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Sample records for cellular regulatory mechanisms

  1. [Regulatory role of mechanical stress response in cellular function: development of new drugs and tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Kazutaka; Matsuda, Takehisa; Oike, Masahiro; Obara, Kazuo; Laher, Ismail; Sugiura, Seiryo; Ohata, Hisayuki; Nakayama, Koichi

    2003-02-01

    The investigation of mechanotransduction in the cardiovascular system is essentially important for elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in not only the maintenance of hemodynamic homeostasis but also etiology of cardiovascular diseases including arteriosclerosis. The present review summarizes the latest research performed by six academic groups, and presented at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Pharmacological Society. Technology of cellular biomechanics is also required for research and clinical application of a vascular hybrid tissue responding to pulsatile stress. 1) Vascular tissue engineering: Design of pulsatile stress-responsive scaffold and in vivo vascular wall reconstruction (T. Matsuda); 2) Cellular mechanisms of mechanosensitive calcium transients in vascular endothelium (M. Oike et al.); 3) Cross-talk of stimulation with fluid flow and lysophosphatidic acid in vascular endothelial cells (K. Momose et al.); 4) Mechanotransduction of vascular smooth muscles: Rate-dependent stretch-induced protein phosphorylations and contractile activation (K. Obara et al.); 5) Lipid mediators in vascular myogenic tone (I. Laher et al.); and 6) Caldiomyocyte regulates its mechanical output in response to mechanical load (S. Sugiura et al.).

  2. Positive and Negative Regulatory Mechanisms for Fine-Tuning Cellularity and Functions of Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Taishin; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Nobuko; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.

    2015-01-01

    Self-tolerant T cells and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus. A wide variety of cell–cell interactions in the thymus is required for the differentiation, proliferation, and repertoire selection of T cells. Various secreted and cell surface molecules expressed in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) mediate these processes. Moreover, cytokines expressed by cells of hematopoietic origin regulate the cellularity of TECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family RANK ligand, lymphotoxin, and CD40 ligand, expressed in T cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), promote the differentiation and proliferation of medullary TECs (mTECs) that play critical roles in the induction of immune tolerance. A recent study suggests that interleukin-22 (IL-22) produced by ILCs promotes regeneration of TECs after irradiation. Intriguingly, tumor growth factor-β and osteoprotegerin limit cellularity of mTECs, thereby attenuating regulatory T cell generation. We will review recent insights into the molecular basis for cell–cell interactions regulating differentiation and proliferation of mTECs and also discuss about a perspective on use of mathematical models for understanding this complicated system. PMID:26441966

  3. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  4. [Division of regulatory cellular systems (Lvov)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusen', S I

    1995-01-01

    Two departments of the A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine were founded in 1969 in Lviv. These were: the Department of Biochemistry of Cell Differentiation headed by Professor S. I. Kusen and Department of Regulation of Cellular Synthesis of Low Molecular Weight Compounds headed by Professor G. M. Shavlovsky. The Lviv Division of the A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine with Professor S. I. Kusen as its chief, was founded in 1974 on the basis of these departments and the Laboratory of Modelling of Regulatory Cellular Systems headed by Professor M. P. Derkach. The above mentioned laboratory which was not the structural unit obtained the status of Structural Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics in 1982 and was headed by O. A. Goida, Candidate of biological sciences. From 1983 the Laboratory of Correcting Therapy of Malignant Tumors and Hemoblastoses at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Chief--S. V. Ivasivka, Candidate of medical sciences) was included in the structure of the Division. That Laboratory was soon transformed into the Department of Carbohydrate Metabolism Regulation headed by Professor I. D. Holovatsky. In 1988 this Department was renamed into the Department of Glycoprotein Biochemistry and headed by M. D. Lutsik, Doctor of biological sciences. In 1982 one more Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics was founded at the Department of Regulation of Cellular Synthesis of Low Molecular Weight Compounds, in 1988 it was transformed into the Department of Biochemical Genetics (Chief--Professor A. A. Sibirny). In 1989 the Laboratory of Anion Transport was taken from A. V. Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of Ukraine to Lviv Division of this Institute. This laboratory was headed by Professor M. M. Veliky. One more reorganization in the Division structure took place in 1994. The Department of

  5. Cellular mechanisms that control mistranslation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Noah M; Lazazzera, Beth A; Ibba, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mistranslation broadly encompasses the introduction of errors during any step of protein synthesis, leading to the incorporation of an amino acid that is different from the one encoded by the gene. Recent research has vastly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms that control mistranslation...

  6. A study of bacterial gene regulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sabine

    the different regulatory mechanisms affect system dynamics. We have designed a synthetic gene regulatory network (GRN) in bacterial cells that enables us to study the dynamics of GRNs. The results presented in this PhD thesis show that model equations based on the established mechanisms of action of each...... of a particular type of regulatory mechanism. The synthetic system presented in this thesis is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind to allow a direct comparison of the dynamic behaviors of gene regulatory networks that employ different mechanisms of regulation. In addition to studying the dynamic behavior...... of GRNs this thesis also provided the first evidence of the sensor histidine kinase VC1831 being an additional player in the Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing (QS) GRN. Bacteria use a process of cell-cell communication called QS which enable the bacterial cells to collectively control their gene expression...

  7. [Cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, Serge

    2010-01-01

    A defining characteristic of the brain is its remarkable capacity to undergo activity-dependent functional and morphological remodelling via mechanisms of plasticity that form the basis of our capacity to encode and retain memories. Today, it is generally accepted that one key neurobiological mechanism underlying the formation of memories reside in activity-driven modifications of synaptic strength and structural remodelling of neural networks activated during learning. The discovery and detailed report of the phenomenon generally known as long-term potentiation, a long-lasting activity-dependent form of synaptic strengthening, opened a new chapter in the study of the neurobiological substrate of memory in the vertebrate brain, and this form of synaptic plasticity has now become the dominant model in the search for the cellular bases of learning and memory. To date, the key events in the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation are starting to be identified. They require the activation of specific receptors and of several molecular cascades to convert extracellular signals into persistent functional changes in neuronal connectivity. Accumulating evidence suggests that the rapid activation of neuronal gene programs is a key mechanism underlying the enduring modification of neural networks required for the laying down of memory. The recent developments in the search for the cellular and molecular mechanisms of memory storage are reviewed.

  8. Cellular and physical mechanisms of branching morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2014-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is the developmental program that builds the ramified epithelial trees of various organs, including the airways of the lung, the collecting ducts of the kidney, and the ducts of the mammary and salivary glands. Even though the final geometries of epithelial trees are distinct, the molecular signaling pathways that control branching morphogenesis appear to be conserved across organs and species. However, despite this molecular homology, recent advances in cell lineage analysis and real-time imaging have uncovered surprising differences in the mechanisms that build these diverse tissues. Here, we review these studies and discuss the cellular and physical mechanisms that can contribute to branching morphogenesis. PMID:25005470

  9. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  10. Regulatory mechanisms link phenotypic plasticity to evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have a remarkable capacity to respond to environmental change. They can either respond directly, by means of phenotypic plasticity, or they can slowly adapt through evolution. Yet, how phenotypic plasticity links to evolutionary adaptability is largely unknown. Current studies of plasticity tend to adopt a phenomenological reaction norm (RN) approach, which neglects the mechanisms underlying plasticity. Focusing on a concrete question - the optimal timing of bacterial sporulation - we here also consider a mechanistic approach, the evolution of a gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying plasticity. Using individual-based simulations, we compare the RN and GRN approach and find a number of striking differences. Most importantly, the GRN model results in a much higher diversity of responsive strategies than the RN model. We show that each of the evolved strategies is pre-adapted to a unique set of unseen environmental conditions. The regulatory mechanisms that control plasticity therefore critically link phenotypic plasticity to the adaptive potential of biological populations.

  11. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  12. Myoblast fusion: Experimental systems and cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schejter, Eyal D

    2016-12-01

    Fusion of myoblasts gives rise to the large, multi-nucleated muscle fibers that power and support organism motion and form. The mechanisms underlying this prominent form of cell-cell fusion have been investigated by a variety of experimental approaches, in several model systems. The purpose of this review is to describe and discuss recent progress in the field, as well as point out issues currently unresolved and worthy of further investigation. Following a description of several new experimental settings employed in the study of myoblast fusion, a series of topics relevant to the current understanding of the process are presented. These pertain to elements of three major cellular machineries- cell-adhesion, the actin-based cytoskeleton and membrane-associated elements- all of which play key roles in mediating myoblast fusion. Among the issues raised are the diversity of functions ascribed to different adhesion proteins (e.g. external cell apposition and internal recruitment of cytoskeleton regulators); functional significance of fusion-associated actin structures; and discussion of alternative mechanisms employing single or multiple fusion pore formation as the basis for muscle cell fusion.

  13. Dynamical modeling and analysis of large cellular regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérenguier, D.; Chaouiya, C.; Monteiro, P. T.; Naldi, A.; Remy, E.; Thieffry, D.; Tichit, L.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamical analysis of large biological regulatory networks requires the development of scalable methods for mathematical modeling. Following the approach initially introduced by Thomas, we formalize the interactions between the components of a network in terms of discrete variables, functions, and parameters. Model simulations result in directed graphs, called state transition graphs. We are particularly interested in reachability properties and asymptotic behaviors, which correspond to terminal strongly connected components (or "attractors") in the state transition graph. A well-known problem is the exponential increase of the size of state transition graphs with the number of network components, in particular when using the biologically realistic asynchronous updating assumption. To address this problem, we have developed several complementary methods enabling the analysis of the behavior of large and complex logical models: (i) the definition of transition priority classes to simplify the dynamics; (ii) a model reduction method preserving essential dynamical properties, (iii) a novel algorithm to compact state transition graphs and directly generate compressed representations, emphasizing relevant transient and asymptotic dynamical properties. The power of an approach combining these different methods is demonstrated by applying them to a recent multilevel logical model for the network controlling CD4+ T helper cell response to antigen presentation and to a dozen cytokines. This model accounts for the differentiation of canonical Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes, as well as of inflammatory Th17 and regulatory T cells, along with many hybrid subtypes. All these methods have been implemented into the software GINsim, which enables the definition, the analysis, and the simulation of logical regulatory graphs.

  14. Molecular regulatory mechanisms of osteoclastogenesis through cytoprotective enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Fumiaki; Kanako, Itohiya; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Fukaya, Sari; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Wada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, take part in osteoclast differentiation as intra-cellular signaling molecules. The current assumed signaling cascade from RANK to ROS production is RANK, TRAF6, Rac1, and then Nox. The target molecules of ROS in RANKL signaling remain unclear; however, several reports support the theory that NF-κB signaling could be the crucial downstream signaling molecule of RANKL-mediated ROS signaling. Furthermore, ROS exert cytotoxic effects such as peroxidation of lipids and phospholipids and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. Therefore, cells have several protective mechanisms against oxidative stressors that mainly induce cytoprotective enzymes and ROS scavenging. Three well-known mechanisms regulate cytoprotective enzymes including Nrf2-, FOXO-, and sirtuin-dependent mechanisms. Several reports have indicated a crosslink between FOXO- and sirtuin-dependent regulatory mechanisms. The agonists against the regulatory mechanisms are reported to induce these cytoprotective enzymes successfully. Some of them inhibit osteoclast differentiation and bone destruction via attenuation of intracellular ROS signaling. In this review article, we discuss the above topics and summarize the current information available on the relationship between cytoprotective enzymes and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26795736

  15. Molecular regulatory mechanisms of osteoclastogenesis through cytoprotective enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kanzaki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, take part in osteoclast differentiation as intra-cellular signaling molecules. The current assumed signaling cascade from RANK to ROS production is RANK, TRAF6, Rac1, and then Nox. The target molecules of ROS in RANKL signaling remain unclear; however, several reports support the theory that NF-κB signaling could be the crucial downstream signaling molecule of RANKL-mediated ROS signaling. Furthermore, ROS exert cytotoxic effects such as peroxidation of lipids and phospholipids and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. Therefore, cells have several protective mechanisms against oxidative stressors that mainly induce cytoprotective enzymes and ROS scavenging. Three well-known mechanisms regulate cytoprotective enzymes including Nrf2-, FOXO-, and sirtuin-dependent mechanisms. Several reports have indicated a crosslink between FOXO- and sirtuin-dependent regulatory mechanisms. The agonists against the regulatory mechanisms are reported to induce these cytoprotective enzymes successfully. Some of them inhibit osteoclast differentiation and bone destruction via attenuation of intracellular ROS signaling. In this review article, we discuss the above topics and summarize the current information available on the relationship between cytoprotective enzymes and osteoclastogenesis.

  16. A cellular mechanism for system memory consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel W. H. Remme

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Declarative memories initially depend on the hippocampus. Over a period of weeks to years, however, these memories become hippocampus-independent through a process called system memory consolidation. The underlying cellular mechanisms are unclear. Here, we suggest a consolidation mechanism, which is based on STDP and a ubiquitous anatomical network motif. As a first step in the memory consolidation process, we consider pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 area. These cells receive Schaffer collateral (SC input from the CA3 area at the proximal dendrites, and perforant path (PP input from entorhinal cortex at the distal dendrites. Both pathways carry sensory information that has been processed by cortical networks and that enters the hippocampus through the entorhinal cortex. Hence, information from entorhinal cortex reaches CA1 cells through an indirect pathway (via CA3 and SC and a direct pathway (PP. Memories are assumed to be initially stored in the recurrent CA3 network and the SC synapses during the awake, exploratory state. During a subsequent consolidation phase (during slow-wave sleep SC-dependent memories are partly transferred to the PP synapses. Through mathematical analysis and numerical simulations we show that this consolidation process occurs as a natural result from the combination of (1 STDP at PP synapses and (2 the temporal correlations between SC and PP activities, since the (indirect SC input is delayed compared to the (direct PP input by about 5-10 ms. With a detailed compartmental model we then show that the spatial tuning of a CA1 cell is copied from the proximal SC-synaptic inputs to the distal PP-inputs. Next, we repeated the network motif across many levels in a hierarchical network model: each direct connection at one level is part of the indirect pathway of the next level. Analysis and simulations of this hierarchical system demonstrate that memories gradually move from hippocampus into neocortex. Moreover, the

  17. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies.

  18. Mechanisms of T regulatory cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yarkoni, Shai

    2008-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a pivotal role in tolerance to self-antigens and tissue grafts, and suppression of autoimmune reactions. These cells modulate the intensity and quality of immune reactions through attenuation of the cytolytic activities of reactive immune cells. Treg cells operate primarily at the site of inflammation where they modulate the immune reaction through three major mechanisms: a) direct killing of cytotoxic cells through cell-to-cell contact, b) inhibition of cytokine production by cytotoxic cells, in particular interleukin-2, c) direct secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines, in particular TGF-beta and interleukin-10. In addition to differential contributions of these mechanisms under variable inflammatory conditions, mechanistic complexity and diversity evolves from the diverse tasks performed by various Treg cell subsets in different stages of the immune reaction. Here we attempt to integrate the current experimental evidence to delineate the major suppressive pathways of Treg cells.

  19. Multiphoton imaging of renal regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Toma, Ildikó; Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah L

    2009-04-01

    Most physiological functions of the kidneys, including the clearance of metabolic waste products, maintenance of body fluid, electrolyte homeostasis, and blood pressure, are achieved by complex interactions between multiple renal cell types and previously inaccessible structures in many organ parts that have been difficult to study. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy offers a state-of-the-art imaging technique for deep optical sectioning of living tissues and organs with minimal deleterious effects. Dynamic regulatory processes and multiple functions in the intact kidney can be quantitatively visualized in real time, noninvasively, and with submicron resolution. This article reviews innovative multiphoton imaging technologies and their applications that provided the most complex, immediate, and dynamic portrayal of renal function-clearly depicting as well as analyzing the components and mechanisms involved in renal (patho)physiology.

  20. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  1. Cellular effector mechanisms against Plasmodium liver stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    Advances in our understanding of the molecular and cell biology of the malaria parasite have led to new vaccine development efforts resulting in a pipeline of over 40 candidates undergoing clinical phase I-III trials. Vaccine-induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells specific for pre-erythrocytic stage antigens have been found to express cytolytic and multi-cytokine effector functions that support a key role for these T cells within the hepatic environment. However, little is known of the cellular interactions that occur during the effector phase in which the intracellular hepatic stage of the parasite is targeted and destroyed. This review focuses on cell biological aspects of the interaction between malaria-specific effector cells and the various antigen-presenting cells that are known to exist within the liver, including hepatocytes, dendritic cells, Kupffer cells, stellate cells and sinusoidal endothelia. Considering the unique immune properties of the liver, it is conceivable that these different hepatic antigen-presenting cells fulfil distinct but complementary roles during the effector phase against Plasmodium liver stages.

  2. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Nevins W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM and remodeling of the lung architecture. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is considered the most common and severe form of the disease, with a median survival of approximately three years and no proven effective therapy. Despite the fact that effective treatments are absent and the precise mechanisms that drive fibrosis in most patients remain incompletely understood, an extensive body of scientific literature regarding pulmonary fibrosis has accumulated over the past 35 years. In this review, we discuss three broad areas which have been explored that may be responsible for the combination of altered lung fibroblasts, loss of alveolar epithelial cells, and excessive accumulation of ECM: inflammation and immune mechanisms, oxidative stress and oxidative signaling, and procoagulant mechanisms. We discuss each of these processes separately to facilitate clarity, but certainly significant interplay will occur amongst these pathways in patients with this disease.

  3. The cellular automaton interpretation of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the deterministic view of quantum mechanics developed by Nobel Laureate Gerard 't Hooft. Dissatisfied with the uncomfortable gaps in the way conventional quantum mechanics meshes with the classical world, 't Hooft has revived the old hidden variable ideas, but now in a much more systematic way than usual. In this, quantum mechanics is viewed as a tool rather than a theory. The book presents examples of models that are classical in essence, but can be analysed by the use of quantum techniques, and argues that even the Standard Model, together with gravitational interactions, might be viewed as a quantum mechanical approach to analysing a system that could be classical at its core. He shows how this approach, even though it is based on hidden variables, can be plausibly reconciled with Bell's theorem, and how the usual objections voiced against the idea of ‘superdeterminism' can be overcome, at least in principle. This framework elegantly explains - and automatically cures - the problems of...

  4. Material and mechanical factors:new strategy in cellular neurogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hillary Stoll; Il Keun Kwon; Jung Yul Lim

    2014-01-01

    Since damaged neural circuits are not generally self-recovered, developing methods to stimulate neurogenesis is critically required. Most studies have examined the effects of soluble pharma-cological factors on the cellular neurogenesis. On the other hand, it is now recognized that the other extracellular factors, including material and mechanical cues, also have a strong potential to induce cellular neurogenesis. This article will review recent data on the material (chemical patterning, micro/nano-topography, carbon nanotube, graphene) and mechanical (static cue from substrate stiffness, dynamic cue from stretch and lfow shear) stimulations of cellular neuro-genesis. These approaches may provide new neural regenerative medicine protocols. Scaffolding material templates capable of triggering cellular neurogenesis can be explored in the presence of neurogenesis-stimulatory mechanical environments, and also with conventional soluble factors, to enhance axonal growth and neural network formation in neural tissue engineering.

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  6. Cellular and network mechanisms of electrographic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor; Fröhlich, Flavio; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    Epileptic seizures constitute a complex multiscale phenomenon that is characterized by synchronized hyperexcitation of neurons in neuronal networks. Recent progress in understanding pathological seizure dynamics provides crucial insights into underlying mechanisms and possible new avenues for the development of novel treatment modalities. Here we review some recent work that combines in vivo experiments and computational modeling to unravel the pathophysiology of seizures of cortical origin. We particularly focus on how activity-dependent changes in extracellular potassium concentration affects the intrinsic dynamics of neurons involved in cortical seizures characterized by spike/wave complexes and fast runs. PMID:19190736

  7. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Keeling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia.

  8. Mechanics of an Ultrafast Cellular Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Gaurav; Dickinson, Richard B.; Ladd, Tony

    2009-03-01

    Vorticella Convallaria is one of a class of fast-moving organisms, traversing its body size in less than a millisecond. It has two main parts, the cell body and a stalk, which attaches the cell body to the substrate. The stalk houses a slender, elastic structure called Spasmoneme, which winds helically inside the stalk and generates a strong tensile force in response to Calcium signaling. We are developing numerical simulations of the collapsing stalk to quantify the magnitude and time scale of the force generation. We have coupled a Kirchhoff model of an elastic rod (representing the stalk) with an embedded helically wound filament (representing the Spasmoneme). Contraction of this assembly is driven by a constant velocity Calcium signal that induces a state of tension in the Spasmoneme. Depending on the speed of the Calcium signal, we observe different mechanical responses from the contracting stalk, which we compare with experimental observations. We follow the interplay of contraction, twist and bend to explain some unexpected features of the retraction process. Two different macroscopic models have been proposed to explain the time-dependent velocity of the cell body; we compare the predictions of these models with the dynamics revealed by our filament model.

  9. Regulatory capital requirements and bail in mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, B.P.M.; Haentjens, M.; Wessels, B.

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of the Capital Requirements Regulation (CRR) in the European Union, the qualitative requirements for bank regulatory capital have changed. These changes aim at implementing in Europe the Basel III principles for better bank capital that is able to absorb losses of banks, withou

  10. [Analysis of the cellular tropism of JC virus with archetypal regulatory region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Y

    1997-07-01

    JC virus (JCV) with an archetypal regulatory region (archetype) has been cloned from urines of a healthy individual. It has been suggested that the regulatory region of prototype JC virus (PML type) isolated from brain of PML patient was derived from that of the archetype by deletion and duplication. Biological characteristics of archetypal JCV, however, have not been fully studied. In the present study we examined the infectivity of archetypal JCV (CY), PML-type JCV (Mad-1) and Chimera JCV (Mad-1/CR-CY), in which the regulatory region is composed of CY and the other region Mad-1. DNAs from the three JCV types were transfected into COS-7 (monkey kidney cells transformed with SV40 T) and IMR-32 (human neuroblastoma cell). COS-7 was permissive for all three types, but IMR-32 was only infected with Mad-1. Infected DNAs were confirmed by Southern blotting, and the constancy of the regulatory regions before and after transmission was verified by DNA sequencing. The results showed that the viral regulatory region was related to viral cell tropism and that PML type regulatory region would be necessary for IMR-32 to propagate. The fact that COS-7 was susceptible for all three types may be explained by the function of SV40 T protein. In addition, we first succeeded in the propagation of CY in COS-7, which would provide a useful system to analyze the mechanism of persistent infection of archetypal JCV.

  11. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  12. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  13. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  14. Regulatory subunits of PKA define an axis of cellular proliferation/differentiation in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall John C

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA exists in two isoforms, RI and RII, which distinguish the PKA isozymes, type I (PKA-I and type II (PKA-II. Evidence obtained from a variety of different experimental approaches has shown that the relative levels of type I and type II PKA in cells can play a major role in determining the balance between cell growth and differentiation. In order to characterize the effect of PKA type I and type II regulatory subunits on gene transcription at a global level, the PKA regulatory subunit genes for RIα and RIIβ were stably transfected into cells of the ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR8. Results RIα transfected cells exhibit hyper-proliferative growth and RIIβ transfected cells revert to a relatively quiescent state. Profiling by microarray revealed equally profound changes in gene expression between RIα, RIIβ, and parental OVCAR cells. Genes specifically up-regulated in RIα cells were highly enriched for pathways involved in cell growth while genes up-regulated in RIIβ cells were enriched for pathways involved in differentiation. A large group of genes (~3600 was regulated along an axis of proliferation/differentiation between RIα, parental, and RIIβ cells. RIα/wt and RIIβ/wt gene regulation was shown by two separate and distinct gene set analytical methods to be strongly cross-correlated with a generic model of cellular differentiation. Conclusion Overexpression of PKA regulatory subunits in an ovarian cancer cell line dramatically influences the cell phenotype. The proliferation phenotype is strongly correlated with recently identified clinical biomarkers predictive of poor prognosis in ovarian cancer suggesting a possible pivotal role for PKA regulation in disease progression.

  15. Porosity and Mechanical Strength of an Autoclaved Clayey Cellular Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Guglielmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the porosity and the mechanical strength of an Autoclaved Clayey Cellular Concrete (ACCC with the binder produced with 75 wt% kaolinite clay and 25 wt% Portland cement. Aluminum powder was used as foaming agent, from 0.2 wt% to 0.8 wt%, producing specimens with different porosities. The results show that the specimens with higher content of aluminum presented pore coalescence, which can explain the lower porosity of these samples. The porosities obtained with the aluminum contents used in the study were high (approximately 80%, what accounts for the low mechanical strength of the investigated cellular concretes (maximum of 0.62 MPa. Nevertheless, comparing the results obtained in this study to the ones for low temperature clayey aerated concrete with similar compositions, it can be observed that autoclaving is effective for increasing the material mechanical strength.

  16. Self-regulatory mechanisms governing gender development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, K; Bandura, A

    1992-10-01

    This study tested predictions about development of gender-related thought and action from social cognitive theory. Children at 4 levels of gender constancy were assessed for their gender knowledge, personal gender standards, and gender-linked behavior under different situational conditions. Irrespective of gender constancy level, all children engaged in more same-sex than cross-sex typed behavior. Younger children reacted in a gender stereotypic manner to peers' gender-linked behavior but did not regulate their own behavior on the basis of personal gender standards. Older children exhibited substantial self-regulatory guidance based on personal standards. They expressed anticipatory self-approval for same-sex typed behavior and self-criticism for cross-sex typed behavior. Their anticipatory self-sanctions, in turn, predicted their actual gender-linked behavior. Neither gender knowledge nor gender constancy predicted gender-linked behavior. These results lend support to social cognitive theory that evaluation and regulation of gender-linked conduct shifts developmentally from anticipatory social sanctions to anticipatory self-sanctions rooted in personal standards.

  17. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation.

  18. Dynamics and mechanisms of quantum dot nanoparticle cellular uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telford William G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid growth of the nanotechnology industry and the wide application of various nanomaterials have raised concerns over their impact on the environment and human health. Yet little is known about the mechanism of cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. An array of nanomaterials has recently been introduced into cancer research promising for remarkable improvements in diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Among them, quantum dots (QDs distinguish themselves in offering many intrinsic photophysical properties that are desirable for targeted imaging and drug delivery. Results We explored the kinetics and mechanism of cellular uptake of QDs with different surface coatings in two human mammary cells. Using fluorescence microscopy and laser scanning cytometry (LSC, we found that both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells internalized large amount of QD655-COOH, but the percentage of endocytosing cells is slightly higher in MCF-7 cell line than in MCF-10A cell line. Live cell fluorescent imaging showed that QD cellular uptake increases with time over 40 h of incubation. Staining cells with dyes specific to various intracellular organelles indicated that QDs were localized in lysosomes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images suggested a potential pathway for QD cellular uptake mechanism involving three major stages: endocytosis, sequestration in early endosomes, and translocation to later endosomes or lysosomes. No cytotoxicity was observed in cells incubated with 0.8 nM of QDs for a period of 72 h. Conclusions The findings presented here provide information on the mechanism of QD endocytosis that could be exploited to reduce non-specific targeting, thereby improving specific targeting of QDs in cancer diagnosis and treatment applications. These findings are also important in understanding the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and in emphasizing the importance of strict environmental control of nanoparticles.

  19. Inferring cellular regulatory networks with Bayesian model averaging for linear regression (BMALR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xun; Zi, Zhike

    2014-08-01

    Bayesian network and linear regression methods have been widely applied to reconstruct cellular regulatory networks. In this work, we propose a Bayesian model averaging for linear regression (BMALR) method to infer molecular interactions in biological systems. This method uses a new closed form solution to compute the posterior probabilities of the edges from regulators to the target gene within a hybrid framework of Bayesian model averaging and linear regression methods. We have assessed the performance of BMALR by benchmarking on both in silico DREAM datasets and real experimental datasets. The results show that BMALR achieves both high prediction accuracy and high computational efficiency across different benchmarks. A pre-processing of the datasets with the log transformation can further improve the performance of BMALR, leading to a new top overall performance. In addition, BMALR can achieve robust high performance in community predictions when it is combined with other competing methods. The proposed method BMALR is competitive compared to the existing network inference methods. Therefore, BMALR will be useful to infer regulatory interactions in biological networks. A free open source software tool for the BMALR algorithm is available at https://sites.google.com/site/bmalr4netinfer/.

  20. Plant Antifreeze Proteins and Their Expression Regulatory Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Yuan-zhen; Lin Shan-zhi; Zhang Zhi-yi; Zhang Wei; Liu Wen-feng

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the major limiting environmental factors which constitutes the growth, development,productivity and distribution of plants. Over the past several years, the proteins and genes associated with freezing resistance of plants have been widely studied. The recent progress of domestic and foreign research on plant antifreeze proteins and the identification and characterization of plant antifreeze protein genes, especially on expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are reviewed in this paper. Finally, some unsolved problems and the trend of research in physiological functions and gene expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are discussed.

  1. The emergence and popularisation of autologous somatic cellular therapies in Australia: therapeutic innovation or regulatory failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Alison K; Stewart, Cameron; Kerridge, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Private stem cell clinics throughout Australia are providing autologous stem cell therapies for a range of chronic and debilitating illnesses despite the lack of published literature to support the clinical application of these therapies. The Therapeutic Goods Administration has excluded autologous stem cell therapies from its regulatory domain leaving such therapies to be regulated by the same mechanisms that regulate research, such as the National Health and Medical Research Council Research Ethics Guidelines, and clinical practice, such as the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. However, the provision of these stem cell therapies does not follow the established pathways for legitimate medical advance--therapeutic innovation or research. The current regulatory framework is failing to achieve its aims of protecting vulnerable patients and ensuring the proper conduct of medical practitioners in the private stem cell industry.

  2. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms associated with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Madon, Prochi F; Parikh, Firuza R

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a complex human condition and is known to be caused by numerous factors including genetic alterations and abnormalities. Increasing evidence from studies has associated perturbed epigenetic mechanisms with spermatogenesis and infertility. However, there has been no consensus...... on whether one or a collective of these altered states is responsible for the onset of infertility. Epigenetic alterations involve changes in factors that regulate gene expression without altering the physical sequence of DNA. Understanding these altered epigenetic states at the genomic level along...... with higher order organisation of chromatin in genes associated with infertility and pericentromeric regions of chromosomes, particularly 9 and Y, could further identify causes of idiopathic infertility. Determining the association between DNA methylation, chromatin state, and noncoding RNAs...

  3. Density-dependence as a size-independent regulatory mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vladar, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The growth function of populations is central in biomathematics. The main dogma is the existence of density-dependence mechanisms, which can be modelled with distinct functional forms that depend on the size of the Population. One important class of regulatory functions is the theta-logistic, which

  4. Neural tube closure: cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Galea, Gabriel L; Rolo, Ana; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2017-02-15

    Neural tube closure has been studied for many decades, across a range of vertebrates, as a paradigm of embryonic morphogenesis. Neurulation is of particular interest in view of the severe congenital malformations - 'neural tube defects' - that result when closure fails. The process of neural tube closure is complex and involves cellular events such as convergent extension, apical constriction and interkinetic nuclear migration, as well as precise molecular control via the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, Shh/BMP signalling, and the transcription factors Grhl2/3, Pax3, Cdx2 and Zic2. More recently, biomechanical inputs into neural tube morphogenesis have also been identified. Here, we review these cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms involved in neural tube closure, based on studies of various vertebrate species, focusing on the most recent advances in the field.

  5. Cellular studies and interaction mechanisms of extremely low frequency fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburdy, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the biological effects of ELF (extremely low frequency, electromagnetic fields has grown significantly. Health professionals and government administrators and regulators, scientists and engineers, and, importantly, an increasing number of individuals in the general public are interested in this health issue. The goal of research at the cellular level is to identify cellular responses to ELF fields, to develop a dose threshold for such interactions, and with such information to formulate and test appropriate interaction mechanisms. This review is selective and will discuss the most recent cellular studies directed at these goals which relate to power line, sinusoidal ELF fields. In these studies an interaction site at the cell membrane is by consensus a likely candidate, since changes in ion transport, ligand-receptor events such as antibody binding, and G protein activation have been reported. These changes strongly indicate that signal transduction (ST) can be influenced. Also, ELF fields are reported to influence enzyme activation, gene expression, protein synthesis, and cell proliferation, which are triggered by earlier ST events at the cell membrane. The concept of ELF fields altering early cell membrane events and thereby influencing intracellular cell function via the ST cascade is perhaps the most plausible biological framework currently being investigated for understanding ELF effects on cells. For example, the consequence of an increase due to ELF fields in mitogenesis, the final endpoint of the ST cascade, is an overall increase in the probability of mutagenesis and consequently cancer, according to the Ames epigenetic model of carcinogenesis. Consistent with this epigenetic mechanism and the ST pathway to carcinogenesis is recent evidence that ELF fields can alter breast cancer cell proliferation and can act as a copromoter in vitro. The most important dosimetric question being addressed currently is whether the electric (E) or the

  6. Cellular Transport Mechanisms of Cytotoxic Metallodrugs: An Overview beyond Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Spreckelmeyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of medicinal inorganic chemistry has grown consistently during the past 50 years; however, metal-containing coordination compounds represent only a minor proportion of drugs currently on the market, indicating that research in this area has not yet been thoroughly realized. Although platinum-based drugs as cancer chemotherapeutic agents have been widely studied, exact knowledge of the mechanisms governing their accumulation in cells is still lacking. However, evidence suggests active uptake and efflux mechanisms are involved; this may be involved also in other experimental metal coordination and organometallic compounds with promising antitumor activities in vitro and in vivo, such as ruthenium and gold compounds. Such knowledge would be necessary to elucidate the balance between activity and toxicity profiles of metal compounds. In this review, we present an overview of the information available on the cellular accumulation of Pt compounds from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies, as well as a summary of reports on the possible accumulation mechanisms for different families of experimental anticancer metal complexes (e.g., Ru Au and Ir. Finally, we discuss the need for rationalization of the investigational approaches available to study metallodrug cellular transport.

  7. Composition, structure and mechanical properties of several natural cellular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The stem piths of sunflower, kaoliang and corn are natural cellular materials. In this paper, the contents of the compositions of these piths are determined and their cell shapes and structures are examined through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Further research is conducted in the effects of the compositions and structures of the piths on the mechanical properties after testing the partial mechanical properties. The results show that the total cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin content of each sample approaches 75% of the dry mass of its primary cell walls. With the fall of R value, a parameter relative to the contents of the main compositions, the flexibilities of the cellular piths descend while their stresses and rigidities increase. The basic cell shape making up the sunflower pith is approximately a tetrakaidehedron. The stem piths of kaoliang and corn are made up of cells close to hexangular prisms and a few tubular ones which can observably reinforce their mechanical properties in the axial directions.

  8. Symbiophagy as a cellular mechanism for coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Craig A; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Martinez, Jon; Kushmaro, Ariel; Woodley, Cheryl M; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is a major contributor to the global declines of coral reefs. This phenomenon is characterized by the loss of symbiotic algae, their pigments or both. Despite wide scientific interest, the mechanisms by which bleaching occurs are still poorly understood. Here we report that the removal of the symbiont during light and temperature stress is achieved using the host's cellular autophagic-associated machinery. Host cellular and subcellular morphologies showed increased vacuolization and appearance of autophagic membranes surrounding a variety of organelles and surrounding the symbiotic algae. Markers of autophagy (Rab 7 and LAS) corroborate these observations. Results showed that during stress the symbiont vacuolar membrane is transformed from a conduit of nutrient exchange to a digestive organelle resulting in the consumption of the symbiont, a process we term symbiophagy. We posit that during a stress event, the mechanism maintaining symbiosis is destabilized and symbiophagy is activated, ultimately resulting in the phenomenon of bleaching. Symbiophagy may have evolved from a more general primordial innate intracellular protective pathway termed xenophagy.

  9. Integration of non-linear cellular mechanisms regulating microvascular perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, T M; Edwards, D H

    1999-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that interactions between the different cell types present in the vessel wall and the physical forces that result from blood flow are highly complex. This short article will review evidence that irregular fluctuations in vascular resistance are generated by non-linearity in the control mechanisms intrinsic to the smooth muscle cell and can be classified as chaotic. Non-linear systems theory has provided insights into the mechanisms involved at the cellular level by allowing the identification of dominant control variables and the construction of one-dimensional iterative maps to model vascular dynamics. Experiments with novel peptide inhibitors of gap junctions have shown that the coordination of aggregate responses depends on direct intercellular communication. The sensitivity of chaotic trajectories to perturbation may nevertheless generate a high degree of variability in the response to pharmacological interventions and altered perfusion conditions.

  10. Regulatory mechanisms of immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes and their failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Chantal; Besançon, Alix; Lemoine, Sébastien; You, Sylvaine; Marquet, Cindy; Candon, Sophie; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2016-07-01

    In this brief review we propose to discuss salient data showing the importance of immune regulatory mechanisms, and in particular of Treg, for the control of pathogenic anti-β-cell response in autoimmune diabetes. Disease progression that culminates with the massive destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells and advent of hyperglycemia and glycosuria tightly correlates with a functional deficit in immune regulation. Better dissection of the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which the immune system normally sustains tolerance to "self", and which become defective when autoimmune aggression is overt, is the only direct and robust way to learn how to harness these effectively, so as to restore immune tolerance in patients with insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. No doubt that regulatory T cells are a privileged mechanism underlying this self-tolerance in the periphery. The discovery of the key role of the transcription factor FoxP3, represented the cornerstone leading to the great advances in the field we are witnessing today. Type 1 diabetes is certainly one of the prototypic T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases where immune regulatory mechanisms relying on specialized subsets of T cells have been the most thoroughly analyzed from the fundamental point of view and also largely exploited in a translational therapeutic perspective.

  11. Small regulatory RNAs control the multi-cellular adhesive lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Boysen, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    . Our demonstration that basal expression of each of the three RNA species is sufficient to downregulate CsgD synthesis and prevent curli formation indicates that all play a prominent role in the curli regulatory network. Our findings provide the first clue as to how the Rcs signalling pathway...... and adhesive state that enables biofilm formation on surfaces. For this, the bacterium needs to reprogramme its gene expression, and in many E. coli and Salmonella strains the lifestyle shift relies on control cascades that inhibit flagellar expression and activate the synthesis of curli, extracellular...... adhesive fibres important for co-aggregation of cells and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces. By combining bioinformatics, genetic and biochemical analysis we identified three small RNAs that act by an antisense mechanism to downregulate translation of CsgD, the master regulator of curli synthesis...

  12. A cellular and regulatory map of the cholinergic nervous system of C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Laura; Kratsios, Paschalis; Serrano-Saiz, Esther; Sheftel, Hila; Mayo, Avi E; Hall, David H; White, John G; LeBoeuf, Brigitte; Garcia, L Rene; Alon, Uri; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-12-25

    Nervous system maps are of critical importance for understanding how nervous systems develop and function. We systematically map here all cholinergic neuron types in the male and hermaphrodite C. elegans nervous system. We find that acetylcholine (ACh) is the most broadly used neurotransmitter and we analyze its usage relative to other neurotransmitters within the context of the entire connectome and within specific network motifs embedded in the connectome. We reveal several dynamic aspects of cholinergic neurotransmitter identity, including a sexually dimorphic glutamatergic to cholinergic neurotransmitter switch in a sex-shared interneuron. An expression pattern analysis of ACh-gated anion channels furthermore suggests that ACh may also operate very broadly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a first application of this comprehensive neurotransmitter map, we identify transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control cholinergic neurotransmitter identity and cholinergic circuit assembly.

  13. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, Detmar [University of Bremen (Germany). Biochemistry, Department of Biology and Chemistry; Hartwig, Andrea [Technical University of Berlin (Germany). Institute of Food Technology and Food Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases. (orig.)

  14. Cellular mechanisms of posterior neural tube morphogenesis in the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Michael J; Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel

    2010-03-01

    The zebrafish is a well established model system for studying neural development, yet neurulation remains poorly understood in this organism. In particular, the morphogenetic movements that shape the posterior neural tube (PNT) have not been described. Using tools for imaging neural tissue and tracking the behavior of cells in real time, we provide the first comprehensive analysis of the cellular events shaping the PNT. We observe that this tissue is formed in a stepwise manner, beginning with merging of presumptive neural domains in the tailbud (Stage 1); followed by neural convergence and infolding to shape the neural rod (Stage 2); and continued elongation of the PNT, in absence of further convergence (Stage 3). We further demonstrate that cell proliferation plays only a minimal role in PNT elongation. Overall, these mechanisms resemble those previously described in anterior regions, suggesting that, in contrast to amniotes, neurulation is a fairly uniform process in zebrafish.

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of antiretroviral effects of HPA23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, D; Yeramian, P; Lambert, P; Spire, B; Daveloose, D; Barre-Sinoussi, F C; Chermann, J C

    1988-01-01

    HPA23 is an antimonio-tungstate that exhibits numerous antiviral activities both in vivo and in vitro. It has been described as a competitive inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT). Patients treated with daily injections of HPA23 show an inhibition of HIV RT activity in cell culture in 60% of the cases. Using biophysical (electronic spin resonance [ESR]), ultrastructural (microspectroscopic analysis), chemical (spectroscopy), and biological (cell culture) assays, HPA23 cellular and molecular mechanisms may be summarized as follows: 1) competitive inhibition of HIV-RT, 2) no or slight effect on cells infected with HIV in culture, 3) interactions with the cell membranes when long incubations are performed, and 4) antiviral activity possibly mediated by immune modulator effect of the drug.

  16. Cellular mechanism for spontaneous calcium oscillations in astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-fei WANG; Chen ZHOU; Ai-hui TANG; Shi-qiang WANG; Zhen CHAI

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the Ca2+ source and cellular mechanisms of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in hippocampal astrocytes. Methods: The cultured cells were loaded with Fluo-4 AM, the indicator of intracellular Ca2+, and the dynamic Ca2+ transients were visualized with confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Results: The spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in astrocytes were observed first in co-cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. These oscillations were not affected by tetrodotoxin (TTX) treatment and kept up in purity cultured astrocytes. The spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations were not impacted after blocking the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels or ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) bathing, indicating that intracellular Ca2+ elevation was not the result of extracellular Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, the correlation between the spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and the Ca2+ store in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were investigated with pharmacological experiments. The oscillations were: 1) enhanced when cells were exposed to both low Na+ (70 mmol/L) and high Ca2+ (5 mmol/L) solution, and eliminated completely by 2 μmol/L thapsigargin, a blocker of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase; and 2) still robust after the application with either 50 μmol/L ryanodine or 400 μmol/L tetracaine, two specific antagonists of ryanodine receptors, but depressed in a dose-dependent manner by 2-APB, an InsP3 receptors (InsP3R) blocker. Conclusion: InsP3R-induced ER Ca2+ release is an important cellular mechanism for the initiation of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation in hippocampal astrocytes.

  17. Mechanobiology and the microcirculation: cellular, nuclear and fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Pekkan, Kerem

    2010-04-01

    Endothelial cells are stimulated by shear stress throughout the vasculature and respond with changes in gene expression and by morphological reorganization. Mechanical sensors of the cell are varied and include cell surface sensors that activate intracellular chemical signaling pathways. Here, possible mechanical sensors of the cell including reorganization of the cytoskeleton and the nucleus are discussed in relation to shear flow. A mutation in the nuclear structural protein lamin A, related to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, is reviewed specifically as the mutation results in altered nuclear structure and stiffer nuclei; animal models also suggest significantly altered vascular structure. Nuclear and cellular deformation of endothelial cells in response to shear stress provides partial understanding of possible mechanical regulation in the microcirculation. Increasing sophistication of fluid flow simulations inside the vessel is also an emerging area relevant to the microcirculation as visualization in situ is difficult. This integrated approach to study--including medicine, molecular and cell biology, biophysics and engineering--provides a unique understanding of multi-scale interactions in the microcirculation.

  18. Glucose- and nitrogen sensing and regulatory mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødkaer, Steven V; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2014-01-01

    steps and by numerous different regulators. As numerous of these regulating proteins, biochemical mechanisms, and cellular pathways are evolutionary conserved, complex biochemical information relevant to humans can be obtained by studying simple organisms. Thus, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has...... been recognized as a powerful model system to study fundamental biochemical processes. In the present review, we highlight central signaling pathways and molecular circuits conferring nitrogen- and glucose sensing in S. cerevisiae....

  19. Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Zuñiga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is a major international public health problem. One-third of the world's population is thought to have latent tuberculosis, a condition where individuals are infected by the intracellular bacteria without active disease but are at risk for reactivation, if their immune system fails. Here, we discuss the role of nonspecific inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines and chemokines induced by interaction of innate receptors expressed in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. We also review current information regarding the importance of several cytokines including IL-17/IL-23 in the development of protective cellular and antibody-mediated protective responses against Mtb and their influence in containment of the infection. Finally, in this paper, emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of failure of Mtb control, including the immune dysregulation induced by the treatment with biological drugs in different autoimmune diseases. Further functional studies, focused on the mechanisms involved in the early host-Mtb interactions and the interplay between host innate and acquired immunity against Mtb, may be helpful to improve the understanding of protective responses in the lung and in the development of novel therapeutic and prophylactic tools in TB.

  20. Mitochondrial and cellular mechanisms for managing lipid excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Aon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current scientific debates center on the impact of lipids and mitochondrial function on diverse aspects of human health, nutrition and disease, among them the association of lipotoxicity with the onset of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and with heart dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. Mitochondria play a fundamental role in aging and in prevalent acute or chronic diseases. Lipids are main mitochondrial fuels however these molecules can also behave as uncouplers and inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Knowledge about the functional composition of these contradictory effects and their impact on mitochondrial-cellular energetics/redox status is incomplete.Cells store fatty acids (FAs as triacylglycerol and package them into cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs. New emerging data shows the LD as a highly dynamic storage pool of FAs that can be used for energy reserve. Lipid excess packaging into LDs can be seen as an adaptive response to fulfilling energy supply without hindering mitochondrial or cellular redox status and keeping low concentration of lipotoxic intermediates.Herein we review the mechanisms of action and utilization of lipids by mitochondria reported in liver, heart and skeletal muscle under relevant physiological situations, e.g. exercise. We report on perilipins, a family of proteins that associate with LDs in response to loading of cells with lipids. Evidence showing that in addition to physical contact, mitochondria and LDs exhibit metabolic interactions is presented and discussed. A hypothetical model of channeled lipid utilization by mitochondria is proposed. Direct delivery and channeled processing of lipids in mitochondria could represent a reliable and efficient way to maintain ROS within levels compatible with signaling while ensuring robust and reliable energy supply.

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of aldosterone producing adenoma development

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    Sheerazed eBoulkroun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary aldosteronism (PA is the most common form of secondary hypertension with an estimated prevalence of ~10% in referred patients. PA occurs as a result of a dysregulation of the normal mechanisms controlling adrenal aldosterone production. It is characterized by hypertension with low plasma renin and elevated aldosterone and often associated with hypokalemia. The two major causes of PA are unilateral aldosterone producing adenoma (APA and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, accounting together for ~95% of cases. In addition to the well-characterized effect of excess mineralocorticoids on blood pressure, high levels of aldosterone also have cardiovascular, renal and metabolic consequences. Hence, long-term consequences of PA include increased risk of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Despite recent progress in the management of patients with PA, critical issues related to diagnosis, subtype differentiation and treatment of non-surgically correctable forms still persist. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease should lead to the identification of more reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for a more sensitive and specific screening and new therapeutic options. In this review we will summarize our current knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of APA development. On one hand, we will discuss how various animal models have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of excess aldosterone production. On the other hand, we will summarize the major advances made during the last few years in the genetics of APA due to transcriptomic studies and whole exome sequencing. The identification of recurrent and somatic mutations in genes coding for ion channels (KCNJ5 and CACNA1D and ATPases (ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 allowed highlighting the central role of calcium signaling in autonomous aldosterone production by the adrenal.

  2. A cellular and regulatory map of the GABAergic nervous system of C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendrel, Marie; Atlas, Emily G; Hobert, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter maps are important complements to anatomical maps and represent an invaluable resource to understand nervous system function and development. We report here a comprehensive map of neurons in the C. elegans nervous system that contain the neurotransmitter GABA, revealing twice as many GABA-positive neuron classes as previously reported. We define previously unknown glia-like cells that take up GABA, as well as 'GABA uptake neurons' which do not synthesize GABA but take it up from the extracellular environment, and we map the expression of previously uncharacterized ionotropic GABA receptors. We use the map of GABA-positive neurons for a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulators that define the GABA phenotype. We synthesize our findings of specification of GABAergic neurons with previous reports on the specification of glutamatergic and cholinergic neurons into a nervous system-wide regulatory map which defines neurotransmitter specification mechanisms for more than half of all neuron classes in C. elegans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17686.001 PMID:27740909

  3. Unraveling the cellular and molecular mechanisms of repetitive magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eMüller-Dahlhaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous clinical studies, which have investigated the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in various brain diseases, our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying rTMS-based therapies remains limited. Thus, a deeper understanding of rTMS-induced neural plasticity is required to optimize current treatment protocols. Studies in small animals or appropriate in vitro preparations (including models of brain diseases provide highly useful experimental approaches in this context. State-of-the-art electrophysiological and live-cell imaging techniques that are well established in basic neuroscience can help answering some of the major questions in the field, such as (i which neural structures are activated during TMS, (ii how does rTMS induce Hebbian plasticity, and (iii are other forms of plasticity (e.g., metaplasticity, structural plasticity induced by rTMS? We argue that data gained from these studies will support the development of more effective and specific applications of rTMS in clinical practice.

  4. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27007394

  5. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-03-21

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms.

  6. Structural imprints in vivo decode RNA regulatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C.; Flynn, Ryan A.; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Crisalli, Pete; Lee, Byron; Jung, Jong-Wha; Kuchelmeister, Hannes Y.; Batista, Pedro J.; Torre, Eduardo A.; Kool, Eric T.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2015-03-01

    Visualizing the physical basis for molecular behaviour inside living cells is a great challenge for biology. RNAs are central to biological regulation, and the ability of RNA to adopt specific structures intimately controls every step of the gene expression program. However, our understanding of physiological RNA structures is limited; current in vivo RNA structure profiles include only two of the four nucleotides that make up RNA. Here we present a novel biochemical approach, in vivo click selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment (icSHAPE), which enables the first global view, to our knowledge, of RNA secondary structures in living cells for all four bases. icSHAPE of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome versus purified RNA folded in vitro shows that the structural dynamics of RNA in the cellular environment distinguish different classes of RNAs and regulatory elements. Structural signatures at translational start sites and ribosome pause sites are conserved from in vitro conditions, suggesting that these RNA elements are programmed by sequence. In contrast, focal structural rearrangements in vivo reveal precise interfaces of RNA with RNA-binding proteins or RNA-modification sites that are consistent with atomic-resolution structural data. Such dynamic structural footprints enable accurate prediction of RNA-protein interactions and N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification genome wide. These results open the door for structural genomics of RNA in living cells and reveal key physiological structures controlling gene expression.

  7. Finiteness due to cellular structure of R[sup N] I. Quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehagias, A.A. (Inst. of Theoretical Physics, Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Zoupanos, G. (Dept. of Physics, National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece))

    1994-04-01

    We construct a cellular space which has as a continuous limit the Euclidean space R[sup N]. We consider quantum mechanics on this cellular space and we examine in particular an harmonic oscillator and a free particle on the cellular R[sup 1], R[sup 2] respectively. In both cases we find that the energy spectrum is bounded from above. (orig.)

  8. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  9. Axial level-dependent molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the genesis of the embryonic neural plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Hisato; Takada, Shinji; Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor gene Sox2, centrally involved in neural primordial regulation, is activated by many enhancers. During the early stages of embryonic development, Sox2 is regulated by the enhancers N2 and N1 in the anterior neural plate (ANP) and posterior neural plate (PNP), respectively. This differential use of the enhancers reflects distinct regulatory mechanisms underlying the genesis of ANP and PNP. The ANP develops directly from the epiblast, triggered by nodal signal inhibition, and via the combined action of TFs SOX2, OTX2, POU3F1, and ZIC2, which promotes the the ANP development and inhibits other cell lineages. In contrast, the PNP is derived from neuromesodermal bipotential axial stem cells that develop into the neural plate when Sox2 is activated by the N1 enhancer, whereas they develop into the paraxial mesoderm when the N1 enhancer is repressed by the action of TBX6. The axial stem cells are maintained by the activity of WNT3a and T (Brachyury). However, at axial levels more anterior to the 8th somites (cervical levels), the development of both the neural plate and somite proceeds in the absence of WNT3a, T, or TBX6. These observations indicate that distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms determine neural plate genesis based on the axial level, and contradict the classical concept of the term "neural induction," which assumes a pan-neural plate mechanism.

  10. A Model of How Different Biology Experts Explain Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do…

  11. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  12. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenhaoChen; MeganS.Ford; KevinJ.Young; LiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4*CD8* double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  13. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhao Chen; Megan S. Ford; Kevin J. Young; Li Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  14. Naturally occurring regulatory T cells: markers, mechanisms, and manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmetterer, Klaus G; Neunkirchner, Alina; Pickl, Winfried F

    2012-06-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(high) forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) are key mediators of immunity, which orchestrate and maintain tolerance to self and foreign antigens. In the recent 1.5 decades, a multitude of studies have aimed to define the phenotype and function of nTregs and to assess their therapeutic potential for modulating immune mediated disorders such as autoimmunity, allergy, and episodes of transplant rejection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of nTregs. We address the exact definition of nTregs by specific markers and combinations thereof, which is a prerequisite for the state-of-the-art isolation of defined nTreg populations. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism by which nTregs mediate immunosuppression and how this knowledge might translate into novel therapeutic modalities. With first clinical studies of nTreg-based therapies being finished, questions concerning the reliable sources of nTregs are becoming more and more eminent. Consequently, approaches allowing conversion of CD4(+) T cells into nTregs by coculture with antigen-presenting cells, cytokines, and/or pharmacological agents are discussed. In addition, genetic engineering approaches for the generation of antigen-specific nTregs are described.

  15. Putting theory to the test: which regulatory mechanisms can drive realistic growth of a root?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Vos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a 'Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule' (ULSR was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the

  16. Putting theory to the test: which regulatory mechanisms can drive realistic growth of a root?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Dirk; Vissenberg, Kris; Broeckhove, Jan; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2014-10-01

    In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a 'Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule' (ULSR) was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR) to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the value of

  17. Interactions between glucocorticoid treatment and cis-regulatory polymorphisms contribute to cellular response phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Maranville

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs mediate physiological responses to environmental stress and are commonly used as pharmaceuticals. GCs act primarily through the GC receptor (GR, a transcription factor. Despite their clear biomedical importance, little is known about the genetic architecture of variation in GC response. Here we provide an initial assessment of variability in the cellular response to GC treatment by profiling gene expression and protein secretion in 114 EBV-transformed B lymphocytes of African and European ancestry. We found that genetic variation affects the response of nearby genes and exhibits distinctive patterns of genotype-treatment interactions, with genotypic effects evident in either only GC-treated or only control-treated conditions. Using a novel statistical framework, we identified interactions that influence the expression of 26 genes known to play central roles in GC-related pathways (e.g. NQO1, AIRE, and SGK1 and that influence the secretion of IL6.

  18. Sterol regulation of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase: a mechanism for coordinate control of cellular lipid.

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, J.M.; Bennett, M K; Sanchez, H B; Rosenfeld, J M; Osborne, T E

    1996-01-01

    Transcription from the housekeeping promoter for the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) gene, which encodes the rate-controlling enzyme of fatty acid biosynthesis, is shown to be regulated by cellular sterol levels through novel binding sites for the sterol-sensitive sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1 transcription factor. The position of the SREBP sites relative to those for the ubiquitous auxiliary transcription factor Sp1 is reminiscent of that previously described for th...

  19. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Legume Nodules: Metabolism and Regulatory Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Sulieman; Lam-Son Phan Tran

    2014-01-01

    The special issue “Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Legume Nodules: Metabolism and Regulatory Mechanisms” aims to investigate the physiological and biochemical advances in the symbiotic process with an emphasis on nodule establishment, development and functioning. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of nodule metabolism and various regulatory pathways, which could have important future implications. This issue also included...

  20. Glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis and cellular mechanisms of myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J; Griffiths, Carrie L

    2009-10-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy is a common side effect of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Several mechanisms are currently being examined as ways in which glucocorticoid-induced myopathy occurs. These include apoptotic signaling through mitochondrial-mediated and Fas-mediated apoptosis, the role of the proteosome, the suppression of the IGF-1 signaling, and the role of ceramide in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis and myopathy. It is difficult to differentiate which mechanism may be the initiating event responsible for the induction of apoptosis; however, all of the mechanisms play a vital role in glucocorticoid-induced myopathy.

  1. Lipoprotein(a: Cellular Effects and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Riches

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a (Lp(a is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Indeed, individuals with plasma concentrations >20 mg/dL carry a 2-fold increased risk of developing CVD, accounting for ~25% of the population. Circulating levels of Lp(a are remarkably resistant to common lipid lowering therapies, and there are currently no robust treatments available for reduction of Lp(a apart from plasma apheresis, which is costly and labour intensive. The Lp(a molecule is composed of two parts, an LDL/apoB-100 core and a unique glycoprotein, apolipoprotein(a (apo(a, both of which can interact with components of the coagulation cascade, inflammatory pathways, and cells of the blood vessel wall (smooth muscle cells (SMC and endothelial cells (EC. Therefore, it is of key importance to determine the molecular pathways by which Lp(a exerts its influence on the vascular system in order to design therapeutics to target its cellular effects. This paper will summarise the role of Lp(a in modulating cell behaviour in all aspects of the vascular system including platelets, monocytes, SMC, and EC.

  2. Evidence for a regulatory role of diatom silicon transporters in cellular silicon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Roshan P; Hildebrand, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of silicon by diatoms has both global and small-scale implications, from oceanic primary productivity to nanotechnological applications of their silica cell walls. The sensing and transport of silicic acid are key aspects of understanding diatom silicon utilization. At low silicic acid concentrations (silicon starvation. SIT1 and SIT2 were localized in the plasma membrane, and protein levels were generally inversely correlated with cellular silicon needs, with a distinct response being found when the two SITs were compared. We developed highly effective approaches for RNA interference and antisense knockdowns, the first such approaches developed for a centric diatom. SIT knockdown differentially affected the uptake of silicon and the incorporation of silicic acid and resulted in the induction of lipid accumulation under silicon starvation conditions far earlier than in the wild-type cells, suggesting that the cells were artificially sensing silicon limitation. The data suggest that the transport role of the SITs is relatively minor under conditions with sufficient silicic acid. Their primary role is to sense silicic acid levels to evaluate whether the cell can proceed with its cell wall formation and division processes.

  3. Phase transitions in the multi-cellular regulatory behavior of pancreatic islet excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Hraha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic islets of Langerhans are multicellular micro-organs integral to maintaining glucose homeostasis through secretion of the hormone insulin. β-cells within the islet exist as a highly coupled electrical network which coordinates electrical activity and insulin release at high glucose, but leads to global suppression at basal glucose. Despite its importance, how network dynamics generate this emergent binary on/off behavior remains to be elucidated. Previous work has suggested that a small threshold of quiescent cells is able to suppress the entire network. By modeling the islet as a Boolean network, we predicted a phase-transition between globally active and inactive states would emerge near this threshold number of cells, indicative of critical behavior. This was tested using islets with an inducible-expression mutation which renders defined numbers of cells electrically inactive, together with pharmacological modulation of electrical activity. This was combined with real-time imaging of intracellular free-calcium activity [Ca2+]i and measurement of physiological parameters in mice. As the number of inexcitable cells was increased beyond ∼15%, a phase-transition in islet activity occurred, switching from globally active wild-type behavior to global quiescence. This phase-transition was also seen in insulin secretion and blood glucose, indicating physiological impact. This behavior was reproduced in a multicellular dynamical model suggesting critical behavior in the islet may obey general properties of coupled heterogeneous networks. This study represents the first detailed explanation for how the islet facilitates inhibitory activity in spite of a heterogeneous cell population, as well as the role this plays in diabetes and its reversal. We further explain how islets utilize this critical behavior to leverage cellular heterogeneity and coordinate a robust insulin response with high dynamic range. These findings also give new

  4. Current perspectives on behavioural and cellular mechanisms of illness anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarian, Lori; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2005-12-01

    Here we review our current understanding of the integration of immune, neural, metabolic and endocrine signals involved in the generation of anorexia during acute infection, with the focus on anorexia elicited by peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We chose to limit this review to peripheral LPS-anorexia because the mechanisms underlying this response may also be valid for anorexia during other types of acute or chronic infections, with slight differences in the duration of anorexia, levels of circulating concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and hypermetabolism. Evidence so far indicates that LPS-anorexia is a complex response beneficial to host defence that involves both peripheral and central action of pro-inflammatory cytokines, other immune factors, such as prostanoids, and neurotransmitters, such as serotonin. One interesting characteristic of LPS-anorexia is its sexual differentiation, an aspect mainly mediated by the gonadal hormone estradiol. Understanding the behavioural and molecular mechanisms of LPS-anorexia may even provide useful leads for identifying mechanisms of eating disorders in humans.

  5. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  6. Planar cell polarity signaling: a common mechanism for cellular polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Andreas; Mlodzik, Marek

    2006-09-01

    Epithelial cells frequently display--in addition to the common apical-basolateral polarity--a polarization within the plane of the epithelium. This is commonly referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP) or tissue polarity. Examples of vertebrate PCP include epithelial patterning in the skin and inner ear, and also the morphogenetic movements of mesenchymal cells during convergent extension at gastrulation. In Drosophila, all adult epithelial structures of the cuticle are polarized within the plane. This review presents recent results and new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of PCP, and compares and contrasts the intriguing similarities between PCP signaling in Drosophila and vertebrates.

  7. Cellular mechanisms of neurovascular damage and repair after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ken; Lok, Josephine; Guo, Shuzhen; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Xing, Changhong; Lo, Eng H

    2011-09-01

    The biological processes underlying stroke are complex, and patients have a narrow repertoire of therapeutic opportunities. After the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened the Stroke Progress Review Group in 2001, stroke research shifted from having a purely neurocentric focus to adopting a more integrated view wherein dynamic interactions between all cell types contribute to function and dysfunction in the brain. This so-called "neurovascular unit" provides a conceptual framework that emphasizes cell-cell interactions between neuronal, glial, and vascular elements. Under normal conditions, signaling within the neurovascular unit helps maintain homeostasis. After stroke, cell-cell signaling is disturbed, leading to pathophysiology. More recently, emerging data now suggest that these cell-cell signaling mechanisms may also mediate parallel processes of neurovascular remodeling during stroke recovery. Because plasticity is a signature feature of the young and developing brain, these concepts may have special relevance to how the pediatric brain responds after stroke.

  8. DMPD: The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of action. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17502370 The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of acti....html) (.csml) Show The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism of action. PubmedID 1...7502370 Title The interferon regulatory factor family in host defense: mechanism

  9. Predicting bulk mechanical properties of cellularized collagen gels using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, C B; Putnam, A J; Tromberg, B J; George, S C

    2010-12-01

    Cellularized collagen gels are a common model in tissue engineering, but the relationship between the microstructure and bulk mechanical properties is only partially understood. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is an ideal non-invasive tool for examining collagen microstructure, cellularity and crosslink content in these gels. In order to identify robust image parameters that characterize microstructural determinants of the bulk elastic modulus, we performed serial MPM and mechanical tests on acellular and cellularized (normal human lung fibroblasts) collagen hydrogels, before and after glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Following gel contraction over 16 days, cellularized collagen gel content approached that of native connective tissues (∼200 mg ml⁻¹). Young's modulus (E) measurements from acellular collagen gels (range 0.5-12 kPa) exhibited a power-law concentration dependence (range 3-9 mg ml⁻¹) with exponents from 2.1 to 2.2, similar to other semiflexible biopolymer networks such as fibrin and actin. In contrast, cellularized collagen gel stiffness (range 0.5-27 kPa) produced concentration-dependent exponents of 0.7 uncrosslinked and 1.1 crosslinked (range ∼5-200 mg ml⁻¹). The variation in E of cellularized collagen hydrogels can be explained by a power-law dependence on robust image parameters: either the second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) (matrix component) skewness (R²=0.75, exponents of -1.0 and -0.6, respectively); or alternatively the SHG and TPF (matrix component) speckle contrast (R²=0.83, exponents of -0.7 and -1.8, respectively). Image parameters based on the cellular component of TPF signal did not improve the fits. The concentration dependence of E suggests enhanced stress relaxation in cellularized vs. acellular gels. SHG and TPF image skewness and speckle contrast from cellularized collagen gels can predict E by capturing mechanically relevant information on collagen fiber, cell and crosslink density.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Cellular Nephrotoxicity due to Radiocontrast Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashour Michael

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern iodinated radiocontrast media are all based on the triiodinated benzene ring with various chemical modifications having been made over the last few decades in order to reduce their toxicity. However, CIN remains a problem especially in patients with pre-existing renal failure. In vitro studies have demonstrated that all RCM are cytotoxic. RCM administration in vivo may lead to a decrease in renal medullary oxygenation leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species that may cause harmful effects to renal tissue. In addition, endothelin and adenosine release and decreased nitric oxide levels may worsen the hypoxic milieu. In vitro cell culture studies together with sparse in vivo rat model data have shown that important cell signalling pathways are affected by RCM. In particular, the prosurvival and proproliferative kinases Akt and ERK1/2 have been shown to be dephosphorylated (deactivated, whilst proinflammatory/cell death molecules such as the p38 and JNK kinases and the transcription factor NF-κB may be activated by RCM, accompanied by activation of apoptotic mediators such as caspases. Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms of RCM action may help to develop future therapies for CIN.

  11. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  12. Kinetic theory approach to modeling of cellular repair mechanisms under genome stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Qi

    Full Text Available Under acute perturbations from outer environment, a normal cell can trigger cellular self-defense mechanism in response to genome stress. To investigate the kinetics of cellular self-repair process at single cell level further, a model of DNA damage generating and repair is proposed under acute Ion Radiation (IR by using mathematical framework of kinetic theory of active particles (KTAP. Firstly, we focus on illustrating the profile of Cellular Repair System (CRS instituted by two sub-populations, each of which is made up of the active particles with different discrete states. Then, we implement the mathematical framework of cellular self-repair mechanism, and illustrate the dynamic processes of Double Strand Breaks (DSBs and Repair Protein (RP generating, DSB-protein complexes (DSBCs synthesizing, and toxins accumulating. Finally, we roughly analyze the capability of cellular self-repair mechanism, cellular activity of transferring DNA damage, and genome stability, especially the different fates of a certain cell before and after the time thresholds of IR perturbations that a cell can tolerate maximally under different IR perturbation circumstances.

  13. Design, analysis, and applications of cellular contact-aided compliant mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vipul

    A new class of compliant mechanisms utilizing the benefits of cellular geometry and contact are addressed in this work. The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of such structures for high-strain and high-strength applications is the focus of the present research. Cellular structures have relatively good strength-to-weight ratios. They also have a higher strain capability than solid structures. Contact during deformation reduces failure-causing bending stresses through stress relief, thereby enabling such cellular structures to be stretched more than the corresponding structures without contact. Both analytical and numerical models are developed to represent one specific mechanism. Several candidate materials are investigated for such mechanisms. Although the allowable strain of all these materials is small, the overall strain of the contact-aided cellular mechanisms is at least an order of magnitude greater than that of the constitutive material. Application of contact to different materials yields an improvement in the global strain capacity by more than 100% relative to cellular structures without contact. Experiments are conducted to validate the models, and good agreement is found. Size optimization is carried out to maximize the stress relief and the overall strain. Two main applications are considered in the present work. One application consists of a morphing aircraft skin for adaptive structures. Different material models such as linearly elastic and multi-linear elastic are examined. For linearly elastic materials, contact-induced stress-relief is advantageous and for nonlinear elastic materials, reduction of transverse deflection due to contact is useful. The proposed contact-aided skin structure is compared with a cellular skin without contact. The contact mechanism helps to increase the morphing capacity while decreasing the structural mass. Using contact-aided cellular mechanisms, the global strain capability is increased by as much as 37%. For a

  14. Analysis of regulatory network involved in mechanical induction of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinan Zhang

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells are conventionally differentiated by modulating specific growth factors in the cell culture media. Recently the effect of cellular mechanical microenvironment in inducing phenotype specific differentiation has attracted considerable attention. We have shown the possibility of inducing endoderm differentiation by culturing the stem cells on fibrin substrates of specific stiffness. Here, we analyze the regulatory network involved in such mechanically induced endoderm differentiation under two different experimental configurations of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture, respectively. Mouse embryonic stem cells are differentiated on an array of substrates of varying mechanical properties and analyzed for relevant endoderm markers. The experimental data set is further analyzed for identification of co-regulated transcription factors across different substrate conditions using the technique of bi-clustering. Overlapped bi-clusters are identified following an optimization formulation, which is solved using an evolutionary algorithm. While typically such analysis is performed at the mean value of expression data across experimental repeats, the variability of stem cell systems reduces the confidence on such analysis of mean data. Bootstrapping technique is thus integrated with the bi-clustering algorithm to determine sets of robust bi-clusters, which is found to differ significantly from corresponding bi-clusters at the mean data value. Analysis of robust bi-clusters reveals an overall similar network interaction as has been reported for chemically induced endoderm or endodermal organs but with differences in patterning between 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture. Such analysis sheds light on the pathway of stem cell differentiation indicating the prospect of the two culture configurations for further maturation.

  15. SUCROSE SYNTHASE: ELUCIDATION OF COMPLEX POST-TRANSLATIONAL REGULATORY MECHANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven C. Huber

    2009-05-12

    Studies have focused on the enzyme sucrose synthase, which plays an important role in the metabolism of sucrose in seeds and tubers. There are three isoforms of SUS in maize, referred to as SUS1, SUS-SH1, and SUS2. SUS is generally considered to be tetrameric protein but recent evidence suggests that SUS can also occur as a dimeric protein. The formation of tetrameric SUS is regulated by sucrose concentration in vitro and this could also be an important factor in the cellular localization of the protein. We found that high sucrose concentrations, which promote tetramer formation, also inhibit the binding of SUS1 to actin filaments in vitro. Previously, high sucrose concentrations were shown to promote SUS association with the plasma membrane. The specific regions of the SUS molecule involved in oligomerization are not known, but we identified a region of the SUS1 moelcule by bioinformatic analysis that was predicted to form a coiled coil. We demonstrated that this sequence could, in fact, self-associate as predicted for a coiled coil, but truncation analysis with the full-length recombinant protein suggested that it was not responsible for formation of dimers or tetramers. However, the coiled coil may function in binding of other proteins to SUS1. Overall, sugar availability may differentially influence the binding of SUS to cellular structures, and these effects may be mediated by changes in the oligomeric nature of the enzyme.

  16. An improved instrumental characterization of mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van; Castro-Prada, E.M.; Luyten, H.; Lichtendonk, W.; Hamer, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed study was performed to simultaneously measure the mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid foods. Different critical aspects are discussed in order to assess optimal test conditions. These are primarily data sampling rate, microphone positioning, frequency spectrum of i

  17. Mechanism resulting in chemical imbalance due to cellular damage associated with mechanoporation: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliozberg, Yelena R.; Chantawansri, Tanya L.

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of ion transport through a transmembrane pore, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were employed. A model membrane where a pore connects the intra- and extra-cellular compartment was considered. Pores with radii of 1.5 nm or less exhibited resealing over the course of 135 ns simulations, and ionic disturbance is minimal. Ion transport through a larger pore (2 nm radius) leads to a substantial change in the intra- and extra-cellular ionic concentrations. The influx of Na+ and Cl- ions down their concentration gradients is greater than the efflux of K+ leading to an osmotic influx of water.

  18. Integrin-linked kinase regulates cellular mechanics facilitating the motility in 3D extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunschmann, Tom; Puder, Stefanie; Fischer, Tony; Perez, Jeremy; Wilharm, Nils; Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2017-03-01

    The motility of cells plays an important role for many processes such as wound healing and malignant progression of cancer. The efficiency of cell motility is affected by the microenvironment. The connection between the cell and its microenvironment is facilitated by cell-matrix adhesion receptors and upon their activation focal adhesion proteins such as integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are recruited to sites of focal adhesion formation. In particular, ILK connects cell-matrix receptors to the actomyosin cytoskeleton. However, ILK's role in cell mechanics regulating cellular motility in 3D collagen matrices is still not well understood. We suggest that ILK facilitates 3D motility by regulating cellular mechanical properties such as stiffness and force transmission. Thus, ILK wild-type and knock-out cells are analyzed for their ability to migrate on 2D substrates serving as control and in dense 3D extracellular matrices. Indeed, ILK wild-type cells migrated faster on 2D substrates and migrated more numerous and deeper in 3D matrices. Hence, we analyzed cellular deformability, Young's modulus (stiffness) and adhesion forces. We found that ILK wild-type cells are less deformable (stiffer) and produce higher cell-matrix adhesion forces compared to ILK knock-out cells. Finally, ILK is essential for providing cellular mechanical stiffness regulating 3D motility.

  19. Murine hyperglycemic vasculopathy and cardiomyopathy: whole-genome gene expression analysis predicts cellular targets and regulatory networks influenced by mannose binding lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui eZou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies.

  20. Determination of the mechanical properties of solid and cellular polymeric dosage forms by diametral compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2016-07-25

    At present, the immediate-release solid dosage forms, such as the oral tablets and capsules, are granular solids. They release drug rapidly and have adequate mechanical properties, but their manufacture is fraught with difficulties inherent in processing particulate matter. Such difficulties, however, could be overcome by liquid-based processing. Therefore, we have recently introduced polymeric cellular (i.e., highly porous) dosage forms prepared from a melt process. Experiments have shown that upon immersion in a dissolution medium, the cellular dosage forms with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as excipient and with predominantly open-cell topology disintegrate by exfoliation, thus enabling rapid drug release. If the volume fraction of voids of the open-cell structures is too large, however, their mechanical strength is adversely affected. At present, the common method for determining the tensile strength of brittle, solid dosage forms (such as select granular forms) is the diametral compression test. In this study, the theory of diametral compression is first refined to demonstrate that the relevant mechanical properties of ductile and cellular solids (i.e., the elastic modulus and the yield strength) can also be extracted from this test. Diametral compression experiments are then conducted on PEG-based solid and cellular dosage forms. It is found that the elastic modulus and yield strength of the open-cell structures are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of the non-porous solids, but still are substantially greater than the stiffness and strength requirements for handling the dosage forms manually. This work thus demonstrates that melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms that release drug rapidly can be designed and manufactured to have adequate mechanical properties.

  1. Prediction of regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin

    2008-01-01

    Finding the regulatory mechanisms responsible for gene expression remains one of the most important challenges for biomedical research. A major focus in cellular biology is to find functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) responsible for the regulation of a downstream gene. As wet-lab...

  2. Sociocognitive self-regulatory mechanisms governing judgments of the acceptability and likelihood of sport cheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Corrion, Karine; Scoffier, Stéphanie; Roussel, Peggy; Chalabaev, Aïna

    2010-10-01

    This study extends previous psychosocial literature (Bandura et al., 2001, 2003) by examining a structural model of the self-regulatory mechanisms governing the acceptability and likelihood of cheating in a sport context. Male and female adolescents (N = 804), aged 15-20 years, took part in this study. Negative affective self-regulatory efficacy influenced the acceptability and likelihood of cheating through the mediating role of moral disengagement, in females and males. Affective efficacy positively influenced prosocial behavior through moral disengagement or through resistive self-regulatory efficacy and social efficacy, in both groups. The direct effects of affective efficacy on beliefs about cheating were only evident in females. These results extend the findings of Bandura et al. (2001, 2003) to the sport context and suggest that affective and resistive self-regulatory efficacy operate in concert in governing adolescents' moral disengagement and transgressive behaviors in sport.

  3. Regulatory mechanisms for glycogenolysis and K+ uptake in brain astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Mangia, Silvia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in brain energy metabolism support the notion that glycogen in astrocytes is necessary for the clearance of neuronally-released K(+) from the extracellular space. However, how the multiple metabolic pathways involved in K(+)-induced increase in glycogen turnover are regulated is only partly understood. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the mechanisms that control glycogen metabolism during enhanced K(+) uptake. We also describe the action of the ubiquitous Na(+)/K(+) ATPase for both ion transport and intracellular signaling cascades, and emphasize its importance in understanding the complex relation between glycogenolysis and K(+) uptake.

  4. Regulatory mechanisms of the phasic respiratory activity in cricothyroid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonckere, P H; Lebacq, J

    1984-01-01

    Phasic respiratory activity of the cricothyroid muscle has been investigated with electromyography in 15 normal subjects, and in 19 pathological cases with well defined neurological troubles. It appears that phasic respiratory activity in the cricothyroid muscle, probably centrally generated, is under control of a complex and intricate mechanisms, in which the nervus laryngeus superior, the nervus laryngeus inferior, the vagus nerve and cross connections all together intervene. Furthermore, a peripheral modulation related somehow to the resistance of the airways is present. Despite differences between animal species, it seems that qualitatively the same contributing elements are present in animals and humans.

  5. A cellular automaton for the signed particle formulation of quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, J. M.; Kapanova, K. G.; Dimov, I.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a new formulation of quantum mechanics, based on the concept of signed particles, has been suggested. In this paper, we introduce a cellular automaton which mimics the dynamics of quantum objects in the phase-space in a time-dependent fashion. This is twofold: it provides a simplified and accessible language to non-physicists who wants to simulate quantum mechanical systems, at the same time it enables a different way to explore the laws of Physics. Moreover, it opens the way towards hybrid simulations of quantum systems by combining full quantum models with cellular automata when the former fail. In order to show the validity of the suggested cellular automaton and its combination with the signed particle formalism, several numerical experiments are performed, showing very promising results. Being this article a preliminary study on quantum simulations in phase-space by means of cellular automata, some conclusions are drawn about the encouraging results obtained so far and the possible future developments.

  6. Regulatory mechanisms of viral hepatitis B and C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Waris; A Siddiqui

    2003-04-01

    Of all the hepatitis viruses, only the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause chronic hepatitis, which can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, we discuss how these two biologically diverse viruses use common pathways to induce oxidative stress and activation of key transcription factors, known to be involved in inflammatory processes in cells. Activation of NF-B and STAT-3 most likely contribute to the progression of viral infections to chronic hepatitis and liver oncogenesis associated with HBV and HCV infections. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms of action of HBx and HCV NS5A proteins in inducing intracellular events associated with the viral infections.

  7. Photosynthesis Control: An underrated short-term regulatory mechanism essential for plant viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Monica; Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Ferrari, Roberto; Tadini, Luca; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport provides efficient performance of oxygenic photosynthesis in plants. During the last 15 years, the molecular bases of various photosynthesis short-term regulatory processes have been elucidated, however the wild type-like phenotypes of mutants lacking of State Transitions, Non Photochemical Quenching, or Cyclic Electron Transport, when grown under constant light conditions, have also raised doubts about the acclimatory significance of these short-regulatory mechanisms on plant performance. Interestingly, recent studies performed by growing wild type and mutant plants under field conditions revealed a prominent role of State Transitions and Non Photochemical Quenching on plant fitness, with almost no effect on vegetative plant growth. Conversely, the analysis of plants lacking the regulation of electron transport by the cytochrome b6f complex, also known as Photosynthesis Control, revealed the fundamental role of this regulatory mechanism in the survival of young, developing seedlings under fluctuating light conditions.

  8. Mechanical models of the cellular cytoskeletal network for the analysis of intracellular mechanical properties and force distributions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-12-01

    The cytoskeleton, which is the major mechanical component of cells, supports the cell body and regulates the cellular motility to assist the cell in performing its biological functions. Several cytoskeletal network models have been proposed to investigate the mechanical properties of cells. This review paper summarizes these models with a focus on the prestressed cable network, the semi-flexible chain network, the open-cell foam, the tensegrity, and the granular models. The components, material parameters, types of connection joints, tension conditions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are evaluated from a structural and biological point of view. The underlying mechanisms that are associated with the morphological changes of spreading cells are expected to be simulated using a cytoskeletal model; however, it is still paid less attention most likely due to the lack of a suitable cytoskeletal model that can accurately model the spreading process. In this review article, the established cytoskeletal models are hoped to provide useful information for the development of future cytoskeletal models with different degrees of cell attachment for the study of the mechanical mechanisms underlying the cellular behaviors in response to external stimulations.

  9. [Glycotoxins and cellular dysfunction. A new mechanism for understanding the preventive effects of lifestyle modifications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, A; Bierhaus, A; Nawroth, P P; Dobos, G J

    2006-08-01

    Recently the AGE-RAGE interaction was identified as a potential mechanism underlying chronic and inflammatory diseases like atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus and kidney disease. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the derivatives of glucose-protein or glucose-lipid reactions and are mainly generated from the diet (depending on intensity of heating, cooking time and oxygenation). Binding of AGEs or other ligands to the AGE receptor (RAGE) results in cellular activation, i.e. increased expression of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress. Diet-derived AGEs thus induce deleterious effects on tissues and the cardiovascular system. Recent research also found that other lifestyle factors are associated with pronounced inflammatory activation, e.g. psychosocial stress and smoking. In addition, each intake of meals is associated with proinflammatory cellular changes. The AGE-RAGE model and investigations of the underlying cellular mechanisms thus may lead to a better understanding of the health benefits of diets (Mediterranean diet, uncooked vegetarian diets), caloric restriction and intermittent fasting. The clinical impact of low-AGE diets and fasting and the interaction between stress and food intake should be further investigated in controlled trials.

  10. [Effects and the mechanisms of cardiac short-term memory on cellular electrical excitability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Lin; Wu, Ruijuan; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2012-08-01

    Electrical instability easily induces a unidirectional conduction block, resulting in ventricular tachycardia (VT) or even fibrillation (VF). Cardiac memory affects dynamic electrical characteristics through previous pacing so that it makes the memory important in arrhythmia study. This paper investigates the impact of the rapid pacing duration on cellular excitability and its mechanism. Based on the canine endocardial single cell, a one-dimensional tissue model was developed. Simulations were realized with OpenMP parallel programming method. The results showed that with repetitive pacing, the cellular excitability became low while the conduction velocity decreased. Accumulation of intracellular [Ca2+]i and [Na+]i and depletion of [K+]i led to the shift of membrane current-voltage curves, changing the membrane resistance. Excitability determined by the resistance at the large width of stimulus pulse, therefore, it suggested that [Ca2+]i and [K+]i-induced memory formed the ionic substrates for the alteration of excitability.

  11. Patterns and cellular mechanisms of arm regeneration in adult starfish Asterias rollestoni bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingjun; Fan, Xianyuan; Du, Yutang; Sun, Wenjie; Zhang, Shaofeng; Li, Jiaxin

    2011-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms of starfish regeneration, the arms of adult starfish Asterias rollestoni Bell were amputated and their regeneration patterns and cellular mechanisms were studied. It was found that cells in the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum near the end of the stump began to dedifferentiate 4 d after amputation. The dedifferentiated cells in the outer epidermis proliferated, migrated to the wound site and formed a thickened pre-epidermis which would then re-differentiate gradually into mature epidermis. The new parietal peritoneum formed on the coelomic side of wound might be from the curvely elongated parietal peritoneum, resulting from the dedifferentiated and proliferated cells by extension. Afterwards, the proliferated cells made the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum invaginate into the interior dermis and formed blastema-like structures together with induced dedifferentiated dermal cells. Most interestingly, the arm regeneration in A. rollestoni was achieved synchronously by de novo arm-bud formation and growth, and arm-stump elongation. The crucial aspects of arm-bud formation included cell dedifferentiation, proliferation and migration, while those of arm-stump elongation included cell dedifferentiation, proliferation, invagination, and arm-wall-across blastema-like structure formation. The unique pattern and cellular mechanisms of amputated arm regeneration make it easier to understand the rapid regeneration process of adult starfish. This study may lay solid foundations for the research into molecular mechanisms of echinoderm regeneration.

  12. A model of how different biology experts explain molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M; Anderson, Trevor R; Pelaez, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do explanations made by experts from different biology subdisciplines at a university support the validity of this model? Guided by the modeling framework of R. S. Justi and J. K. Gilbert, the validity of an initial model was tested by asking seven biologists to explain a molecular mechanism of their choice. Data were collected from interviews, artifacts, and drawings, and then subjected to thematic analysis. We found that biologists explained the specific activities and organization of entities of the mechanism. In addition, they contextualized explanations according to their biological and social significance; integrated explanations with methods, instruments, and measurements; and used analogies and narrated stories. The derived methods, analogies, context, and how themes informed the development of our final MACH model of mechanistic explanations. Future research will test the potential of the MACH model as a guiding framework for instruction to enhance the quality of student explanations.

  13. Patterns and Cellular Mechanisms of Arm Regeneration in Adult Starfish Asterias rollestoni Bell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Tingjun; FAN Xianyuan; DU Yutang; SUN Wenjie; ZHANG Shaofeng; LI Jiaxin

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of starfish regeneration,the arms of adult starfish Asterias rollestoni Bell were amputated and their regeneration pattems and cellular mechanisms were studied.It was found that cells in the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum near the end of the stump began to dedifferentiate 4d after amputation.The dedifferentiated cells in the outer epidermis proliferated,migrated to the wound site and formed a thickened pre-epidermis which would then re-differentiate gradually into mature epidermis.The new parietal peritoneum formed on the coelomic side of wound might be from the curvely elongated parietal peritoneum,resulting from the dedifferentiated and proliferated cells by extension.Afterwards,the proliferated cells made the outer epidermis and inner parietal peritoneum invaginate into the interior dermis and formed blastema-like structures together with induced dedifferentiated dermal cells.Most interestingly,the arm regeneration in A.rollestoni was achieved synchronously by de novo arm-bud formation and growth,and arm-stump elongation.The crucial aspects of arm-bud formation included cell dedifferentiation,proliferation and migration,while those of arm-stump elongation included cell dedifferentiation,proliferation,invagination,and arm-wall-across blastema-like structure formation.The unique pattern and cellular mechanisms of amputated arm regeneration make it easier to understand the rapid regeneration process of adult starfish.This study may lay solid foundations for the research into molecular mechanisms of echinoderm regeneration.

  14. IMPAIRED REGULATORY MECHANISMS OF THE mTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN OSTEOARTHROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasilyevna Chetina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the pattern of impaired regulatory mechanisms of the mammalian target of rapamycin (TOR signaling pathway, by monitoring gene expression in the blood of patients with osteoarthrosis (OA at different stages of the disease. Subjects and methods. The study covered 33 outpatients with OA, 14 patients with this condition prior to knee joint endoprosthesis, and 27 healthy individuals (controls (mean age 58.0+7.4, 56.5+8.9, and 55.0+8.3 years, respectively. Total RNA was isolated from their blood and used to determine the level of gene expression by a real-time polymerase chain reaction for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α, the rate-limiting proteins of the hexosamine signaling pathway — glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase and acetylglucosaminyltransferase, as well as the glucose transporter GLUT1 and steps 6 and 7 glycolytic pathway components — glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglycerate kinase-1, respectively; the lipogenesis-related genes — fatty acid synthase (FAS and the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway — glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the blood of patients with OA at different stages of the disease. Results. Analysis of gene expressions showed that in the OA patients with a low expression of the mTOR gene (a LOW subgroup, the expression of AGT and GLUT1 genes proved to be significantly lower and that of the AMPK gene was higher than in the healthy individuals. In the OA patients with a high expression of the mTOR gene (a HIGH subgroup, the expression of all the genes under study was much higher, except for the FAS gene; moreover, the greatest expression excess as compared to the controls was observed for the AMPK and HIFlα genes. In the patients with endstage disease (an ES subgroup, the expression of all the study genes, including the FAS gene, turned out to be higher than in the healthy individuals. Conclusion. The development of OA is

  15. [Molecular-cellular and hormonal mechanisms of induced brain tolerance of extreme factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoĭlov, M O; Rybnikova, E A

    2012-01-01

    This review includes results of own studies and literature data on the topical problem of neurobiology and medicine: discovery of the mechanisms of increased brain resistance to extreme exposures. The emphasis is made on the molecular-cellular and hormonal mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning-induced brain tolerance to injurious hypoxia, psychoemotional and traumatic stress. A role of basic hormonal and intracellular cascade pro-adaptive processes mediating the neuroprotective action of hypoxic preconditioning is reviewed. A dynamics of the mechanisms of development of induced susceptible brain areas (hippocampus, neocortex) tolerance which includes phases of induction, transformation and expression, is presented. New data on preconditioning-induced cross-tolerance providing increased brain resistance not only to hypoxia but also to other stresses are reported. For the first time neuroprotective effects of hypoxic postconditioning are described.

  16. Cell-Penetrating Peptides—Mechanisms of Cellular Uptake and Generation of Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Trabulo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The successful clinical application of nucleic acid-based therapeutic strategies has been limited by the poor delivery efficiency achieved by existing vectors. The development of alternative delivery systems for improved biological activity is, therefore, mandatory. Since the seminal observations two decades ago that the Tat protein, and derived peptides, can translocate across biological membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs have been considered one of the most promising tools to improve non-invasive cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules. Despite extensive research on the use of CPPs for this purpose, the exact mechanisms underlying their cellular uptake and that of peptide conjugates remain controversial. Over the last years, our research group has been focused on the S413-PV cell-penetrating peptide, a prototype of this class of peptides that results from the combination of 13-amino-acid cell penetrating sequence derived from the Dermaseptin S4 peptide with the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal. By performing an extensive biophysical and biochemical characterization of this peptide and its analogs, we have gained important insights into the mechanisms governing the interaction of CPPs with cells and their translocation across biological membranes. More recently, we have started to explore this peptide for the intracellular delivery of nucleic acids (plasmid DNA, siRNA and oligonucleotides. In this review we discuss the current knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides, including the S413-PV peptide, and the potential of peptide-based formulations to mediate nucleic acid delivery.

  17. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms regulating Acanthamoeba castellanii adherence to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Arredondo, K J; Flores-Villavicencio, L L; Serrano-Luna, J J; Shibayama, M; Sabanero-López, M

    2014-04-01

    Free-living amoebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba are the causative agents of infections such as amoebic keratitis (AK), granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and cutaneous lesions. The mechanisms involved in the establishment of infection are unknown. However, it is accepted that the initial phase of pathogenesis involves adherence to the host tissue. In this work, we analysed surface molecules with an affinity for epithelial and neuronal cells from the trophozoites of Acanthamoeba castellanii. We also investigated the cellular mechanisms that govern the process of trophozoite adhesion to the host cells. We first used confocal and epifluorescence microscopy to examine the distribution of the A. castellanii actin cytoskeleton during interaction with the host cells. The use of drugs, as cytochalasin B (CB) and latrunculin B (LB), revealed the participation of cytoskeletal filaments in the adhesion process. In addition, to identify the proteins and glycoproteins on the surface of A. castellanii, the trophozoites were labelled with biotin and biotinylated lectins. The results revealed bands of surface proteins, some of which were glycoproteins with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine residues. Interaction assays of biotinylated amoebae proteins with epithelial and neuronal cells showed that some surface proteins had affinity for both cell types. The results of this study provide insight into the biochemical and cellular mechanisms of the Acanthamoeba infection process.

  18. The Role of Mechanical Force in Molecular and Cellular during Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Narmada

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Application of mechanical force on abnormally positioned tooth, cause changes in tooth location and transmitted to the bone ia the periodontal ligament (PDL produce orthodontic tooth movement. This force application is further way that remodeling in the area occurs. In order to develop biological strategies for enhancing this movement of teeth in bone, the underlying mechanisms of bone resorption and apposition should be understood in detail. Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF may be a good means of examining the on going molecular and cellular process associated with gingival and bone turnover during orthodontic tooth movement. If it could be possible to biologically monitor and predict the outcome of orthodontic force, then the appliance management could be based on dividual tissue response and the effectiveness of the treatment could be improved and understanding their biology is critical to finding ways to modify bone biology to move teeth faster. The present article reviewed a short introduction to some mayors advanced mechanical force in molecular and cellular biology during orthodontic tooth movement.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i3.30

  19. Antidiabetic Drugs: Mechanisms of Action and Potential Outcomes on Cellular Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Maria J; Silva, Branca M; Sousa, Mário; Sá, Rosália; Oliveira, Pedro F; Alves, Marco G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases and has been a leading cause of death in the last decades. Thus, methods to detect, prevent or delay this disease and its co-morbidities have long been a matter of discussion. Nowadays, DM patients, particularly those suffering with type 2 DM, are advised to alter their diet and physical exercise regimens and then proceed progressively from monotherapy, dual therapy, and multi-agent therapy to insulin administration, as the disease becomes more severe. Although progresses have been made, the pursuit for the "perfect" antidiabetic drug still continues. The complexity of DM and its impact on whole body homeodynamics are two of the main reasons why there is not yet such a drug. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms by which DM can be controlled are still under an intense debate. As the associated risks, disadvantages, side effects and mechanisms of action vary from drug to drug, the choice of the most suitable therapy needs to be thoroughly investigated. Herein we propose to discuss the different classes of antidiabetic drugs available, their applications and mechanisms of action, particularly those of the newer and/or most widely prescribed classes. A special emphasis will be made on their effects on cellular metabolism, since these drugs affect those pathways in several cellular systems and organs, promoting metabolic alterations responsible for either deleterious or beneficial effects. This is a crucial property that needs to be carefully investigated when prescribing an antidiabetic.

  20. DMPD: Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17981503 Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmol...) (.html) (.csml) Show Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mech...anisms. PubmedID 17981503 Title Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new in

  1. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to quantify the adherence and mechanical properties of an array of L. monocytogenes strains and their surface biopolymers. First, eight L. monocytogenes strains that represented the two major lineages of the species were compared for their adherence and mechanics at cellular and molecular levels. Our results indicated that strains of lineage' II were characterized by higher adhesion and Young's moduli, longer and more rigid surface biopolymers and lower specific and nonspecific forces when compared to lineage' I strains. Additionally, adherence and mechanical properties of eight L. monocytogenes epidemic and environmental strains were probed. Our results pointed to that environmental and epidemic strains representative of a given lineage were similar in their adherence and mechanical properties when investigated at a cellular level. However, when the molecular properties of the strains were considered, epidemic strains were characterized by higher specific and nonspecific forces, shorter, denser and more flexible biopolymers compared to environmental strains. Second, the role of environmental pH conditions of growth on the adhesion and mechanics of a pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe was investigated. Our results pointed to a transition in the adhesion energies for cells cultured at pH 7. In addition, when the types of molecular forces that govern the adhesion were quantified using Poisson statistical approach and using a new proposed method, specific hydrogen-bond energies dominated the bacterial adhesion process. Such a finding is instrumental to researchers designing methods to control bacterial adhesion. Similarly, bacterial cells underwent a transition in their mechanical properties. We have shown that cells cultured at pH 7 were the most rigid compared to those cultured in lower or higher pH conditions of growth. Due to transitions observed in adherence and mechanics when cells were cultured at pH 7, we hypothesized that

  2. Rapid construction of mechanically- confined multi- cellular structures using dendrimeric intercellular linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xuejun; Li, Qiushi; Yi Lui, Lena Wai; Zheng, Baixue; Kang, Chiang Huen; Nugraha, Bramasta; Yue, Zhilian; Jia, Rui Rui; Fu, Hong Xia; Choudhury, Deepak; Arooz, Talha; Yan, Jie; Lim, Chwee Teck; Shen, Shali; Hong Tan, Choon; Yu, Hanry

    2010-10-01

    Tissue constructs that mimic the in vivo cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions are especially useful for applications involving the cell- dense and matrix- poor internal organs. Rapid and precise arrangement of cells into functional tissue constructs remains a challenge in tissue engineering. We demonstrate rapid assembly of C3A cells into multi- cell structures using a dendrimeric intercellular linker. The linker is composed of oleyl- polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives conjugated to a 16 arms- polypropylenimine hexadecaamine (DAB) dendrimer. The positively charged multivalent dendrimer concentrates the linker onto the negatively charged cell surface to facilitate efficient insertion of the hydrophobic oleyl groups into the cellular membrane. Bringing linker- treated cells into close proximity to each other via mechanical means such as centrifugation and micromanipulation enables their rapid assembly into multi- cellular structures within minutes. The cells exhibit high levels of viability, proliferation, three- dimensional (3D) cell morphology and other functions in the constructs. We constructed defined multi- cellular structures such as rings, sheets or branching rods that can serve as potential tissue building blocks to be further assembled into complex 3D tissue constructs for biomedical applications.

  3. Mood disorders in Huntington's disease: from behavior to cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Patrick; Orvoen, Sophie; Saudou, Frédéric; David, Denis J; Humbert, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is best known for its effect on motor control. Mood disturbances such as depression, anxiety, and irritability also have a high prevalence in patients with HD, and often start before the onset of motor symptoms. Various rodent models of HD recapitulate the anxiety/depressive behavior seen in patients. HD is caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the N-terminal part of a 350 kDa protein called huntingtin (HTT). HTT is ubiquitously expressed and is implicated in several cellular functions including control of transcription, vesicular trafficking, ciliogenesis, and mitosis. This review summarizes progress in efforts to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral disorders in patients with HD. Dysfunctional HTT affects cellular pathways that are involved in mood disorders or in the response to antidepressants, including BDNF/TrkB and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, HTT affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a physiological phenomenon that is implicated in some of the behavioral effects of antidepressants and is linked to the control of anxiety. These findings are consistent with the emerging role of wild-type HTT as a crucial component of neuronal development and physiology. Thus, the pathogenic polyQ expansion in HTT could lead to mood disorders not only by the gain of a new toxic function but also by the perturbation of its normal function.

  4. Mood disorders in Huntington’s disease: from behavior to cellular and molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick ePla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder that is best known for its effect on motor control. Mood disturbances such as depression, anxiety, and irritability also have a high prevalence in patients with HD, and often start before the onset of motor symptoms. Various rodent models of HD recapitulate the anxiety/depressive behavior seen in patients. HD is caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the N-terminal part of a 350 kDa protein called huntingtin (HTT. HTT is ubiquitously expressed and is implicated in several cellular functions including control of transcription, vesicular trafficking, ciliogenesis, and mitosis. This review summarizes progress in efforts to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral disorders in patients with HD. Dysfunctional HTT affects cellular pathways that are involved in mood disorders or in the response to antidepressants, including BDNF/TrkB and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, HTT affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a physiological phenomenon that is implicated in some of the behavioral effects of antidepressants and is linked to the control of anxiety. These findings are consistent with the emerging role of wild-type HTT as a crucial component of neuronal development and physiology. Thus, the pathogenic polyQ expansion in HTT could lead to mood disorders not only by the gain of a new toxic function but also by the perturbation of its normal function.

  5. Short-term plasticity in thalamocortical pathways: cellular mechanisms and functional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alamancos, M A

    1997-01-01

    Information reaches the neocortex through different types of thalamocortical pathways. These differ in many morphological and physiological properties. One interesting aspect in which thalamocortical pathways differ is in their temporal dynamics, such as their short-term plasticity. Primary pathways display frequency-dependent depression, while secondary pathways display frequency-dependent enhancement. The cellular mechanisms underlying these dynamic responses involve pre- and post-synaptic and circuit properties. They may serve to synchronize, amplify and/or filter neural activity in neocortex depending on behavioral demands, and thus to adapt each pathway to its specific function.

  6. Irreparable telomeric DNA damage and persistent DDR signalling as a shared causative mechanism of cellular senescence and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiello, Francesca; Herbig, Utz; Longhese, Maria Pia; Fumagalli, Marzia; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA repair and halts cell cycle. If damage is not resolved, cells can enter into an irreversible state of proliferative arrest called cellular senescence. Organismal ageing in mammals is associated with accumulation of markers of cellular senescence and DDR persistence at telomeres. Since the vast majority of the cells in mammals are non-proliferating, how do they age? Are telomeres involved? Also oncogene activation causes cellular senescence due to altered DNA replication and DDR activation in particular at the telomeres. Is there a common mechanism shared among apparently distinct types of cellular senescence? And what is the role of telomeric DNA damage?

  7. Exploring associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological functioning and driver behaviour after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rike, Per-Ola; Johansen, Hans J; Ulleberg, Pål; Lundqvist, Anna; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

    2016-04-11

    The objective of this prospective one-year follow-up study was to explore the associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological tests as well as baseline and follow-up ratings of driver behaviour. The participants were a cohort of subjects with stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were found fit to drive after a multi-disciplinary driver assessment (baseline). Baseline measures included neuropsychological tests and ratings of self-regulatory mechanisms, i.e., executive functions (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version; BRIEF-A) and impulsive personality traits (UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale). The participants rated pre-injury driving behaviour on the Driver Behaviour Qestionnaire (DBQ) retrospectively at baseline and after one year of post-injury driving (follow-up). Better performance on neuropsychological tests was significantly associated with more post-injury DBQ Violations. The BRIEF-A main indexes were significantly associated with baseline and follow-up ratings of DBQ Mistakes and follow-up DBQ Inattention. UPPS (lack of) Perseverance was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inattention, whereas UPPS Urgency was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inexperience and post-injury DBQ Mistakes. There were no significant changes in DBQ ratings from baseline (pre-injury) to follow-up (post-injury). It was concluded that neuropsychological functioning and self-regulatory mechanisms are related to driver behaviour. Some aspects of driver behaviour do not necessarily change after brain injury, reflecting the influence of premorbid driving behaviour or impaired awareness of deficits on post-injury driving behaviour. Further evidence is required to predict the role of self-regulatory mechanisms on driver behaviour and crashes or near misses.

  8. Expression pattern and transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa gene in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yongyan; Lu, Xiaonan; He, Libo; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Aidi; Li, Yongming; Huang, Rong; Liao, Lanjie; Zhu, Zuoyan; Wang, Yaping

    2015-12-01

    Noxa, a pro-apoptotic protein, plays an important role in cell apoptosis. The researches about noxa gene were concentrated in mammalians, whereas the role and transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa in fish were still unclear. In this study, the expression pattern and transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa gene in grass carp were analyzed. Noxa was constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues but the relative expression level differed. After exposure to grass carp reovirus (GCRV), mRNA expression level of noxa was down-regulated at the early phase whereas up-regulated at the late phase of infection. Luciferase assays showed that the promoter region -867 ∼ +107 of noxa had high activity and the region -678 ∼ -603 was important in the response to GCRV infection. By deleting the predicted transcription factor binding sites, transcription factors FOXO1 and CEBPβ were found important for noxa in response to GCRV infection. Moreover, the noxa promoter was biotin-labeled and incubated with nuclear extracts from GCRV infected cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that transcription factors FOXO1 and CEBPβ were also enriched in the combined proteins. Therefore, the results suggested that transcription factors FOXO1 and CEBPβ may play an important role in the regulation of noxa. Our study would provide new insight into the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of noxa in teleost fish.

  9. A qrr noncoding RNA deploys four different regulatory mechanisms to optimize quorum-sensing dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lihui; Rutherford, Steven T; Papenfort, Kai; Bagert, John D; van Kessel, Julia C; Tirrell, David A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-15

    Quorum sensing is a cell-cell communication process that bacteria use to transition between individual and social lifestyles. In vibrios, homologous small RNAs called the Qrr sRNAs function at the center of quorum-sensing pathways. The Qrr sRNAs regulate multiple mRNA targets including those encoding the quorum-sensing regulatory components luxR, luxO, luxM, and aphA. We show that a representative Qrr, Qrr3, uses four distinct mechanisms to control its particular targets: the Qrr3 sRNA represses luxR through catalytic degradation, represses luxM through coupled degradation, represses luxO through sequestration, and activates aphA by revealing the ribosome binding site while the sRNA itself is degraded. Qrr3 forms different base-pairing interactions with each mRNA target, and the particular pairing strategy determines which regulatory mechanism occurs. Combined mathematical modeling and experiments show that the specific Qrr regulatory mechanism employed governs the potency, dynamics, and competition of target mRNA regulation, which in turn, defines the overall quorum-sensing response.

  10. Chronobiology at the cellular and molecular levels: models and mechanisms for circadian timekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, L N

    1983-12-01

    This review considers cellular chronobiology and examines, at least in a superficial way, several classes of models and mechanisms that have been proposed for circadian rhythmicity and some of the experimental approaches that have appeared to be most productive. After a brief discussion of temporal organization and the metabolic, epigenetic, and circadian time domains, the general properties of circadian rhythms are enumerated. A survey of independent oscillations in isolated organs, tissues, and cells is followed by a review of selected circadian rhythms in eukaryotic microorganisms, with particular emphasis placed on the rhythm of cell division in the algal flagellate Euglena as a model system illustrating temporal differentiation. In the ensuing section, experimental approaches to circadian clock mechanisms are considered. The dissection of the clock by the use of chemical inhibitors is illustrated for the rhythm of bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax and for the rhythm of photosynthetic capacity in the unicellular green alga Acetabularia. Alternatively, genetic analysis of circadian oscillators is considered in the green alga Chlamydomonas and in the bread mold Neurospora, both of which have yielded clock mutants and mutants having biochemical lesions that exhibit altered clock properties. On the basis of the evidence generated by these experimental approaches, several classes of biochemical and molecular models for circadian clocks have been proposed. These include strictly molecular models, feedback loop (network) models, transcriptional (tape-reading) models, and membrane models; some of their key elements and predictions are discussed. Finally, a number of general unsolved problems at the cellular level are briefly mentioned: cell cycle interfaces, the evolution of circadian rhythmicity, the possibility of multiple cellular oscillators, chronopharmacology and chronotherapy, and cell-cycle clocks in development and aging.

  11. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarygin, Konstantin N.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable. PMID:28210629

  12. The biocompatibility of fluorescent nanodiamonds and their mechanism of cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaijayanthimala, Vairakkannu; Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Chung-Leung, E-mail: hcchang@po.sinica.edu.t, E-mail: chungL@gate.sinica.edu.t [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2009-10-21

    The labeling of cells with fluorescent nanoparticles is promising for various biomedical applications. The objective of this study is to evaluate the biocompatibility and the mechanism of the cellular uptake of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in cancer cells (HeLa) and pre-adipocytes (3T3-L1). With flow cytometry and the use of a battery of metabolic and cytoskeletal inhibitors, we found that the mechanism of the FND uptake in both cells is by energy-dependent clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, the surface charge of FND influences its cellular uptake, as the uptake of poly-L-lysine-coated FNDs is better than that of oxidative-acid-purified FNDs at the same concentration in regular medium with or without serum. We also confirm that the proliferative potential of FND-treated and untreated cells does not exhibit any significant differences when measured at bulk cultures, and more stringently at clonal cell density. Further biocompatibility studies indicate that the in vitro differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and 489-2 osteoprogenitors is not affected by the FND treatment. Our results show that FNDs are biocompatible and ideal candidates for potential applications in human stem cell research.

  13. Resveratrol Inhibition of Cellular Respiration: New Paradigm for an Old Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Perez, Luis Alberto; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, RSV) has emerged as an important molecule in the biomedical area. This is due to its antioxidant and health benefits exerted in mammals. Nonetheless, early studies have also demonstrated its toxic properties toward plant-pathogenic fungi of this phytochemical. Both effects appear to be opposed and caused by different molecular mechanisms. However, the inhibition of cellular respiration is a hypothesis that might explain both toxic and beneficial properties of resveratrol, since this phytochemical: (1) decreases the production of energy of plant-pathogenic organisms, which prevents their proliferation; (2) increases adenosine monophosphate/adenosine diphosphate (AMP/ADP) ratio that can lead to AMP protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which is related to its health effects, and (3) increases the reactive oxygen species generation by the inhibition of electron transport. This pro-oxidant effect induces expression of antioxidant enzymes as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress. In this review, evidence is discussed that supports the hypothesis that cellular respiration is the main target of resveratrol. PMID:26999118

  14. Resveratrol Inhibition of Cellular Respiration: New Paradigm for an Old Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Madrigal-Perez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, RSV has emerged as an important molecule in the biomedical area. This is due to its antioxidant and health benefits exerted in mammals. Nonetheless, early studies have also demonstrated its toxic properties toward plant-pathogenic fungi of this phytochemical. Both effects appear to be opposed and caused by different molecular mechanisms. However, the inhibition of cellular respiration is a hypothesis that might explain both toxic and beneficial properties of resveratrol, since this phytochemical: (1 decreases the production of energy of plant-pathogenic organisms, which prevents their proliferation; (2 increases adenosine monophosphate/adenosine diphosphate (AMP/ADP ratio that can lead to AMP protein kinase (AMPK activation, which is related to its health effects, and (3 increases the reactive oxygen species generation by the inhibition of electron transport. This pro-oxidant effect induces expression of antioxidant enzymes as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress. In this review, evidence is discussed that supports the hypothesis that cellular respiration is the main target of resveratrol.

  15. The neurobiology of depression--revisiting the serotonin hypothesis. I. Cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Paul R; Benkelfat, Chawki; Descarries, Laurent

    2012-09-05

    The serotonin (5-HT) hypothesis of depression dates from the 1960s. It originally postulated that a deficit in brain serotonin, corrected by antidepressant drugs, was the origin of the illness. Nowadays, it is generally accepted that recurring mood disorders are brain diseases resulting from the combination, to various degrees, of genetic and other biological as well as environmental factors, evolving through the lifespan. All areas of neuroscience, from genes to behaviour, molecules to mind, and experimental to clinical, are actively engaged in attempts at elucidating the pathophysiology of depression and the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of antidepressant treatments. This first of two special issues of Philosophical Transactions B seeks to provide an overview of current developments in the field, with an emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms, and how their unravelling opens new perspectives for future research.

  16. [Cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury: can peripheral markers be detected?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, A K; Nikitin, K V; Potapov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury is a relevant fundamental objective of radiobiology and neuroradiology. Damage to the healthy brain tissue is the key factor limiting the application of radiation therapy in patients with nervous systems neoplasms. Furthermore, postradiation brain injury can be clinically indiscernible from continued tumor growth and requires differential diagnosis. Thus, there exists high demand for biomarkers of radiation effects on the brain in neurosurgery and radiobiology. These markers could be used for better understanding and quantifying the effects of ionizing radiation on brain tissues, as well as for elaborating personalized therapy. Despite the high demand, biomarkers of radiation-induced brain injury have not been identified thus far. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of the effect of ionizing radiation on the brain were analyzed in this review in order to identify potential biomarkers of radiation-induced injury to nervous tissue.

  17. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration as revealed by studies in Xenopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Siwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Survival of any living organism critically depends on its ability to repair and regenerate damaged tissues and/or organs during its lifetime following injury, disease, or aging. Various animal models from invertebrates to vertebrates have been used to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of wound healing and tissue regeneration. It is hoped that such studies will form the framework for identifying novel clinical treatments that will improve the healing and regenerative capacity of humans. Amongst these models, Xenopus stands out as a particularly versatile and powerful system. This review summarizes recent findings using this model, which have provided fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for efficient and perfect tissue repair and regeneration.

  18. Pathogens penetrating the central nervous system: infection pathways and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Norton, Robert; Currie, Bart J; St John, James A; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Batzloff, Michael; Ulett, Glen C; Beacham, Ifor R

    2014-10-01

    The brain is well protected against microbial invasion by cellular barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). In addition, cells within the central nervous system (CNS) are capable of producing an immune response against invading pathogens. Nonetheless, a range of pathogenic microbes make their way to the CNS, and the resulting infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Bacteria, amoebae, fungi, and viruses are capable of CNS invasion, with the latter using axonal transport as a common route of infection. In this review, we compare the mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens reach the CNS and infect the brain. In particular, we focus on recent data regarding mechanisms of bacterial translocation from the nasal mucosa to the brain, which represents a little explored pathway of bacterial invasion but has been proposed as being particularly important in explaining how infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in melioidosis encephalomyelitis.

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P; Nunan, R

    2015-08-01

    A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to heal and leave behind a noticeable scar. At the extreme end, chronic wounds - defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months - have become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world and will only increase as our populations advance in age, and with the increasing incidence of diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Here we describe the clinical problems and how, through better dialogue between basic researchers and clinicians, we may extend our current knowledge to enable the development of novel potential therapeutic treatments.

  20. Changes in cellular mechanical properties during onset or progression of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciasca, Gabriele; Papi, Massimiliano; Minelli, Eleonora; Palmieri, Valentina; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development represents a multistep process starting with specific mutations that affect proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. These mutations confer a selective growth advantage to colonic epithelial cells that form first dysplastic crypts, and then malignant tumours and metastases. All these steps are accompanied by deep mechanical changes at the cellular and the tissue level. A growing consensus is emerging that such modifications are not merely a by-product of the malignant progression, but they could play a relevant role in the cancer onset and accelerate its progression. In this review, we focus on recent studies investigating the role of the biomechanical signals in the initiation and the development of CRC. We show that mechanical cues might contribute to early phases of the tumour initiation by controlling the Wnt pathway, one of most important regulators of cell proliferation in various systems. We highlight how physical stimuli may be involved in the differentiation of non-invasive cells into metastatic variants and how metastatic cells modify their mechanical properties, both stiffness and adhesion, to survive the mechanical stress associated with intravasation, circulation and extravasation. A deep comprehension of these mechanical modifications may help scientist to define novel molecular targets for the cure of CRC.

  1. Cellular mechanisms for the slow phase of the Frank-Starling response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, W F; Sung, D; Lew, W Y; Garfinkel, A; McCulloch, A D

    1998-01-01

    Following a step increase in sarcomere length, isometric cardiac muscle tension increases instantaneously by the Frank-Starling mechanism. In isolated papillary muscle and myocytes, there is an additional significant rise in developed tension over the following 15 min due to an unknown mechanism. This slow change in tension could not be explained by mechanical heterogeneity of the muscle preparations or by an increase in myofilament sensitivity to Ca2+. The slow change in tension was not dependent on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ loading assessed with rapid cooling contractures, and was not significantly altered by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ depletion (ryanodine) or inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ reuptake (cyclopiazonic acid). We used the Luo-Rudy ionic model of the ventricular myocyte together with a model of the length-dependent myofilament activation by Ca2+ to examine the effects of step changes in the parameters of sarcolemmal ion fluxes as possible mechanisms for the slow change in stress. The slow increase in tension was simulated by step changes in the Na+-K+ pump or Na+ leak currents, suggesting that the slow change in stress may be caused by length induced changes in Na+ fluxes. The model also predicted a slow increase in the magnitude of the initial repolarization during phase 1 of the action potential. The combination of experimental and computational models used in this investigation represents a valuable technique in elucidating the cellular mechanisms of fundamental processes in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling.

  2. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Nasr Esfahani, S.; Taheri Andani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.; Karaca, H.; Elahinia, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress-strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure.

  3. Lamins, laminopathies and disease mechanisms: Possible role for proteasomal degradation of key regulatory proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veena K Parnaik; Pankaj Chaturvedi; B H Muralikrishna

    2011-08-01

    Lamins are major structural proteins of the nucleus and are essential for nuclear integrity and organization of nuclear functions. Mutations in the human lamin genes lead to highly degenerative genetic diseases that affect a number of different tissues such as muscle, adipose or neuronal tissues, or cause premature ageing syndromes. New findings on the role of lamins in cellular signalling pathways, as well as in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, have given important insights into possible mechanisms of pathogenesis.

  4. Cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of hydrophobically modified pullulan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Liqin Jiang,1 Xuemin Li,1 Lingrong Liu,1 Qiqing Zhang1,21Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs of cholesterol-modified pullulan (CHSP by human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells were investigated. Covalent conjugation with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC yielded stably labeled CHSP (FITC-CHSP, which was successfully formulated into NPs (mean particle size 63.0 ± 1.9 nm by dialysis. A cytotoxicity assay clearly indicated that the CHSP NPs did not show significant toxicity in HepG2 cells. The effects of NP concentration, incubation time, and temperature on the cellular uptake of the NPs were systematically evaluated by fluorometry, and the results suggested that cellular uptake of the NPs was concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent. In vitro experiments with endocytic inhibitors revealed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis were involved in the internalization of CHSP NPs. The intracellular trafficking study demonstrated that CHSP NPs were entrapped in the lysosomes at 1 hour after incubation; colocalization of NPs with either the Golgi apparatus or the endoplasmic reticula was not observed during the entire course of the study. These results suggested that the CHSP NPs may serve as a versatile carrier for intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents.Keywords: cholesterol-modified pullulan, self-assembled nanoparticles, FITC, endocytosis, intracellular trafficking

  5. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  6. Robust mechanisms of ventral furrow invagination require the combination of cellular shape changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Vito; Muñoz, José J.; Baum, Buzz; Miodownik, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Ventral furrow formation in Drosophila is the first large-scale morphogenetic movement during the life of the embryo, and is driven by co-ordinated changes in the shape of individual epithelial cells within the cellular blastoderm. Although many of the genes involved have been identified, the details of the mechanical processes that convert local changes in gene expression into whole-scale changes in embryonic form remain to be fully understood. Biologists have identified two main cell deformation modes responsible for ventral furrow invagination: constriction of the apical ends of the cells (apical wedging) and deformation along their apical-basal axes (radial lengthening/shortening). In this work, we used a computer 2D finite element model of ventral furrow formation to investigate the ability of different combinations of three plausible elementary active cell shape changes to bring about epithelial invagination: ectodermal apical-basal shortening, mesodermal apical-basal lengthening/shortening and mesodermal apical constriction. We undertook a systems analysis of the biomechanical system, which revealed many different combinations of active forces (invagination mechanisms) were able to generate a ventral furrow. Two important general features were revealed. First that combinations of shape changes are the most robust to environmental and mutational perturbation, in particular those combining ectodermal pushing and mesodermal wedging. Second, that ectodermal pushing plays a big part in all of the robust mechanisms (mesodermal forces alone do not close the furrow), and this provides evidence that it may be an important element in the mechanics of invagination in Drosophila.

  7. Mechanism of cellular uptake and impact of ferucarbotran on macrophage physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles are contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging. Ferucarbotran is a clinically approved SPIO-coated carboxydextran with a diameter of about 45-60 nm. We investigated the mechanism of cellular uptake of Ferucarbotran with a cell model using the murine macrophage cell line Raw 264.7. We observed a dose-dependent uptake of these SPIO particles by spectrophotometer analysis and also a dose-dependent increase in the granularity of the macrophages as determined by flow cytometry. There was a linear correlation between the side scattering mean value and iron content (P<0.001, R(2 = 0. 8048. For evaluation of the endocytotic pathway of these ingested SPIO particles, different inhibitors of the endocytotic pathways were employed. There was a significant decrease of side scattering counts in the cells and a less significant change in signal intensity based on magnetic resonance in the phenylarsine oxide-treated macrophages. After labeling with SPIO particles, the macrophages showed an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species at 2, 24, and 48 h; a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential at 24 h; and an increase in cell proliferation at 24 h. We concluded that Ferucarbotran was internalized into macrophages via the clathrin-mediated pathway and can change the cellular behavior of these cells after labeling.

  8. Programming Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of 3D Hydrogel Cellular Microcultures via Direct Ink Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Joselle M; Badea, Adina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Gladman, A Sydney; Wetzel, David J; Popescu, Gabriel; Lewis, Jennifer A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2016-05-01

    3D hydrogel scaffolds are widely used in cellular microcultures and tissue engineering. Using direct ink writing, microperiodic poly(2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate) (pHEMA) scaffolds are created that are then printed, cured, and modified by absorbing 30 kDa protein poly-l-lysine (PLL) to render them biocompliant in model NIH/3T3 fibroblast and MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cell cultures. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) live cell imaging studies are carried out to quantify cellular motilities for each cell type, substrate, and surface treatment of interest. 3D scaffold mechanics is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), while their absorption kinetics are determined by confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) for a series of hydrated hydrogel films prepared from prepolymers with different homopolymer-to-monomer (Mr ) ratios. The observations reveal that the inks with higher Mr values yield relatively more open-mesh gels due to a lower degree of entanglement. The biocompatibility of printed hydrogel scaffolds can be controlled by both PLL content and hydrogel mesh properties.

  9. Latent Tuberculosis: Models, Computational efforts and the Pathogen's regulatory mechanisms during dormancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesham eMagombedze

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Latent tuberculosis is a clinical syndrome that occurs after an individual has been exposed to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb bacillus, the infection has been established and an immune response has been generated to control the pathogen and force it into a quiescent state. Mtb can exit this quiescent state where it is unresponsive to treatment and elusive to the immune response, and enter a rapid replicating state, hence causing infection reactivation. It remains a grey area to understand how the pathogen causes a persistent infection and it is unclear whether the organism will be in a slow replicating state or a dormant non-replicating state. The ability of the pathogen to adapt to changing host immune response mechanisms, in which it is exposed to hypoxia, low pH, nitric oxide (NO, nutrient starvation and several other anti-microbial effectors, is associated with a high metabolic plasticity that enables it to metabolise under these different conditions. Adaptive gene regulatory mechanisms are thought to coordinate how the pathogen changes their metabolic pathways through mechanisms that sense changes in oxygen tension and other stress factors, hence stimulating the pathogen to make necessary adjustments to ensure survival. Here, we review studies that give insights into latency/dormancy regulatory mechanisms that enable infection persistence and pathogen adaptation to different stress conditions. We highlight what mathematical and computational models can do and what they should do to enhance our current understanding of TB latency.

  10. A mathematical model of cortical bone remodeling at cellular level under mechanical stimulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Hua Qin; Ya-Nan Wang

    2012-01-01

    A bone cell population dynamics model for cortical bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus is developed in this paper.The external experiments extracted from the literature which have not been used in the creation of the model are used to test the validity of the model.Not only can the model compare reasonably well with these experimental results such as the increase percentage of final values of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone fracture energy (BFE) among different loading schemes (which proves the validity of the model),but also predict the realtime development pattern of BMC and BFE,as well as the dynamics of osteoblasts (OBA),osteoclasts (OCA),nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) for each loading scheme,which can hardly be monitored through experiment.In conclusion,the model is the first of its kind that is able to provide an insight into the quantitative mechanism of bone remodeling at cellular level by which bone cells are activated by mechanical stimulus in order to start resorption/formation of bone mass.More importantly,this model has laid a solid foundation based on which future work such as systemic control theory analysis of bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus can be investigated.The to-be identified control mechanism will help to develop effective drugs and combined nonpharmacological therapies to combat bone loss pathologies.Also this deeper understanding of how mechanical forces quantitatively interact with skeletal tissue is essential for the generation of bone tissue for tissue replacement purposes in tissue engineering.

  11. Characterization of a two-component regulatory system from Acinetobacter baumannii that controls biofilm formation and cellular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaras, Andrew P; Flagler, Michael J; Dorsey, Caleb W; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Actis, Luis A

    2008-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii forms biofilms on abiotic surfaces, a phenotype that may explain its ability to survive in nosocomial environments and to cause device-related infections in compromised patients. The biofilm proficiency of the 19606 type strain depends on the production of pili, cell-surface appendages assembled via the CsuAB-A-B-C-D-E chaperone-usher secretion system. The screening of a bank of isogenic insertion derivatives led to the identification of a biofilm-deficient derivative in which a transposon insertion disrupted a gene predicted to encode the response regulator of a two-component regulatory system. This gene, which was named bfmR, is required for the expression of the Csu pili chaperone-usher assembly system. This coding region is followed by an ORF encoding a putative sensor kinase that was named bfmS, which plays a less relevant role in biofilm formation when cells are cultured in rich medium. Further examination showed that the bfmR mutant was capable of attaching to abiotic surfaces, although to levels significantly lower than those of the parental strain, when it was cultured in a chemically defined minimal medium. Additionally, the morphology of planktonic cells of this mutant, when grown in minimal medium, was drastically affected, while adherent mutant cells were indistinguishable in shape and size from the parental strain. Together, these results indicate that BfmR is part of a two-component regulatory system that plays an important role in the morphology of A. baumannii 19606 cells and their ability to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces.

  12. Cellular origin and developmental mechanisms during the formation of skin melanocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernfors, Patrik, E-mail: patrik.ernfors@ki.se [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institute, 17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Melanocytes are derived from the neural crest (NC), which are transient multipotent cells arising by delamination from the developing dorsal neural tube. During recent years, signaling systems and molecular mechanisms of melanocyte development have been studied in detail, but the exact diversification of the NC into melanocytes and how they migrate, expand and disperse in the skin have not been fully understood. The recent finding that Schwann cell precursors (SCPs) of the growing nerve represents a stem cell niche from which various cell types, including Schwann cells, endoneural fibroblasts and melanocytes arise has exposed new knowledge on the cellular basis for melanocyte development. This opens for the identification of new factors and reinterpretation of old data on cell fate instructive, proliferative, survival and cell homing factors participating in melanocyte development.

  13. Understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in crossbred bulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Rajib; Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Singh, Umesh; Alex, Rani; Raja, T. V.; Alyethodi, Rafeeque R.; Kumar, Sushil; Sengar, Gyanendra; Sharma, Sheetal; Singh, Rani; Prakash, B.

    2015-12-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase is an integral membrane protein composed of a large catalytic subunit (alpha), a smaller glycoprotein subunit (beta), and gamma subunit. The beta subunit is essential for ion recognition as well as maintenance of the membrane integrity. Present study was aimed to analyze the expression pattern of ATPase beta subunit genes (ATPase B1, ATPase B2, and ATPase B3) among the crossbred bulls under different ambient temperatures (20-44 °C). The present study was also aimed to look into the relationship of HSP70 with the ATPase beta family genes. Our results demonstrated that among beta family genes, transcript abundance of ATPase B1 and ATPase B2 is significantly ( P P < 0.01) with HSP70, representing that the change in the expression pattern of these genes is positive and synergistic. These may provide a foundation for understanding the mechanisms of ATPase beta family genes for cellular thermotolerance in cattle.

  14. Androgens and skeletal muscle: cellular and molecular action mechanisms underlying the anabolic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2012-05-01

    Androgens increase both the size and strength of skeletal muscle via diverse mechanisms. The aim of this review is to discuss the different cellular targets of androgens in skeletal muscle as well as the respective androgen actions in these cells leading to changes in proliferation, myogenic differentiation, and protein metabolism. Androgens bind and activate a specific nuclear receptor which will directly affect the transcription of target genes. These genes encode muscle-specific transcription factors, enzymes, structural proteins, as well as microRNAs. In addition, anabolic action of androgens is partly established through crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as Akt, myostatin, IGF-I, and Notch. Finally, androgens may also exert non-genomic effects in muscle by increasing Ca(2+) uptake and modulating kinase activities. In conclusion, the anabolic effect of androgens on skeletal muscle is not only explained by activation of the myocyte androgen receptor but is also the combined result of many genomic and non-genomic actions.

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of HGF/Met in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Simona; Sala, Valentina; Gatti, Stefano; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2015-12-01

    Met tyrosine kinase receptor, also known as c-Met, is the HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) receptor. The HGF/Met pathway has a prominent role in cardiovascular remodelling after tissue injury. The present review provides a synopsis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of HGF/Met in the heart and blood vessels. In vivo, HGF/Met function is particularly important for the protection of the heart in response to both acute and chronic insults, including ischaemic injury and doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Accordingly, conditional deletion of Met in cardiomyocytes results in impaired organ defence against oxidative stress. After ischaemic injury, activation of Met provides strong anti-apoptotic stimuli for cardiomyocytes through PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. Recently, we found that HGF/Met is also important for autophagy regulation in cardiomyocytes via the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. HGF/Met induces proliferation and migration of endothelial cells through Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) activation. In fibroblasts, HGF/Met antagonizes the actions of TGFβ1 (transforming growth factor β1) and AngII (angiotensin II), thus preventing fibrosis. Moreover, HGF/Met influences the inflammatory response of macrophages and the immune response of dendritic cells, indicating its protective function against atherosclerotic and autoimmune diseases. The HGF/Met axis also plays an important role in regulating self-renewal and myocardial regeneration through the enhancement of cardiac progenitor cells. HGF/Met has beneficial effects against myocardial infarction and endothelial dysfunction: the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying repair function in the heart and blood vessels are common and include pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic actions. Thus administration of HGF or HGF mimetics may represent a promising therapeutic agent for the

  16. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  17. Molecular and cellular mechanism of the effect of La(III) on horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-09-01

    Horseradish is an important economic crop. It contains horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and lots of nutrients, and has specific pungency. Lanthanum is one of the heavy metals in the environment. It can transfer through the food chain to humans. In this paper, the molecular and cellular mechanism of the toxic effects of La(III) on HRP in vivo was investigated with an optimized combination of biophysical, biochemical, and cytobiological methods. It was found that La(III) could interact with O and/or N atoms in the backbone/side chains of the HRP molecule in the cell membrane of horseradish treated with 80 microM La(III), leading to the formation of a new complex of La and HRP (La-HRP). The formation of the La-HRP complex causes the redistribution of the electron densities of atoms in the HRP molecule, especially the decrease in the electron density of the active center, Fe(III), in the heme group of the La-HRP molecule compared with the native HRP molecule in vivo. Therefore, the electron transfer and the activity of HRP in horseradish treated with 80 microM La(III) are obviously decreased compared with those of the native HRP in vivo. This is a possible molecular and cellular mechanism for the toxic effect of La(III) on HRP in vivo. It is suggested that the accumulation of La in the environment, especially the formation of the La-HRP complex in vivo, is harmful to organisms.

  18. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  19. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  20. Cellular mechanisms of Cl- transport in trout gill mitochondrion-rich cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Scott K; Tresguerres, Martin; Goss, Greg G

    2009-04-01

    We have studied Cl(-) transport mechanisms in freshwater rainbow trout gill mitochondrion-rich (MR) cells using intracellular pH (pH(i)) imaging. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated maintenance of cellular polarity in isolated MR cells. MR cell subtypes were identified by Na(+) introduction to the bath, and Cl(-) transport mechanisms were subsequently examined. Cl(-)-free exposure resulted in an alkalinization of pH(i) in both MR cell subtypes, which was dependent on HCO(3)(-) in the bath and inhibited by 1 mM DIDS. Recovery of pH(i) from an acidified state in Na(+)-free conditions was also DIDS sensitive. These results are the first functional evidence for Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchangers in fish gill MR cells. A direct switch from NaCl to Cl(-)-free conditions caused a pH(i) acidification in a subset of MR cells, which was enhanced in the absence of HCO(3)(-). The acidification was replaced by an alkalinization when Cl(-) removal was performed in the presence of NPPB (500 microM) or EIPA (500 microM). Finally, we found that the Na(+)-induced alkalinization of pH(i) found in a previous study is inhibited by EIPA. This inhibitor profile's results suggest the presence of a Cl(-)-dependent Na(+)/H(+) exchange mechanism.

  1. Cellular mechanisms of Cl− transport in trout gill mitochondrion-rich cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Scott K.; Tresguerres, Martin; Goss, Greg G.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied Cl− transport mechanisms in freshwater rainbow trout gill mitochondrion-rich (MR) cells using intracellular pH (pHi) imaging. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated maintenance of cellular polarity in isolated MR cells. MR cell subtypes were identified by Na+ introduction to the bath, and Cl− transport mechanisms were subsequently examined. Cl−-free exposure resulted in an alkalinization of pHi in both MR cell subtypes, which was dependent on HCO3− in the bath and inhibited by 1 mM DIDS. Recovery of pHi from an acidified state in Na+-free conditions was also DIDS sensitive. These results are the first functional evidence for Cl−/HCO3− exchangers in fish gill MR cells. A direct switch from NaCl to Cl−-free conditions caused a pHi acidification in a subset of MR cells, which was enhanced in the absence of HCO3−. The acidification was replaced by an alkalinization when Cl− removal was performed in the presence of NPPB (500 μM) or EIPA (500 μM). Finally, we found that the Na+-induced alkalinization of pHi found in a previous study is inhibited by EIPA. This inhibitor profile's results suggest the presence of a Cl−-dependent Na+/H+ exchange mechanism. PMID:19211727

  2. Optimization of the diabetic nephropathy treatment with attention to the special features of cellular inflammation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тетяна Дмитрівна Щербань

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Optimization of the diabetic nephropathy (DN treatment in association with hypertonic disease (HD based on the study of neutrophil chain of pathogenic cellular mechanisms of these diseases development and the special features of its clinical course.Materials and methods. There were complexly examined 86 patients with HD associated with DN and 30 patients with isolated HD. The control group was formed by 30 practically healthy persons. The activity of NO-synthases in neutrophils was detected by Green colorimetric methods using Griess reagent. The expression of ІСАМ-1 (CD54, CD11b-integrin and inducible NO-synthase on neutrophils was detected by the indirect immunocytochemical method. Oxygen-depending activity of neutrophils was assessed in NBT-test.Results. Expression of adhesive molecules of CD54and CD11b-integrin on neutrophils of peripheral blood essentially increases (р <0,001 in patients with DN in association with HD comparing with isolated HD and the control group.At associated pathology on the background of high oxygen-depending activity of neutrophils its functional reserve decreases that results in intensification of inflammatory processes in kidneys (р<0,001.In comorbid patients chronization of pathological process results in imbalance of NO-synthases system in neutrophils: on the background of decrease of activity of constituent NO-synthases the expression and activity of inducible NO-synthase increase (р<0,001 .The use of L-arginine hydrochloride in the complex therapy of patients with DN associated with HD intensifies organoprotective effect of basal therapy, results in facilitation of the clinical course, decreases albuminuria, corrects the functional indices of neutrophils and diminishes imbalance in NO-synthases system.Conclusions. In patients with DN in association with HD the neutrophil chain of cellular inflammation mechanisms are activated: expression of adhesive molecules grows, oxygen-depending metabolism is

  3. Using Xenopus Embryos to Study Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Gene Regulatory Mechanisms of Intermediate Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Szaro, Ben G

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament genes exhibit highly regulated, tissue-specific patterns of expression during development and in response to injury. Identifying the responsible cis-regulatory gene elements thus holds great promise for revealing insights into fundamental gene regulatory mechanisms controlling tissue differentiation and repair. Because much of this regulation occurs in response to signals from surrounding cells, characterizing them requires a model system in which their activity can be tested within the context of an intact organism conveniently. We describe methods for doing so by injecting plasmid DNAs into fertilized Xenopus embryos. A prokaryotic element for site-specific recombination and two dual HS4 insulator elements flanking the reporter gene promote penetrant, promoter-typic expression that persists through early swimming tadpole stages, permitting the observation of fluorescent reporter protein expression in live embryos. In addition to describing cloning strategies for generating these plasmids, we present methods for coinjecting test and reference plasmids to identify the best embryos for analysis, for analyzing reporter protein and RNA expression, and for characterizing the trafficking of expressed reporter RNAs from the nucleus to polysomes. Thus, this system can be used to study the activities of cis-regulatory elements of intermediate filament genes at multiple levels of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control within an intact vertebrate embryo, from early stages of embryogenesis through later stages of organogenesis and tissue differentiation.

  4. Cellular Mechanism of Inner Ear Genetic Disease, roles of Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi Nik, Atefeh

    Potassium channels are the most diverse and widely distributed membrane protein in all living organisms. They have various roles in the body such as controlling membrane potential, cell volume, and cell migration. Many studies have shown that mutation in these channels is associated with different diseases for example: Hearing Defect, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Episodic Ataxia, Seizure and Neuromyotonia. One of the most important diseases associated with K+ channel mutations is called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS). This disease causes bilateral congenital deafness and the patients also suffer from Long QT and they usually experience syncopal episodes in their life and eventually die as a result of cardiac arrest. The gene KCNQ1 encodes the Kv7.1 voltage gated potassium channel. This channel expresses in apical membrane of marginal cell in stria vasularis of cochlea and secret K+ ion to endolymp to keep the endocochlear potential stable, which is necessary for the inner ear to function properly. Kv7.1 channel also expresses in cardiac myocytes and mutation in this gene is associated with another syndrome called Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS). Although Romano-Ward patients have mutation in KCNQ1, similar to Jervell and Lange-Nielsen patients, they only suffer from cardiac defect, and their hearing is completely normal. Several studies identified that mutations in Kv7.1 gene is associated with JLNS and RWS, but the biophysical and cellular mechanisms of these mutations are still unknown. To determine the cellular mechanisms of JLNS and RWS, and to provide mechanistic insight on the functional outputs of JLNS versus RWS mutations, we generated several mutant forms of the human Kv7.1 ( KCNQ1) clone, using site-directed mutagenesis to define their sub-cellular localization and examined their electrophysiological properties. We identified JLNS and RWS mutations at the S4-S5-linker, the pore loop (P-loop) and the C-terminus of hKv7.1 which have been found to control

  5. Biosafety, biosecurity and internationally mandated regulatory regimes: compliance mechanisms for education and global health security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sture, Judi; Whitby, Simon; Perkins, Dana

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the biosafety and biosecurity training obligations that three international regulatory regimes place upon states parties. The duty to report upon the existence of such provisions as evidence of compliance is discussed in relation to each regime. We argue that such mechanisms can be regarded as building blocks for the development and delivery of complementary biosafety and biosecurity teaching and training materials. We show that such building blocks represent foundations upon which life and associated scientists – through greater awareness of biosecurity concerns – can better fulfil their responsibilities to guard their work from misuse in the future. PMID:24494580

  6. Distinct regulatory mechanisms act to establish and maintain Pax3 expression in the developing neural tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Moore

    Full Text Available Pattern formation in developing tissues is driven by the interaction of extrinsic signals with intrinsic transcriptional networks that together establish spatially and temporally restricted profiles of gene expression. How this process is orchestrated at the molecular level by genomic cis-regulatory modules is one of the central questions in developmental biology. Here we have addressed this by analysing the regulation of Pax3 expression in the context of the developing spinal cord. Pax3 is induced early during neural development in progenitors of the dorsal spinal cord and is maintained as pattern is subsequently elaborated, resulting in the segregation of the tissue into dorsal and ventral subdivisions. We used a combination of comparative genomics and transgenic assays to define and dissect several functional cis-regulatory modules associated with the Pax3 locus. We provide evidence that the coordinated activity of two modules establishes and refines Pax3 expression during neural tube development. Mutational analyses of the initiating element revealed that in addition to Wnt signaling, Nkx family homeodomain repressors restrict Pax3 transcription to the presumptive dorsal neural tube. Subsequently, a second module mediates direct positive autoregulation and feedback to maintain Pax3 expression. Together, these data indicate a mechanism by which transient external signals are converted into a sustained expression domain by the activities of distinct regulatory elements. This transcriptional logic differs from the cross-repression that is responsible for the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression in the ventral neural tube, suggesting that a variety of circuits are deployed within the neural tube regulatory network to establish and elaborate pattern formation.

  7. Gene Regulatory Mechanisms Underlying the Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Target-Dependent Gene Expression in Drosophila Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J E Berndt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation often requires target-derived signals from the cells they innervate. These signals typically activate neural subtype-specific genes, but the gene regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. Highly restricted expression of the FMRFa neuropeptide in Drosophila Tv4 neurons requires target-derived BMP signaling and a transcription factor code that includes Apterous. Using integrase transgenesis of enhancer reporters, we functionally dissected the Tv4-enhancer of FMRFa within its native cellular context. We identified two essential but discrete cis-elements, a BMP-response element (BMP-RE that binds BMP-activated pMad, and a homeodomain-response element (HD-RE that binds Apterous. These cis-elements have low activity and must be combined for Tv4-enhancer activity. Such combinatorial activity is often a mechanism for restricting expression to the intersection of cis-element spatiotemporal activities. However, concatemers of the HD-RE and BMP-RE cis-elements were found to independently generate the same spatiotemporal expression as the Tv4-enhancer. Thus, the Tv4-enhancer atypically combines two low-activity cis-elements that confer the same output from distinct inputs. The activation of target-dependent genes is assumed to 'wait' for target contact. We tested this directly, and unexpectedly found that premature BMP activity could not induce early FMRFa expression; also, we show that the BMP-insensitive HD-RE cis-element is activated at the time of target contact. This led us to uncover a role for the nuclear receptor, seven up (svp, as a repressor of FMRFa induction prior to target contact. Svp is normally downregulated immediately prior to target contact, and we found that maintaining Svp expression prevents cis-element activation, whereas reducing svp gene dosage prematurely activates cis-element activity. We conclude that the target-dependent FMRFa gene is repressed prior to target contact, and that target-derived BMP

  8. Proton cellular influx as a probable mechanism of variation potential influence on photosynthesis in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Sherstneva, Oksana; Surova, Lyubov; Katicheva, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    Electrical signals (action potential and variation potential, VP) caused by environmental stimuli are known to induce various physiological responses in plants, including changes in photosynthesis; however, their functional mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, the influence of VP on photosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated and the proton participation in this process analysed. VP, induced by local heating, inactivated photosynthesis and activated respiration, with the initiation of the photosynthetic response connected with inactivation of the photosynthetic dark stage; however, direct VP influence on the light stage was also probable. VP generation was accompanied with pH increases in apoplasts (0.17-0.30 pH unit) and decreases in cytoplasm (0.18-0.60 pH unit), which probably reflected H(+) -ATPase inactivation and H(+) influx during this electrical event. Imitation of H(+) influx using the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) induced a photosynthetic response that was similar with a VP-induced response. Experiments on chloroplast suspensions showed that decreased external pH also induced an analogous response and that its magnitude depended on the magnitude of pH change. Thus, the present results showed that proton cellular influx was the probable mechanism of VP's influence on photosynthesis in pea. Potential means of action for this influence are discussed.

  9. Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses About the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Conolly, Rory B; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2006-11-21

    This report describes the development of a computational systems biology approach to evaluate the hypotheses of molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptive response to low dose ionizing radiation. Our concept is that computational models of signaling pathways can be developed and linked to biologically based dose response models to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms which lead to adaptive response. For development of quantitatively accurate, predictive models, it will be necessary to describe tissues consisting of multiple cell types where the different types each contribute in their own way to the overall function of the tissue. Such a model will probably need to incorporate not only cell type-specific data but also spatial information on the architecture of the tissue and on intercellular signaling. The scope of the current model was more limited. Data obtained in a number of different biological systems were synthesized to describe a chimeric, “average” population cell. Biochemical signaling pathways involved in sensing of DNA damage and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoint controls and the apoptotic path were also included. As with any computational modeling effort, it was necessary to develop these simplified initial descriptions (models) that can be iteratively refined. This preliminary model is a starting point which, with time, can evolve to a level of refinement where large amounts of detailed biological information are synthesized and a capability for robust predictions of dose- and time-response behaviors is obtained.

  10. Clinical Impact and Cellular Mechanisms of Iron Overload-Associated Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeney, Viktória

    2017-01-01

    Diseases/conditions with diverse etiology, such as hemoglobinopathies, hereditary hemochromatosis and menopause, could lead to chronic iron accumulation. This condition is frequently associated with a bone phenotype; characterized by low bone mass, osteoporosis/osteopenia, altered microarchitecture and biomechanics, and increased incidence of fractures. Osteoporotic bone phenotype constitutes a major complication in patients with iron overload. The purpose of this review is to summarize what we have learnt about iron overload-associated bone loss from clinical studies and animal models. Bone is a metabolically active tissue that undergoes continuous remodeling with the involvement of osteoclasts that resorb mineralized bone, and osteoblasts that form new bone. Growing evidence suggests that both increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation are involved in the pathological bone-loss in iron overload conditions. We will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in this detrimental process. Fuller understanding of this complex mechanism may lead to the development of improved therapeutics meant to interrupt the pathologic effects of excess iron on bone. PMID:28270766

  11. Modeling mechanical behaviors of composites with various ratios of matrixeinclusion properties using movable cellular automaton method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Yu. SMOLIN; E.V. SHILKO; S.V. ASTAFUROV; I.S. KONOVALENKO; S.P. BUYAKOVA; S.G. PSAKHIE

    2015-01-01

    Two classes of composite materials are considered: classical metaleceramic composites with reinforcing hard inclusions as well as hard ceramics matrix with soft gel inclusions. Movable cellular automaton method is used for modeling the mechanical behaviors of such different heterogeneous materials. The method is based on particle approach and may be considered as a kind of discrete element method. The main feature of the method is the use of many-body forces of inter-element interaction within the formalism of simply deformable element approximation. It was shown that the strength of reinforcing particles and the width of particle-binder interphase boundaries had determining influence on the service characteristics of metaleceramic composite. In particular, the increasing of strength of carbide inclusions may lead to significant increase in the strength and ultimate strain of composite material. On the example of porous zirconia ceramics it was shown that the change in the mechanical properties of pore surface leads to the corresponding change in effective elastic modulus and strength limit of the ceramic sample. The less is the pore size, the more is this effect. The increase in the elastic properties of pore surface of ceramics may reduce its fracture energy.

  12. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle aging and sarcopenia and effects of electrical stimulation in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Barberi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers, alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors.

  13. MECANISMOS CELULARES EN RESPUESTA AL ESTRÉS:: SIRTUINAS Cellular mechanisms in response to stress: sirtuin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Paola Echeverri-Ruíz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace algún tiempo se conoce el papel de la restricción calórica sobre la longevidad y la prevención de enfermedades crónicas, pero hasta hace poco los mecanismos celulares involucrados comienzan a ser elucidados. El estrés celular se podría definir como el estado en el que la célula no presenta las condiciones óptimas de supervivencia, siendo el oxidativo un tipo de estrés en el que se generan radicales libres nocivos para las estructuras celulares. La restricción calórica podría incrementar la resistencia celular a diferentes formas de estrés. Las sirtuinas, proteínas deacetilasas de histonas tipo III, están involucradas en la relación entre balance energético y transcripción génica, permitiendo que la célula responda a la restricción calórica y sobreviva a situaciones de estrés oxidativo. En esta relación las sirtuinas regulan genes de la familia FOXO, cMYC, hTERT, p53, entre otros. La activación o silenciamiento de estos genes es importante en los procesos de apoptosis, reparación y muerte celular.The role of caloric restriction on longevity and prevention of chronic diseases has been known for some time; recently, cellular mechanisms involved are beginning to be elucidated. Cellular stress could be defined as the state in which the cell does not present optimal survival conditions; oxidative stress is a type of stress in which free radicals harmful cell structures. Caloric restriction might increase cellular resistance to various forms of stress. Sirtuins, histone deacetylases type III proteins are involved in the relationship between energy balance and gene transcription, allowing cell to respond to caloric restriction and to survive to oxidative stress. In this relationship, sirtuins regulate FOXO family genes, cMYC, hTERT, p53, among others. Activation or silencing of those genes is important in the process of apoptosis, repair and cell death

  14. Global Rebalancing of Cellular Resources by Pleiotropic Point Mutations Illustrates a Multi-scale Mechanism of Adaptive Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utrilla, José; O'Brien, Edward J.; Chen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Pleiotropic regulatory mutations affect diverse cellular processes, posing a challenge to our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships across multiple biological scales. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) allows for such mutations to be found and characterized in the context of clear...... selection pressures. Here, several ALE-selected single-mutation variants in RNA polymerase (RNAP) of Escherichia coli are detailed using an integrated multi-scale experimental and computational approach. While these mutations increase cellular growth rates in steady environments, they reduce tolerance...... to stress and environmental fluctuations. We detail structural changes in the RNAP that rewire the transcriptional machinery to rebalance proteome and energy allocation toward growth and away from several hedging and stress functions. We find that while these mutations occur in diverse locations in the RNAP...

  15. Newly Described Components and Regulatory Mechanisms of Circadian Clock Function in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manuel Adrián Troncoso-Ponce; Paloma Mas

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock temporally coordinates plant growth and metabolism in close synchronization with the diurnal and seasonal environmental changes.Research over the last decade has identified a number of clock components and a variety of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the rhythmic oscillations in metabolic and physiological activities.At the core of the clock,transcriptional/translational feedback loops modulate the expression of a significant proportion of the genome.In this article,we briefly describe some of the very recent advances that have improved our understanding of clock organization and function in Arabidopsis thaliana.The new studies illustrate the role of clock protein complex formation on circadian gating of plant growth and identify alternative splicing as a new regulatory mechanism for clock function.Examination of key clock properties such as temperature compensation has also opened new avenues for functional research within the plant clockwork.The emerging connections between the circadian clock and metabolism,hormone signaling and response to biotic and abiotic stress also add new layers of complexity to the clock network and underscore the significance of the circadian clock regulating the daily life of plants.

  16. The underlying molecular and network level mechanisms in the evolution of robustness in gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pujato

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks show robustness to perturbations. Previous works identified robustness as an emergent property of gene network evolution but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We used a multi-tier modeling approach that integrates molecular sequence and structure information with network architecture and population dynamics. Structural models of transcription factor-DNA complexes are used to estimate relative binding specificities. In this model, mutations in the DNA cause changes on two levels: (a at the sequence level in individual binding sites (modulating binding specificity, and (b at the network level (creating and destroying binding sites. We used this model to dissect the underlying mechanisms responsible for the evolution of robustness in gene regulatory networks. Results suggest that in sparse architectures (represented by short promoters, a mixture of local-sequence and network-architecture level changes are exploited. At the local-sequence level, robustness evolves by decreasing the probabilities of both the destruction of existent and generation of new binding sites. Meanwhile, in highly interconnected architectures (represented by long promoters, robustness evolves almost entirely via network level changes, deleting and creating binding sites that modify the network architecture.

  17. Transancestral fine-mapping of four type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci highlights potential causal regulatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Momoko; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Wiltshire, Steven; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Mahajan, Anubha; Asimit, Jennifer L.; Ferreira, Teresa; Locke, Adam E.; Robertson, Neil R.; Wang, Xu; Sim, Xueling; Fujita, Hayato; Hara, Kazuo; Young, Robin; Zhang, Weihua; Choi, Sungkyoung; Chen, Han; Kaur, Ismeet; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Fontanillas, Pierre; Thuillier, Dorothée; Yengo, Loic; Below, Jennifer E.; Tam, Claudia H.T.; Wu, Ying; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Altshuler, David; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Burtt, Noél P.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Florez, Jose C.; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Atzmon, Gil; Chan, Juliana C.N.; Ma, Ronald C.W.; Froguel, Philippe; Wilson, James G.; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Dupuis, Josee; Meigs, James B.; Cho, Yoon Shin; Park, Taesung; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Kadowaki, Takashi; Tai, E. Shyong; Mohlke, Karen L.; Cox, Nancy J.; Ferrer, Jorge; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kato, Norihiro; Teo, Yik Ying; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    To gain insight into potential regulatory mechanisms through which the effects of variants at four established type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility loci (CDKAL1, CDKN2A-B, IGF2BP2 and KCNQ1) are mediated, we undertook transancestral fine-mapping in 22 086 cases and 42 539 controls of East Asian, European, South Asian, African American and Mexican American descent. Through high-density imputation and conditional analyses, we identified seven distinct association signals at these four loci, each with allelic effects on T2D susceptibility that were homogenous across ancestry groups. By leveraging differences in the structure of linkage disequilibrium between diverse populations, and increased sample size, we localised the variants most likely to drive each distinct association signal. We demonstrated that integration of these genetic fine-mapping data with genomic annotation can highlight potential causal regulatory elements in T2D-relevant tissues. These analyses provide insight into the mechanisms through which T2D association signals are mediated, and suggest future routes to understanding the biology of specific disease susceptibility loci. PMID:26911676

  18. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss - A Common Hereditary Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Jeffrey C; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. However, there is no apparent, demonstrable relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel) functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K(+)-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Cx30 (GJB6), Cx29 (GJC3), Cx31 (GJB3), and Cx43 (GJA1) mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation-induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes remain unclear. Also, little is known about specific mutation-induced pathological changes in vivo and little information is available for humans. Such further studies are urgently required.

  19. Mechanisms of stochastic onset and termination of atrial fibrillation studied with a cellular automaton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical models of cardiac electrical excitation are increasingly complex, with multiscale models seeking to represent and bridge physiological behaviours across temporal and spatial scales. The increasing complexity of these models makes it computationally expensive to both evaluate long term (more than 60 s) behaviour and determine sensitivity of model outputs to inputs. This is particularly relevant in models of atrial fibrillation (AF), where individual episodes last from seconds to days, and interepisode waiting times can be minutes to months. Potential mechanisms of transition between sinus rhythm and AF have been identified but are not well understood, and it is difficult to simulate AF for long periods of time using state-of-the-art models. In this study, we implemented a Moe-type cellular automaton on a novel, topologically equivalent surface geometry of the left atrium. We used the model to simulate stochastic initiation and spontaneous termination of AF, arising from bursts of spontaneous activation near pulmonary veins. The simplified representation of atrial electrical activity reduced computational cost, and so permitted us to investigate AF mechanisms in a probabilistic setting. We computed large numbers (approx. 105) of sample paths of the model, to infer stochastic initiation and termination rates of AF episodes using different model parameters. By generating statistical distributions of model outputs, we demonstrated how to propagate uncertainties of inputs within our microscopic level model up to a macroscopic level. Lastly, we investigated spontaneous termination in the model and found a complex dependence on its past AF trajectory, the mechanism of which merits future investigation. PMID:28356539

  20. Investigation of biomimetic shear stress on cellular uptake and mechanism of polystyrene nanoparticles in various cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taehee; Park, Chulhun; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment are affected by fluid shear stress generated by blood flow in the vascular microenvironment and interstitial flows in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, we investigated how fluidic shear stress affects cellular uptake as well as the endocytosis mechanism of nanoparticles using a biomimetic microfluidic system that mimics the human dynamic environment. Positively charged amino-modified polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNs) at 100 μg/mL were delivered to cancer cells under static and biomimetic dynamic conditions (0.5 dyne/cm(2)). Additionally, the experiment was done in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors specific for one of the endocytosis pathways. To evaluate cellular uptake of cationic PSNs, the fluorescence intensity of cationic PSNs in cancer cells was measured by flow cytometer and fluorescence images were taken using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cancer cells in dynamic conditions exhibited higher cellular uptake of PSNs and showed different cellular uptake mechanisms compared with those in static conditions. From these results, it suggested that biomimetic dynamic conditions stimulated specific endocytosis and prompted cellular uptake. It was also important to consider fluidic shear stress as one of the critical factors because cellular uptake and drug delivery could play a key role in cancer cells and metastasis.

  1. A systematic in vitro investigation on poly-arginine modified nanostructured lipid carrier: Pharmaceutical characteristics, cellular uptake, mechanisms and cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingshuang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a poly-arginine modified nanostructured lipid carrier (R-NLC by fusion-emulsification method and to test its pharmaceutical characteristics. The influence of R-NLC on A549 cells like cellular uptake and cytotoxicity was also appraised using unmodified NLC as the controlled group. As the results revealed, R-NLC had an average diameter of about 40 nm and a positive zeta potential of about +17 mv, the entrapment efficiency decreased apparently, and no significant difference on the in vitro drug release was found after R8-modification. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity increased obviously compared with unmodified NLC. The cellular uptake mechanisms of R-NLC involved energy, macropinocytosis, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and caveolin-mediated endocytosis. The outcomes of the present study strongly support the theory that cell penetrating peptides have the ability of enhancing the cellular uptake of nanocarriers.

  2. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  3. Multiple Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Lycopene in Cancer Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  4. Multiple molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of lycopene in cancer inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Solís, Cristina; Pedraza-Chaverrí, Jose; Torres-Ramos, Mónica; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Cruz Salgado, Arturo; Serrano-García, Norma; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Sotelo, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in regular dietary intake might prevent and reverse cellular carcinogenesis, reducing the incidence of primary tumours. Bioactive components present in food can simultaneously modulate more than one carcinogenic process, including cancer metabolism, hormonal balance, transcriptional activity, cell-cycle control, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. Some studies have shown an inverse correlation between a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and carotenoids and a low incidence of different types of cancer. Lycopene, the predominant carotenoid found in tomatoes, exhibits a high antioxidant capacity and has been shown to prevent cancer, as evidenced by clinical trials and studies in cell culture and animal models. In vitro studies have shown that lycopene treatment can selectively arrest cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In vivo studies have revealed that lycopene treatment inhibits tumour growth in the liver, lung, prostate, breast, and colon. Clinical studies have shown that lycopene protects against prostate cancer. One of the main challenges in cancer prevention is the integration of new molecular findings into clinical practice. Thus, the identification of molecular biomarkers associated with lycopene levels is essential for improving our understanding of the mechanisms underlying its antineoplastic activity.

  5. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eGuseva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  6. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  7. Vision preservation during retinal inflammation by anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract: cellular and molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Seiji; Takahashi, Noriko; Sasaki, Mariko; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract, a plant-derived antioxidant, has been utilized as a popular supplement for ocular health worldwide. However, it is unclear whether this extract has any biological effect on visual function, and the mechanism for such an effect is completely unknown. In this study, we generated a mouse model of endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) that shows retinal inflammation, as well as uveitis, by injecting lipopolysaccharide. We pretreated the mice with anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract and analyzed the effect on the retina. Anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract prevented the impairment of photoreceptor cell function, as measured by electroretinogram. At the cellular level, we found that the EIU-associated rhodopsin decreased and the shortening of outer segments in photoreceptor cells were suppressed in the bilberry-extract-treated animals. Moreover, the extract prevented both STAT3 activation, which induces inflammation-related rhodopsin decrease, and the increase in interleukin-6 expression, which activates STAT3. In addition to its anti-inflammatory effect, the anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract ameliorated the intracellular elevation of reactive oxygen species and activated NF-κB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor, in the inflamed retina. Our findings indicate that anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract has a protective effect on visual function during retinal inflammation.

  8. Biologic plausibility, cellular effects, and molecular mechanisms of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borow, Kenneth M; Nelson, John R; Mason, R Preston

    2015-09-01

    Residual cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in dyslipidemic patients despite intensive statin therapy, underscoring the need for additional intervention. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is incorporated into membrane phospholipids and atherosclerotic plaques and exerts beneficial effects on the pathophysiologic cascade from onset of plaque formation through rupture. Specific salutary actions have been reported relating to endothelial function, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, inflammation, plaque formation/progression, platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, and plaque rupture. EPA also improves atherogenic dyslipidemia characterized by reduction of triglycerides without raising low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Other beneficial effects of EPA include vasodilation, resulting in blood pressure reductions, as well as improved membrane fluidity. EPA's effects are at least additive to those of statins when given as adjunctive therapy. In this review, we present data supporting the biologic plausibility of EPA as an anti-atherosclerotic agent with potential clinical benefit for prevention of CV events, as well as its cellular effects and molecular mechanisms of action. REDUCE-IT is an ongoing, randomized, controlled study evaluating whether the high-purity ethyl ester of EPA (icosapent ethyl) at 4 g/day combined with statin therapy is superior to statin therapy alone for reducing CV events in high-risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia. The results from this study are expected to clarify the role of EPA as adjunctive therapy to a statin for reduction of residual CV risk.

  9. Activation of counter-regulatory mechanisms in a rat renal acute rejection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomon Daniel R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray analysis provides a powerful approach to identify gene expression alterations following transplantation. In patients the heterogeneity of graft specimens, co-morbidity, co-medications and the challenges in sample collection and preparation complicate conclusions regarding the underlying mechanisms of graft injury, rejection and immune regulation. Results We used a rat kidney transplantation model with strict transplant and sample preparation procedures to analyze genome wide changes in gene expression four days after syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation. Both interventions were associated with substantial changes in gene expression. After allogeneic transplantation, genes and pathways related to transport and metabolism were predominantly down-regulated consistent with rejection-mediated graft injury and dysfunction. Up-regulated genes were primarily related to the acute immune response including antigen presentation, T-cell receptor signaling, apoptosis, interferon signaling and complement cascades. We observed a cytokine and chemokine expression profile consistent with activation of a Th1-cell response. A novel finding was up-regulation of several regulatory and protective genes after allogeneic transplantation, specifically IL10, Bcl2a1, C4bpa, Ctla4, HO-1 and the SOCS family. Conclusion Our data indicate that in parallel with the predicted activation of immune response and tissue injury pathways, there is simultaneous activation of pathways for counter regulatory and protective mechanisms that would balance and limit the ongoing inflammatory/immune responses. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind and the clinical consequences of alterations in expression of these gene classes in acute rejection, injury and dysfunction vs. protection and immunoregulation, prompt further analyses and open new aspects for therapeutic approaches.

  10. Extracellular reduction of uranium via Geobacter conductive pili as a protective cellular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Speers, Allison M; Kelly, Shelly D; Reguera, Gemma

    2011-09-13

    The in situ stimulation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter bacteria leads to the concomitant precipitation of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater. Despite its promise for the bioremediation of uranium contaminants, the biological mechanism behind this reaction remains elusive. Because Fe(III) oxide reduction requires the expression of Geobacter's conductive pili, we evaluated their contribution to uranium reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under pili-inducing or noninducing conditions. A pilin-deficient mutant and a genetically complemented strain with reduced outer membrane c-cytochrome content were used as controls. Pili expression significantly enhanced the rate and extent of uranium immobilization per cell and prevented periplasmic mineralization. As a result, pili expression also preserved the vital respiratory activities of the cell envelope and the cell's viability. Uranium preferentially precipitated along the pili and, to a lesser extent, on outer membrane redox-active foci. In contrast, the pilus-defective strains had different degrees of periplasmic mineralization matching well with their outer membrane c-cytochrome content. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses demonstrated the extracellular reduction of U(VI) by the pili to mononuclear tetravalent uranium U(IV) complexed by carbon-containing ligands, consistent with a biological reduction. In contrast, the U(IV) in the pilin-deficient mutant cells also required an additional phosphorous ligand, in agreement with the predominantly periplasmic mineralization of uranium observed in this strain. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for Geobacter conductive pili in the extracellular reduction of uranium, and highlight its essential function as a catalytic and protective cellular mechanism that is of interest for the bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

  11. Use of lactobacilli and their pheromone-based regulatory mechanism in gene expression and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, D B; Mathiesen, G; Eijsink, V G H; Nes, I F

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacilli are common microorganisms in diverse vegetables and meat products and several of these are also indigenous inhabitants in the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract of humans and animals where they are believed to have health promoting effects on the host. One of the highly appreciated probiotic effects is their ability to inhibit the growth of pathogens by producing antimicrobial peptides, so-called bacteriocins. Production of some bacteriocins has been shown to be strictly regulated through a quorum-sensing based mechanism mediated by a secreted peptide-pheromone (also called induction peptide; IP), a membrane-located sensor (histidine protein kinase; HPK) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR). The interaction between an IP and its sensor, which is highly specific, leads to activation of the cognate RR which in turn binds to regulated promoters and activates gene expression. The HPKs and RRs are built up by conserved modules, and the signalling between them within a network is efficient and directional, and can easily be activated by exogenously added synthetic IPs. Consequently, components from such regulatory networks have successfully been exploited in construction of a number of inducible gene expression systems. In this review, we discuss some well-characterised quorum sensing networks involved in bacteriocin production in lactobacilli, with special focus on the use of the regulatory components in gene expression and on lactobacilli as potential delivery vehicle for therapeutic and vaccine purposes.

  12. Mechanisms of cellular adaptation to quantum dots--the role of glutathione and transcription factor EB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica

    2012-05-01

    Cellular adaptation is the dynamic response of a cell to adverse changes in its intra/extra cellular environment. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of: (i) the glutathione antioxidant system, and (ii) the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a newly revealed master regulator of lysosome biogenesis, in cellular adaptation to nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress. Intracellular concentrations of glutathione species and activation of TFEB were assessed in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells following treatment with uncapped CdTe quantum dots (QDs), using biochemical, live cell fluorescence and immunocytochemical techniques. Exposure to toxic concentrations of QDs resulted in a significant enhancement of intracellular glutathione concentrations, redistribution of glutathione species and a progressive translocation and activation of TFEB. These changes were associated with an enlargement of the cellular lysosomal compartment. Together, these processes appear to have an adaptive character, and thereby participate in the adaptive cellular response to toxic nanoparticles.

  13. Novel Regulatory Mechanisms of Pathogenicity and Virulence to Combat MDR in Candida albicans

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    Saif Hameed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous deployment of antifungals in treating infections caused by dimorphic opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans has led to the emergence of drug resistance resulting in cross-resistance to many unrelated drugs, a phenomenon termed multidrug resistance (MDR. Despite the current understanding of major factors which contribute to MDR mechanisms, there are many lines of evidence suggesting that it is a complex interplay of multiple factors which may be contributed by still unknown mechanisms. Coincidentally with the increased usage of antifungal drugs, the number of reports for antifungal drug resistance has also increased which further highlights the need for understanding novel molecular mechanisms which can be explored to combat MDR, namely, ROS, iron, hypoxia, lipids, morphogenesis, and transcriptional and signaling networks. Considering the worrying evolution of MDR and significance of C. albicans being the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, this review summarizes these new regulatory mechanisms which could be exploited to prevent MDR development in C. albicans as established from recent studies.

  14. Regulatory mechanism of endothelin receptor B in the cerebral arteries after focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Anne-Sofie; Thigarajah, Rushani; Edvinsson, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    drug targets to restore normal cerebral artery contractile function as part of successful neuroprotective therapy. METHODS: We have employed in vitro methods on human and rat cerebral arteries to study the regulatory mechanisms and the efficacy of target selective inhibitor, Mithramycin A (MitA...... arteries. RESULTS: Increased expression of specificity protein (Sp1) was observed in human and rat cerebral arteries after organ culture, strongly correlating with the ETBR upregulation. Similar observations were made in MCAO rats. Treatment with MitA, a Sp1 specific inhibitor, significantly downregulated...... vasoconstriction in focal cerebral ischemia via MEK-ERK signaling, which is also conserved in humans. The results show that MitA can effectively be used to block ETBR mediated vasoconstriction as a supplement to an existing ischemic stroke therapy....

  15. Systemic blood loss affects NF-kappa B regulatory mechanisms in the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, P; Shenkar, R; Kaneko, D; Le Tulzo, Y; Abraham, E

    1997-07-01

    The nuclear regulatory factor (NF)-kappa B is activated in the lungs of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In experimental models of acute lung injury, activation of NF-kappa B contributes to the increased expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators in the lungs. Because of the important role that NF-kappa B activation appears to play in the development of acute lung injury, we examined cytoplasmic and nuclear NF-kappa B counterregulatory mechanisms in lung mononuclear cells, using a murine model in which inflammatory lung injury develops after blood loss. Sustained activation of NF-kappa B was present in lung mononuclear cells over the 4-h period after blood loss. The activation of NF-kappa B after hemorrhage was accompanied by alterations in levels of the NF-kappa B regulatory proteins I kappa B alpha and Bcl-3. Cytoplasmic and nuclear I kappa B alpha were increased and nuclear Bcl-3 was decreased during the first hour after blood loss, but, by 4 h posthemorrhage, cytoplasmic and nuclear I kappa B alpha levels were decreased and nuclear levels of Bcl-3 were increased. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity in otherwise unmanipulated unhemorrhaged mice resulted in increased levels of I kappa B alpha and decreased amounts of Bcl-3 in nuclear extracts from lung mononuclear cells. No changes in the levels of nuclear I kappa B alpha or Bcl-3 occurred after hemorrhage when xanthine oxidase activity was inhibited. These results demonstrate that blood loss, at least partly through xanthine oxidase-dependent mechanisms, produces alterations in the levels of both I kappa B alpha and Bcl-3 in lung mononuclear cell populations. The effects of hemorrhage on proteins that regulate activation of NF-kappa B may contribute to the frequent development of inflammatory lung injury in this setting.

  16. Functional Analysis of In-frame Indel ARID1A Mutations Reveals New Regulatory Mechanisms of Its Tumor Suppressor Functions

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    Bin Guan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A has emerged as a new tumor suppressor in which frequent somatic mutations have been identified in several types of human cancers. Although most ARID1A somatic mutations are frame-shift or nonsense mutations that contribute to mRNA decay and loss of protein expression, 5% of ARID1A mutations are in-frame insertions or deletions (indels that involve only a small stretch of peptides. Naturally occurring in-frame indel mutations provide unique and useful models to explore the biology and regulatory role of ARID1A. In this study, we analyzed indel mutations identified in gynecological cancers to determine how these mutations affect the tumor suppressor function of ARID1A. Our results demonstrate that all in-frame mutants analyzed lost their ability to inhibit cellular proliferation or activate transcription of CDKN1A, which encodes p21, a downstream effector of ARID1A. We also showed that ARID1A is a nucleocytoplasmic protein whose stability depends on its subcellular localization. Nuclear ARID1A is less stable than cytoplasmic ARID1A because ARID1A is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nucleus. In-frame deletions affecting the consensus nuclear export signal reduce steady-state protein levels of ARID1A. This defect in nuclear exportation leads to nuclear retention and subsequent degradation. Our findings delineate a mechanism underlying the regulation of ARID1A subcellular distribution and protein stability and suggest that targeting the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system can increase the amount of the ARID1A protein in the nucleus and restore its tumor suppressor functions.

  17. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of eukaryotic transcriptional activation by SAGA and TFIID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2011-02-01

    A growing number of human diseases are linked to abnormal gene expression which is largely controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. The gene-specific activator promotes the initiation of transcription through its interaction with one or more components of the transcriptional initiation machinery, hence leading to stimulated transcriptional initiation or activation. However, all activator proteins do not target the same component(s) of the transcriptional initiation machinery. Rather, they can have different target specificities, and thus, can lead to distinct mechanisms of transcriptional activation. Two such distinct mechanisms of transcriptional activation in yeast are mediated by the SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5-Acetyltransferase) and TFIID (Transcription factor IID) complexes, and are termed as "SAGA-dependent" and "TFIID-dependent" transcriptional activation, respectively. SAGA is the target of the activator in case of SAGA-dependent transcriptional activation, while the targeting of TFIID by the activator leads to TFIID-dependent transcriptional activation. Both the SAGA and TFIID complexes are highly conserved from yeast to human, and play crucial roles in gene activation among eukaryotes. The regulatory mechanisms of eukaryotic transcriptional activation by SAGA and TFIID are discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The 26S Proteasome: When degradation is just not enough!

  18. Dopamine D4 receptor excitation of lateral habenula neurons via multiple cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Cameron H; Wang, Huikun; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A; Hoffman, Alexander F; Lupica, Carl R

    2013-10-23

    Glutamatergic lateral habenula (LHb) output communicates negative motivational valence to ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons via activation of the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg). However, the LHb also receives a poorly understood DA input from the VTA, which we hypothesized constitutes an important feedback loop regulating DA responses to stimuli. Using whole-cell electrophysiology in rat brain slices, we find that DA initiates a depolarizing inward current (I(DAi)) and increases spontaneous firing in 32% of LHb neurons. I(DAi) was also observed upon application of amphetamine or the DA uptake blockers cocaine or GBR12935, indicating involvement of endogenous DA. I(DAi) was blocked by D4 receptor (D4R) antagonists (L745,870 or L741,742), and mimicked by a selective D4R agonist (A412997). I(DAi) was associated with increased whole-cell conductance and was blocked by Cs+ or a selective blocker of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channel, ZD7288. I(DAi) was also associated with a depolarizing shift in half-activation voltage for the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) mediated by HCN channels. Recordings from LHb neurons containing fluorescent retrograde tracers revealed that I(DAi) was observed only in cells projecting to the RMTg and not the VTA. In parallel with direct depolarization, DA also strongly increased synaptic glutamate release and reduced synaptic GABA release onto LHb cells. These results demonstrate that DA can excite glutamatergic LHb output to RMTg via multiple cellular mechanisms. Since the RMTg strongly inhibits midbrain DA neurons, activation of LHb output to RMTg by DA represents a negative feedback loop that may dampen DA neuron output following activation.

  19. Cellular mechanisms underlying spontaneous interictal spikes in an acute model of focal cortical epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Curtis, M; Radici, C; Forti, M

    1999-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms involved in the generation of spontaneous epileptiform potentials were investigated in the pirifom cortex of the in vitro isolated guinea-pig brain. A single, unilateral injection of bicuculline (150-200 nmol) in the anterior piriform cortex induced locally spontaneous interictal spikes that recurred with a period of 8.81+/-4.47 s and propagated caudally to the ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres. Simultaneous extra- and intracellular recordings from layer II and III principal cells showed that the spontaneous interictal spike correlates to a burst of action potentials followed by a large afterdepolarization. Intracellular application of the sodium conductance blocker, QX-314 (80 mM), abolished bursting activity and unmasked a high-threshold slow spike enhanced by the calcium chelator EGTA (50 mM). The slow spike was abolished by membrane hyperpolarization and by local perfusion with 2 mM cadmium. The depolarizing potential that followed the primary burst was reduced by arterial perfusion with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (100-200 microM). The non-N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (20 microM), completely and reversibly blocked the spontaneous spikes. The interictal spikes were terminated by a large afterpotential blocked either by intracellular QX-314 (80 mM) or by extracellular application of phaclofen and 2-hydroxysaclofen (10 and 4 mM, respectively). The present study demonstrates that, in an acute model of epileptogenesis, spontaneous interictal spikes are fostered by a primary burst of fast action potentials that ride on a regenerative high-threshold, possibly calcium-mediated spike, which activates a recurrent, glutamate-mediated potential responsible for the entrainment of adjacent and remote cortical regions. The bursting activity is controlled by a GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic potential.

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunomodulation in the brain through environmental enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eSinghal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on environmental enrichment (EE have shown cytokines, cellular immune components (e.g. T lymphocytes, NK cells and glial cells in causal relationship to EE in bringing out changes to neurobiology and behavior. The purpose of this review is to evaluate these neuroimmune mechanisms associated with neurobiological and behavioral changes in response to different EE methods. We systematically reviewed common research databases. After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 328 articles remained for this review. Physical exercise, a form of EE, elicits anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory effects through interaction with several immune pathways including IL-6 secretion from muscle fibers, reduced expression of TLR’s on monocytes and macrophages, reduced secretion of adipokines, modulation of hippocampal T cells, priming of microglia and upregulation of MKP-1 in CNS. In contrast, immunomodulatory roles of other enrichment methods are not studied extensively. Nonetheless, studies showing reduction in the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α in response to enrichment with novel objects and accessories suggest anti-inflammatory effects of novel environment. Likewise, social enrichment, though considered a necessity for healthy behavior, results in immunosuppression in socially defeated animals. This has been attributed to reduction in T lymphocytes, NK cells and IL-10 in subordinate animals. EE through sensory stimuli has been investigated to a lesser extent and the effect on immune factors has not been evaluated yet. Discovery of this multidimensional relationship between immune system, brain functioning and EE has paved a way towards formulating environ-immuno therapies for treating psychiatric illnesses with minimal use of pharmacotherapy. While the immuno-modulatory role of physical exercise has been evaluated extensively, more research is required to investigate neuroimmune changes associated with other enrichment methods.

  1. A computational model of cellular mechanisms of temporal coding in the medial geniculate body (MGB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cal F Rabang

    Full Text Available Acoustic stimuli are often represented in the early auditory pathway as patterns of neural activity synchronized to time-varying features. This phase-locking predominates until the level of the medial geniculate body (MGB, where previous studies have identified two main, largely segregated response types: Stimulus-synchronized responses faithfully preserve the temporal coding from its afferent inputs, and Non-synchronized responses, which are not phase locked to the inputs, represent changes in temporal modulation by a rate code. The cellular mechanisms underlying this transformation from phase-locked to rate code are not well understood. We use a computational model of a MGB thalamocortical neuron to test the hypothesis that these response classes arise from inferior colliculus (IC excitatory afferents with divergent properties similar to those observed in brain slice studies. Large-conductance inputs exhibiting synaptic depression preserved input synchrony as short as 12.5 ms interclick intervals, while maintaining low firing rates and low-pass filtering responses. By contrast, small-conductance inputs with Mixed plasticity (depression of AMPA-receptor component and facilitation of NMDA-receptor component desynchronized afferent inputs, generated a click-rate dependent increase in firing rate, and high-pass filtered the inputs. Synaptic inputs with facilitation often permitted band-pass synchrony along with band-pass rate tuning. These responses could be tuned by changes in membrane potential, strength of the NMDA component, and characteristics of synaptic plasticity. These results demonstrate how the same synchronized input spike trains from the inferior colliculus can be transformed into different representations of temporal modulation by divergent synaptic properties.

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunomodulation in the brain through environmental enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Gaurav; Jaehne, Emily J; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on environmental enrichment (EE) have shown cytokines, cellular immune components [e.g., T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells], and glial cells in causal relationship to EE in bringing out changes to neurobiology and behavior. The purpose of this review is to evaluate these neuroimmune mechanisms associated with neurobiological and behavioral changes in response to different EE methods. We systematically reviewed common research databases. After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 328 articles remained for this review. Physical exercise (PE), a form of EE, elicits anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory effects through interaction with several immune pathways including interleukin (IL)-6 secretion from muscle fibers, reduced expression of Toll-like receptors on monocytes and macrophages, reduced secretion of adipokines, modulation of hippocampal T cells, priming of microglia, and upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in central nervous system. In contrast, immunomodulatory roles of other enrichment methods are not studied extensively. Nonetheless, studies showing reduction in the expression of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α in response to enrichment with novel objects and accessories suggest anti-inflammatory effects of novel environment. Likewise, social enrichment, though considered a necessity for healthy behavior, results in immunosuppression in socially defeated animals. This has been attributed to reduction in T lymphocytes, NK cells and IL-10 in subordinate animals. EE through sensory stimuli has been investigated to a lesser extent and the effect on immune factors has not been evaluated yet. Discovery of this multidimensional relationship between immune system, brain functioning, and EE has paved a way toward formulating environ-immuno therapies for treating psychiatric illnesses with minimal use of pharmacotherapy. While the immunomodulatory role of PE has been evaluated extensively, more research

  3. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Robertson

    Full Text Available Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and

  4. NF-kappaB regulatory mechanisms in alveolar macrophages from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, P; McIntyre, R; Schwartz, M D; Kaneko, D; Shenkar, R; Le Tulzo, Y; Moore, E E; Abraham, E

    2000-02-01

    Activation of the nuclear regulatory factor NF-kappaB occurs in the lungs of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and may contribute to the increased expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators in this setting. Because of the important role that NF-kappaB activation appears to play in the development of acute lung injury, we examined cytoplasmic and nuclear NF-kapppaB counterregulatory mechanisms, involving IkappaB proteins, in alveolar macrophages obtained from 7 control patients without lung injury and 11 patients with established ARDS. Cytoplasmic levels of the NF-kappaB subunits p50, p65, and c-Rel were significantly decreased in alveolar macrophages from patients with ARDS, consistent with enhanced migration of liberated NF-kappaB dimers from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of IkappaBalpha were not significantly altered in alveolar macrophages from patients with established ARDS, compared with controls. In contrast, nuclear levels of Bcl-3 were significantly decreased in patients with ARDS compared with controls (P = 0.02). No IkappaBgamma, IkappaBbeta, or p105 proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages from control patients or patients with ARDS. The presence of activated NF-kappaB in alveolar macrophages from patients with established ARDS implies the presence of an ongoing stimulus for NF-kappaB activation. In this setting, appropriate counterregulatory mechanisms to normalize nuclear levels of NF-kappaB and to suppress NF-kappaB-mediated transcription, such as increased cytoplasmic and nuclear IkappaBalpha levels or decreased Bcl-3 levels, appeared to be induced. Nevertheless, even though counterregulatory mechanisms to NF-kappaB activation are activated in lung macrophages of patients with ARDS, NF-kappaB remains activated. These results suggest that fundamental abnormalities in transcriptional mechanisms involving NF-kappaB and important in the

  5. Up-regulation of miR-98 and unraveling regulatory mechanisms in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing-Li; Zhang, Lu; Li, Jian; Tian, Shi; Lv, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Xue-Qin; Su, Xing; Li, Ying; Hu, Yi; Ma, Xu; Xia, Hong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    MiR-98 expression was up-regulated in kidney in response to early diabetic nephropathy in mouse and down-regulated in muscle in type 2 diabetes in human. However, the expression prolife and functional role of miR-98 in human gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remained unclear. Here, we investigated its expression and function in placental tissues from GDM patients and the possible molecular mechanisms. The results showed that miR-98 was up-regulated in placentas from GDM patients compared with normal placentas. MiR-98 over-expression increased global DNA methylational level and miR-98 knockdown reduced global DNA methylational level. Further investigation revealed that miR-98 could inhibit Mecp2 expression by binding the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of methyl CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2), and then led to the expression dysregulation of canonical transient receptor potential 3 (Trpc3), a glucose uptake related gene. More importantly, in vivo analysis found that the expression level of Mecp2 and Trpc3 in placental tissues from GDM patients, relative to the increase of miR-98, was diminished, especially for GDM patients over the age of 35 years. Collectively, up-regulation of miR-98 in the placental tissues of human GDM is linked to the global DNA methylation via targeting Mecp2, which may imply a novel regulatory mechanism in GDM. PMID:27573367

  6. Comprehensive population-based genome sequencing provides insight into hematopoietic regulatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Michael H.; Nandakumar, Satish K.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Zekavat, Seyedeh M.; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Salem, Rany M.; Chiarle, Roberto; Mitt, Mario; Kals, Mart; Pärn, Kalle; Fischer, Krista; Milani, Lili; Mägi, Reedik; Palta, Priit; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Metspalu, Andres; Lander, Eric S.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Esko, Tõnu; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variants affecting hematopoiesis can influence commonly measured blood cell traits. To identify factors that affect hematopoiesis, we performed association studies for blood cell traits in the population-based Estonian Biobank using high-coverage whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in 2,284 samples and SNP genotyping in an additional 14,904 samples. Using up to 7,134 samples with available phenotype data, our analyses identified 17 associations across 14 blood cell traits. Integration of WGS-based fine-mapping and complementary epigenomic datasets provided evidence for causal mechanisms at several loci, including at a previously undiscovered basophil count-associated locus near the master hematopoietic transcription factor CEBPA. The fine-mapped variant at this basophil count association near CEBPA overlapped an enhancer active in common myeloid progenitors and influenced its activity. In situ perturbation of this enhancer by CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells demonstrated that it is necessary for and specifically regulates CEBPA expression during basophil differentiation. We additionally identified basophil count-associated variation at another more pleiotropic myeloid enhancer near GATA2, highlighting regulatory mechanisms for ordered expression of master hematopoietic regulators during lineage specification. Our study illustrates how population-based genetic studies can provide key insights into poorly understood cell differentiation processes of considerable physiologic relevance. PMID:28031487

  7. Apoptosis as a mechanism of T-regulatory cell homeostasis and suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolcu, Esma S; Ash, Shifra; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Sagiv, Yuval; Askenasy, Nadir; Yarkoni, Shai

    2008-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death is a general mechanism of immune homeostasis through negative regulation of clonal expansion of activated immune cells. This mechanism is involved in the maintenance of self- and transplant tolerance through polarization of the immune responses. The Fas/Fas-ligand interaction is a major common executioner of apoptosis in lymphocytes, with a dual role in regulatory T cell (Treg) function: Treg cell homeostasis and Treg cell-mediated suppression. Sensitivity to apoptosis and the patterns of Treg-cell death are of outmost importance in immune homeostasis that affects the equilibrium between cytolytic and suppressor forces in activation and termination of immune activity. Naive innate (naturally occurring) Treg cells present variable sensitivities to apoptosis, related to their turnover rates in tissue under steady state conditions. Following activation, Treg cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than cytotoxic effector subsets. Their susceptibility to apoptosis is influenced by cytokines within the inflammatory environment (primarily interleukin-2), the mode of antigenic stimulation and the proliferation rates. Here, we attempt to resolve some controversies surrounding the sensitivity of Treg cells to apoptosis under various experimental conditions, to delineate the function of cell death in regulation of immunity.

  8. Novel optical-based methods and analyses for elucidating cellular mechanics and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Peter K.

    Resolving distinct biochemical interaction states by analyzing the diffusive behaviors of individual protein trajectories is challenging due to the limited statistics provided by short trajectories and experimental noise sources, which are intimately coupled into each proteins localization. In the first part of this thesis, we introduce a novel, a machine-learning based classification methodology, called perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM), which simultaneously analyzes a population of protein trajectories to uncover the system of short-time diffusive behaviors which collectively result from distinct biochemical interactions. We then discuss an experimental application of pEM to Rho GTPase, an integral regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular homeostasis, inside live cells. We also derive the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for driven diffusion, confined diffusion, and fractional Brownian motion. We demonstrate that MLE yields improved estimates in comparison with traditional diffusion analysis, namely mean squared displacement analysis. In addition, we also introduce mleBayes, which is an empirical Bayesian model selection scheme to classify an individual protein trajectory to a given diffusion mode. By employing mleBayes on simulated data, we demonstrate that accurate determination of the underlying diffusive properties, beyond normal diffusion, remains challenging when analyzing particle trajectories on an individual basis. To improve upon the statistical limitations of classification from analyzing trajectories on an individual basis, we extend pEM with a new version (pEMv2) to simultaneously analyzing a collection of particle trajectories to uncover the system of interactions which give rise to unique normal or non-normal diffusive states. We test the performance of pEMv2 on various sets of simulated particle trajectories which transition between various modes of normal and non-normal diffusive states to highlight considerations when

  9. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cigarette smoke-induced myocardial injury: prevention by vitamin C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archita Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains one of the major killers in modern society. One strong risk factor of CVD is cigarette smoking that causes myocardial injury and leads to the genesis of pathological cardiovascular events. However, the exact toxic component(s of cigarette smoke (CS and its molecular and cellular mechanisms for causing myocardial injury leading to heart damage and its prevention are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a guinea pig model, here we show that chronic exposure to CS produces myocardial injury that is prevented by vitamin C. Male guinea pigs were fed either vitamin C-deficient (0.5 mg/day or vitamin C-sufficient (15 mg/day diet and subjected to CS exposure from 5 Kentucky Research cigarettes (3R4F/day (6 days/week in a smoke chamber up to 8 weeks. Pair-fed sham controls were subjected to air exposure instead of CS exposure under similar conditions. Myocardial injury was produced in CS-exposed marginal vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs as evidenced by release of cardiac Troponin-T and I in the serum, oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, thrombosis and collagen deposition in the myocardium. Treatment of rat cardiomyocyte cells (H9c2 in vitro and guinea pigs in vivo with p-benzoquinone (p-BQ in amounts derived from CS revealed that p-BQ was a major factor responsible for CS-induced myocardial damage. A moderately large dose of vitamin C (15 mg/day prevented CS/p-BQ-induced myocardial injury. Population based studies indicated that plasma vitamin C levels of smokers without disease were significantly lower (p = 0,0000 than that of non-smokers. Vitamin C levels of CS-related cardiovascular patients were further lower (p = 0.0000 than that of smokers without disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that dietary supplementation of vitamin C may be a novel and simple therapy for the prevention of pathological cardiovascular events in habitual smokers.

  10. Molecular mechanism of cellular reception of ionizing radiation and of activation of signal transduction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    The author reviewed what in cells receives ionizing radiation as a stress and which signal transduction pathway is activated to induce the stress reaction in the following order: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway by radiation, activation of MAP kinase superfamily by radiation, induction of p53 function by radiation, and radiation exposure and stress reaction pathway. Conclusion was as follows: Cellular receptors to radiation can be cell membrane and DNA. Membrane reception of radiation induces activation of tyrosine kinase and sphingomyelinase, which resulting in activation of PKC- and MAP kinase-mediated signal transduction. The signal generated in the nucleus participates in regulation of cell cycle and in DNA repair. Therefore, it seems that irradiation of ionizing radiation gives energy to various cellular receptor sites as well as DNA, which generate various independent signals to be transduced and accumulated in the nucleus, and leading to cellular response. (K.H.). 63 refs.

  11. Evolving gene regulatory networks into cellular networks guiding adaptive behavior: an outline how single cells could have evolved into a centralized neurosensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Jahan, Israt; Pan, Ning; Elliott, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of the neurosensory system of man, able to reflect on its own origin, is one of the major goals of comparative neurobiology. Details of the origin of neurosensory cells, their aggregation into central nervous systems and associated sensory organs and their localized patterning leading to remarkably different cell types aggregated into variably sized parts of the central nervous system have begun to emerge. Insights at the cellular and molecular level have begun to shed some light on the evolution of neurosensory cells, partially covered in this review. Molecular evidence suggests that high mobility group (HMG) proteins of pre-metazoans evolved into the definitive Sox [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box] genes used for neurosensory precursor specification in metazoans. Likewise, pre-metazoan basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes evolved in metazoans into the group A bHLH genes dedicated to neurosensory differentiation in bilaterians. Available evidence suggests that the Sox and bHLH genes evolved a cross-regulatory network able to synchronize expansion of precursor populations and their subsequent differentiation into novel parts of the brain or sensory organs. Molecular evidence suggests metazoans evolved patterning gene networks early, which were not dedicated to neuronal development. Only later in evolution were these patterning gene networks tied into the increasing complexity of diffusible factors, many of which were already present in pre-metazoans, to drive local patterning events. It appears that the evolving molecular basis of neurosensory cell development may have led, in interaction with differentially expressed patterning genes, to local network modifications guiding unique specializations of neurosensory cells into sensory organs and various areas of the central nervous system.

  12. The role of nanosecond electric pulse-induced mechanical stress in cellular nanoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.

    Background: Exposures of cells to very short (less than 1 microsecond) electric pulses in the megavolt/meter range have been shown to cause a multitude of effects, both physical and molecular in nature. Physically, nanosecond electrical pulse exposure can disrupt the plasma membrane, leading to a phenomenon known as nanoporation. Nanoporation is the production of nanometer sized holes (less than 2 nanometers in diameter) that can persist for up to fifteen minutes, allowing the flow of ions into and out of the cell. Nanoporation can lead to secondary physical effects, such as cellular swelling, shrinking and blebbing. Molecularly, nanosecond electrical pulses have been shown to activate signaling pathways, produce oxidative stress, stimulate hormone secretion and induce both apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause molecular changes is unknown; however, it is thought the flow of ions, such as calcium, into the cell via nanopores, could be a major cause. The ability of nanosecond electrical pulses to cause membranes to become permeable and to induce apoptosis makes the technology a desirable modality for cancer research; however, the lack of understanding regarding the mechanisms by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause nanoporation impedes further development of this technology. This dissertation documents the genomic and proteomic responses of cells exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses and describes in detail the biophysical effects of these electrical pulses, including the demonstration for the first time of the generation of acoustic pressure transients capable of disrupting plasma membranes and possibly contributing to nanoporation. Methods: Jurkat, clone E6-1 (human lymphocytic cell line), U937 (human lymphocytic cell line), Chinese hamster ovarian cells and adult primary human dermal fibroblasts exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses were subjected to a variety of molecular assays, including flow cytometry

  13. Immunology Mechanism of CD4+ CD25 T Regulatory Cells Acting on Effector T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENGNing-han; WUHong-fei; WUJun; ZHANGWei; SUIYuan-gen; HEHou-guang; ZHANGChun-lei; ZHENGJun-song

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To detect the inhibiting co-stimulating molecule CTLA4 and cytokines secreted by Treg cells, and explore the immunology mechanism of T regulatory cells acting on effector T cells in co-cultured system(CCS) and separating-cultured system(SCS). Methods: Detecting the percentage of CTLA4 and CD28 expressed on the Treg ceils and effector T ceils, and then adding Treg cells to mixed lymphocyte reaction(MLR) system in CCS and TransWeil Milliceil-PCF SCS, at the same time, adding or not adding anti-IL-10 or anti-TGF.II1 to the reacting systems, examining the inhibitory capacity of Treg ceils exerting on the MLR. Results: Compared with effector T cells, Treg cells expressed higher level CTLA4 and secreted much more IL-10 and TGF-β(P<0.01). The inhibitory capacity of Treg cells co-cultured with effector T ceils is much stronger than that in separating cultured group(P<0.01). Moreover, the inhibiting rate of Treg ceils exerting on effector T ceils through secretin_g IL-10 was more powerful than that through secreting TGF-β1 (P<0.01). Coaclusion: Both ceil-to-ceil contact and cytokines secretion mechanisms are involved in CD4+ CD25+ Treg ceils operating function. However, the former is more important. Intresfingly, we for the first time pointfound that IL-10 plays more powerful roles than TGF-β1 in the cytokines secretion mechanism.

  14. Functional Development of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract: Hormone- and Growth Factor-Mediated Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ménard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the control of gastrointestinal (GI tract development. The first section addresses the differences in general mechanisms of GI development in humans versus rodents, highlighting that morphogenesis of specific digestive organs and the differentiation of digestive epithelia occur not only at different stages of ontogeny but also at different rates. The second section provides an overview of studies from the author's laboratory at the Université de Sherbrooke pertaining to the development of the human fetal small intestine and colon. While both segments share similar morphological and functional characteristics, they are nevertheless modulated by distinct regulatory mechanisms. Using the organ culture approach, the author and colleagues were able to establish that hormones and growth factors, such as glucocorticoids, epidermal growth factor, insulin and keratinocyte growth factor, not only exert differential effects within these two segments, they can also trigger opposite responses in comparison with animal models. In the third section, emphasis is placed on the functional development of human fetal stomach and its various epithelial cell types; in particular, the glandular chief cells responsible for the synthesis and secretion of gastric enzymes such as pepsinogen-5 and gastric lipase. Bearing in mind that limitations of available cell models have, until now, greatly impeded the comprehension of molecular mechanisms regulating human gastric epithelial cell functions, the last section focuses on new human gastric epithelial cell models recently developed in the author's laboratory. These models comprise a novel primary culture system of human fetal gastric epithelium including, for the first time, functional chief cells, and human gastric epithelium cell lines cloned from the parental NCI-N87 strain. These new cells lines could serve important applications in the study of pathogenic action and epithelial

  15. Subchromoplast sequestration of carotenoids affects regulatory mechanisms in tomato lines expressing different carotenoid gene combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Marilise; Mora, Leticia; Enfissi, Eugenia M A; Bramley, Peter M; Fraser, Paul D

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway in recent years has successfully enhanced the carotenoid contents of crop plants. It is now clear that only increasing biosynthesis is restrictive, as mechanisms to sequestrate these increased levels in the cell or organelle should be exploited. In this study, biosynthetic pathway genes were overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines and the effects on carotenoid formation and sequestration revealed. The bacterial Crt carotenogenic genes, independently or in combination, and their zygosity affect the production of carotenoids. Transcription of the pathway genes was perturbed, whereby the tissue specificity of transcripts was altered. Changes in the steady state levels of metabolites in unrelated sectors of metabolism were found. Of particular interest was a concurrent increase of the plastid-localized lipid monogalactodiacylglycerol with carotenoids along with membranous subcellular structures. The carotenoids, proteins, and lipids in the subchromoplast fractions of the transgenic tomato fruit with increased carotenoid content suggest that cellular structures can adapt to facilitate the sequestration of the newly formed products. Moreover, phytoene, the precursor of the pathway, was identified in the plastoglobule, whereas the biosynthetic enzymes were in the membranes. The implications of these findings with respect to novel pathway regulation mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Complex I Disorders: Causes, Mechanisms, and Development of Treatment Strategies at the Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Federica; Koopman, Werner J. H.; Manjeri, Ganesh R.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Willems, Peter H. G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) represents the final step in the conversion of nutrients into cellular energy. Genetic defects in the OXPHOS system have an incidence between 1:5,000 and 1:10,000 live births. Inherited isolated deficiency of the first complex (CI) of this system, a multisubunit assembly of 45 different proteins,…

  17. Cellular senescence in aging and age-related disease: from mechanisms to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Childs, B.G.; Durik, M.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a process that imposes permanent proliferative arrest on cells in response to various stressors, has emerged as a potentially important contributor to aging and age-related disease, and it is an attractive target for therapeutic exploitation. A wealth of information about senesc

  18. Secretion and regulatory mechanism of leptin during pregnancy in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the secretion pattern and regulatory mechanism of leptin during pregnancy in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). 100 pregnant golden hamsters were separated into 16 groups and the serum was sampled daily throughout gestation for the leptin assay. Results indicated that a gestational leptin profile existed during pregnancy in the golden hamster. To investigate if endocrine conditions during pregnancy contribute to this gestational leptin profile, serums collected during different reproductive stages were added to the adipocyte culture medium. Results showed that sera collected from all reproductive stages have significant stimulating effect on the secretion of leptin as compared with the control (P 0.05). However, sera from mid and late pregnancy significantly stimulate leptin secretion as compared with the cycling sera (P < 0.01). Serum collected on day 15 of pregnancy have the strongest stimulating effect on leptin secretion compared with sera collected on day 8 (P < 0.0001) and day 12 (P < 0.001) of the pregnancy. But after the extraction of steroid hormones, sera collected during different reproductive stages have the same effect on leptin secretion in vitro. Further study showed that dexamethason, progesterone and insulin stimulated while estradiol suppressed leptin secretion in vitro. Our results suggested that steroid hormones (or other steroid factors) have significant regulating effect on the leptin secretion during pregnancy and they may be the most important contributors of the gestational leptin profile in the golden hamster.

  19. Numerical study of mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under compression loading in the framework of movable cellular automaton method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Smolin, Alexey Yu., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Promakhov, Vladimir V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Movable cellular automaton method was used for investigating the mechanical behavior of ceramic composites under uniaxial compression. A 2D numerical model of ceramic composites based on oxides of zirconium and aluminum with different structural parameters was developed using the SEM images of micro-sections of a real composite. The influence of such structural parameters as the geometrical dimensions of layers, inclusions, and their spatial distribution in the sample, the volume content of the composite components and their mechanical properties (as well as the amount of zirconium dioxide that underwent the phase transformation) on the fracture, strength, deformation and dissipative properties was investigated.

  20. The Characteristics and Regulatory Mechanisms of Superoxide Generation from eNOS Reductase Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Peng

    Full Text Available In addition to superoxide (O2.- generation from nitric oxide synthase (NOS oxygenase domain, a new O2.- generation site has been identified in the reductase domain of inducible NOS (iNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS. Cysteine S-glutathionylation in eNOS reductase domain also induces O2.- generation from eNOS reductase domain. However, the characteristics and regulatory mechanism of the O2.- generation from NOS reductase domain remain unclear. We cloned and purified the wild type bovine eNOS (WT eNOS, a mutant of Serine 1179 replaced with aspartic acid eNOS (S1179D eNOS, which mimics the negative charge caused by phosphorylationand truncated eNOS reductase domain (eNOS RD. Both WT eNOS and S1179D eNOS generated significant amount of O2.- in the absence of BH4 and L-arginine. The capacity of O2.- generation from S1179D eNOS was significantly higher than that of WT eNOS (1.74:1. O2.- generation from both WT eNOS and S1179D eNOS were not completely inhibited by 100nM tetrahydrobiopterin(BH4. This BH4 un-inhibited O2.- generation from eNOS was blocked by 10mM flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI. Purified eNOS reductase domain protein confirmed that this BH4 un-inhibited O2.- generation originates at the FMN or FAD/NADPH binding site of eNOS reductase domain. DEPMPO-OOH adduct EPR signals and NADPH consumptions analyses showed that O2.- generation from eNOS reductase domain was regulated by Serine 1179 phosphorylation and DPI, but not by L-arginine, BH4 or calmodulin (CaM. In addition to the heme center of eNOS oxygenase domain, we confirmed another O2.- generation site in the eNOS reductase domain and characterized its regulatory properties.

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance has been noticed in both clinical observation and laboratory studies. Evidence shows that many molecular and cellular events that play essential roles in opioid analgesia and tolerance are actually age-dependent. For example, the expression and functions of endogenous opioid peptides, multiple types of opioid receptors, G protein subunits that couple to opioid receptors, and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins change with development and age. Other signaling systems that are critical to opioid tolerance development, such as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors, also undergo age-related changes. It is plausible that the age-dependent expression and functions of molecules within and related to the opioid signaling pathways, as well as age-dependent cellular activity such as agonist-induced opioid receptor internalization and desensitization, eventually lead to significant age-dependent changes in opioid analgesia and tolerance development.

  2. Mechanisms and Regulation of Intestinal Absorption of Water-soluble Vitamins: Cellular and Molecular Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Said, Hamid M

    2012-01-01

    The water-soluble vitamins represent a group of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds that share the common feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth, and development. With the exception of some endogenous production of niacin, human cells cannot synthesize...... or deficiency. An impaired absorptive function occurs in a variety of conditions including congenital defects in the digestive or absorptive processes, intestinal diseases, drug interaction, and chronic alcohol use....

  3. Mutational analysis of structural elements in a class-I cyclic di-GMP riboswitch to elucidate its regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuzuka, Saki; Nishimura, Kei-Ichiro; Kakizawa, Hitoshi; Fujita, Yuki; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2016-09-01

    The Vc2 riboswitch possesses an aptamer domain belonging to the class-I c-di-GMP riboswitch family. This domain has been analysed and the molecular mechanism by which it recognizes the c-di-GMP ligand has been elucidated. On the other hand, the regulatory mechanism of the full-length Vc2 riboswitch to control its downstream open reading frame (ORF) remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed in vivo reporter assays and in vitro biochemical analyses of the full-length riboswitch and its aptamer domain. We evaluated the results of in vivo and in vitro analyses to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of the Vc2 riboswitch. The present results suggest that recognition of c-di-GMP ligand by the Vc2 riboswitch aptamer domain downregulates expression of its downstream ORF primarily at the translational level.

  4. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCraty, Rollin; Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems.

  5. Mimicking cellular transport mechanism in stem cells through endosomal escape of new peptide-coated quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Yen, Swee Kuan; Dou, Qingqing; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Ahmed, Sohail; Ying, Jackie Y.; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-07-01

    Protein transport is an important phenomenon in biological systems. Proteins are transported via several mechanisms to reach their destined compartment of cell for its complete function. One such mechanism is the microtubule mediated protein transport. Up to now, there are no reports on synthetic systems mimicking the biological protein transport mechanism. Here we report a highly efficient method of mimicking the microtubule mediated protein transport using newly designed biotinylated peptides encompassing a microtubule-associated sequence (MTAS) and a nuclear localization signaling (NLS) sequence, and their final conjugation with streptavidin-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). Our results demonstrate that these novel bio-conjugated QDs enhance the endosomal escape and promote targeted delivery into the nucleus of human mesenchymal stem cells via microtubules. Mimicking the cellular transport mechanism in stem cells is highly desirable for diagnostics, targeting and therapeutic applications, opening up new avenues in the area of drug delivery.

  6. Tuning of redox regulatory mechanisms, reactive oxygen species and redox homeostasis under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain eSazzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g. the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH, alternative oxidase (AOX, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants.

  7. Confocal microscopy-based three-dimensional cell-specific modeling for large deformation analyses in cellular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Noa; Gefen, Amit

    2010-06-18

    This study introduces a new confocal microscopy-based three-dimensional cell-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology for simulating cellular mechanics experiments involving large cell deformations. Three-dimensional FE models of undifferentiated skeletal muscle cells were developed by scanning C2C12 myoblasts using a confocal microscope, and then building FE model geometries from the z-stack images. Strain magnitudes and distributions in two cells were studied when the cells were subjected to compression and stretching, which are used in pressure ulcer and deep tissue injury research to induce large cell deformations. Localized plasma membrane and nuclear surface area (NSA) stretches were observed for both the cell compression and stretching simulation configurations. It was found that in order to induce large tensile strains (>5%) in the plasma membrane and NSA, one needs to apply more than approximately 15% of global cell deformation in cell compression tests, or more than approximately 3% of tensile strains in the elastic plate substrate in cell stretching experiments. Utilization of our modeling can substantially enrich experimental cellular mechanics studies in classic cell loading designs that typically involve large cell deformations, such as static and cyclic stretching, cell compression, micropipette aspiration, shear flow and hydrostatic pressure, by providing magnitudes and distributions of the localized cellular strains specific to each setup and cell type, which could then be associated with the applied stimuli.

  8. Examining the limits of cellular adaptation bursting mechanisms in biologically-based excitatory networks of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, K A; Njap, F; Nicola, W; Skinner, F K; Campbell, S A

    2015-12-01

    Determining the biological details and mechanisms that are essential for the generation of population rhythms in the mammalian brain is a challenging problem. This problem cannot be addressed either by experimental or computational studies in isolation. Here we show that computational models that are carefully linked with experiment provide insight into this problem. Using the experimental context of a whole hippocampus preparation in vitro that spontaneously expresses theta frequency (3-12 Hz) population bursts in the CA1 region, we create excitatory network models to examine whether cellular adaptation bursting mechanisms could critically contribute to the generation of this rhythm. We use biologically-based cellular models of CA1 pyramidal cells and network sizes and connectivities that correspond to the experimental context. By expanding our mean field analyses to networks with heterogeneity and non all-to-all coupling, we allow closer correspondence with experiment, and use these analyses to greatly extend the range of parameter values that are explored. We find that our model excitatory networks can produce theta frequency population bursts in a robust fashion.Thus, even though our networks are limited by not including inhibition at present, our results indicate that cellular adaptation in pyramidal cells could be an important aspect for the occurrence of theta frequency population bursting in the hippocampus. These models serve as a starting framework for the inclusion of inhibitory cells and for the consideration of additional experimental features not captured in our present network models.

  9. Cellular and circuit mechanisms maintain low spike co-variability and enhance population coding in somatosensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng eLy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The responses of cortical neurons are highly variable across repeated presentations of a stimulus. Understanding this variability is critical for theories of both sensory and motor processing, since response variance affects the accuracy of neural codes. Despite this influence, the cellular and circuit mechanisms that shape the trial-to-trial variability of population responses remain poorly understood. We used a combination of experimental and computational techniques to uncover the mechanisms underlying response variability of populations of pyramidal (E cells in layer 2/3 of rat whisker barrel cortex. Spike trains recorded from pairs of E-cells during either spontaneous activity or whisker deflected responses show similarly low levels of spiking co-variability, despite large differences in network activation between the two states. We developed network models that show how spike threshold nonlinearities dilutes E-cell spiking co-variability during spontaneous activity and low velocity whisker deflections. In contrast, during high velocity whisker deflections, cancelation mechanisms mediated by feedforward inhibition maintain low E-cell pairwise co-variability. Thus, the combination of these two mechanisms ensure low E-cell population variability over a wide range of whisker deflection velocities. Finally, we show how this active decorrelation of population variability leads to a drastic increase in the population information about whisker velocity. The canonical cellular and circuit components of our study suggest that low network variability over a broad range of neural states may generalize across the nervous system.

  10. Mechanical constraints imposed by 3D cellular geometry and arrangement modulate growth patterns in the Arabidopsis embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassel, George W; Stamm, Petra; Mosca, Gabriella; Barbier de Reuille, Pierre; Gibbs, Daniel J; Winter, Robin; Janka, Ales; Holdsworth, Michael J; Smith, Richard S

    2014-06-10

    Morphogenesis occurs in 3D space over time and is guided by coordinated gene expression programs. Here we use postembryonic development in Arabidopsis plants to investigate the genetic control of growth. We demonstrate that gene expression driving the production of the growth-stimulating hormone gibberellic acid and downstream growth factors is first induced within the radicle tip of the embryo. The center of cell expansion is, however, spatially displaced from the center of gene expression. Because the rapidly growing cells have very different geometry from that of those at the tip, we hypothesized that mechanical factors may contribute to this growth displacement. To this end we developed 3D finite-element method models of growing custom-designed digital embryos at cellular resolution. We used this framework to conceptualize how cell size, shape, and topology influence tissue growth and to explore the interplay of geometrical and genetic inputs into growth distribution. Our simulations showed that mechanical constraints are sufficient to explain the disconnect between the experimentally observed spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression and early postembryonic growth. The center of cell expansion is the position where genetic and mechanical facilitators of growth converge. We have thus uncovered a mechanism whereby 3D cellular geometry helps direct where genetically specified growth takes place.

  11. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  12. microRNA regulatory mechanism by which PLLA aligned nanofibers influence PC12 cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yadong; Lü, Xiaoying; Ding, Fei

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Aligned nanofibers (AFs) are regarded as promising biomaterials in nerve tissue engineering. However, a full understanding of the biocompatibility of AFs at the molecular level is still challenging. Therefore, the present study focused on identifying the microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulatory mechanism by which poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) AFs influence PC12 cell differentiation. Approach. Firstly, the effects of PLLA random nanofibers (RFs)/AFs and PLLA films (control) on the biological responses of PC12 cells that are associated with neuronal differentiation were examined. Then, SOLiD sequencing and cDNA microarray were employed to profile the expressions of miRNAs and mRNAs. The target genes of the misregulated miRNAs were predicted and compared with the mRNA profile data. Functions of the matched target genes (the intersection between the predicted target genes and the experimentally-determined, misregulated genes) were analyzed. Main results. The results revealed that neurites spread in various directions in control and RF groups. In the AF group, most neurites extended in parallel with each other. The glucose consumption and lactic acid production in the RF and AF groups were higher than those in the control group. Compared with the control group, 42 and 94 miRNAs were significantly dysregulated in the RF and AF groups, respectively. By comparing the predicted target genes with the mRNA profile data, five and 87 matched target genes were found in the RF and AF groups, respectively. Three of the matched target genes in the AF group were found to be associated with neuronal differentiation, whereas none had this association in the RF group. The PLLA AFs induced the dysregulation of miRNAs that regulate many biological functions, including axonal guidance, lipid metabolism and long-term potentiation. In particular, two miRNA-matched target gene-biological function modules associated with neuronal differentiation were identified as follows: (1) miR-23b, mi

  13. Cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system: factors, mechanism, and relevance to cellular iron regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anil K; Pallesen, Leif J; Spang, Robert J; Walden, William E

    2010-08-27

    FeS cluster biogenesis is an essential process in virtually all forms of life. Complex protein machineries that are conserved from bacteria through higher eukaryotes facilitate assembly of the FeS cofactor in proteins. In the last several years, significant strides have been made in our understanding of FeS cluster assembly and the functional overlap of this process with cellular iron homeostasis. This minireview summarizes the present understanding of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) system in eukaryotes, with a focus on information gained from studies in budding yeast and mammalian systems.

  14. Regulatory Mechanisms of the Molecular Pathways in Fibrosis Induced by MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Yang; Si-Dao Zheng; Hong-Jin Wu; Shao-Jun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective:MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) play critical roles in the fibrotic process in different organs.We summarized the latest research progress on the roles and mechanisms of miRNAs in the regulation of the molecular signaling pathways involved in fibrosis.Data Sources:Papers published in English from January 2010 to August 2015 were selected from the PubMed and Web of Science databases using the search terms "microRNA","miR","transforming growth factor β","tgf β","mitogen-activated protein kinase","mapk","integrin","p38","c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase","jnk","extracellular signal-regulated kinase","erk",and "fibrosis".Study Selection:Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the regulatory effects of miRNAs on molecular signaling pathways involved in the fibrosis.Results:Recent evidence has shown that miRNAs are involved in regulating fibrosis by targeting different substrates in the molecular processes that drive fibrosis,such as immune cell sensitization,effector cell activation,and extracellular matrix remodeling.Moreover,several important molecular signaling pathways involve in fibrosis,such as the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway,mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways,and the integrin pathway are regulated by miRNAs.Third,regulation of the fibrotic pathways induced by miRNAs is found in many other tissues in addition to the heart,lung,liver,and kidney.Interestingly,the actions of many drugs on the human body are also induced by miRNAs.It is encouraging that the fibrotic process can be blocked or reversed by targeting specific miRNAs and their signaling pathways,thereby protecting the structures and functions of different organs.Conclusions:miRNAs not only regulate molecular signaling pathways in fibrosis but also serve as potential targets of novel therapeutic interventions for fibrosing diseases.

  15. Helicobacter pylori eradication to prevent gastric cancer:underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shingo Tsuji; Norio Hayashi; Masahiko Tsujii; Hiroaki Murata; Tsutomu Nishida; Masato Komori; Masakazu Yasumaru; Shuji Ishii; Yoshiaki Sasayama; Sunao Kawano

    2006-01-01

    Numerous cellular and molecular events have been described in development of gastric cancer. In this article,we overviewed roles of Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection on some of the important events in gastric carcinogenesis and discussed whether these cellular and molecular events are reversible after cure of the infection. There are several bacterial components affecting gastric epithelial kinetics and promotion of gastric carcinogenesis. The bacterium also increases risks of genetic instability and mutations due to NO and other reactive oxygen species. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes such as RUNX3 may alter the frequency of phenotype change of gastric glands to those with intestinal metaplasia. Host factors such as increased expression of growth factors, cytokines and COX-2 have been also reported in non-cancerous tissue in H pylori-positive subjects. It is noteworthy that most of the above phenomena are reversed after the cure of the infection. However,some of them including overexpression of COX-2 continue to exist and may increase risks for carcinogenesis in metaplastic or dysplastic mucosa even after successful H pylori eradication. Thus, H pylori eradication may not completely abolish the risk for gastric carcinogenesis. Efficiency of the cure of the infection in suppressing gastric cancer depends on the timing and the target population,and warrant further investigation.

  16. Inhibitory mechanism of dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) in the cellular biomethylation of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Shi, Nan; Geng, Zhirong; Li, Xiangli; Hu, Xin; Wang, Zhilin

    2014-11-01

    Dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) has been approved for the treatment of arsenic poisoning through promoting arsenic excretion and modulating arsenic species. To clarify how DMPS regulates the excretion of arsenic species, we investigated the effects of DMPS on the biomethylation of arsenite (As(3+)) in HepG2 cells. In the experiments, we found that DMPS at low concentrations dramatically decreased the content of arsenic in HepG2 cells and inhibited the cellular methylation of As(3+). Three aspects, the expression of human arsenic (III) methyltransferase (hAS3MT), the accumulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the in vitro enzymatic methylation of arsenic, were considered to explain the reasons for the inhibition of DMPS in arsenic metabolism. The results suggested that DMPS competitively coordinated with As(3+) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(3+)) to inhibit the up-regulation of arsenic on the expression of hAS3MT and block arsenic involving in the enzymatic methylation. Moreover, DMPS eliminated arsenic-induced accumulation of ROS, which might contribute to the antidotal effects of DMPS on arsenic posing.

  17. The Nobel Prize for understanding autophagy, a cellular mechanism of waste disposal that keeps us healthy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MEGHA BANSAL; GHANSHYAM SWARUP

    2016-12-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2016, was awarded to Prof Yoshinori Ohsumi from TokyoInstitute of Technology, Yokohoma, Japan, for his work that helped in understanding the molecularmechanisms of autophagy, a process used by most eukaryotic cells to degrade a portion of cytoplasmincluding damaged organelles, large protein complexes and aggregated proteins in lysosomes. This processof autophagy (self-eating) maintains cellular homeostasis and helps the cell and the organism to surviveduring periods of stress, such as starvation, by recycling the cellular components to generate amino acidsand nutrients needed for producing energy. Autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome system are the two majorprotein degradation systems in the cell.The lysosome was identified by Christian de Duve in the 1950s as a membrane bound organelle in thecell that contains degradative enzymes such as proteases, lipases, acid phosphatases, etc. (de Duve, 2005).The term autophagy was coined by Christian de Duve in 1963. Autophagy generally occurs at low level, butit increases under conditions such as stress and differentiation/remodelling of tissues. Autophagy wasprimarily studied by electron microscopy for decades because no molecular markers were available for itsmolecular analysis.

  18. Cellular graphene aerogel combines ultralow weight and high mechanical strength: A highly efficient reactor for catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingxing; Zhang, Jianling; Sang, Xinxin; Liu, Chengcheng; Luo, Tian; Peng, Li; Han, Buxing; Tan, Xiuniang; Ma, Xue; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Ning

    2016-05-12

    The construction of three-dimensional graphene aerogels (GAs) is of great importance owing to their outstanding properties for various applications. Up to now, the combination of ultralow weight and super mechanical strength for GA remains a great challenge. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of cellular GAs by a facile, easily controlled and versatile route, i.e. the chemical reduction of graphene oxide assemblies at oil-water interface under a mild condition (70 °C). The GA is ultralight (with density <3 mg cm(-3)) yet mechanically resilient because the walls of the cell closely pack in a highly ordered manner to maximize mechanical strength. The GA has been utilized as an appealing reactor for catalytic hydrogenation, which exhibited great advantages such as large oil absorption capability, exceptional catalytic activity, ease of product separation and high stability.

  19. Cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying blood flow regulation in the retina and choroid in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2012-09-01

    We review the cellular and physiological mechanisms responsible for the regulation of blood flow in the retina and choroid in health and disease. Due to the intrinsic light sensitivity of the retina and the direct visual accessibility of fundus blood vessels, the eye offers unique opportunities for the non-invasive investigation of mechanisms of blood flow regulation. The ability of the retinal vasculature to regulate its blood flow is contrasted with the far more restricted ability of the choroidal circulation to regulate its blood flow by virtue of the absence of glial cells, the markedly reduced pericyte ensheathment of the choroidal vasculature, and the lack of intermediate filaments in choroidal pericytes. We review the cellular and molecular components of the neurovascular unit in the retina and choroid, techniques for monitoring retinal and choroidal blood flow, responses of the retinal and choroidal circulation to light stimulation, the role of capillaries, astrocytes and pericytes in regulating blood flow, putative signaling mechanisms mediating neurovascular coupling in the retina, and changes that occur in the retinal and choroidal circulation during diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's disease. We close by discussing issues that remain to be explored.

  20. Wiring olfaction: the cellular and molecular mechanisms that guide the development of synaptic connections from the nose to the cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando De Castro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the central nervous system, the olfactory system fascinates by its developmental and physiological particularities, and is one of the most studied models to understand the mechanisms underlying the guidance of growing axons to their appropriate targets. A constellation of contact-mediated (laminins, CAMs, ephrins, etc. and secreted mechanisms (semaphorins, slits, growth factors, etc. are known to play different roles in the establishment of synaptic interactions between the olfactory epithelium, olfactory bulb (OB and olfactory cortex. Specific mechanisms of this system (including the amazing family of about 1000 different olfactory receptors have been also proposed. In the last years, different reviews have focused in partial sights, specially in the mechanisms involved in the formation of the olfactory nerve, but a detailed review of the mechanisms implicated in the development of the connections among the different olfactory structures (olfactory epithelium, OB, olfactory cortex remains to be written. In the present work, we afford this systematic review: the different cellular and molecular mechanisms which rule the formation of the olfactory nerve, the lateral olfactory tract and the intracortical connections, as well as the few data available regarding the accessory olfactory system. These mechanisms are compared, and the implications of the differences and similarities discussed in this fundamental scenario of ontogeny.

  1. Vpu Mediates Depletion of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 during HIV Infection by a Lysosome-Dependent Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Rustagi, Arjun; McNevin, John; McElrath, M. Juliana; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    HIV has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid restriction by intracellular innate immune defenses that otherwise serve to control acute viral infection and virus dissemination. Innate defenses are triggered when pattern recognition receptor (PRR) proteins of the host cell engage pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) present in viral products. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) plays a central role in PRR signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon ...

  2. The interplay among chromatin dynamics, cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms modulates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Federico; Giannattasio, Michele; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Plevani, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Cells are continuously under the assault of endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress that challenges the integrity of DNA. To cope with such a formidable task cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms, known as checkpoints, and a variety of DNA repair systems responding to different types of DNA lesions. These lesions occur in the context of the chromatin structure and, as expected for all DNA transactions, the cellular response to DNA damage is going to be influenced by the chromatin enviroment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies implicating chromatin remodelling factors and histone modifications in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and in checkpoint activation in response to UV lesions.

  3. Shock-induced damage to mitochondrial function and some cellular antioxidant mechanisms in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Gasparetto, A; Candiani, A; Crimi, G; Antonelli, M; Bufi, M; De Blasi, R A; Cooper, M B; Gohil, K

    1985-01-01

    The effects of circulatory shock on skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative activity in various substrates and cytochrome oxidase activity have been investigated using samples of muscle obtained by the needle biopsy technique from human subjects. The effect of shock on superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content of skeletal muscle was also examined. The results show that there is a large decrease in cytochrome oxidase activity during shock and also in the capacity of the mitochondria to oxidize either succinate, or pyruvate, or palmitoyl carnitine. There is a fall in the tissue content of superoxide dismutase and in the total glutathione present. Furthermore, an increased oxidized glutathione content causes a decrease in the molar ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione present in the muscle. These findings suggest that mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) oxidative damage can play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of circulatory shock and support the hypothesis of oxygen-free radical involvement in the cellular injury.

  4. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of 3,3′-Diindolylmethane in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Mi Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies in humans have shown that 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM, which is found in cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage and broccoli, is effective in the attenuation of gastrointestinal cancers. This review presents the latest findings on the use, targets, and modes of action of DIM for the treatment of human gastrointestinal cancers. DIM acts upon several cellular and molecular processes in gastrointestinal cancer cells, including apoptosis, autophagy, invasion, cell cycle regulation, metastasis, angiogenesis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. In addition, DIM increases the efficacy of other drugs or therapeutic chemicals when used in combinatorial treatment for gastrointestinal cancer. The studies to date offer strong evidence to support the use of DIM as an anticancer and therapeutic agent for gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, this review provides a comprehensive understanding of the preventive and therapeutic properties of DIM in addition to its different perspective on the safety of DIM in clinical applications for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

  5. MECHANISMS OF DAMAGING EFFECT OF MANGENESE IN TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS ON CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharenko A. V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of subtoxic concentration of manganese chloride in dose equal to LD 50 on condition of plasmatic membranes (model: erythrocytes and functional activity of cell power (model: the isolated liver mitochondrion of rats was studied. It was established that manganese chloride in fixed concentration caused authentic augmentation of sorption capacity of erythrocytes towards alcian blue, influenced increasing of their spontaneous haemolysis and activation of peroxide oxidation of lipids. In experiment on the isolated mitochondrion it was proved that manganese chloride caused dissociation of an oxidizing phosphorusling and complete inhibition of respiration in concentrations of 3 and 4,5mM. These dependences testify that subtoxic concentration of manganese can damage the cell energy. Thus, this pilot research indicated damaging effect of manganese on cellular (erythrocytes and subcellular (mitochondrion levels which are realized through external functioning of membrane structures and deprived them from restoration.

  6. Regulatory Mechanisms of the Molecular Pathways in Fibrosis Induced by MicroRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui; Zheng, Si-Dao; Wu, Hong-Jin; Chen, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) play critical roles in the fibrotic process in different organs. We summarized the latest research progress on the roles and mechanisms of miRNAs in the regulation of the molecular signaling pathways involved in fibrosis. Data Sources: Papers published in English from January 2010 to August 2015 were selected from the PubMed and Web of Science databases using the search terms “microRNA”, “miR”, “transforming growth factor β”, “tgf β”, “mitogen-activated protein kinase”, “mapk”, “integrin”, “p38”, “c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase”, “jnk”, “extracellular signal-regulated kinase”, “erk”, and “fibrosis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the regulatory effects of miRNAs on molecular signaling pathways involved in the fibrosis. Results: Recent evidence has shown that miRNAs are involved in regulating fibrosis by targeting different substrates in the molecular processes that drive fibrosis, such as immune cell sensitization, effector cell activation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Moreover, several important molecular signaling pathways involve in fibrosis, such as the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and the integrin pathway are regulated by miRNAs. Third, regulation of the fibrotic pathways induced by miRNAs is found in many other tissues in addition to the heart, lung, liver, and kidney. Interestingly, the actions of many drugs on the human body are also induced by miRNAs. It is encouraging that the fibrotic process can be blocked or reversed by targeting specific miRNAs and their signaling pathways, thereby protecting the structures and functions of different organs. Conclusions: miRNAs not only regulate molecular signaling pathways in fibrosis but also serve as potential targets of novel therapeutic interventions for fibrosing diseases. PMID:27647197

  7. Regulatory framework and development perspectives of the mechanism of public participation in the management of Russia’s forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Mikhaylovich Shmatkov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article dwells on the current state of the regulatory framework of the Russian Federation and the mechanism of public participation in forest management. The examples of addressing the problems of public participation in forest management in individual regions are disclosed. The article deals with the issues concerning the provision of in-interests of the local population through the voluntary forest certification system under the FSC scheme. Recommendations on improving the mechanism of public participation in solving the forest management issues are suggested

  8. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular l...

  9. 3D printed cellular solid outperforms traditional stochastic foam in long-term mechanical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, A.; Small, W.; Lewicki, J. P.; Weisgraber, T. H.; Duoss, E. B.; Chinn, S. C.; Pearson, M. A.; Spadaccini, C. M.; Maxwell, R. S.; Wilson, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of polymeric foams by direct-ink-write is a recent technological breakthrough that enables the creation of versatile compressible solids with programmable microstructure, customizable shapes, and tunable mechanical response including negative elastic modulus. However, in many applications the success of these 3D printed materials as a viable replacement for traditional stochastic foams critically depends on their mechanical performance and micro-architectural stability while deployed under long-term mechanical strain. To predict the long-term performance of the two types of foams we employed multi-year-long accelerated aging studies under compressive strain followed by a time-temperature-superposition analysis using a minimum-arc-length-based algorithm. The resulting master curves predict superior long-term performance of the 3D printed foam in terms of two different metrics, i.e., compression set and load retention. To gain deeper understanding, we imaged the microstructure of both foams using X-ray computed tomography, and performed finite-element analysis of the mechanical response within these microstructures. This indicates a wider stress variation in the stochastic foam with points of more extreme local stress as compared to the 3D printed material, which might explain the latter’s improved long-term stability and mechanical performance.

  10. Historical review: Molecular and cellular mechanisms of opiate and cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2004-04-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse was founded in 1974, and since that time there have been significant advances in understanding the processes by which drugs of abuse cause addiction. The initial protein targets for almost all drugs of abuse are now known. Animal models that replicate key features of addiction are available, and these models have made it possible to characterize the brain regions that are important for addiction and other drug effects, such as physical dependence. A large number of drug-induced changes at the molecular and cellular levels have been identified in these brain areas and rapid progress is being made in relating individual changes to specific behavioral abnormalities in animal models of addiction. The current challenges are to translate this increasingly impressive knowledge of the basic neurobiology of addiction to human addicts, and to identify the specific genes that make some individuals either particularly vulnerable or resistant to addiction. In this article, I present a historical review of basic research on opiate and cocaine addiction.

  11. In Silico Investigation into Cellular Mechanisms of Cardiac Alternans in Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial ischemia is associated with pathophysiological conditions such as hyperkalemia, acidosis, and hypoxia. These physiological disorders may lead to changes on the functions of ionic channels, which in turn form the basis for cardiac alternans. In this paper, we investigated the roles of hyperkalemia and calcium handling components played in the genesis of alternans in ischemia at the cellular level by using computational simulations. The results show that hyperkalemic reduced cell excitability and delayed recovery from inactivation of depolarization currents. The inactivation time constant τf of L-type calcium current (ICaL increased obviously in hyperkalemia. One cycle length was not enough for ICaL to recover completely. Alternans developed as a result of ICaL responding to stimulation every other beat. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA2a function decreased in ischemia. This change resulted in intracellular Ca (Cai alternans of small magnitude. A strong Na+-Ca2+ exchange current (INCX increased the magnitude of Cai alternans, leading to APD alternans through excitation-contraction coupling. Some alternated repolarization currents contributed to this repolarization alternans.

  12. An Overview of Sub-Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Action of TTFields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A. Tuszynski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing research on electric and electromagnetic field interactions with biological cells and their subcellular structures has mainly focused on the low- and high-frequency regimes. Biological effects at intermediate frequencies between 100 and 300 kHz have been recently discovered and applied to cancer cells as a therapeutic modality called Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields. TTFields are clinically applied to disrupt cell division, primarily for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. In this review, we provide an assessment of possible physical interactions between 100 kHz range alternating electric fields and biological cells in general and their nano-scale subcellular structures in particular. This is intended to mechanistically elucidate the observed strong disruptive effects in cancer cells. Computational models of isolated cells subject to TTFields predict that for intermediate frequencies the intracellular electric field strength significantly increases and that peak dielectrophoretic forces develop in dividing cells. These findings are in agreement with in vitro observations of TTFields’ disruptive effects on cellular function. We conclude that the most likely candidates to provide a quantitative explanation of these effects are ionic condensation waves around microtubules as well as dielectrophoretic effects on the dipole moments of microtubules. A less likely possibility is the involvement of actin filaments or ion channels.

  13. Life under Climate Change Scenarios: Sea Urchins’ Cellular Mechanisms for Reproductive Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Bögner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean Acidification (OA represents a major field of research and increased efforts are being made to elucidate its repercussions on biota. Species survival is ensured by successful reproduction, which may be threatened under detrimental environmental conditions, such as OA acting in synergy with other climate change related stressors. Achieving successful gametogenesis, fertilization, and the development of larvae into healthy juveniles and adults is crucial for the perpetuation of species and, thus, ecosystems’ functionality. The considerable vulnerability of the abovementioned developmental stages to the adverse conditions that future OA may impose has been shown in many species, including sea urchins which are commonly used due to the feasibility of their maintenance in captivity and the great amount of gametes that a mature adult is able to produce. In the present review, the latest knowledge about the impact of OA on various stages of the life cycle of sea urchins is summarized with remarks on the possible impact of other stressors. The cellular physiology of the gametes before, at fertilization and, at early development, is extensively described with a focus on the complex enzymatic machinery and the intracellular pH (pHi and Ca2+ homeostasis for their vulnerability when facing adverse conditions such as acidification, temperature variations, or hypoxia.

  14. In Silico Investigation into Cellular Mechanisms of Cardiac Alternans in Myocardial Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaqi; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia is associated with pathophysiological conditions such as hyperkalemia, acidosis, and hypoxia. These physiological disorders may lead to changes on the functions of ionic channels, which in turn form the basis for cardiac alternans. In this paper, we investigated the roles of hyperkalemia and calcium handling components played in the genesis of alternans in ischemia at the cellular level by using computational simulations. The results show that hyperkalemic reduced cell excitability and delayed recovery from inactivation of depolarization currents. The inactivation time constant τf of L-type calcium current (ICaL) increased obviously in hyperkalemia. One cycle length was not enough for ICaL to recover completely. Alternans developed as a result of ICaL responding to stimulation every other beat. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA2a) function decreased in ischemia. This change resulted in intracellular Ca (Cai) alternans of small magnitude. A strong Na+-Ca2+ exchange current (INCX) increased the magnitude of Cai alternans, leading to APD alternans through excitation-contraction coupling. Some alternated repolarization currents contributed to this repolarization alternans. PMID:28070211

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NOD2 risk-associated polymorphisms in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Warren; Asano, Naoki; Fuss, Ivan; Kitani, Atsushi; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2014-07-01

    The discovery that polymorphisms in the NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2) gene are associated with a greatly increased risk for the development of Crohn's disease has provided a means to achieve a deeper understanding of the dysregulation of mucosal immune responses to the commensal intestinal organisms that is thought to underlie this disease. NOD2 is a NOD-like receptor (NLR) family member that senses and responds to bacterial wall peptides; thus, the most widely held view of the relation of the NOD2 polymorphisms with Crohn's disease is that these polymorphisms lead to deficient immune responses to gut bacteria, and these, in turn, lead to quantitative or qualitative changes in the bacterial population in the gut lumen or lamina propria that cause inflammation at this site. Initially, this view was based mainly on the observation that defective NOD2 function can result in reduced α-defensin production by intestinal Paneth cells and that such impairment leads to loss of host defense against gut bacteria. In this review, we reconsider this possibility and marshal evidence that it is not in fact likely to be a prime element of Crohn's disease causation. More recently, evidence has been accumulating that the NOD2 dysfunction leads to Crohn's inflammation by inducing changes in the gut microbiome that influence immune effector or regulatory function. We review the strengths and weaknesses of this emerging hypothesis. Finally, we consider the possibility that NOD2 dysfunction can lead to inflammation because of a second and somewhat overlooked aspect of its function, that as an immunoregulator of innate immune responses. In particular, we review the body of evidence that NOD2 stimulation activates a cross-tolerance response that downregulates and thus prevents excessive TLR responses that cause Crohn's inflammation.

  16. Cellular and circuit mechanisms maintain low spike co-variability and enhance population coding in somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Cheng; Middleton, Jason W; Doiron, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The responses of cortical neurons are highly variable across repeated presentations of a stimulus. Understanding this variability is critical for theories of both sensory and motor processing, since response variance affects the accuracy of neural codes. Despite this influence, the cellular and circuit mechanisms that shape the trial-to-trial variability of population responses remain poorly understood. We used a combination of experimental and computational techniques to uncover the mechanisms underlying response variability of populations of pyramidal (E) cells in layer 2/3 of rat whisker barrel cortex. Spike trains recorded from pairs of E-cells during either spontaneous activity or whisker deflected responses show similarly low levels of spiking co-variability, despite large differences in network activation between the two states. We developed network models that show how spike threshold non-linearities dilute E-cell spiking co-variability during spontaneous activity and low velocity whisker deflections. In contrast, during high velocity whisker deflections, cancelation mechanisms mediated by feedforward inhibition maintain low E-cell pairwise co-variability. Thus, the combination of these two mechanisms ensure low E-cell population variability over a wide range of whisker deflection velocities. Finally, we show how this active decorrelation of population variability leads to a drastic increase in the population information about whisker velocity. The prevalence of spiking non-linearities and feedforward inhibition in the nervous system suggests that the mechanisms for low network variability presented in our study may generalize throughout the brain.

  17. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  18. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes: Implications for cellular properties and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100µm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages ...

  19. Cellular Mechanisms in Regulating Mammary Cell Turnover During Lactation and Dry Period in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, J V; Theil, P K; Sørensen, M T

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in regulating mammary cell turnover during the pregnancy-lactaion cycle in dairy cows are unclear. The objective of present experiment was to describe expression of genes encoding proteins known to be involved in pathways regulating mammary cell proliferation, apoptosis......, differentiation, cell survival, and tissue remodeling....

  20. (Some) cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laska, Magdalena Janina; Nissen, Kari Konstantin; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is not wel...

  1. The number of regulatory T cells in transbronchial lung allograft biopsies is related to FoxP3 mRNA levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and to the degree of acute cellular rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Dorrit; Madsen, Caroline B; Iversen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor Forkhead Box P3 (FoxP3) is a marker of regulatory T cells (Tregs) - a subset of T cells known to suppress a wide range of immune responses. These cells are considered to be pivotal for the induction of tolerance to donor antigens in human allografts. We aimed to correlate...... the number of lymphocytes expressing FoxP3 in transbronchial biopsies from lung allografts with the FoxP3 expression in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, we aimed to correlate the number of FoxP3+ cells in transbronchial biopsies with the degree of acute cellular rejection in lung allografts....

  2. Apical constriction: themes and variations on a cellular mechanism driving morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam C; Goldstein, Bob

    2014-05-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes tissue remodeling in a variety of homeostatic and developmental contexts, including gastrulation in many organisms and neural tube formation in vertebrates. In recent years, progress has been made towards understanding how the distinct cell biological processes that together drive apical constriction are coordinated. These processes include the contraction of actin-myosin networks, which generates force, and the attachment of actin networks to cell-cell junctions, which allows forces to be transmitted between cells. Different cell types regulate contractility and adhesion in unique ways, resulting in apical constriction with varying dynamics and subcellular organizations, as well as a variety of resulting tissue shape changes. Understanding both the common themes and the variations in apical constriction mechanisms promises to provide insight into the mechanics that underlie tissue morphogenesis.

  3. Soft matter physics: Tools and mechanical models for living cellular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifat, Nada; Beaune, Grégory; Nagarajan, Usharani; Winnik, Françoise M.; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2016-11-01

    Tissues belong to the broad field of active matter, a novel class of non-equilibrium materials composed of many interacting units that individually consume energy and collectively generate motion or mechanical stresses. Active systems span an enormous range of length scales, from individual living cells, to tissues and organisms, to animal groups. We introduce the concept of biological tissues as examples of entangled active matter, where the units (cell) are bound by transient links. We focus here on the mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, and viscosity) of cells and tissues derived from measurements performed by the pipette aspiration technique. This approach has been very fruitful in unveiling striking analogies between the physics of inert soft matter (polymer, viscous pastes, and Silly Putty®) and the behavior of biological tissues. The results obtained from such analogies suggest important implications in the fields of tissue engineering and development.

  4. (Some cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Janina Laska

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs is not well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional potential of HERV-Fc1 proviral 5'LTR in more detail, and examined the specific influence of CpG methylation on this LTR in number of cell lines. Specifically, the role of demethylating chemicals e.g. 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine and Trichostatin-A, in inducing or reactivating expression of HERV-Fc1 specific sequences and the mechanisms were investigated. In our present study, 5-aza-dC is shown to be a powerful inducer of HERV-Fc1, and at the same time it strongly inhibits methylation of DNA. Treatment with this demethylating agent 5-aza-dC, results in significantly increased levels of HERV-Fc1 expression in cells previously not expressing HERV-Fc1, or with a very low expression level. The extent of expression of HERV-Fc1 RNAs precisely correlates with the apparent extent of demethylation of the related DNA sequences. In conclusion, the results suggest that inhibition of DNA methylation/histone deacetylase can interfere with gene silencing mechanisms affecting HERV-Fc1 expression in human cells.

  5. AFM studies of cellular mechanics during osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, Pan; Chen, Jia-Nan; Cai, Ji-Ye; Cai, Xiao-Fang; Ding, Hui; Pan, Yun-Long

    2010-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are becoming an important source of cells for regenerative medicine given with apparent advantages of accessibility, renewal capacity and multipotentiality. In this study, the mechanical properties of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), such as the average Young's modulus, were determined by atomic force microscopy (3.97 ± 0.53 kPa for hAFSCs vs. 1.52 ± 0.63 kPa for fully differentiated osteoblasts). These differences in cell elasticity result primarily from differential actin cytoskeleton organization in these two cell types. Furthermore, ultrastructures, nanostructural details on the surface of cell, were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was clearly shown that surface of osteoblasts were covered by mineralized particles, and the histogram of particles size showed that most of the particles on the surface of osteoblasts distributed from 200 to 400 nm in diameter, while the diameter of hAFSCs particles ranged from 100 to 200 nm. In contrast, there were some dips on the surface of hAFSCs, and particles were smaller than that of osteoblasts. Additionally, as osteogenic differentiation of hAFSCs progressed, more and more stress fibers were replaced by a thinner actin network which is characteristic of mature osteoblasts. These results can improve our understanding of the mechanical properties of hAFSCs during osteogenic differentiation. AFM can be used as a powerful tool for detecting ultrastructures and mechanical properties.

  6. Notes on a "printomere" mechanism of cellular memory and ion regulation of chromatin configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olovnikov, A M

    1999-12-01

    with chromatin proteins is able to pass over the replicative forks during printomere replication and replication of the chromosome. That is why any printomere can be stably retained on the chromosomal body in the course of numerous cell divisions. Owing to printomeres, cellular memory about the proper structure of chromatin decompactions is created, kept, and can be carried through the succession of doublings of differentiated cells.

  7. Cellular intrinsic mechanism affecting the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C in a syngeneic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhao

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying acute myeloid leukemia (AML treatment failure are not clear. Here, we established a mouse model of AML by syngeneic transplantation of BXH-2 derived myeloid leukemic cells and developed an efficacious Ara-C-based regimen for treatment of these mice. We proved that leukemic cell load was correlated with survival. We also demonstrated that the susceptibility of leukemia cells to Ara-C could significantly affect the survival. To examine the molecular alterations in cells with different sensitivity, genome-wide expression of the leukemic cells was profiled, revealing that overall 366 and 212 genes became upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the resistant cells. Many of these genes are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. Some of them were further validated by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, the Ara-C resistant cells retained the sensitivity to ABT-737, an inhibitor of anti-apoptosis proteins, and treatment with ABT-737 prolonged the life span of mice engrafted with resistant cells. These results suggest that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C. Incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors, such as ABT-737, into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. This work provided direct in vivo evidence that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C, suggesting that incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C.

  8. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  9. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florea, Ana-Maria [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf (Germany); Büsselberg, Dietrich, E-mail: dib2015@qatar-med.cornell.edu [Weil Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Foundation-Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha (Qatar)

    2011-03-15

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  10. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mughal, Nadeem A. [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan, E-mail: s.ponnambalam@leeds.ac.uk [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  11. Integrated automated nanomanipulation and real-time cellular surface imaging for mechanical properties characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Zareian, Ramin; Jalili, Nader

    2012-10-01

    Surface microscopy of individual biological cells is essential for determining the patterns of cell migration to study the tumor formation or metastasis. This paper presents a correlated and effective theoretical and experimental technique to automatically address the biophysical and mechanical properties and acquire live images of biological cells which are of interest in studying cancer. In the theoretical part, a distributed-parameters model as the comprehensive representation of the microcantilever is presented along with a model of the contact force as a function of the indentation depth and mechanical properties of the biological sample. Analysis of the transfer function of the whole system in the frequency domain is carried out to characterize the stiffness and damping coefficients of the sample. In the experimental section, unlike the conventional atomic force microscope techniques basically using the laser for determining the deflection of microcantilever's tip, a piezoresistive microcantilever serving as a force sensor is implemented to produce the appropriate voltage and measure the deflection of the microcantilever. A micromanipulator robotic system is integrated with the MATLAB® and programmed in such a way to automatically control the microcantilever mounted on the tip of the micromanipulator to achieve the topography of biological samples including the human corneal cells. For this purpose, the human primary corneal fibroblasts are extracted and adhered on a sterilized culture dish and prepared to attain their topographical image. The proposed methodology herein allows an approach to obtain 2D quality images of cells being comparatively cost effective and extendable to obtain 3D images of individual cells. The characterized mechanical properties of the human corneal cell are furthermore established by comparing and validating the phase shift of the theoretical and experimental results of the frequency response.

  12. Characterization of Wave Dispersion in Viscoelastic Cellular Assemblies by Doublet Mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yan-Fang; XIONG Chun-Yang; FANG Jing; FERRARI Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Using the Voigt model, we analyze wave propagation in viscoelastic granular media with a monatomic lattice, planar simple cubic package and cubical-tetrahedral assembly within the context of doublet mechanics. Microstrains of elongation between the doublet particles are considered in the models. Wave dispersive relations are derived from dynamic equations of the particles involved in the media, and phase velocities and attenuations of the dispersive waves are obtained for the different assemblies. Variations in these dispersion characteristics are analyzed with the changes of cell interval, modulus, and wave frequency. The relations between micro-constants and macro-parameters are presented under the condition of non-scale continuity of the media.

  13. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana P Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1 apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2 ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3 neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4 limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots. Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in

  14. Mechanisms underlying autoimmune synaptic encephalitis leading to disorders of memory, behavior and cognition: insights from molecular, cellular and synaptic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Emilia H; Jain, Ankit; Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan G; Dalmau, Josep; Balice-Gordon, Rita J

    2010-07-01

    Recently, several novel, potentially lethal and treatment-responsive syndromes that affect hippocampal and cortical function have been shown to be associated with auto-antibodies against synaptic antigens, notably glutamate or GABA-B receptors. Patients with these auto-antibodies, sometimes associated with teratomas and other neoplasms, present with psychiatric symptoms, seizures, memory deficits and decreased levels of consciousness. These symptoms often improve dramatically after immunotherapy or tumor resection. Here we review studies of the cellular and synaptic effects of these antibodies in hippocampal neurons in vitro and preliminary work in rodent models. Our work suggests that patient antibodies lead to rapid and reversible removal of neurotransmitter receptors from synaptic sites, leading to changes in synaptic and circuit function that in turn are likely to lead to behavioral deficits. We also discuss several of the many questions raised by these and related disorders. Determining the mechanisms underlying these novel anti-neurotransmitter receptor encephalopathies will provide insights into the cellular and synaptic bases of the memory and cognitive deficits that are hallmarks of these disorders, and potentially suggest avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  15. [Using atomic force microscopy to analyze morphological changes and mechanical properties caused by cellular exposure to low doses of pesticides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Abbate, N; Lasalvia, M; Perna, G; D'Antonio, P; Quartucci, G; Gallo, C; Capozzi, V

    2012-01-01

    A commercial pesticide is usually composed of active ingredients and formulants. Among the active ingredients, Deltamethrin is a pyrethroid chemical widely used for synthesizing pesticides products which are very effective in damaging the central nervous system of pests. In this work, we analyze, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), cellular morphological changes induced by exposure to a Deltamethrin-based commercial pesticide (Decaflow). AFM microscopy, in addition to the well-known characterization of the cellular topography, has the ability to monitor interesting biomechanical parameters of the surface as roughness and elastic modulus. In particular, we exposed normal human keratinocytes for 24 hours at different solutions of Decaflow, well below the threshold of cytotoxicity. The AFM images of exposed cells show alterations of surface cell shape. Moreover exposed cells are characterized by an increase of the value of membrane roughness. The mechanical properties of cells are also modified after Decaflow exposure, as confirmed by a decrease of the elasticity modulus with increasing the concentration of pesticide.

  16. A cellular memory mechanism aids overload hypertrophy in muscle long after an episodic exposure to anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Ingrid M; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Eftestøl, Einar; Gundersen, Kristian

    2013-12-15

    Previous strength training with or without the use of anabolic steroids facilitates subsequent re-acquisition of muscle mass even after long intervening periods of inactivity. Based on in vivo and ex vivo microscopy we here propose a cellular memory mechanism residing in the muscle cells. Female mice were treated with testosterone propionate for 14 days, inducing a 66% increase in the number of myonuclei and a 77% increase in fibre cross-sectional area. Three weeks after removing the drug, fibre size was decreased to the same level as in sham treated animals, but the number of nuclei remained elevated for at least 3 months (>10% of the mouse lifespan). At this time, when the myonuclei-rich muscles were exposed to overload-exercise for 6 days, the fibre cross-sectional area increased by 31% while control muscles did not grow significantly. We suggest that the lasting, elevated number of myonuclei constitutes a cellular memory facilitating subsequent muscle overload hypertrophy. Our findings might have consequences for the exclusion time of doping offenders. Since the ability to generate new myonuclei is impaired in the elderly our data also invites speculation that it might be beneficial to perform strength training when young in order to benefit in senescence.

  17. The Effect of Structural Design on Mechanical Properties and Cellular Response of Additive Manufactured Titanium Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wieding

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of segmental defects in long bones remains a challenging task in orthopedic surgery. Although autologous bone is still the ‘Gold Standard’ because of its high biocompatibility, it has nevertheless been associated with several disadvantages. Consequently, artificial materials, such as calcium phosphate and titanium, have been considered for the treatment of bone defects. In the present study, the mechanical properties of three different scaffold designs were investigated. The scaffolds were made of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V, fabricated by means of an additive manufacturing process with defined pore geometry and porosities of approximately 70%. Two scaffolds exhibited rectangular struts, orientated in the direction of loading. The struts for the third scaffold were orientated diagonal to the load direction, and featured a circular cross-section. Material properties were calculated from stress-strain relationships under axial compression testing. In vitro cell testing was undertaken with human osteoblasts on scaffolds fabricated using the same manufacturing process. Although the scaffolds exhibited different strut geometry, the mechanical properties of ultimate compressive strength were similar (145–164 MPa and in the range of human cortical bone. Test results for elastic modulus revealed values between 3.7 and 6.7 GPa. In vitro testing demonstrated proliferation and spreading of bone cells on the scaffold surface.

  18. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.;

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehens...

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms affecting tumour radiosensitivity : An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Olive Mary

    The response of tumour cells in vitro to ionising radiation can, to a certain extent, predict the response of tumours to various radiotherapy treatment modalities. This thesis considers some of the factors known to be involved in the radiation response of human tumour cells in vitro. These parameters include radiation-induced cell-cycle perturbations, apoptosis and DNA damage repair. A panel of eight human tumour cell lines with markedly differing radiosensitivities were assessed in order to determine the key factors governing their radiation response. A wide range of doses spanning both the low dose region (0-2 Gy and 0-5 Gy) and the clinically relevant region (1-4 Gy) were used to determine whether differences in responses could distinguish cells which were radiosensitive or resistant. Ionising radiation produced a cell cycle delay in all cell lines in one or both of the cellular checkpoints. A Gl/S delay was detected in those cell lines that expressed wild-type p53, and the duration of this delay appeared to be directly related to the level of constitutive protein. p53 protein stabilisation was observed after 4 h, even at doses of 0-2 Gy, although a Gl/S delay was only detectable at higher doses. There was no direct relationship between p53 status and survival although wild-type p53 expression was more prevalent in the radiosensitive cell lines (3/4 sensitives are wild-type versus 2/4 resistants). A G2/M delay could only be detected at doses of > 1 Gy. This delay appeared to be dose independent in the resistant cell lines, suggesting a threshold dose of IGy, above which no further effect is observed. A radiation-induced reduction of cyclin B1 protein was observed in all cell lines implicating this protein in the induction of a G2/M delay. The duration of G2/M delay was significantly longer in the radiosensitive cell lines at 4 Gy (7-20 h versus 4-6 h at 4 Gy). The proportion of cells that exited the G2/M block and re-entered GO/G1 phase was also significantly

  20. The cytotoxicity of polycationic iron oxide nanoparticles: Common endpoint assays and alternative approaches for improved understanding of cellular response mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoskins Clare

    2012-04-01

    Our findings indicate that common in vitro cell endpoint assays do not give detailed and complete information on cellular state and it is essential to explore novel approaches and carry out more in-depth studies to elucidate cellular response mechanism to magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J; Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD(+), which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in V max (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves.

  2. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shahriari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD+, which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28 from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in Vmax (pyruvate-reducing direction as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves.

  3. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-10-13

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5'-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism.

  4. Attenuation of cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms in kidney of rats intoxicated with carbofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Bhupindervir; Khera, Alka; Sandhir, Rajat

    2012-10-01

    Carbofuran, an anticholinestrase carbamate, is commonly used as an insecticide. Its toxic effect on kidney is less established. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of carbofuran on kidneys and to understand the mechanism involved in its nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups of eight animals each; control animals received sunflower oil (vehicle) and carbofuran exposed animals were treated with carbofuran (1 mg/kg body weight) orally for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, significant increase was observed in urea and creatinine levels in serum along with the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, suggesting nephrotoxicity. The antioxidant defense system of animals treated with carbofuran was altered in terms of increased lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, and total thiols and decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase). The results indicate that carbofuran is nephrotoxic and increased oxidative stress appears to be involved in its nephrotoxic effects.

  5. Cellular Microcultures: Programming Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of 3D Hydrogel Cellular Microcultures via Direct Ink Writing (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 9/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Joselle M; Badea, Adina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Gladman, A Sydney; Wetzel, David J; Popescu, Gabriel; Lewis, Jennifer A; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2016-05-01

    R. Nuzzo and co-workers show on page 1025 how compositional differences in hydrogels are used to tune their cellular compliance by controlling their polymer mesh properties and subsequent uptake of the protein poly-l-lysine (green spheres in circled inset). The cover image shows pyramid micro-scaffolds prepared using direct ink writing (DIW) that differentially direct fibroblast and preosteoblast growth in 3D, depending on cell motility and surface treatment.

  6. Two-Component Regulatory Systems – implication in the quorum sensing mechanisms and bacteriocin production in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia–Mara Ditu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For lactic acid bacteria, the mechanisms of quorum sensing and response are mediated by peptides or pheromones that interfere with the synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMP called bacteriocins, when these molecules reach a certain critical level of concentration. Generally, the synthesis and activity of pheromones is adjusted by means of a two-component regulatory system. The observation that some microorganisms, in particular lactic acid bacteria, produce bacteriocins according to the cell density, has led to the discovery of the involvement of QS mechanisms in the synthesis of these peptides. Bacteriocins synthesis is inducible, the process requiring the extracellular accumulation of peptides that functions as chemical messengers activators of bacteriocins synthesis. This minireview presents the molecular architecture and functions of two-component regulatory systems and ABC transporters implicated in the synthesis and secretion of nisin, one of the most studied bacteriocin. The elucidation of the intimate mechanisms of bacteriocins synthesis is equally of biotechnological and medical importance, opening interesting perspectives for the development of improved technologies for the production of bacteriocins with good yields, and also, for increasing the beneficial anti-infective roles of probiotic bacteria when administered in vivo.

  7. Mechanisms of diabetic autoimmunity: II--Is diabetes a central or peripheral disorder of effector and regulatory cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-02-01

    Two competing hypotheses aiming to explain the onset of autoimmune reactions are discussed in the context of genetic and environmental predisposition to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The first hypothesis has evolved along characterization of the mechanisms of self-discrimination and attributes diabetic autoimmunity to escape of reactive T cells from central regulation in the thymus. The second considers frequent occurrence of autoimmune reactions within the immune homunculus, which are adequately suppressed by regulatory T cells originating from the thymus, and occasionally, insufficient suppression results in autoimmunity. Besides thymic dysfunction, deregulation of both effector and suppressor cells can in fact result from homeostatic aberrations at the peripheral level during initial stages of evolution of adaptive immunity. Pathogenic cells sensitized in the islets are efficiently expanded in the target tissue and pancreatic lymph nodes of lymphopenic neonates. In parallel, the same mechanisms of peripheral sensitization contribute to tolerization through education of naïve/effector T cells and expansion of regulatory T cells. Experimental evidence presented for each individual mechanism implies that T1D may result from a primary effector or suppressor immune abnormality. Disturbed self-tolerance leading to T1D may well result from peripheral deregulation of innate and adaptive immunity, with variable contribution of central thymic dysfunction.

  8. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhim, Munira A

    2012-08-22

    The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "non-targeted responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell

  9. Mechanisms associated with cellular desiccation tolerance of Artemia encysted embryos from locations around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengherr, Steffen; Schill, Ralph O; Clegg, J S

    2011-10-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry we demonstrated the presence of biological glasses and measured the glass transition temperatures (Tg) in dry encysted gastrula embryos (cysts) of the brine shrimp, Artemia, from eleven different locations, two of which provided cysts from parthenogenetic animals. Values for Tg were highest, by far, in Artemia franciscana cysts from the Mekong Delta, Vietnam (VN), these cysts having been produced from previous sequential inoculations into growth ponds of cysts from the San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Tg values for three groups of A. franciscana cysts were significantly higher than those of other cysts (except those of Artemia persimilis) studied here, as well as all other desiccation-tolerant animal systems studied to date. We also measured three stress proteins (hsc70, artemin and p26) in all these cysts as well as the total alcohol soluble carbohydrates (ASC), about 90% of which is the disaccharide trehalose, a known component of biological glasses. We interpret the results in terms of mechanisms involved with desiccation tolerance and, to some extent, with thermal conditions at the sites of cyst collection.

  10. Cellular and molecular mechanisms activating the cell death processes by chalcones: Critical structural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champelovier, Pierre; Chauchet, Xavier; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Garrel, Catherine; Laporte, François; Boutonnat, Jean; Boumendjel, Ahcène

    2013-12-01

    Chalcones are naturally occurring compounds with diverse pharmacological activities. Chalcones derive from the common structure: 1,3-diphenylpropenone. The present study aims to better understand the mechanistic pathways triggering chalcones anticancer effects and providing evidences that minor structural difference could lead to important difference in mechanistic effect. We selected two recently investigated chalcones (A and B) and investigated them on glioblastoma cell lines. It was found that chalcone A induced an apoptotic process (type I PCD), via the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Chalcone A also increased CDK1/cyclin B ratios and decreased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). Chalcone B induced an autophagic cell death process (type II PCD), ROS-related but independent of both caspases and protein synthesis. Both chalcones increased Bax/Bcl2 ratios and decreased Ki67 and CD71 antigen expressions. The present investigation reveals that despite the close structure of chalcones A and B, significant differences in mechanism of effect were found.

  11. Gastric cytoprotection beyond prostaglandins: cellular and molecular mechanisms of gastroprotective and ulcer healing actions of antacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnawski, Andrzej; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    This article updates current views on gastric mucosal defense, injury, protection and ulcer healing with a focus on mucosal protective and ulcer healing actions of antacids. The gastric mucosa is continuously exposed to a variety of noxious factors, both endogenous such as: 0.1N hydrochloric acid, pepsin, bile acids, lysolecithin, H. pylori toxins and exogenous such as NSAIDs, ethanol and others. Gastric mucosal integrity is maintained by pre-epithelial, epithelial and post-epithelial defense mechanisms permitting the mucosa to withstand exposure to the above damaging factors. When mucosal defense is weakened or overwhelmed by injurious factors, injury develops in the form of erosions or ulcers. In the late 1970s Andre Robert and coworkers discovered that microgram amounts of a prostaglandin E2 analog protects the gastric mucosa against a variety of ulcerogenic and necrotizing agents - even such strong inducers of injury as 100% ethanol and boiling water. They proposed a new concept of cytoprotection. Subsequently, other compounds, such as sulfhydryls, sucralfate and epidermal growth factor were shown to exert protective action on gastric mucosa. Additionally, some antacids have been shown to exert a potent mucosal protective action against a variety of injurious factors and accelerate healing of erosions and gastric ulcers. These actions of antacids, especially hydrotalcite - the newest and the most extensively studied antacid - are due to activation of prostaglandin synthesis; binding to and inactivation of pepsin, bile acids and H. pylori toxins; induction of heat shock proteins; and, activation of genes encoding growth factors and their receptors.

  12. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Gill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2, histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2, the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2, transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2, tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT, RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11, DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL, and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21. A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS.

  13. Kindling-induced learning deficiency and possible cellular and molecular involved mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz; Ahmad-Molaei, Leila; Nejadhoseynian, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Hosseini, Arman; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2013-06-01

    Hippocampus learning disturbance is a major symptom of patients with seizure, hence hippocampal dysfunction has essential role in worsening the disease. Hippocampal formation includes neurons and myelinated fibers that are necessary for acquisition and consolidation of memory, long-term potentiation and learning activity. The exact mechanism by which seizure can decrease memory and learning activity of hippocampus remains unknown. In the present study, electrical kindling-induced learning deficit in rats was evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) test. The hippocampus was removed and changes in neurons and myelin sheaths around hippocampal fibers were investigated using histological and immunohistochemical methods. Demyelination was assessed by luxol fast blue staining, and immunohistological staining of myelin-binding protein (MBP). The TUNEL assay was used for evaluation of neuronal apoptosis and the glial fibriliary acetic protein (GFAP) was used for assessment of inflammatory reaction. The results indicated that electrical kindling of hippocampus could induce deficiency in spatial learning and memory as compared to control group. In addition, electrical kindling caused damage to the myelin sheath around hippocampal fibers and produced vast demyelination. Furthermore, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells in hippocampal slices was observed. In addition, inflammatory response was higher in kindled animals as compared to the control group. The results suggested that the decrease in learning and memory in kindled animals is likely due to demyelination and augmentation in apoptosis rate accompanied by inflammatory reaction in hippocampal neurons of kindled rats.

  14. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by curcumin: Implication of its cellular mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Han Wern; Lim, Hwee Ying [Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Wong, Kim Ping, E-mail: bchsitkp@nus.edu.sg [Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2009-11-06

    Curcumin is a phytochemical isolated from the rhizome of turmeric. Recent reports have shown curcumin to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties as well as affecting the 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), mTOR and STAT-3 signaling pathways. We provide evidence that curcumin acts as an uncoupler. Well-established biochemical techniques were performed on isolated rat liver mitochondria in measuring oxygen consumption, F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase activity and ATP biosynthesis. Curcumin displays all the characteristics typical of classical uncouplers like fccP and 2,4-dinitrophenol. In addition, at concentrations higher than 50 {mu}M, curcumin was found to inhibit mitochondrial respiration which is a characteristic feature of inhibitory uncouplers. As a protonophoric uncoupler and as an activator of F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase, curcumin causes a decrease in ATP biosynthesis in rat liver mitochondria. The resulting change in ATP:AMP could disrupt the phosphorylation status of the cell; this provides a possible mechanism for its activation of AMPK and its downstream mTOR and STAT-3 signaling.

  15. Numerical analysis on mechanical behaviors of hierarchical cellular structures with negative Poisson’s ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Yin, Jianhua; Dong, Liang; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional hierarchical re-entrant honeycomb structures were designed and the mechanical behaviors of the structures were studied using a finite element method. Hierarchical re-entrant structure of order n (n ≥ 1) was constructed by replacing each vertex of a lower order (n - 1) hierarchical re-entrant structure with a smaller re-entrant hexagon with identical strut aspect ratio. The Poisson’s ratio and energy absorption capacity of re-entrant structures of different hierarchical orders were studied under different compression velocities. The results showed that the Poisson’s ratio of the first and second order hierarchical structures can reach -1.36 and -1.33 with appropriate aspect ratio, 13.8% and 12.1% lower than that of the zeroth order hierarchical structure. The energy absorption capacity of the three models increased with an increasing compression velocity; the second order hierarchical structure exhibited the highest rate of increase in energy absorption capacity with an increasing compression velocity. The plateau stresses of the first and second order hierarchical structures were slightly lower than that of the zeroth order hierarchical structure; however the second order hierarchical structure exhibited the highest energy absorption capacity at high compression velocity (60 m s-1).

  16. Nanosilicon carbide/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites: structural, mechanical and in vitro cellular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Saeed; Ebadzadeh, Touraj; Ahmadzadeh-Asl, Shaghayegh

    2010-07-01

    In this study, bioceramic nanocomposites were synthesized by sintering compacted bodies of hydroxyapatite (HA) mixed with 5 or 15 wt% nanosilicon carbide at 1,100 or 1,200 degrees C in a reducing atmosphere. Pure hydroxyapatite was also prepared for comparison. Phase compositions, structural and physical properties of the composites were studied using appropriate techniques. Some in vitro biological properties of the composites were also investigated by using newrat calvaria osteoblastic cells. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that tricalcium phosphate (TCP) comprising negligible alpha-TCP and considerable beta-TCP were formed in composites during sintering meanwhile hydroxyapatite and silicon carbide (SiC) were also existed in the composition. Based on the results, that composite made of 5 wt% nanosilicon carbide exhibited higher bending strength, fracture toughness and bulk density than pure HA and composite with 15 wt% silicon carbide. The scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that the addition of nanosilicon carbide suppressed the grain growth and yielded a feature of island-type clusters consisting of blistered calcium phosphate (HA and TCP) and SiC grains. Also, in this study, better proliferation rate and alkaline phosphatase activity were observed for the osteoblastic cells seeded on top of the composites compared to pure HA. Overall, the results indicated that the composite of 95 wt% hydroxyapatite and 5 wt% SiC exhibited better mechanical and biological properties than pure HA and further addition of SiC failed strength and toughness.

  17. Linking Cellular Mechanisms to Behavior: Entorhinal Persistent Spiking and Membrane Potential Oscillations May Underlie Path Integration, Grid Cell Firing, and Episodic Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Hasselmo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex plays an important role in spatial memory and episodic memory functions. These functions may result from cellular mechanisms for integration of the afferent input to entorhinal cortex. This article reviews physiological data on persistent spiking and membrane potential oscillations in entorhinal cortex then presents models showing how both these cellular mechanisms could contribute to properties observed during unit recording, including grid cell firing, and how they could underlie behavioural functions including path integration. The interaction of oscillations and persistent firing could contribute to encoding and retrieval of trajectories through space and time as a mechanism relevant to episodic memory.

  18. Mosaic gene network modelling identified new regulatory mechanisms in HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popik, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Mishchenko, Elena L; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2016-06-15

    Modelling of gene networks is widely used in systems biology to study the functioning of complex biological systems. Most of the existing mathematical modelling techniques are useful for analysis of well-studied biological processes, for which information on rates of reactions is available. However, complex biological processes such as those determining the phenotypic traits of organisms or pathological disease processes, including pathogen-host interactions, involve complicated cross-talk between interacting networks. Furthermore, the intrinsic details of the interactions between these networks are often missing. In this study, we developed an approach, which we call mosaic network modelling, that allows the combination of independent mathematical models of gene regulatory networks and, thereby, description of complex biological systems. The advantage of this approach is that it allows us to generate the integrated model despite the fact that information on molecular interactions between parts of the model (so-called mosaic fragments) might be missing. To generate a mosaic mathematical model, we used control theory and mathematical models, written in the form of a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In the present study, we investigated the efficiency of this method in modelling the dynamics of more than 10,000 simulated mosaic regulatory networks consisting of two pieces. Analysis revealed that this approach was highly efficient, as the mean deviation of the dynamics of mosaic network elements from the behaviour of the initial parts of the model was less than 10%. It turned out that for construction of the control functional, data on perturbation of one or two vertices of the mosaic piece are sufficient. Further, we used the developed method to construct a mosaic gene regulatory network including hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the first piece and the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis and NF-κB induction pathways as the second piece. Thus

  19. Cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of Kv1.2 regulation in the rat cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael R; Fuchs, Jason R; Green, John T; Morielli, Anthony D

    2012-01-01

    The potassium channel Kv1.2 alpha-subunit is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) dendrites where its pharmacological inhibition increases excitability (Khavandgar et al., 2005). Kv1.2 is also expressed in cerebellar basket cell (BC) axon terminals (Sheng et al., 1994), where its blockade increases BC inhibition of PCs (Southan and Robertson, 1998a). Secretin receptors are also expressed both in PC dendrites and BC axon terminals (reviewed in (Yuan et al.). The effect of secretin on PC excitability is not yet known, but, like Kv1.2 inhibitors, secretin potently increases inhibitory input to PCs (Yung et al., 2001). This suggests secretin may act in part by suppressing Kv1.2. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a mechanism of Kv1.2 suppression (Nesti et al., 2004). This process can be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA) (Connors et al., 2008). Since secretin receptors activate PKA (Wessels-Reiker et al., 1993), we tested the hypothesis that secretin regulates Kv1.2 trafficking in the cerebellum. Using cell surface protein biotinylation of rat cerebellar slices, we found secretin decreased cell-surface Kv1.2 levels by modulating Kv1.2 endocytic trafficking. This effect was mimicked by activating adenylate cyclase (AC) with forskolin, and was blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of AC or PKA. Imaging studies identified the BC axon terminal and Purkinje cell dendrites as loci of AC-dependent Kv1.2 trafficking. The physiological significance of secretin regulated Kv1.2 endocytosis is supported by our finding that infusion into the cerebellar cortex of either the Kv1.2 inhibitor Tityustoxin-Kα, or of the Kv1.2 regulator secretin, significantly enhances acquisition of eyeblink conditioning in rats. PMID:22764231

  20. HAMLET kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism--cellular, molecular, and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanborg, Catharina; Agerstam, Helena; Aronson, Annika; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Düringer, Caroline; Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Leijonhuvud, Irene; Linse, Sara; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Nilsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Jenny; Svensson, Malin

    2003-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex that induces apoptosis-like death in tumor cells, but leaves fully differentiated cells unaffected. This review summarizes the information on the in vivo effects of HAMLET in patients and tumor models on the tumor cell biology, and on the molecular characteristics of the complex. HAMLET limits the progression of human glioblastomas in a xenograft model and removes skin papillomas in patients. This broad anti-tumor activity includes >40 different lymphomas and carcinomas and apoptosis is independent of p53 or bcl-2. In tumor cells HAMLET enters the cytoplasm, translocates to the perinuclear area, and enters the nuclei where it accumulates. HAMLET binds strongly to histones and disrupts the chromatin organization. In the cytoplasm, HAMLET targets ribosomes and activates caspases. The formation of HAMLET relies on the propensity of alpha-lactalbumin to alter its conformation when the strongly bound Ca2+ ion is released and the protein adopts the apo-conformation that exposes a new fatty acid binding site. Oleic acid (C18:1,9 cis) fits this site with high specificity, and stabilizes the altered protein conformation. The results illustrate how protein folding variants may be beneficial, and how their formation in peripheral tissues may depend on the folding change and the availability of the lipid cofactor. One example is the acid pH in the stomach of the breast-fed child that promotes the formation of HAMLET. This mechanism may contribute to the protective effect of breastfeeding against childhood tumors. We propose that HAMLET should be explored as a novel approach to tumor therapy.

  1. Altering the cellular mechanical force balance results in integrated changes in cell, cytoskeletal and nuclear shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, J. R.; Karp, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out with capillary endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (FN)-coated dishes in order to analyze the mechanism of cell and nuclear shape control by extracellular matrix (ECM). To examine the role of the cytoskeleton in shape determination independent of changes in transmembrane osmotic pressure, membranes of adherent cells were permeabilized with saponin (25 micrograms/ml) using a buffer that maintains the functional integrity of contractile microfilaments. Real-time videomicroscopic studies revealed that addition of 250 microM ATP resulted in time-dependent retraction and rounding of permeabilized cells and nuclei in a manner similar to that observed in intact living cells following detachment using trypsin-EDTA. Computerized image analysis confirmed that permeabilized cells remained essentially rigid in the absence of ATP and that retraction was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner as the concentration of ATP was raised from 10 to 250 microM. Maximal rounding occurred by 30 min with projected cell and nuclear areas being reduced by 69 and 41%, respectively. ATP-induced rounding was also accompanied by a redistribution of microfilaments resulting in formation of a dense net of F-actin surrounding retracted nuclei. Importantly, ATP-stimulated changes in cell, cytoskeletal, and nuclear form were prevented in permeabilized cells using a synthetic myosin peptide (IRICRKG) that has been previously shown to inhibit actomyosin filament sliding in muscle. In contrast, both the rate and extent of cell and nuclear rounding were increased in permeabilized cells exposed to ATP when the soluble FN peptide, GRGDSP, was used to dislodge immobilized FN from cell surface integrin receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  3. Study on the Cellular Molecular Mechanism of Intrauterine Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健; 孙琳

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study intrauterine transmission of HBV and its celbular molecular mechanism and influence on the fetus. Methods: A total of 46 cases of Fegnant uxnnen who suffered from HBV were divided into HBeAg (+) and HBeAg (-) groups. HBV-DNA in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells ( PBMC ) of 46 cases of pregnant women before delivery urns detected by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR). After placenta being delivery, HBV-DNA in serum and cord blood mononuclear cells ( CBMC) was also detected by PCR. Results: The total of positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum and PBMC of pregnant women with hepatitis B were 69.57% (32/46) and 41.30% (19/46). The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of cord blood and CBMC were 56.52%(26/46) and 21.74% (10/46) respectively. Among them, the positive rates of HBV-DNA inserum and PBMC of pregnant women with HBeAg (+) were 100. 00% (25/25) and 60.00% (15/25) respectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of cord blood and CBMC were 88.00% (22/25) and 32. 00% (8/25) respectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum and PBMC of pregnant women with HBeAg (-) were 33.33%(7/21) and 19.05%(4/21) respectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of card blood and CBMC were 19.05%(4/21) and 9.52%(2/21) resspectively. The positive rates of HBV-DNA in serum of card blood and CBMC of newborns were higher in the group of pregnant women with HBeAg (+) than those in the group of pregnant women with HBeAg (--) (P<0. O1 and P<0. 05). There was no HBV-DNA in serum, PBMC and CBMC of normal pregnant women and normal neorwles. Conclusion : The intrauterine transmission of HBV can be existent and its transmission way not only can be induced by serum but also can be induced by PBMC. The way of intrauterine transmission of HBV in-duced by PBMC was concealed. The dangerous possibility of intrauterine transmission is higher in thepregnant women with HBeAg (+) than that in the group of pregnant women with HBeAg (-).

  4. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    KAUST Repository

    Yun, Kil-Young

    2010-01-25

    Background: The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach.Results: Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters.Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters.Conclusion: Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. 2010 Yun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. The Regulatory Mechanisms of Tumor Suppressor P16INK4A and Relevance to Cancer†

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junan; Poi, Ming Jye; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2011-01-01

    P16INK4A (also known as P16 and MTS1), a protein consisting exclusively of four ankyrin repeats, is recognized as a tumor suppressor mainly due to the prevalence of genetic inactivation of the p16INK4A (or CDKN2A) gene in virtually all types of human cancers. However, it has also been shown that elevated expression (up-regulation) of P16 is involved in cellular senescence, aging, and cancer progression, indicating that the regulation of P16 is critical for its function. Here, we discuss the r...

  6. A meta-analysis of caloric restriction gene expression profiles to infer common signatures and regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Michael; Wuttke, Daniel; van Dam, Sipko; Clarke, Susan A; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-04-01

    Caloric restriction, a reduction in calorie intake without malnutrition, retards age-related degeneration and extends lifespan in several organisms. CR induces multiple changes, yet its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, we first performed a meta-analysis of microarray CR studies in mammals and identified genes and processes robustly altered due to CR. Our results reveal a complex array of CR-induced changes and we re-identified several genes and processes previously associated with CR, such as growth hormone signalling, lipid metabolism and immune response. Moreover, our results highlight novel associations with CR, such as retinol metabolism and copper ion detoxification, as well as hint of a strong effect of CR on circadian rhythms that in turn may contribute to metabolic changes. Analyses of our signatures by integrating co-expression data, information on genetic mutants, and transcription factor binding site analysis revealed candidate regulators of transcriptional modules in CR. Our results hint at a transcriptional module involved in sterol metabolism regulated by Srebf1. A putative regulatory role of Ppara was also identified. Overall, our conserved molecular signatures of CR provide a comprehensive picture of CR-induced changes and help understand its regulatory mechanisms.

  7. Modeling mechanical behaviors of composites with various ratios of matrix–inclusion properties using movable cellular automaton method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Smolin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two classes of composite materials are considered: classical metal–ceramic composites with reinforcing hard inclusions as well as hard ceramics matrix with soft gel inclusions. Movable cellular automaton method is used for modeling the mechanical behaviors of such different heterogeneous materials. The method is based on particle approach and may be considered as a kind of discrete element method. The main feature of the method is the use of many-body forces of inter-element interaction within the formalism of simply deformable element approximation. It was shown that the strength of reinforcing particles and the width of particle-binder interphase boundaries had determining influence on the service characteristics of metal–ceramic composite. In particular, the increasing of strength of carbide inclusions may lead to significant increase in the strength and ultimate strain of composite material. On the example of porous zirconia ceramics it was shown that the change in the mechanical properties of pore surface leads to the corresponding change in effective elastic modulus and strength limit of the ceramic sample. The less is the pore size, the more is this effect. The increase in the elastic properties of pore surface of ceramics may reduce its fracture energy.

  8. Structures of human cytosolic NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase reveal a novel self-regulatory mechanism of activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhao, Jingyue; Xu, Zhen; Peng, Baozhen; Huang, Qiuhua; Arnold, Eddy; Ding, Jianping

    2004-08-06

    Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate, and regulation of the enzymatic activity of IDHs is crucial for their biological functions. Bacterial IDHs are reversibly regulated by phosphorylation of a strictly conserved serine residue at the active site. Eukaryotic NADP-dependent IDHs (NADP-IDHs) have been shown to have diverse important biological functions; however, their regulatory mechanism remains unclear. Structural studies of human cytosolic NADP-IDH (HcIDH) in complex with NADP and in complex with NADP, isocitrate, and Ca2+ reveal three biologically relevant conformational states of the enzyme that differ substantially in the structure of the active site and in the overall structure. A structural segment at the active site that forms a conserved alpha-helix in all known NADP-IDH structures assumes a loop conformation in the open, inactive form of HcIDH; a partially unraveled alpha-helix in the semi-open, intermediate form; and an alpha-helix in the closed, active form. The side chain of Asp279 of this segment occupies the isocitrate-binding site and forms hydrogen bonds with Ser94 (the equivalent of the phosphorylation site in bacterial IDHs) in the inactive form and chelates the metal ion in the active form. The structural data led us to propose a novel self-regulatory mechanism for HcIDH that mimics the phosphorylation mechanism used by the bacterial homologs, consistent with biochemical and biological data. This mechanism might be applicable to other eukaryotic NADP-IDHs. The results also provide insights into the recognition and specificity of substrate and cofactor by eukaryotic NADP-IDHs.

  9. Mechanism of Laser/light beam interaction at cellular and tissue level and study of the influential factors for the application of low level laser therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of laser therapy it was realized it has useful application of wound healing and reduce pain, but due to the poor understanding of the mechanism and dose response this technique remained to be controversial for therapeutic applications. In order to understand the working and effectiveness different experiments were performed to determine the laser beam effect at the cellular and tissue level. This article discusses the mechanism of beam interaction at tissues and cellular level with different light sources and dosimetry principles for clinical application of low level laser therapy. Different application techniques and methods currently in use for clinical treatment has also been reviewed.

  10. Structure reveals regulatory mechanisms of a MaoC-like hydratase from Phytophthora capsici involved in biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huizheng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs have attracted increasing attention as "green plastic" due to their biodegradable, biocompatible, thermoplastic, and mechanical properties, and considerable research has been undertaken to develop low cost/high efficiency processes for the production of PHAs. MaoC-like hydratase (MaoC, which belongs to (R-hydratase involved in linking the β-oxidation and the PHA biosynthetic pathways, has been identified recently. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of (R-hydratase catalysis is critical for efficient production of PHAs that promise synthesis an environment-friendly plastic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have determined the crystal structure of a new MaoC recognized from Phytophthora capsici. The crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 2.00 Å resolution. The structure shows that MaoC has a canonical (R-hydratase fold with an N-domain and a C-domain. Supporting its dimerization observed in structure, MaoC forms a stable homodimer in solution. Mutations that disrupt the dimeric MaoC result in a complete loss of activity toward crotonyl-CoA, indicating that dimerization is required for the enzymatic activity of MaoC. Importantly, structure comparison reveals that a loop unique to MaoC interacts with an α-helix that harbors the catalytic residues of MaoC. Deletion of the loop enhances the enzymatic activity of MaoC, suggesting its inhibitory role in regulating the activity of MaoC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data in our study reveal the regulatory mechanism of an (R-hydratase, providing information on enzyme engineering to produce low cost PHAs.

  11. 76 FR 4919 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ..., vaccines, and cellular, tissue, and gene therapies. CBER is committed to advancing the public health... products to patients. To support this primary goal, CBER has initiated various training and development... not intended as a mechanism to inspect, assess, judge, or perform a regulatory function, but are...

  12. 76 FR 76168 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... products, vaccines, and cellular, tissue, and gene therapies. CBER is committed to advancing the public... development programs, including programs to further enhance performance of its compliance staff, regulatory... part of the program, are not intended as a mechanism to inspect, assess, judge, or perform a...

  13. 论食品安全奖励机制%Regulatory Mechanism for Food Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施吉龙

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, food safety issues have become increasingly prominent. Despite repeated adjustments of government regulators and its functions, it is still unable to curb the frequent occurrence of food safety incidents. Considering its reason, we will find that we are too over-reliancing on government power, and do not take advantage of market regulation and the role of social cohabitation. In order to alleviate or even to a certain extent to solve the current food security dilemma , we attempts to construct food safety incentives, and improve food safety regulatory system.%近年来,食品安全问题日渐突出。政府监管机构和职能虽经多次调整,但仍无法遏制食品安全事故的频繁发生。究其原因,在于过分依赖政府权力,而没有有效利用市场监管和社会共治的效用。本文试图通过建构食品安全奖励机制,完善食品安全监管制度以缓解甚至一定程度上解决当前食品安全困境。

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulatory mechanisms and inhibition in treating diabetes, heart ischemia, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, T E; Hiromasa, Y

    2007-04-01

    The fraction of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) in the active form is reduced by the activities of dedicated PD kinase isozymes (PDK1, PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4). Via binding to the inner lipoyl domain (L2) of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2 60mer), PDK rapidly access their E2-bound PD substrate. The E2-enhanced activity of the widely distributed PDK2 is limited by dissociation of ADP from its C-terminal catalytic domain, and this is further slowed by pyruvate binding to the N-terminal regulatory (R) domain. Via the reverse of the PDC reaction, NADH and acetyl-CoA reductively acetylate lipoyl group of L2, which binds to the R domain and stimulates PDK2 activity by speeding up ADP dissociation. Activation of PDC by synthetic PDK inhibitors binding at the pyruvate or lipoyl binding sites decreased damage during heart ischemia and lowered blood glucose in insulin-resistant animals. PDC activation also triggers apoptosis in cancer cells that selectively convert glucose to lactate.

  15. Parity and Short-Term Estradiol Treatment Utilizes Similar Cellular Mechanisms to Confer Protection Against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar Arumugam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protective effect of early pregnancy and short-term estrogen treatment (STET, against breast cancer is well established. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we compared the mammary gland cellular microenvironment influenced/induced by parity and STET alongside age-matched controls. Methods: Parous, STET, and control rats were injected with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea at 15 weeks and monitored for the development of mammary cancer. A subset of 4 rats were killed five weeks post carcinogen treatment and mammary gland samples were isolated and subjected to molecular analysis. Results: Our results demonstrated a reduction in cell survival, extracellular matrix associated proliferation, hormonal and growth factor receptor pathways in the experimental groups compared to control rats. Moreover, concomitant reductions in the EMT markers along with cell migration regulators were also observed in parous and STET groups. Hormonal receptor such as GHR, PR, ERα and growth factor receptors IGFR, EGFR and erbB2 were down regulated in the treatment groups. Further analysis revealed that parity and STET drastically reduced the expression, activation of JAK2 and nuclear localization of STATs. Conclusion: Parity and STET by targeting major cell signaling pathways involved in cell survival, cell migration and cell death reduces the mammary tumor promoting environment.

  16. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by which Total Saponin Extracted from Tribulus Terrestris Protects Against Artherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengquan Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Total saponin extracted from Tribulus terrestris (TSETT has been reported to protect against atherosclerosis. We here investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TSETT underlying protection against atherosclerosis. Methods: Cell proliferation was measured with Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT; Intracellular H2O2 was measured with DCFH-DA, a fluorescent dye; Intracellular free Ca2+ was measured with a confocal laser scanning microscopy; Genes expression was measured with gene array and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2 was measured with cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and western blotting. Results: TSETT significantly suppressed the increase in cells proliferation induced by angiotensin II, significantly suppressed the increase in the intracellular production of H2O2 induced by angiotensin II, significantly inhibited the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ induced by H2O2, significantly inhibited the increase in phospho-ERK1/2 induced by angiotensin II; significantly inhibited the increase in mRNA expression of c-fos, c-jun and pkc-α induced by angiotensin II. Conclusion: These findings provide a new insight into the antiatherosclerotic properties of TSETT and provide a pharmacological basis for the clinical application of TSETT in anti-atherosclerosis.

  17. Differential localization of ion transporters suggests distinct cellular mechanisms for calcification and photosynthesis between two coral species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, Katie L; Perez, Sidney O; Linsmayer, Lauren B; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Ion transport is fundamental for multiple physiological processes, including but not limited to pH regulation, calcification, and photosynthesis. Here, we investigated ion-transporting processes in tissues from the corals Acropora yongei and Stylophora pistillata, representatives of the complex and robust clades that diverged over 250 million years ago. Antibodies against complex IV revealed that mitochondria, an essential source of ATP for energetically costly ion transporters, were abundant throughout the tissues of A. yongei. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy revealed septate junctions in all cell layers of A. yongei, as previously reported for S. pistillata, as well as evidence for transcellular vesicular transport in calicoblastic cells. Antibodies against the alpha subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) immunolabeled cells in the calicoblastic epithelium of both species, suggesting conserved roles in calcification. However, NKA was abundant in the apical membrane of the oral epithelium in A. yongei but not S. pistillata, while PMCA was abundant in the gastroderm of S. pistillata but not A. yongei. These differences indicate that these two coral species utilize distinct pathways to deliver ions to the sites of calcification and photosynthesis. Finally, antibodies against mammalian sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBC; SLC4 family) resulted in strong immunostaining in the apical membrane of oral epithelial cells and in calicoblastic cells in A. yongei, a pattern identical to NKA. Characterization of ion transport mechanisms is an essential step toward understanding the cellular mechanisms of coral physiology and will help predict how different coral species respond to environmental stress.

  18. The Molecular Regulatory Mechanism of c-FLIP%c-FLIP的分子调节机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马华谋; 何华; 周克元

    2006-01-01

    细胞型含死亡域的Fas结合蛋白样白介素-1β转换酶抑制蛋白(cellular FADD-like interleukin-1β converting enzyme inhibitory protein,c-FLIP)是一类含有死亡效应结构域(the death effector domain,DED)的天然存在的胱天蛋白酶(caspase)抑制蛋白,广泛存在于各种生物物种中,其过量表达能抑制Fas和肿瘤坏死因子相关促凋亡配体(TRAIL)等死亡受体介导的细胞凋亡.目前认为c-FLIP与炎症、肿瘤及自身免疫性疾病的发生发展密切相关.对其分子调节机制的深入研究将有助于深化对这些疾病的认识,并为临床治疗这些疾病提供新的方法和思路.

  19. Cytokine expression and secretion by skeletal muscle cells: regulatory mechanisms and exercise effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Jonathan M; Della Gatta, Paul; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Nieman, David C

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are important mediators of various aspects of health and disease, including appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. Over the past decade or so, considerable attention has focused on the potential for regular exercise to counteract a range of disease states by modulating cytokine production. Exercise stimulates moderate to large increases in the circulating concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL- 10, IL-1 receptor antagonist, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and smaller increases in tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-1β, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, IL-12p35/p40 and IL-15. Although many of these cytokines are also expressed in skeletal muscle, not all are released from skeletal muscle into the circulation during exercise. Conversely, some cytokines that are present in the circulation are not expressed in skeletal muscle after exercise. The reasons for these discrepant cytokine responses to exercise are unclear. In this review, we address these uncertainties by summarizing the capacity of skeletal muscle cells to produce cytokines, analyzing other potential cellular sources of circulating cytokines during exercise, and discussing the soluble factors and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cytokine synthesis (e.g., RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins, soluble receptors).

  20. The Storability and Its Regulatory Mechanism of Huanghua Pear(Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai. )Fruit as Influenced by Postharvest Treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Shi-juan; CHEN Kun-song; L(U) Jun-liang; ZHENG Jin-tu

    2002-01-01

    Different temperatures and PEF packing treatments were carried out on postharvest Huanghua pear fruit to investigate their effects on fruit storability and the regulatory mechanism. LOX activity, O2- content, AOS activity, ACC synthase activity, ACC content, ACC oxidase activity and ethylene production changed with peaks in the ripening fruit at 20℃ and were inhibited by cold storage, incidence of fruit wooiness and fruit decay were lightened as well. Low temperature combined with PEF packing(PEF1 and PEF2)treatmernts could further improve the fruit storability, maintain preferable quality. There was no significant difference between PEF1 and PEF2 both during cold storage at 1℃ and shelf life at 20℃. The recommended storage period of Huanghua fruit was two months at 1℃ and could be extended one month longer with PEF packing treatments.

  1. Regulatory mechanisms differ in UMP kinases from gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrin, Cécile; Straut, Monica; Slavova-Azmanova, Neli; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian; Assairi, Liliane; Ionescu, Mihaela; Palibroda, Nicolae; Bârzu, Octavian; Gilles, Anne-Marie

    2007-03-09

    In this work, we examined the regulation by GTP and UTP of the UMP kinases from eight bacterial species. The enzyme from Gram-positive organisms exhibited cooperative kinetics with ATP as substrate. GTP decreased this cooperativity and increased the affinity for ATP. UTP had the opposite effect, as it decreased the enzyme affinity for ATP. The nucleotide analogs 5-bromo-UTP and 5-iodo-UTP were 5-10 times stronger inhibitors than the parent compound. On the other hand, UMP kinases from the Gram-negative organisms did not show cooperativity in substrate binding and catalysis. Activation by GTP resulted mainly from the reversal of inhibition caused by excess UMP, and inhibition by UTP was accompanied by a strong increase in the apparent K(m) for UMP. Altogether, these results indicate that, depending on the bacteria considered, GTP and UTP interact with different enzyme recognition sites. In Gram-positive bacteria, GTP and UTP bind to a single site or largely overlapping sites, shifting the T R equilibrium to either the R or T form, a scenario corresponding to almost all regulatory proteins, commonly called K systems. In Gram-negative organisms, the GTP-binding site corresponds to the unique allosteric site of the Gram-positive bacteria. In contrast, UTP interacts cooperatively with a site that overlaps the catalytic center, i.e. the UMP-binding site and part of the ATP-binding site. These characteristics make UTP an original regulator of UMP kinases from Gram-negative organisms, beyond the common scheme of allosteric control.

  2. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying tissue-dependent genetic variation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Jingyuan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Deelen, Patrick; Westra, Harm Jan; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; te Meerman, Gerhardus; Buurman, Wim A; Rensen, Sander S M; Groen, Hendricus; Weersma, Rinse K; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan; Ophoff, Roel A; Snieder, Harold; van Heel, David; Jansen, Ritsert C; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Franke, Lude

    2012-01-01

    It is known that genetic variants can affect gene expression, but it is not yet completely clear through what mechanisms genetic variation mediate this expression. We therefore compared the cis-effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on gene expression between blood samples from 1,240 human

  3. TGF-β1 exerts opposing effects on grass carp leukocytes: implication in teleost immunity, receptor signaling and potential self-regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Yang

    Full Text Available In fish immunity, the regulatory role of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 has not been fully characterized. Here we examined the immunoregulatory effects of TGF-β1 in grass carp peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL and head kidney leukocytes (HKL. It is interesting that TGF-β1 consistently stimulated the cell viability and the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Tnfα and Ifnγ and T/B cell markers [Cd4-like (Cd4l, Cd8α, Cd8β and Igμ] in PBL, which contrasted with its inhibitory tone in HKL. Further studies showed that grass carp TGF-β1 type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5, was indispensable for the immunoregulatory effects of TGF-β1 in PBL and HKL. Notably, TGF-β1 persistently attenuated ALK5 expression, whereas immunoneutralization of endogenous grass carp TGF-β1 could increase ALK5 mRNA and protein levels. It is consistent with the observation that TGF-β1 decreased the number of ALK5(+ leukocytes in PBL and HKL, revealing a negative regulation of TGF-β1 signaling at the receptor level. Moreover, transient treatment with TGF-β1 for 24 h was sufficient to induce similar cellular responses compared with the continuous treatment. This indicated a possible mechanism by which TGF-β1 triggered the down-regulation of ALK5 mRNA and protein, leading to the desensitization of grass carp leukocytes toward TGF-β1. Accordingly, our data revealed a dual role of TGF-β1 in teleost immunity in which it can serve as a positive or negative control device and provided additional mechanistic insights as to how TGF-β1 controls its signaling in vertebrate leukocytes.

  4. Transport mechanism and regulatory properties of the human amino acid transporter ASCT2 (SLC1A5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Pochini, Lorena; Panni, Simona; Pingitore, Piero; Hedfalk, Kristina; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-11-01

    The kinetic mechanism of the transport catalyzed by the human glutamine/neutral amino acid transporter hASCT2 over-expressed in P. pastoris was determined in proteoliposomes by pseudo-bi-substrate kinetic analysis of the Na(+)-glutamineex/glutaminein transport reaction. A random simultaneous mechanism resulted from the experimental analysis. Purified functional hASCT2 was chemically cross-linked to a stable dimeric form. The oligomeric structure correlated well with the kinetic mechanism of transport. Half-saturation constants (Km) of the transporter for the other substrates Ala, Ser, Asn and Thr were measured both on the external and internal side. External Km were much lower than the internal ones confirming the asymmetry of the transporter. The electric nature of the transport reaction was determined imposing a negative inside membrane potential generated by K(+) gradients in the presence of valinomycin. The transport reaction resulted to be electrogenic and the electrogenicity originated from external Na(+). Internal Na(+) exerted a stimulatory effect on the transport activity which could be explained by a regulatory, not a counter-transport, effect. Native and deglycosylated hASCT2 extracted from HeLa showed the same transport features demonstrating that the glycosyl moiety has no role in transport function. Both in vitro and in vivo interactions of hASCT2 with the scaffold protein PDZK1 were revealed.

  5. Mechanisms of autoimmunity in the non-obese diabetic mouse: effector/regulatory cell equilibrium during peak inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-04-01

    Immune imbalance in autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes may originate from aberrant activities of effector cells or dysfunction of suppressor cells. All possible defective mechanisms have been proposed for diabetes-prone species: (i) quantitative dominance of diabetogenic cells and decreased numbers of regulatory T cells, (ii) excessive aggression of effectors and defective function of suppressors, (iii) perturbed interaction between effector and suppressor cells, and (iv) variations in sensitivity to negative regulation. The experimental evidence available to date presents conflicting information on these mechanisms, with identification of perturbed equilibrium on the one hand and negation of critical role of each mechanism in propagation of diabetic autoimmunity on the other hand. In our analysis, there is no evidence that inherent abnormalities in numbers and function of effector and suppressor T cells are responsible for the immune imbalance responsible for propagation of type 1 diabetes as a chronic inflammatory process. Possibly, the experimental tools for investigation of these features of immune activity are still underdeveloped and lack sufficient resolution, in the presence of the extensive biological viability and functional versatility of effector and suppressor elements.

  6. Boosters of a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine induce divergent T cell responses related to regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Andreas; Brekke, Kristin; Sommerfelt, Maja; Holmberg, Jens O; Aass, Hans Christian D; Baksaas, Ingebjørg; Sørensen, Birger; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma; Kvale, Dag

    2013-09-23

    Therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines aim to reduce disease progression by inducing HIV-specific T cells. Vacc-4x are peptides derived from conserved domains within HIV-1 p24 Gag. Previously, Vacc-4x induced T cell responses in 90% of patients which were associated with reduced viral loads. Here we evaluate the effects of Vacc-4x boosters on T cell immunity and immune regulation seven years after primary immunization. Twenty-five patients on effective antiretroviral therapy received two Vacc-4x doses four weeks apart and were followed for 16 weeks. Vacc-4x T cell responses were measured by proliferation (CFSE), INF-γ, CD107a, Granzyme B, Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity test (DTH) and cytokines and chemokines (Luminex). Functional regulation of Vacc-4x-specific T cell proliferation was estimated in vitro using anti-IL-10 and anti-TGF-ß monoclonal antibodies. Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation increased in 80% after either the first (64%) or second (16%) booster. Only 40% remained responders after two boosters with permanently increased Vacc-4x-specific proliferative responses (p=0.005) and improved CD8(+) T cell degranulation, IFN-γ production and DTH. At baseline, responders had higher CD8(+) T cell degranulation (p=0.05) and CD4(+) INF-γ production (p=0.01), whereas non-responders had higher production of proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-1ß (p<0.045) and regulatory IL-10 (p=0.07). Notably, IL-10 and TGF-ß mediated downregulation of Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation increased only in non-responders (p<0.001). Downregulation during the study correlated to higher PD-1 expression on Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cells (r=0.44, p=0.037), but was inversely correlated to changes in Vacc4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation (r=-0.52, p=0.012). These findings show that Vacc-4x boosters can improve T cell responses in selected patients, but also induce vaccine-specific downregulation of T cell responses in others. Broad

  7. Transcriptome profiling of a curdlan-producing Agrobacterium reveals conserved regulatory mechanisms of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruffing Anne M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPS is widespread among microorganisms, and microbial EPS play important roles in biofilm formation, pathogen persistence, and applications in the food and medical industries. Although it is well established that EPS synthesis is invariably in response to environmental cues, it remains largely unknown how various environmental signals trigger activation of the biochemical synthesis machinery. Results We report here the transcriptome profiling of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749, a microorganism that produces large amounts of a glucose polymer known as curdlan under nitrogen starvation. Transcriptome analysis revealed a nearly 100-fold upregulation of the curdlan synthesis operon upon transition to nitrogen starvation, thus establishing the prominent role that transcriptional regulation plays in the EPS synthesis. In addition to known mechanisms of EPS regulation such as activation by c-di-GMP, we identify novel mechanisms of regulation in ATCC 31749, including RpoN-independent NtrC regulation and intracellular pH regulation by acidocalcisomes. Furthermore, we show evidence that curdlan synthesis is also regulated by conserved cell stress responses, including polyphosphate accumulation and the stringent response. In fact, the stringent response signal, pppGpp, appears to be indispensible for transcriptional activation of curdlan biosynthesis. Conclusions This study identifies several mechanisms regulating the synthesis of curdlan, an EPS with numerous applications. These mechanisms are potential metabolic engineering targets for improving the industrial production of curdlan from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749. Furthermore, many of the genes identified in this study are highly conserved across microbial genomes, and we propose that the molecular elements identified in this study may serve as universal regulators of microbial EPS synthesis.

  8. The cellular distribution of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 is determined by the PDZ-I domain and regulates the malignant progression of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guifang; Gu, Yanan; Hao, Chengcheng; Yuan, Zhu; He, Junqi; Jiang, Wen G.; Cheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of ectopic expression of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) was recently suggested. Here, we show that NHERF1 was upregulated in high grades compared with low grades. Increased NHERF1 expression was correlated with poor prognosis and poor survival. NHERF1 expression was higher in the nucleus of cancer cells than in contiguous non- mammary epithelial cells. A novel mutation, namely NHERF1 Y24S, was identified in human breast cancer tissues and shown to correspond to a conserved residue in the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1. Truncation and mutation of the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1 increased the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, and this redistribution was associated with the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells, including growth, migration, and adhesion. The present results suggest a role for NHERF1 in the progression of breast cancer mediated by the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, as determined by the truncation or key site mutation of the PDZ-I domain. PMID:27097111

  9. Autophagy Regulatory Network - a systems-level bioinformatics resource for studying the mechanism and regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türei, Dénes; Földvári-Nagy, László; Fazekas, Dávid; Módos, Dezső; Kubisch, János; Kadlecsik, Tamás; Demeter, Amanda; Lenti, Katalin; Csermely, Péter; Vellai, Tibor; Korcsmáros, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a complex cellular process having multiple roles, depending on tissue, physiological, or pathological conditions. Major post-translational regulators of autophagy are well known, however, they have not yet been collected comprehensively. The precise and context-dependent regulation of autophagy necessitates additional regulators, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional components that are listed in various datasets. Prompted by the lack of systems-level autophagy-related information, we manually collected the literature and integrated external resources to gain a high coverage autophagy database. We developed an online resource, Autophagy Regulatory Network (ARN; http://autophagy-regulation.org), to provide an integrated and systems-level database for autophagy research. ARN contains manually curated, imported, and predicted interactions of autophagy components (1,485 proteins with 4,013 interactions) in humans. We listed 413 transcription factors and 386 miRNAs that could regulate autophagy components or their protein regulators. We also connected the above-mentioned autophagy components and regulators with signaling pathways from the SignaLink 2 resource. The user-friendly website of ARN allows researchers without computational background to search, browse, and download the database. The database can be downloaded in SQL, CSV, BioPAX, SBML, PSI-MI, and in a Cytoscape CYS file formats. ARN has the potential to facilitate the experimental validation of novel autophagy components and regulators. In addition, ARN helps the investigation of transcription factors, miRNAs and signaling pathways implicated in the control of the autophagic pathway. The list of such known and predicted regulators could be important in pharmacological attempts against cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Calcium-mediated oxidative stress: a common mechanism in tight junction disruption by different types of cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Ruchika; Meena, Avtar S; Shukla, Pradeep K; Nagaraja, Archana S; Dorniak, Piotr L; Pallikuth, Sandeep; Waters, Christopher M; Sood, Anil; Rao, RadhaKrishna

    2017-02-20

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osmotic stress, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and cyclic stretch-induced tight junction (TJ) disruption was investigated in Caco-2 cell monolayers in vitro and restraint stress-induced barrier dysfunction in mouse colon in vivo Live cell imaging showed that osmotic stress, cyclic stretch and DSS triggered rapid production of ROS in Caco-2 cell monolayers, which was blocked by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. Knockdown of CaV1.3 or TRPV6 channels blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production and attenuated TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. N-Acetyl l-cysteine (NAC) and l-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) blocked stress-induced TJ disruption and barrier dysfunction. NAC and l-NAME also blocked stress-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Src. ROS was colocalized with the mitochondrial marker in stressed cells. Cyclosporin A blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced ROS production, barrier dysfunction, TJ disruption and JNK activation. Mitochondria-targeted Mito-TEMPO blocked osmotic stress and DSS-induced barrier dysfunction and TJ disruption. Chronic restraint stress in mice resulted in the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), activation of JNK and c-Src, and disruption of TJ in the colonic epithelium. Furthermore, corticosterone administration induced JNK and c-Src activation, TJ disruption and protein thiol oxidation in colonic mucosa. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress is a common signal in the mechanism of TJ disruption in the intestinal epithelium by different types of cellular stress in vitro and bio behavioral stress in vivo.

  11. Insight into the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism by which cortisol suppresses pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Kellie M; Davis, Tracy L; Doro, Lisa C; Nett, Terry M; Oakley, Amy E; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Rispoli, Louisa A; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2008-02-01

    Stress-like elevations in plasma glucocorticoids rapidly inhibit pulsatile LH secretion in ovariectomized sheep by reducing pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. This effect can be blocked by a nonspecific antagonist of the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) RU486. A series of experiments was conducted to strengthen the evidence for a mediatory role of the type II GR and to investigate the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect of cortisol. First, we demonstrated that a specific agonist of the type II GR, dexamethasone, mimics the suppressive action of cortisol on pituitary responsiveness to GnRH pulses in ovariectomized ewes. This effect, which became evident within 30 min, documents mediation via the type II GR. We next determined that exposure of cultured ovine pituitary cells to cortisol reduced the LH response to pulse-like delivery of GnRH by 50% within 30 min, indicating a pituitary site of action. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that suppression of pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in ovariectomized ewes is due to reduced tissue concentrations of GnRH receptor. Although cortisol blunted the amplitude of GnRH-induced LH pulses within 1-2 h, the amount of GnRH receptor mRNA or protein was not affected over this time frame. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that cortisol acts via the type II GR within the pituitary gland to elicit a rapid decrease in responsiveness to GnRH, independent of changes in expression of the GnRH receptor.

  12. [Research progress in biofilm formation and regulatory mechanism of Campylobacter jejuni].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingping; Zhong, Xian; Zhang, Jumei

    2016-02-04

    Biofilm of Campylobacter jejuni was formed by cross-linking its extracellular secretion, polysaccharides, various extracellular proteins, nucleic acids etc to enhance its survival in hostile environments, especially for detergents, antibiotics and disinfectants. This paper elaborated C. jejuni biofilm formation and regulation mechanisms in the surface properties of the media, temperatures, gas environment, the regulation of gene etc, also analysed and discussed a variety of biofilm removal practical applications. We hope it can provide a reference for studies on biofilm control of C. jejuni.

  13. Novel Sinorhizobium meliloti quorum sensing positive and negative regulatory feedback mechanisms respond to phosphate availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Matthew; Meyer, Stefan; Becker, Anke

    2009-12-01

    The Sin quorum sensing system of Sinorhizobium meliloti depends upon at least three genes, sinR, sinI and expR, and N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signals to regulate multiple processes in its free-living state in the rhizosphere and in the development towards symbiosis with its plant host. In this study, we have characterized novel mechanisms of transcription control through which the system regulates itself. At low AHL levels a positive feedback loop activates expression of sinI (AHL synthase), resulting in amplification of AHL levels. At high AHL levels, expression of sinI is reduced by a negative feedback loop. These feedback mechanisms are mediated by the LuxR-type regulators ExpR and SinR. Expression of sinR and expR is regulated by ExpR in the presence of AHLs. A novel ExpR binding site in the promoter of sinR is responsible for the reduction of expression of this gene. In addition, expression of sinR, upon which sinI expression is dependent, is induced by phoB during growth under phosphate-limiting conditions. This indicates that this response ensures quorum sensing in phosphate-restricted growth.

  14. To Gate, or Not to Gate: Regulatory Mechanisms for Intercellular Protein Transport and Virus Movement in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shoko Ueki; Vitaly Citovsky

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell signal transduction is vital for orchestrating the whole-body physiology of multi-cellular organisms,and many endogenous macromolecules,proteins,and nucleic acids function as such transported signals.In plants,many of these molecules are transported through plasmodesmata (Pd),the cell wall-spanning channel structures that interconnect plant cells.Furthermore,Pd also act as conduits for cell-to-cell movement of most plant viruses that have evolved to pirate these channels to spread the infection.Pd transport is presumed to be highly selective,and only a limited repertoire of molecules is transported through these channels.Recent studies have begun to unravel mechanisms that actively regulate the opening of the Pd channel to allow traffic.This macromolecular transport between cells comprises two consecutive steps:intracellular targeting to Pd and translocation through the channel to the adjacent cell.Here,we review the current knowledge of molecular species that are transported though Pd and the mechanisms that control this traffic.Generally,Pd traffic can occur by passive diffusion through the trans-Pd cytoplasm or through the membrane/lumen of the trans-Pd ER,or by active transport that includes protein-protein interactions.It is this latter mode of Pd transport that is involved in intercellular traffic of most signal molecules and is regulated by distinct and sometimes interdependent mechanisms,which represent the focus of this article.

  15. Ocean warming and acidification modulate energy budget and gill ion regulatory mechanisms in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiss, C M; Michael, K; Lucassen, M; Jutfelt, F; Motyka, R; Dupont, S; Pörtner, H-O

    2015-10-01

    Ocean warming and acidification are threatening marine ecosystems. In marine animals, acidification is thought to enhance ion regulatory costs and thereby baseline energy demand, while elevated temperature also increases baseline metabolic rate. Here we investigated standard metabolic rates (SMR) and plasma parameters of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after 3-4 weeks of exposure to ambient and future PCO2 levels (550, 1200 and 2200 µatm) and at two temperatures (10, 18 °C). In vivo branchial ion regulatory costs were studied in isolated, perfused gill preparations. Animals reared at 18 °C responded to increasing CO2 by elevating SMR, in contrast to specimens at 10 °C. Isolated gills at 10 °C and elevated PCO2 (≥1200 µatm) displayed increased soft tissue mass, in parallel to increased gill oxygen demand, indicating an increased fraction of gill in whole animal energy budget. Altered gill size was not found at 18 °C, where a shift in the use of ion regulation mechanisms occurred towards enhanced Na(+)/H(+)-exchange and HCO3 (-) transport at high PCO2 (2200 µatm), paralleled by higher Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. This shift did not affect total gill energy consumption leaving whole animal energy budget unaffected. Higher Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities in the warmth might have compensated for enhanced branchial permeability and led to reduced plasma Na(+) and/or Cl(-) concentrations and slightly lowered osmolalities seen at 18 °C and 550 or 2200 µatm PCO2 in vivo. Overall, the gill as a key ion regulation organ seems to be highly effective in supporting the resilience of cod to effects of ocean warming and acidification.

  16. Insight from Molecular, Pathological, and Immunohistochemical Studies on Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Responsible for Vaccine-Induced Protection of Rainbow Trout against Yersinia ruckeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Sidhartha; Kania, Per W.; Chettri, Jiwan K.

    2013-01-01

    techniques. It was shown that these cellular reactions, which were more prominent in spleen than in head kidney, were associated with the expression of immune-related genes, suggesting a Th2-like response. Y. ruckeri, as shown by in situ hybridization (ISH), was eliminated within a few days in vaccinated......The immunological mechanisms associated with protection of vaccinated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, against enteric redmouth disease (ERM), caused by Yersinia ruckeri, were previously elucidated by the use of gene expression methodology and immunochemical methods. That approach pointed...... indirectly to both humoral and cellular elements being involved in protection. The present study correlates the level of protection in rainbow trout to cellular reactions in spleen and head kidney and visualizes the processes by applying histopathological, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization...

  17. The Mechanisms of Water Exchange: The Regulatory Roles of Multiple Interactions in Social Wasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanshu Agrawal

    Full Text Available Evolutionary benefits of task fidelity and improving information acquisition via multiple transfers of materials between individuals in a task partitioned system have been shown before, but in this paper we provide a mechanistic explanation of these phenomena. Using a simple mathematical model describing the individual interactions of the wasps, we explain the functioning of the common stomach, an information center, which governs construction behavior and task change. Our central hypothesis is a symmetry between foragers who deposit water and foragers who withdraw water into and out of the common stomach. We combine this with a trade-off between acceptance and resistance to water transfer. We ultimately derive a mathematical function that relates the number of interactions that foragers complete with common stomach wasps during a foraging cycle. We use field data and additional model assumptions to calculate values of our model parameters, and we use these to explain why the fullness of the common stomach stabilizes just below 50 percent, why the average number of successful interactions between foragers and the wasps forming the common stomach is between 5 and 7, and why there is a variation in this number of interactions over time. Our explanation is that our proposed water exchange mechanism places natural bounds on the number of successful interactions possible, water exchange is set to optimize mediation of water through the common stomach, and the chance that foragers abort their task prematurely is very low.

  18. Phosphorylation regulates myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase: a novel regulatory mechanism of inositol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deranieh, Rania M; He, Quan; Caruso, Joseph A; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2013-09-13

    myo-Inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS) plays a crucial role in inositol homeostasis. Transcription of the coding gene INO1 is highly regulated. However, regulation of the enzyme is not well defined. We previously showed that MIPS is indirectly inhibited by valproate, suggesting that the enzyme is post-translationally regulated. Using (32)Pi labeling and phosphoamino acid analysis, we show that yeast MIPS is a phosphoprotein. Mass spectrometry analysis identified five phosphosites, three of which are conserved in the human MIPS. Analysis of phosphorylation-deficient and phosphomimetic site mutants indicated that the three conserved sites in yeast (Ser-184, Ser-296, and Ser-374) and humans (Ser-177, Ser-279, and Ser-357) affect MIPS activity. Both S296A and S296D yeast mutants and S177A and S177D human mutants exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, suggesting that a serine residue is critical at that location. The phosphomimetic mutations S184D (human S279D) and S374D (human S357D) but not the phosphodeficient mutations decreased activity, suggesting that phosphorylation of these two sites is inhibitory. The double mutation S184A/S374A caused an increase in MIPS activity, conferred a growth advantage, and partially rescued sensitivity to valproate. Our findings identify a novel mechanism of regulation of inositol synthesis by phosphorylation of MIPS.

  19. The regulatory mechanism of fungal elicitor-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis in medical plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xin; Jia, Min; Chen, Ling; Zheng, Cheng-Jian; Rahman, Khalid; Han, Ting; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2017-03-01

    A wide range of external stress stimuli trigger plant cells to undergo complex network of reactions that ultimately lead to the synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Throughout evolution, endophytic fungi, an important constituent in the environment of medicinal plants, have known to form long-term stable and mutually beneficial symbiosis with medicinal plants. The endophytic fungal elicitor can rapidly and specifically induce the expression of specific genes in medicinal plants which can result in the activation of a series of specific secondary metabolic pathways resulting in the significant accumulation of active ingredients. Here we summarize the progress made on the mechanisms of fungal elicitor including elicitor signal recognition, signal transduction, gene expression and activation of the key enzymes and its application. This review provides guidance on studies which may be conducted to promote the efficient synthesis and accumulation of active ingredients by the endogenous fungal elicitor in medicinal plant cells, and provides new ideas and methods of studying the regulation of secondary metabolism in medicinal plants.

  20. Endocannabinoids are involved in male vertebrate reproduction: regulatory mechanisms at central and gonadal level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia eBovolin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids are natural lipids regulating a large array of physiological functions and behaviors in vertebrates. The endocannabinoid system is highly conserved in evolution and comprises several specific receptors (type-1 and type-2 cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (e.g. anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and a number of biosynthetic and degradative enzymes. In the last few years, endocannabinoids have been described as critical signals in the control of male and female reproduction at multiple levels: centrally, by targeting hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing-Hormone secreting neurons and pituitary, and locally, with direct effects on the gonads. These functions are supported by the extensive localization of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in mammals, as well as bonyfish and amphibians. In vivo and in vitro studies indicate that endocannabinoids centrally regulate gonadal functions by modulating the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone-gonadotropin-steroid network through direct and indirect mechanisms. Several proofs of local endocannabinoid regulation have been found in the testis and male genital tracts, since endocannabinoids control Sertoli and Leydig cells activity, germ cell progression, as well as the acquisition of sperm functions. A comparative approach usually is a key step in the study of physiological events leading to the building of a general model. Thus, in this review we summarize the action of endocannabinoids at different levels of the male reproductive axis, with special emphasis, where appropriate, on data from non-mammalian vertebrates.

  1. A competitive regulatory mechanism discriminates between juxtaposed splice sites and pri-miRNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Chiara; Pianigiani, Giulia; Pagani, Franco

    2013-10-01

    We have explored the functional relationships between spliceosome and Microprocessor complex activities in a novel class of microRNAs (miRNAs), named Splice site Overlapping (SO) miRNAs, whose pri-miRNA hairpins overlap splice sites. We focused on the evolutionarily conserved SO miR-34b, and we identified two indispensable elements for recognition of its 3' splice site: a branch point located in the hairpin and a downstream purine-rich exonic splicing enhancer. In minigene systems, splicing inhibition owing to exonic splicing enhancer deletion or AG 3'ss mutation increases miR-34b levels. Moreover, small interfering-mediated silencing of Drosha and/or DGCR8 improves splicing efficiency and abolishes miR-34b production. Thus, the processing of this 3' SO miRNA is regulated in an antagonistic manner by the Microprocessor and the spliceosome owing to competition between these two machineries for the nascent transcript. We propose that this novel mechanism is commonly used to regulate the relative amount of SO miRNA and messenger RNA produced from primary transcripts.

  2. Social dominance-related major urinary proteins and the regulatory mechanism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huifen; Fang, Qi; Huo, Ying; Zhang, Yaohua; Zhang, Jianxu

    2015-11-01

    Major urinary proteins (MUPs) have been proven to be non-volatile male pheromones in mice. Here, we aimed to elucidate the relationship between MUPs and dominance hierarchy, and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Dominance-submission relationship was established by chronic dyadic encountering. We found that at the urinary protein level and hepatic mRNA level, the expression of major MUPs, including Mup20, was enhanced in dominant males compared with subordinate males, indicating that MUPs might signal the social status of male mice. Meanwhile, the mRNA level of hepatic corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) was higher in subordinate male mice than in dominant male mice. Castration also enhanced the expression of CRHR2, but suppressed that of MUPs. CRHR2 agonist treatment reduced the expression of MUPs in liver. However, male social status failed to exert significant influence on serum testosterone and corticosterone as well as the mRNA expression of their receptors. These findings reveal that some MUPs, especially Mup20, might constitute potential dominance pheromones and could be downregulated by hepatic CRHR2, which is possibly independent of androgen or corticosterone systems.

  3. Seasonality of reproduction in mammals: intimate regulatory mechanisms and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemineau, P; Guillaume, D; Migaud, M; Thiéry, J C; Pellicer-Rubio, M T; Malpaux, B

    2008-07-01

    Farm mammals generally express seasonal variations in their production traits, thus inducing changing availability of fresh derived animal products (meat, milk and cheese) or performances (horses). This is due to a more or less marked seasonal birth distribution in sheep and goats, in horses but not cattle. Birth peak occurs at the end of winter-early spring, the most favourable period for the progeny to survive. Most species show seasonal variations in their ovulation frequency (presence or absence of ovulation), spermatogenic activity (from moderate decrease to complete absence of sperm production), gamete quality (variations in fertilization rates and embryo survival), and also sexual behaviour. The intimate mechanism involved is a complex combination of endogenous circannual rhythm driven and synchronized by light and melatonin. Profound and long-term neuroendocrine changes involving different neuromediator systems were described to play a role in these processes. In most species artificial photoperiodic treatments consisting of extra-light during natural short days (in sheep and goats and mares) or melatonin during long days (in sheep and goats) are extensively used to either adjust the breeding season to animal producer needs and/or to completely overcome seasonal variations of sperm production in artificial insemination centres. Pure light treatments (without melatonin), especially when applied in open barns, could be considered as non-invasive ones which fully respect animal welfare. Genetic selection could be one of the future ways to decrease seasonality in sheep and goats.

  4. Vpu Mediates Depletion of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 during HIV Infection by a Lysosome-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehle, Brian P.; Chang, Kristina; Rustagi, Arjun; McNevin, John; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2012-01-01

    HIV has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid restriction by intracellular innate immune defenses that otherwise serve to control acute viral infection and virus dissemination. Innate defenses are triggered when pattern recognition receptor (PRR) proteins of the host cell engage pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) present in viral products. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) plays a central role in PRR signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon (IFN) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including a variety of HIV restriction factors, that serve to limit viral replication directly and/or program adaptive immunity. Productive infection of T cells by HIV is dependent upon the targeted proteolysis of IRF3 that occurs through a virus-directed mechanism that results in suppression of innate immune defenses. However, the mechanisms by which HIV controls innate immune signaling and IRF3 function are not defined. Here, we examined the innate immune response induced by HIV strains identified through their differential control of PRR signaling. We identified viruses that, unlike typical circulating HIV strains, lack the ability to degrade IRF3. Our studies show that IRF3 regulation maps specifically to the HIV accessory protein Vpu. We define a molecular interaction between Vpu and IRF3 that redirects IRF3 to the endolysosome for proteolytic degradation, thus allowing HIV to avoid the innate antiviral immune response. Our studies reveal that Vpu is an important IRF3 regulator that supports acute HIV infection through innate immune suppression. These observations define the Vpu-IRF3 interface as a novel target for therapeutic strategies aimed at enhancing the immune response to HIV. PMID:22593165

  5. Vpu mediates depletion of interferon regulatory factor 3 during HIV infection by a lysosome-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehle, Brian P; Chang, Kristina; Rustagi, Arjun; McNevin, John; McElrath, M Juliana; Gale, Michael

    2012-08-01

    HIV has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid restriction by intracellular innate immune defenses that otherwise serve to control acute viral infection and virus dissemination. Innate defenses are triggered when pattern recognition receptor (PRR) proteins of the host cell engage pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) present in viral products. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) plays a central role in PRR signaling of innate immunity to drive the expression of type I interferon (IFN) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including a variety of HIV restriction factors, that serve to limit viral replication directly and/or program adaptive immunity. Productive infection of T cells by HIV is dependent upon the targeted proteolysis of IRF3 that occurs through a virus-directed mechanism that results in suppression of innate immune defenses. However, the mechanisms by which HIV controls innate immune signaling and IRF3 function are not defined. Here, we examined the innate immune response induced by HIV strains identified through their differential control of PRR signaling. We identified viruses that, unlike typical circulating HIV strains, lack the ability to degrade IRF3. Our studies show that IRF3 regulation maps specifically to the HIV accessory protein Vpu. We define a molecular interaction between Vpu and IRF3 that redirects IRF3 to the endolysosome for proteolytic degradation, thus allowing HIV to avoid the innate antiviral immune response. Our studies reveal that Vpu is an important IRF3 regulator that supports acute HIV infection through innate immune suppression. These observations define the Vpu-IRF3 interface as a novel target for therapeutic strategies aimed at enhancing the immune response to HIV.

  6. Electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra reticulata : Detection of neuronal extracellular GABA in the ventromedial thalamus and its regulatory mechanism using microdialysis in awake rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    A combination of electrical stimulation and microdialysis was used to study the nigrothalamic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system and its regulatory mechanisms in awake rats. Extracellular GABA levels in the ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus were detected in S-min fractions collected befor

  7. A knock-in model of human epilepsy in Drosophila reveals a novel cellular mechanism associated with heat-induced seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Gilligan, Jeff; Staber, Cynthia; Schutte, Ryan J; Nguyen, Vivian; O'Dowd, Diane K; Reenan, Robert

    2012-10-10

    Over 40 missense mutations in the human SCN1A sodium channel gene are linked to an epilepsy syndrome termed genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Inheritance of GEFS+ is dominant, but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report that knock-in of a GEFS+ SCN1A mutation (K1270T) into the Drosophila sodium channel gene, para, causes a semidominant temperature-induced seizure phenotype. Electrophysiological studies of GABAergic interneurons in the brains of adult GEFS+ flies reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying heat-induced seizures: the deactivation threshold for persistent sodium currents reversibly shifts to a more negative voltage when the temperature is elevated. This leads to sustained depolarizations in GABAergic neurons and reduced inhibitory activity in the central nervous system. Furthermore, our data indicate a natural temperature-dependent shift in sodium current deactivation (exacerbated by mutation) may contribute to febrile seizures in GEFS+ and perhaps normal individuals.

  8. Mechanisms of Nrf2/Keap1-Dependent Phase II Cytoprotective and Detoxifying Gene Expression and Potential Cellular Targets of Chemopreventive Isothiocyanates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Nath Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isothiocyanates (ITCs are abundantly found in cruciferous vegetables. Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic consumption of cruciferous vegetables can lower the overall risk of cancer. Natural ITCs are key chemopreventive ingredients of cruciferous vegetables, and one of the prime chemopreventive mechanisms of natural isothiocyanates is the induction of Nrf2/ARE-dependent gene expression that plays a critical role in cellular defense against electrophiles and reactive oxygen species. In the present review, we first discuss the underlying mechanisms how natural ITCs affect the intracellular signaling kinase cascades to regulate the Keap1/Nrf2 activities, thereby inducing phase II cytoprotective and detoxifying enzymes. We also discuss the potential cellular protein targets to which natural ITCs are directly conjugated and how these events aid in the chemopreventive effects of natural ITCs. Finally, we discuss the posttranslational modifications of Keap1 and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of Nrf2 in response to electrophiles and oxidants.

  9. Cis- and trans-regulatory mechanisms of gene expression in the ASJ sensory neuron of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. González-Barrios (María); J.C. Fierro-González (Juan Carlos); E. Krpelanova (Eva); J.A. Mora-Lorca (José Antonio); J. Rafael Pedrajas (José); X. Peñate (Xenia); S. Chavez (Sebastián); P. Swoboda (Peter); G. Jansen (Gert); A. Miranda-Vizuet (Antonio)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe identity of a given cell type is determined by the expression of a set of genes sharing common cis-regulatory motifs and being regulated by shared transcription factors. Here, we identify cis and trans regulatory elements that drive gene expression in the bilateral sensory neuron ASJ

  10. Comparative study between transcriptionally- and translationally-acting adenine riboswitches reveals key differences in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Lemay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial mRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional or translational level by ligand-binding elements called riboswitches. Although they both bind adenine, the adenine riboswitches of Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio vulnificus differ by controlling transcription and translation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that, beyond the obvious difference in transcriptional and translational modulation, both adenine riboswitches exhibit different ligand binding properties and appear to operate under different regulation regimes (kinetic versus thermodynamic. While the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch fully depends on co-transcriptional binding of adenine to function, the V. vulnificus add riboswitch can bind to adenine after transcription is completed and still perform translation regulation. Further investigation demonstrates that the rate of transcription is critical for the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch to perform efficiently, which is in agreement with a co-transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the nature of gene regulation control, that is transcription or translation, may have a high importance in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

  11. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato.

  12. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Hao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2 which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato.

  13. A knock-in model of human epilepsy in Drosophila reveals a novel cellular mechanism associated with heat-induced seizure

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Lei; Gilligan, Jeff; Staber, Cynthia; Schutte, Ryan J.; Nguyen, Vivian; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Reenan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Over 40 missense mutations in the human SCN1A sodium channel gene are linked to an epilepsy syndrome termed genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Inheritance of GEFS+ is dominant but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report knock-in of a GEFS+ SCN1A mutation (K1270T) into the Drosophila sodium channel gene, para, causes a semi-dominant temperature-induced seizure phenotype. Electrophysiological studies of GABAergic interneurons in the brains o...

  14. Cellular mechanisms regulating neuronal excitability: Functional implications and in epilepsy | Mecanismos celulares reguladores de la excitabilidad celular: Implicaciones funcionales y en epilepsia

    OpenAIRE

    Cabezas-Fernández, C.; Martín-Montiel, E. D.; Buño, W

    2003-01-01

    Introduction and method. The cellular mechanisms that regulate neuronal excitability and the propagation of electrical signals in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are incompletely understood and of key functional and pathological importance. The capacity of dendrites to actively propagate action potentials is vital in processes related to memory and learning. The deregulation of dendritic excitability may also contribute to epilepsy. The contributions of ionic conductances that regulate neu...

  15. A novel antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mechanism involved in defense against malaria requires costimulation of monocytes FcgammaRII and FcgammaRIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafarshad, Ali; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Lundquist, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    Clinical experiments have shown that the Ab-dependent cell-mediated inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum is a major mechanism controlling malaria parasitemia and thereby symptoms. In this study, we demonstrate that a single merozoite per monocyte (MN) is sufficient to trigger optimal antiparasitic......-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and implies that all MN are not equally effective. These findings have both fundamental and practical implications, particularly for vaccine discovery....

  16. Cis and trans regulatory mechanisms control AP2-mediated B cell receptor endocytosis via select tyrosine-based motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Busman-Sahay

    Full Text Available Following antigen recognition, B cell receptor (BCR-mediated endocytosis is the first step of antigen processing and presentation to CD4+ T cells, a crucial component of the initiation and control of the humoral immune response. Despite this, the molecular mechanism of BCR internalization is poorly understood. Recently, studies of activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL have shown that mutations within the BCR subunit CD79b leads to increased BCR surface expression, suggesting that CD79b may control BCR internalization. Adaptor protein 2 (AP2 is the major mediator of receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. The BCR contains five putative AP2-binding YxxØ motifs, including four that are present within two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs. Using a combination of in vitro and in situ approaches, we establish that the sole mediator of AP2-dependent BCR internalization is the membrane proximal ITAM YxxØ motif in CD79b, which is a major target of mutation in ABC DLBCL. In addition, we establish that BCR internalization can be regulated at a minimum of two different levels: regulation of YxxØ AP2 binding in cis by downstream ITAM-embedded DCSM and QTAT regulatory elements and regulation in trans by the partner cytoplasmic domain of the CD79 heterodimer. Beyond establishing the basic rules governing BCR internalization, these results illustrate an underappreciated role for ITAM residues in controlling clathrin-dependent endocytosis and highlight the complex mechanisms that control the activity of AP2 binding motifs in this receptor system.

  17. Multistructure index in revealing complexity of regulatory mechanisms of human cardiovascular system at rest and orthostatic stress in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2017-02-01

    Biological regulation is sufficiently complex to pose an enduring challenge for characterization of both its equilibrium and transient non-equilibrium dynamics. Two univariate but coupled observables, heart rate and systolic blood pressure, are commonly characterized in the benchmark example of the human cardiovascular regulatory system. Asymmetric distributions of accelerations and decelerations of heart rate, as well as rises and falls in systolic blood pressure, recorded in humans during a head-up tilt test provide insights into the dynamics of cardiovascular response to a rapid, controlled deregulation of the system's homeostasis. The baroreflex feedback loop is assumed to be the fundamental physiological mechanism for ensuring homeostatic blood supply to distant organs at rest and during orthostatic stress, captured in a classical beat-to-beat autoregressive model of baroreflex by de Boer et al. (1987). For model corroboration, a multistructure index statistic is proposed, seamlessly evaluating the size spectrum of magnitudes of neural reflexes such as baroreflex, responsible for maintaining the homeostatic dynamics. The multistructure index exposes a distinctly different dynamics of multiscale asymmetry between results obtained from real-life signals recorded from healthy subjects and those simulated using both the classical and perturbed versions of the model. Nonlinear effects observed suggest the pronounced presence of complex mechanisms resulting from baroreflex regulation when a human is at rest, which is aggravated in the system's response to orthostatic stress. Using our methodology of multistructure index, we therefore show a marked difference between model and real-life scenarios, which we attribute to multiscale asymmetry of non-linear origin in real-life signals, which we are not reproducible by the classical model.

  18. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  19. p16(INK4a suppression by glucose restriction contributes to human cellular lifespan extension through SIRT1-mediated epigenetic and genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    Full Text Available Although caloric restriction (CR has been shown to increase lifespan in various animal models, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been revealed. We developed an in vitro system to mimic CR by reducing glucose concentration in cell growth medium which excludes metabolic factors and allows assessment of the effects of CR at the cellular and molecular level. We monitored cellular proliferation of normal WI-38, IMR-90 and MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction (GR can inhibit cellular senescence and significantly extend cellular lifespan compared with cells receiving normal glucose (NG in the culture medium. Moreover, GR decreased expression of p16(INK4a (p16, a well-known senescence-related gene, in all of the tested cell lines. Over-expressed p16 resulted in early replicative senescence in glucose-restricted cells suggesting a crucial role of p16 regulation in GR-induced cellular lifespan extension. The decreased expression of p16 was partly due to GR-induced chromatin remodeling through effects on histone acetylation and methylation of the p16 promoter. GR resulted in an increased expression of SIRT1, a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, which has positive correlation with CR-induced longevity. The elevated SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of the Akt/p70S6K1 signaling pathway in response to GR. Furthermore, knockdown of SIRT1 abolished GR-induced p16 repression as well as Akt/p70S6K1 activation implying that SIRT1 may affect p16 repression through direct deacetylation effects and indirect regulation of Akt/p70S6K1 signaling. Collectively, these results provide new insights into interactions between epigenetic and genetic mechanisms on CR-induced longevity that may contribute to anti-aging approaches and also provide a general molecular model for studying CR in vitro in mammalian systems.

  20. Deep sequencing reveals direct targets of gammaherpesvirus-induced mRNA decay and suggests that multiple mechanisms govern cellular transcript escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Clyde

    Full Text Available One characteristic of lytic infection with gammaherpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV68, is the dramatic suppression of cellular gene expression in a process known as host shutoff. The alkaline exonuclease proteins (KSHV SOX, MHV-68 muSOX and EBV BGLF5 have been shown to induce shutoff by destabilizing cellular mRNAs. Here we extend previous analyses of cellular mRNA abundance during lytic infection to characterize the effects of SOX and muSOX, in the absence of other viral genes, utilizing deep sequencing technology (RNA-seq. Consistent with previous observations during lytic infection, the majority of transcripts are downregulated in cells expressing either SOX or muSOX, with muSOX acting as a more potent shutoff factor than SOX. Moreover, most cellular messages fall into the same expression class in both SOX- and muSOX-expressing cells, indicating that both factors target similar pools of mRNAs. More abundant mRNAs are more efficiently downregulated, suggesting a concentration effect in transcript targeting. However, even among highly expressed genes there are mRNAs that escape host shutoff. Further characterization of select escapees reveals multiple mechanisms by which cellular genes can evade downregulation. While some mRNAs are directly refractory to SOX, the steady state levels of others remain unchanged, presumably as a consequence of downstream effects on mRNA biogenesis. Collectively, these studies lay the framework for dissecting the mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of mRNA to destruction during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection.

  1. The Role of Twist1 in Cellular Mechanosensing /

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Spencer C

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces are recently recognized as potent regulatory signals of cellular behavior in a wide range of biological contexts, including tumor progression and stem cell differentiation (Calvo et al., 2013; Dupont et al., 2011; Engler et al., 2006; Jaalouk and Lammerding, 2009; Leight et al., 2012; Levental et al., 2009; Paszek et al., 2005). Matrix stiffness is controlled by deposition and modification of extracellular matrix, especially collagen (Provenzano et al., 2006; Provenzano et a...

  2. A mathematical model of cancer stem cell driven tumor initiation: implications of niche size and loss of homeostatic regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara N Gentry

    Full Text Available Hierarchical organized tissue structures, with stem cell driven cell differentiation, are critical to the homeostatic maintenance of most tissues, and this underlying cellular architecture is potentially a critical player in the development of a many cancers. Here, we develop a mathematical model of mutation acquisition to investigate how deregulation of the mechanisms preserving stem cell homeostasis contributes to tumor initiation. A novel feature of the model is the inclusion of both extrinsic and intrinsic chemical signaling and interaction with the niche to control stem cell self-renewal. We use the model to simulate the effects of a variety of types and sequences of mutations and then compare and contrast all mutation pathways in order to determine which ones generate cancer cells fastest. The model predicts that the sequence in which mutations occur significantly affects the pace of tumorigenesis. In addition, tumor composition varies for different mutation pathways, so that some sequences generate tumors that are dominated by cancerous cells with all possible mutations, while others are primarily comprised of cells that more closely resemble normal cells with only one or two mutations. We are also able to show that, under certain circumstances, healthy stem cells diminish due to the displacement by mutated cells that have a competitive advantage in the niche. Finally, in the event that all homeostatic regulation is lost, exponential growth of the cancer population occurs in addition to the depletion of normal cells. This model helps to advance our understanding of how mutation acquisition affects mechanisms that influence cell-fate decisions and leads to the initiation of cancers.

  3. Submandibular salivary glands and saliva : an experimental study in male mice on cellular growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eeftinck Schattenkerk

    1981-01-01

    textabstractCells turn over at an enormous rate in man and animals. Man loses 250 g of cells into the intestinal lumen every 24 hours (Leblond and Walker, 1956). The regulatory mechanisms of cellular proliferation have been extensively studied (for reviews see: D011ling and Riecken, 1974; Williamson

  4. Comparison on cellular mechanisms of iron and cadmium accumulation in rice: prospects for cultivating Fe-rich but Cd-free rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Chang, Jiadong; Chen, Ruijie; Li, Hubo; Lu, Hongfei; Tao, Longxing; Xiong, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for rice growth and humans consuming as their staple food but is often deficient because of insoluble Fe(III) in soil for rice growth and limited assimilation for human bodies, while cadmium (Cd) is non-essential and toxic for rice growth and humans if accumulating at high levels. Over-accumulated Cd can cause damage to human bodies. Selecting and breeding Fe-rich but Cd-free rice cultivars are ambitious, challenging and meaningful tasks for researchers. Although evidences show that the mechanisms of Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice are common to some extent as a result of similar entry routes within rice, an increasing number of researchers have discovered distinct mechanisms between Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice. This comprehensive review systematically elaborates and compares cellular mechanisms of Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice, respectively. Mechanisms for maintaining Fe homeostasis and Cd detoxicification are also elucidated. Then, effects of different fertilizer management on Fe/Cd accumulation in rice are discussed. Finally, this review enumerates various approaches for reducing grain Cd accumulation and enhancing Fe content in rice. In summary, understanding of discrepant cellular mechanisms of Fe/Cd accumulation in rice provides guidance for cultivating Fe-fortified rice and has paved the way to develop rice that are tolerant to Cd stress, aiming at breeding Fe-rich but Cd-free rice.

  5. Early-life Stress Impacts the Developing Hippocampus and Primes Seizure Occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tung eHuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures and an increase in epileptogenesis. This article reviews the cellular and molecular changes encountered during prenatal and postnatal stress, and assesses the possible link between these changes and increases in seizure occurrence and epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus. In addititon, the priming effect of prenatal and postnatal stress for seizures and epileptogenesis is discussed. Finally, the roles of epigenetic modifications in hippocampus and HPA axis programming, early-life stress, and epilepsy are discussed.

  6. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  7. Glycosylation regulates prestin cellular activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Lavanya; Organ-Darling, Louise E; Liu, Haiying; Davidson, Amy L; Raphael, Robert M; Brownell, William E; Pereira, Fred A

    2010-03-01

    Glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of proteins and is implicated in a variety of cellular functions including protein folding, degradation, sorting and trafficking, and membrane protein recycling. The membrane protein prestin is an essential component of the membrane-based motor driving electromotility changes (electromotility) in the outer hair cell (OHC), a central process in auditory transduction. Prestin was earlier identified to possess two N-glycosylation sites (N163, N166) that, when mutated, marginally affect prestin nonlinear capacitance (NLC) function in cultured cells. Here, we show that the double mutant prestin(NN163/166AA) is not glycosylated and shows the expected NLC properties in the untreated and cholesterol-depleted HEK 293 cell model. In addition, unlike WT prestin that readily forms oligomers, prestin(NN163/166AA) is enriched as monomers and more mobile in the plasma membrane, suggesting that oligomerization of prestin is dependent on glycosylation but is not essential for the generation of NLC in HEK 293 cells. However, in the presence of increased membrane cholesterol, unlike the hyperpolarizing shift in NLC seen with WT prestin, cells expressing prestin(NN163/166AA) exhibit a linear capacitance function. In an attempt to explain this finding, we discovered that both WT prestin and prestin(NN163/166AA) participate in cholesterol-dependent cellular trafficking. In contrast to WT prestin, prestin(NN163/166AA) shows a significant cholesterol-dependent decrease in cell-surface expression, which may explain the loss of NLC function. Based on our observations, we conclude that glycosylation regulates self-association and cellular trafficking of prestin(NN163/166AA). These observations are the first to implicate a regulatory role for cellular trafficking and sorting in prestin function. We speculate that the cholesterol regulation of prestin occurs through localization to and internalization from membrane microdomains by

  8. Confocal imaging of whole vertebrate embryos reveals novel insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadel, Diana M.; Keller, Bradley B.; Sandell, Lisa L.

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has been an invaluable tool for studying cellular or sub-cellular biological processes. The study of vertebrate embryology is based largely on examination of whole embryos and organs. The application of confocal microscopy to immunostained whole mount embryos, combined with three dimensional (3D) image reconstruction technologies, opens new avenues for synthesizing molecular, cellular and anatomical analysis of vertebrate development. Optical cropping of the region of interest enables visualization of structures that are morphologically complex or obscured, and solid surface rendering of fluorescent signal facilitates understanding of 3D structures. We have applied these technologies to whole mount immunostained mouse embryos to visualize developmental morphogenesis of the mammalian inner ear and heart. Using molecular markers of neuron development and transgenic reporters of neural crest cell lineage we have examined development of inner ear neurons that originate from the otic vesicle, along with the supporting glial cells that derive from the neural crest. The image analysis reveals a previously unrecognized coordinated spatial organization between migratory neural crest cells and neurons of the cochleovestibular nerve. The images also enable visualization of early cochlear spiral nerve morphogenesis relative to the developing cochlea, demonstrating a heretofore unknown association of neural crest cells with extending peripheral neurite projections. We performed similar analysis of embryonic hearts in mouse and chick, documenting the distribution of adhesion molecules during septation of the outflow tract and remodeling of aortic arches. Surface rendering of lumen space defines the morphology in a manner similar to resin injection casting and micro-CT.

  9. Regulatory mechanism of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate is mediated by nuclear factor-κB and inhibits neutrophil accumulation in ARDS mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongman; Xu, Lisheng; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Donghui; Guo, Ranran; Wang, Junfei; Gong, Wenbin; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Liang

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulatory mechanism of nuclear factor (NF)-κB on polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) accumulation and the inflammatory response in lung tissues with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), as well as the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). Mouse models of ARDS were established by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups. The expression of PMN adhesion molecules, CD11b/CD18 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), were detected by immunohistochemistry, while the protein expression levels of NF-κB p65 in the lung tissue were analyzed by western blot analysis. In addition, flow cytometry was used to investigate the apoptosis rate of PMNs in the bronchoalveolar fluid, and the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were also determined. Following an intraperitoneal injection of LPS, alveolar septum rupture, pulmonary interstitial hyperemia and PMN infiltration in the alveolar was observed. The protein expression of p65 in the pulmonary cytoplasm decreased, while the expression of p65 in the nucleus increased. The levels of IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α increased and the high expression status was maintained for 24 h. As the time increased, CD11b/CD18 and ICAM-1 expression increased, as well as MPO activity, while the apoptosis of PMNs was delayed. Compared with the LPS group, the expression of p65 in the pulmonary cytoplasm and the PMN apoptosis rate increased following PDTC intervention, while the expression of p65 in the nucleus decreased, as well as the expression levels of the cytokines and MPO activity. Therefore, PDTC reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines via the NF-κB pathway, which reduced the activation of PMNs in the lung tissue and promoted PMN apoptosis.

  10. Regulation of the CDP-choline pathway by sterol regulatory element binding proteins involves transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Neale D; Lagace, Thomas A

    2003-06-15

    The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) by the CDP-choline pathway is under the control of the rate-limiting enzyme CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) have been proposed to regulate CCT at the transcriptional level, or via the synthesis of lipid activators or substrates of the CDP-choline pathway. To assess the contributions of these two mechanisms, we examined CCTalpha expression and PtdCho synthesis by the CDP-choline pathway in cholesterol and fatty acid auxotrophic CHO M19 cells inducibly expressing constitutively active nuclear forms of SREBP1a or SREBP2. Induction of either SREBP resulted in increased expression of mRNAs for sterol-regulated genes, elevated fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis (>10-50-fold) and increased PtdCho synthesis (2-fold). CCTalpha mRNA was increased 2-fold by enforced expression of SREBP1a or SREBP2. The resultant increase in CCTalpha protein and activity (2-fold) was restricted primarily to the soluble fraction of cells, and increased CCTalpha activity in vivo was not detected. Inhibition of the synthesis of fatty acids or their CoA esters by cerulenin or triacsin C respectively following SREBP induction effectively blocked the accompanying elevation in PtdCho synthesis. Thus PtdCho synthesis was driven by increased synthesis of fatty acids or a product thereof. These data show that transcriptional activation of CCTalpha is modest relative to that of other SREBP-regulated genes, and that stimulation of PtdCho synthesis by SREBPs in CHO cells is due primarily to increased fatty acid synthesis.

  11. Bacillus subtilis as a platform for molecular characterisation of regulatory mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chong; Stiegeler, Emanuel; Cook, Gregory M; Mascher, Thorsten; Gebhard, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    To combat antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms, particularly of antibiotic detection, signal transduction and gene regulation is needed. Because molecular studies in this bacterium can be challenging, we aimed at exploiting the genetically highly tractable Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis as a heterologous host. Two fundamentally different regulators of E. faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics, the bacitracin sensor BcrR and the vancomycin-sensing two-component system VanSB-VanRB, were produced in B. subtilis and their functions were monitored using target promoters fused to reporter genes (lacZ and luxABCDE). The bacitracin resistance system BcrR-BcrAB of E. faecalis was fully functional in B. subtilis, both regarding regulation of bcrAB expression and resistance mediated by the transporter BcrAB. Removal of intrinsic bacitracin resistance of B. subtilis increased the sensitivity of the system. The lacZ and luxABCDE reporters were found to both offer sensitive detection of promoter induction on solid media, which is useful for screening of large mutant libraries. The VanSB-VanRB system displayed a gradual dose-response behaviour to vancomycin, but only when produced at low levels in the cell. Taken together, our data show that B. subtilis is a well-suited host for the molecular characterization of regulatory systems controlling resistance against cell wall active compounds in E. faecalis. Importantly, B. subtilis facilitates the careful adjustment of expression levels and genetic background required for full functionality of the introduced regulators.

  12. Bacillus subtilis as a platform for molecular characterisation of regulatory mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Fang

    Full Text Available To combat antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms, particularly of antibiotic detection, signal transduction and gene regulation is needed. Because molecular studies in this bacterium can be challenging, we aimed at exploiting the genetically highly tractable Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis as a heterologous host. Two fundamentally different regulators of E. faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics, the bacitracin sensor BcrR and the vancomycin-sensing two-component system VanSB-VanRB, were produced in B. subtilis and their functions were monitored using target promoters fused to reporter genes (lacZ and luxABCDE. The bacitracin resistance system BcrR-BcrAB of E. faecalis was fully functional in B. subtilis, both regarding regulation of bcrAB expression and resistance mediated by the transporter BcrAB. Removal of intrinsic bacitracin resistance of B. subtilis increased the sensitivity of the system. The lacZ and luxABCDE reporters were found to both offer sensitive detection of promoter induction on solid media, which is useful for screening of large mutant libraries. The VanSB-VanRB system displayed a gradual dose-response behaviour to vancomycin, but only when produced at low levels in the cell. Taken together, our data show that B. subtilis is a well-suited host for the molecular characterization of regulatory systems controlling resistance against cell wall active compounds in E. faecalis. Importantly, B. subtilis facilitates the careful adjustment of expression levels and genetic background required for full functionality of the introduced regulators.

  13. Review: Regulatory mechanisms of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi eTsutsui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH is a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that was discovered in quail as an inhibitory factor for gonadotropin release. GnIH inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release in birds through actions on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons and gonadotropes, mediated via the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R, GPR147. Subsequently, GnIH was identified in mammals and other vertebrates. As in birds, mammalian GnIH inhibits gonadotropin secretion, indicating a conserved role for this neuropeptide in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis across species. Identification of the regulatory mechanisms governing GnIH expression and release is important in understanding the physiological role of the GnIH system. A nocturnal hormone, melatonin, appears to act directly on GnIH neurons through its receptor to induce expression and release of GnIH in quail, a photoperiodic bird. Recently, a similar, but opposite, action of melatonin on the inhibition of expression of mammalian GnIH was shown in hamsters and sheep, photoperiodic mammals. These results in photoperiodic animals demonstrate that GnIH expression is photoperiodically modulated via a melatonin-dependent process. Recent findings indicate that GnIH may be a mediator of stress-induced reproductive disruption in birds and mammals, pointing to a broad role for this neuropeptide in assessing physiological state and modifying reproductive effort accordingly. This paper summarizes the advances made in our knowledge regarding the regulation of GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic birds and mammals. This paper also discusses the neuroendocrine integration of environmental signals, such as photoperiods and stress, and internal signals, such as GnIH, melatonin and glucocorticoids, to control avian and mammalian reproduction.

  14. Regulatory mechanisms for abnormal expression of the human breast cancer specific gene 1 in breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Aiping; LI; Qing; LIU; Jingwen

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer-specific gene 1 (BCSG1), also referred as synuclein γ, was originally isolated from a human breast cancer cDNA library and the protein is mainly localized to presynaptic terminals in the nervous system. BCSG1 is not expressed in normal or benign breast lesions, but expressed at an extremely high level in the vast majority of the advanced staged breast carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas. Overexpression of BCSG1 in cancer cells led to significant increase in cell proliferation, motility and invasiveness, and metastasis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism and regulation for abnormal transcription of BCSG1, a variety of BCSG1 promoter luciferase reporters were constructed including 3' end deleted sequences, Sp1 deleted, and activator protein-1 (AP1) domains mutated. Transient transfection assay was used to detect the transcriptional activation of BCSG1 promoters. Results showed that the Sp1 sequence in 5'-flanking region was involved in the basal transcriptional activities of BCSG1 without cell-type specificity. In comparison to pGL3-1249, the reporter activities of pGL3-1553 in BCSG1-negative MCF-7 cells and pGL3-1759 in HepG2 cells were notably decreased. Mutations at AP1 sites in BCSG1 intron 1 significantly reduced the promoter activity in all cell lines. Transcription factors, c-jun, c-fos and cyclin AMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein, could markedly enhance the promoter activities. Thus, our results suggest that the abnormal expression of BCSG1 in breast cancer cells is likely regulated by multiple mechanisms. The 5' flanking region of BCSG1 provides the basal transcriptional activity without cell type specificity. A critical promoter element involved in abnormal expression of BCSG1 presents in the first exon. The cell type specificity of BCSG1 transcription is probably affected through intronic cis-regulatory sequences. AP1 domains in the first intron play an important role in control of BCSG1 transcription.

  15. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  16. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  17. Phenylpyrazole insecticides induce cytotoxicity by altering mechanisms involved in cellular energy supply in the human epithelial cell model Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidau, Cyril; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Badiou, Alexandra; Belzunces, Luc P

    2009-06-01

    Phenylpyrazoles are relatively new insecticides designed to manage problematic insect resistance and public health hazards encountered with older pesticide families. In vitro cytotoxicity induced by the phenylpyrazole insecticides, Ethiprol and Fipronil, and Fipronil metabolites, sulfone and sulfide, was studied in Caco-2 cells. This cellular model was chosen because it made possible to mimic the primary site of oral exposure to xenobiotics, the intestinal epithelium. Assessment of the barrier function of Caco-2 epithelium was assessed by TEER measurement and showed a major loss of barrier integrity after exposure to Fipronil and its metabolites, but not to Ethiprol. The disruption of the epithelial barrier was attributed to severe ATP depletion independent of cell viability, as revealed by LDH release. The origin of energetic metabolism failure was investigated and revealed a transient enhancement of tetrazolium salt reduction and an increase in lactate production by Caco-2 cells, suggesting an increase in glucose metabolism by pesticides. Cellular symptoms observed in these experiments lead us to hypothesize that phenylpyrazole insecticides interacted with mitochondria.

  18. 纳米粒摄取机制的研究进展%Research progress on the cellular uptake mechanism of nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张超; 马桂蕾

    2015-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology,nanomaterials have great application potential in drug delivery system.Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism of nanoparticles has important scientific significance and application value in understanding life processes in cellular level,mechanisms of drug action and gene therapy,which provides the basis for developing safer and more effective nanosized drug carrier.This review summarizes the latest advancement about cellular uptake mechanisms of nanopatricles.Based on a brief introduction of the endocytic pathway of nanoparticles,influencing factors of endocytosis pathway are discussed,and the common methods used to study nanoparticle endocytosis pathways are also introduced in detail.%随着纳米技术的发展,纳米材料在药物传输领域有着潜在的应用空间.研究细胞对纳米粒的细胞摄取机制,有助于从细胞层次上理解生命体的生理过程和药物的作用机制,掌握细胞治疗的机理;同时也可为构建更加安全有效的纳米药物载体提供依据.综述了纳米粒摄取机制的最新研究进展,在简要介绍纳米粒内吞途径的基础上着重讨论了影响内吞的因素,同时详细介绍了纳米粒内吞途径的常用研究方法.

  19. Cu(II)-vitamin D interaction leads to free radical-mediated cellular DNA damage: a novel putative mechanism for its selective cytotoxic action against malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Asim; Chibber, Sandesh; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin D (vit D) is a known anticancer molecule, and cancer cells are reported to have elevated levels of Cu(II) ions. In this study, we show that interaction of vit D and Cu(II) leads to the formation of hydroxyl free radicals, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, which causes severe oxidative stress, selectively in malignant cells. We show that the production of these reactive oxygen species causes cellular DNA fragmentation which may cause cell death. A novel putative chemical mechanism explaining how vit D causes cell death by DNA damage, selectively in malignant cells, is proposed.

  20. Cellular entry of ebola virus involves uptake by a macropinocytosis-like mechanism and subsequent trafficking through early and late endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F Saeed

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV, a highly pathogenic zoonotic virus, poses serious public health, ecological and potential bioterrorism threats. Currently no specific therapy or vaccine is available. Virus entry is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. However, current knowledge of the ZEBOV entry mechanism is limited. While it is known that ZEBOV enters cells through endocytosis, which of the cellular endocytic mechanisms used remains unclear. Previous studies have produced differing outcomes, indicating potential involvement of multiple routes but many of these studies were performed using noninfectious surrogate systems such as pseudotyped retroviral particles, which may not accurately recapitulate the entry characteristics of the morphologically distinct wild type virus. Here we used replication-competent infectious ZEBOV as well as morphologically similar virus-like particles in specific infection and entry assays to demonstrate that in HEK293T and Vero cells internalization of ZEBOV is independent of clathrin, caveolae, and dynamin. Instead the uptake mechanism has features of macropinocytosis. The binding of virus to cells appears to directly stimulate fluid phase uptake as well as localized actin polymerization. Inhibition of key regulators of macropinocytosis including Pak1 and CtBP/BARS as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, which affects macropinosome formation, resulted in significant reduction in ZEBOV entry and infection. It is also shown that following internalization, the virus enters the endolysosomal pathway and is trafficked through early and late endosomes, but the exact site of membrane fusion and nucleocapsid penetration in the cytoplasm remains unclear. This study identifies the route for ZEBOV entry and identifies the key cellular factors required for the uptake of this filamentous virus. The findings greatly expand our understanding of the ZEBOV entry mechanism that can be applied to development of new

  1. Numerical simulation on the adaptation of forms in trabecular bone to mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit activation threshold at menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit (BMU) activation threshold on the form of trabecular bone during menopause. A bone adaptation model with mechanical- biological factors at BMU level was integrated with finite element analysis to simulate the changes of trabecular bone structure during menopause. Mechanical disuse and changes in the BMU activation threshold were applied to the model for the period from 4 years before to 4 years after menopause. The changes in bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and fractal dimension of the trabecular structures were used to quantify the changes of trabecular bone in three different cases associated with mechanical disuse and BMU activation threshold. It was found that the changes in the simulated bone volume fraction were highly correlated and consistent with clinical data, and that the trabecular thickness reduced significantly during menopause and was highly linearly correlated with the bone volume fraction, and that the change trend of fractal dimension of the simulated trabecular structure was in correspondence with clinical observations. The numerical simulation in this paper may help to better understand the relationship between the bone morphology and the mechanical, as well as biological environment; and can provide a quantitative computational model and methodology for the numerical simulation of the bone structural morphological changes caused by the mechanical environment, and/or the biological environment.

  2. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of the human ferritin gene by hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while it upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5'UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  3. Dose response relationship in anti-stress gene regulatory networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Zhang; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2007-01-01

    To maintain a stable intracellular environment, cells utilize complex and specialized defense systems against a variety of external perturbations, such as electrophilic stress, heat shock, and hypoxia, etc. Irrespective of the type of stress, many adaptive mechanisms contributing to cellular homeostasis appear to operate through gene regulatory networks that are organized into negative feedback loops. In general, the degree of deviation of the controlled variables, such as electrophiles, misf...

  4. 5-, 12- and 15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids induce cellular hypertrophy in the human ventricular cardiomyocyte, RL-14 cell line, through MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayah, Zaid H; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have established the role of mid-chain hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) in the development of cardiovascular disease. Mid-chain HETEs have been reported to have vasoconstrictive and pro-inflammatory effects. However, whether mid-chain HETEs can induce cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. Therefore, the overall objective of the present study was to elucidate the potential hypertrophic effect of mid-chain HETEs in the human ventricular cardiomyocytes, RL-14 cells, and to explore the mechanisms involved. For this purpose, RL-14 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of mid-chain HETEs (2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µM). Thereafter, the cardiac hypertrophy markers and cell size were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and phase contrast imaging, respectively. Phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) level and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) binding activity were determined. Our results showed that mid-chain HETEs induced cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells as evidenced by the induction of cardiac hypertrophy markers, α- and β-myocin heavy chain and atrial and brain natriuretic peptide as well as the increase in cell size. Mechanistically, all mid-chain HETEs were able to induce the binding activity of NF-κB to its responsive element in a HETE-dependent manner, and they significantly induced the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The induction of cellular hypertrophy was associated with proportional increase in the formation of dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids parallel to the increase of soluble epoxide hydrolase enzyme activity. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidence that mid-chain HETEs induce cellular hypertrophy in RL-14 cells through MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanism.

  5. Oral administration of copper to rats leads to increased lymphocyte cellular DNA degradation by dietary polyphenols: implications for a cancer preventive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Ullah, Mohd F; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2011-12-01

    To account for the observed anticancer properties of plant polyphenols, we have earlier proposed a mechanism which involves the mobilization of endogenous copper ions by polyphenols leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that serve as proximal DNA cleaving agents and lead to cell death. Over the last decade we have proceeded to validate our hypothesis with considerable success. As a further confirmation of our hypothesis, in this paper we first show that oral administration of copper to rats leads to elevated copper levels in lymphocytes. When such lymphocytes with a copper overload were isolated and treated with polyphenols EGCG, genistein and resveratrol, an increased level of DNA breakage was observed. Further, preincubation of lymphocytes having elevated copper levels with the membrane permeable copper chelator neocuproine, resulted in inhibition of polyphenol induced DNA degradation. However, membrane impermeable chelator of copper bathocuproine, as well as iron and zinc chelators were ineffective in causing such inhibition in DNA breakage, confirming the involvement of endogenous copper in polyphenol induced cellular DNA degradation. It is well established that serum and tissue concentrations of copper are greatly increased in various malignancies. In view of this fact, the present results further confirm our earlier findings and strengthen our hypothesis that an important anticancer mechanism of plant polyphenols could be the mobilization of intracellular copper leading to ROS-mediated cellular DNA breakage. In this context, it may be noted that cancer cells are under considerable oxidative stress and increasing such stress to cytotoxic levels could be a successful anticancer approach.

  6. Mechanical properties and cellular response of novel electrospun nanofibers for ligament tissue engineering: Effects of orientation and geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Trujillo, Nathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Helen O; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are a promising material for ligamentous tissue engineering, however weak mechanical properties of fibers to date have limited their clinical usage. The goal of this work was to modify electrospun nanofibers to create a robust structure that mimics the complex hierarchy of native tendons and ligaments. The scaffolds that were fabricated in this study consisted of either random or aligned nanofibers in flat sheets or rolled nanofiber bundles that mimic the size scale of fascicle units in primarily tensile load bearing soft musculoskeletal tissues. Altering nanofiber orientation and geometry significantly affected mechanical properties; most notably aligned nanofiber sheets had the greatest modulus; 125% higher than that of random nanofiber sheets; and 45% higher than aligned nanofiber bundles. Modifying aligned nanofiber sheets to form aligned nanofiber bundles also resulted in approximately 107% higher yield stresses and 140% higher yield strains. The mechanical properties of aligned nanofiber bundles were in the range of the mechanical properties of the native ACL: modulus=158±32MPa, yield stress=57±23MPa and yield strain=0.38±0.08. Adipose derived stem cells cultured on all surfaces remained viable and proliferated extensively over a 7 day culture period and cells elongated on nanofiber bundles. The results of the study suggest that aligned nanofiber bundles may be useful for ligament and tendon tissue engineering based on their mechanical properties and ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and elongation.

  7. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  8. SMTCI: Secure Multi-Trial Trust Evaluation and Cost- Effective Incentive Mechanism for Multi-Hop Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Sumathi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In multi-hop cellular networks, finding an optimum and trusted route in the network through intermediate node is a major issue. At MCN, or the next-generation wireless networks, can significantly improve network performance and deployment and help implement many novel applications and services. However, when compared to wired and single-hop wireless networks, MCNs are highly vulnerable to serious security threats because packets may be relayed through integrated networks and autonomous devices. Our Proposed work has been focusing on developing secure trust based protocols for securing MCNs. Specifically, we are interested in securing route establishment and data transmission processes, establishing stable routes, and preserving users’ anonymity and location privacy. In this paperwe propose a multi-trial trust evaluation scheme, trusted node based ad hoc routing using trials to establish security accomplishes establishment of trusted networks in MANETs. We apply the same idea todevelop our proposed algorithm TBARA to rate neighbor nodes using hash values for identifying the misbehaving nodes. After the successful transmission of packets from source to destination, thedestination will send acknowledgement for the corresponding packet, upon receiving of acknowledgement incentive will be generated. It reduces the number of public-key cryptographic operations and protectagainst collusion attack.

  9. Metabolomics Reveals New Mechanisms for Pathogenesis in Barth Syndrome and Introduces Novel Roles for Cardiolipin in Cellular Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Sandlers

    Full Text Available Barth Syndrome is the only known Mendelian disorder of cardiolipin remodeling, with characteristic clinical features of cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, and neutropenia. While the primary biochemical defects of reduced mature cardiolipin and increased monolysocardiolipin are well-described, much of the downstream biochemical dysregulation has not been uncovered, and biomarkers are limited. In order to further expand upon the knowledge of the biochemical abnormalities in Barth Syndrome, we analyzed metabolite profiles in plasma from a cohort of individuals with Barth Syndrome compared to age-matched controls via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A clear distinction between metabolite profiles of individuals with Barth Syndrome and controls was observed, and was defined by an array of metabolite classes including amino acids and lipids. Pathway analysis of these discriminating metabolites revealed involvement of mitochondrial and extra-mitochondrial biochemical pathways including: insulin regulation of fatty acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, biogenic amine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, and tRNA biosynthesis. Taken together, this data indicates broad metabolic dysregulation in Barth Syndrome with wide cellular effects.

  10. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  11. Numerical simulation on the adaptation of forms in trabecular bone to mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit activation threshold at menopause

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Gong; Yubo Fan; Ming Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit (BMU) activation threshold on the form of trabecular bone during menopause. A bone adaptation model with mechanical-biological factors at BMU level was integrated with finite element analysis to simulate the changes of trabecular bone structure during menopause. Mechanical disuse and changes in the BMU activation threshold were applied to the model for the period from 4 years before to 4 years after menopause.The changes in bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and fractal dimension of the trabecular structures were used to quantify the changes of trabecular bone in three different cases associated with mechanical disuse and BMU activation threshold. It was found that the changes in the simulated bone volume fraction were highly correlated and consistent with clinical data, and that the trabecular thickness reduced signi-ficantly during menopause and was highly linearly correlated with the bone volume fraction, and that the change trend of fractal dimension of the simulated trabecular structure was in correspondence with clinical observations. The numerical simulation in this paper may help to better understand the relationship between the bone morphology and the mecha- nical, as well as biological environment; and can provide a quantitative computational model and methodology for the numerical simulation of the bone structural morphological changes caused by the mechanical environment, and/or the biological environment.

  12. [How is the sense of smell connected? Cellular and molecular mechanisms guiding the development of the synaptic connections from the nose to the cortex (I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Diego; de Castro, Fernando

    2011-04-16

    The physiological particularities that occur during the development of the olfactory system make it one of the most fascinating parts of the central nervous system and one of models that has been most widely studied in order to understand the mechanisms related with axonal growth and guidance towards the right targets. A variety of mechanisms are known, some mediated by contact (laminins, cell adhesion molecules, ephrins, etc.) and others that are secreted (semaphorins, slits, growth factors, etc.), to play diverse roles in establishing the synaptic interactions among the olfactory epithelium, the olfactory bulb and the olfactory cortex. In relation to this, other specific mechanisms for this system have also been proposed, including the incredible family of close to 1000 different olfactory receptors. In recent years, different reviews have focused on the partial elements of this system, especially on the mechanisms involved in the formation of the olfactory nerve. However, no detailed review of those related with the development of the connections between the different olfactory structures (epithelium, bulb and cortex) has been put forward to date. In this first part of the review, we address this topic from the following perspective: the different cellular and molecular mechanisms that guide the formation of the olfactory nerve and the lateral olfactory tract.

  13. α -Actinin TvACTN3 of Trichomonas vaginalis is an RNA-binding protein that could participate in its posttranscriptional iron regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla-Choque, Jaeson Santos; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Ávila-González, Leticia; Arroyo, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted flagellated protist parasite responsible for trichomoniasis. This parasite is dependent on high levels of iron, favoring its growth and multiplication. Iron also differentially regulates some trichomonad virulence properties by unknown mechanisms. However, there is evidence to support the existence of gene regulatory mechanisms at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels that are mediated by iron concentration in T. vaginalis. Thus, the goal of this study was to identify an RNA-binding protein in T. vaginalis that interacts with the tvcp4 RNA stem-loop structure, which may participate in a posttranscriptional iron regulatory mechanism mediated by RNA-protein interactions. We performed RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay (REMSA) and supershift, UV cross-linking, Northwestern blot, and western blot (WB) assays using cytoplasmic protein extracts from T. vaginalis with the tvcp4 RNA hairpin structure as a probe. We identified a 135-kDa protein isolated by the UV cross-linking assays as α-actinin 3 (TvACTN3) by MALDI-TOF-MS that was confirmed by LS-MS/MS and de novo sequencing. TvACTN3 is a cytoplasmic protein that specifically binds to hairpin RNA structures from trichomonads and humans when the parasites are grown under iron-depleted conditions. Thus, TvACTN3 could participate in the regulation of gene expression by iron in T. vaginalis through a parallel posttranscriptional mechanism similar to that of the IRE/IRP system.

  14. Mimicking Exercise in Three-Dimensional Bioengineered Skeletal Muscle to Investigate Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Physiological Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Andreas M; Turner, Daniel C; Martin, Neil R W; Sharples, Adam P

    2017-02-03

    Bioengineering of skeletal muscle in-vitro in order to produce highly aligned myofibres in relevant three dimensional (3D) matrices have allowed scientists to model the in-vivo skeletal muscle niche. This review discusses essential experimental considerations for developing bioengineered muscle in order to investigate exercise mimicking stimuli. We identify current knowledge in the use of electrical stimulation and co-culture with motor neurons to enhance skeletal muscle maturation and contractile function in bioengineered systems in-vitro. Importantly, we provide a current opinion on the use of acute and chronic exercise mimicking stimuli (electrical stimulation and mechanical overload) and the subsequent mechanisms underlying physiological adaptation in 3D bioengineered muscle. We also identify that future studies using the latest bioreactor technology, providing simultaneous electrical and mechanical loading and flow perfusion in-vitro, may provide the basis for advancing knowledge in the future. We also envisage, that more studies using genetic, pharmacological and hormonal modifications applied in human 3D bioengineered skeletal muscle may allow for an enhanced discovery of the in-depth mechanisms underlying the response to exercise in relevant human testing systems. Finally, 3D bioengineered skeletal muscle may provide an opportunity to be used as a pre-clinical in-vitro test-bed to investigate the mechanisms underlying catabolic disease, whilst modelling disease itself via the use of cells derived from human patients without exposing animals or humans (in phase I trials) to the side effects of potential therapies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. By Different Cellular Mechanisms, Lymphatic Vessels Sprout by Endothelial Cell Recruitment Whereas Blood Vessels Grow by Vascular Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; McKay, Terri L.; Leontiev, Dmitry; Condrich, Terence K.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The development of effective vascular therapies requires the understanding of all modes of vessel formation contributing to vasculogenesis, angiogenesis (here termed hemangiogenesis) and lymphangiogenesis. We show that lymphangiogenesis proceeds by blind-ended vessel sprouting via recruitment of isolated endothelial progenitor cells to the tips of growing vessels, whereas hemangiogenesis occurs by non-sprouting vessel expansion from the capillary network, during middevelopment in the quail chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Blood vessels expanded out of capillaries that displayed transient expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alphaSMA), accompanied by mural recruitment of migratory progenitor cells expressing SMA. Lymphatics and blood vessels were identified by confocal/fluorescence microscopy of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, alphaSMA (expressed on CAM blood vessels but not on lymphatics), homeobox transcription factor Prox-1 (specific to CAM lymphatic endothelium), and the quail hematopoetic/vascular marker, QH-1. Expression of VEGFR-1 was highly restricted to blood vessels (primarily capillaries). VEGFR-2 was expressed intensely in isolated hematopoietic cells, lymphatic vessels and moderately in blood vessels. Prox-1 was absent from endothelial progenitor cells prior to lymphatic recruitment. Although vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(sub 165)) is a key regulator of numerous cellular processes in hemangiogenesis and vasculogenesis, the role of VEGF(sub 165) in lymphangiogenesis is less clear. Exogenous VEGF(sub 165) increased blood vessel density without changing endogenous modes of vascular/lymphatic vessel formation or marker expression patterns. However, VEGF(sub 165) did increase the frequency of blood vascular anastomoses and strongly induced the antimaturational dissociation of lymphatics from blood vessels, with frequent formation of homogeneous lymphatic networks.

  16. Long term ex vivo culturing of Drosophila brain as a method to live image pupal brains: insights into the cellular mechanisms of neuronal remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Dana; Mayseless, Oded; Schuldiner, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Holometabolous insects, including Drosophila melanogaster, undergo complete metamorphosis that includes a pupal stage. During metamorphosis, the Drosophila nervous system undergoes massive remodeling and growth, that include cell death and large-scale axon and synapse elimination as well as neurogenesis, developmental axon regrowth, and formation of new connections. Neuronal remodeling is an essential step in the development of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Research on the stereotypic remodeling of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) γ neurons has contributed to our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of remodeling but our knowledge of the cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. A major hurdle in understanding various dynamic processes that occur during metamorphosis is the lack of time-lapse resolution. The pupal case and opaque fat bodies that enwrap the central nervous system (CNS) make live-imaging of the central brain in-vivo impossible. We have established an ex vivo long-term brain culture system that supports the development and neuronal remodeling of pupal brains. By optimizing culture conditions and dissection protocols, we have observed development in culture at kinetics similar to what occurs in vivo. Using this new method, we have obtained the first time-lapse sequence of MB γ neurons undergoing remodeling in up to a single cell resolution. We found that axon pruning is initiated by blebbing, followed by one-two nicks that seem to initiate a more widely spread axon fragmentation. As such, we have set up some of the tools and methodologies needed for further exploration of the cellular mechanisms of neuronal remodeling, not limited to the MB. The long-term ex vivo brain culture system that we report here could be used to study dynamic aspects of neurodevelopment of any Drosophila neuron.

  17. Mechanisms of shrub encroachment into Northern Chihuahuan Desert grasslands and impacts of climate change investigated using a cellular automata model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, Domenico; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Noto, Leonardo Valerio; Collins, Scott L.

    2016-05-01

    Arid and semiarid grasslands of southwestern North America have changed dramatically over the last 150 years as a result of woody plant encroachment. Overgrazing, reduced fire frequency, and climate change are known drivers of woody plant encroachment into grasslands. In this study, relatively simple algorithms for encroachment factors (i.e., grazing, grassland fires, and seed dispersal by grazers) are proposed and implemented in the ecohydrological Cellular-Automata Tree Grass Shrub Simulator (CATGraSS). CATGraSS is used in a 7.3 km2 rectangular domain located in central New Mexico along a zone of grassland to shrubland transition, where shrub encroachment is currently active. CATGraSS is calibrated and used to investigate the relative contributions of grazing, fire frequency, seed dispersal by herbivores and climate change on shrub abundance over a 150-year period of historical shrub encroachment. The impact of future climate change is examined using a model output that realistically represents current vegetation cover as initial condition, in a series of stochastic CATGraSS future climate simulations. Model simulations are found to be highly sensitive to the initial distribution of shrub cover. Encroachment factors more actively lead to shrub propagation within the domain when the model starts with randomly distributed individual shrubs. However, when shrubs are naturally evolved into clusters, the model response to encroachment factors is muted unless the effect of seed dispersal by herbivores is amplified. The relative contribution of different drivers on modeled shrub encroachment varied based on the initial shrub cover condition used in the model. When historical weather data is used, CATGraSS predicted loss of shrub and grass cover during the 1950 s drought. While future climate change is found to amplify shrub encroachment (∼13% more shrub cover by 2100), grazing remains the dominant factor promoting shrub encroachment. When we modeled future climate

  18. Mechanical dissociation of human embryonic stem cell colonies by manual scraping after collagenase treatment is much more detrimental to cellular viability than is trypsinization with gentle pipetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua; Ge, Zigang; Cao, Tong

    2007-05-01

    Because hESC (human embryonic stem cells) are 'social cells' that require co-operative interactions and intimate physical contact with each other, it is absolutely essential to dissociate hESC colonies into cellular clumps rather than into a single-cell suspension during serial passage. The present study compared two commonly used protocols for dissociating hESC colonies. The first protocol involved mild enzymatic treatment with collagenase type IV (1 mg/ml) for approx. 5-10 min, prior to mechanical dissociation into cellular clumps through manual scraping with a plastic pipette tip. The second protocol involved a short duration of exposure (2-3 min) to low concentrations of trypsin (0.05%), followed by gentle pipetting. The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay was used to compare the recovery of viable cells after dissociating hESC colonies with these two protocols, before and after conventional freeze-thawing with 10% (v/v) DMSO. Besides undifferentiated hESC, the randomly differentiated fibroblastic progenies of hESC at various passages (P0-P4), together with an immortalized cell line (CRL-1486), were also utilized to compare the two protocols. The results demonstrated that the second protocol (trypsinization with gentle pipetting) is much less detrimental to cellular viability than is the first protocol (collagenase treatment with scratching). This in turn translated to higher freeze-thaw survival rates. It is hypothesized that scratching after collagenase treatment (first protocol) somehow induces physical damage to the cells, thereby leading to a lower recovery of viable cells, both before and after freeze-thawing.

  19. Neurobiological mechanisms for the regulation of mammalian sleep-wake behavior: reinterpretation of historical evidence and inclusion of contemporary cellular and molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Maclean, Robert Ross

    2007-01-01

    At its most basic level, the function of mammalian sleep can be described as a restorative process of the brain and body; recently, however, progressive research has revealed a host of vital functions to which sleep is essential. Although many excellent reviews on sleep behavior have been published, none have incorporated contemporary studies examining the molecular mechanisms that govern the various stages of sleep. Utilizing a holistic approach, this review is focused on the basic mechanisms involved in the transition from wakefulness, initiation of sleep and the subsequent generation of slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Additionally, using recent molecular studies and experimental evidence that provides a direct link to sleep as a behavior, we have developed a new model, the cellular-molecular-network model, explaining the mechanisms responsible for regulating REM sleep. By analyzing the fundamental neurobiological mechanisms responsible for the generation and maintenance of sleep-wake behavior in mammals, we intend to provide a broader understanding of our present knowledge in the field of sleep research.

  20. Cellular uptake mechanism and comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel–cholesterol lipid emulsion on triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jun Ye,1,2 Xuejun Xia,1,2 Wujun Dong,1,2 Huazhen Hao,1,2 Luhua Meng,1,2 Yanfang Yang,1,2 Renyun Wang,1,2 Yuanfeng Lyu,3 Yuling Liu1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substance and Function of Natural Medicines, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Drug Delivery Technology and Novel Formulation, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 3School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: There is no effective clinical therapy for triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs, which have high low-density lipoprotein (LDL requirements and express relatively high levels of LDL receptors (LDLRs on their membranes. In our previous study, a novel lipid emulsion based on a paclitaxel–cholesterol complex (PTX-CH Emul was developed, which exhibited improved safety and efficacy for the treatment of TNBC. To date, however, the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul have not been investigated. In order to offer powerful proof for the therapeutic effects of PTX-CH Emul, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul and made a comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects on TNBC (MDA-MB-231 and non-TNBC (MCF7 cell lines through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro antineoplastic effects and in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of PTX-CH Emul were significantly more enhanced in MDA-MB-231-based models than those in MCF7-based models, which was associated with the more abundant expression profile of LDLR in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results of the cellular uptake mechanism indicated that PTX-CH Emul was internalized into breast cancer cells through the LDLR-mediated internalization pathway via clathrin-coated pits, localized in lysosomes, and then released into the cytoplasm, which was consistent with the internalization pathway and intracellular trafficking of native

  1. Multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets based on chitosan derivative and layered double hydroxide: cellular uptake mechanism and application for topical ocular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Huibo; Gu, Yan; Xu, Tingting; Cao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    To study the cellular uptake mechanism of multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets, new chitosan–glutathione–valine–valine-layered double hydroxide (CG-VV-LDH) nanosheets with active targeting to peptide transporter-1 (PepT-1) were prepared, characterized and further compared with CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles. Both organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets showed a sustained release in vitro and prolonged precorneal retention time in vivo, but CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles showed superior permeability in the isolated cornea of rabbits than CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. Furthermore, results of cellular uptake on human corneal epithelial primary cells (HCEpiC) and retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells indicated that both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and active transport of PepT-1 are involved in the internalization of CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles and CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. In summary, the CG-VV-LDH nanoparticle may be a promising carrier as a topical ocular drug delivery system for the treatment of ocular diseases of mid-posterior segments, while the CG-VV-LDH nanosheet may be suitable for the treatment of ocular surface diseases. PMID:28280329

  2. Metabolic constraint-based refinement of transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong need for computational frameworks that integrate different biological processes and data-types to unravel cellular regulation. Current efforts to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) focus primarily on proximal data such as gene co-expression and transcription factor (TF) binding. While such approaches enable rapid reconstruction of TRNs, the overwhelming combinatorics of possible networks limits identification of mechanistic regulatory interactions. Utilizing growth phenotypes and systems-level constraints to inform regulatory network reconstruction is an unmet challenge. We present our approach Gene Expression and Metabolism Integrated for Network Inference (GEMINI) that links a compendium of candidate regulatory interactions with the metabolic network to predict their systems-level effect on growth phenotypes. We then compare predictions with experimental phenotype data to select phenotype-consistent regulatory interactions. GEMINI makes use of the observation that only a small fraction of regulatory network states are compatible with a viable metabolic network, and outputs a regulatory network that is simultaneously consistent with the input genome-scale metabolic network model, gene expression data, and TF knockout phenotypes. GEMINI preferentially recalls gold-standard interactions (p-value = 10(-172)), significantly better than using gene expression alone. We applied GEMINI to create an integrated metabolic-regulatory network model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae involving 25,000 regulatory interactions controlling 1597 metabolic reactions. The model quantitatively predicts TF knockout phenotypes in new conditions (p-value = 10(-14)) and revealed potential condition-specific regulatory mechanisms. Our results suggest that a metabolic constraint-based approach can be successfully used to help reconstruct TRNs from high-throughput data, and highlights the potential of using a biochemically-detailed mechanistic framework to

  3. Modeling mechanical restriction differences between car and heavy truck in two-lane cellular automata traffic flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Li, Xingang; Xiao, Yao; Jia, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Real traffic is heterogeneous with car and truck. Due to mechanical restrictions, the car and the truck have different limited deceleration capabilities, which are important factors in safety driving. This paper extends the single lane safety driving (SD) model with limited deceleration capability to two-lane SD model, in which car-truck heterogeneous traffic is considered. A car has a larger limited deceleration capability while a heavy truck has a smaller limited deceleration capability as a result of loaded goods. Then the safety driving conditions are different as the types of the following and the leading vehicles vary. In order to eliminate the well-known plug in heterogeneous two-lane traffic, it is assumed that heavy truck has active deceleration behavior when the heavy truck perceives the forming plug. The lane-changing decisions are also determined by the safety driving conditions. The fundamental diagram, spatiotemporal diagram, and lane-changing frequency were investigated to show the effect of mechanical restriction on heterogeneous traffic flow. It was shown that there would be still three traffic phases in heterogeneous traffic condition; the active deceleration of the heavy truck could well eliminate the plug; the lane-changing frequency was low in synchronized flow; the flow and velocity would decrease as the proportion of heavy truck grows or the limited deceleration capability of heavy truck drops; and the flow could be improved with lane control measures.

  4. Comparison of the cellular transport mechanism of cationic, star-shaped polymers and liposomes in HaCat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo H

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Heng-Cong Luo,1,2,* Na Li,1,* Li Yan,1 Kai-jin Mai,3 Kan Sun,1 Wei Wang,1 Guo-Juan Lao,1 Chuan Yang,1 Li-Ming Zhang,3 Meng Ren1 1Department of Endocrinology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation Medical Research Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Endocrinology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Several biological barriers must be overcome to achieve efficient nonviral gene delivery. These barriers include target cell uptake, lysosomal degradation, and dissociation from the carrier. In this study, we compared the differences in the uptake mechanism of cationic, star-shaped polymer/MMP-9siRNA complexes (β-CD-(D37/MMP-9siRNA complexes: polyplexes and commercial liposome/MMP-9siRNA complexes (Lipofectamine® 2000/MMP-9siRNA complexes: liposomes. The uptake pathway and transfection efficiency of the polyplexes and liposomes were determined by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The occurrence of intracellular processing was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Endosomal acidification inhibitors were used to explore the endosomal escape mechanisms of the polyplexes and lysosomes. We concluded that the polyplexes were internalized by non-caveolae- and non-clathrin-mediated pathways, with no lysosomal trafficking, thereby inducing successful transfection, while the majority of liposomes were internalized by clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE, caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and macropinocytosis, and only CDE induced successful transfection. Liposomes might escape more quickly than polyplexes, and

  5. The Nuclear Receptor LXR Limits Bacterial Infection of Host Macrophages through a Mechanism that Impacts Cellular NAD Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Matalonga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages exert potent effector functions against invading microorganisms but constitute, paradoxically, a preferential niche for many bacterial strains to replicate. Using a model of infection by Salmonella Typhimurium, we have identified a molecular mechanism regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR that limits infection of host macrophages through transcriptional activation of the multifunctional enzyme CD38. LXR agonists reduced the intracellular levels of NAD+ in a CD38-dependent manner, counteracting pathogen-induced changes in macrophage morphology and the distribution of the F-actin cytoskeleton and reducing the capability of non-opsonized Salmonella to infect macrophages. Remarkably, pharmacological treatment with an LXR agonist ameliorated clinical signs associated with Salmonella infection in vivo, and these effects were dependent on CD38 expression in bone-marrow-derived cells. Altogether, this work reveals an unappreciated role for CD38 in bacterial-host cell interaction that can be pharmacologically exploited by activation of the LXR pathway.

  6. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  7. The Chick as a Model for the Study of the Cellular Mechanisms and Potential Therapies for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Mileusnic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While animal experiments have contributed much to our understanding of the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD, their value in predicting the effectiveness of treatment strategies in clinical trials has remained controversial. The disparity between the results obtained in animal models and clinical trials may in part be explained by limitations of the models and species-specific differences. We propose that one trial passive avoidance in the day-old chick is a useful system to study AD because of the close sequence homologies of chick and human amyloid precursor protein (APP. In the chick, APP is essential for memory consolidation, and disrupting its synthesis or structure results in amnesia. RER, a tripeptide sequence corresponding to part of the growth domain of APP, can restore memory loss and act as a cognitive enhancer. We suggest that RER and its homologues may form the basis for potential pharmacological protection against memory loss in AD.

  8. Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl- current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl- channel activity (IC50 ∼ 10 µM via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na(+-K(+ ATPases and Na(+-K(+-Cl- cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K(+ channels with IC50 of ∼ 3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca(2+-activated Cl- channels, inwardly rectifying Cl- channels, and Ca(2+-activated basolateral K(+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT-induced Cl- secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼ 70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca(2+-activated Cl- secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl- channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  9. Cellular mechanisms by which oxytocin stimulates uterine PGF2 alpha synthesis in bovine endometrium: roles of phospholipases C and A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, P D; Graf, G A; Hayes, S H; Silvia, W J

    1997-05-01

    The objective of these experiments was to identify the cellular mechanisms by which oxytocin stimulates prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha synthesis in bovine endometrial tissue. Uteri were collected on the day after spontaneous luteal regression. Caruncular endometrial explants were dissected and incubated in vitro to assess PGF2 alpha release or phospholipase (PL) C activity. Oxytocin (10(-6) M) stimulated PGF2 alpha release and PLC activity within 30 min of incubation (P 0.10). By comparing the time course of stimulation and dose-response relationships between PGF2 alpha and PLC activity, it appears that oxytocin may stimulate PGF2 alpha secretion by activating PLC. The effects of melittin and aristolochic acid indicate that PLA2 may play a role in mediating the stimulatory effect of oxytocin on PGF2 alpha secretion, as well.

  10. Using Nano-mechanics and Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) for Disease Monitoring and Diagnostics at a Cellular Level in Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanantha, Ninnuja; Ma, Charles; Collins, David J.; Sesen, Muhsincan; Brenker, Jason; Coppel, Ross L.; Neild, Adrian; Alan, Tuncay

    A popular approach to monitoring diseases and their diagnosis is through biological, pathological or immunological characterization. However, at a cellular level progression of certain diseases manifests itself through mechanical effects as well. Here, we present a method which exploits localised flow; surface acoustic wave (SAW) induced acoustic streaming in a 9 μL droplet to characterize the adhesive properties of red blood cells (healthy, gluteraldehyde treated and malaria infected) in approximately 50 seconds. Our results show a 79% difference in cell mobilization between healthy malaria infected RBCs (and a 39% difference between healthy and treated ones), indicating that the method can serve as a platform for rapid clinical diagnosis; where separation of two or more different cell populations in a mixed solution is desirable. It can also act as a key biomarker for monitoring some diseases offering quantitative measures of disease progression and response to therapy.

  11. Genetic Redundancies Enhance Information Transfer in Noisy Regulatory Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Poyatos, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular decision making is based on regulatory circuits that associate signal thresholds to specific physiological actions. This transmission of information is subjected to molecular noise what can decrease its fidelity. Here, we show instead how such intrinsic noise enhances information transfer in the presence of multiple circuit copies. The result is due to the contribution of noise to the generation of autonomous responses by each copy, which are altogether associated with a common decision. Moreover, factors that correlate the responses of the redundant units (extrinsic noise or regulatory cross-talk) contribute to reduce fidelity, while those that further uncouple them (heterogeneity within the copies) can lead to stronger information gain. Overall, our study emphasizes how the interplay of signal thresholding, redundancy, and noise influences the accuracy of cellular decision making. Understanding this interplay provides a basis to explain collective cell signaling mechanisms, and to engineer robust decisions with noisy genetic circuits. PMID:27741249

  12. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha D Pauls

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunogloblulin isotype switch, germinal center responses and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  13. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  14. Reconciling the IPC and Two-Hit Models: Dissecting the Underlying Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Two Seemingly Opposing Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carlos F M; Tahir, Muhammad; Arshid, Samina; Castro, Mariana S; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cascades and mechanisms are ubiquitous during host responses to various types of insult. Biological models and interventional strategies have been devised as an effort to better understand and modulate inflammation-driven injuries. Amongst those the two-hit model stands as a plausible and intuitive framework that explains some of the most frequent clinical outcomes seen in injuries like trauma and sepsis. This model states that a first hit serves as a priming event upon which sequential insults can build on, culminating on maladaptive inflammatory responses. On a different front, ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has risen to light as a readily applicable tool for modulating the inflammatory response to ischemia and reperfusion. The idea is that mild ischemic insults, either remote or local, can cause organs and tissues to be more resilient to further ischemic insults. This seemingly contradictory role that the two models attribute to a first inflammatory hit, as priming in the former and protective in the latter, has set these two theories on opposing corners of the literature. The present review tries to reconcile both models by showing that, rather than debunking each other, each framework offers unique insights in understanding and modulating inflammation-related injuries.

  15. Metabolic fate of saturated and monounsaturated dietary fats: the Mediterranean diet revisited from epidemiological evidence to cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Momken, Iman; Schoeller, Dale A; Simon, Chantal; Blanc, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates favourable effects of the Mediterranean diet, partly associated to its monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) content on both obesity and diabetes. However, neither the underlying mechanisms by which the Mediterranean diet exerts its protective effect, nor the interplay with other environmental factors (i.e. physical activity), are fully characterised. In this review, we examined recent data on how the metabolic fate of MUFA and saturated fatty acids (SFA) differs. Because of differential packaging into lipoproteins, hydrolysis of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins by lipoprotein lipase and transport into oxidative tissues, MUFA are oxidised more than SFA. This high MUFA oxidation favour lipid oxidation and according to the oxidative balance concept reduces the risk of obesity. It also improves the intra-muscular triacylglycerol turnover, which mitigates the SFA-induced accumulation of diacylglycerol and ceramides, and thus protects the insulin sensitivity and cell viability. Finally, physical activity through its action on the energy turnover differentially regulates the metabolism of SFA and MUFA. The putative combined role of AMP-activated kinase and mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate transferase on the intra-muscular partitioning of MUFA and SFA provides new areas of research to better understand the beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet and physical activity on obesity and diabetes.

  16. Cellular mechanisms of reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in L-thyroxin-induced rat ventricular hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lai-jing SONG; Guan-lei WANG; Jie LIU; Qin-ying QIU; Jing-hua OU; Yong-yuan GUAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To examine how the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content changes and the underlying mechanism in L-thyroxin-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Methods:Echocardiography was used to confirm the establishment of the cardiac hypertro-phy model. The confocal microscopy and fluorescent indicator Fluo-3 was ap-plied to examine the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]I), the Ca2+ sparks, and the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient in freshly isolated cardiac ventricular myocytes. The activity of sarcolemmal and SR Ca2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) in the ventricular tissue was also measured, respectively. Results:L-thyroxin (1 mg/kg injection for 10 d) induces left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy with normal myocardial function. The decreased caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient in the Ca2+-free solution was detected. The spontaneous Ca2+ sparks in hypertrophied myocytes occurred more frequently than in normal cells, with similar duration and spatial spread, but smaller amplitude. Then the basal [Ca2+]I increase was observed in quiescent left ventricular myocytes from hyperthyroidism rats. The activity of sarcolemmal and SR Ca2+-ATPase was decreased in the hypertrophied ventricle tissue. Conclusion:The results suggested that the reduced SR Ca2+ content may be associated with an increased Ca2+ leak and reduced SERCA2a activity, contributing to abnormal intracellular Ca2+ handling during hypertrophy in hyperthyroidism rats.

  17. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Václav

    2011-11-10

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. © 2011 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  18. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  19. High proportions of regulatory B and T cells are associated with decreased cellular responses to pH1N1 influenza vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth (IMPAACT P1088).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Adriana; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Richardson, Kelly; Dominguez, Teresa; Bloom, Anthony; Petzold, Elizabeth; Anthony, Patricia; Cunningham, Coleen K; Spector, Stephen A; Nachman, Sharon; Siberry, George K; Handelsman, Edward; Flynn, Patricia M

    2013-05-01

    HIV-infected individuals have poor responses to inactivated influenza vaccines. To evaluate the potential role of regulatory T (Treg) and B cells (Breg), we analyzed their correlation with humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to pandemic influenza (pH1N1) monovalent vaccine in HIV-infected children and youth. Seventy-four HIV-infected, 4- to 25-y old participants in a 2-dose pH1N1 vaccine study had circulating and pH1N1-stimulated Treg and Breg measured by flow cytometry at baseline, post-dose 1 and post-dose 2. Concomitantly, CMI was measured by ELISPOT and flow cytometry; and antibodies by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). At baseline, most of the participants had pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses, whose magnitude positively correlated with the baseline pH1N1, but not with seasonal H1N1 HAI titers. pH1N1-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses did not change post-dose 1 and significantly decreased post-dose 2. In contrast, circulating CD4+CD25+% and CD4+FOXP3+% Treg increased after vaccination. The decrease in IFNγ ELISPOT results was marginally associated with higher pH1N1-specific CD19+FOXP3+ and CD4+TGFβ+% Breg and Treg, respectively. In contrast, increases in HAI titers post-dose 1 were associated with significantly higher circulating CD19+CD25+% post-dose 1, whereas increases in IFNγ ELISPOT results post-dose 1 were associated with higher circulating CD4+/C8+CD25+FOXP3+%. In conclusion, in HIV-infected children and youth, influenza-specific Treg and Breg may contribute to poor responses to vaccination. However, robust humoral and CMI responses to vaccination may result in increased circulating Treg and/or Breg, establishing a feed-back mechanism.

  20. Coordination of autophagy with other cellular activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan WANG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2013-01-01

    The cell biological phenomenon of autophagy has attracted increasing attention in recent years,partly as a consequence of the discovery of key components of its cellular machinery.Autophagy plays a crucial role in a myriad of cellular functions.Autophagy has its own regulatory mechanisms,but this process is not isolated.Autophagy is coordinated with other cellular activities to maintain cell homeostasis.Autophagy is critical for a range of human physiological processes.The multifunctional roles of autophagy are explained by its ability to interact with several key components of various cell pathways.In this review,we focus on the coordination between autophagy and other physiological processes,including the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS),energy homeostasis,aging,programmed cell death,the immune responses,microbial invasion and inflammation.The insights gained from investigating autophagic networks should increase our understanding of their roles in human diseases and their potential as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Induction and measurement of IgE : a study in mice, with emphasis on the regulatory role of lymphokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.F.J. Savelkoul (Huub)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractA better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms and cellular interactions of the IgE antibody response is of fundamental interest to allergologists and clinical immunologists because of the role of IgE in the pathogenesis of the immediate type allergic disease. In addition, basic kno

  2. Effects of dimerized lysozyme (KLP-602) on the cellular and humoral defence mechanisms in sheatfish (Silurus glanis): in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, M; Siwicki, A; Pozet, F; Klein, P; Vinaize, J C; Keck, N

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the dimerized lysozyme (KLP-602) on the immunocompetence cell activity in sheatfish (Silurus glanis) and its influence in vivo on the non-specific defence mechanisms and protection against motile aeromonad septicaemia (MAS). The in vitro study showed that the lysozyme dimer (KLP-602), at concentrations between 5 and 50 micrograms/mL of medium significantly (P < 0.05) increased the respiratory burst activity and potential killing activity of pronephric macrophages, as well as the proliferative ability of pronephric lymphocytes stimulated by ConA and LPS. The in vivo study showed that injecting lysozyme dimer (Lydium-KLP) intraperitoneally at doses of 50 micrograms/kg bw stimulated cell-mediated and humoral-mediated imunity. On day 5, after application of Lydium-KLP in vivo, a statistically higher (P < 0.05) respiratory burst activity and potential killing activity of blood and pronephros phagocytes were observed. A higher proliferative ability of blood and pronephros lymphocytes stimulated by Concanavaline A (ConA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also observed. At the same time, the myeloperoxidase activity in the PMN cells and the lysozyme activity and total Ig levels in serum were significantly higher (P < 0.05), compared to the control group. A challenge test with Aeromonas hydrophila showed that dimerized lysozyme increased the protection against MAS. Dimerized lysozyme stimulates non-specific cellular and humoral mechanisms and protection against MAS in sheatfish.

  3. Universal quantifier derived from AFM analysis links cellular mechanical properties and cell-surface integration forces with microbial deposition and transport behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueyun; Wang, Xin; Onnis-Hayden, Annalisa; Wan, Kai-tak; Gu, April Z

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we employed AFM analysis combined with mathematical modeling for quantifying cell-surface contact mechanics and magnitude and range of cell-surface interaction forces for seven bacterial strains with a wide range of cell morphology, dimension, and surface characteristics. Comprehensive cell-surface characterization including surface charge, extracellular polymeric substance content, hydrophobicity, and cell-cell aggregation analyses were performed. Flow-through column tests were employed to determine the attachment efficiency and deposition-transport behavior of these bacterial strains. No statistically significant correlation between attachment efficiency and any single-cell surface property was identified. Single-cell characterization by atomic force microscopy (AFM) yielded the mechanical deformation and elastic modulus, penetration resistance to AFM probe penetration by cellular surface substances (CSS), range and magnitude of the repulsive-attractive intersurface forces, and geometry of each strain. We proposed and derived a universal dimensionless modified Tabor's parameter to integrate all these properties that account for their collective behavior. Results showed that the Tabor parameter derived from AFM analysis correlated well with experimentally determined attachment efficiency (α), which therefore is able to link microscale cell-surface properties with macroscale bacterial transport behavior. Results suggested that the AFM tests performed between a single cell and a surface captured the key quantities of the interactions between the cell and the surface that dictate overall cell attachment behavior. Tabor's parameter therefore can be potentially incorporated into the microbial transport model.

  4. Multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets based on chitosan derivative and layered double hydroxide: cellular uptake mechanism and application for topical ocular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Huibo Chi,1,2,* Yan Gu,1,* Tingting Xu,1 Feng Cao1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 2State Key Laboratory of Drug Delivery Technology and Pharmacokinetics, Tianjin Institute of Pharmaceutical Research Co., Ltd., Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: To study the cellular uptake mechanism of multifunctional organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets, new chitosan–glutathione–valine–valine-layered double hydroxide (CG-VV-LDH nanosheets with active targeting to peptide transporter-1 (PepT-1 were prepared, characterized and further compared with CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles. Both organic–inorganic hybrid nanoparticles and nanosheets showed a sustained release in vitro and prolonged precorneal retention time in vivo, but CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles showed superior permeability in the isolated cornea of rabbits than CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. Furthermore, results of cellular uptake on human corneal epithelial primary cells (HCEpiC and retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19 cells indicated that both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and active transport of PepT-1 are involved in the internalization of CG-VV-LDH nanoparticles and CG-VV-LDH nanosheets. In summary, the CG-VV-LDH nanoparticle may be a promising carrier as a topical ocular drug delivery system for the treatment of ocular diseases of mid-posterior segments, while the CG-VV-LDH nanosheet may be suitable for the treatment of ocular surface diseases. Keywords: LDH nanoparticles, LDH nanosheets, ocular drug delivery, human corneal epithelial primary cell, retinal pigment cell, ARPE-19, active targeting

  5. Caveolin-1/PTRF upregulation constitutes a mechanism for mediating p53-induced cellular senescence: implications for evidence-based therapy of delayed wound healing in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Milad S; Abdel-Halim, Samy M; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2013-10-15

    A heightened state of oxidative stress and senescence of fibroblasts constitute potential therapeutic targets in nonhealing diabetic wounds. Here, we studied the underlying mechanism mediating diabetes-induced cellular senescence using in vitro cultured dermal fibroblasts and in vivo circular wounds. Our results demonstrated that the total antioxidant capacity and mRNA levels of thioredoxinreductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase as well as the ratio of NADPH/NADP were decreased markedly in fibroblasts from patients with type 2 diabetes (DFs). Consistent with this shift in favor of excessive reactive oxygen species, DFs also displayed a significant increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and phospho-γ-histone H2AX (pH2AX) level. Moreover, the ability of PDGF to promote cell proliferation/migration and regulate the phosphorylation-dependent activation of Akt and ERK1/2 appears to be attenuated as a function of diabetes. Mechanistically, we found that diabetes-induced oxidative stress upregulated caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and PTRF expression, which in turn sequestered Mdm2 away from p53. This process resulted in the activation of a p53/p21-dependent pathway and the induction of premature senescence in DFs. Most of the aforementioned oxidative stress and senescence-based features observed in DFs were recapitulated in a 10-day-old diabetic wound. Intriguingly, we confirmed that the targeted depletion of Cav-1 or PTRF using siRNA- or Vivo-Morpholino antisense-based gene therapy markedly inhibited diabetes/oxidative stress-induced premature senescence and also accelerated tissue repair in this disease state. Overall, our data illuminate Cav-1/PTRF-1 as a key player of a novel signaling pathway that may link a heightened state of oxidative stress to cellular senescence and impaired wound healing in diabetes.

  6. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of metformin for clinical application%二甲双胍分子机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颐轩; 臧莎莎; 宋光耀

    2015-01-01

    二甲双胍是治疗T2DM的一线用药,其分子机制未明。主要通过轻度抑制线粒体呼吸链复合物Ⅰ,进而激动腺苷酸活化蛋白激酶(AM PK )来减少肝脏葡萄糖输出。除降糖外,二甲双胍在治疗多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)、降低糖尿病微血管及大血管并发症方面均发挥作用,还可用于癌症的辅助治疗。%[Summary] Considerable efforts have been made to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of metformin ,a potent antihyperglycemic agent now recommended as the first‐line treatment of patients with T2DM. The main effect of this drug is to reducethe hepatic glucose output ,primarily through inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex Ⅰ and then activating AM P‐activated protein kinase (AMPK) ,which provide a generally acceptable mechanism for the action of metformin on hepatic gluconeogenesis. Beyond its effect on glucose metabolism ,metformin has been reported to improve ovarian function of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to reduce the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications in patients with T2DM. In addition ,metfomin has also recently been suggested as an adjuvant treatment of cancer. Here we reviewed the progress of mechanism research and clinical application of metformin.

  7. Post-translational hydroxylation by 2OG/Fe(II-dependent oxygenases as a novel regulatory mechanism in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M van Staalduinen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein hydroxylation has been well-studied in eukaryotic systems. The structural importance of hydroxylation of specific proline and lysine residues during collagen biosynthesis is well established while, recently, key roles for post-translational hydroxylation in signalling and degradation pathways have been discovered. The function of hydroxylation in signalling is highlighted by its role in the hypoxic response of eukaryotic cells, where oxygen dependent hydroxylation of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor both targets it for degradation and blocks its activation. In contrast, the role of protein hydroxylation has been largely understudied in prokaryotes. Recently, an evolutionarily conserved class of ribosomal oxygenases (ROX that catalyze the hydroxylation of specific residues in the ribosome has been identified in bacteria. ROX activity has been linked to cell growth, and has been found to have a direct impact on bulk protein translation. This discovery of ribosomal protein hydroxylation in bacteria could lead to new therapeutic targets for regulating bacterial growth, as well as, shed light on new prokaryotic hydroxylation signalling pathways. In this review, recent structural and functional studies will be highlighted and discussed, underscoring the regulatory potential of post-translational hydroxylation in bacteria.

  8. Cellular Immune Mechanisms in Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    In order to detect cells with Fc receptors, SRBC were coated with subagglutinating amounts of 7S (IgG) anti-SRBC ( Cordis Laboratories, Miami, Florida... Cordis ) and then incubated with fresh mouse serum. Procedures for detecting rosette forming lymphocytes: The methods of Mendes et al were employed with...Sephadex-G-200 anti (Fab’)2 column to separate the cells into a non-imiunoglobulin bearing (T plus Null) cell population and an immuno- globulin

  9. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  10. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  11. 基因表达调控机制--操纵子模型的确立%The establishment of genetic regulatory mechanisms-operon model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向义和

    2013-01-01

    笔者介绍了基因表达调控机制--操纵子模型建立的过程:诱导物和阻遏物的发现及对其性质的研究;调节基因和操纵基因的发现及对其性能的分析;操纵子模型建立和实验验证。%The establishment of genetic regulatory mechanisms-operon model is introduced. The key events include the discovery of inducer, repressor, regulator gene and operator, the study of their properties, the establishment of operon model and the evidence of experiment.

  12. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in major bovine health disorders including postpartum uterine infection has been explored by many workers. In this review, we discussed specifically importance of postpartum uterine infection, the role of energy balance in uterine infections and potential of APPs as a predictor of postpartum uterine infections during the transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle.

  13. Functional anatomy and ion regulatory mechanisms of the antennal gland in a semi-terrestrial crab, Ocypode stimpsoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyuan-Ru Tsai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brachyuran crabs from diverse habitats show great differences in their osmoregulatory processes, especially in terms of the structural and physiological characteristics of the osmoregulatory organs. In crustaceans, the antennal glands are known to be important in osmoregulation, and they play a functional role analogous to that of the vertebrate kidney. Nevertheless, the detailed structure and function of the antennal glands in different species have rarely been described. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the antennal gland in ion regulation by examining the ultrastructure of the cells and the distribution of the ion regulatory proteins in each cell type in the antennal gland of a semi-terrestrial crab. The results showed that Na+, K+-ATPase activity significantly increased in the antennal gland after a 4-day acclimation in dilute seawater and returned to its original (day 0 level after 7 days. Three major types of cells were identified in the antennal gland, including coelomic cells (COEs, labyrinthine cells (LBRs and end-labyrinthine cells (ELBRs. The proximal tubular region (PT and distal tubular region (DT of the antennal gland consist of LBRs and COEs, whereas the end tubular region (ET consists of all three types of cells, with fewer COEs and more ELBRs. We found a non-uniform distribution of NKA immunoreactivity, with increasing intensity from the proximal to the distal regions of the antennal gland. We summarise our study with a proposed model for the urine reprocessing pathway and the role of each cell type or segment of the antennal gland.

  14. 两栖动物器官再生的细胞与分子机制%Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Amphibian Appendage Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨荔; 林古法

    2015-01-01

    包括人类在内的哺乳动物仅具有极为有限的再生能力,然而以蝾螈、非洲爪蟾等为代表的两栖类动物则能在特定时期完全修复缺损的组织器官.该文对近年来两栖类动物组织器官再生的细胞及分子机制研究作一综述,并以诱导成体爪蟾断肢再生为例,探讨诱导器官再生的研究策略.%The ultimate goal of regenerative medicine is to stimulate the regeneration and functional reconstruction of damaged tissues and injured organs.While mammals,including humans,only have very limited regenerative ability,amphibians such as the Salamanders and the African clawed frog Xenopus can fully regenerate their lost tissues,such as appendages including the limb and the tail,in a particular period of life time.Here we review the cellular origins and molecular mechanisms in amphibian regeneration,where recent findings have provided new strategies for stimulating organ regeneration.

  15. Associations of Unilateral Whisker and Olfactory Signals Induce Synapse Formation and Memory Cell Recruitment in Bilateral Barrel Cortices: Cellular Mechanism for Unilateral Training Toward Bilateral Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zilong; Chen, Lei; Fan, Ruicheng; Lu, Wei; Wang, Dangui; Cui, Shan; Huang, Li; Zhao, Shidi; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex (CBC) were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveal the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory. PMID:28018178

  16. Associations of unilateral whisker and olfactory signals induce synapse formation and memory cell recruitment in bilateral barrel cortices: cellular mechanism for unilateral training toward bilateral memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilong Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveals the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory.

  17. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song, E-mail: song_li59@126.com

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  18. 肺纤维化的信号转导分子调控机制%Signaling molecular regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余杰; 毛丽君; 赵金垣

    2015-01-01

    肺纤维化是一组各种原因所导致肺组织损伤的致命性疾病,主要表现为成纤维细胞增殖分化与胶原沉积.肺纤维化的分子机制主要集中于纤维化的始动因素以及成肌纤维母细胞的增殖分化;研究显示整个肺纤维化过程接受细胞因子网络与细胞内信号转导中的调控机制;阐明肺纤维化分子调控机制有利于抗纤维化治疗的开展.%Pulmonary fibrosis is a kind of lethal lung tissue injury diseases caused by various etiologies,with the main performance of fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition.The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis mainly focus on the initiating factors of the fibrosis and the myofibroblast proliferation and differentiation.Studies show that the whole course of pulmonary fibrosis is regulated by the mechanisms of cytokine networks and intracellular signal transduction.The research on molecular regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis can be beneficial to the development of anti fibrosis therapy.

  19. Mussel-inspired bioceramics with self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer: preparation, formation mechanism, improved cellular bioactivity and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengtie; Han, Pingping; Liu, Xiaoguo; Xu, Mengchi; Tian, Tian; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2014-01-01

    The nanostructured surface of biomaterials plays an important role in improving their in vitro cellular bioactivity as well as stimulating in vivo tissue regeneration. Inspired by the mussel's adhesive versatility, which is thought to be due to the plaque-substrate interface being rich in 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalamine (DOPA) and lysine amino acids, in this study we developed a self-assembly method to prepare a uniform calcium phosphate (Ca-P)/polydopamine composite nanolayer on the surface of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) bioceramics by soaking β-TCP bioceramics in Tris-dopamine solution. It was found that the addition of dopamine, reaction temperature and reaction time are three key factors inducing the formation of a uniform Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer. The formation mechanism of a Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer involved two important steps: (i) the addition of dopamine to Tris-HCl solution decreases the pH value and accelerates Ca and P ionic dissolution from the crystal boundaries of β-TCP ceramics; (ii) dopamine is polymerized to form self-assembled polydopamine film and, at the same time, nanosized Ca-P particles are mineralized with the assistance of polydopamine, in which the formation of polydopamine occurs simultaneously with Ca-P mineralization (formation of nanosized microparticles composed of calcium phosphate-based materials), and finally a self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer forms on the surface of the β-TCP ceramics. Furthermore, the formed self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer significantly enhances the surface roughness and hydrophilicity of β-TCP ceramics, and stimulates the attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and bone-related gene expression (ALP, OCN, COL1 and Runx2) of human bone marrow stromal cells. Our results suggest that the preparation of self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayers is a viable method to modify the surface of biomaterials by

  20. Probing the chemical mechanism and critical regulatory amino acid residues of Drosophila melanogaster arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Daniel R; Carpenter, Anne-Marie; Ospina, Santiago Rodriguez; Merkler, David J

    2015-11-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acyltransferase like 2 (AANATL2) catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides from the corresponding acyl-CoA and arylalkylamine. The N-acylation of biogenic amines in Drosophila melanogaster is a critical step for the inactivation of neurotransmitters, cuticle sclerotization, and melatonin biosynthesis. In addition, D. melanogaster has been used as a model system to evaluate the biosynthesis of fatty acid amides: a family of potent cell signaling lipids. We have previously showed that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylakylamides, including long-chain N-acylserotonins and N-acyldopamines. Herein, we define the kinetic mechanism for AANATL2 as an ordered sequential mechanism with acetyl-CoA binding first followed by tyramine to generate the ternary complex prior to catalysis. Bell shaped kcat,app - acetyl-CoA and (kcat/Km)app - acetyl-CoA pH-rate profiles identified two apparent pKa,app values of ∼7.4 and ∼8.9 that are critical to catalysis, suggesting the AANATL2-catalyzed formation of N-acetyltyramine occurs through an acid/base chemical mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved glutamate that corresponds to the catalytic base for other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes did not produce a substantial depression in the kcat,app value nor did it abolish the pKa,app value attributed to the general base in catalysis (pKa ∼7.4). These data suggest that AANATL2 catalyzes the formation of N-acylarylalkylamides using either different catalytic residues or a different chemical mechanism relative to other D. melanogaster AANATL enzymes. In addition, we constructed other site-directed mutants of AANATL2 to help define the role of targeted amino acids in substrate binding and/or enzyme catalysis.

  1. Immune-Regulatory Mechanisms of Classical and Experimental Multiple Sclerosis Drugs: A Special Focus on Helminth-Derived Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peón, Alberto N; Terrazas, Luis I

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most prevalent autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Its pathophysiology is centered on neuron myelin sheath destruction in a manner largely dependent upon CD4+/CD8+ T-cell autoreactivity against myelin antigens, inducing Th1/Th17 pathogenic responses with the resulting production of free radicals and soluble mediators that exhibit the effector mechanisms of neurodegeneration. The immune response responsible for this disease is complex and challenges modern medicine. Consequently, many experimental therapies have been proposed in addition to the classical array of immunoregulatory/ immunosuppressive drugs that are normally used to treat MS. In this review, we will describe the effects and mechanisms of action of widely used disease-modifying MS drugs as well as those of select treatments that are currently in the experimental phase. Special emphasis is placed on helminth-derived immunoregulators, as some of them have shown promising results. Additionally, we will compare the mechanisms of action of both the MS drugs and the helminth-derived treatments to discuss the potential importance of some signaling pathways in the control of MS.

  2. Mechanisms of action of hormone-sensitive lipase in mouse Leydig cells: its role in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Pulak R; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Counis, Raymond; Garner, Charles W; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Kraemer, Fredric B; Stocco, Douglas M

    2013-03-22

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters in steroidogenic tissues and, thus, facilitates cholesterol availability for steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) controls the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis. However, the modes of action of HSL in the regulation of StAR expression remain obscure. We demonstrate in MA-10 mouse Leydig cells that activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, by a cAMP analog Bt2cAMP, enhanced expression of HSL and its phosphorylation (P) at Ser-660 and Ser-563, but not at Ser-565, concomitant with increased HSL activity. Phosphorylation and activation of HSL coincided with increases in StAR, P-StAR (Ser-194), and progesterone levels. Inhibition of HSL activity by CAY10499 effectively suppressed Bt2cAMP-induced StAR expression and progesterone synthesis. Targeted silencing of endogenous HSL, with siRNAs, resulted in increased cholesteryl ester levels and decreased cholesterol content in MA-10 cells. Depletion of HSL affected lipoprotein-derived cellular cholesterol influx, diminished the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria, and resulted in the repression of StAR and P-StAR levels. Cells overexpressing HSL increased the efficacy of liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR expression and steroid synthesis, suggesting HSL-mediated steroidogenesis entails enhanced oxysterol production. Conversely, cells deficient in LXRs exhibited decreased HSL responsiveness. Furthermore, an increase in HSL was correlated with the LXR target genes, steroid receptor element-binding protein 1c and ATP binding cassette transporter A1, demonstrating HSL-dependent regulation of steroidogenesis predominantly involves LXR signaling. LXRs interact/cooperate with RXRs and result in the activation of StAR gene transcription. These findings provide novel insight and demonstrate the molecular events by which HSL acts to drive cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of StAR expression and

  3. Task Group 7B: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging: The Roles of Nature, Nurture and Chance in the Maintenance of Human Healthspan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Arya, Suresh; Grant, Christine; Miller, Linda; Ono, Santa Jeremy; Patil, Chris; Shay, Jerry; Topol, Eric; Torry, Michael; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tse, Iris; Lin, Su-Ju; Miller, Richard

    2007-11-14

    The degree to which an individual organism maintains healthspan and lifespan is a function of complex interactions between genetic inheritance ('nature'), environment, including cultural inheritance (nurture) and stochastic events ('luck' or 'chance'). This task group will focus upon the role of chance because it is so poorly understood and because it appears to be of major importance in the determination of individual variations in healthspan and lifespan within species. The major factor determining variations in healthspan and lifespan between species is genetic inheritance. Broader aspects of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological aging will also be considered, given their importance for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of successful aging. The task force will consider the cellular and molecular basis for nature, nurture and chance in healthspan and life span determination. On the basis of comparisons between identical and non-identical twins, geneticists have estimated that genes control no more than about a quarter of the inter-individual differences in lifespan (Herskind 1996). Twin studies of very old individuals, however, show substantially greater genetic contributions to Healthspan (McClearn 2004; Reed 2003). The environment clearly plays an important role in the length and the quality of life. Tobacco smoke, for example has the potential to impact upon multiple body systems in ways that appear to accelerate the rates at which those systems age (Bernhard 2007). To document the role of chance events on aging, one must rigorously control both the genetic composition of an organism and its environment. This has been done to a remarkable degree in a species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans (Vanfleteren 1998). The results confirm hundreds of previous studies with a wide range of species, especially those with inbred rodents housed under apparently identical but less well controlled environments. One

  4. Advancement in the research of mechanism of immune dysfunction in sepsis and the regulatory effects of Xuebijing injection%脓毒症免疫功能障碍机制及血必净调节效应研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高玉雷; 柴艳芬; 姚咏明

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting from a host response to infection.The early stage of sepsis is characterized by excessive inflammatory response,accompanied by immune dysfunction characterized by aggravating cellular immunosuppression.The vast majority of patients with sepsis survive the initial excessive inflammatory response,but die of hospital-acquired infection,opportunistic pathogenic bacteria infection,latent virus reactivation,and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.These facts indicate that immunosuppression may be a significant cause of exacerbation of the illness even death of the septic patients.The primary cellular mechanisms in inducing immune dysfunction include immune dysfunction of T lymphocytes,negative regulation of regulatory T lymphocytes and dendritic cells,and damage of intestinal mucosa associated lymphoid tissue.Xuebijing injection is a complex Chinese patent medicine,which is widely used in the treatment of sepsis.It has a potential immunoregulation ability,as well as effects on bacteriostasis,anti-endotoxin and anti-inflammation.Its target and mechanism of action need to be explored further.

  5. Mechanism of Regulatory Effect of MicroRNA-206 on Connexin 43 in Distant Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Jing Lin; Jia Ming; Lu Yang; Jun-Ze Du; Ning Wang; Hao-Jun Luo

    2016-01-01

    Background: MicroRNA-206 (miR-206) and connexin 43 (Cx43) are related with the distant metastasis of breast cancer.It remains unclear whether the regulatory effect of miR-206 on Cx43 is involved in metastasis of breast cancer.Methods: Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, the expressions of miR-206 and Cx43 were determined in breast cancer tissues, hepatic and pulmonary metastasis (PM), and cell lines (MCF-10A, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231).MCF-7/MDA-M-231 cells were transfected with lentivirus-shRNA vectors to enhance/inhibit miR-206, and then Cx43 expression was observed.Cell counting kit-8 assay and Transwell method were used to detect their changes in proliferation, migration, and invasion activity.The mutant plasmids of Cx43-3' untranslated region (3'UTR) at position 478-484 and position 1609-1615 were constructed.Luciferase reporter assay was performed to observe the effects of miR-206 on luciferase expression of different mutant plasmids and to confirm the potential binding sites of Cx43.Results: Cx43 protein expression in hepatic and PM was significantly higher than that in the primary tumor, while no significant difference was showed in messenger RNA (mRNA) expression.MiR-206 mRNA expression in hepatic and PM was significantly lower than that in the primary tumor.Cx43 mRNA and protein levels, as well as cell proliferation, migration, and invasion capabilities, were all significantly improved in MDA-MB-231 cells after reducing miR-206 expression but decreased in MCF-7 cells after elevating miR-206 expression, which demonstrated a significantly negative correlation between miR-206 and Cx43 expression (P =0.03).MiR-206 can drastically decrease Cx43 expression of MCF-7 cells but exerts no effects on Cx43 expression in 293 cells transfected with the Cx43 coding region but the lack of Cx43-3'UTR, suggesting that Cx43-3'UTR may be the key in Cx43 regulated by miR-206.Luciferase expression showed that the inhibition efficiency was

  6. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodaran, T.V., E-mail: tdamodar@nccu.edu [Dept of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Dept of Biology, North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707 (United States); Attia, M.K. [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Abou-Donia, M.B., E-mail: donia@mc.duke.edu [Pharmacology and Cancer biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    analysis revealed that the order of severity of damage declines from the spino-cerebellar, ventral, and dorsal tract respectively, suggesting neuroanatomical specificity. Thus, early activation of cell death and cell survival processes may play significant role in the clinical progression and syndromic clinical feature presentation of OPIDN. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple mechanisms of neurodegeneration were indicated in a study on OPIDN model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altered expressions of BCL2 and GADD45 were recorded in various tissues of CNS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple anomalous cellular (neuronal and astroglial) features were recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anatomical specificity of the neurodegeneration was described.

  7. First Insights into the Subterranean Crustacean Bathynellacea Transcriptome: Transcriptionally Reduced Opsin Repertoire and Evidence of Conserved Homeostasis Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Seunghyun; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Ahn, Inhye; Lee, Chi-Woo; Cho, Joo-Lae; Min, Gi-Sik; Park, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Bathynellacea (Crustacea, Syncarida, Parabathynellidae) are subterranean aquatic crustaceans that typically inhabit freshwater interstitial spaces (e.g., groundwater) and are occasionally found in caves and even hot springs. In this study, we sequenced the whole transcriptome of Allobathynella bangokensis using RNA-seq. De novo sequence assembly produced 74,866 contigs including 28,934 BLAST hits. Overall, the gene sequences were most similar to those of the waterflea Daphnia pulex. In the A. bangokensis transcriptome, no opsin or related sequences were identified, and no contig aligned to the crustacean visual opsins and non-visual opsins (i.e. arthropsins, peropsins, and melaopsins), suggesting potential regressive adaptation to the dark environment. However, A. bangokensis expressed conserved gene family sets, such as heat shock proteins and those related to key innate immunity pathways and antioxidant defense systems, at the transcriptional level, suggesting that this species has evolved adaptations involving molecular mechanisms of homeostasis. The transcriptomic information of A. bangokensis will be useful for investigating molecular adaptations and response mechanisms to subterranean environmental conditions. PMID:28107438

  8. Complementary vascular and matrix regulatory pathways underlie the beneficial mechanism of action of sorafenib in liver fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabut, Dominique; Routray, Chittaranjan; Lomberk, Gwen; Shergill, Uday; Glaser, Kevin; Huebert, Robert; Patel, Leena; Masyuk, Tetyana; Blechacz, Boris; Vercnocke, Andrew; Ritman, Erik; Ehman, Richard; Urrutia, Raul; Shah, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Background Paracrine signaling between hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and liver endothelial cells (LEC) modulates fibrogenesis, angiogenesis, and portal hypertension. However, mechanisms regulating these processes are not fully defined. Sorafenib is a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that blocks growth factor signaling in tumor cells but also displays important and not yet fully characterized effects on liver nonparenchymal cells including HSC and LEC. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that sorafenib influences paracrine signaling between HSC and LEC and thereby regulates matrix and vascular changes associated with chronic liver injury. Results Complementary magnetic resonance elastography, micro-CT, and histochemical analyses indicate that sorafenib attenuates the changes in both matrix and vascular compartments that occur in response to bile-duct ligation induced liver injury in rats. Cell biology studies demonstrate that sorafenib markedly reduces cell to cell apposition and junctional complexes, thus reducing the proximity typically observed between these sinusoidal barrier cells. At the molecular level, sorafenib down-regulates angiopoietin-1 and fibronectin, both released by HSC in a manner dependent on the transcription factor KLF6, suggesting that this pathway underlies both matrix and vascular changes associated with chronic liver disease. Conclusion Collectively, our results demonstrate that sorafenib inhibits both matrix restructuring and vascular remodeling that accompany chronic liver diseases and characterize cell and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. These data may help to refine future therapies for advanced gastrointestinal and liver diseases characterized by abundant fibrosis and neovascularization. PMID:21567441

  9. Mesenchymal stromal cells and immunomodulation: A gathering of regulatory immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, Mehdi; Raicevic, Gordana; Fayyad-Kazan, Hussein; Bron, Dominique; Toungouz, Michel; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2016-02-01

    Because of their well-recognized immunomodulatory properties, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell population for therapeutic purposes. In particular, there is growing interest in the use of MSCs as cellular immunotherapeutics for tolerance induction in allogeneic transplantations and the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, multiple mechanisms have been identified to mediate the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs, sometimes with several ambiguities and inconsistencies. Although published studies have mainly reported the role of soluble factors, we believe that a sizeable cellular component plays a critical role in MSC immunomodulation. We refer to these cells as regulatory immune cells, which are generated from both the innate and adaptive responses after co-culture with MSCs. In this review, we discuss the nature and role of these immune regulatory cells as well as the role of different mediators, and, in particular, regulatory immune cell induction by MSCs through interleukin-10. Once induced, immune regulatory cells accumulate and converge their regulatory pathways to create a tolerogenic environment conducive for immunomodulation. Thus, a better understanding of these regulatory immune cells, in terms of how they can be optimally manipulated and induced, would be suitable for improving MSC-based immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies.

  10. Research progress on regulatory mechanism of liver cancer stem cells%肝癌干细胞调控机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭; 王超

    2014-01-01

    肿瘤干细胞学说认为,肝癌的复发和转移主要与肝癌干细胞密切相关.以手术为主的传统治疗肝癌的方法只是杀死了大量快速增殖的肿瘤细胞,并未清除起决定性作用的肝癌干细胞,故术后极易复发转移.调控肝癌干细胞的信号通路及因子较多,如Wnt/β-catenin通路、TGF-β通路、Notch通路、Hedgehog通路、乙型肝炎病毒等.表观遗传学在肝癌干细胞调控机制中的作用亦很重要.深入研究肝癌干细胞的调控机制,可为防止肝癌的复发和转移提供新的治疗依据.%The theory of cancer stem cells proposed that recurrence and metastasis of liver cancer are closely related to liver cancer stem cells.The traditional surgical treatment of liver cancer simply kills those rapidly proliferating tunor cells instead of eliminating hepatic cancer stem cells which play decisive role in recurrence and metastasis.As far as people have concerned,there are many signaling pathways and regulatory factors modulating liver cancer stem cells,such as the Wnt/β-catenin pathway,TGF-β pathway,Notch pathway,Hedgehog pathway,hepatitis B virus,as well as epigenetics.Further studies on regulatory mechanisms of liver cancer stem cells are of great significance,in hope of providing new evidence for treatment and prevention of recurrence and metastasis of liver cancer.

  11. Study of the main regulatory mechanisms to encourage renewable and alternative energy applied internationally and in Brazil; Estudo dos principais mecanismos regulatorios de incentivo as fontes renovaveis e alternativas de energia aplicados internacionalmente e no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Juliana M.C.; Cavaliero, Carla Kazue Nakao [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia], Emails: jumcm@fem.unicamp.br, cavaliero@fem.unicamp.br

    2009-07-01

    The investment in renewable and alternative energy sources has been stimulated by some countries in Europe and Americas through the introduction of encouragement regulatory mechanisms. This paper considers the most important international mechanisms such as Feed-in System, Tender System and Quota System with green certificates. In Brazil, there are three regulatory mechanisms in course: PROINFA, the 1. Tender of Renewable and 1. Tender Reserve. The carried out preliminary analysis made possible to classify PROINFA as a mechanism similar to Feed-in, while the auction of Renewable and Reserve are more like an auction system. This article points out the differences and similarities between the instruments and gives a preliminary analysis of their effectiveness, emphasizing national mechanisms, especially regarding the criteria for capacity increase and cost reduction of the technological bands, such as for biomass and small hydroelectric. (author)

  12. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick;

    2007-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, forms the intermediate cytoskeleton in cells of the glial lineage. Besides the common GFAP alpha transcript, the GFAP epsilon and GFAP kappa transcripts are generated by alternative mRNA 3'-end processing. Here we use a GFAP minigene to characterize...... molecular mechanisms participating in alternative GFAP expression. Usage of a polyadenylation signal within the alternatively spliced exon 7a is essential to generate the GFAP kappa and GFAP kappa transcripts. The GFAP kappa mRNA is distinct from GFAP epsilon mRNA given that it also includes intron 7a...... with the selection of the exon 7a polyadenylation site being the essential and primary event for regulating GFAP alternative processing. Udgivelsesdato: 2007...

  13. The RNA-mediated, asymmetric ring regulatory mechanism of the transcription termination Rho helicase decrypted by time-resolved nucleotide analog interference probing (trNAIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Emilie; Schwartz, Annie; Nollmann, Marcello; Margeat, Emmanuel; Boudvillain, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Rho is a ring-shaped, ATP-dependent RNA helicase/translocase that dissociates transcriptional complexes in bacteria. How RNA recognition is coupled to ATP hydrolysis and translocation in Rho is unclear. Here, we develop and use a new combinatorial approach, called time-resolved Nucleotide Analog Interference Probing (trNAIP), to unmask RNA molecular determinants of catalytic Rho function. We identify a regulatory step in the translocation cycle involving recruitment of the 2'-hydroxyl group of the incoming 3'-RNA nucleotide by a Rho subunit. We propose that this step arises from the intrinsic weakness of one of the subunit interfaces caused by asymmetric, split-ring arrangement of primary RNA tethers around the Rho hexamer. Translocation is at highest stake every seventh nucleotide when the weak interface engages the incoming 3'-RNA nucleotide or breaks, depending on RNA threading constraints in the Rho pore. This substrate-governed, 'test to run' iterative mechanism offers a new perspective on how a ring-translocase may function or be regulated. It also illustrates the interest and versatility of the new trNAIP methodology to unveil the molecular mechanisms of complex RNA-based systems.

  14. Insights into the mechanism of FTY720 and compatibility with regulatory T cells for the inhibition of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patricia A; Ehrhardt, Michael J; Lees, Christopher J; Tolar, Jakub; Weigel, Brenda J; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Serody, Jonathan S; Brinkmann, Volker; Blazar, Bruce R

    2007-11-01

    The immunomodulator FTY720 (FTY) has been shown to be beneficial in experimental models of organ transplantation and autoimmunity. We show that FTY significantly inhibited but did not prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in lethally irradiated or nonirradiated allogeneic recipients. Although most studies implicate prevention of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs as the primary mechanism of action, our data indicate that FTY effects on the host are more likely to be responsible for GVHD inhibition. FTY reduced splenic CD11c+ cells by 50%, and similarly reduced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responder frequencies in the spleen early after transplantation. Imaging of GFP+ effectors indicated that FTY modified donor effector T-cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs, but did not uniformly trap T cells in lymph nodes or prevent early effector migration to GVHD parenchymal target organs. Administration of FTY only prior to transplantation inhibited GVHD, indicating that the primary function of FTY may be targeted to host cells. FTY was additive with regulatory T cells for GVHD inhibition. FTY slightly impaired but did not abrogate a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect against C1498, a myeloid leukemia. Our data further define the mechanisms of action and provide insight as to the potential clinical uses of FTY in allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients.

  15. A novel regulatory mechanism of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter revealed by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB202190.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Mayte; Lobaton, Carmen D; Moreno, Alfredo; Alvarez, Javier

    2002-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake modulates the cytosolic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]c) acting as a transient Ca2+ buffer. In addition, mitochondrial [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]M) regulates the rate of respiration and may trigger opening of the permeability transition pore and start apoptosis. However, no mechanism for the physiological regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake has been described. We show here that SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, strongly stimulates ruthenium red-sensitive mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, both in intact and in permeabilized HeLa cells. The [Ca2+]M peak induced by agonists was increased about fourfold in the presence of the inhibitor, with a concomitant reduction in the [Ca2+]c peak. The stimulation occurred fast and was rapidly reversible. In addition, experiments in permeabilized cells perfused with controlled [Ca2+] showed that SB202190 stimulated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by more than 10-fold, but only in the physiological [Ca2+]c range (1-4 mM). Other structurally related p38 MAP kinase inhibitors (SB203580, PD169316, or SB220025) produced little or no effect. Our data suggest that in HeLa cells, a protein kinase sensitive to SB202190 tonically inhibits the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. This novel regulatory mechanism may be of paramount importance to modulate mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake under different physiopathological conditions.

  16. 血脑屏障中P-糖蛋白的调节机制%Regulatory mechanisms of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉璘; 王少峡; 郭虹; 胡利民

    2011-01-01

    P-糖蛋白属于ABC转运蛋白超家族.它在脑微血管中大量表达,限制毒性物质和大量治疗中枢神经系统的药物进入脑内,因此弄清P-糖蛋白在血脑屏障中的调节机制对疾病的治疗尤为重要.该文总结了P-糖蛋白基本结构、分布、功能,并讨论了P-糖蛋白在血脑屏障中调节机制的研究进展.%P-glycoprotein (P-gp) belongs to the adenosine triphosphate( ATP )-binding cassette( ABC ) proteins, which is present in the microvessels in the brain, so it can prevent cytotoxic compounds and large amount of CNS agents entering the brain. Thus, it is important to find out the mechanisms that regulate P-gp function and expression in the blood-brain barier for pharmcotherapy. In this review, the structure, tissue distribution and the function of P-glycoprotein were reviewed, focusing on the research advances of regulatory mechanisms at the bloodbrain barrier.

  17. P2X7 Cell Death Receptor Activation and Mitochondrial Impairment in Oxaliplatin-Induced Apoptosis and Neuronal Injury: Cellular Mechanisms and In Vivo Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Massicot

    Full Text Available Limited information is available regarding the cellular mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced painful neuropathy during exposure of patients to this drug. We therefore determined oxidative stress in cultured cells and evaluated its occurrence in C57BL/6 mice. Using both cultured neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y and macrophage (RAW 264.7 cell lines and also brain tissues of oxaliplatin-treated mice, we investigated whether oxaliplatin (OXA induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. Cultured cells were treated with 2-200 µM OXA for 24 h. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative stress or inflammation (N-acetyl cysteine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen were also tested. Inhibitors were added 30 min before OXA treatment and then in combination with OXA for 24 h. In SH-SY5Y cells, OXA caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in viability, a large increase in ROS and NO production, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment as assessed by a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential, which are deleterious for the cell. An increase in levels of negatively charged phospholipids such as cardiolipin but also phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, was also observed. Additionally, OXA caused concentration-dependent P2X7 receptor activation, increased chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation associated with TNF-α and IL-6 release. The majority of these toxic effects were equally observed in Raw 264.7 which also presented high levels of PGE2. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with pharmacological inhibitors significantly reduced or blocked all the neurotoxic OXA effects. In OXA-treated mice (28 mg/kg cumulated dose significant cold hyperalgesia and oxidative stress in the tested brain areas were shown. Our study suggests that targeting P2X7 receptor activation and mitochondrial impairment might be a potential therapeutic strategy against OXA-induced neuropathic pain.

  18. Studies on the regulatory effect of Peony-Glycyrrhiza Decoction on prolactin hyperactivity and underlying mechanism in hyperprolactinemia rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Yulin; Wang, Juan; Jia, Dongxu; Wong, Hei Kiu; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2015-10-08

    Clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of Peony-Glycyrrhiza Decoction (PGD) in alleviating antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia (hyperPRL) in schizophrenic patients. In previous experiment, PGD suppressed prolactin (PRL) level in MMQ cells, involving modulating the expression of D2 receptor (DRD2) and dopamine transporter (DAT). In the present study, hyperPRL female rat model induced by dopamine blocker metoclopramide (MCP) was applied to further confirm the anti-hyperpPRL activity of PGD and underlying mechanism. In MCP-induced hyperPRL rats, the elevated serum PRL level was significantly suppressed by either PGD (2.5-10 g/kg) or bromocriptine (BMT) (0.6 mg/kg) administration for 14 days. However, in MCP-induced rats, only PGD restored the under-expressed serum progesterone (P) to control level. Both PGD and BMT administration restore the under-expression of DRD2, DAT and TH resulted from MCP in pituitary gland and hypothalamus. Compared to untreated group, hyperPRL animals had a marked reduction on DRD2 and DAT expression in the arcuate nucleus. PGD (10 g/kg) and BMT (0.6 mg/kg) treatment significant reversed the expression of DRD2 and DAT. Collectively, the anti-hyperPRL activity of PGD associates with the modulation of dopaminergic neuronal system and the restoration of serum progesterone level. Our finding supports PGD as an effective agent against hyperPRL.

  19. Acupuncture Alleviates Colorectal Hypersensitivity and Correlates with the Regulatory Mechanism of TrpV1 and p-ERK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we used a mouse model of zymosan-induced colorectal hypersensitivity, a similar model of IBS in our previous work, to evaluate the effectiveness of the different number of times of acupuncture and elucidate its potential mechanism of EA treatment. Colorectal distension (CRD tests show that intracolonic zymosan injection does, while saline injection does not, induce a typical colorectal hypersensitivity. EA treatment at classical acupoints Zusanli (ST36 and Shangjuxu (ST37 in both hind limbs for 15 min slightly attenuated and significantly blunted the hypersensitive responses after first and fifth acupunctures, respectively, to colorectal distention in zymosan treatment mice, but not in saline treatment mice. Western blot results indicated that ion channel and TrpV1 expression in colorectum as well as ERK1/2 MAPK pathway activation in peripheral and central nerve system might be involved in this process. Hence, we conclude that EA is a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment and alleviation of chronic abdominal pain, and the effectiveness of acupuncture analgesia is accumulative with increased number of times of acupuncture when compared to that of a single time of acupuncture.

  20. A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Type II Collagen Expression via a SOX9-dependent Enhancer in Intron 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hideyo; Oh, Chun-do; Chen, Di; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2017-01-13

    Type II collagen α1 is specific for cartilaginous tissues, and mutations in its gene are associated with skeletal diseases. Its expression has been shown to be dependent on SOX9, a master transcription factor required for chondrogenesis that binds to an enhancer region in intron 1. However, ChIP sequencing revealed that SOX9 does not strongly bind to intron 1, but rather it binds to intron 6 and a site 30 kb upstream of the transcription start site. Here, we aimed to determine the role of the novel SOX9-binding site in intron 6. We prepared reporter constructs that contain a Col2a1 promoter, intron 1 with or without intron 6, and the luciferase gene. Although the reporter constructs were not activated by SOX9 alone, the construct that contained both introns 1 and 6 was activated 5-10-fold by the SOX9/SOX5 or the SOX9/SOX6 combination in transient-transfection assays in 293T cells. This enhancement was also observed in rat chondrosarcoma cells that stably expressed the construct. CRISPR/Cas9-induced deletion of intron 6 in RCS cells revealed that a 10-bp region of intron 6 is necessary both for Col2a1 expression and SOX9 binding. Furthermore, SOX9, but not SOX5, binds to this region as demonstrated in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, although both SOX9 and SOX5 bind to a larger 325-bp fragment of intron 6 containing this small sequence. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of action of SOX5/6; namely, the SOX9/5/6 combination enhances Col2a1 transcription through a novel enhancer in intron 6 together with the enhancer in intron 1.

  1. Lycopene treatment against loss of bone mass, microarchitecture and strength in relation to regulatory mechanisms in a postmenopausal osteoporosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardawi, Mohammed-Salleh M; Badawoud, Mohammed H; Hassan, Sherif M; Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Ardawi, Jumanah M S; AlNosani, Nouf M; Qari, Mohammed H; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-02-01

    Lycopene supplementation decreases oxidative stress and exhibits beneficial effects on bone health, but the mechanisms through which it alters bone metabolism in vivo remain unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of lycopene treatment on postmenopausal osteoporosis. Six-month-old female Wistar rats (n=264) were sham-operated (SHAM) or ovariectomized (OVX). The SHAM group received oral vehicle only and the OVX rats were randomized into five groups receiving oral daily lycopene treatment (mg/kg body weight per day): 0 OVX (control), 15 OVX, 30 OVX, and 45 OVX, and one group receiving alendronate (ALN) (2μg/kg body weight per day), for 12weeks. Bone densitometry measurements, bone turnover markers, biomechanical testing, and histomorphometric analysis were conducted. Micro computed tomography was also used to evaluate changes in microarchitecture. Lycopene treatment suppressed the OVX-induced increase in bone turnover, as indicated by changes in biomarkers of bone metabolism: serum osteocalcin (s-OC), serum N-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen (s-PINP), serum crosslinked carboxyterminal telopeptides (s-CTX-1), and urinary deoxypyridinoline (u-DPD). Significant improvement in OVX-induced loss of bone mass, bone strength, and microarchitectural deterioration was observed in lycopene-treated OVX animals. These effects were observed mainly at sites rich in trabecular bone, with less effect in cortical bone. Lycopene treatment down-regulated osteoclast differentiation concurrent with up-regulating osteoblast together with glutathione peroxidase (GPx) catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. These findings demonstrate that lycopene treatment in OVX rats primarily suppressed bone turnover to restore bone strength and microarchitecture.

  2. Studies on gene structure, enzymatic activity and regulatory mechanism of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase from G2 pea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yunjian (徐云剑); GU Xuesong (顾雪松); LI Jun (李珺); LI Qing (李 晴); Peter J. Davies; ZHU Yuxian (朱玉贤)

    2003-01-01

    The AAIR genomic DNA of G2 pea (Pisum sativum L.) was amplified by PCR method. Sequence analysis showed that it was composed of 8 introns and 9 exons with three of the introns containing specific A/T-rich endogenous promoter regions. Molecular hybridization experiments revealed that the expression of AAIR remained at a high level before and after flowering if grown in short day growth chambers. However, when grown under long day conditions, the level of AAIR expression declined very rapidly after flowering. This variation of AAIR expression is consistent with the change of enzymatic activity of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase. Functional complementation experiments carried out using an acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase deficient E. coli strain showed that these cells could not grow on M9 medium without addition of branched-chain amino acids unless they were transformed with the AAIR expression vector. Further study revealed that overexpression of the pea AAIR cDNA in acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase deficient E. coli strain enhanced significantly its branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic capacity. Results from gel shift experiments showed that fractions of pea nuclear protein extracts could bind specifically to some A/T rich regions present in introns of the AAIR gene. The A/T-rich-region-binding proteins remained at a steady level in the non-senescing apical buds of short-day grown G2 pea. In the rapid-senescing apical buds of long-day grown G2 pea, the levels of these proteins declined rapidly after flower initiation. Therefore, the nuclear protein binding capacities to endogenous promoter regions may constitute an important mechanism to regulate AAIR gene expression.

  3. Energy Landscape of Cellular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    Cellular Networks are in general quite robust and perform their biological functions against the environmental perturbations. Progresses have been made from experimental global screenings, topological and engineering studies. However, there are so far few studies of why the network should be robust and perform biological functions from global physical perspectives. In this work, we will explore the global properties of the network from physical perspectives. The aim of this work is to develop a conceptual framework and quantitative physical methods to study the global nature of the cellular network. The main conclusion of this presentation is that we uncovered the underlying energy landscape for several small cellular networks such as MAPK signal transduction network and gene regulatory networks, from the experimentally measured or inferred inherent chemical reaction rates. The underlying dynamics of these networks can show bi-stable as well as oscillatory behavior. The global shapes of the energy landscapes of the underlying cellular networks we have studied are robust against perturbations of the kinetic rates and environmental disturbances through noise. We derived a quantitative criterion for robustness of the network function from the underlying landscape. It provides a natural explanation of the robustness and stability of the network for performing biological functions. We believe the robust landscape is a global universal property for cellular networks. We believe the robust landscape is a quantitative realization of Darwinian principle of natural selection at the cellular network level. It may provide a novel algorithm for optimizing the network connections, which is crucial for the cellular network design and synthetic biology. Our approach is general and can be applied to other cellular networks.

  4. 海峡两岸货币清算机制监管合作设想%On the Regulatory Mechanisms of Currency Liquidation across the Taiwan Straits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱丽洪; 涂晓今; 钱远玲

    2015-01-01

    自海峡两岸货币清算机制实质运作以来,货币清算机制的监管合作显得十分必要与迫切。通过回顾和总结两岸经贸、银行业的合作历程,比较两岸银行监管的差异,从两岸银行规定的协调、货币清算机构间的协调、信息交换与共享以及风险预警与危机处理的协调,积极探索两岸对货币清算机制监管合作的拓展空间,确保两岸货币清算机制的健康运作,从而促进两岸经贸合作的进一步发展。%After the operation of the Currency Liquidation Mechanism across the Taiwan Straits in 2013, there is an urgent need for the establishment of regulatory mechanisms of currency liquidation.On review of the development of economic and trade coop-eration as well as ties-up between banks, together with the difference in banking supervision, the paper puts forward suggestions on coordination of banking laws, coordination between organizations of currency liquidation as well as coordination of information exchange, risk warning system and risk management system.It actively explores the collaboration of banking supervision across the Straits in hope of smooth functioning of currency liquidation mechanism and further development of economic and trade ex-change across the Straits.

  5. A cellular microRNA mediates antiviral defense in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Dunoyer, Patrice; Arar, Khalil; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Eyquem, Stephanie; Himber, Christophe; Saïb, Ali; Voinnet, Olivier

    2005-04-22

    In eukaryotes, 21- to 24-nucleotide-long RNAs engage in sequence-specific interactions that inhibit gene expression by RNA silencing. This process has regulatory roles involving microRNAs and, in plants and insects, it also forms the basis of a defense mechanism directed by small interfering RNAs that derive from replicative or integrated viral genomes. We show that a cellular microRNA effectively restricts the accumulation of the retrovirus primate foamy virus type 1 (PFV-1) in human cells. PFV-1 also encodes a protein, Tas, that suppresses microRNA-directed functions in mammalian cells and displays cross-kingdom antisilencing activities. Therefore, through fortuitous recognition of foreign nucleic acids, cellular microRNAs have direct antiviral effects in addition to their regulatory functions.

  6. Honeybee colony thermoregulation--regulatory mechanisms and contribution of individuals in dependence on age, location and thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Stabentheiner

    Full Text Available Honeybee larvae and pupae are extremely stenothermic, i.e. they strongly depend on accurate regulation of brood nest temperature for proper development (33-36 degrees C. Here we study the mechanisms of social thermoregulation of honeybee colonies under changing environmental temperatures concerning the contribution of individuals to colony temperature homeostasis. Beside migration activity within the nest, the main active process is "endothermy on demand" of adults. An increase of cold stress (cooling of the colony increases the intensity of heat production with thoracic flight muscles and the number of endothermic individuals, especially in the brood nest. As endothermy means hard work for bees, this eases much burden of nestmates which can stay ectothermic. Concerning the active reaction to cold stress by endothermy, age polyethism is reduced to only two physiologically predetermined task divisions, 0 to approximately 2 days and older. Endothermic heat production is the job of bees older than about two days. They are all similarly engaged in active heat production both in intensity and frequency. Their active heat production has an important reinforcement effect on passive heat production of the many ectothermic bees and of the brood. Ectothermy is most frequent in young bees (< approximately 2 days both outside and inside of brood nest cells. We suggest young bees visit warm brood nest cells not only to clean them but also to speed up flight muscle development for proper endothermy and foraging later in their life. Young bees inside brood nest cells mostly receive heat from the surrounding cell wall during cold stress, whereas older bees predominantly transfer heat from the thorax to the cell wall. Endothermic bees regulate brood comb temperature more accurately than local air temperature. They apply the heat as close to the brood as possible: workers heating cells from within have a higher probability of endothermy than those on the comb

  7. Microhomology-mediated mechanisms underlie non-recurrent disease-causing microdeletions of the FOXL2 gene or its regulatory domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Verdin

    Full Text Available Genomic disorders are often caused by recurrent copy number variations (CNVs, with nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR as the underlying mechanism. Recently, several microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms--such as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ, fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS, microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR, serial replication slippage (SRS, and break-induced SRS (BISRS--were described in the etiology of non-recurrent CNVs in human disease. In addition, their formation may be stimulated by genomic architectural features. It is, however, largely unexplored to what extent these mechanisms contribute to rare, locus-specific pathogenic CNVs. Here, fine-mapping of 42 microdeletions of the FOXL2 locus, encompassing FOXL2 (32 or its regulatory domain (10, serves as a model for rare, locus-specific CNVs implicated in genetic disease. These deletions lead to blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES, a developmental condition affecting the eyelids and the ovary. For breakpoint mapping we used targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, quantitative PCR (qPCR, long-range PCR, and Sanger sequencing of the junction products. Microhomology, ranging from 1 bp to 66 bp, was found in 91.7% of 24 characterized breakpoint junctions, being significantly enriched in comparison with a random control sample. Our results show that microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms underlie at least 50% of these microdeletions. Moreover, genomic architectural features, like sequence motifs, non-B DNA conformations, and repetitive elements, were found in all breakpoint regions. In conclusion, the majority of these microdeletions result from microhomology-mediated mechanisms like MMEJ, FoSTeS, MMBIR, SRS, or BISRS. Moreover, we hypothesize that the genomic architecture might drive their formation by increasing the susceptibility for DNA breakage or promote replication fork stalling. Finally, our locus-centered study

  8. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoleiTang; TrevorRFSmith

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations, suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):11-19.

  9. Physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired seawater tolerance following exposure of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts to acid and aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monette, Michelle Y., E-mail: michelle.monette@yale.edu [Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); USGS, Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center, Turners Falls, MA 01376 (United States); Yada, Takashi [Freshwater Fisheries Research Department, National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Nikko (Japan); Matey, Victoria [Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); McCormick, Stephen D. [Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); USGS, Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center, Turners Falls, MA 01376 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    We examined the physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired ion regulation in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts following acute acid and aluminum (Al) exposure. Smolts were exposed to: control (pH 6.5, 3.4 {mu}g l{sup -1} Al), acid and low Al (LAl: pH 5.4, 11 {mu}g l{sup -1} Al), acid and moderate Al (MAl: pH 5.3, 42 {mu}g l{sup -1} Al), and acid and high Al (HAl: pH 5.4, 56 {mu}g l{sup -1} Al) for two and six days. At each time-point, smolts were sampled directly from freshwater treatment tanks and after a 24 h seawater challenge. Exposure to acid/MAl and acid/HAl led to accumulation of gill Al, substantial alterations in gill morphology, reduced gill Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase (NKA) activity, and impaired ion regulation in both freshwater and seawater. Exposure to acid/MAl for six days also led to a decrease in gill mRNA expression of the apical Cl{sup -} channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator I), increased apoptosis upon seawater exposure, an increase in the surface expression of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) within the filament epithelium of the gill, but reduced abundance of gill NKA-positive MRCs. By contrast, smolts exposed to acid and the lowest Al concentration exhibited minor gill Al accumulation, slight morphological modifications in the gill, and impaired seawater tolerance in the absence of a detectable effect on freshwater ion regulation. These impacts were accompanied by decreased cell proliferation, a slight increase in the surface expression of MRCs within the filament epithelium, but no impact on gill apoptosis or total MRC abundance was observed. However, MRCs in the gills of smolts exposed to acid/LAl exhibited morphological alterations including decreased size, staining intensity, and shape factor. We demonstrate that the seawater tolerance of Atlantic salmon smolts is extremely sensitive to acute exposure to acid and low levels of Al, and that the mechanisms underlying this depend on the time

  10. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies proposes to develop a unique structural cellular core material to improve mechanical performance, reduce platform weight and lower...

  11. Task Group 7B: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Biological Aging: The Roles of Nature, Nurture and Chance in the Maintenance of Human Healthspan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Arya, Suresh; Grant, Christine; Miller, Linda; Ono, Santa Jeremy; Patil, Chris; Shay, Jerry; Topol, Eric; Torry, Michael; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tse, Iris; Lin, Su-Ju; Miller, Richard

    2007-11-14

    The degree to which an individual organism maintains healthspan and lifespan is a function of complex interactions between genetic inheritance ('nature'), environment, including cultural inheritance (nurture) and stochastic events ('luck' or 'chance'). This task group will focus upon the role of chance because it is so poorly understood and because it appears to be of major importance in the determination of individual variations in healthspan and lifespan within species. The major factor determining variations in healthspan and lifespan between species is genetic inheritance. Broader aspects of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological aging will also be considered, given their importance for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of successful aging. The task force will consider the cellular and molecular basis for nature, nurture and chance in healthspan and life span determination. On the basis of comparisons between identical and non-identical twins, geneticists have estimated that genes control no more than about a quarter of the inter-individual differences in lifespan (Herskind 1996). Twin studies of very old individuals, however, show substantially greater genetic contributions to Healthspan (McClearn 2004; Reed 2003). The environment clearly plays an important role in the length and the quality of life. Tobacco smoke, for example has the potential to impact upon multiple body systems in ways that appear to accelerate the rates at which those systems age (Bernhard 2007). To document the role of chance events on aging, one must rigorously control both the genetic composition of an organism and its environment. This has been done to a remarkable degree in a species of nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans (Vanfleteren 1998). The results confirm hundreds of previous studies with a wide range of species, especially those with inbred rodents housed under apparently identical but less well controlled environments. One

  12. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, le...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  13. Cellular mechanisms by which oxytocin mediates ovine endometrial prostaglandin F2alpha synthesis: role of G(i) proteins and mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, P D; Mendes, J O; Yemm, R S; Clay, C M; Nelson, S E; Hayes, S H; Silvia, W J

    2001-10-01

    Oxytocin stimulates a rapid increase in ovine endometrial prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha synthesis. The overall objective of these experiments was to investigate the cellular mechanisms by which oxytocin induces endometrial PGF2alpha synthesis. The objective of experiment 1 was to determine whether G(i) proteins mediate oxytocin-induced PGF2alpha synthesis. Uteri were collected from four ovary-intact ewes on Day 14 postestrus. Caruncular endometrial explants were dissected and subjected to in vitro incubation. Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(i) proteins, had no effect on the ability of oxytocin to induce PGF2alpha synthesis (P > 0.10). The objective of experiment 2 was to determine whether any of the three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK), or p38 MAPK, mediate oxytocin-induced PGF(2alpha) synthesis. Eleven ovary-intact ewes were given an injection of oxytocin (10 IU; i.v.; n = 5) or physiological saline (i.v.; n = 6) on Day 15 postestrus. Uteri were collected 15 min after injection and caruncular endometrium was dissected. Endometrial homogenates were prepared and subjected to Western blotting. Membranes were probed for both total and phosphorylated forms of all three classes of MAPK. All classes of MAPK were detected in ovine endom