Network theory is expanding its application to different levels of matter organization such as molecular, biological, technological, and social networks. A network is a set of items, usually called nodes, with connections between them, which are called links or edges. There are many different experimental and/or theoretical methods to assign node-node links depending on the type of network we want to construct. Unfortunately, the use of a method for experimental reevaluation of the entire network is very expensive in terms of time and resources; thus the development of cheaper theoretical methods is of major importance. In addition, different methods to link nodes in the same type of network are not totally accurate in such a way that they do not always coincide. In this sense, the development of computational methods useful to evaluate connectivity quality in complex networks (a posteriori of network assemble) is a goal of major interest. In this work, we report for the first time a new method to calculate numerical quality scores S(L(ij)) for network links L(ij) (connectivity) based on the Markov-Shannon Entropy indices of order k-th (θ(k)) for network nodes. The algorithm may be summarized as follows: (i) first, the θ(k)(j) values are calculated for all j-th nodes in a complex network already constructed; (ii) A Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is used to seek a linear equation that discriminates connected or linked (L(ij)=1) pairs of nodes experimentally confirmed from non-linked ones (L(ij)=0); (iii) the new model is validated with external series of pairs of nodes; (iv) the equation obtained is used to re-evaluate the connectivity quality of the network, connecting/disconnecting nodes based on the quality scores calculated with the new connectivity function. This method was used to study different types of large networks. The linear models obtained produced the following results in terms of overall accuracy for network reconstruction

  1. Cellular Uptake and Photo-Cytotoxicity of a Gadolinium(III-DOTA-Naphthalimide Complex “Clicked” to a Lipidated Tat Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. O’Malley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A new bifunctional macrocyclic chelator featuring a conjugatable alkynyl-naphthalimide fluorophore pendant group has been prepared and its Gd(III complex coupled to a cell-penetrating lipidated azido-Tat peptide derivative using Cu(I-catalysed “click” chemistry. The resulting fluorescent conjugate is able to enter CAL-33 tongue squamous carcinoma cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy, producing a very modest anti-proliferative effect (IC50 = 93 µM. Due to the photo-reactivity of the naphthalimide moiety, however, the conjugate’s cytotoxicity is significantly enhanced (IC50 = 16 µM upon brief low-power UV-A irradiation.

  2. Cellular immune responses to ESAT-6 discriminate between patients with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex and those with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lein, A D; von Reyn, C F; Ravn, P;

    1999-01-01

    disease due to either Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis with those in healthy, skin test-negative, control subjects. Significant IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 were detected in 16 (59%) of 27 M. tuberculosis pulmonary disease patients, 0 (0%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 0...... (0%) of 8 controls. Significant IFN-gamma responses to M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative were detected in 23 (85%) of 27 M. tuberculosis disease patients, 2 (25%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 5 (63%) of 8 healthy controls. M. avium sensitin was recognized in 24 (89%) of 27 M. tuberculosis...... disease patients, 4 (50%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 1 (13%) of 8 controls. IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 are specificfor disease due to M. tuberculosis and are not observed in patients with MAC disease or in healthy controls....

  3. Cellular immune responses to ESAT-6 discriminate between patients with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex and those with pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lein, A D; von Reyn, C F; Ravn, P;

    1999-01-01

    disease due to either Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis with those in healthy, skin test-negative, control subjects. Significant IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 were detected in 16 (59%) of 27 M. tuberculosis pulmonary disease patients, 0 (0%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 0...... (0%) of 8 controls. Significant IFN-gamma responses to M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative were detected in 23 (85%) of 27 M. tuberculosis disease patients, 2 (25%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 5 (63%) of 8 healthy controls. M. avium sensitin was recognized in 24 (89%) of 27 M. tuberculosis...... disease patients, 4 (50%) of 8 MAC disease patients, and 1 (13%) of 8 controls. IFN-gamma responses to ESAT-6 are specific for disease due to M. tuberculosis and are not observed in patients with MAC disease or in healthy controls....

  4. The virion host shutoff endonuclease (UL41) of herpes simplex virus interacts with the cellular cap-binding complex eIF4F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Heidi G; Read, G Sullivan

    2010-07-01

    The herpes simplex virus Vhs endonuclease degrades host and viral mRNAs. Isolated Vhs cuts any RNA at many sites. Yet, within cells, it targets mRNAs and cuts at preferred sites, including regions of translation initiation. Previous studies have shown that Vhs binds the translation factors eIF4A and eIF4H. Here, we show that Vhs binds the cap-binding complex eIF4F. Association with eIF4F correlated with the ability of Vhs to bind eIF4A but not eIF4H. All Vhs proteins that degrade mRNAs associated with eIF4F. However, simply tethering an active endonuclease to eIF4F is not sufficient to degrade mRNAs. Binding to eIF4H may also be required.

  5. New Markov-Shannon Entropy models to assess connectivity quality in complex networks: from molecular to cellular pathway, Parasite-Host, Neural, Industry, and Legal-Social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera-Fernández, Pablo; Munteanu, Cristian R; Escobar, Manuel; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Martín-Romalde, Raquel; Pereira, David; Villalba, Karen; Duardo-Sánchez, Aliuska; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2012-01-21

    Graph and Complex Network theory is expanding its application to different levels of matter organization such as molecular, biological, technological, and social networks. A network is a set of items, usually called nodes, with connections between them, which are called links or edges. There are many different experimental and/or theoretical methods to assign node-node links depending on the type of network we want to construct. Unfortunately, the use of a method for experimental reevaluation of the entire network is very expensive in terms of time and resources; thus the development of cheaper theoretical methods is of major importance. In addition, different methods to link nodes in the same type of network are not totally accurate in such a way that they do not always coincide. In this sense, the development of computational methods useful to evaluate connectivity quality in complex networks (a posteriori of network assemble) is a goal of major interest. In this work, we report for the first time a new method to calculate numerical quality scores S(L(ij)) for network links L(ij) (connectivity) based on the Markov-Shannon Entropy indices of order k-th (θ(k)) for network nodes. The algorithm may be summarized as follows: (i) first, the θ(k)(j) values are calculated for all j-th nodes in a complex network already constructed; (ii) A Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is used to seek a linear equation that discriminates connected or linked (L(ij)=1) pairs of nodes experimentally confirmed from non-linked ones (L(ij)=0); (iii) the new model is validated with external series of pairs of nodes; (iv) the equation obtained is used to re-evaluate the connectivity quality of the network, connecting/disconnecting nodes based on the quality scores calculated with the new connectivity function. This method was used to study different types of large networks. The linear models obtained produced the following results in terms of overall accuracy for network reconstruction

  6. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  8. Transfer of Ho Endonuclease and Ufo1 to the Proteasome by the UbL-UbA Shuttle Protein, Ddi1, Analysed by Complex Formation In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Voloshin; Anya Bakhrat; Sharon Herrmann; Dina Raveh

    2012-01-01

    The F-box protein, Ufo1, recruits Ho endonuclease to the SCF(Ufo1) complex for ubiquitylation. Both ubiquitylated Ho and Ufo1 are transferred by the UbL-UbA protein, Ddi1, to the 19S Regulatory Particle (RP) of the proteasome for degradation. The Ddi1-UbL domain binds Rpn1 of the 19S RP, the Ddi1-UbA domain binds ubiquitin chains on the degradation substrate. Here we used complex reconstitution in vitro to identify stages in the transfer of Ho and Ufo1 from the SCF(Ufo1) complex to the protea...

  9. Association and dissociation of the GlnK-AmtB complex in response to cellular nitrogen status can occur in the absence of GlnK post-translational modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eMerrick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PII proteins are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and their regulatory effect is achieved by direct interaction with their target. Many, but by no means all, PII proteins are subject to post-translational modification of a residue within the T-loop of the protein. The protein’s modification state is influenced by the cellular nitrogen status and in the past this has been considered to regulate PII activity by controlling interaction with target proteins. However the fundamental ability of PII proteins to respond to the cellular nitrogen status has been shown to be dependent on binding of key effector molecules, ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate which brings into question the precise role of post-translational modification. In this study we have used the Escherichia coli PII protein GlnK to examine the influence of post-translational modification (uridylylation on the interaction between GlnK and its cognate target the ammonia channel protein AmtB. We have compared the interaction with AmtB of wild-type GlnK and a variant protein, GlnKTyr51Ala, that cannot be uridylylated. This analysis was carried out both in vivo and in vitro and showed that association and dissociation of the GlnK-AmtB complex is not dependent on the uridylylation state of GlnK. However our in vivo studies show that post-translational modification of GlnK does influence the dynamics of its interaction with AmtB.

  10. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  11. The Origins of Cellular Life

    OpenAIRE

    Schrum, Jason P.; Zhu, Ting F.; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the origin of cellular life on Earth requires the discovery of plausible pathways for the transition from complex prebiotic chemistry to simple biology, defined as the emergence of chemical assemblies capable of Darwinian evolution. We have proposed that a simple primitive cell, or protocell, would consist of two key components: a protocell membrane that defines a spatially localized compartment, and an informational polymer that allows for the replication and inheritance of fun...

  12. On the Behavior Characteristics of Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin-cai; ZHANG Jiang-ling; FENG Dan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the inherent relationships between the running regulations and behavior characteristics of cellular automata are presented; an imprecise taxonomy of such systems is put forward; the three extreme cases of stable systems are discussed; and the illogicalness of evolutional strategies of cellular automata is analyzed. The result is suitable for the emulation and prediction of behavior of discrete dynamics systems; especially it can be taken as an important analysis means of dynamic performance of complex networks.

  13. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  14. The cellular RNA export receptor TAP/NXF1 is required for ICP27-mediated export of herpes simplex virus 1 RNA, but the TREX complex adaptor protein Aly/REF appears to be dispensable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lisa A; Li, Ling; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M

    2009-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein ICP27 has been shown to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and to bind viral RNA during infection. ICP27 was found to interact with the cellular RNA export adaptor protein Aly/REF, which is part of the TREX complex, and to relocalize Aly/REF to viral replication sites. ICP27 is exported to the cytoplasm through the export receptor TAP/NXF1, and ICP27 must be able to interact with TAP/NXF1 for efficient export of HSV-1 early and late transcripts. We examined the dynamics of ICP27 movement and its localization with respect to Aly/REF and TAP/NXF1 in living cells during viral infection. Recombinant viruses with a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tag on the N or C terminus of ICP27 were constructed. While the N-terminally tagged ICP27 virus behaved like wild-type HSV-1, the C-terminally tagged virus was defective in viral replication and gene expression, and ICP27 was confined to the nucleus, suggesting that the C-terminal YFP tag interfered with ICP27's C-terminal interactions, including the interaction with TAP/NXF1. To assess the role of Aly/REF and TAP/NXF1 in viral RNA export, these factors were knocked down using small interfering RNA. Knockdown of Aly/REF had little effect on the export of ICP27 or poly(A)(+) RNA during infection. In contrast, a decrease in TAP/NXF1 levels severely impaired export of ICP27 and poly(A)(+) RNA. We conclude that TAP/NXF1 is essential for ICP27-mediated export of RNA during HSV-1 infection, whereas Aly/REF may be dispensable.

  15. Modelling cellular behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  16. Reversible quantum cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, B

    2004-01-01

    We define quantum cellular automata as infinite quantum lattice systems with discrete time dynamics, such that the time step commutes with lattice translations and has strictly finite propagation speed. In contrast to earlier definitions this allows us to give an explicit characterization of all local rules generating such automata. The same local rules also generate the global time step for automata with periodic boundary conditions. Our main structure theorem asserts that any quantum cellular automaton is structurally reversible, i.e., that it can be obtained by applying two blockwise unitary operations in a generalized Margolus partitioning scheme. This implies that, in contrast to the classical case, the inverse of a nearest neighbor quantum cellular automaton is again a nearest neighbor automaton. We present several construction methods for quantum cellular automata, based on unitaries commuting with their translates, on the quantization of (arbitrary) reversible classical cellular automata, on quantum c...

  17. Cellular functions of the microprocessor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Sara; Cordiner, Ross A; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-08-01

    The microprocessor is a complex comprising the RNase III enzyme Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 gene) that catalyses the nuclear step of miRNA (microRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as an endonuclease. Recent global analyses of microprocessor and Dicer proteins have suggested novel functions for these components independent of their role in miRNA biogenesis. A HITS-CLIP (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation) experiment designed to identify novel substrates of the microprocessor revealed that this complex binds and regulates a large variety of cellular RNAs. The microprocessor-mediated cleavage of several classes of RNAs not only regulates transcript levels, but also modulates alternative splicing events, independently of miRNA function. Importantly, DGCR8 can also associate with other nucleases, suggesting the existence of alternative DGCR8 complexes that may regulate the fate of a subset of cellular RNAs. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the diverse functional roles of the microprocessor.

  18. Les déterminants des choix de méthodes comptables dans les entreprises algériennes lors de l’adoption du SCF

    OpenAIRE

    BENSABEUR-SLIMANE, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Dans ce travail notre but est d’expliquer le choix des méthodes comptables adoptées par les entreprises algériennes, dans le cadre de la théorie positive de la comptabilité (Watts et Zimmerman, 1978) et la théorie institutionnelle (DiMaggio et Powell, 1983), lors de leur transition comptable vers le SCF. L'analyse empirique de 68 entreprises (publiques et privées), sur les données de l'année 2010, a été réalisée à travers un modèle logistique multinomial. Les résultats statistiques permettent...

  19. NPs/NPRs Signaling Pathways May Be Involved in Depression-Induced Loss of Gastric ICC by Decreasing the Production of mSCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue-Lian; Tang, Xu-Dong; Cai, Zheng-Xu; Wang, Feng-Yun; Li, Ping; Sui, Hua; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that natriuretic peptides (NPs) are involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are the pacemaker cells of gastrointestinal motility and gastrointestinal dyskinesia is one of the important digestive tract symptoms of depression. However, it is unclear whether they are involved in depression-induced loss of ICC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the natriuretic peptide signaling pathway and depression-induced loss of gastric ICC in depressed rats. These results showed that the expression of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) in smooth muscle layers of stomach were down-regulated in depressed rats at the mRNA and protein levels. The expression of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A, B and C were up-regulated in the stomach of depressed rats at the mRNA and protein levels. NPR-A, B and C can significantly decrease the expression of SCF to treat cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (GSMCs) obtained from normal rats with different concentrations of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). Pretreatment of cultured GSMCs with 8-Brom-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP, a membrane permeable cGMP analog), cANF (a specific NPR-C agonist) and CNP (10-6 mol/L) demonstrated that 8-Br-cGMP had a similar effect as CNP, but treatment with cANF did not. The results of the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay indicated that high concentrations of cANF (10-6 mol/L) restrained the proliferation of cultured GSMCs. Taken together, these results indicate that the up-regulation of the NPs/NPR-C and NPs/NPR-A, B/cGMP signaling pathways may be involved in depression-induced loss of gastric ICC.

  20. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  1. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  2. Structure of a glomulin-RBX1-CUL1 complex: inhibition of a RING E3 ligase through masking of its E2-binding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David M; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Tron, Adriana E; Hammel, Michal; Lambert, Lester J; Waddell, M Brett; Mittag, Tanja; DeCaprio, James A; Schulman, Brenda A

    2012-08-10

    The approximately 300 human cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are multisubunit E3s in which a RING protein, either RBX1 or RBX2, recruits an E2 to catalyze ubiquitination. RBX1-containing CRLs also can bind Glomulin (GLMN), which binds RBX1's RING domain, regulates the RBX1-CUL1-containing SCF(FBW7) complex, and is disrupted in the disease Glomuvenous Malformation. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between GLMN, RBX1, and a fragment of CUL1. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that GLMN adopts a HEAT-like repeat fold that tightly binds the E2-interacting surface of RBX1, inhibiting CRL-mediated chain formation by the E2 CDC34. The structure explains the basis for GLMN's selectivity toward RBX1 over RBX2, and how disease-associated mutations disrupt GLMN-RBX1 interactions. Our study reveals a mechanism for RING E3 ligase regulation, whereby an inhibitor blocks E2 access, and raises the possibility that other E3s are likewise controlled by cellular proteins that mask E2-binding surfaces to mediate inhibition. PMID:22748924

  3. Structure of a Glomulin-RBX1-CUL1 Complex: Inhibition of a RING E3 Ligase through Masking of Its E2-Binding Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, David M.; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Tron, Adriana E.; Hammel, Michal; Lambert, Lester J.; Waddell, M. Brett; Mittag, Tanja; DeCaprio, James A.; Schulman, Brenda A. (BWH); (LBNL); (SJCH); (DFCI)

    2012-11-01

    The approximately 300 human cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are multisubunit E3s in which a RING protein, either RBX1 or RBX2, recruits an E2 to catalyze ubiquitination. RBX1-containing CRLs also can bind Glomulin (GLMN), which binds RBX1's RING domain, regulates the RBX1-CUL1-containing SCF{sup FBW7} complex, and is disrupted in the disease Glomuvenous Malformation. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between GLMN, RBX1, and a fragment of CUL1. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that GLMN adopts a HEAT-like repeat fold that tightly binds the E2-interacting surface of RBX1, inhibiting CRL-mediated chain formation by the E2 CDC34. The structure explains the basis for GLMN's selectivity toward RBX1 over RBX2, and how disease-associated mutations disrupt GLMN-RBX1 interactions. Our study reveals a mechanism for RING E3 ligase regulation, whereby an inhibitor blocks E2 access, and raises the possibility that other E3s are likewise controlled by cellular proteins that mask E2-binding surfaces to mediate inhibition.

  4. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  5. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  6. Caractérisation biochimique et moléculaire du complexe SCF (SKP1-CULLIN-FBOX) chez le blé tendre

    OpenAIRE

    El Beji, Imen

    2011-01-01

    Les modifications post-traductionnelles des protéines constituent un niveau crucial de régulation de l'expression des gènes. Parmi elles, la conjugaison peptidique impliquant l'ubiquitine intervient entre autre dans la régulation de la stabilité protéique. La fixation de ce peptide de 76 acides aminés, extrêmement conservé, sous forme de chaîne de polyubiquitine, nécessite l'intervention de trois enzymes (E1, E2 et E3) et constitue un signal de dégradation de la protéine ainsi modifiée. Cette...

  7. Characterizing heterogeneous cellular responses to perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Michael D; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2008-12-01

    Cellular populations have been widely observed to respond heterogeneously to perturbation. However, interpreting the observed heterogeneity is an extremely challenging problem because of the complexity of possible cellular phenotypes, the large dimension of potential perturbations, and the lack of methods for separating meaningful biological information from noise. Here, we develop an image-based approach to characterize cellular phenotypes based on patterns of signaling marker colocalization. Heterogeneous cellular populations are characterized as mixtures of phenotypically distinct subpopulations, and responses to perturbations are summarized succinctly as probabilistic redistributions of these mixtures. We apply our method to characterize the heterogeneous responses of cancer cells to a panel of drugs. We find that cells treated with drugs of (dis-)similar mechanism exhibit (dis-)similar patterns of heterogeneity. Despite the observed phenotypic diversity of cells observed within our data, low-complexity models of heterogeneity were sufficient to distinguish most classes of drug mechanism. Our approach offers a computational framework for assessing the complexity of cellular heterogeneity, investigating the degree to which perturbations induce redistributions of a limited, but nontrivial, repertoire of underlying states and revealing functional significance contained within distinct patterns of heterogeneous responses.

  8. Pathologic changes and expressions of SCF and c-kit in contralateral testes in rat model of unilateral cryptorchidism%单侧隐睾大鼠对侧睾丸组织中SCF/c-kit基因表达变化及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐明; 郑新民; 李世文; 丁协刚; 周克文; 汪聪

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究单侧隐睾大鼠对侧睾丸病理变化及SCF/c-kit基因表达,探讨单侧隐睾致对侧睾丸损害的机制.方法 30只SD大鼠随机分为对照组和实验组,实验组复制单侧(左侧)腹腔隐睾模型.3个月后分别取两组右侧睾丸组织进行real-time RT-PCR、Western blot及免疫组化检测干细胞生长因子(SCF)和其受体c-kit基因及其蛋白表达变化,TUNEL法检测细胞凋亡.结果 所有动物均存活,与对照组相比实验组对侧睾丸明显缩小,光镜下观察其曲细精管发生退化,生精上皮变薄,管腔较空,生殖细胞明显减少,细胞凋亡增加.两组凋亡指数分别为14.4±0.63和4.45±0.37,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).荧光实时定量PT-PCR检测SCF、c-kit基因mRNA含量,实验组对侧睾丸明显降低,两组相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).Western blot检测SCF及c-kit蛋白表达含量,实验组对侧睾丸同样明显降低,两组相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).免疫组化染色显示各级生精细胞膜均有c-kit表达,SCF主要表达于支持细胞膜表面,但实验组两者的表达均较对照组减弱.相关性检验SCF与AI相关系数r=-0.941,P<0.01;c-kit与AI相关系数r=-0.908,P<0.01;SCF与c-kit相关系数r=0.956,P<0.01,均有统计学意义.结论 单侧隐睾可致对侧睾丸SCF/c-kit基因表达减弱,生精细胞凋亡增加引起不育.%Objective To investigate the pathologic changes and expressions of SCF and c-kit in the contralateral testes in rat model of unilateral cryptorchidism. Methods Thirty male SD rats were maintained under controlled temperature and constant photoperiodic conditions with access to food and water. The rats were randomly assaigned to the control group and the experimental unilateral cryptorchidism group. The left testis of the rats in the unilateral cryptorchidism group was placed into the abdominal cavity. The control group rats were subjected to sham surgery. Three months later, the rats were

  9. Benchmark study between FIDAP and a cellular automata code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akau, R. L.; Stockman, H. W.

    A fluid flow benchmark exercise was conducted to compare results between a cellular automata code and FIDAP. Cellular automata codes are free from gridding constraints, and are generally used to model slow (Reynolds number approximately 1) flows around complex solid obstacles. However, the accuracy of cellular automata codes at higher Reynolds numbers, where inertial terms are significant, is not well-documented. In order to validate the cellular automata code, two fluids problems were investigated. For both problems, flow was assumed to be laminar, two-dimensional, isothermal, incompressible and periodic. Results showed that the cellular automata code simulated the overall behavior of the flow field.

  10. Corresponding author: ZHAO Suoqi. Tel: (010)89733743; E-mail: scf@www.bjpeu.edu.cn.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Direct catalytic oxidative conversion of light alkanes to alcohols using molecular oxygen as an oxidant is a challenging and important synthetical goal, which might be met by transition metal porphyrin complexes that are capable of forming active metal oxo intermediates via direct reaction with O2 in the presence of a co-reductant[1]. It was found that iron complexes of halogenated porphyrins were remarkably active catalysts for the hydroxylation of light alkanes by O2 without added co-reductants in an organic solvent such as benzene

  11. PARC and CUL7 form atypical cullin RING ligase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaar, Jeffrey R; Florens, Laurence; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Arai, Takehiro; Tron, Adriana; Swanson, Selene K; Washburn, Michael P; DeCaprio, James A

    2007-03-01

    CUL7 and the p53-associated, PARkin-like cytoplasmic protein (PARC) were previously reported to form homodimers and heterodimers, the first demonstration of cullin dimerization. Although a CUL7-based SKP1/CUL1/F-box (SCF)-like complex has been observed, little is known about the existence of a PARC-based SCF-like complex and how PARC interacts with CUL7-based complexes. To further characterize PARC-containing complexes, we examined the ability of PARC to form an SCF-like complex. PARC binds RBX1 and is covalently modified by NEDD8, defining PARC as a true cullin. However, PARC fails to bind SKP1 or F-box proteins, including the CUL7-associated FBXW8. To examine the assembly of PARC- and CUL7-containing complexes, tandem affinity purification followed by multidimensional protein identification technology were used. Multidimensional protein identification technology analysis revealed that the CUL7 interaction with FBXW8 was mutually exclusive of CUL7 binding to PARC or p53. Notably, although heterodimers of CUL7 and PARC bind p53, p53 is not required for the dimerization of CUL7 and PARC. The observed physical separation of FBXW8 and PARC is supported functionally by the generation of Parc-/-, Fbxw8-/- mice, which do not show exacerbation of the Fbxw8-/- phenotype. Finally, all of the PARC and CUL7 subcomplexes examined exhibit E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. Together, these findings indicate that the intricate assembly of PARC- and CUL7-containing complexes is highly regulated, and multiple subcomplexes may exhibit ubiquitin ligase activity. PMID:17332328

  12. Cellular and synaptic network defects in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Peça, João; Feng, Guoping

    2012-01-01

    Many candidate genes are now thought to confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Here we review four interrelated complexes, each composed of multiple families of genes that functionally coalesce on common cellular pathways. We illustrate a common thread in the organization of glutamatergic synapses and suggest a link between genes involved in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome and several synaptic ASD candidate genes. When viewed in this conte...

  13. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  14. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  15. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  16. Cellular Response to Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo; YAN Shi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    To explore the nonlinear activities of the cellular signaling system composed of one transcriptional arm and one protein-interaction arm, we use an irradiation-response module to study the dynamics of stochastic interactions.It is shown that the oscillatory behavior could be described in a unified way when the radiation-derived signal and noise are incorporated.

  17. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  18. Cellular host responses to gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Najbauer

    together with pericytes give rise to tumor vasculature. Mapping the cellular composition of glioma microenvironment and deciphering the complex 'crosstalk' between tumor and host may ultimately aid the development of novel anti-glioma therapies.

  19. An ab initio study of complexes between ethylene and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, M.L. (Auburn Univ., AL (USA)); Rohlfing, C.M. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1989-03-29

    A series of complexes between ethylene and ozone have been examined at the SCF, MP2, and MP4(SDTQ) levels of theory within a split-valence-plus-polarization basis. The conformational nature of the primary ozonide (PO) is determined to be an O-envelope, and the theoretically predicted geometry is in excellent agreement with a recently reported microwave structure. The binding energy of PO at correlated levels is computed to be slightly less than 50 kcal/mol, which is also in very good agreement with thermochemical estimates. Five other weakly bound complexes and the transition state to PO have also been investigated.

  20. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  1. Metadata Standard and Data Exchange Specifications to Describe, Model, and Integrate Complex and Diverse High-Throughput Screening Data from the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vempati, Uma D; Chung, Caty; Mader, Chris; Koleti, Amar; Datar, Nakul; Vidović, Dušica; Wrobel, David; Erickson, Sean; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Berriz, Gabriel; Benes, Cyril H; Subramanian, Aravind; Pillai, Ajay; Shamu, Caroline E; Schürer, Stephan C

    2014-06-01

    The National Institutes of Health Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program is generating extensive multidimensional data sets, including biochemical, genome-wide transcriptional, and phenotypic cellular response signatures to a variety of small-molecule and genetic perturbations with the goal of creating a sustainable, widely applicable, and readily accessible systems biology knowledge resource. Integration and analysis of diverse LINCS data sets depend on the availability of sufficient metadata to describe the assays and screening results and on their syntactic, structural, and semantic consistency. Here we report metadata specifications for the most important molecular and cellular components and recommend them for adoption beyond the LINCS project. We focus on the minimum required information to model LINCS assays and results based on a number of use cases, and we recommend controlled terminologies and ontologies to annotate assays with syntactic consistency and semantic integrity. We also report specifications for a simple annotation format (SAF) to describe assays and screening results based on our metadata specifications with explicit controlled vocabularies. SAF specifically serves to programmatically access and exchange LINCS data as a prerequisite for a distributed information management infrastructure. We applied the metadata specifications to annotate large numbers of LINCS cell lines, proteins, and small molecules. The resources generated and presented here are freely available.

  2. Investigation of the Semicoa SCF9550 and the International Rectifier IRHM57260SE for Single-Event Gate Rapture and Single-Event Burnout : NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Office of Safety and Mission Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheick, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Single-event-effect test results for hi-rel total-dose-hardened power MOSFETs are presented in this report. TheSCF9550 from Semicoa and the IRHM57260SE from International Rectifier were tested to NASA test condition/standards and requirements.The IRHM57260SE performed much better when compared to previous testing. These initial results confirm that parts from the Temecula line are marginally comparable to the El Segundo line. The SCF9550 from Semicoa was also tested and represents the initial parts offering from this vendor. Both parts experienced single-event gate rupture (SEGR) and single-event burnout (SEB). All of the SEGR was from gate to drain.

  3. Progress in research on ICCs in gastrointestinal tract and SCF/c-kit signal system%胃肠道Cajal间质细胞与干细胞因子/c-kit信号系统的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田姣

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), distributed throughout the whole gastrointestinal (GI) tract, are a special kind of mesenchymal cells. The special relationship among ICCs, enteric nervous system and smooth muscle contributes to the formation of the "neuron-ICC-smooth muscle" networks. Especially, ICC is the important coordinator in the network, and is closely related with the generation of intestinal slow waves. There is the signaling pathway which is activated by c-kit, a specific membrane receptor of ICC, binds to stem cell factor (SCF), a ligand for c-kit, and the pathway plays an important role in the development and maintenance of ICC. Therefore, through the investigation of the SCF/c-kit signaling pathway, it is expected to find a new therapy for ICCs associated gastrointestinal motility disorders.%胃肠道Cajal间质细胞(interstitial cells of Cajal,ICCs)是一类分布于消化道各个部位的特殊间质细胞,它和肠神经系统、平滑肌之间的特殊位置关系构成了“肠神经-ICCs-平滑肌细胞”的网络结构,其中ICCs是该网络重要的协调者,与肠道慢波的形成密切相关.胃肠道ICCs的特异性受体c-kit,与其配体干细胞因子(stem cell factors,SCF)结合后启动的信号途径,在ICCs的生长、发育及表型维持中起着重要作用.因此,从SCF/c-kit信号系统人手,有望拉开治疗ICCs相关性胃肠运动功能障碍性疾病的新序幕.

  4. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  5. Magnetic Cellular Switches

    OpenAIRE

    Overby, Darryl R.; Alenghat, Francis J.; Montoya-Zavala, Martín; Bei, HuCheng; Oh, Philmo; Karavitis, John; Ingber, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of magnetic cellular switches to enable magnetic control of intracellular functions in living mammalian cells, including receptor signal transduction and gene transcription. Our approach takes advantage of the mechanosensitivity of adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) induction and downstream transcription controlled by the cAMP regulatory element (CRE) to engineer gene constructs that optically report gene expression in living cells. We activate transcri...

  6. Cellular therapy in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreemanta K. Parida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB. We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs, as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy.

  7. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In today’s world, three great classes of non-infectious diseases – the metabolic syndromes (such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis), the cancers, and the neurodegenerative disorders – have risen to the fore. These diseases, all associated with increasing age of an individual, have proven to be remarkably complex and difficult to treat. This is because, in large measure, when the cellular signaling pathways responsible for maintaining homeostasis and health of the body become dysregulated, they generate equally stable disease states. As a result the body may respond positively to a drug, but only for a while and then revert back to the disease state. Cellular Signaling in Health and Disease summarizes our current understanding of these regulatory networks in the healthy and diseased states, showing which molecular components might be prime targets for drug interventions. This is accomplished by presenting models that explain in mechanistic, molecular detail how a particular part of the cellular sign...

  8. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  9. Involvement of an SCFSlmb complex in timely elimination of E2F upon initiation of DNA replication in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Farrell Patrick H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cul1 is a core component of the evolutionarily conserved SCF-type ubiquitin ligases that target specific proteins for destruction. SCF action contributes to cell cycle progression but few of the key targets of its action have been identified. Results We found that expression of the mouse Cul1 (mCul1 in the larval wing disc has a dominant negative effect. It reduces, but does not eliminate, the function of SCF complexes, promotes accumulation of Cubitus interruptus (a target of SCF action, triggers apoptosis, and causes a small wing phenotype. A screen for mutations that dominantly modify this phenotype showed effective suppression upon reduction of E2F function, suggesting that compromised downregulation of E2F contributes to the phenotype. Partial inactivation of Cul1 delayed the abrupt loss of E2F immunofluorescence beyond its normal point of downregulation at the onset of S phase. Additional screens showed that mild reduction in function of the F-box encoding gene slimb enhanced the mCul1 overexpression phenotype. Cell cycle modulation of E2F levels is virtually absent in slimb mutant cells in which slimb function is severely reduced. This implicates Slimb, a known targeting subunit of SCF, in E2F downregulation. In addition, Slimb and E2F interacted in vitro in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Conclusion We have used genetic and physical interactions to identify the G1/S transcription factor E2F as an SCFSlmb target in Drosophila. These results argue that the SCFSlmb ubiquitin ligase directs E2F destruction in S phase.

  10. C-kit、SCF、Cx43在先天性巨结肠中的表达及作用%Expression and correlation study of C-kit, SCF and Cx43 in hirschsprung's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢丽微; 夏丽娜; 赵志光

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the action of C-kit,SCF and Cx43 in the pathogenesis of HD by examining the expression and distribution of C-kit,SCF and Cx43.Methods:The colon specimens of 68 cases of HD and 8 cases of accidental death without digestive tract malformations (control) were collected.The case group composed of a expansion group in which the ganglion cells were normal in the intestinal wall and a narrow group in which the ganglion cells were absent in the intestinal wall according to diagnosis by HE.Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the proteins of C-Kit,SCF and Cx43,and hybridization in situ to detect the mRNA of C-Kit in all specimens.Results:Expression of C-kit,SCF and Cx43 in the expansion group was not significantly different from the control group (P > 0.05),while expression of C-kit,SCF and Cx43 in narrow group decreased significantly compared with the control group (P < 0.05).Conclusion:The development of Hirschsprung's disease is associated with the decreased expression of C-kit,SCF and Cx43.%目的:探讨酪氨酸激酶膜受体基因(C-kit)、干细胞因子(SCF)与缝隙连接蛋白(Cx43)在先天性巨结肠发病机制中的作用.方法:收集68例先天性巨结肠(HD)患儿手术切除标本的存档蜡块,根据HE染色结果,将神经节细胞正常的扩张段标本设为扩张组,无神经节细胞的狭窄段标本设为狭窄组.并收集8例无消化道畸形新生儿尸检结肠组织作为对照.用免疫组织化学EliVision法检测C-kit、SCF及Cx43蛋白的表达,原位杂交法检测 C-kit mRNA的表达.结果:与对照组比较,HD扩张组中C-kit、SCF、Cx43的表达差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),狭窄组中C-kit、SCF、Cx43的表达差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:先天性巨结肠的发生与C-kit、SCF及Cx43表达减少有关.

  11. c-KIT and c-KIT ligand (SCF) in synovial sarcoma (SS): an mRNA expression analysis in 23 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, E; Papini, D; Mezzelani, A; Riva, C; Azzarelli, A; Sozzi, G; Pierotti, M A; Pilotti, S

    2001-01-01

    In a previous immunophenotypic molecular-based analysis it was shown that bcl2 over-expression characterizes the SS gene profile in addition to the non-random translocations. Here we show that the over-expression of an additional potentially antiapoptotic gene, the c-KIT gene, is associated with this tumour. Interestingly, whereas bcl2 over-expression appears to be restricted to the spindle cell tumoral component, c-kit mainly involves the epithelial component of biphasic SS. Twenty-three primary and metastatic samples from 21 patients were analysed by immunophenotyping (23/23), immunoprecipitations and Western blotting (3/23), and RT-PCR (23/23). Ten cases were biphasic and 13 monophasic in sub-type. Twelve, 10 and 1 case carried the SYT-SSX1, SYT-SSX2 and SYT-SSX4 fusion transcript, respectively. Co-presence of both c-Kit and SCF mRNA was observed in almost all cases (20/23), suggesting the occurrence of an autocrine loop. Immunophenotyping, confirmed by biochemical analyses, showed a modulation of c-Kit expression which was faint in the spindle and strong in the epithelial component, respectively. The study was complemented by c-Met/HGF receptor/ligand expression and c-Met protein analysis with results superimposable to those already reported. Since in each tumour, epithelial and spindle cell components harbour the same type of translocation t(X;18) the present findings suggest a shifting of the anti-apoptotic role from BCL2 to c-KIT gene during the transition from the uncommitted spindle to the differentiated epithelial cells. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487273

  12. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation.......Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...

  13. Designing beauty the art of cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, Genaro

    2016-01-01

    This fascinating, colourful book offers in-depth insights and first-hand working experiences in the production of art works, using simple computational models with rich morphological behaviour, at the edge of mathematics, computer science, physics and biology. It organically combines ground breaking scientific discoveries in the theory of computation and complex systems with artistic representations of the research results. In this appealing book mathematicians, computer scientists, physicists, and engineers brought together marvelous and esoteric patterns generated by cellular automata, which are arrays of simple machines with complex behavior. Configurations produced by cellular automata uncover mechanics of dynamic patterns formation, their propagation and interaction in natural systems: heart pacemaker, bacterial membrane proteins, chemical rectors, water permeation in soil, compressed gas, cell division, population dynamics, reaction-diffusion media and self-organisation. The book inspires artists to tak...

  14. Cellular Signaling in the Bovine Antral Follicles

    OpenAIRE

    Juan F. Vásquez - Cano; Martha Olivera - A.

    2010-01-01

    Antral follicle development in the ovary of female cattle is the product of a complex of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine relationships. The interactions of the pituitary gonadotropins over granulosa and theca cells prepare the follicle to produce estradiol and for the final stages of maturation of the oocyte and its potencial ovulation or atresia inside subordinate follicles. It is a dynamic event where cellular signaling patterns changes sequentiallyand quickly at different stages of foll...

  15. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multiple levels of compartments and static obstacles can be used to create a dense environment to mimic cellular boundaries and the intracellular space. The CDS algorithm takes into account volume exclusion and molecular crowding that may impact signaling cascades in small sub-cellular compartments such as dendritic spines. With the CDS, we can simulate simple enzyme reactions; aggregation, channel transport, as well as highly complicated chemical reaction networks of both freely diffusing and membrane bound multi-protein complexes. Components of the CDS are generally defined such that the simulator can be applied to a wide range of environments in terms of scale and level of detail. Through an initialization GUI, a simple simulation environment can be created and populated within minutes yet is powerful enough to design complex 3D cellular architecture. The initialization tool allows visual confirmation of the environment construction prior to execution by the simulator. This paper describes the CDS algorithm, design implementation, and provides an overview of the types of features available and the utility of those features are highlighted in demonstrations. PMID:20361275

  16. Integrated cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  17. Multiuser Cellular Network

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Modern radio communication is faced with a problem about how to distribute restricted frequency to users in a certain space. Since our task is to minimize the number of repeaters, a natural idea is enlarging coverage area. However, coverage has restrictions. First, service area has to be divided economically as repeater's coverage is limited. In this paper, our fundamental method is to adopt seamless cellular network division. Second, underlying physics content in frequency distribution problem is interference between two close frequencies. Consequently, we choose a proper frequency width of 0.1MHz and a relevantly reliable setting to apply one frequency several times. We make a few general assumptions to simplify real situation. For instance, immobile users yield to homogenous distribution; repeaters can receive and transmit information in any given frequency in duplex operation; coverage is mainly decided by antenna height. Two models are built up to solve 1000 users and 10000 users situations respectively....

  18. Prenatal stress increased Snk Polo-like kinase 2, SCF β-TrCP ubiquitin ligase and ubiquitination of SPAR in the hippocampus of the offspring at adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutabhakdikul, Naunchan; Surakul, Pornprom

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to excessive glucocorticoids during fetal development period contributes to later life psychopathology. Prenatal stress decreases dendritic spine density and impair LTP in the hippocampus of rat pups, however, the mechanisms regulating these changes are still unclear. Glutamate receptors are localized in the postsynaptic density. PSD-95 is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein that plays a role in synaptic maturation and regulation of the synaptic strength and plasticity. PSD-95 interacts with other proteins to form the protein networks that promote dendritic spine formation. The present study investigated the effect of prenatal stress on the levels of scaffolding proteins of NMDA receptor in the hippocampus in order to explain how prenatal stress alters the amount of NMDA receptor in the pups' brain. Pregnant rats were randomly assigned to either the prenatal stress (PS) or the control group (C). The pregnant rats in the PS group were restrained in a plexiglas restrainer for 4h/day during the GD 14-21. Control rats were left undisturbed for the duration of their pregnancies. The amount of PSD-95, SPAR, NR2A and NR2B, as well as the levels of Snk Polo-like kinase 2 and the SCF β-TrCP ubiquitin ligase were measured in the hippocampus of the offspring. The results show that prenatal stress induces a reduction in the amount of NR2B and NR2A subunits in the hippocampus of rat pups, parallel to the decrease in PSD-95 and SPAR at P40 and P60. Moreover, prenatal stress increases Snk and β-TrCP in the hippocampus of rat pups, and the timing correlates with the decrease of SPAR and PSD-95. Prenatal stress also induces a significantly increases in the level of ubiquitinated SPAR in the hippocampus of rat pups at adulthood. The results suggest that degradation of SPAR via UPS system may contribute to the loss of PSD-95 and NMDA receptor subunits in the hippocampus of rat pups at adulthood. In conclusion, the present work demonstrates that the developing brain is

  19. Efficiency of cellular information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We show that a rate of conditional Shannon entropy reduction, characterizing the learning of an internal process about an external process, is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production. This approach allows for the definition of an informational efficiency that can be used to study cellular information processing. We analyze three models of increasing complexity inspired by the E. coli sensory network, where the external process is an external ligand concentration jumping between two values. We start with a simple model for which ATP must be consumed so that a protein inside the cell can learn about the external concentration. With a second model for a single receptor we show that the rate at which the receptor learns about the external environment can be nonzero even without any dissipation inside the cell since chemical work done by the external process compensates for this learning rate. The third model is more complete, also containing adaptation. For this model we show inter alia that a bacterium i...

  20. The State of Cellular Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Youngbin

    2003-01-01

    Cellular probe technology is one of several potentially promising technologies for obtaining accurate travel time information. In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) mandated E911 requirements that cellular location be provided when 911 emergency calls come in to emergency management authorities. The E911 requirements allow 50 -300 meters from the emergency call location, depending on the type of cellular phone technology used and whether handset-based or network-based solutions...

  1. Metodología de diseño para la recogida de residuos sólidos urbanos mediante factores punta de generación: sistemas de caja fija (scf)

    OpenAIRE

    Zafra Mejía, Carlos Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    El desarrollo económico y de la sociedad de consumo implica una gran producción de residuos sólidos en una localidad, hecho que se constituye en un serio problema ambiental si no se cuenta con la infraestructura adecuada para su gestión integral. En este artículo se presenta un desarrollo metodológico para el diseño de la recogida de residuos sólidos urbanos con sistemas de caja fija (SCF), considerando la variación temporal en las cantidades generadas y recolectadas. La variación temporal s...

  2. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  3. Molecular kinesis in cellular function and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedge, H; Bloom, F E; Richter, D

    2001-06-19

    Intracellular transport and localization of cellular components are essential for the functional organization and plasticity of eukaryotic cells. Although the elucidation of protein transport mechanisms has made impressive progress in recent years, intracellular transport of RNA remains less well understood. The National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Molecular Kinesis in Cellular Function and Plasticity therefore was devised as an interdisciplinary platform for participants to discuss intracellular molecular transport from a variety of different perspectives. Topics covered at the meeting included RNA metabolism and transport, mechanisms of protein synthesis and localization, the formation of complex interactive protein ensembles, and the relevance of such mechanisms for activity-dependent regulation and synaptic plasticity in neurons. It was the overall objective of the colloquium to generate momentum and cohesion for the emerging research field of molecular kinesis.

  4. SELF-ORGANIZED CRITICALITY AND CELLULAR AUTOMATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular automata provide a fascinating class of dynamical systems based on very simple rules of evolution yet capable of displaying highly complex behavior. These include simplified models for many phenomena seen in nature. Among other things, they provide insight into self-organized criticality, wherein dissipative systems naturally drive themselves to a critical state with important phenomena occurring over a wide range of length and the scales. This article begins with an overview of self-organized criticality. This is followed by a discussion of a few examples of simple cellular automaton systems, some of which may exhibit critical behavior. Finally, some of the fascinating exact mathematical properties of the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sand-pile model [1] are discussed.

  5. Cellular bridges: Routes for intercellular communication and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zani, Brett G.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is the basis of all biology in multicellular organisms, allowing evolution of complex forms and viability in dynamic environments. Though biochemical interactions occur over distances, physical continuity remains the most direct means of cellular interactions. Cellular bridging through thin cytoplasmic channels—plasmodesmata in plants and tunneling nanotubes in animals—creates direct routes for transfer of signals and components, even pathogens, between cells. Recen...

  6. About Strongly Universal Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Margenstern

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we construct a strongly universal cellular automaton on the line with 11 states and the standard neighbourhood. We embed this construction into several tilings of the hyperbolic plane and of the hyperbolic 3D space giving rise to strongly universal cellular automata with 10 states.

  7. Cytokines as cellular communicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Debets

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines and their receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of many diseases. Here we present a detailed review on cytokines, receptors and signalling routes, and show that one important lesson from cytokine biology is the complex and diverse regulation of cytokine activity. The activity of cytokines is controlled at the level of transcription, translation, storage, processing, posttranslational modification, trapping, binding by soluble proteins, and receptor number and/or function. Translation of this diverse regulation in strategies aimed at the control of cytokine activity will result in the development of more specific and selective drugs to treat diseases.

  8. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  9. CATALAN NUMBERS, DYCK LANGUAGE AND TIME SERIES OF ELEMENTARY CELLULAR AUTOMATON OF RULE 56

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Dakang; XIE Huimin

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to study the evolution complexity of cellular automata is proposed and explained thoroughly by an example of elementary cellular automaton of rule 56. Using the tools of distinct excluded blocks, computational search and symbolic dynamics, the mathematical structure underlying the time series generated from the elementary cellular automaton of rule 56 is analyzed and its complexity is determined, in which the Dyck language and Catalan numbers emerge naturally.

  10. Imaging protein interactions in vivo with sub-cellular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Raicu, Valerica; Fung, Russell; Melnichuk, Mike; Jansma, David B; Pisterzi, Luca; Fox, Michael; Wells, James W; Saldin, Dilano K

    2008-01-01

    Resonant Energy Transfer (RET) from an optically excited donor molecule (D) to a non-excited acceptor molecule (A) residing nearby is widely used to detect molecular interactions in living cells. Stoichiometric information, such as the number of proteins forming a complex, has been obtained so far for a handful of proteins, but only after exposing the sample sequentially to at least two different excitation wavelengths. During this lengthy process of measurement, the molecular makeup of a cellular region may change, and this has so far limited the applicability of RET to determination of cellular averages. Here we demonstrate a method for imaging protein complex distribution in living cells with sub-cellular spatial resolution, which relies on a spectrally-resolved two-photon microscope, a simple but competent theory, and a keen selection of fluorescent tags. This technology may eventually lead to tracking dynamics of macromolecular complex formation and dissociation with spatial resolution inside living cell...

  11. Physics of Cellular Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, Erich; Keber, Felix; Heinrich, Doris

    2010-04-01

    The survival of cells depends on perpetual active motions, including (a) bending excitations of the soft cell envelopes, (b) the bidirectional transport of materials and organelles between the cell center and the periphery, and (c) the ongoing restructuring of the intracellular macromolecular scaffolds mediating global cell changes associated with cell adhesion locomotion and phagocytosis. Central questions addressed are the following: How can this bustling motion of extremely complex soft structures be characterized and measured? What are the major driving forces? Further topics include (a) the active dynamic control of global shape changes by the interactive coupling of the aster-like soft scaffold of microtubules and the network of actin filaments associated with the cell envelope (the actin cortex) and (b) the generation of propulsion forces by solitary actin gelation waves propagating within the actin cortex.

  12. Relação da expressão de fatores de crescimento celular (IGF-1 e (SCF com fatores prognósticos e o alvo da rapamicina em mamíferos (m-TOR em mastocitomas cutâneos caninos IGF-1 and SCF protein expression in cutaneous mast cell tumors in dogs and relation to prognostic factors and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel B. Ferioli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available O mastocitoma cutâneo (MTC é a neoplasia maligna mais comum na pele dos cães e seu comportamento biológico é muito variável. Dentre os fatores prognósticos estudados nos MTCs, a classificação histopatológica, o índice proliferativo e o padrão de expressão doc-KIT são os que apresentam uma associação mais relevante com o provável prognóstico deste tumor. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a expressão proteica de fator de crescimento semelhante à insulina tipo 1 (IGF-1, fator de célula tronco (SCF e sua relação com o receptor tirosina quinase (c-KIT, alvo da rapamicina em mamíferos (m-TOR, grau histológico, índice proliferativo pelo KI-67e o número de figuras de mitose (IM com dados clínicos de cães com MTCs . Foram utilizadas 133 amostras de MTCs, provenientes de 133 cães, dispostas em lâminas de microarranjo de tecidos (TMA. A técnica de imuno-histoquímica foi utilizada para a avaliação destas proteínas. Observou-se associação entre SCF e, a graduação histopatológica proposta em 2011, índice mitótico, proliferação celular (KI-67, escore de IGF-1, local da lesão, idade dos animais e padrão imuno-histoquímico do receptor c-KIT. A relação de dependência também foi observada entre IGF-1 e o porte dos animais, IM, m-TOR e c-KIT. A expressão de SCF teve relacção com a agressividade dos MTCs caninos, uma vez que foi mais freqüente em MTCs com c-KIT citoplasmático. A relação entre a expressão de IGF-1, SCF, c-KIT e m-TOR pode estar associada à integralização de suas vias de ação. A expressão de IGF-1 está associada à MTCs em cães de porte grande.Cutaneous mast cell tumor (MCT is one of the most common neoplasms in the skin of dogs and express variable biological behavior. Among the MTC aspects studied, histological classification, proliferative index and protein expression of c-KIT show the most defined connection with the tumor prognostic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the

  13. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  14. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  15. Pirin inhibits cellular senescence in melanocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-05-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  16. Cellular mechanisms during vascular development

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system is an essential organ in vertebrate animals and provides the organism with enough oxygen and nutrients. It is composed of an interconnected network of blood vessels, which form using a number of different morphogenetic mechanisms. Angiogenesis describes the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels. A number of molecular pathways have been shown to be essential during angiogenesis. However, cellular architecture of blood vessels as well as cellular mechanisms...

  17. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the...

  18. Important cellular targets for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mariam M; Tovmasyan, Artak; Craik, James D; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T

    2016-09-01

    The persistent problem of antibiotic resistance has created a strong demand for new methods for therapy and disinfection. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microbes has demonstrated promising results for eradication of antibiotic-resistant strains. PDI is based on the use of a photosensitive compound (photosensitizer, PS), which upon illumination with visible light generates reactive species capable of damaging and killing microorganisms. Since photogenerated reactive species are short lived, damage is limited to close proximity of the PS. It is reasonable to expect that the larger the number of damaged targets is and the greater their variety is, the higher the efficiency of PDI is and the lower the chances for development of resistance are. Exact molecular mechanisms and specific targets whose damage is essential for microbial inactivation have not been unequivocally established. Two main cellular components, DNA and plasma membrane, are regarded as the most important PDI targets. Using Zn porphyrin-based PSs and Escherichia coli as a model Gram-negative microorganism, we demonstrate that efficient photoinactivation of bacteria can be achieved without detectable DNA modification. Among the cellular components which are modified early during illumination and constitute key PDI targets are cytosolic enzymes, membrane-bound protein complexes, and the plasma membrane. As a result, membrane barrier function is lost, and energy and reducing equivalent production is disrupted, which in turn compromises cell defense mechanisms, thus augmenting the photoinduced oxidative injury. In conclusion, high PDI antimicrobial effectiveness does not necessarily require impairment of a specific critical cellular component and can be achieved by inducing damage to multiple cellular targets. PMID:27221289

  19. Knowledge discovery for geographical cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; Anthony Gar-On Yeh

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for geographical simulation by applying data mining techniques to cellular automata. CA has strong capabilities in simulating complex systems. The core of CA is how to define transition rules. There are no good methods for defining these transition rules. They are usually defined by using heuristic methods and thus subject to uncertainties. Mathematical equations are used to represent transition rules implicitly and have limitations in capturing complex relationships. This paper demonstrates that the explicit transition rules of CA can be automatically reconstructed through the rule induction procedure of data mining. The proposed method can reduce the influences of individual knowledge and preferences in defining transition rules and generate more reliable simulation results. It can efficiently discover knowledge from a vast volume of spatial data.

  20. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  1. Prognosis of Different Cellular Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetish Ranjan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancement in mobile telephony from 1G to 3G, 4G and 5G has a very axiomatic fact that made an entire world a global village. The cellular system employs a different design approach and technology that most commercial radio and television system use. In the cellular system, the service area is divided into cells and a transmitter is designed to serve an individual cell. The system seeks to make efficient use of available channels by using low-power transmitters to allow frequency reuse at a smaller distance. Maximizing the number of times each channel can be reused in a given geographical area is the key to an efficient cellular system design. During the past three decades, the world has seen significant changes in telecommunications industry. There have been some remarkable aspects to the rapid growth in wireless communications, as seen by the large expansion in mobile systems. This paper focuses on “Past, Present & Future of Cellular Telephony” and some light has been thrown upon the technologies of the cellular systems, namely 1G, 2G, 2.5G, 3G and future generations like 4G and 5G systems as well.

  2. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  3. Method for analyzing signaling networks in complex cellular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavec, Ivan; Sirenko, Oksana; Privat, Sylvie; Wang, Yuker; Dajee, Maya; Melrose, Jennifer; Nakao, Brian; Hytopoulos, Evangelos; Berg, Ellen L; Butcher, Eugene C

    2004-02-01

    Now that the human genome has been sequenced, the challenge of assigning function to human genes has become acute. Existing approaches using microarrays or proteomics frequently generate very large volumes of data not directly related to biological function, making interpretation difficult. Here, we describe a technique for integrative systems biology in which: (i) primary cells are cultured under biologically meaningful conditions; (ii) a limited number of biologically meaningful readouts are measured; and (iii) the results obtained under several different conditions are combined for analysis. Studies of human endothelial cells overexpressing different signaling molecules under multiple inflammatory conditions show that this system can capture a remarkable range of functions by a relatively small number of simple measurements. In particular, measurement of seven different protein levels by ELISA under four different conditions is capable of reconstructing pathway associations of 25 different proteins representing four known signaling pathways, implicating additional participants in the NF-kappaBorRAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and defining additional interactions between these pathways. PMID:14745015

  4. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  5. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  6. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  7. SCF/c-KIT signal regulates the proliferation and division of alpaca (lama pacos) hair follicle melanocytes and its mechanism%干细胞因子及其受体c-KIT对羊驼毛囊黑色素细胞增殖与分化的影响及其机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜俊兵; 于秀菊; 田雪; 贺俊平; 董常生

    2011-01-01

    Objective To research the cytological mechanism of the genesis of different coat color in alpaca by investigating the regulation mechanism of the SCF/c-KIT signal on the cell division, proliferation and distribution of alpaca hair follicle melanocytes. Methods We selected eight mature female alpacas, four with pigmented coat color and four with natural white coat color. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the expression distribution of SCF and c-KIT receptor. Comparative quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine expression levels of SCF and c-kit genes. Results The expression of SCF and c-KIT immunoactivity was detected in different coat color skin, but the expression level and localization were different in the hair follicle. △△Ct method was used for quantitative analysis of the expression levels of SCF and c-kit genes in different coat colors of alpaca skin. The comparative expression of gene SCF in colored skins was 2. 41 times of white skins, and the comparative expression of gene c-kit in colored skins was 1.20 times of white skins.Conclusion SCF/c-KIT signal regulates the hair follicle melanocytes proliferation and division. The mature degree and mounts of melanocytes in hair follicle play central role in the genesis of coat color of alpaca. Furthermore, the differential distribution of melanocytes in hair follicle is mainly regulated by the SCF signal.%目的 探讨SCF/c-KIT信号通路对羊驼毛囊黑色素细胞分化、增殖和定位的作用及羊驼丰富毛色性形状形成的细胞学机制.方法 选取8只成年雄性羊驼(4只有色被毛,4只白色被毛),采用免疫组织化学方法研究SCF和c-KIT在羊驼皮肤组织中的表达定位;采用实时定量PCR方法分析SCF和c-kit基因在羊驼皮肤组织中的表达水平.结果 SCF和c-KIT受体在不同毛色皮肤组织中均有表达,但在不同被毛颜色羊驼皮肤组织中的表达量和表达部位存在差异;ΔΔCt法统计分析SCF和c-kit基因在不同颜色

  8. ESR studies of some oxotetrahalo complexes of vanadium(IV) and molybdenum(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESR spectra of [VOF4]2- and [MoOF4]- have been studied in single crystals of (NH4)2SbF5 and spectra of [MoOCl4]- in single crystals of (NH4)2SbCl5. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters of these pentacoordinated complexes have been obtained and compared with those for the corresponding hexacoordinated species. Molecular orbital parameters for the penta- and hexacoordinated species obtained from experimental g- and A-tensor components have been compared with values calculated by the MS-SCF-Xα method

  9. Aquaporins in complex tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, S; Zeuthen, T; La Cour, M;

    1998-01-01

    Multiple physiological fluid movements are involved in vision. Here we define the cellular and subcellular sites of aquaporin (AQP) water transport proteins in human and rat eyes by immunoblotting, high-resolution immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. AQP3 is abundant in bulbar conj......, predicting specific roles for each in the complex network through which water movements occur in the eye....

  10. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M;

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  11. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van Jan-Kees

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handli

  12. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, MQT; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian H.;

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-...

  13. Cellular heterogeneity and live cell arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Maureen A; Shepard, Jason R E

    2011-07-01

    In the past decade, the tendency to move from a global, one-size-fits-all treatment philosophy to personalized medicine is based, in part, on the nuanced differences and sub-classifications of disease states. Our knowledge of these varied states stems from not only the ability to diagnose, classify, and perform experiments on cell populations as a whole, but also from new technologies that allow interrogation of cell populations at the individual cell level. Such departures from conventional thinking are driven by the recognition that clonal cell populations have numerous activities that manifest as significant levels of non-genetic heterogeneity. Clonal populations by definition originate from a single genetic origin so are regarded as having a high level of homogeneity as compared to genetically distinct cell populations. However, analysis at the single cell level has revealed a different phenomenon; cells and organisms require an inherent level of non-genetic heterogeneity to function properly, and in some cases, to survive. The growing understanding of this occurrence has lead to the development of methods to monitor, analyze, and better characterize the heterogeneity in cell populations. Following the trend of DNA- and protein microarrays, platforms capable of simultaneously monitoring each cell in a population have been developed. These cellular microarray platforms and other related formats allow for continuous monitoring of single live cells and simultaneously generate individual cell and average population data that are more descriptive and information-rich than traditional bulk methods. These technological advances have helped develop a better understanding of the intricacies associated with biological processes and afforded greater insight into complex biological systems. The associated instruments, techniques, and reagents now allow for highly multiplexed analyses, which enable multiple cellular activities, processes, or pathways to be monitored

  14. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Popescu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of isolated and purified glyconectins revealed the presence of specific carbohydrate structures, acidic glycans, different from classical glycosaminoglycans. Such acidic glycans of high molecular weight containing fucose, glucuronic or galacturonic acids, and sulfate groups, originally found in sponges and sea urchin embryos, may represent a new class of carbohydrate carcino-embryonal antigens in mice and humans. Such interactions between biological macromolecules are usually investigated by kinetic binding studies, calorimetric methods, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and other spectroscopic analyses. However, these methods do not supply a direct estimation of the intermolecular binding forces that are fundamental for the function of the ligand-receptor association. Recently, we have introduced atomic force microscopy to quantify the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans. Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to cell adhesion proteoglycans is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. As a model, we selected the glyconectin 1, a cell adhesion proteoglycan isolated from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera. This glyconectin mediates in vivo cell recognition and aggregation via homophilic, species-specific, polyvalent, and calcium ion-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Under physiological conditions, an adhesive force of up to 400 piconewtons

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  16. Cellular Auxin Homeostasis:Gatekeeping Is Housekeeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michel Ruiz Rosquete; Elke Barbez; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is essential for plant development and contributes to nearly every aspect of the plant life cycle.The spatio-temporal distribution of auxin depends on a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and cell-to-cell auxin transport.Auxin metabolism and transport are both crucial for plant development;however,it largely remains to be seen how these processes are integrated to ensure defined cellular auxin levels or even gradients within tissues or organs.In this review,we provide a glance at very diverse topics of auxin biology,such as biosynthesis,conjugation,oxidation,and transport of auxin.This broad,but certainly superficial,overview highlights the mutual importance of auxin metabolism and transport.Moreover,it allows pinpointing how auxin metabolism and transport get integrated to jointly regulate cellular auxin homeostasis.Even though these processes have been so far only separately studied,we assume that the phytohormonal crosstalk integrates and coordinates auxin metabolism and transport.Besides the integrative power of the global hormone signaling,we additionally introduce the hypothetical concept considering auxin transport components as gatekeepers for auxin responses.

  17. Tension and robustness in multitasking cellular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V Wong

    Full Text Available Cellular networks multitask by exhibiting distinct, context-dependent dynamics. However, network states (parameters that generate a particular dynamic are often sub-optimal for others, defining a source of "tension" between them. Though multitasking is pervasive, it is not clear where tension arises, what consequences it has, and how it is resolved. We developed a generic computational framework to examine the source and consequences of tension between pairs of dynamics exhibited by the well-studied RB-E2F switch regulating cell cycle entry. We found that tension arose from task-dependent shifts in parameters associated with network modules. Although parameter sets common to distinct dynamics did exist, tension reduced both their accessibility and resilience to perturbation, indicating a trade-off between "one-size-fits-all" solutions and robustness. With high tension, robustness can be preserved by dynamic shifting of modules, enabling the network to toggle between tasks, and by increasing network complexity, in this case by gene duplication. We propose that tension is a general constraint on the architecture and operation of multitasking biological networks. To this end, our work provides a framework to quantify the extent of tension between any network dynamics and how it affects network robustness. Such analysis would suggest new ways to interfere with network elements to elucidate the design principles of cellular networks.

  18. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  19. Hyper bio assembler for 3D cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Fumihito; Yamato, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyper Bio Assembler for Cellular Systems is the first book to present a new methodology for measuring and separating target cells at high speed and constructing 3D cellular systems in vitro. This book represents a valuable resource for biologists, biophysicists and robotic engineers, as well as researchers interested in this new frontier area, offering a better understanding of the measurement, separation, assembly, analysis and synthesis of complex biological tissue, and of the medical applications of these technologies. This book is the outcome of the new academic fields of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology’s Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research in Japan.

  20. Commercialization of cellular immunotherapies for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Anthony; Johnson, Robert

    2016-04-15

    Successful commercialization of a cell therapy requires more than proving safety and efficacy to the regulators. The inherent complexity of cellular products delivers particular manufacturing, logistical and reimbursement hurdles that threaten commercial viability for any therapy with a less than spectacular clinical profile that truly changes the standard of care. This is particularly acute for autologous cell therapies where patients receive bespoke treatments manufactured from a sample of their own cells and where economies of scale, which play an important role in containing the production costs for small molecule and antibody therapeutics, are highly limited. Nevertheless, the promise of 'game-changing' efficacy, as exemplified by very high levels of complete responses in refractory haematological malignancies, has attracted capital investments on a vast scale, and the attendant pace of technology development provides promising indicators for future clinical and commercial success. PMID:27068936

  1. Effect of morphology on water sorption in cellular solid foods. Part I: Pore scale network model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esveld, D.C.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Dalen, van G.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    A pore scale network model is developed to predict the dynamics of moisture diffusion into complex cellular solid foods like bread, crackers, and cereals. The morphological characteristics of the sample, including the characteristics of each cellular void and the open pore connections between them a

  2. Modeling chemical systems using cellular automata a textbook and laboratory manual

    CERN Document Server

    Kier, Lemont B; Cheng, Chao-Kun

    2006-01-01

    Provides a practical introduction to an exciting modeling paradigm for complex systems. This book discusses the nature of scientific inquiry using models and simulations, and describes the nature of cellular automata models. It gives descriptions of how cellular automata models can be used in the study of a variety of phenomena.

  3. Mast cells modulate transport of CD23/IgE/antigen complex across human intestinal epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chang Yang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food allergy and chronic intestinal inflammation are common in western countries. The complex of antigen/IgE is taken up into the body from the gut lumen with the aid of epithelial cell-derived CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor II that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of intestinal allergy. This study aimed to elucidate the role of mast cell on modulation of antigen/IgE complex transport across intestinal epithelial barrier. Methods: Human intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 cell monolayer was used as a study platform. Transepithelial electric resistance (TER and permeability to ovalbumin (OVA were used as the markers of intestinal epithelial barrier function that were recorded in response to the stimulation of mast cell-derived chemical mediators. Results: Conditioned media from naïve mast cell line HMC-1 cells or monocyte cell line THP-1 cells significantly upregulated the expression of CD23 and increased the antigen transport across the epithelium. Treatment with stem cell factor (SCF, nerve growth factor (NGF, retinoic acid (RA or dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO enhanced CD23 expression in HT29 cells. Conditioned media from SCF, NGF or RA-treated HMC-1 cells, and SCF, NGF, DMSO or RA-treated THP-1 cells enhanced immune complex transport via enhancing the expression of the CD23 in HT29 cells and the release of inflammatory mediator TNF-α. Nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor, tryptase and TNF-α inhibited the increase in CD23 in HT29 cells and prevents the enhancement of epithelial barrier permeability. Conclusions: Mast cells play an important role in modulating the intestinal CD23 expression and the transport of antigen/IgE/CD23 complex across epithelial barrier.

  4. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  5. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  6. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Meng, Gang; Zijm, Henk; Ommeren, van, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling set-up times as well as transfer and process batch size information of multiple products that flow through the system. It is assumed that two sets of discrete material handling devices are used fo...

  7. Identification of Nonstationary Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AndrewI.Adamatzky

    1992-01-01

    The principal feature of nonstationary cellular automata(NCA) is that a local transitiol rule of each cell is changed at each time step depending on neighborhood configuration at previous time step.The identification problem for NCA is extraction of local transition rules and the establishment of mechanism for changing these rules using sequence of NCA configurations.We present serial and parallel algorithms for identification of NCA.

  8. Stochastic Nature in Cellular Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘波; 刘圣君; 王祺; 晏世伟; 耿轶钊; SAKATA Fumihiko; GAO Xing-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The importance of stochasticity in cellular processes is increasingly recognized in both theoretical and experimental studies. General features of stochasticity in gene regulation and expression are briefly reviewed in this article, which include the main experimental phenomena, classification, quantization and regulation of noises. The correlation and transmission of noise in cascade networks are analyzed further and the stochastic simulation methods that can capture effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noise are described.

  9. CELLULAR FETAL MICROCHIMERISM IN PREECLAMPSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gammill, Hilary S; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Nkwopara, Evangelyn C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown elevated concentrations of free fetal deoxyribonucleic acid and erythroblasts in maternal circulation in preeclampsia compared with normal pregnancy. Pluripotent and immunocompetent fetal cells also transfer to the maternal circulation during pregnancy, but whether concentrations of fetal mononuclear cells also differed in preeclampsia was unknown. We sought to quantify cellular fetal microchimerism in maternal circulation in women with preeclampsia and healthy con...

  10. Cellular reactions to patterned biointerfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Vera Antonie

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is to study cellular reactions to topographically, mechanically and biochemically tunable polymeric biomaterials. Different aspects of in vitro cell-biomaterial interactions were systematically studied with the murine fibroblast cell line NIH L929 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Besides a general cytocompatibility assessment of the applied materials and the quantification of cell adhesion per se, cell morphological changes (e.g. cell spreading) and intr...

  11. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, O.; Sumanovski, L. T.; I. Checiu; Elisabeta Popescu; G. N. Misevic

    1999-01-01

    Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals) have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of...

  12. Progress of cellular dedifferentiation research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hu-xian; HU Da-hai; JIA Chi-yu; FU Xiao-bing

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation, the stepwise specialization of cells, and transdifferentiation, the apparent switching of one cell type into another, capture much of the stem cell spotlight. But dedifferentiation, the developmental reversal of a cell before it reinvents itself, is an important process too. In multicellular organisms, cellular dedifferentiation is the major process underlying totipotency, regeneration and formation of new stem cell lineages. In humans,dedifferentiation is often associated with carcinogenesis.The study of cellular dedifferentiation in animals,particularly early events related to cell fate-switch and determination, is limited by the lack of a suitable,convenient experimental system. The classic example of dedifferentiation is limb and tail regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as salamanders. Recently, several investigators have shown that certain mammalian cell types can be induced to dedifferentiate to progenitor cells when stimulated with the appropriate signals or materials. These discoveries open the possibility that researchers might enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of mammals by inducing cellular dedifferentiation in vivo.

  13. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  14. Cellular pressure and volume regulation and implications for cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X

    2013-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death, and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of cells and tissues. Here, we develop a mathematical model of cellular volume and pressure regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechanosensitive channels, active ion pumps, and active stresses in the cortex. The model can fully explain recent experimental data, and it predicts cellular volume and pressure for several models of cell cortical mechanics. Moreover, we show that when cells are subjected to an externally applied load, such as in an atomic force microscopy indentation experiment, active regulation of volume and pressure leads to a complex cellular response. Instead of the passive mechanics of the cortex, the observed cell stiffness depends on several factors working together. This provides a mathematical explanation of rate-dependent response of cells under force. PMID:23931309

  15. Error performance analysis in downlink cellular networks with interference management

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2015-05-01

    Modeling aggregate network interference in cellular networks has recently gained immense attention both in academia and industry. While stochastic geometry based models have succeeded to account for the cellular network geometry, they mostly abstract many important wireless communication system aspects (e.g., modulation techniques, signal recovery techniques). Recently, a novel stochastic geometry model, based on the Equivalent-in-Distribution (EiD) approach, succeeded to capture the aforementioned communication system aspects and extend the analysis to averaged error performance, however, on the expense of increasing the modeling complexity. Inspired by the EiD approach, the analysis developed in [1] takes into consideration the key system parameters, while providing a simple tractable analysis. In this paper, we extend this framework to study the effect of different interference management techniques in downlink cellular network. The accuracy of the proposed analysis is verified via Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Cellular communications a comprehensive and practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Even as newer cellular technologies and standards emerge, many of the fundamental principles and the components of the cellular network remain the same. Presenting a simple yet comprehensive view of cellular communications technologies, Cellular Communications provides an end-to-end perspective of cellular operations, ranging from physical layer details to call set-up and from the radio network to the core network. This self-contained source forpractitioners and students represents a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of cellular communications and the landscape of commercially deployed

  17. The Design and Implementation of Graphic Signalling Tracking System for CIN-SCF%CIN-SCF系统可视化信令跟踪工具的设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小帆

    2013-01-01

    CIN-SCF是CIN智能网系统的核心,为智能网业务提供执行环境,存储业务逻辑和业务数据。跟踪信令是CIN-SCF定位故障和维护现网业务的一个重要手段,但是CIN-SCF现有的信令跟踪功能由于功能简单、使用复杂,不能很好地满足现有需求。本文设计并实现了一个基于CIN-SCF的可视化信令跟踪工具,实现了对智能网平台中各个功能组件和业务的信令跟踪,并通过改造Wireshark,实现了对信令消息和信令流程的图形化展示,向业务开发和测试人员、现网工程维护人员提供了可视化的信令跟踪工具,使其可以快速有效地进行业务调测和故障定位。%CIN-SCF, which support the service logic execution environment, storage of service logic and storage of service data, is the core of CIN Intelligent Network System. Signalling tracking function of CIN-SCF, which is a very important way to and locate problems, is not good enough for the existing demand because it’s function is too simple and using method is too complicated. This paper discusses a graphic signalling tracking tool, to implement a ultimate signalling tracking function for IN service systems. Furthermore, through the secondary development of Wireshark, it give a convenient graphic way to analyse the signalling message, so that the service developers, service testers and service system maintainers can efifciently debug the service logic programs and locate problems.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of alkyldisulfanido zinc complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardon, Erwan; Tomas, Alain; Selkti, Mohamed; Roussel, Pascal; Artaud, Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    The alkyldisulfanido zinc complexes Tp(iPr,iPr)Zn(SSR) and Tp(Ph,Me)Zn(SSR) where Tp(iPr,iPr) is hydridotris-((3,5-isopropyl)pyrazolyl)borate, Tp(Ph,Me) is hydridotris-((3-phenyl,5-methyl)pyrazolyl)borate, and (SSR) is tert-butyldisulfanido or triphenylmethanedisulfanido were synthesized by reaction between the corresponding hydroxo complexes TpZn(OH) and the synthetic persulfide RSSH. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and representative members of the class were also structurally characterized. The reactivity of the alkyldisulfanido TpZn(SSR) complexes with thiols was studied. In the absence of base, a simple exchange reaction between the alkyldisulfanido ligand and the thiol was observed in dichloromethane; when in the presence of base, the corresponding hydrogen(sulfido) complexes TpZn(SH) were obtained. The mechanism of the latter reaction has been studied and does not involve the coordinated alkyldisulfanido group. Reaction of the hydrogen(sulfido) complexes Tp(iPr,iPr)Zn(SH) with the thiosulfonate PhCH(2)S-SO(2)CF(3) did not yield the expected alkyldisulfanido complex but benzyltrisulfide and a new complex tentatively assigned as Tp(iPr,iPr)Zn(O(2)SCF(3)). PMID:19514736

  19. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezzi, M. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Florence (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section.

  20. Return of the Quantum Cellular Automata: Episode VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Hillberry, Logan E.; Rall, Patrick; Halpern, Nicole Yunger; Bao, Ning; Montangero, Simone

    2016-05-01

    There are now over 150 quantum simulators or analog quantum computers worldwide. Although exploring quantum phase transitions, many-body localization, and the generalized Gibbs ensemble are exciting and worthwhile endeavors, there are totally untapped directions we have not yet pursued. One of these is quantum cellular automata. In the past a principal goal of quantum cellular automata was to reproduce continuum single particle quantum physics such as the Schrodinger or Dirac equation from simple rule sets. Now that we begin to really understand entanglement and many-body quantum physics at a deeper level, quantum cellular automata present new possibilities. We explore several time evolution schemes on simple spin chains leading to high degrees of quantum complexity and nontrivial quantum dynamics. We explain how the 256 known classical elementary cellular automata reduce to just a few exciting quantum cases. Our analysis tools include mutual information based complex networks as well as more familiar quantifiers like sound speed and diffusion rate. Funded by NSF and AFOSR.

  1. Modeling evolution and immune system by cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review the behavior of two different biological systems is investigated using cellular automata. Starting from this spatially extended approach it is also tried, in some cases, to reduce the complexity of the system introducing mean-field approximation, and solving (or trying to solve) these simplified systems. It is discussed the biological meaning of the results, the comparison with experimental data (if available) and the different features between spatially extended and mean-field versions. The biological systems considered in this review are the following: Darwinian evolution in simple ecosystems and immune system response. In the first section the main features of molecular evolution are introduced, giving a short survey of genetics for physicists and discussing some models for prebiotic systems and simple ecosystems. It is also introduced a cellular automaton model for studying a set of evolving individuals in a general fitness landscape, considering also the effects of co-evolution. In particular the process of species formation (speciation) is described in sect. 5. The second part deals with immune system modeling. The biological features of immune response are discussed, as well as it is introduced the concept of shape space and of idiotypic network. More detailed reviews which deal with immune system models (mainly focused on idiotypic network models) can be found. Other themes here discussed: the applications of CA to immune system modeling, two complex cellular automata for humoral and cellular immune response. Finally, it is discussed the biological data and the general conclusions are drawn in the last section

  2. Cellular and molecular aspects of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm G Smith; Georgina L Hold; Eiichi Tahara; Emad M El-Omar

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global killer with a shifting burden from the developed to the developing world.The cancer develops along a multistage process that is defined by distinct histological and pathophysiological phases. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations mediate the transition from one stage to another and these include mutations in oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cell cycle and mismatch repair genes. The most significant advance in the fight against gastric caner came with the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as the most important acquired aetiological agent for this cancer. Recent work has focussed on elucidating the complex host/microbial interactions that underlie the neoplastic process. There is now considerable insight into the pathogenesis of this cancer and the prospect of preventing and eradicating the disease has become a reality. Perhaps more importantly, the study of H pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis offers a paradigm for understanding more complex human cancers. In this review, we examine the molecular and cellular events that underlie H pyloriinduced gastric cancer.

  3. Complexity measurement based on information theory and kolmogorov complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Leong Ting; Terrazas, Germán; Zenil, Hector; Alexander, Cameron; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades many definitions of complexity have been proposed. Most of these definitions are based either on Shannon's information theory or on Kolmogorov complexity; these two are often compared, but very few studies integrate the two ideas. In this article we introduce a new measure of complexity that builds on both of these theories. As a demonstration of the concept, the technique is applied to elementary cellular automata and simulations of the self-organization of porphyrin molecules.

  4. Estimation in Cellular Radio Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Fredrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem to track time-varying parameters in cellular radio systems is studied, and the focus is on estimation based only on the signals that are readily available. Previous work have demonstrated very good performance, but were relying on analog measurement that are not available. Most of the information is lost due to quantization and sampling at a rate that might be as low as 2 Hz (GSM case). For that matter a maximum likelihood estimator have been designed and exemplified in the case o...

  5. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  6. Game of Life Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, British mathematician John Conway invented a virtual mathematical machine that operates on a two-dimensional array of square cell. Each cell takes two states, live and dead. The cells' states are updated simultaneously and in discrete time. A dead cell comes to life if it has exactly three live neighbours. A live cell remains alive if two or three of its neighbours are alive, otherwise the cell dies. Conway's Game of Life became the most programmed solitary game and the most known cellular automaton. The book brings together results of forty years of study into computational

  7. Two Phase Flow Simulation Using Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    channel. It was noticed that the CHF phenomena generally starts in cells located at the boundary.The fact that the phenomena can be well described by using simple rules shows that the related physics and even the physics with stochastic characteristics, has been captured with t his simple model. Some fractal properties of automata were also studied, arriving at the conclusion that the internal dynamics present fractal characteristics.Findings hint towards a new approach to solve open issues.Finally, a calculus related to the Australian reactor designed by INVAP was performed.The problem consists of a simulation of helium bubble production by the mechanism of mass diffusion in heavy water.It was verified that cellular automata systems are a powerful tool for describing problems with high complexity and short reach interactions between components.It was proved that two-phase flows could be described very well with this model.The approach is a powerful tool to describe non-equilibrium features, such as boiling flow development and interfacial topological transitions.A novel computer model of boiling crisis was encountered following this type of analysis.By means of this research, without invalidating the important advances obtained in other directions, a new tool is offered which can be useful regarding the modeling of boiling heat transfer systems

  8. Protein accounting in the cellular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the copy number of cellular proteins is critical for understanding cell physiology. By being able to measure the absolute synthesis rates of the majority of cellular proteins, Li et al. (2014) gain insights into key aspects of translation regulation and fundamental principles of cellular strategies to adjust protein synthesis according to the needs. PMID:24766801

  9. The late stage of autophagy: cellular events and molecular regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Jingjing; Yan, Xianghua; Yu, Li

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that delivers cytoplasmic contents to the lysosome for degradation. It is a “self-eating” process and plays a “house-cleaner” role in cells. The complex process consists of several sequential steps—induction, autophagosome formation, fusion of lysosome and autophagosome, degradation, efflux transportation of degradation products, and autophagic lysosome reformation. In this review, the cellular and molecular regulations of late stage of autopha...

  10. Typing of murine cell-surface antigens by cellular radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-labelled Protein A was used for detecting antigen-antibody complexes on gultaraldehyde fixed cells attached to microtiter plates. This method is rapid, sensitive and specific for revealing H-2 private and public specificities as well as Ia and Lyt antigens. As plates may be kept for months, several reactivities can be tested in one step on a large panel rendering a regular supply of animals unnecessary. (Auth.)

  11. Knowledge Discovery in Database: Induction Graph and Cellular Automaton

    OpenAIRE

    Baghdad Atmani; Bouziane Beldjilali

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present the general architecture of a cellular machine, which makes it possible to reduce the size of induction graphs, and to optimize automatically the generation of symbolic rules. Our objective is to propose a tool for detecting and eliminating non relevant variables from the database. The goal, after acquisition by machine learning from a set of data, is to reduce the complexity of storage, thus to decrease the computing time. The objective of this work is to experimen...

  12. Ion beam analysis based on cellular nonlinear networks

    OpenAIRE

    Senger, V.; R. Tetzlaff; H. Reichau; Ratzinger, U.

    2011-01-01

    The development of a non- destructive measurement method for ion beam parameters has been treated in various projects. Although results are promising, the high complexity of beam dynamics has made it impossible to implement a real time process control up to now. In this paper we will propose analysing methods based on the dynamics of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) that can be implemented on pixel parallel CNN based architectures and yield satisfying results even at low re...

  13. Finite Field Arithmetic Architecture Based on Cellular Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-Won Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various finite field arithmetic structures are introduced for VLSI circuit implementation on cryptosystems and error correcting codes. In this study, we present an efficient finite field arithmetic architecture based on cellular semi-systolic array for Montgomery multiplication by choosing a proper Montgomery factor which is highly suitable for the design on parallel structures. Therefore, our architecture has reduced a time complexity by 50% compared to typical architecture.

  14. Evolution of Cellular Automata using Lindenmayer Systems and Fourier Transforms

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Sivert

    2013-01-01

    Cellular automata (CAs) are a class of highly parallel computing systems consisting of many simple computing elements called cells. The cells can only communicate with neighboring cells, meaning there is no global communication in the system. Programming such a system to solve complex problems can be a daunting task, and indirect methods are often applied to make it easier. In this thesis we use evolutionary algorithms (EAs) to evolve CAs. We also look at the possibility of employing L-system...

  15. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammelgaard, Bente; Furger, Evelyne; Alberto, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-) and H2O, respectively), were included as control samples. The results indicated that B12 derivatives delivered cisplatin to both cellular cytosol and nuclei with an efficiency of one third compared to the uptake of free cisplatin cis-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)2]. In addition, uptake of charged B12 derivatives including [Cbl-OH2](+), [{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), [{Re}-{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), and [{Co}-CN-{trans-Pt(Cyt)(NH3)2}](2+) (Cyt = cytarabin) was high compared to neutral B12, which implied the existence of an additional internalization pathway for charged B12 vitamin analogs. The affinities of the charged B12 derivatives to the B12 transporters HC, IF and TC were similar to that of native vitamin B12. PMID:26739575

  16. Cellular automata modelling of SEIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Quan-Xing; Jin Zhen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the SEIRS epidemic spread is analysed, and a two-dimensional probability cellular automata model for SEIRS is presented. Each cellular automation cell represents a part of the population that may be found in one of five states of individuals: susceptible, exposed (or latency), infected, immunized (or recovered) and death. Here studied are the effects of two cases on the epidemic spread. i.e. the effects of non-segregation and segregation on the latency and the infected of population. The conclusion is reached that the epidemic will persist in the case of non-segregation but it will decrease in the case of segregation. The proposed model can serve as a basis for the development of algorithms to simulate real epidemics based on real data. Last we find the density series of the exposed and the infected will fluctuate near a positive equilibrium point, when the constant for the immunized is less than its corresponding constant τ0. Our theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  17. Universal map for cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Morales, V., E-mail: vmorales@ph.tum.de [Institute for Advanced Study – Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 2a, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-08-20

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  18. Melanoma screening with cellular phones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Massone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermatology has recently been shown to be suitable for teledermatology despite limitations in image definition in preliminary studies. The unique aspect of mobile teledermatology is that this system represents a filtering or triage system, allowing a sensitive approach for the management of patients with emergent skin diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the feasibility of teleconsultation using a new generation of cellular phones in pigmented skin lesions. 18 patients were selected consecutively in the Pigmented Skin Lesions Clinic of the Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria. Clinical and dermoscopic images were acquired using a Sony Ericsson with a built-in two-megapixel camera. Two teleconsultants reviewed the images on a specific web application (http://www.dermahandy.net/default.asp where images had been uploaded in JPEG format. Compared to the face-to-face diagnoses, the two teleconsultants obtained a score of correct telediagnoses of 89% and of 91.5% reporting the clinical and dermoscopic images, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work is the first study performing mobile teledermoscopy using cellular phones. Mobile teledermatology has the potential to become an easy applicable tool for everyone and a new approach for enhanced self-monitoring for skin cancer screening in the spirit of the eHealth program of the European Commission Information for Society and Media.

  19. Multiuser Scheduling on the Downlink of an LTE Cellular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Kwan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of scheduling user transmissions on the downlink of a long-term evolution (LTE cellular communication system is addressed. In particular, a novel optimalmultiuser scheduler is proposed. Numerical results show that the system performance improves with increasing correlation among OFDMA subcarriers. It is found that only a limited amount of feedback information is needed to achieve relatively good performance. A suboptimal reduced-complexity scheduler is also proposed and shown to provide good performance. The suboptimal scheme is especially attractive when the number of users is large, in which case the complexity of the optimal scheme is high.

  20. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  1. Cellular Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlea, Lorena; Puri, Anu; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Bindewald, Eckart; Zakrevsky, Paul; Satterwhite, Emily; Joseph, Kenya; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-09-12

    RNA nanostructures can be programmed to exhibit defined sizes, shapes and stoichiometries from naturally occurring or de novo designed RNA motifs. These constructs can be used as scaffolds to attach functional moieties, such as ligand binding motifs or gene expression regulators, for nanobiology applications. This review is focused on four areas of importance to RNA nanotechnology: the types of RNAs of particular interest for nanobiology, the assembly of RNA nanoconstructs, the challenges of cellular delivery of RNAs in vivo, and the delivery carriers that aid in the matter. The available strategies for the design of nucleic acid nanostructures, as well as for formulation of their carriers, make RNA nanotechnology an important tool in both basic research and applied biomedical science. PMID:27509068

  2. Discrete geodesics and cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a dynamical notion of discrete geodesics, understood as straightest trajectories in discretized curved spacetime. The notion is generic, as it is formulated in terms of a general deviation function, but readily specializes to metric spaces such as discretized pseudo-riemannian manifolds. It is effective: an algorithm for computing these geodesics naturally follows, which allows numerical validation---as shown by computing the perihelion shift of a Mercury-like planet. It is consistent, in the continuum limit, with the standard notion of timelike geodesics in a pseudo-riemannian manifold. Whether the algorithm fits within the framework of cellular automata is discussed at length. KEYWORDS: Discrete connection, parallel transport, general relativity, Regge calculus.

  3. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  4. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-09-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  5. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces......' functionalization with biomolecules, metal nanoparticles and chemical functional groups such as thiols, showing the versatility and flexibility of this material's applications. A technique for the patterning of these nanostructures using soft lithography was also developed and tested for suitable cell sensing....... An in vivo investigation also gave evidence of how the peptide nanowires can be used as surface modification in implantable electrodes for neurological measurements. Conducting polymers were utilized in electrode modifications for electrochemical sensor surfaces. Both chemical and electrochemical deposition...

  6. CNN a paradigm for complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Chua, Leon O

    1998-01-01

    Revolutionary and original, this treatise presents a new paradigm of EMERGENCE and COMPLEXITY, with applications drawn from numerous disciplines, including artificial life, biology, chemistry, computation, physics, image processing, information science, etc.CNN is an acronym for Cellular Neural Networks when used in the context of brain science, or Cellular Nonlinear Networks, when used in the context of emergence and complexity. A CNN is modeled by cells and interactions: cells are defined as dynamical systems and interactions are defined via coupling laws. The CNN paradigm is a universal Tur

  7. Cellular automata modelling of biomolecular networks dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchev, D; Thomas, S; Apte, A; Kier, L B

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of biological systems dynamics is traditionally performed by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). When dealing with intracellular networks of genes, proteins and metabolites, however, this approach is hindered by network complexity and the lack of experimental kinetic parameters. This opened the field for other modelling techniques, such as cellular automata (CA) and agent-based modelling (ABM). This article reviews this emerging field of studies on network dynamics in molecular biology. The basics of the CA technique are discussed along with an extensive list of related software and websites. The application of CA to networks of biochemical reactions is exemplified in detail by the case studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, the FAS-ligand (FASL)-induced and Bcl-2-related apoptosis. The potential of the CA method to model basic pathways patterns, to identify ways to control pathway dynamics and to help in generating strategies to fight with cancer is demonstrated. The different line of CA applications presented includes the search for the best-performing network motifs, an analysis of importance for effective intracellular signalling and pathway cross-talk. PMID:20373215

  8. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues. (paper)

  9. Analytical Modeling of Uplink Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Novlan, Thomas D; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cellular uplink analysis has typically been undertaken by either a simple approach that lumps all interference into a single deterministic or random parameter in a Wyner-type model, or via complex system level simulations that often do not provide insight into why various trends are observed. This paper proposes a novel middle way that is both accurate and also results in easy-to-evaluate integral expressions based on the Laplace transform of the interference. We assume mobiles and base stations are randomly placed in the network with each mobile pairing up to its closest base station. The model requires two important changes compared to related recent work on the downlink. First, dependence is introduced between the user and base station point processes to make sure each base station serves a single mobile in the given resource block. Second, per-mobile power control is included, which further couples the locations of the mobiles and their receiving base stations. Nevertheless, we succeed in deriving the cov...

  10. Cellular recurrent deep network for image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M.; Vidyaratne, L.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2015-09-01

    Image registration using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) remains a challenging learning task. Registration can be posed as a two-step problem: parameter estimation and actual alignment/transformation using the estimated parameters. To date ANN based image registration techniques only perform the parameter estimation, while affine equations are used to perform the actual transformation. In this paper, we propose a novel deep ANN based image rigid registration that combines parameter estimation and transformation as a simultaneous learning task. Our previous work shows that a complex universal approximator known as Cellular Simultaneous Recurrent Network (CSRN) can successfully approximate affine transformations with known transformation parameters. This study introduces a deep ANN that combines a feed forward network with a CSRN to perform full rigid registration. Layer wise training is used to pre-train feed forward network for parameter estimation and followed by a CSRN for image transformation respectively. The deep network is then fine-tuned to perform the final registration task. Our result shows that the proposed deep ANN architecture achieves comparable registration accuracy to that of image affine transformation using CSRN with known parameters. We also demonstrate the efficacy of our novel deep architecture by a performance comparison with a deep clustered MLP.

  11. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  12. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  13. Autophagy and mitophagy in cellular damage control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and mitophagy are important cellular processes that are responsible for breaking down cellular contents, preserving energy and safeguarding against accumulation of damaged and aggregated biomolecules. This graphic review gives a broad summary of autophagy and discusses examples where autophagy is important in controlling protein degradation. In addition we highlight how autophagy and mitophagy are involved in the cellular responses to reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction. The key signaling pathways for mitophagy are described in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction.

  14. Coordination of plant mitochondrial biogenesis: keeping pace with cellular requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina eWelchen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant mitochondria are complex organelles that carry out numerous metabolic processes related with the generation of energy for cellular functions and the synthesis and degradation of several compounds. Mitochondria are semiautonomous and dynamic organelles changing in shape, number and composition depending on tissue or developmental stage. The biogenesis of functional mitochondria requires the coordination of genes present both in the nucleus and the organelle. In addition, due to their central role, all processes held inside mitochondria must be finely coordinated with those in other organelles according to cellular demands. Coordination is achieved by transcriptional control of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by specific transcription factors that recognize conserved elements in their promoter regions. In turn, the expression of most of these transcription factors is linked to developmental and environmental cues, according to the availability of nutrients, light-dark cycles and warning signals generated in response to stress conditions. Among the signals impacting in the expression of nuclear genes, retrograde signals that originate inside mitochondria help to adjust mitochondrial biogenesis to organelle demands. Adding more complexity, several nuclear encoded proteins are dual localized to mitochondria and either chloroplasts or the nucleus. Dual targeting might establish a crosstalk between the nucleus and cell organelles to ensure a fine coordination of cellular activities. In this article, we discuss how the different levels of coordination of mitochondrial biogenesis interconnect to optimize the function of the organelle according to both internal and external demands.

  15. In search of cellular control: signal transduction in context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D.

    1998-01-01

    The field of molecular cell biology has experienced enormous advances over the last century by reducing the complexity of living cells into simpler molecular components and binding interactions that are amenable to rigorous biochemical analysis. However, as our tools become more powerful, there is a tendency to define mechanisms by what we can measure. The field is currently dominated by efforts to identify the key molecules and sequences that mediate the function of critical receptors, signal transducers, and molecular switches. Unfortunately, these conventional experimental approaches ignore the importance of supramolecular control mechanisms that play a critical role in cellular regulation. Thus, the significance of individual molecular constituents cannot be fully understood when studied in isolation because their function may vary depending on their context within the structural complexity of the living cell. These higher-order regulatory mechanisms are based on the cell's use of a form of solid-state biochemistry in which molecular components that mediate biochemical processing and signal transduction are immobilized on insoluble cytoskeletal scaffolds in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Key to the understanding of this form of cellular regulation is the realization that chemistry is structure and hence, recognition of the the importance of architecture and mechanics for signal integration and biochemical control. Recent work that has unified chemical and mechanical signaling pathways provides a glimpse of how this form of higher-order cellular control may function and where paths may lie in the future.

  16. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies proposes to develop a unique structural cellular core material to improve mechanical performance, reduce platform weight and lower...

  17. Nanomechanics of Hierarchical Cellular Solids

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Materials Science and Engineering, a young and vibrant discipline with its inception in the 1950s, has expanded into three directions: metals, polymers, and ceramics (and their mixtures, composites). Beyond the traditional scope, biological materials have drawn much attention since 1990s due to their optimal structures, which rise from hundreds of million years of evolution. Generally, biological materials are complex composites and possess varieties of hierarchical structures, multifunctiona...

  18. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation–Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation–mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  19. Modeling integrated cellular machinery using hybrid Petri-Boolean networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Berestovsky

    Full Text Available The behavior and phenotypic changes of cells are governed by a cellular circuitry that represents a set of biochemical reactions. Based on biological functions, this circuitry is divided into three types of networks, each encoding for a major biological process: signal transduction, transcription regulation, and metabolism. This division has generally enabled taming computational complexity dealing with the entire system, allowed for using modeling techniques that are specific to each of the components, and achieved separation of the different time scales at which reactions in each of the three networks occur. Nonetheless, with this division comes loss of information and power needed to elucidate certain cellular phenomena. Within the cell, these three types of networks work in tandem, and each produces signals and/or substances that are used by the others to process information and operate normally. Therefore, computational techniques for modeling integrated cellular machinery are needed. In this work, we propose an integrated hybrid model (IHM that combines Petri nets and Boolean networks to model integrated cellular networks. Coupled with a stochastic simulation mechanism, the model simulates the dynamics of the integrated network, and can be perturbed to generate testable hypotheses. Our model is qualitative and is mostly built upon knowledge from the literature and requires fine-tuning of very few parameters. We validated our model on two systems: the transcriptional regulation of glucose metabolism in human cells, and cellular osmoregulation in S. cerevisiae. The model produced results that are in very good agreement with experimental data, and produces valid hypotheses. The abstract nature of our model and the ease of its construction makes it a very good candidate for modeling integrated networks from qualitative data. The results it produces can guide the practitioner to zoom into components and interconnections and investigate them

  20. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  1. Multi-cellular logistics of collective cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Yamao

    Full Text Available During development, the formation of biological networks (such as organs and neuronal networks is controlled by multicellular transportation phenomena based on cell migration. In multi-cellular systems, cellular locomotion is restricted by physical interactions with other cells in a crowded space, similar to passengers pushing others out of their way on a packed train. The motion of individual cells is intrinsically stochastic and may be viewed as a type of random walk. However, this walk takes place in a noisy environment because the cell interacts with its randomly moving neighbors. Despite this randomness and complexity, development is highly orchestrated and precisely regulated, following genetic (and even epigenetic blueprints. Although individual cell migration has long been studied, the manner in which stochasticity affects multi-cellular transportation within the precisely controlled process of development remains largely unknown. To explore the general principles underlying multicellular migration, we focus on the migration of neural crest cells, which migrate collectively and form streams. We introduce a mechanical model of multi-cellular migration. Simulations based on the model show that the migration mode depends on the relative strengths of the noise from migratory and non-migratory cells. Strong noise from migratory cells and weak noise from surrounding cells causes "collective migration," whereas strong noise from non-migratory cells causes "dispersive migration." Moreover, our theoretical analyses reveal that migratory cells attract each other over long distances, even without direct mechanical contacts. This effective interaction depends on the stochasticity of the migratory and non-migratory cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that stochastic behavior at the single-cell level works effectively and precisely to achieve collective migration in multi-cellular systems.

  2. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  3. Complex Beauty

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschet, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Complex systems and their underlying convoluted networks are ubiquitous, all we need is an eye for them. They pose problems of organized complexity which cannot be approached with a reductionist method. Complexity science and its emergent sister network science both come to grips with the inherent complexity of complex systems with an holistic strategy. The relevance of complexity, however, transcends the sciences. Complex systems and networks are the focal point of a philosophical, cultural ...

  4. From Cnn Dynamics to Cellular Wave Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roska, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Embedded in a historical overview, the development of the Cellular Wave Computing paradigm is presented, starting from the standard CNN dynamics. The theoretical aspects, the physical implementation, the innovation process, as well as the biological relevance are discussed in details. Finally, the latest developments, the physical versus virtual cellular machines, as well as some open questions are presented.

  5. Cellular encoding for interactive evolutionary robotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruau, F.C.; Quatramaran, K.

    1996-01-01

    This work reports experiments in interactive evolutionary robotics. The goal is to evolve an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to control the locomotion of an 8-legged robot. The ANNs are encoded using a cellular developmental process called cellular encoding. In a previous work similar experiments ha

  6. Recent development of cellular manufacturing systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Arora; A Haleem; M K Singh

    2013-06-01

    Cellular manufacturing system has been proved a vital approach for batch and job shop production systems. Group technology has been an essential tool for developing a cellular manufacturing system. The paper aims to discuss various cell formation techniques and highlights the significant research work done in past over the years and attempts to points out the gap in research.

  7. The Universe as a Cellular System

    CERN Document Server

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular systems are observed everywhere in nature, from crystal domains in metals, soap froth and cucumber cells to the network of cosmological voids. Surprisingly, despite their disparate scale and origin all cellular systems follow certain scaling laws relating their geometry, topology and dynamics. Using a cosmological N-body simulation we found that the Cosmic Web, the largest known cellular system, follows the same scaling relations seen elsewhere in nature. Our results extend the validity of scaling relations in cellular systems by over 30 orders of magnitude in scale with respect to previous studies. The dynamics of cellular systems can be used to interpret local observations such as the local velocity anomaly as the result of a collapsing void in our cosmic backyard. Moreover, scaling relations depend on the curvature of space, providing an independent measure of geometry.

  8. Cellular Cations Control Conformational Switching of Inositol Pyrophosphate Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Anastasia; Wu, Mingxuan; Wang, Huanchen; Brown, Nathaniel W; Shears, Stephen B; Veiga, Nicolás; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2016-08-22

    The inositol pyrophosphate messengers (PP-InsPs) are emerging as an important class of cellular regulators. These molecules have been linked to numerous biological processes, including insulin secretion and cancer cell migration, but how they trigger such a wide range of cellular responses has remained unanswered in many cases. Here, we show that the PP-InsPs exhibit complex speciation behaviour and propose that a unique conformational switching mechanism could contribute to their multifunctional effects. We synthesised non-hydrolysable bisphosphonate analogues and crystallised the analogues in complex with mammalian PPIP5K2 kinase. Subsequently, the bisphosphonate analogues were used to investigate the protonation sequence, metal-coordination properties, and conformation in solution. Remarkably, the presence of potassium and magnesium ions enabled the analogues to adopt two different conformations near physiological pH. Understanding how the intrinsic chemical properties of the PP-InsPs can contribute to their complex signalling outputs will be essential to elucidate their regulatory functions. PMID:27460418

  9. Nanoparticle-cell interactions: molecular structure of the protein corona and cellular outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Payne, Christine K

    2014-08-19

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology and medicine requires a molecular-level understanding of how NPs interact with cells in a physiological environment. A critical difference between well-controlled in vitro experiments and in vivo applications is the presence of a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. It has been established that extracellular serum proteins present in blood will adsorb onto the surface of NPs, forming a "protein corona". Our goal was to understand how this protein layer affected cellular-level events, including NP binding, internalization, and transport. A combination of microscopy, which provides spatial resolution, and spectroscopy, which provides molecular information, is necessary to probe protein-NP-cell interactions. Initial experiments used a model system composed of polystyrene NPs functionalized with either amine or carboxylate groups to provide a cationic or anionic surface, respectively. Serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of both cationic and anionic NPs, forming a net anionic protein-NP complex. Although these protein-NP complexes have similar diameters and effective surface charges, they show the exact opposite behavior in terms of cellular binding. In the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs is enhanced, whereas the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs is inhibited. These trends are independent of NP diameter or cell type. Similar results were obtained for anionic quantum dots and colloidal gold nanospheres. Using competition assays, we determined that BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs bind to albumin receptors on the cell surface. BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs are redirected to scavenger receptors. The observation that similar NPs with identical protein corona compositions bind to different cellular receptors suggested that a difference in the structure of the adsorbed protein may be responsible for the

  10. The origin of cellular life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This essay presents a scenario of the origin of life that is based on analysis of biological architecture and mechanical design at the microstructural level. My thesis is that the same architectural and energetic constraints that shape cells today also guided the evolution of the first cells and that the molecular scaffolds that support solid-phase biochemistry in modern cells represent living microfossils of past life forms. This concept emerged from the discovery that cells mechanically stabilize themselves using tensegrity architecture and that these same building rules guide hierarchical self-assembly at all size scales (Sci. Amer 278:48-57;1998). When combined with other fundamental design principles (e.g., energy minimization, topological constraints, structural hierarchies, autocatalytic sets, solid-state biochemistry), tensegrity provides a physical basis to explain how atomic and molecular elements progressively self-assembled to create hierarchical structures with increasingly complex functions, including living cells that can self-reproduce.

  11. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert.

  12. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  13. Chaotic phenomena in Josephson circuits coupled quantum cellular neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Sen; Cai Li; Li Qin; Wu Gang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the nonlinear dynamical behaviour of a quantum cellular neural network (QCNN) by coupling Josephson circuits was investigated and it was shown that the QCNN using only two of them can cause the onset of chaotic oscillation. The theoretical analysis and simulation for the two Josephson-circuits-coupled QCNN have been done by using the amplitude and phase as state variables. The complex chaotic behaviours can be observed and then proved by calculating Lyapunov exponents. The study provides valuable information about QCNNs for future application in high-parallel signal processing and novel chaotic generators.

  14. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  15. HIV-1 replication and the cellular eukaryotic translation apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Santiago; Batisse, Julien; Libre, Camille; Bernacchi, Serena; Marquet, Roland; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication. PMID:25606970

  16. The Flagellum Attachment Zone: 'The Cellular Ruler' of Trypanosome Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-04-01

    A defining feature of Trypanosoma brucei cell shape is the lateral attachment of the flagellum to the cell body, mediated by the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ). The FAZ is a complex cytoskeletal structure that connects the flagellum skeleton through two membranes to the cytoskeleton. The FAZ acts as a 'cellular ruler' of morphology by regulating cell length and organelle position and is therefore critical for both cell division and life cycle differentiations. Here we provide an overview of the advances in our understanding of the composition, assembly, and function of the FAZ. PMID:26776656

  17. Two Novel Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Full Adders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdie Qanbari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA is an efficient technology to create computing devices. QCA is a suitable candidate for the next generation of digital systems. Full adders are the main member of computational systems because other operations can be implemented by adders. In this paper, two QCA full adders are introduced. The first one is implemented in one layer, and the second one is implemented in three layers. Five-input majority gate is used in both of them. These full adders are better than pervious designs in terms of area, delay, and complexity.

  18. Macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our studies of the interaction of densely ionizing particles with macromolecules in the living cell may be divided into four parts: characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the unmodified Bragg ionization curve; characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the spread Bragg curve as used in radiation therapy; elucidation of the cellular radiation chemistry characteristic of high vs. low LET radiation qualities; and the introduction of novel techniques designed to give a better understanding of the fundamental properties of induction of lesions and their repair potentials in high LET radiation

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progression. This review focuses on new findings that enhance understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the characteristics of myofibroblasts, their progenitors, and molecular pathways regulating both fibrogenesis and its resolution. PMID:24892703

  20. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  1. Imaging in cellular and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hanry

    2013-01-01

    Details on specific imaging modalities for different cellular and tissue engineering applications are scattered throughout articles and chapters in the literature. Gathering this information into a single reference, Imaging in Cellular and Tissue Engineering presents both the fundamentals and state of the art in imaging methods, approaches, and applications in regenerative medicine. The book underscores the broadening scope of imaging applications in cellular and tissue engineering. It covers a wide range of optical and biological applications, including the repair or replacement of whole tiss

  2. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Their Clinical Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ceren Sumer-Turanligil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling pathways have important roles in cellular growth, differentiation, inflammatory response and apoptosis and in regulation of cellular responses under various chemical stimulators. Different proteins which belong to these pathways may be exposed to loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutations; this may lead to many clinical phenotypes including primarily cancer. In this review information about basic working principles of these pathways and diseases related to them are included. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 180-191

  3. Cellular Cell Bifurcation of Cylindrical Detonations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Gui-Lai; JIANG Zong-Lin; WANG Chun; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    Cellular cell pattern evolution of cylindrically-diverging detonations is numerically simulated successfully by solving two-dimensional Euler equations implemented with an improved two-step chemical kinetic model. From the simulation, three cell bifurcation modes are observed during the evolution and referred to as concave front focusing, kinked and wrinkled wave front instability, and self-merging of cellular cells. Numerical research demonstrates that the wave front expansion resulted from detonation front diverging plays a major role in the cellular cell bifurcation, which can disturb the nonlinearly self-sustained mechanism of detonations and finally lead to cell bifurcations.

  4. Relação da expressão de fatores de crescimento celular (IGF-1 e (SCF com fatores prognósticos e o alvo da rapamicina em mamíferos (m-TOR em mastocitomas cutâneos caninos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel B. Ferioli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available O mastocitoma cutâneo (MTC é a neoplasia maligna mais comum na pele dos cães e seu comportamento biológico é muito variável. Dentre os fatores prognósticos estudados nos MTCs, a classificação histopatológica, o índice proliferativo e o padrão de expressão doc-KIT são os que apresentam uma associação mais relevante com o provável prognóstico deste tumor. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a expressão proteica de fator de crescimento semelhante à insulina tipo 1 (IGF-1, fator de célula tronco (SCF e sua relação com o receptor tirosina quinase (c-KIT, alvo da rapamicina em mamíferos (m-TOR, grau histológico, índice proliferativo pelo KI-67e o número de figuras de mitose (IM com dados clínicos de cães com MTCs . Foram utilizadas 133 amostras de MTCs, provenientes de 133 cães, dispostas em lâminas de microarranjo de tecidos (TMA. A técnica de imuno-histoquímica foi utilizada para a avaliação destas proteínas. Observou-se associação entre SCF e, a graduação histopatológica proposta em 2011, índice mitótico, proliferação celular (KI-67, escore de IGF-1, local da lesão, idade dos animais e padrão imuno-histoquímico do receptor c-KIT. A relação de dependência também foi observada entre IGF-1 e o porte dos animais, IM, m-TOR e c-KIT. A expressão de SCF teve relacção com a agressividade dos MTCs caninos, uma vez que foi mais freqüente em MTCs com c-KIT citoplasmático. A relação entre a expressão de IGF-1, SCF, c-KIT e m-TOR pode estar associada à integralização de suas vias de ação. A expressão de IGF-1 está associada à MTCs em cães de porte grande.

  5. Interplay between Inflammation and Cellular Stress Triggered by Flaviviridae Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, Ana L. C.; Aguiar, Renato S.; de Arruda, Luciana B.

    2016-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family comprises several human pathogens, including Dengue, Zika, Yellow Fever, West Nile, Japanese Encephalitis viruses, and Hepatitis C Virus. Those are enveloped, single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses, which replicate mostly in intracellular compartments associated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi complex. Virus replication results in abundant viral RNAs and proteins, which are recognized by cellular mechanisms evolved to prevent virus infection, resulting in inflammation and stress responses. Virus RNA molecules are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA5) and RNA-dependent protein kinases (PKR), inducing the production of inflammatory mediators and interferons. Simultaneously, the synthesis of virus RNA and proteins are distinguished in different compartments such as mitochondria, ER and cytoplasmic granules, triggering intracellular stress pathways, including oxidative stress, unfolded protein response pathway, and stress granules assembly. Here, we review the new findings that connect the inflammatory pathways to cellular stress sensors and the strategies of Flaviviridae members to counteract these cellular mechanisms and escape immune response. PMID:27610098

  6. Parallelizing the Cellular Potts Model on graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, José Juan; D'Souza, Roshan M.

    2011-04-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a lattice based modeling technique used for simulating cellular structures in computational biology. The computational complexity of the model means that current serial implementations restrict the size of simulation to a level well below biological relevance. Parallelization on computing clusters enables scaling the size of the simulation but marginally addresses computational speed due to the limited memory bandwidth between nodes. In this paper we present new data-parallel algorithms and data structures for simulating the Cellular Potts Model on graphics processing units. Our implementations handle most terms in the Hamiltonian, including cell-cell adhesion constraint, cell volume constraint, cell surface area constraint, and cell haptotaxis. We use fine level checkerboards with lock mechanisms using atomic operations to enable consistent updates while maintaining a high level of parallelism. A new data-parallel memory allocation algorithm has been developed to handle cell division. Tests show that our implementation enables simulations of >10 cells with lattice sizes of up to 256 3 on a single graphics card. Benchmarks show that our implementation runs ˜80× faster than serial implementations, and ˜5× faster than previous parallel implementations on computing clusters consisting of 25 nodes. The wide availability and economy of graphics cards mean that our techniques will enable simulation of realistically sized models at a fraction of the time and cost of previous implementations and are expected to greatly broaden the scope of CPM applications.

  7. Biological Augmentation of Flexor Tendon Repair: A Challenging Cellular Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiselle, Alayna E; Kelly, Meghan; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical technique and rehabilitation have transformed zone II flexor tendon injuries from an inoperable no-man's land to a standard surgical procedure. Despite these advances, many patients develop substantial range of motion-limiting adhesions after primary flexor tendon repair. These suboptimal outcomes may benefit from biologic augmentation or intervention during the flexor tendon healing process. However, there is no consensus biological approach to promote satisfactory flexor tendon healing; we propose that insufficient understanding of the complex cellular milieu in the healing tendon has hindered the development of successful therapies. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the cellular components of flexor tendon healing and adhesion formation, including resident tendon cells, synovial sheath, macrophages, and bone marrow-derived cells. In addition, it examines molecular approaches that have been used in translational animal models to improve flexor tendon healing and gliding function, with a specific focus on progress made using murine models of healing. This information highlights the importance of understanding and potentially exploiting the heterogeneity of the cellular environment during flexor tendon healing, to define rational therapeutic approaches to improve healing outcomes. PMID:26652792

  8. A cellular automata evacuation model considering friction and repulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Weiguo; YU Yanfei; FAN Weicheng; Zhang Heping

    2005-01-01

    There exist interactions among pedestrians and between pedestrian and environment in evacuation. These interactions include attraction, repulsion and friction that play key roles in human evacuation behaviors, speed and efficiency. Most former evacuation models focus on the attraction force, while repulsion and friction are not well modeled. As a kind of multi-particle self-driven model, the social force model introduced in recent years can represent those three forces but with low simulation efficiency because it is a continuous model with complex rules. Discrete models such as the cellular automata model and the lattice gas model have simple rules and high simulation efficiency, but are not quite suitable for interactions' simulation. In this paper, a new cellular automata model based on traditional models is introduced in which repulsion and friction are modeled quantitatively. It is indicated that the model can simulate some basic behaviors, e.g.arching and the "faster-is-slower" phenomenon, in evacuation as multi-particle self-driven models, but with high efficiency as the normal cellular automata model and the lattice gas model.

  9. Interplay between Inflammation and Cellular Stress Triggered by Flaviviridae Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, Ana L C; Aguiar, Renato S; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family comprises several human pathogens, including Dengue, Zika, Yellow Fever, West Nile, Japanese Encephalitis viruses, and Hepatitis C Virus. Those are enveloped, single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses, which replicate mostly in intracellular compartments associated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi complex. Virus replication results in abundant viral RNAs and proteins, which are recognized by cellular mechanisms evolved to prevent virus infection, resulting in inflammation and stress responses. Virus RNA molecules are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA5) and RNA-dependent protein kinases (PKR), inducing the production of inflammatory mediators and interferons. Simultaneously, the synthesis of virus RNA and proteins are distinguished in different compartments such as mitochondria, ER and cytoplasmic granules, triggering intracellular stress pathways, including oxidative stress, unfolded protein response pathway, and stress granules assembly. Here, we review the new findings that connect the inflammatory pathways to cellular stress sensors and the strategies of Flaviviridae members to counteract these cellular mechanisms and escape immune response. PMID:27610098

  10. Interplay between inflammation and cellular stress triggered by Flaviviridae viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Chaves Valadão

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses, from Flaviviridae virus family, comprises several human pathogens, including Dengue, Zika, Yellow Fever, West Nile and Japanese Encephalitis viruses. Those are enveloped, single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses, and replicate mostly in intracellular compartments associated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi complex. Virus replication results in abundant viral RNAs and proteins, which are recognized by cellular mechanisms evolved to prevent virus infection, resulting in inflammation and stress responses. Virus RNA molecules are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, RIG-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA5 and RNA-dependent protein kinases (PKR, inducing the production of inflammatory mediators and interferons. Simultaneously, the synthesis of virus RNA and proteins are distinguished in different compartments such as mitochondria, ER and cytoplasmic granules, triggering intracellular stress pathways, including oxidative stress, UPR pathway, and stress granules assembly. Here, we review the new findings that connect the inflammatory pathways to cellular stress sensors and the strategies of Flaviviridae members to counteract these cellular mechanisms and escape immune response.

  11. Using RNA as Molecular Code for Programming Cellular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Manish; Rostain, William; Prakash, Satya; Duncan, John N; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-08-19

    RNA is involved in a wide-range of important molecular processes in the cell, serving diverse functions: regulatory, enzymatic, and structural. Together with its ease and predictability of design, these properties can lead RNA to become a useful handle for biological engineers with which to control the cellular machinery. By modifying the many RNA links in cellular processes, it is possible to reprogram cells toward specific design goals. We propose that RNA can be viewed as a molecular programming language that, together with protein-based execution platforms, can be used to rewrite wide ranging aspects of cellular function. In this review, we catalogue developments in the use of RNA parts, methods, and associated computational models that have contributed to the programmability of biology. We discuss how RNA part repertoires have been combined to build complex genetic circuits, and review recent applications of RNA-based parts and circuitry. We explore the future potential of RNA engineering and posit that RNA programmability is an important resource for firmly establishing an era of rationally designed synthetic biology. PMID:26999422

  12. The cellular story of dishevelleds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Anja; Bašić-Kinda, Sandra; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-10-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) proteins, three of which have been identified in humans, are highly conserved components of canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. These multifunctional proteins, originally discovered in the fruit fly, through their different domains mediate complex signal transduction: DIX (dishevelled, axin) and PDZ (postsynaptic density 95, discs large, zonula occludens-1) domains serve for canonical beta-catenin signaling, while PDZ and DEP (dishevelled, Egl-10, pleckstrin) domains serve for non-canonical signaling. In canonical or beta-catenin signaling, DVL forms large molecular supercomplexes at the plasma membrane consisting of Wnt-Fz-LRP5/6-DVL-AXIN. This promotes the disassembly of the beta-catenin destruction machinery, beta-catenin accumulation, and consequent activation of Wnt signaling. Therefore, DVLs are considered to be key regulators that rescue cytoplasmic beta-catenin from degradation. The potential medical importance of DVLs is in both human degenerative disease and cancer. The overexpression of DVL has been shown to potentiate the activation of Wnt signaling and it is now apparent that up-regulation of DVLs is involved in several types of cancer.

  13. Densities and entropies in cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Guillon, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Following work by Hochman and Meyerovitch on multidimensional SFT, we give computability-theoretic characterizations of the real numbers that can appear as the topological entropies of one-dimensional and two-dimensional cellular automata.

  14. A Matrix Construction of Cellular Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dajing Xiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we give a concrete method to construct cellular algebras from matrix algebras by specifying certain fixed matrices for the data of inflations. In particular,orthogonal matrices can be chosen for such data.

  15. The role of sirtuins in cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupis, Wioleta; Pałyga, Jan; Tomal, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent lysine deacylases or ADP-ribosyltransferases. These cellular enzymes are metabolic sensors sensitive to NAD(+) levels that maintain physiological homeostasis in the animal and plant cells. PMID:27154583

  16. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies has developed, produced and tested, as part of the Phase-I SBIR, a new form of composite cellular core material, named Interply...

  17. Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160862.html Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's: Study Abnormality might apply to all forms of ... that may be common to all forms of Parkinson's disease. The defect plays a major role in ...

  18. MILLIMETER-WAVE EMISSIVITY OF CELLULAR SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A general analysis has been presented of the millimeter-wave and farinfrared spectroscopic properties of in vivo cellular systems, and of the boson radiative equilibrium with steady-state nonequilibrium molecular systems. The frequency threshhold of spectroscopic properties assoc...

  19. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Carsten Münk; Jörg Zielonka

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating...

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in kidney fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a characteristic feature of all forms of chronic kidney disease. Deposition of pathological matrix in the interstitial space and within the walls of glomerular capillaries as well as the cellular processes resulting in this deposition are increasingly recognized as important factors amplifying kidney injury and accelerating nephron demise. Recent insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis herald the promise of new therapies to slow kidney disease progressi...

  1. Apoptotic regulation of epithelial cellular extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Daniel,; Rosenblatt, Jody

    2011-01-01

    Cellular extrusion is a mechanism that removes dying cells from epithelial tissues to prevent compromising their barrier function. Extrusion occurs in all observed epithelia in vivo and can be modeled in vitro by inducing apoptosis in cultured epithelial monolayers. We established that actin and myosin form a ring that contracts in the surrounding cells that drives cellular extrusion. It is not clear, however, if all apoptotic pathways lead to extrusion and how apoptosis and extrusion are mol...

  2. Cellularity of certain quantum endomorphism algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Lehrer, Gus; Zhang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    For any ring A˜ such that Z[q±1∕2]⊆A˜⊆Q(q1∕2), let ΔA˜(d) be an A˜-form of the Weyl module of highest weight d∈N of the quantised enveloping algebra UA˜ of sl2. For suitable A˜, we exhibit for all positive integers r an explicit cellular structure for EndUA˜(ΔA˜(d)⊗r). This algebra and its cellular...

  3. Cellular Hyperproliferation and Cancer as Evolutionary Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in biology have begun to dramatically change the way we think about evolution, development, health and disease. The ability to sequence the genomes of many individuals within a population, and across multiple species, has opened the door to the possibility of answering some long-standing and perplexing questions about our own genetic heritage. One such question revolves around the nature of cellular hyperproliferation. This cellular behavior is used to effect wound heal...

  4. Building mathematics cellular phone learning communities

    OpenAIRE

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2011-01-01

    Researchers emphasize the importance of maintaining learning communities and environments. This article describes the building and nourishment of a learning community, one comprised of middle school students who learned mathematics out-of-class using the cellular phone. The building of the learning community was led by three third year pre-service teachers majoring in mathematics and computers. The pre-service teachers selected thirty 8th grade students to learn mathematics with the cellular ...

  5. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models.

    OpenAIRE

    STORDAL, BRITTA KRISTINA

    2007-01-01

    PUBLISHED Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 ?g/ml. Cisplatin resistance i...

  6. Understanding cisplatin resistance using cellular models

    OpenAIRE

    Stordal, Britta; Davey, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Many mechanisms of cisplatin resistance have been proposed from studies of cellular models of resistance including changes in cellular drug accumulation, detoxification of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis and repair of the DNA adducts. A series of resistant models were developed from CCRF-CEM leukaemia cells with increasing doses of cisplatin from 100 ng/ml. This produced increasing resistance up to 7-fold with a treatment dose of 1.6 microg/ml. Cisplatin resistance in these cells correlated...

  7. Cellular Scaling Rules of Insectivore Brains

    OpenAIRE

    Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2009-01-01

    Insectivores represent extremes in mammalian body size and brain size, retaining various “primitive” morphological characteristics, and some species of Insectivora are thought to share similarities with small-bodied ancestral eutherians. This raises the possibility that insectivore brains differ from other taxa, including rodents and primates, in cellular scaling properties. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for insectivore brains and demonstrate that insectivore scaling rules overla...

  8. Cellular scaling rules of insectivore brains

    OpenAIRE

    Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Kaas, Jon H.; Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2009-01-01

    Insectivores represent extremes in mammalian body size and brain size, retaining various “primitive” morphological characteristics, and some species of Insectivora are thought to share similarities with small-bodied ancestral eutherians. This raises the possibility that insectivore brains differ from other taxa, including rodents and primates, in cellular scaling properties. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for insectivore brains and demonstrate that insectivore scaling ...

  9. Cellular scaling rules for primate brains

    OpenAIRE

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Collins, Christine E.; Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.

    2007-01-01

    Primates are usually found to have richer behavioral repertoires and better cognitive abilities than rodents of similar brain size. This finding raises the possibility that primate brains differ from rodent brains in their cellular composition. Here we examine the cellular scaling rules for primate brains and show that brain size increases approximately isometrically as a function of cell numbers, such that an 11× larger brain is built with 10× more neurons and ≈12× more nonneuronal cells of ...

  10. Bucolic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Brešar, Bostjan; Chepoi, Victor; Gologranc, Tanja; Osajda, Damian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we introduce and investigate bucolic complexes, a common generalization of systolic complexes and of CAT(0) cubical complexes. This class of complexes is closed under Cartesian products and amalgamations over some convex subcomplexes. We study various approaches to bucolic complexes: from graph-theoretic and topological viewpoints, as well as from the point of view of geometric group theory. Bucolic complexes can be defined as locally-finite simply connected prism complexes satisfying some local combinatorial conditions. We show that bucolic complexes are contractible, and satisfy some nonpositive-curvature-like properties. In particular, we prove a version of the Cartan-Hadamard theorem, the fixed point theorem for finite group actions, and establish some results on groups acting geometrically on such complexes. We also characterize the 1-skeletons (which we call bucolic graphs) and the 2-skeletons of bucolic complexes. In particular, we prove that bucolic graphs are precisely retracts of Ca...

  11. Study and Simulation of Traffic Behavior in Cellular Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhup, D. K.; Shrestha, C. L.; Sharma, R. K.

    2007-07-01

    Cellular radio systems accommodate a large number of users with a limited radio spectrum. The concept of trunking allows a large number of users to share the relatively small number of channels in a cell by providing access to each user, on demand, from a pool of available channels. Traffic engineering deals with provisioning of communication circuits in a given area for a number of subscribers with a required grade of service. Traffic in any cell depends upon the number of users, the average request rate and average call duration. Certain number of channels is required for the required GOS. To design an optimum capacity cellular system, traffic behavior on that system is important. The number of channel required can be estimated by using Erlang formula and Erlang table. Erlang table is not always useful to calculate the probability of blocking in various complex scenarios such as channel borrowing strategies. When the total number of channel available in a given cell are divided to serve partly for newly generated calls and partly for handover calls, and if they use dynamic channel assignment strategies like channel borrowing, then the probability of blocking can't be calculated from Erlang table. Simulation model of the behavior help us to determine the blocking and the channel utilization while using various channel assignment strategies. The title "Study and Simulation of Traffic Behavior in Cellular Network" entail the study of the blocking probability of traffic in cellular network for static channel assignment strategies and dynamic channel borrowing strategies through MATLAB programming language and graphic user interface (GUI). The result shows that the dynamic scheme can perform better than static maximizing the overall utilization of the circuits and minimizing the overall blocking.

  12. Polymersomes containing quantum dots for cellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camblin M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine Camblin,1 Pascal Detampel,1 Helene Kettiger,1 Dalin Wu,2 Vimalkumar Balasubramanian,1,* Jörg Huwyler1,*1Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Quantum dots (QDs are highly fluorescent and stable probes for cellular and molecular imaging. However, poor intracellular delivery, stability, and toxicity of QDs in biological compartments hamper their use in cellular imaging. To overcome these limitations, we developed a simple and effective method to load QDs into polymersomes (Ps made of poly(dimethylsiloxane-poly(2-methyloxazoline (PDMS-PMOXA diblock copolymers without compromising the characteristics of the QDs. These Ps showed no cellular toxicity and QDs were successfully incorporated into the aqueous compartment of the Ps as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Ps containing QDs showed colloidal stability over a period of 6 weeks if stored in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at physiological pH (7.4. Efficient intracellular delivery of Ps containing QDs was achieved in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2 and was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Ps containing QDs showed a time- and concentration-dependent uptake in HepG2 cells and exhibited better intracellular stability than liposomes. Our results suggest that Ps containing QDs can be used as nanoprobes for cellular imaging.Keywords: quantum dots, polymersomes, cellular imaging, cellular uptake

  13. Receptor Oligomerization as a Process Modulating Cellular Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The majority of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) self-assemble in the form dimeric/oligomeric complexes along the plasma membrane. Due to the molecular interactions they participate, GPCRs can potentially provide the framework for discriminating a wide variety of intercellular signals, as based...... at which selective categorical sensing may occur. Categorical sensing can be seen as the cellular capacity for identifying and ordering complex patterns of mixed signals out of a contextual matrix, i.e., the recognition of meaningful patterns out of ubiquitous signals. In this context, redundancy...... be another level of quality control that may help maintaining GPCRs rather stable throughout evolution. We propose here receptor oligomerization to be a basic molecular mechanism controlling GPCRs redundancy in many different cell types, and the plasma membrane as the first hierarchical cell structure...

  14. Role of XPD in cellular functions: To TFIIH and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houten, Bennett Van; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    XPD, as part of the TFIIH complex, has classically been linked to the damage verification step of nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, recent data indicate that XPD, due to its iron-sulfur center interacts with the iron sulfur cluster assembly proteins, and may interact with other proteins in the cell to mediate a diverse set of biological functions including cell cycle regulation, mitosis, and mitochondrial function. In this perspective, after first reviewing the function and some of the key disease causing variants that affect XPD's interaction with TFIIH and the CDK-activating kinase complex (CAK), we investigate these intriguing cellular roles of XPD and highlight important unanswered questions that provide a fertile ground for further scientific exploration. PMID:27262611

  15. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes (64Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective 64Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective 64Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential, with hypoxia

  16. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearling, J.L

    1998-11-01

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes ({sup 64}Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective {sup 64}Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective {sup 64}Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential

  17. Cellular Recycling of Proteins in Seed Dormancy Alleviation and Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oracz, Krystyna; Stawska, Marlena

    2016-01-01

    Each step of the seed-to-seed cycle of plant development including seed germination is characterized by a specific set of proteins. The continual renewal and/or replacement of these biomolecules are crucial for optimal plant adaptation. As proteins are the main effectors inside the cells, their levels need to be tightly regulated. This is partially achieved by specific proteolytic pathways via multicatalytic protease complexes defined as 20S and 26S proteasomes. In plants, the 20S proteasome is responsible for degradation of carbonylated proteins, while the 26S being a part of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is known to be involved in proteolysis of phytohormone signaling regulators. On the other hand, the role of translational control of plant development is also well-documented, especially in the context of pollen tube growth and light signaling. Despite the current progress that has been made in seed biology, the sequence of cellular events that determine if the seed can germinate or not are still far from complete understanding. The role and mechanisms of regulation of proteome composition during processes occurring in the plant's photosynthetic tissues have been well-characterized since many years, but in non-photosynthetic seeds it has emerged as a tempting research task only since the last decade. This review discusses the recent discoveries providing insights into the role of protein turnover in seed dormancy alleviation, and germination, with a focus on the control of translation and proteasomal proteolysis. The presented novel data of translatome profiling in seeds highlighted that post-transcriptional regulation of germination results from a timely regulated initiation of translation. In addition, the importance of 26S proteasome in the degradation of regulatory elements of cellular signaling and that of the 20S complex in proteolysis of specific carbonylated proteins in hormonal- and light-dependent processes occurring in seeds is discussed. Based on the

  18. Bilayer Beams and Relay Sharing based OFDMA Cellular Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxiong Pan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, researchers have been putting a lot of energy on co-channel interference suppression in the forthcoming fourth generation (4G wireless networks. Existing approaches to interference suppression are mainly based on signal processing, cooperative communication or coordination techniques. Though good performance has been attained already, a more complex receiver is needed, and there is still room for improvement through other ways.Considering spatial frequency reuse, which provides an easier way to cope with the co-channel interference, this paper proposed a bilayer beams and relay sharing based (BBRS OFDMA cellular architecture and corresponding frequency planning scheme. The main features of the novel architecture are as follows. Firstly, the base station (BS uses two beams, one composed of six wide beams providing coverage to mobile stations (MSs that access to the BS, and the other composed of six narrow beams communicating with fixed relay stations (FRSs. Secondly, in the corresponding frequency planning scheme, soft frequency reuse is considered on all FRSs further. System-level simulation results demonstrate that better coverage performance is obtained and the mean data rate of MSs near the cell edge is improved significantly. The BBRS cellular architecture provides a practical method to interference suppression in 4G networks since a better tradeoff between performance and complexity is achieved.

  19. Neural networks and cellular automata in experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the past few years, two novel computing techniques, cellular automata and neural networks, have shown considerable promise in the solution of problems of a very high degree of complexity, such as turbulent fluid flow, image processing, and pattern recognition. Many of the problems faced in experimental high energy physics are also of this nature. Track reconstruction in wire chambers and cluster finding in cellular calorimeters, for instance, involve pattern recognition and high combinatorial complexity since many combinations of hits or cells must be considered in order to arrive at the final tracks or clusters. Here we examine in what way connective network methods can be applied to some of the problems of experimental high physics. It is found that such problems as track and cluster finding adapt naturally to these approaches. When large scale hardwired connective networks become available, it will be possible to realize solutions to such problems in a fraction of the time required by traditional methods. For certain types of problems, faster solutions are already possible using model networks implemented on vector or other massively parallel machines. It should also be possible, using existing technology, to build simplified networks that will allow detailed reconstructed event information to be used in fast trigger decisions

  20. A hybrid parallel framework for the cellular Potts model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; He, Kejing [SOUTH CHINA UNIV; Dong, Shoubin [SOUTH CHINA UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) has been widely used for biological simulations. However, most current implementations are either sequential or approximated, which can't be used for large scale complex 3D simulation. In this paper we present a hybrid parallel framework for CPM simulations. The time-consuming POE solving, cell division, and cell reaction operation are distributed to clusters using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The Monte Carlo lattice update is parallelized on shared-memory SMP system using OpenMP. Because the Monte Carlo lattice update is much faster than the POE solving and SMP systems are more and more common, this hybrid approach achieves good performance and high accuracy at the same time. Based on the parallel Cellular Potts Model, we studied the avascular tumor growth using a multiscale model. The application and performance analysis show that the hybrid parallel framework is quite efficient. The hybrid parallel CPM can be used for the large scale simulation ({approx}10{sup 8} sites) of complex collective behavior of numerous cells ({approx}10{sup 6}).

  1. Structural Basis of Cargo Recognition by Unconventional Myosins in Cellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianchao; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based molecular motors playing diverse roles including cellular trafficking, mechanical supports, force sensing and transmission, etc. The variable neck and tail domains of unconventional myosins function to bind to specific cargoes including proteins and lipid vesicles and thus are largely responsible for the diverse cellular functions of myosins in vivo. In addition, the tail regions, together with their cognate cargoes, can regulate activities of the motor heads. This review outlines the advances made in recent years on cargo recognition and cargo binding-induced regulation of the activity of several unconventional myosins including myosin-I, V, VI and X in cellular trafficking. We approach this topic by describing a series of high-resolution structures of the neck and tail domains of these unconventional myosins either alone or in complex with their specific cargoes, and by discussing potential implications of these structural studies on cellular trafficking of these myosin motors. PMID:26842936

  2. Optimization of Inter Cellular Movement of Parts in Cellular Manufacturing System Using Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Prasad Darla; C.D. Naiju; Polu Vidya Sagar; B. Venkat Likhit

    2014-01-01

    In the modern manufacturing environment, Cellular Manufacturing Systems (CMS) have gained greater importance in job shop or batch-type production to gain economic advantage similar to those of mass production. Successful implementation of CMS highly depends on the determination of part families; machine cells and minimizing inter cellular movement. This study considers machine component grouping problems namely inter-cellular movement and cell load variation by developing a mathematical model...

  3. Optimization of Inter Cellular Movement of Parts in Cellular Manufacturing System Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Prasad Darla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern manufacturing environment, Cellular Manufacturing Systems (CMS have gained greater importance in job shop or batch-type production to gain economic advantage similar to those of mass production. Successful implementation of CMS highly depends on the determination of part families; machine cells and minimizing inter cellular movement. This study considers machine component grouping problems namely inter-cellular movement and cell load variation by developing a mathematical model and optimizing the solution using Genetic Algorithm to arrive at a cell formation to minimize the inter-cellular movement and cell load variation. The results are presented with a numerical example.

  4. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  5. Several components of SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and associated factors play a role in Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ajith; Rojas, Clemencia M; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2012-07-01

    • Successful genetic transformation of plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens requires the import of bacterial T-DNA and virulence proteins into the plant cell that eventually form a complex (T-complex). The essential components of the T-complex include the single stranded T-DNA, bacterial virulence proteins (VirD2, VirE2, VirE3 and VirF) and associated host proteins that facilitate the transfer and integration of T-DNA. The removal of the proteins from the T-complex is likely achieved by targeted proteolysis mediated by VirF and the plant ubiquitin proteasome complex. • We evaluated the involvement of the host SKP1/culin/F-box (SCF)-E3 ligase complex and its role in plant transformation. Gene silencing, mutant screening and gene expression studies suggested that the Arabidopsis homologs of yeast SKP1 (suppressor of kinetochore protein 1) protein, ASK1 and ASK2, are required for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. • We identified the role for SGT1b (suppressor of the G2 allele of SKP1), an accessory protein that associates with SCF-complex, in plant transformation. We also report the differential expression of many genes that encode F-box motif containing SKP1-interacting proteins (SKIP) upon Agrobacterium infection. • We speculate that these SKIP genes could encode the plant specific F-box proteins that target the T-complex associated proteins for polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. PMID:22486382

  6. Decomposing PPI networks for complex discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Chua Hon Nian; Yong Chern Han; Liu Guimei; Wong Limsoon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein complexes are important for understanding principles of cellular organization and functions. With the availability of large amounts of high-throughput protein-protein interactions (PPI), many algorithms have been proposed to discover protein complexes from PPI networks. However, existing algorithms generally do not take into consideration the fact that not all the interactions in a PPI network take place at the same time. As a result, predicted complexes often cont...

  7. Dynamic Self-Consistent Field Theory of Inhomogeneous Complex Fluids Under Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlovic, Maja; Lo, Tak Shing; Shnidman, Yitzhak

    2003-03-01

    Understanding and predicting the interplay between morphology and rheology of sheared, inhomogeneous, complex fluids is of great importance. Yet modeling of such phenomena is in its infancy. We have developed a novel dynamic self-consistent field (DSCF) theory that makes possible detailed computational study of such phenomena. Our DSCF theory couples the time evolution of chain conformation statistics with probabilistic transport equations for volume fractions and momenta, based on local conservation laws formulated on a segmental scale. To generate chain conformation statistics, we are using a modification of the lattice random walk formalism of Scheutjens and Fleer. Their static SCF theory is limited to equilibrium systems, since probability distributions are obtained by free energy minimization, assuming isotropic Gaussian chain conformations. In contrast, our DSCF approach accounts for explicit time evolution of the segmental and (anisotropic) stepping probabilities used for generating chain conformations. We will present highlights of DSCF studies of a variety of inhomogenous fluids containing homopolymers, block copolymers and nanoparticles.

  8. Parametric study of double cellular detonation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasainov, B.; Virot, F.; Presles, H.-N.; Desbordes, D.

    2013-05-01

    A parametric numerical study is performed of a detonation cellular structure in a model gaseous explosive mixture whose decomposition occurs in two successive exothermic reaction steps with markedly different characteristic times. Kinetic and energetic parameters of both reactions are varied in a wide range in the case of one-dimensional steady and two-dimensional (2D) quasi-steady self-supported detonations. The range of governing parameters of both exothermic steps is defined where a "marked" double cellular structure exists. It is shown that the two-level cellular structure is completely governed by the kinetic parameters and the local overdrive ratio of the detonation front propagating inside large cells. Furthermore, since it is quite cumbersome to use detailed chemical kinetics in unsteady 2D case, the proposed work should help to identify the mixtures and the domain of their equivalence ratio where double detonation structure could be observed.

  9. Infrared image enhancement using Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2016-05-01

    Image enhancement is a crucial technique for infrared images. The clear image details are important for improving the quality of infrared images in computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new enhancement method based on two priors via Cellular Automata. First, we directly learn the gradient distribution prior from the images via Cellular Automata. Second, considering the importance of image details, we propose a new gradient distribution error to encode the structure information via Cellular Automata. Finally, an iterative method is applied to remap the original image based on two priors, further improving the quality of enhanced image. Our method is simple in implementation, easy to understand, extensible to accommodate other vision tasks, and produces more accurate results. Experiments show that the proposed method performs better than other methods using qualitative and quantitative measures.

  10. Spin Echo Studies on Cellular Water

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, D C; Nichols, B L; Rorschach, H E

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the physical state of cellular water could be significantly different from pure liquid water. To experimentally investigate this possibility, we conducted a series of spin-echo NMR measurements on water protons in rat skeletal muscle. Our result indicated that the spin-lattice relaxation time and the spin-spin relaxation time of cellular water protons are both significantly shorter than that of pure water (by 4.3-fold and 34-fold, respectively). Furthermore, the spin diffusion coefficient of water proton is almost 1/2 of that of pure water. These data suggest that cellular water is in a more ordered state in comparison to pure water.

  11. Online isolation of defects in cellular nanocomputers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teijiro Isokawa; Shin'ya Kowada; Ferdinand Peper; Naotake Kamiura; Nobuyuki Matsui

    2007-01-01

    Unreliability will be a major issue for computers built from components at nanometer scales.Thus,it's to be expected that such computers will need a high degree of defect-tolerance to overcome components' defects which have arisen during the process of manufacturing.This paper presents a novel approach to defect-tolerance that is especially geared towards nanocomputers based on asynchronous cellular automata.According to this approach,defective cells are detected and isolated by small configurations that move around randomly in cellular space.These configurations,called random flies,will attach to configurations that are static,which is typical for configurations that contain defective cells.On the other hand,dynamic configurations,like those that conduct computations,will not be isolated from the rest of the cellular space by the random flies,and will be able to continue their operations unaffectedly.

  12. Software-Defined Cellular Mobile Network Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiandong Li; Peng Liu; Hongyan Li

    2014-01-01

    The emergency relating to software-defined networking (SDN), especially in terms of the prototype associated with OpenFlow, pro-vides new possibilities for innovating on network design. Researchers have started to extend SDN to cellular networks. Such new programmable architecture is beneficial to the evolution of mobile networks and allows operators to provide better services. The typical cellular network comprises radio access network (RAN) and core network (CN); hence, the technique roadmap diverges in two ways. In this paper, we investigate SoftRAN, the latest SDN solution for RAN, and SoftCell and MobileFlow, the latest solu-tions for CN. We also define a series of control functions for CROWD. Unlike in the other literature, we emphasize only software-defined cellular network solutions and specifications in order to provide possible research directions.

  13. Asymptotic Behavior of Excitable Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Durrett, R; Durrett, Richard; Griffeath, David

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: We study two families of excitable cellular automata known as the Greenberg-Hastings Model (GHM) and the Cyclic Cellular Automaton (CCA). Each family consists of local deterministic oscillating lattice dynamics, with parallel discrete-time updating, parametrized by the range of interaction, the "shape" of its neighbor set, threshold value for contact updating, and number of possible states per site. GHM and CCA are mathematically tractable prototypes for the spatially distributed periodic wave activity of so-called excitable media observed in diverse disciplines of experimental science. Earlier work by Fisch, Gravner, and Griffeath studied the ergodic behavior of these excitable cellular automata on Z^2, and identified two distinct (but closely-related) elaborate phase portraits as the parameters vary. In particular, they noted the emergence of asymptotic phase diagrams (and Euclidean dynamics) in a well-defined threshold-range scaling limit. In this study we present several rigorous results and som...

  14. Alleviate Cellular Congestion Through Opportunistic Trough Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichuan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cellular data service has been skyrocketing since the debut of data-intensive smart phones and touchpads. However, not all data are created equal. Many popular applications on mobile devices, such as email synchronization and social network updates, are delay tolerant. In addition, cellular load varies significantly in both large and small time scales. To alleviate network congestion and improve network performance, we present a set of opportunistic trough filling schemes that leverage the time-variation of network congestion and delay-tolerance of certain traffic in this paper. We consider average delay, deadline, and clearance time as the performance metrics. Simulation results show promising performance improvement over the standard schemes. The work shed lights on addressing the pressing issue of cellular overload.

  15. Cellular automatons applied to gas dynamic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lyle N.; Coopersmith, Robert M.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares the results of a relatively new computational fluid dynamics method, cellular automatons, with experimental data and analytical results. This technique has been shown to qualitatively predict fluidlike behavior; however, there have been few published comparisons with experiment or other theories. Comparisons are made for a one-dimensional supersonic piston problem, Stokes first problem, and the flow past a normal flat plate. These comparisons are used to assess the ability of the method to accurately model fluid dynamic behavior and to point out its limitations. Reasonable results were obtained for all three test cases, but the fundamental limitations of cellular automatons are numerous. It may be misleading, at this time, to say that cellular automatons are a computationally efficient technique. Other methods, based on continuum or kinetic theory, would also be very efficient if as little of the physics were included.

  16. Mitochondria and ionizing radiation: their inter relationship toward cellular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contemporary theory of radiobiology posit that cellular damage during an event of radiation exposure is mediated through DNA damage/repair signaling processes along with secondary mechanisms induced by free radical generation. Nevertheless, up-coming experimental data suggests that this speculative framework is not enough for unfolding extranuclear radiation effects, particularly the response of mitochondria, key organelles for maintaining cellular function. Therefore, the present study aims at understanding ionizing radiation induced cellular damage and the associated mitochondrial structure/functional changes, using normal human fibroblast cells as an experimental model. Cells were exposed to X-rays (using Faxitron CP 160; dose rate 1 Gray (Gy)/min, fitted with 0.5 mm Al filter). Changes in the mitochondrial structure/mass were investigated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorimetry using MiTotracker red/nonyl-acridine orange dyes. Functional changes were measured by comparative measurement of cytosolic/mitochondrial ROS release using DCFH2DA/MiToSOX dye, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) using Rhodamine 123, activity of respiratory complexes, ATP synthesis and DNA damage using long amplicon (LA) PCR. Results obtained showed that exposure to X-rays led to mitochondrial fragmentation, concomitantly increasing the mitochondrial mass. Elevated cytosolic ROS levels were correlated with increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in case of X-ray treated cells indicating increased oxidative stress accompanied by depletion in MMP and activity of respiratory enzyme complexes followed by lowering of ATP levels. LA-PCR data showed time dependent decrease in the amplification of 8.9 kb region of mitochondrial DNA and 13.5 kb region of beta-globin nuclear gene segment indicating ROS precedes mtDNA damage exhibiting the deleterious nature of X-ray which may be considered as a key causative factor for mitochondrial dysfunction. Also, the role of DRP1 (dynamin

  17. Direct translocation as major cellular uptake for CADY self-assembling peptide-based nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rydström

    Full Text Available Cell penetrating peptides constitute a potent approach to overcome the limitations of in vivo siRNA delivery. We recently proposed a peptide-based nanoparticle system, CADY, for efficient delivery of siRNA into numerous cell lines. CADY is a secondary amphipathic peptide that forms stable complexes with siRNA thereby improving both their cellular uptake and biological response. With the aim of understanding the cellular uptake mechanism of CADY:siRNA complexes, we have combined biochemical, confocal and electron microscopy approaches. In the present work, we provide evidence that the major route for CADY:siRNA cellular uptake involves direct translocation through the membrane but not the endosomal pathway. We have demonstrated that CADY:siRNA complexes do not colocalize with most endosomal markers and remain fully active in the presence of inhibitors of the endosomal pathway. Moreover, neither electrostatic interactions with cell surface heparan sulphates nor membrane potential are essential for CADY:siRNA cell entry. In contrast, we have shown that CADY:siRNA complexes clearly induce a transient cell membrane permeabilization, which is rapidly restored by cell membrane fluidity. Therefore, we propose that direct translocation is the major gate for cell entry of CADY:siRNA complexes. Membrane perturbation and uptake are driven mainly by the ability of CADY to interact with phospholipids within the cell membrane, followed by rapid localization of the complex in the cytoplasm, without affecting cell integrity or viability.

  18. Dia2 controls transcription by mediating assembly of the RSC complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Andress

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dia2 is an F-box protein found in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae. Together with Skp1 and Cul1, Dia2 forms the substrate-determining part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, otherwise known as the SCF. Dia2 has previously been implicated in the control of replication and genome stability via its interaction with the replisome progression complex. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified components of the RSC chromatin remodelling complex as genetic interactors with Dia2, suggesting an additional role for Dia2 in the regulation of transcription. We show that Dia2 is involved in controlling assembly of the RSC complex. RSC belongs to a group of ATP-dependent nucleosome-remodelling complexes that controls the repositioning of nucleosomes. The RSC complex is expressed abundantly and its 17 subunits are recruited to chromatin in response to both transcription activation and repression. In the absence of Dia2, RSC-mediated transcription regulation was impaired, with concomitant abnormalities in nucleosome positioning. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings imply that Dia2 is required for the correct assembly and function of the RSC complex. Dia2, by controlling the RSC chromatin remodeller, fine-tunes transcription by controlling nucleosome positioning during transcriptional activation and repression.

  19. Nonlinear optical methods for cellular imaging and localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, A; Crain, J

    2014-07-01

    Of all the ways in which complex materials (including many biological systems) can be explored, imaging is perhaps the most powerful because delivering high information content directly. This is particular relevant in aspects of cellular localization where the physical proximity of molecules is crucial in biochemical processes. A great deal of effort in imaging has been spent on enabling chemically selective imaging so that only specific features are revealed. This is almost always achieved by adding fluorescent chemical labels to specific molecules. Under appropriate illumination conditions only the molecules (via their labels) will be visible. The technique is simple and elegant but does suffer from fundamental limitations: (1) the fluorescent labels may fade when illuminated (a phenomenon called photobleaching) thereby constantly decreasing signal contrast over the course of image acquisition. To combat photobleaching one must reduce observation times or apply unfavourably low excitation levels all of which reduce the information content of images; (2) the fluorescent species may be deactivated by various environmental factors (the general term is fluorescence quenching); (3) the presence of fluorescent labels may introduce unexpected complications or may interfere with processes of interest (4) Some molecules of interest cannot be labelled. In these circumstances we require a fundamentally different strategy. One of the most promising alternative is based on a technique called Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). CARS is a fundamentally more complex process than is fluorescence and the experimental procedures and optical systems required to deliver high quality CARS images are intricate. However, the rewards are correspondingly very high: CARS probes the chemically distinct vibrations of the constituent molecules in a complex system and is therefore also chemically selective as are fluorescence-based methods. Moreover,the potentially severe problems of

  20. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  1. The cellular decision between apoptosis and autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Jun Fan; Wei-Xing Zong

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis and autophagy are important molecular processes that maintain organismal and cellular homeostasis,respectively.While apoptosis fulfills its role through dismantling damaged or unwanted cells,autophagy maintains cellular homeostasis through recycling selective intracellular organelles and molecules.Yet in some conditions,autophagy can lead to cell death.Apoptosis and autophagy can be stimulated by the same stresses.Emerging evidence indicates an interplay between the core proteins in both pathways,which underlies the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy.This review summarizes recent literature on molecules that regulate both the apoptotic and autophagic processes.

  2. Rapid Cellular Turnover in Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Rigamonti; Kristen Brennand; Frank Lau; Cowan, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that cellular turnover occurs within the human adipocyte population. Through three independent experimental approaches — dilution of an inducible histone 2B-green fluorescent protein (H2BGFP), labeling with the cell cycle marker Ki67 and incorporation of BrdU — we characterized the degree of cellular turnover in murine adipose tissue. We observed rapid turnover of the adipocyte population, finding that 4.8% of preadipocytes are replicating at any time and that between 1–...

  3. Chaotic behavior in the disorder cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disordered cellular automata (DCA) represent an intermediate class between elementary cellular automata and the Kauffman network. Recently, Rule 126 of DCA has been explicated: the system can be accurately described by a discrete probability function. However, a means of extending to other rules has not been developed. In this investigation, a density map of the dynamical behavior of DCA is formulated based on Rule 22 and other totalistic rules. The numerical results reveal excellent agreement between the model and original automata. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous situation is also discussed

  4. Green Cellular - Optimizing the Cellular Network for Minimal Emission from Mobile Stations

    CERN Document Server

    Ezri, Doron

    2009-01-01

    Wireless systems, which include cellular phones, have become an essential part of the modern life. However the mounting evidence that cellular radiation might adversely affect the health of its users, leads to a growing concern among authorities and the general public. Radiating antennas in the proximity of the user, such as antennas of mobile phones are of special interest for this matter. In this paper we suggest a new architecture for wireless networks, aiming at minimal emission from mobile stations, without any additional radiation sources. The new architecture, dubbed Green Cellular, abandons the classical transceiver base station design and suggests the augmentation of transceiver base stations with receive only devices. These devices, dubbed Green Antennas, are not aiming at coverage extension but rather at minimizing the emission from mobile stations. We discuss the implications of the Green Cellular architecture on 3G and 4G cellular technologies. We conclude by showing that employing the Green Cell...

  5. Microwave gallium-68 radiochemistry for kinetically stable bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: structural investigations and cellular uptake under hypoxia† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 1001632–1001634. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c5dt02537k Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arrowsmith, Rory L.; Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Twyman, Frazer; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Botchway, Stanley W.; Dilworth, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the microwave synthesis of several bis(thiosemicarbazones) and the rapid gallium-68 incorporation to give the corresponding metal complexes. These proved kinetically stable under ‘cold’ and ‘hot’ biological assays and were investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and radioactive cell retention studies under normoxia and hypoxia. 68Ga complex retention was found to be 34% higher in hypoxic cells than in normoxic cells over 30 min, further increasing to 53% at 120 min. Our data suggests that this class of gallium complexes show hypoxia selectivity suitable for imaging in living cells and in vivo tests by microPET in nude athymic mice showed that they are excreted within 1 h of their administration. PMID:26583314

  6. On reversibility of cellular automata with periodic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobe, Atsushi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-3, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Yura, Fumitaka [Imai Quantum Computing and Information Project, ERATO, JST, Daini Hongo White Bldg 201, 5-28-3 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2004-06-04

    Reversibility of one-dimensional cellular automata with periodic boundary conditions is discussed. It is shown that there exist exactly 16 reversible elementary cellular automaton rules for infinitely many cell sizes by means of a correspondence between elementary cellular automaton and the de Bruijn graph. In addition, a sufficient condition for reversibility of three-valued and two-neighbour cellular automaton is given.

  7. Cellular Automata Rules and Linear Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Birendra Kumar; Sahoo, Sudhakar; Biswal, Sagarika

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, linear Cellular Automta (CA) rules are recursively generated using a binary tree rooted at "0". Some mathematical results on linear as well as non-linear CA rules are derived. Integers associated with linear CA rules are defined as linear numbers and the properties of these linear numbers are studied.

  8. Virtual cellular manufacturing : Configuring routing flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, G.; van der Zee, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual cellular manufacturing (VCM) creates groups of products and machines in the production planning and control system. Similar groupings may help to reduce set-up times. Starting from two industrial cases, we study parallel machine shops assuming the implementation of VCM. We address the way mi

  9. Determining lineage pathways from cellular barcoding experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perié, Leïla; Hodgkin, Philip D; Naik, Shalin H; Schumacher, Ton N; de Boer, Rob J; Duffy, Ken R

    2014-01-01

    Cellular barcoding and other single-cell lineage-tracing strategies form experimental methodologies for analysis of in vivo cell fate that have been instrumental in several significant recent discoveries. Due to the highly nonlinear nature of proliferation and differentiation, interrogation of the r

  10. Building mathematics cellular phone learning communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers emphasize the importance of maintaining learning communities and environments. This article describes the building and nourishment of a learning community, one comprised of middle school students who learned mathematics out-of-class using the cellular phone. The building of the learning community was led by three third year pre-service teachers majoring in mathematics and computers. The pre-service teachers selected thirty 8th grade students to learn mathematics with the cellular phone and be part of a learning community experimenting with this learning. To analyze the building and development stages of the cellular phone learning community, two models of community building stages were used; first the team development model developed by Tuckman (1965, second the life cycle model of a virtual learning community developed by Garber (2004. The research findings indicate that a learning community which is centered on a new technology has five 'life' phases of development: Pre-birth, birth, formation, performing, and maturity. Further, the research finding indicate that the norms that were encouraged by the preservice teachers who initiated the cellular phone learning community resulted in a community which developed, nourished and matured to be similar to a community of experienced applied mathematicians who use mathematical formulae to study everyday phenomena.

  11. Cellular grafts in management of leucoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular grafting methods constitute important advances in the surgical management of leucoderma. Different methods such as noncultured epidermal suspensions, melanocyte cultures, and melanocyte-keratinocyte cultures have all been shown to be effective. This article reviews these methods.

  12. Cellular telephone use and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    expected in the Danish population. RESULTS: A total of 14,249 cancers were observed (SIR = 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.93 to 0.97) for men and women combined. Cellular telephone use was not associated with increased risk for brain tumors (SIR = 0.97), acoustic neuromas (SIR = 0.73), salivary...

  13. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  14. Cellular studies and interaction mechanisms of extremely low frequency fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    magnetic (B) field, or if combinations of static B and time-varying B fields represent an exposure metric for the cell. This question relates directly to understanding fundamental interaction mechanisms and to the development of a rationale for ELF dose threshold guidelines. The weight of experimental evidence indicates that an induced E field according to Faraday's law of induction during magnetic field exposures elicits cellular effects. An E-field-mediated interaction has interesting consequences for microdosimetry at the cellular level and is mechanistically consistent with an interaction at the cell surface, since the E field does not penetrate beyond the cell membrane. Recently, several studies have suggested that an ELF B field by itself or in combination with a static B field may elicit cellular effects. Thus in addition to E-field-mediated effects, other interaction mechanisms as yet not fully understood may operate at the cellular level; this complexity is in contrast to the case for ionizing radiation. In addition to the question of an exposure field metric, the biological state of the target cell is important in ELF interactions. Biological factors such as cell type, cell cycle, cell activation, age of donor animal, passage number of cell line, presence of specific growth/mitogenic factors, temperature, shape, and cell density/packing during exposures have been shown to play a role in mediating ELF interactions with cells. Most recently, reports of single-cell studies usher in a new direction for research that can be termed microbioelectromagnetics. Single-cell digital microscopy introduces a new approach to answer the above questions with potential for real-time microdosimetry and bioeffects limited only by the spatial resolution of state-of-the-art microscopy, which is approximately 0.1 /μm. Digital imaging microscopy should therefore permit the quantitative assessment of spatial and temporal features of ELF field interactions within living single cells.

  15. Representing and analysing molecular and cellular function using the computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, J; Naim, A; Mancuso, R; Eldridge, M; Wernisch, L; Gilbert, D; Wodak, S J

    2000-01-01

    Determining the biological function of a myriad of genes, and understanding how they interact to yield a living cell, is the major challenge of the post genome-sequencing era. The complexity of biological systems is such that this cannot be envisaged without the help of powerful computer systems capable of representing and analysing the intricate networks of physical and functional interactions between the different cellular components. In this review we try to provide the reader with an appreciation of where we stand in this regard. We discuss some of the inherent problems in describing the different facets of biological function, give an overview of how information on function is currently represented in the major biological databases, and describe different systems for organising and categorising the functions of gene products. In a second part, we present a new general data model, currently under development, which describes information on molecular function and cellular processes in a rigorous manner. The model is capable of representing a large variety of biochemical processes, including metabolic pathways, regulation of gene expression and signal transduction. It also incorporates taxonomies for categorising molecular entities, interactions and processes, and it offers means of viewing the information at different levels of resolution, and dealing with incomplete knowledge. The data model has been implemented in the database on protein function and cellular processes 'aMAZE' (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/research/pfbp/), which presently covers metabolic pathways and their regulation. Several tools for querying, displaying, and performing analyses on such pathways are briefly described in order to illustrate the practical applications enabled by the model.

  16. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Klotho-Dependent Cellular Transport Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, M; Dërmaku-Sopjani, M

    2016-01-01

    Klotho is a transmembrane protein that in humans is encoded by the hKL gene. This protein is known to have aging suppressor effects and is predominantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney, parathyroid glands, and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in both full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form, which exerts numerous distinct functions. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it functions as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho is a multifunction protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid of mammals. Klotho deficiency leads to multiple organ failure accompanied by early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and early death, whereas overexpression of Klotho results in the opposite effects. Klotho, an enzyme and hormone, has been reported to participate in the regulation of cellular transport processes across the plasma membrane either indirectly through inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) formation or other mechanism, or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, cellular carriers, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Accordingly, Klotho protein serves as a powerful regulator of cellular transport across the plasma membrane. Importantly, Klotho-dependent cellular transport regulation implies stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Klotho has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of multiple calcium and potassium ion channels, and various cellular carriers including the Na(+)-coupled cotransporters such as NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIb, EAAT3, and EAAT4, CreaT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These regulations are parts of the antiaging function of Klotho, which will be discussing throughout this chapter. Clearly, further experimental efforts are required to investigate the effect of Klotho on other transport proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms by which Klotho

  18. Alkalizing reactions streamline cellular metabolism in acidogenic microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Arioli

    Full Text Available An understanding of the integrated relationships among the principal cellular functions that govern the bioenergetic reactions of an organism is necessary to determine how cells remain viable and optimise their fitness in the environment. Urease is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbonic acid. While the induction of urease activity by several microorganisms has been predominantly considered a stress-response that is initiated to generate a nitrogen source in response to a low environmental pH, here we demonstrate a new role of urease in the optimisation of cellular bioenergetics. We show that urea hydrolysis increases the catabolic efficiency of Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium that is widely used in the industrial manufacture of dairy products. By modulating the intracellular pH and thereby increasing the activity of β-galactosidase, glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase, urease increases the overall change in enthalpy generated by the bioenergetic reactions. A cooperative altruistic behaviour of urease-positive microorganisms on the urease-negative microorganisms within the same environment was also observed. The physiological role of a single enzymatic activity demonstrates a novel and unexpected view of the non-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern the bioenergetics of a bacterial cell, highlighting a new role for cytosol-alkalizing biochemical pathways in acidogenic microorganisms.

  19. Daily magnesium fluxes regulate cellular timekeeping and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Kevin A; Hansen, Louise L; Putker, Marrit; Olivares-Yañez, Consuelo; Day, Jason; Eades, Lorna J; Larrondo, Luis F; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2016-04-21

    Circadian clocks are fundamental to the biology of most eukaryotes, coordinating behaviour and physiology to resonate with the environmental cycle of day and night through complex networks of clock-controlled genes. A fundamental knowledge gap exists, however, between circadian gene expression cycles and the biochemical mechanisms that ultimately facilitate circadian regulation of cell biology. Here we report circadian rhythms in the intracellular concentration of magnesium ions, [Mg(2+)]i, which act as a cell-autonomous timekeeping component to determine key clock properties both in a human cell line and in a unicellular alga that diverged from each other more than 1 billion years ago. Given the essential role of Mg(2+) as a cofactor for ATP, a functional consequence of [Mg(2+)]i oscillations is dynamic regulation of cellular energy expenditure over the daily cycle. Mechanistically, we find that these rhythms provide bilateral feedback linking rhythmic metabolism to clock-controlled gene expression. The global regulation of nucleotide triphosphate turnover by intracellular Mg(2+) availability has potential to impact upon many of the cell's more than 600 MgATP-dependent enzymes and every cellular system where MgNTP hydrolysis becomes rate limiting. Indeed, we find that circadian control of translation by mTOR is regulated through [Mg(2+)]i oscillations. It will now be important to identify which additional biological processes are subject to this form of regulation in tissues of multicellular organisms such as plants and humans, in the context of health and disease.

  20. Concepts of dose to soft tissue at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation effects begin at the cellular level of biological organization. Radiation dosimetry at the cellular level is particularly important for internally deposited alpha and beta particle emitters. Microdosimetry is a mechanism for studying the dose imparted to microscopic sites, for determining hit probabilities, and for determining the probability that sites are missed. Internal microdosimetry calculations are complex, but can be easily executed using computer programs. The investigator must specify the target and its size, determine the radionuclide activity per unit mass for each region in which targets are located, describe the activity per radioactive particulate, understand the geometrical relationship between the activity and the targets, and account for the biological retention of the activity in the region as a function of time. Internal microdosimetry has many potential applications in radiological protection. Microdosimetry is a special research area designed to provide a better understanding of the importance of microscopic patterns of radiation interaction with cells within the broader framework of biochemistry and radiation biology. Its objective is to provide a methodology that is both consistent and precise for correlating biological response to varying levels and distributions of internal emitters. Microdosimetry may contribute to a more complete understanding of the mechanisms of cancer induction by radiation. The correlation between specific energy density and various biological effects might best be treated statistically, since the effects occur in response of stochastic processes. If applied correctly, these concepts should provide a reliable tool for learning more about the effects of radiation and for setting radiation protection standards

  1. Cellular Functions Regulated by Phosphorylation of EGFR on Tyr845

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Src gene product (Src and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR are prototypes of oncogene products and function primarily as a cytoplasmic non-receptor tyrosine kinase and a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, respectively. The identification of Src and EGFR, and the subsequent extensive investigations of these proteins have long provided cutting edge research in cancer and other molecular and cellular biological studies. In 1995, we reported that the human epidermoid carcinoma cells, A431, contain a small fraction of Src and EGFR in which these two kinase were in physical association with each other, and that Src phosphorylates EGFR on tyrosine 845 (Y845 in the Src-EGFR complex. Y845 of EGFR is located in the activation segment of the kinase domain, where many protein kinases contain kinase-activating autophosphorylation sites (e.g., cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Src family kinases, transmembrane receptor type tyrosine kinases or trans-phosphorylation sites (e.g., cyclin-dependent protein kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt protein kinase. A number of studies have demonstrated that Y845 phosphorylation serves an important role in cancer as well as normal cells. Here we compile the experimental facts involving Src phosphorylation of EGFR on Y845, by which cell proliferation, cell cycle control, mitochondrial regulation of cell metabolism, gamete activation and other cellular functions are regulated. We also discuss the physiological relevance, as well as structural insights of the Y845 phosphorylation.

  2. Cellular Transport Mechanisms of Cytotoxic Metallodrugs: An Overview beyond Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Spreckelmeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of medicinal inorganic chemistry has grown consistently during the past 50 years; however, metal-containing coordination compounds represent only a minor proportion of drugs currently on the market, indicating that research in this area has not yet been thoroughly realized. Although platinum-based drugs as cancer chemotherapeutic agents have been widely studied, exact knowledge of the mechanisms governing their accumulation in cells is still lacking. However, evidence suggests active uptake and efflux mechanisms are involved; this may be involved also in other experimental metal coordination and organometallic compounds with promising antitumor activities in vitro and in vivo, such as ruthenium and gold compounds. Such knowledge would be necessary to elucidate the balance between activity and toxicity profiles of metal compounds. In this review, we present an overview of the information available on the cellular accumulation of Pt compounds from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies, as well as a summary of reports on the possible accumulation mechanisms for different families of experimental anticancer metal complexes (e.g., Ru Au and Ir. Finally, we discuss the need for rationalization of the investigational approaches available to study metallodrug cellular transport.

  3. Alkalizing Reactions Streamline Cellular Metabolism in Acidogenic Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arioli, Stefania; Ragg, Enzio; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Karp, Matti; Daffonchio, Daniele; De Noni, Ivano; Mulas, Laura; Oggioni, Marco; Guglielmetti, Simone; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the integrated relationships among the principal cellular functions that govern the bioenergetic reactions of an organism is necessary to determine how cells remain viable and optimise their fitness in the environment. Urease is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbonic acid. While the induction of urease activity by several microorganisms has been predominantly considered a stress-response that is initiated to generate a nitrogen source in response to a low environmental pH, here we demonstrate a new role of urease in the optimisation of cellular bioenergetics. We show that urea hydrolysis increases the catabolic efficiency of Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium that is widely used in the industrial manufacture of dairy products. By modulating the intracellular pH and thereby increasing the activity of β-galactosidase, glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase, urease increases the overall change in enthalpy generated by the bioenergetic reactions. A cooperative altruistic behaviour of urease-positive microorganisms on the urease-negative microorganisms within the same environment was also observed. The physiological role of a single enzymatic activity demonstrates a novel and unexpected view of the non-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern the bioenergetics of a bacterial cell, highlighting a new role for cytosol-alkalizing biochemical pathways in acidogenic microorganisms. PMID:21152088

  4. Rapid detection of biothreat agents based on cellular machinery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.; Gantt, Richard W.

    2004-12-01

    This research addresses rapid and sensitive identification of biological agents in a complex background. We attempted to devise a method by which the specificity of the cellular transcriptional machinery could be used to detect and identify bacterial bio-terror agents in a background of other organisms. Bacterial cells contain RNA polymerases and transcription factors that transcribe genes into mRNA for translation into proteins. RNA polymerases in conjunction with transcription factors recognize regulatory elements (promoters) upstream of the gene. These promoters are, in many cases, recognized by the polymerase and transcription factor combinations of one species only. We have engineered a plasmid, for Escherichia coli, containing the virA promoter from the target species Shigella flexneri. This promoter was fused to a reporter gene Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). In theory the indicator strain (carrying the plasmid) is mixed with the target strain and the two are lysed. The cellular machinery from both cells mixes and the GFP is produced. This report details the results of testing this system.

  5. Humoral and Cellular Immune Response in Canine Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Popiel, J; Chełmońska-Soyta, A

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine diseases in dogs and is generally considered to be autoimmune in nature. In human hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is destroyed by both cellular (i.e. autoreactive helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes) and humoral (i.e. autoantibodies specific for thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine) effector mechanisms. Other suggested factors include impaired peripheral immune suppression (i.e. the malfunction of regulatory T cells) or an additional pro-inflammatory effect of T helper 17 lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunological changes in canine hypothyroidism. Twenty-eight clinically healthy dogs, 25 hypothyroid dogs without thyroglobulin antibodies and eight hypothyroid dogs with these autoantibodies were enrolled into the study. There were alterations in serum proteins in hypothyroid dogs compared with healthy controls (i.e. raised concentrations of α-globulins, β2- and γ-globulins) as well as higher concentration of acute phase proteins and circulating immune complexes. Hypothyroid animals had a lower CD4:CD8 ratio in peripheral blood compared with control dogs and diseased dogs also had higher expression of interferon γ (gene and protein expression) and CD28 (gene expression). Similar findings were found in both groups of hypothyroid dogs. Canine hypothyroidism is therefore characterized by systemic inflammation with dominance of a cellular immune response.

  6. Open-cellular copper structures fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Relative stiffness versus relative density measurements for reticulated mesh and stochastic open cellular copper were shown to follow the Gibson-Ashby foam model. → Microstructures for the mesh struts and foam ligaments illustrated a propensity of copper oxide precipitates which provided structural hardness and strength. → These components, fabricated by electron beam melting, exhibit interesting prospects for specialized, complex heat-transfer devices. - Abstract: Cu reticulated mesh and stochastic open cellular foams were fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting. Fabricated densities ranged from 0.73 g/cm3 to 6.67 g/cm3. The precursor Cu powder contained Cu2O precipitates and the fabricated components contained arrays of Cu2O precipitates and interconnected dislocation microstructures having average spacings of ∼2 μm, which provide hardness values ∼75% above commercial Cu products. Plots of stiffness (Young's modulus) versus density and relative stiffness versus relative density were in very close agreement with the Gibson-Ashby model for open cellular foams. These open cellular structure components exhibit considerable potential for novel, complex, multi-functional electrical and thermal management systems, especially complex, monolithic heat exchange devices.

  7. Text Extraction and Enhancement of Binary Images Using Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Sahoo; Tapas Kumar; B.L. Rains; C.M. Bhatia

    2009-01-01

    Text characters embedded in images represent a rich source of information for content-based indexing and retrieval applications. However, these text characters are difficult to be detected and recognized due to their various sizes, grayscale values, and complex backgrounds. Existing methods cannot handle well those texts with different contrast or embedded in a complex image background. In this paper, a set of sequential algorithms for text extraction and enhancement of image using cellular automata are proposed. The image enhancement includes gray level, contrast manipulation, edge detection, and filtering. First, it applies edge detection and uses a threshold to filter out for low-contrast text and simplify complex background of high-contrast text from binary image. The proposed algorithm is simple and easy to use and requires only a sample texture binary image as an input. It generates textures with perceived quality, better than those proposed by earlier published techniques. The performance of our method is demonstrated by presenting experimental results for a set of text based binary images. The quality of thresholding is assessed using the precision and recall analysis of the resultant text in the binary image.

  8. Engaging complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gys M. Loubser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss studies in complexity and its epistemological implications for systematic and practical theology. I argue that engagement with complexity does not necessarily assurea non-reductionist approach. However, if complexity is engaged transversally, it becomes possible to transcend reductionist approaches. Moreover, systematic and practical the ologians can draw on complexity in developing new ways of understanding and, therefore, new ways of describing the focus, epistemic scope and heuristic structures of systematic and practical theology. Firstly, Edgar Morin draws a distinction between restricted and general complexity based on the epistemology drawn upon in studies in complexity. Moving away from foundationalist approaches to epistemology, Morin argues for a paradigm of systems. Secondly,I discuss Kees van Kooten Niekerk�s distinction between epistemology, methodology andontology in studies in complexity and offer an example of a theological argument that drawson complexity. Thirdly, I argue for the importance of transversality in engaging complexity by drawing on the work of Wentzel van Huyssteen and Paul Cilliers. In conclusion, I argue that theologians have to be conscious of the epistemic foundations of each study in complexity, and these studies illuminate the heart of Reformed theology.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Therefore, this article has both intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary implications. When theologians engage studies incomplexity, the epistemological roots of these studies need to be considered seeing thatresearchers in complexity draw on different epistemologies. Drawing on transversality wouldenhance such considerations. Furthermore, Edgar Morin�s and Paul Cilliers� approach tocomplexity will inform practical and theoretical considerations in church polity and unity.

  9. The development of the orbital fasciae and cellular tissue spaces at an early stage of human ontogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shkrobanets A.A.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the orbital fasciae and cellular tissue spaces during the embryonic and prefetal periods of ontogenesis has been studied by means of the morphological research methods. It has been established that the said structures develop from the mesenchyme, surrounding the eyeballs germ and optic nerve. The forming of the cellular tissue spaces proceed simultaneously with the development of the orbital walls and the musculo-fascial complex of the oculomotor muscles and roughly takes s...

  10. Fundamental Tradeoffs among Reliability, Latency and Throughput in Cellular Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Mogensen, Preben; Pedersen, Klaus I.;

    2014-01-01

    theory as analytical framework for calculating the maximum achievable rate for a given latency and reliability constraint. The analysis is conducted in a simplified LTE network, providing baseline - yet powerful - insight of the main tradeoffs. Guidelines to extend the theory to more complex systems...... are also presented, including a semi-analytical approach for cases with intractable channel and traffic models. We also discuss the use of system-level simulations to explore the limits of LTE networks. Based on our findings, we give some recommendations for the imminent 5G technology design phase......We address the fundamental tradeoffs among latency, reliability and throughput in a cellular network. The most important elements influencing the KPIs in a 4G network are identified, and the inter-relationships among them is discussed. We use the effective bandwidth and the effective capacity...

  11. Photo-induced binding of sulfanilamide to cellular macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, B.K.; Arnold, J.T.; Chignell, C.F. (National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1982-03-01

    Ultraviolet light (lambda > 295 nm) induced binding of sulfanilamide to cellular macromolecules has been examined. It was found that the drug bound irreversibly to native DNA, and complexes containing one drug molecule per 80 nucleotides were obtained after 60 min of irradiation under anaerobic conditions. Oxygen reduced this binding significantly. More drug was bound to RNA and heat denatured DNA under identical conditions. The binding of sulfanilamide to DNA was found to induce nicking of circular closed plasmid DNA and cross-linking of calf thymus DNA. Oxygen significantly decreased nicking and cross-linking of DNA. Irradiation of sulfanilamide and human serum albumin resulted in covalent binding of the drug to the protein and a concomitant increase in protein crosslinking. While oxygen decreased covalent binding, crosslinking increased under aerobic conditions. These reactions may be important in the photosensitization caused by sulfanilamide.

  12. Contrast agents for functional and cellular MRI of the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, Nicolas [ERT CNRS ' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle' , Universite Victor Segalen-Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France) and Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle de l' Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Place Amelie Raba-Leon, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.grenier@chu-bordeaux.fr; Pedersen, Michael [MR Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Hauger, Olivier [ERT CNRS ' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle' , Universite Victor Segalen-Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France); Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle de l' Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Place Amelie Raba-Leon, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    Low-molecular-weight gadolinium (Gd) chelates are glomerular tracers but their role in evaluation of renal function with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is still marginal. Because of their small size, they diffuse freely into the interstitium and the relationship between measured signal intensity and concentration is complex. New categories of contrast agents, such as large Gd-chelates or iron oxide particules, with different pharmacokinetic and magnetic properties have been developed. These large molecules could be useful for both functional (quantification of perfusion, quantification of glomerular filtration rate, estimation of tubular function) and cellular imaging (intrarenal phagocytosis in inflammatory renal diseases). Continuous development of new contrast agents remains worthwhile to get the best adequacy between the physiological phenomenon of interest and the pharmacokinetic of the agent.

  13. Threshold-Range Scaling of Excitable Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Fisch, R; Griffeath, D; Fisch, Robert; Gravner, Janko; Griffeath, David

    1993-01-01

    Each cell of a two-dimensional lattice is painted one of k colors, arranged in a "color wheel." The colors advance (0 to k-1 mod k) either automatically or by contact with at least a threshold number of successor colors in a prescribed local neighborhood. Discrete-time parallel systems of this sort in which color 0 updates by contact and the rest update automatically are called Greenberg-Hastings (GH) rules. A system in which all colors update by contact is called a cyclic cellular automaton (CCA). Started from appropriate initial conditions these models generate periodic traveling waves. Started from random configurations the same rules exhibit complex self-organization, typically characterized by nucleation of locally periodic "ram's horns" or spirals. Corresponding random processes give rise to a variety of "forest fire" equilibria that display large-scale stochastic wave fronts. This article describes a framework, theoretically based, but relying on extensive interactive computer graphics experimentation,...

  14. Cellular automata simulation of traffic including cars and bicycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasic, Jelena; Ruskin, Heather J.

    2012-04-01

    As 'greening' of all aspects of human activity becomes mainstream, transportation science is also increasingly focused around sustainability. Modal co-existence between motorised and non-motorised traffic on urban networks is, in this context, of particular interest for traffic flow modelling. The main modelling problems here are posed by the heterogeneity of vehicles, including size and dynamics, and by the complex interactions at intersections. Herein we address these with a novel technique, based on one-dimensional cellular automata components, for modelling network infrastructure and its occupancy by vehicles. We use this modelling approach, together with a corresponding vehicle behaviour model, to simulate combined car and bicycle traffic for two elemental scenarios-examples of components that would be used in the building of an arbitrary network. Results of simulations performed on these scenarios, (i) a stretch of road and (ii) an intersection causing conflict between cars and bicycles sharing a lane, are presented and analysed.

  15. Injectable, Cellular-Scale Optoelectronics with Applications for Wireless Optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-il; McCall, Jordan G.; Jung, Yei Hwan; Huang, Xian; Siuda, Edward R.; Li, Yuhang; Song, Jizhou; Song, Young Min; Pao, Hsuan An; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Lu, Chaofeng; Lee, Sung Dan; Song, Il-Sun; Shin, GunChul; Al-Hasani, Ream; Kim, Stanley; Tan, Meng Peun; Huang, Yonggang; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Rogers, John A.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-04-01

    Successful integration of advanced semiconductor devices with biological systems will accelerate basic scientific discoveries and their translation into clinical technologies. In neuroscience generally, and in optogenetics in particular, the ability to insert light sources, detectors, sensors, and other components into precise locations of the deep brain yields versatile and important capabilities. Here, we introduce an injectable class of cellular-scale optoelectronics that offers such features, with examples of unmatched operational modes in optogenetics, including completely wireless and programmed complex behavioral control over freely moving animals. The ability of these ultrathin, mechanically compliant, biocompatible devices to afford minimally invasive operation in the soft tissues of the mammalian brain foreshadow applications in other organ systems, with potential for broad utility in biomedical science and engineering.

  16. Simplifying complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemput, van de I.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I use mathematical models to explore the properties of complex systems ranging from microbial nitrogen pathways and coral reefs to the human state of mind. All are examples of complex systems, defined as systems composed of a number of interconnected parts, where the systemic behavior

  17. Carney Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Carney complex are Cushing’s syndrome and multiple thyroid nodules (tumors). Cushing’s syndrome features a combination of weight gain, ... with Carney complex include adrenocortical carcinoma , pituitary gland tumors , thyroid , colorectal , liver and pancreatic cancers . Ovarian cancer in ...

  18. Papillomavirus E2 Proteins and the Host Brd4 Protein Associate with Transcriptionally Active Cellular Chromatin▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Moon Kyoo; Kwon, Deukwoo; Alison A McBride

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of papillomavirus E2 proteins with cellular Brd4 protein is important for transcriptional regulation of viral genes and partitioning of viral genomes. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) E2 binds cellular chromatin in complex with Brd4 in both mitotic and interphase cells. To identify specific sites of E2 interaction on cellular chromatin, a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis was carried out using human promoter sequences. Both E2 and Brd4 were found b...

  19. Suppressors of superoxide production from mitochondrial complex III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Adam L; Vargas, Leonardo; Turk, Carolina N; Baaten, Janine E; Matzen, Jason T; Dardov, Victoria J; Attle, Stephen J; Li, Jing; Quackenbush, Douglas C; Goncalves, Renata L S; Perevoshchikova, Irina V; Petrassi, H Michael; Meeusen, Shelly L; Ainscow, Edward K; Brand, Martin D

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport drives ATP synthesis but also generates reactive oxygen species, which are both cellular signals and damaging oxidants. Superoxide production by respiratory complex III is implicated in diverse signaling events and pathologies, but its role remains controversial. Using high-throughput screening, we identified compounds that selectively eliminate superoxide production by complex III without altering oxidative phosphorylation; they modulate retrograde signaling including cellular responses to hypoxic and oxidative stress.

  20. Cellular Dynamic Simulator: An Event Driven Molecular Simulation Environment for Cellular Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Michael J.; Waxham, M. Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Cellular Dynamic Simulator (CDS) for simulating diffusion and chemical reactions within crowded molecular environments. CDS is based on a novel event driven algorithm specifically designed for precise calculation of the timing of collisions, reactions and other events for each individual molecule in the environment. Generic mesh based compartments allow the creation / importation of very simple or detailed cellular structures that exist in a 3D environment. Multi...

  1. Mobile Node Localization in Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Malik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Location information is the major component in location based applications. This information is used in different safety and service oriented applications to provide users with services according to their Geolocation. There are many approaches to locate mobile nodes in indoor and outdoor environments. In thispaper, we are interested in outdoor localization particularly in cellular networks of mobile nodes andpresented a localization method based on cell and user location information. Our localization method is based on hello message delay (sending and receiving time and coordinate information of Base Transceiver Station (BTSs. To validate our method across cellular network, we implemented and simulated our method in two scenarios i.e. maintaining database of base stations in centralize and distributed system. Simulation results show the effectiveness of our approach and its implementation applicability in telecommunication systems.

  2. External insulation with cellular plastic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Nielsen, Anker

    2014-01-01

    External thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS) can be used as extra insulation of existing buildings. The system can be made of cellular plastic materials or mineral wool. There is a European Technical guideline, ETAG 004, that describe the tests that shall be conducted on such systems....... This paper gives a comparison of systems with mineral wool and cellular plastic, based on experience from practice and literature. It is important to look at the details in the system and at long time stability of the properties such as thermal insulation, moisture and fire. Investigation of fire properties...... must be done before utilisation of the system, including the risk of fire spread from one storey to the next for practical solutions. An elaboration of fire spread risks require thermo physic knowledge about ignition temperatures, critical radiation, upward flame spread velocities etc. of the actual...

  3. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of AKI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anupam; Dong, Zheng; Harris, Raymond; Murray, Patrick; Parikh, Samir M; Rosner, Mitchell H; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we review the current evidence for the cellular and molecular mechanisms of AKI, focusing on epithelial cell pathobiology and related cell-cell interactions, using ischemic AKI as a model. Highlighted are the clinical relevance of cellular and molecular targets that have been investigated in experimental models of ischemic AKI and how such models might be improved to optimize translation into successful clinical trials. In particular, development of more context-specific animal models with greater relevance to human AKI is urgently needed. Comorbidities that could alter patient susceptibility to AKI, such as underlying diabetes, aging, obesity, cancer, and CKD, should also be considered in developing these models. Finally, harmonization between academia and industry for more clinically relevant preclinical testing of potential therapeutic targets and better translational clinical trial design is also needed to achieve the goal of developing effective interventions for AKI. PMID:26860342

  4. Cellular and molecular introduction to brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangning; Nardelli, Jeannette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the study of brain development over the last decades, especially recent findings regarding the evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex, and large-scale analyses of the proteome/transcriptome in the human brain, have offered novel insights into the molecular mechanisms guiding neural maturation, and the pathophysiology of multiple forms of neurological disorders. As a preamble to reviews of this issue, we provide an overview of the cellular, molecular and genetic bases of brain development with an emphasis on the major mechanisms associated with landmarks of normal neural development in the embryonic stage and early postnatal life, including neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation, cortical neuronal migration, evolution and folding of the cerebral cortex, synaptogenesis and neural circuit development, gliogenesis and myelination. We will only briefly depict developmental disorders that result from perturbations of these cellular or molecular mechanisms, and the most common perinatal brain injuries that could disturb normal brain development. PMID:26184894

  5. Cellularity of certain quantum endomorphism algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Lehrer, G. I.; Zhang, R.

    Let $\\tA=\\Z[q^{\\pm \\frac{1}{2}}][([d]!)\\inv]$ and let $\\Delta_{\\tA}(d)$ be an integral form of the Weyl module of highest weight $d \\in \\N$ of the quantised enveloping algebra $\\U_{\\tA}$ of $\\fsl_2$. We exhibit for all positive integers $r$ an explicit cellular structure for $\\End_{\\U_{\\tA}}(\\Del......Let $\\tA=\\Z[q^{\\pm \\frac{1}{2}}][([d]!)\\inv]$ and let $\\Delta_{\\tA}(d)$ be an integral form of the Weyl module of highest weight $d \\in \\N$ of the quantised enveloping algebra $\\U_{\\tA}$ of $\\fsl_2$. We exhibit for all positive integers $r$ an explicit cellular structure for $\\End...

  6. Cellular automata in image processing and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Sun, Xianfang

    2014-01-01

    The book presents findings, views and ideas on what exact problems of image processing, pattern recognition and generation can be efficiently solved by cellular automata architectures. This volume provides a convenient collection in this area, in which publications are otherwise widely scattered throughout the literature. The topics covered include image compression and resizing; skeletonization, erosion and dilation; convex hull computation, edge detection and segmentation; forgery detection and content based retrieval; and pattern generation. The book advances the theory of image processing, pattern recognition and generation as well as the design of efficient algorithms and hardware for parallel image processing and analysis. It is aimed at computer scientists, software programmers, electronic engineers, mathematicians and physicists, and at everyone who studies or develops cellular automaton algorithms and tools for image processing and analysis, or develops novel architectures and implementations of mass...

  7. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  8. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cerebellar Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMartinez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function.

  9. WD40 proteins propel cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnimann, Christian U; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Russell, Robert B; Müller, Christoph W

    2010-10-01

    Recent findings indicate that WD40 domains play central roles in biological processes by acting as hubs in cellular networks; however, they have been studied less intensely than other common domains, such as the kinase, PDZ or SH3 domains. As suggested by various interactome studies, they are among the most promiscuous interactors. Structural studies suggest that this property stems from their ability, as scaffolds, to interact with diverse proteins, peptides or nucleic acids using multiple surfaces or modes of interaction. A general scaffolding role is supported by the fact that no WD40 domain has been found with intrinsic enzymatic activity despite often being part of large molecular machines. We discuss the WD40 domain distributions in protein networks and structures of WD40-containing assemblies to demonstrate their versatility in mediating critical cellular functions.

  10. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schroedinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of "natural" Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, "deformed" quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale $l$ are obtained, which for $l\\rightarrow 0$ reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form "multipartite" systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce...

  11. A cellular glass substrate solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, R.; Bell, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a second generation point focusing solar concentration is discussed. The design is based on reflective gores fabricated of thin glass mirror bonded continuously to a contoured substrate of cellular glass. The concentrator aperture and structural stiffness was optimized for minimum concentrator cost given the performance requirement of delivering 56 kWth to a 22 cm diameter receiver aperture with a direct normal insolation of 845 watts sq m and an operating wind of 50 kmph. The reflective panel, support structure, drives, foundation and instrumentation and control subsystem designs, optimized for minimum cost, are summarized. The use of cellular glass as a reflective panel substrate material is shown to offer significant weight and cost advantages compared to existing technology materials.

  12. A Modified Sensitive Driving Cellular Automaton Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Hong-Xia; DAI Shi-Qiang; DONG Li-Yun; LEI Li

    2005-01-01

    A modified cellular automaton model for traffic flow on highway is proposed with a novel concept about the variable security gap. The concept is first introduced into the original Nagel-Schreckenberg model, which is called the non-sensitive driving cellular automaton model. And then it is incorporated with a sensitive driving NaSch model,in which the randomization brake is arranged before the deterministic deceleration. A parameter related to the variable security gap is determined through simulation. Comparison of the simulation results indicates that the variable security gap has different influence on the two models. The fundamental diagram obtained by simulation with the modified sensitive driving NaSch model shows that the maximumflow are in good agreement with the observed data, indicating that the presented model is more reasonable and realistic.

  13. Cellular and molecular basis of mammary microcalcifications

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Mammary microcalcifications represent one of the most reliable mammographic features of non-palpable breast cancer and are often the sole indicator of the disease. However, it is unknown whether these microcalcifications are a sign of degeneration or an active cellular process. The aims of this project were to establish and characterise an in vitro model of mammary mineralisation in monolayer, 3D scaffolds and in vivo and to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process, focus...

  14. Exponential Stability for Delayed Cellular Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-xiang; ZHONG Shou-ming; YAN Ke-yu

    2005-01-01

    The exponential stability of the delayed cellular neural networks (DCNN's) is investigated. By dividing the network state variables into some parts according to the characters of the neural networks, some new sufficient conditions of exponential stability are derived via constructing a Liapunov function. It is shown that the conditions differ from previous ones. The new conditions, which are associated with some initial value, are represented by some blocks of the interconnection matrix.

  15. Light weight cellular structures based on aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, O. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India); Embury, J.D.; Sinclair, C. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Sang, H. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada); Silvetti, P. [Cordoba Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisicas y Naturales

    1997-02-01

    An interesting form of lightweight material which has emerged in the past 2 decades is metallic foam. This paper deals with the basic concepts of making metallic foams and a detailed study of foams produced from Al-SiC. In addition, some aspects of cellular solids based on honeycomb structures are outlined including the concept of producing both two-phase foams and foams with composite walls.

  16. Animal and cellular models of human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arends, Mark; White, Eric; Whitelaw, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this eighteenth (2016) Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology, we present a collection of 19 invited review articles that cover different aspects of cellular and animal models of disease. These include genetically-engineered models, chemically-induced models, naturally-occurring models, and combinations thereof, with the focus on recent methodological and conceptual developments across a wide range of human diseases.

  17. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:6240164

  18. Spectrum sharing for future mobile cellular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Spectrum sharing has become a high priority research area over the past few years. The motivation behind this lies in the fact that the limited spectrum is currently inefficiently utilized. As recognized by the World radio communication conference (WRC)-07, the amount of identified spectrum is not large enough to support large bandwidths for a substantial number of operators. Therefore, it is paramount for future mobile cellular systems to share the frequency spectrum and coexist ...

  19. Cellular factors required for papillomavirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Melendy, T; Sedman, J; Stenlund, A

    1995-01-01

    In vitro replication of papillomavirus DNA has been carried out with a combination of purified proteins and partially purified extracts made from human cells. DNA synthesis requires the viral E1 protein and the papillomavirus origin of replication. The E2 protein stimulates DNA synthesis in a binding site-independent manner. Papillomavirus DNA replication is also dependent on the cellular factors replication protein A, replication factor C, and proliferating-cell nuclear antigen as well as a ...

  20. Clinical applications of cellular therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Yanbakan

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell types and have usage about lots of regenerative medicine research fields. Especially bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have a wide range of case presentation. New discoveries about stem cell biology will progress new options about cellular therapy products and isolation of different stem cell types will increase hope for treatment of important illness such as Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, malign brain tumors. It...

  1. Sumo and the cellular stress response

    OpenAIRE

    Enserink, Jorrit M.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin family member Sumo has important functions in many cellular processes including DNA repair, transcription and cell division. Numerous studies have shown that Sumo is essential for maintaining cell homeostasis when the cell encounters endogenous or environmental stress, such as osmotic stress, hypoxia, heat shock, genotoxic stress, and nutrient stress. Regulation of transcription is a key component of the Sumo stress response, and multiple mechanisms have been described by which ...

  2. The flow of forces through cellular materials

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Mitchell A.

    2012-01-01

    Describing and measuring the elastic properties of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams can be a difficult problem when the cell structure is disordered. This paper suggests that tracking the flow of forces through the material can help in visualizing and understanding how the geometry of the cell structure affects the elastic behaviour. The mean strain tensor for a sample of material can be calculated by summing over the force paths, weighted by the strengths of the paths. This me...

  3. Imaging cellular and molecular biological functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorte, S.L. [Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France). Plateforme d' Imagerie Dynamique PFID-Imagopole; Frischknecht, F. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Parasitology

    2007-07-01

    'Imaging cellular and molecular biological function' provides a unique selection of essays by leading experts, aiming at scientist and student alike who are interested in all aspects of modern imaging, from its application and up-scaling to its development. Indeed the philosophy of this volume is to provide student, researcher, PI, professional or provost the means to enter this applications field with confidence, and to construct the means to answer their own specific questions. (orig.)

  4. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Jumaat Mohd Yussof; Effat Omar; Pai, Dinker R.; Suneet Sood

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth f...

  5. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    OpenAIRE

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira; João Paulo Ferreira Schoffen

    2010-01-01

    Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the fac...

  6. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology o...

  7. Introduction to Tissular and Cellular Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JF; STOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    Most human tissues do not regenerate spontaneously, which is why cellular therapies and tissular engineering are promising alternatives. The principle is simple: cells are sampled in a patient and introduced in the damaged tissue or in a tridimentional porous support and cultivated in a bioreactor in which the physico-chemical and mechanical parameters are controlled. Once the tissues (or the cells) are mature they may be implanted. In parallel, the development of biotherapies with stem cells is a field of ...

  8. Empirical multiscale networks of cellular regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin de Bivort

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Grouping genes by similarity of expression across multiple cellular conditions enables the identification of cellular modules. The known functions of genes enable the characterization of the aggregate biological functions of these modules. In this paper, we use a high-throughput approach to identify the effective mutual regulatory interactions between modules composed of mouse genes from the Alliance for Cell Signaling (AfCS murine B-lymphocyte database which tracks the response of approximately 15,000 genes following chemokine perturbation. This analysis reveals principles of cellular organization that we discuss along four conceptual axes. (1 Regulatory implications: the derived collection of influences between any two modules quantifies intuitive as well as unexpected regulatory interactions. (2 Behavior across scales: trends across global networks of varying resolution (composed of various numbers of modules reveal principles of assembly of high-level behaviors from smaller components. (3 Temporal behavior: tracking the mutual module influences over different time intervals provides features of regulation dynamics such as duration, persistence, and periodicity. (4 Gene Ontology correspondence: the association of modules to known biological roles of individual genes describes the organization of functions within coexpressed modules of various sizes. We present key specific results in each of these four areas, as well as derive general principles of cellular organization. At the coarsest scale, the entire transcriptional network contains five divisions: two divisions devoted to ATP production/biosynthesis and DNA replication that activate all other divisions, an "extracellular interaction" division that represses all other divisions, and two divisions (proliferation/differentiation and membrane infrastructure that activate and repress other divisions in specific ways consistent with cell cycle control.

  9. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  10. Stability of Stochastic Neutral Cellular Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Zhao, Hongyong

    In this paper, we study a class of stochastic neutral cellular neural networks. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional and employing the nonnegative semi-martingale convergence theorem we give some sufficient conditions ensuring the almost sure exponential stability of the networks. The results obtained are helpful to design stability of networks when stochastic noise is taken into consideration. Finally, two examples are provided to show the correctness of our analysis.

  11. Cellular Automation of Galactic Habitable Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotic, Branislav

    2010-01-01

    We present a preliminary results of our Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) 2D probabilistic cellular automata models. The relevant time-scales (emergence of life, it's diversification and evolution influenced with the global risk function) are modeled as the probability matrix elements and are chosen in accordance with the Copernican principle to be well-represented by the data inferred from the Earth's fossil record. With Fermi's paradox as a main boundary condition the resulting histories of astrobiological landscape are discussed.

  12. Cognitive resource management for heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yongkang

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief focuses on cognitive resource management in heterogeneous cellular networks (Het Net) with small cell deployment for the LTE-Advanced system. It introduces the Het Net features, presents practical approaches using cognitive radio technology in accommodating small cell data relay and optimizing resource allocation and examines the effectiveness of resource management among small cells given limited coordination bandwidth and wireless channel uncertainty. The authors introduce different network characteristics of small cell, investigate the mesh of small cell access points in

  13. Cellular Kinetics of Perivascular MSC Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. W. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  14. HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H F

    2011-12-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be \\'tipped\\' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between \\'normal\\' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.

  15. Dynamic Channel Allocation in Sectored Cellular Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is known that dynamic channel assignment(DCA) strategy outperforms the fixed channel assignment(FCA) strategy in omni-directional antenna cellular systems. One of the most important methods used in DCA was channel borrowing. But with the emergence of cell sectorization and spatial division multiple access(SDMA) which are used to increase the capacity of cellular systems, the channel assignment faces a series of new problems. In this paper, a dynamic channel allocation scheme based on sectored cellular systems is proposed. By introducing intra-cell channel borrowing (borrowing channels from neighboring sectors) and inter-cell channel borrowing (borrowing channels from neighboring cells) methods, previous DCA strategies, including compact pattern based channel borrowing(CPCB) and greedy based dynamic channel assignment(GDCA) schemes proposed by the author, are improved significantly. The computer simulation shows that either intra-cell borrowing scheme or inter-cell borrowing scheme is efficient enough to uniform and non-uniform traffic service distributions.

  16. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  17. Literature Review on Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri Houshyar, A.; Leman, Z.; Pakzad Moghadam, H.; Ariffin, M. K. A. M.; Ismail, N.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2014-06-01

    In previous decades, manufacturers faced a lot of challenges because of globalization and high competition in markets. These problems arise from shortening product life cycle, rapid variation in demand of products, and also rapid changes in manufcaturing technologies. Nowadays most manufacturing companies expend considerable attention for improving flexibility and responsiveness in order to overcome these kinds of problems and also meet customer's needs. By considering the trend toward the shorter product life cycle, the manufacturing environment is towards manufacturing a wide variety of parts in small batches [1]. One of the major techniques which are applied for improving manufacturing competitiveness is Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS). CMS is type of manufacturing system which tries to combine flexibility of job shop and also productivity of flow shop. In addition, Dynamic cellular manufacturing system which considers different time periods for the manufacturing system becomes an important topic and attracts a lot of attention to itself. Therefore, this paper made attempt to have a brief review on this issue and focused on all published paper on this subject. Although, this topic gains a lot of attention to itself during these years, none of previous researchers focused on reviewing the literature of that which can be helpful and useful for other researchers who intend to do the research on this topic. Therefore, this paper is the first study which has focused and reviewed the literature of dynamic cellular manufacturing system.

  18. Cellular vs. organ approaches to dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular distribution of tissue-incorporated radionuclides has generally been neglected in the dosimetry of internal emitters. Traditional dosimetry assumes homogeneous distribution of radionuclides in organs of interest, while presuming that the ranges of particulate radiations are large relative to typical cell diameters. The macroscopic distribution of dose thus calculated has generally served as a sufficient approximation for the energy deposited within radiosensitive sites. However, with the increasing utilization of intracellular agents, such as thallium-201, it has become necessary to examine the microscopic distribution of energy at the cellular level. This is particularly important in the instance of radionuclides that decay by electron capture or by internal conversion with the release of Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons. In many instances, these electrons are released as a dense shower of low-energy particles with ranges of subcellular dimensions. The high electron density in the immediate vicinity of the decaying atom produces a focal deposition of energy that far exceeds the average dose taken over several cell diameters. These studies point out the increasing need to take into account the microscopic distribution of dose on the cellular level as radionuclides distributed in cells become more commonplace, especially if the decay involves electron capture or internal conversion. As radiotracers are developed for the measurement of intracellular functions these factors should be given greater consideration. 16 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  19. Coordination of autophagy with other cellular activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan WANG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2013-01-01

    The cell biological phenomenon of autophagy has attracted increasing attention in recent years,partly as a consequence of the discovery of key components of its cellular machinery.Autophagy plays a crucial role in a myriad of cellular functions.Autophagy has its own regulatory mechanisms,but this process is not isolated.Autophagy is coordinated with other cellular activities to maintain cell homeostasis.Autophagy is critical for a range of human physiological processes.The multifunctional roles of autophagy are explained by its ability to interact with several key components of various cell pathways.In this review,we focus on the coordination between autophagy and other physiological processes,including the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS),energy homeostasis,aging,programmed cell death,the immune responses,microbial invasion and inflammation.The insights gained from investigating autophagic networks should increase our understanding of their roles in human diseases and their potential as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia;

    2013-01-01

    and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing.......This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dutch...